Science.gov

Sample records for aluminized teflon fep

  1. Ground Laboratory Soft X-Ray Durability Evaluation of Aluminized Teflon FEP Thermal Control Insulation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Hall, Rachelle L.

    1998-01-01

    Metallized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control insulation is mechanically degraded if exposed to a sufficient fluence of soft x-ray radiation. Soft x-ray photons (4-8 A in wavelength or 1.55 - 3.2 keV) emitted during solar flares have been proposed as a cause of mechanical properties degradation of aluminized Teflon FEP thermal control insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such degradation can be characterized by a reduction in elongation-to-failure of the Teflon FEP. Ground laboratory soft x-ray exposure tests of aluminized Teflon FEP were conducted to assess the degree of elongation degradation which would occur as a result of exposure to soft x-rays in the range of 3-10 keV. Tests results indicate that soft x-ray exposure in the 3-10 keV range, at mission fluence levels, does not alone cause the observed reduction in elongation of flight retrieved samples. The soft x-ray exposure facility design, mechanical properties degradation results and implications will be presented.

  2. Synchrontron VUV and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1998-01-01

    Surfaces of the aluminized Teflon FEP multi-layer thermal insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were found to be cracked and curled in some areas at the time of the second servicing, mission in February 1997, 6.8 years after HST was deployed in low Earth orbit (LEO). As part of a test program to assess environmental conditions which would produce embrittlement sufficient to cause cracking of Teflon on HST, samples of Teflon FEP with a backside layer of vapor deposited aluminum were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft x-ray radiation of various energies using facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples were exposed to synchrotron radiation of narrow energy bands centered on energies between 69 eV and 1900 eV. Samples were analyzed for ultimate tensile strength and elongation. Results will be compared to those of aluminized Teflon FEP retrieved from HST after 3.6 years and 6.8 years on orbit and will he referenced to estimated HST mission doses of VUV and soft x-ray radiation.

  3. Ground Laboratory Soft X-Ray Durability Evaluation of Aluminized Teflon FEP Thermal Control Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    1998-01-01

    Metallized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control insulation is mechanically degraded if exposed to a sufficient fluence of soft x-ray radiation. Soft x-ray photons (4-8 A in wavelength or 1.55 - 3.2 keV) emitted during solar flares have been proposed as a cause of mechanical properties degradation of aluminized Teflon FEP thermal control insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such degradation can be characterized by a reduction in elongation-to-failure of the Teflon FER Ground laboratory soft x-ray exposure tests of aluminized Teflon FEP were conducted to assess the degree of elongation degradation which would occur as a result of exposure to soft x-rays in the range of 3-10 keV. Tests results indicate that soft x-ray exposure in the 3-10 keV range, at mission fluence levels, does not alone cause the observed reduction in elongation of flight retrieved samples. The soft x-ray exposure facility design, mechanical properties degradation results and implications will be presented.

  4. Effect of X-Rays on the Mechanical Properties of Aluminized FEP Teflon(trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Brinkmeier, Michael R.; Gaier, Elizabeth M.

    1999-01-01

    Pieces of the multilayer insulation (MLI) that is integral to the thermal control of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have been returned by two servicing missions after 3.6 and 6.8 years in orbit. They reveal that the outer layer, which is made from 5 mil (0.13 mm) thick aluminized fluorinated ethylenepropylene (FEP) Teflon. has become severely embrittled. Although possible agents of this embrittlement include electromagnetic radiation across the entire solar spectrum, trapped particle radiation, atomic oxygen, and thermal cycling, intensive investigations have not yielded unambiguous causes. Previous studies utilizing monoenergetic photons in the 69-1900 eV range did not cause significant embrittlement, even at much higher doses than were experienced by the HST MLI. Neither did x-rays in the 3 to 10 keV range generated in a modified electron bean evaporator. An antidotal aluminized FEP sample that was exposed to an intensive dose from unfiltered Mo x-ray radiation from a rotating anode generator, however, did show the requisite embrittlement. Thus, a study was undertaken to determine the effects of x-ray exposure on the embrittlement of aluminized FEP in hopes that it might elucidate the HST MLI degradation mechanism. Tensile specimens of aluminized 5 mil thick FEP were exposed to a constant fluence of unfiltered x-ray radiation from a Mo target whose maximum energy ranged from 20-60 kV. Other samples were annealed, thermally cycled (100x) between 77-333 K, or cycled and irradiated. Tensile tests and density measurements were then performed on the samples. Only the samples which had been irradiated had the drastically reduced elongation-to-break, characteristic of the HST samples. Thermal cycling may accelerate the embrittlement, but the effect was near the scatter in the measurements. Annealing and thermal cycling had no apparent effect. Only the samples which had been irradiated and annealed showed significant density increases, likely implicating polymer chain

  5. Effect of X-Rays on the Mechanical Properties of Aluminized FEP Teflon(R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Brinkmeier, Michael R.; Gaier, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    Pieces of the multilayer insulation (MLI) that is integral to the thermal control of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have been returned by two servicing missions after 3.6 and 6.8 years in orbit. They reveal that the outer layer, which is made from 5 mil (0.13 mm)thick aluminized fluorinated ethylene propylene(FEP) Teflon(R), has become severely embrittled. Although possible agents of this embrittlement include electromagnetic radiation across the entire solar spectrum, trapped particle radiation, atomic oxygen, and thermal cycling, intensive investigations have not yielded unambiguous causes. Previous studies utilizing monoenergetic photons in the 69-1900 eV range did not cause significant embrittlement, even at much higher doses than were experienced by the HST MLI. Neither did x-rays in the 3 to 10 keV range generated in a modified electron beam evaporator. An antidotal aluminized FEP sample that was exposed to an intensive dose from unfiltered Mo x-ray radiation from a rotating anode generator, however, did show the requisite embrittlement. Thus, a study was undertaken to determine the effects of x-ray exposure on the embrittlement of aluminized FEP in hopes that it might elucidate the HST MLI degradation mechanism. Tensile specimens of aluminized 5 mil thick FEP were exposed to a constant fluence of unfiltered x-ray radiation from a Mo target whose maximum energy ranged from 20-60 kV. Other samples were annealed, thermally cycled (100x) between 77-333 K, or cycled and irradiated. Tensile tests and density measurements were then performed on the samples. Only the samples which had been irradiated had the drastically reduced elongation-to-break, characteristic of the HST samples. Thermal cycling may accelerate the embrittlement, but the effect was near the scatter in the measurements. Annealing and thermal cycling had no apparent effect. Only the samples which had been irradiated and annealed showed significant density increases, likely implicating polymer

  6. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  7. On-Orbit Teflon FEP Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon' FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations, and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, LTV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the Teflon FEP.

  8. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) (DuPont) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces for thermal control in the low-Earth orbit environment. Silverized or aluminized Teflon FEP is used for the outer layers of the thermal control blanket because of its high reflectance, low solar absorptance, and high thermal emittance. Teflon FEP is also desirable because, compared with other spacecraft polymers (such as Kapton), it has relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its comparably low atomic oxygen erosion yield, Teflon FEP has been used unprotected in the space environment. Samples of Teflon FEP from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (retrieved during its first servicing mission) were evaluated for solar-induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  9. Investigation of Teflon FEP embrittlement on spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(TM) fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) is used on the exterior of spacecraft surfaces in the low earth orbit environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized Teflon(TM) FEP used in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provided evidence of the low earth orbit environments. Samples from the LDEF and HST were evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  10. Atomic oxygen interactions with FEP Teflon and silicones on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Gebauer, Linda

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft represents the first controlled unidirectional exposure of high-fluence atomic oxygen on fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP Teflon) and silicones. The atomic oxygen erosion yield for FEP Teflon was found to be significantly in excess of previous low fluence orbital data and is an order of magnitude below that of polyimide Kapton. LDEF FEP Teflon erosion yield data as a function of angle of attack is presented. Atomic oxygen interaction with silicon polymers results in crazing of the silicones as well as deposition of dark contaminant oxidation products on adjoining surfaces. Documentation of results and possible mechanistic explanations are presented.

  11. On-Orbit Teflon(R) FEP Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon(R) FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon(R) FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations, and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, UV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the Teflon(R) FEP.

  12. On-Orbit Teflon(trademark) FEP Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon(trademark) FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations, and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, UV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  13. On-Orbit Teflon(trademark) FEP Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, Joyce A.

    1999-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon(trademark) FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations, and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, UV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  14. Atomic oxygen interactions with FEP Teflon and silicones on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Gebauer, Linda; Hill, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft has enabled the measurement of the effects of fixed orientation exposure of high fluence atomic oxygen on fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP Teflon) and silicones. The atomic oxygen erosion yield for the FEP Teflon was found to be 3.64 x 10(exp -25) cm(exp 3)/atom. This erosion yield is significantly higher than that measured from previous low fluence orbital data. The FEP Teflon erosion yield was found to have the same dependence on oxygen arrival angle as Kapton and Mylar. Atomic oxygen interaction with silicon polymers results in the crazing of silicon. Released silicone contaminants were found to darken upon further atomic oxygen exposure.

  15. Physical and Thermal Properties Evaluated of Teflon FEP Retrieved From the Hubble Space Telescope During Three Servicing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim, K.; Sutter, James K.; Gaier, James R.; Messer, Russell, K.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McClendon, Mark W.; Viens, Michael J.; Wang, L. Len; He, Charles C.; Gummow, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical properties of aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) exposed to low Earth orbit for up to 9.7 years have significantly degraded, with extensive cracking occurring on orbit. The NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have collaborated on analyzing the physical and thermal properties of aluminized FEP (FEP-Al, DuPont) materials retrieved in December 1999 during HST's third servicing mission (SM3A). Comparisons have been made to properties of FEP-Al retrieved during the first and second HST servicing missions, SM1 and SM2, in order to determine degradation processes for FEP on HST.

  16. Soft X-Ray Exposure Testing of FEP Teflon for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.

    1998-01-01

    The FEP Teflon (DuPont) multilayer insulation (MLI) thermal-control blanket material on the Hubble Space Telescope is degrading in the space environment. During the first Hubble servicing mission in 1993, after 3.6 years in low Earth orbit, aluminized and silvered FEP Teflon MLI thermal-control blanket materials were retrieved. These materials have been jointly analyzed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for degradation induced in the space environment (ref. 1). Solar-facing blanket materials were found to be embrittled with through-the-thickness cracking in the 5-mil FEP. During the second Hubble servicing mission in 1997, astronauts noticed that several blankets had large areas with tears. The torn FEP was curled up in some areas, exposing the underlying materials to the space environment. This tearing problem, and the associated curling up of torn areas, could lead to over-heating of the telescope and to particulate contamination. A Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board was assembled by Goddard to investigate and identify the degradation mechanism of the FEP, to identify and characterize replacement materials, and to estimate the extent of damage at the time of the third servicing mission in 1999. A small piece of FEP retrieved during the second servicing mission is being evaluated by this failure review board along with materials from the first servicing mission. Since the first servicing mission, and as part of the failure review board, Lewis has been exposing FEP to soft x-rays to help determine the damage mechanisms of FEP in the space environment. Soft x-rays, which can penetrate into the bulk of FEP, are generated during solar flares and appear to be contributing to the degradation of the Hubble MLI.

  17. The Effect of Heating on the Degradation of Ground Laboratory and Space Irradiated Teflon(r) FEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2002-01-01

    The outer most layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is back surface aluminized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene). As seen by data collected after each of the three servicing missions and as observed during the second servicing mission (SM2), the FEP has become embrittled in the space environment, leading to degradation of the mechanical properties and severe on-orbit cracking of the FEP. During SM2, a sample of aluminized-FEP was retrieved from HST that had cracked and curled, exposing its aluminum backside to space. Because of the difference in optical properties between FEP and aluminum, this insulation piece reached 200 C on-orbit, which is significantly higher than the nominal MLI temperature extreme of 50 C. This piece was more brittle than other retrieved material from the first and third servicing missions (SM1 and SM3A, respectively). Due to this observation and the fact that Teflon thermal shields on the solar array bi-stems were heated on-orbit to 130 C, experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of FEP that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on HST. Teflon FEP samples were X-ray irradiated in a high vacuum facility in order to simulate the damage caused by radiation in the space environment. Samples of pristine FEP, X-ray irradiated FEP and FEP retrieved from the HST during SM3A were heat treated from 50 to 200 C at 25 intervals in a high vacuum facility and then tensile tested. In addition, samples were tested in a density gradient column to determine the effect of the radiation and heating on the density of FEP. Results indicate that although heating does not degrade the tensile properties of non-irradiated Teflon, there is a significant dependence of the percent elongation at failure of irradiated Teflon as a function of heating temperature. Irradiated Teflon was found to undergo increasing degradation in the elongation

  18. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(registered trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene-propylene) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized FEP is used for the outer layer of thermal control blankets because of its low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. FEP is also preferred over other spacecraft polymers because of its relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its low atomic oxygen erosion yield, FEP has not been protected in the space environment. Recent, long term space exposures such as on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF, 5.8 years in space), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, after 3.6 years in space) have provided evidence of LEO environmental degradation of FEP. These exposures provide unique opportunities for studying environmental degradation because of the long durations and the different conditions (such as differences in altitude) of the exposures. Samples of FEP from LDEF and from HST (retrieved during its first servicing mission) have been evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen. Micro-indenter results indicate that the surface hardness increased as the ratio of atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence decreased for the LDEF samples. FEP multilayer insulation (MLI) retrieved from HST provided evidence of severe embrittlement on solar facing surfaces. Micro-indenter measurements indicated higher surface hardness values for these samples than LDEF samples, but the solar exposures were higher. Cracks induced during bend testing were significantly deeper for the HST samples with the highest solar exposure than for LDEF samples with similar atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence ratios. If solar fluences are compared, the LDEF samples appear as damaged as HST samples, except that HST had deeper induced cracks. The results illustrate difficulties in comparing LEO exposed materials from

  19. Flexible, FEP-Teflon covered solar cell module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques and equipment were developed for the large scale, low-cost fabrication of lightweight, roll-up and fold-up, FEP-Teflon encapsulated solar cell modules. Modules were fabricated by interconnecting solderless single-crystal silicon solar cells and heat laminating them at approximately 300 C between layers of optically clear FEP and to a loadbearing Kapton substrate sheet. Modules were fabricated from both conventional and wraparound contact solar cells. A heat seal technique was developed for mechanically interconnecting modules into an array. The electrical interconnections for both roll-up and fold-up arrays were also developed. The use of parallel-gap resistance welding, ultrasonic bonding, and thermocompression bonding processes for attaching interconnects to solar cells were investigated. Parallel-gap welding was found to be best suited for interconnecting the solderless solar cells into modules. Details of the fabrication equipment, fabrication processes, module and interconnect designs, environmental test equipment, and test results are presented.

  20. Teflon FEP Analyzed After Retrieval From the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Wang, Len; He, Charles

    1999-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission, 6.8 years after the telescope was deployed in low Earth orbit, degradation of unsupported Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer (see the photograph) was retrieved during the second servicing mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. Also retrieved was a Teflon FEP radiator surface from a cryogen vent cover that was exposed to the space environment on the aft bulkhead of the HST. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included determining the FEP degradation mechanisms. As part of the investigations into the degradation mechanisms, specimens retrieved from the first and second HST servicing missions, 3.6 and 6.8 years after launch, respectively, were characterized through exhaustive mechanical, optical, and chemical testing. Testing led by Goddard included scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, tensile testing, solar absorptance measurements, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), Fourier transform infrared microscopy (m-FTIR), attenuated total reflectance infrared microscopy (ATR/FTIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The NASA Lewis Research Center contributed significantly to the analysis of the retrieved HST materials by leading efforts and providing results of bend testing, surface microhardness measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and density measurements. Other testing was conducted by Nano Instruments, Inc., and the University of Akron.

  1. Effect of Air and Vacuum Storage on the Tensile Properties of X-Ray Exposed Aluminized-FEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Gummow, Jonathan D.

    2000-01-01

    Metallized Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), a common spacecraft thermal control material, from the exterior layer of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has become embrittled and suffers from extensive cracking. Teflon samples retrieved during Hubble servicing missions and from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicate that there may be continued degradation in tensile properties over time. An investigation has been conducted to evaluate the effect of air and vacuum storage on the mechanical properties of x-ray exposed FEP. Aluminized-FEP (Al-FEP) tensile samples were irradiated with 15.3 kV Cu x-rays and stored in air or under vacuum for various time periods. Tensile data indicate that samples stored in air display larger decreases in tensile properties than for samples stored under vacuum. Air-stored samples developed a hazy appearance, which corresponded to a roughening of the aluminized surface. Optical property changes were also characterized. These findings indicate that air exposure plays a role in the degradation of irradiated FEP, therefore proper sample handling and storage is necessary with materials retrieved from space.

  2. Environmental Exposure Conditions for Teflon FEP on the Hubble Space Telescope Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline a.; Barth, Janet L.; Thomson, Shaun; Gregory, Teri; Savage, William J.

    2000-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched into low Earth orbit on April 24,1990. During the first servicing mission in December 1993 (3.6 years after launch), multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets were retrieved from the two magnetic sensing systems located on the light shield. Retrieval of one of the solar arrays during this mission also provided MLI blanket material from the solar array drive arm. These MLI materials were analyzed in ground-based facilities, and results indicate that the space-facing outer layer of the MLI, aluminized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene), was beginning to degrade. Close inspection of the FEP revealed through-the-thickness cracks in areas with the highest solar exposure and stress concentration. During the second servicing mission in February 1997 (6.8 years after launch), astronauts observed and documented severe cracking in the outer layer of the MLI blankets on both the solar-facing and anti-solar-facing surfaces. During this second mission, some material from the outer layer of the light shield MLI was retrieved and subsequently analyzed in ground-based facilities. After the second servicing mission, a Failure Review Board was convened by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to address the MLI degradation problem on HST. Members of the Electro-Physics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field participated on this board. To determine possible degradation mechanisms, board researchers needed to consider all environmental constituents to which the FEP MLI surfaces were exposed. On the basis of measurements, models, and predictions, environmental exposure conditions for FEP surfaces on HST were estimated for various time periods from launch in 1990 through 2010, the planned end-of-life for HST. The table summarizes these data including the number and temperature ranges of thermal cycles; equivalent Sun hours; fluence and absorbed radiation dose from solar event x rays; fluence and absorbed dose from

  3. Degradation of Teflon(trademark) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  4. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon' FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon FEP.

  5. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno F.

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon' FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(registered trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(registered trademark) FEP.

  6. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(R) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(R) FEP.

  7. Effect of Air and Vacuum Storage on the Degradation of X-Ray-Exposed Aluminized-Teflon Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Gummow, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    Metalized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene, DuPont), a common thermal control material, has been found to degrade in the low-Earth-orbit space environment. The aluminized-FEP (Al-FEP) exterior layer on the Hubble Space Telescope has become extremely embrittled, with extensive cracking occurring on all sides of the telescope. This embrittlement has been primarily attributed to radiation exposure (x-rays from solar flares, electron/proton radiation, and possibly near-ultraviolet radiation) combined with thermal cycling. Limited samples of FEP tested after long-term exposure to low Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope and on the Long Duration Exposure Facility indicated that there might be continued degradation in tensile properties over time. An investigation was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center to evaluate the effect of air and vacuum storage on the mechanical properties of x-ray-exposed FEP. Aluminized-FEP (5-mil-thick) tensile samples were x-ray exposed with 15.3-kV copper xrays for 2 hr, reducing the percent elongation to failure by approximately 50 percent in comparison to that for pristine Al-FEP. X-ray-exposed samples were stored in air or under vacuum for various time periods to see the effect of storage on tensile properties. Tensile results indicated that samples stored in air had larger decreases in tensile properties than samples stored under vacuum had, as seen in the graph. Samples stored under vacuum (for up to 400 hr) showed no further decrease in tensile properties over time, whereas samples stored in air (for up to 900 hr) appeared to show decreases in tensile properties over time. X-ray-exposed samples stored in air developed a hazy appearance in the exposed area, as seen in the photographs. When the source of the haziness was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, it was found to reside at the Al/FEP interface as witnessed by an increased surface roughness of the aluminized side of the

  8. A Comparison of Space and Ground Based Facility Environmental Effects for FEP Teflon. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kitral, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon is widely used as a thermal control material for spacecraft, however, it is susceptible to erosion, cracking, and subsequent mechanical failure in low Earth orbit. One of the difficulties in determining whether FEP Teflon will survive during a mission is the wide disparity of erosion rates observed for this material in space and in ground based facilities. Each environment contains different levels of atomic oxygen, ions, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in addition to parameters such as the energy of the arriving species and temperature. These variations make it difficult to determine what is causing the observed differences in erosion rates. This paper attempts to narrow down which factors affect the erosion rate of FEP Teflon through attempting to change only one environmental constituent at a time. This was attempted through the use of a single simulation facility (plasma asher) environment with a variety of Faraday cages and VUV transparent windows. Isolating one factor inside of a radio frequency (RF) plasma proved to be very difficult. Two observations could be made. First, it appears that the erosion yield of FEP Teflon with respect to that of polyimide Kapton is not greatly affected by the presence or lack of VUV radiation present in the RF plasma and the relative erosion yield for the FEP Teflon may decrease with increasing fluence. Second, shielding from charged particles appears to lower the relative erosion yield of the FEP to approximately that observed in space, however it is difficult to determine for sure whether ions, electrons, or some other components are causing the enhanced erosion.

  9. Effects of Various Wavelength Ranges of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation on Teflon FEP Film Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; McCracken, Cara A.

    2004-01-01

    Teflon Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FTP) films (DuPont) have been widely used for spacecraft thermal control and have been observed to become embrittled and cracked upon exposure to the space environment. This degradation has been attributed to a synergistic combination of radiation and thermal effects. A research study was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center to examine the effects of different wavelength ranges of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation on the degradation of the mechanical properties of FEP. This will contribute to an overall understanding of space radiation effects on Teflon FEP, and will provide information necessary to determine appropriate techniques for using laboratory tests to estimate space VUV degradation. Research was conducted using inhouse facilities at Glenn and was carried out, in part, through a grant with the Cleveland State University. Samples of Teflon FEP film of 50.8 microns thickness were exposed to radiation from a VUV lamp from beneath different cover windows to provide different exposure wavelength ranges: MgF2 (115 to 400 nm), crystalline quartz (140 to 400 nm), and fused silica (FS, 155 to 400 nm). Following exposure, FEP film specimens were tensile tested to determine the ultimate tensile strength and elongation at failure as a function of the exposure duration for each wavelength range. The graphs show the effect of ultraviolet exposure on the mechanical properties of the FEP samples.

  10. Mechanical Properties Degradation of Teflon(Trademark) FEP Returned from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Wang, L. Len

    1998-01-01

    After 6.8 years on orbit, degradation has been observed in the mechanical properties of second-surface metalized Teflon(Reg) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) used on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on the outer surface of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets and on radiator surfaces. Cracking of FEP surfaces on HST was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission (SM1) conducted 3.6 years after HST was put into orbit. Astronaut observations and photographs from the second servicing mission (SM2), conducted after 6.8 years on orbit, revealed severe cracks in the FEP surfaces of the MLI on many locations around the telescope. This paper describes results of mechanical properties testing of FEP surfaces exposed for 3.6 years and 6.8 years to the space environment on HST. These tests include tensile testing, surface micro-hardness testing, and bend testing.

  11. Analyses of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Insulation Retrieved After 19 Years of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Mohammed, Jelila S.; Perry, Bruce A.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has made many important observations from its vantage point in low Earth orbit (LEO). However, as seen during five servicing missions, the outer layer of multilayer insulation (MLI) has become successively more embrittled and has cracked in many areas. In May 2009, during the 5th servicing mission (called SM4), two MLI blankets were replaced with new insulation pieces and the space-exposed MLI blankets were retrieved for degradation analyses by teams at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The MLI blankets were from Equipment Bay 8, which received direct sunlight, and Equipment Bay 5, which received grazing sunlight. Each blanket contained a range of unique regions based on environmental exposure and/or physical appearance. The retrieved MLI blanket s aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) outer layers have been analyzed for changes in optical, physical, and mechanical properties, along with space induced chemical and morphological changes. When compared to pristine material, the analyses have shown how the Al-FEP was severely affected by the space environment. This paper reviews tensile properties, solar absorptance, thermal emittance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data and atomic oxygen erosion values of the retrieved HST blankets after 19 years of space exposure.

  12. Degradation of Hubble Space Telescope Metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Yoshikawa, Yukio; Castro, J. David; Triolo, Jack J.; Peters, Wanda C.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and optical properties of the metallized Teflon Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have degraded over the seven years the telescope has been in orbit. Astronaut observations and photographic documentation from the Second Servicing Mission revealed severe cracks of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) blanket outer layer in many locations around the telescope, particularly on solar facing surfaces. Two samples, the outer Teflon FEP MLI layer and radiator surfaces, were characterized post- mission through exhaustive mechanical, thermal, chemical, and optical testing. The observed damage to the thermal control materials, the sample retrieval and handling, and the significant changes to the radiator surfaces of HST will be discussed. Each of these issues is addressed with respect to current and future mission requirements.

  13. An analysis of LDEF-exposed silvered FEP teflon thermal blanket material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected silvered fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) teflon thermal blanket material which received 5 years and 9 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and thermal analyses did not detect a significant change at the molecular level as the result of this exposure. However, various microscopic analyses revealed a roughening of the coating surface due to atomic oxygen erosion which resulted in some materials changing from specular reflectors of visible radiation to diffuse reflectors. The potential effect of silicon-containing molecular contamination on these materials is addressed.

  14. Effects of Heating on Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP Thermal Control Material from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim; Gaier, James R.; Hall, Rachelle L.; Norris, Mary Jo; Espe, Matthew P.; Cato, Daveen R.

    1999-01-01

    Metallized Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) thermal control material on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is degrading in the space environment. Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP thermal control blankets (space-facing FEP) retrieved during the first servicing mission (SM1) were found to be embrittled on solar facing surfaces and contained microscopic cracks. During the second servicing mission (SM2) astronauts noticed that the FEP outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was cracked in many locations around the telescope. Large cracks were observed on the light shield, forward shell and equipment bays. A tightly curled piece of cracked FEP from the light shield was retrieved during SM2 and was severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. A Failure Review Board (FRB) was organized to determine the mechanism causing the MLI degradation. Density, x-ray crystallinity and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of FEP retrieved during SM1 were inconsistent with results of FEP retrieved during SM2. Because the retrieved SM2 material curled while in space, it experienced a higher temperature extreme during thermal cycling, estimated at 200 C, than the SM1 material, estimated at 50 C. An investigation on the effects of heating pristine and FEP exposed on HST was therefore conducted. Samples of pristine. SM1, and SM2 FEP were heated to 200 C and evaluated for changes in density and morphology. Elevated temperature exposure was found to have a major impact on the density of the retrieved materials. Characterization of polymer morphology of as-received and heated FEP samples by NMR provided results that were consistent with the density results. These findings have provided insight to the damage mechanisms of FEP in the space environment.

  15. Insights Developed Into the Damage Mechanism of Teflon FEP Thermal Control Material on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Gaier, James R.; Hall, Rachelle L.; Norris, mary Jo; Espe, Matthew P.; Cato, Daveen R.

    2000-01-01

    Metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) thermal control material on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has been found to degrade in the space environment. Teflon FEP thermal control blankets retrieved during the first servicing mission were found to be embrittled on solar-facing surfaces and to contain microscopic cracks (the FEP surface is exposed to the space environment). During the second servicing mission, astronauts noticed that the FEP outer layer of the multilayer insulation blanketing covering the telescope was cracked in many locations. Large cracks were observed on the light shield, forward shell, and equipment bays. A tightly curled piece of cracked FEP from the light shield was retrieved during the second mission. This piece was severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. A Failure Review Board was organized by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to determine the mechanism causing the multilayer insulation degradation. This board included members of the Electro-Physics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. Density measurements of the retrieved materials obtained under the review board's investigations indicated that FEP from the first servicing mission was essentially unchanged from pristine FEP but that the second servicing mission FEP had increased in density in comparison to pristine FEP (ref. 1). The results were consistent with crystallinity measurements taken using x-ray diffraction and with results from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance tests (see the table and ref. 1). Because the second servicing mission FEP was embrittled and its density and crystallinity had increased in comparison to pristine FEP, board researchers expected that the first servicing mission FEP, which was also embrittled, would also have increased in crystallinity and density, but it did not. Because the retrieved second servicing mission material curled while in space, it experienced a higher temperature extreme during

  16. Analyses of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Multilayer Insulation Blankets Retrieved After 19 Years of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Groh, Kim K.; Perry, Bruce A.; Mohammed, Jelila S.; Banks, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has made many important observations from its vantage point in low Earth orbit (LEO). However, as seen during five servicing missions, the outer layer of multilayer insulation (MLI) has become increasingly embrittled and has cracked in many areas. In May 2009, during the 5th servicing mission (called SM4), two MLI blankets were replaced with new insulation and the space-exposed MLI blankets were retrieved for degradation analyses by teams at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The retrieved MLI blankets were from Equipment Bay 8, which received direct sunlight, and Equipment Bay 5, which received grazing sunlight. Each blanket was divided into several regions based on environmental exposure and/or physical appearance. The aluminized-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) outer layers of the retrieved MLI blankets have been analyzed for changes in optical, physical, and mechanical properties, along with chemical and morphological changes. Pristine and as-retrieved samples (materials) were heat treated to help understand degradation mechanisms. When compared to pristine material, the analyses have shown how the Al-FEP was severely affected by the space environment. Most notably, the Al-FEP was highly embrittled, fracturing like glass at strains of 1 to 8 percent. Across all measured properties, more significant degradation was observed for Bay 8 material as compared to Bay 5 material. This paper reviews the tensile and bend-test properties, density, thickness, solar absorptance, thermal emittance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental composition measurements, surface and crack morphologies, and atomic oxygen erosion yields of the Al-FEP outer layer of the retrieved HST blankets after 19 years of space exposure.

  17. Effect of Solar Exposure on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Thermal Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Ashmead, Claire C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to low Earth orbital (LEO) environment, external spacecraft materials degrade due to radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and atomic oxygen (AO) interaction. Collisions between AO and spacecraft can result in oxidation of external spacecraft surface materials, which can lead to erosion and severe structural and/or optical property deterioration. It is therefore essential to understand the AO erosion yield (Ey), the volume loss per incident oxygen atom (cu cm/atom), of polymers to assure durability of spacecraft materials. The objective of this study was to determine whether solar radiation exposure can increase the rate of AO erosion of polymers in LEO. The material studied was a section of aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) thermal shield exposed to space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for 8.25 years. Retrieved samples were sectioned from the circular thermal shield and exposed to ground laboratory thermal energy AO. The results indicate that the average Ey of the solar facing HST Al-FEP was 1.9 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom, while the average Ey of the anti-solar HST Al-FEP was 1.5 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. The Ey of the pristine samples was 1.6- 1.7 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. These results indicate that solar exposure affects the post-flight erosion rate of FEP in a plasma asher. Therefore, it likely affects the erosion rate while in LEO.

  18. Effect of Solar Exposure on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Thermal Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Aobo; Ashmead, Claire C.; de Groh, Kim K.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    When exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) environment, external spacecraft materials degrade due to radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and interaction with atomic oxygen (AO). Collisions between AO and spacecraft can result in oxidation of external spacecraft surface materials, which can lead to erosion and severe structural and/or optical properties deterioration. It is therefore essential to understand the AO erosion yield (Ey), the volume loss per incident oxygen atom (cm3/atom) of polymers to assure durability of spacecraft materials. The objective of this study was to determine whether solar radiation exposure can increase the rate of AO erosion of polymers in LEO. The material studied was a section of aluminized-Teflon® fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) thermal shield exposed to space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for 8.25 years. Retrieved samples were sectioned from the circular thermal shield and exposed to ground laboratory thermal energy AO. The results indicate that the average Ey of the solar facing HST Al-FEP was 1.9 × 10-24 cm3/atom, while the average Ey of the anti-solar HST Al-FEP was 1.5 × 10-24 cm3/atom. The Ey of the pristine samples was 1.6 to 1.7 × 10-24 cm3/atom. These results indicate that solar exposure affects the post-flight erosion rate of FEP in a plasma asher. Therefore, it likely affects the erosion rate while in LEO.

  19. Synthesis of perm-selective membranes by grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Annick; Chapiro, Adolphe

    Grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films was investigated. Pre-irradiation doses ranged from 0.5 to 10 kGy. Grafting occurred at 45 or 60°C. Homopolymerization inhibitors, ferrous ions or methylene blue, were added to the system. It was found that after completion of the reaction, within 40-100 min, membranes were obtained with very low electric resistivities. The influence of added inhibitors, pre-irradiation dose and grafting temperature was studied. From the results it is concluded that the initiating centers in air-irradiated Teflon-FEP are, on the one hand, peroxides of structure POOP', in which P is a polymeric radical and Pprime; a small fragment, and on the other trapped PO .2 radicals. The latter only react after losing their oxygen. In the presence of polymerization inhibitors, initiation involves a redox process which reduces the overall activation energy.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Metallized Teflon(registered trademark) FEP Thermal Control Materials: On-Orbit Degradation and Post-Retrieval Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hansen, Patricia A.; Dever, J. A.; deGroh, K. K.; Banks, B.; Wang, L.; He, C.

    1988-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Second Servicing Mission (SM2), degradation of unsupported Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), used as the outer layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets, was evident as large cracks on the telescope light shield. A sample of the degraded outer layer was retrieved during the mission and returned to Earth for ground testing and evaluation. The results of the Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP sample evaluation and additional testing of pristine Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP led the investigative team to theorize that the HST damage was caused by thermal cycling with deep-layer damage from electron and proton radiation which allowed the propagation of cracks along stress concentrations , and that the damage increased with the combined total dose of electrons, protons, UV and x-rays along with thermal cycling. This paper discusses the testing and evaluation of the retrieved Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP.

  1. Ground-based simulation of LEO environment: Investigations of a select LDEF material: FEP Teflon (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has produced a wealth of data on materials degradation in the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment and has conclusively shown that surface chemistry (as opposed to surface physics-sputtering) is the key to understanding and predicting the degradation of materials in the LEO environment. It is also clear that materials degradation and spacecraft contamination are closely linked and that the fundamental mechanisms responsible for this linking are in general not well understood especially in the area of synergistic effects. The study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying materials degradation in LEO is hampered by the fact that the degradation process itself is not observed during the actual exposure to the environment. Rather the aftermath of the degradation process is studied, i.e., the material that remains after exposure is observed and mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results. The EOIM-3 flight experiment is an attempt to bring sophisticated diagnostic equipment into the space environment and monitor the degradation process in real time through the use of mass spectrometry. More experiments of this nature which would include surface sensitive diagnostics (Auger and photoelectron spectroscopes) are needed to truly unravel the basic chemical mechanisms involved in the materials degradation process. Since these in-space capabilities will most likely not be available in the near future, ground-based LEO simulation facilities employing sophisticated diagnostics are needed to further advance the basic understanding of the materials degradation mechanisms. The LEO simulation facility developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been used to investigate the atomic oxygen/vacuum ultraviolet (AO/VUV) enhanced degradation of FEP Teflon. The results show that photo-ejection of polymer fragments occur at elevated temperature (200 C), that VUV synergistic rare gas sputtering of polymer fragments occur even at

  2. Beam-surface scattering studies of the individual and combined effects of VUV radiation and hyperthermal O, O2, or Ar on FEP Teflon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Amy L; Zhang, Jianming; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Minton, Timothy K

    2009-01-01

    Beam-surface scattering experiments were used to probe products that scattered from FEP Teflon surfaces during bombardment by various combinations of atomic and molecular oxygen, Ar atoms, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. A laser-breakdown source was used to create hyperthermal (translational energies in the range 4-13 eV) beams of argon and atomic/molecular oxygen. The average incidence energy of these beams was tunable and was controlled precisely with a synchronized chopper wheel. A filtered deuterium lamp provided a source of VUV light in a narrow-wavelength range centered at 161 nm. Volatile products that exited the surfaces were monitored with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Hyperthermal O atoms with average translational energies above approximately 4 eV may react directly with a pristine FEP Teflon surface, and the reactivity appears to increase with the translational energy of the incident O atoms. VUV light or highly energetic collisions of O2 or Ar may break chemical bonds and lead to the ejection of volatile products; the ejection of volatile products is enhanced when the surface is subjected to VUV light and energetic collisions simultaneously. Exposure to VUV light or to hyperthermal O2 or Ar may increase the reactivity of an FEP Teflon surface to O atoms. PMID:20355771

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) radiation-induced degradation of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Stiegman, A. E.; Staszak, Paul R.; Laue, Eric G.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1992-01-01

    Examination of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer specimens recovered from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provides evidence for degradation attributed to extended solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of sheared FEP film edges reveal the presence of a highly embrittled layer on the exposed surface of specimens obtained from the trailing edge of the LDEF. Similar images obtained for leading edge and control FEP films do not exhibit evidence for such an embrittled layer. Laboratory VUV irradiation of FEP films is found to produce a damage layer similar to that witnessed in the LDEF trailing edge films. Spectroscopic analyses of irradiated films provide data to advance a photochemical mechanism for degradation.

  4. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  5. Thermal Contributions to the Degradation of Ground-Laboratory- and Space-Irradiated Teflon Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2003-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is covered with two primary types of thermal control materials, radiators and multilayer insulation blankets, which passively control temperatures during orbit. Both of these thermal control materials utilize back-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) as the exterior (spacefacing) layer because of its excellent optical properties (low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance). The aluminized-FEP (Al-FEP) outermost layer of the multilayer insulation blankets on the HST has become embrittled while in space, resulting in severe on-orbit cracking (see the photographs). During the second servicing mission, an extremely embrittled piece of Al-FEP was retrieved that had curled, exposing the backsurface aluminum to space (see the photograph on the right). Because the aluminum surface has a lower thermal emittance than the FEP, this curled piece reached 200 C during orbit, 150 C higher than the nominal temperature extreme. To better understand the effect of temperature on the rate of degradation, and on the mechanism of degradation, of this insulation material in the low-Earth-orbit environment, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center conducted experiments to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of FEP that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on the HST. For this study, Teflon FEP retrieved from the HST during the third servicing mission after 9.7 years of space exposure was provided to Glenn by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  6. Utilization of FEP energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Abbassi, P.; Afifi, F.; Khandhar, P. K.; Ono, D. Y.; Chen, W. E. W.

    1987-01-01

    The research and development work on Fountain Effect Pump Systems (FEP systems) has been of interest in the competition between mechanical pumps for He II and FEP units. The latter do not have moving parts. In the course of the work, the energetics have been addressed using one part of a simple four-changes-of-state cycle. One option is the FEP ideal change of state at constant chemical potential (mu). The other option is the two-state sequence mu-P with a d mu=0 state change followed by an isobar. Questions of pump behavior, of flow rate response to temperature difference at the hot end, and related questions of thermodynamic cycle completion and heat transfer have been addressed. Porous media data obtained elucidate differences between vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) and Zero Net Mass Transfer (ZNMF).

  7. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

  8. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps.

    PubMed

    Grover, William H; von Muhlen, Marcio G; Manalis, Scott R

    2008-06-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane bonded between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:18497911

  9. Space environmental effects on silvered Teflon thermal control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, C. S.; Stuckey, W. K.; Uht, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Cumulative space environmental effects on silver/fluorinated ethylene propylene (Ag/FEP) were a function of exposure orientation. Samples from nineteen silvered Teflon (Ag/FEP) thermal control surfaces recovered from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were analyzed to determine changes in this material as a function of position on the spacecraft. Although solar absorptance and infrared emittance of measured thermal blanket specimens are relatively unchanged from control specimen values, significant changes in surface morphology, composition, and chemistry were observed. We hypothesize that the FEP surfaces on the LDEF are degraded by UV radiation at all orientations, but that the damaged material has been removed by erosion from the blankets exposed to atomic oxygen flux and that contamination is masking the damage in some areas on the trays flanking the trailing edge.

  10. Whole Teflon valves for handling droplets.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Olgierd; Jakiela, Slawomir; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-06-21

    We propose and test a new whole-Teflon gate valve for handling droplets. The valve allows droplet plugs to pass through without disturbing them. This is possible due to the geometric design, the choice of material and lack of any pulses of flow generated by closing or opening the valve. The duct through the valve resembles a simple segment of tubing, without constrictions, change in lumen or side pockets. There are no extra sealing materials with different wettability or chemical resistance. The only material exposed to liquids is FEP Teflon, which is resistant to aggressive chemicals and fully biocompatible. The valve can be integrated into microfluidic systems: we demonstrate a complex system for culturing bacteria in hundreds of microliter droplet chemostats. The valve effectively isolates modules of the system to increase precision of operations on droplets. We verified that the valve allowed millions of droplet plugs to safely pass through, without any cross-contamination with bacteria between the droplets. The valve can be used in automating complex microfluidic systems for experiments in biochemistry, biology and organic chemistry. PMID:27182628

  11. Miscellaneous Waste-Form FEPs

    SciTech Connect

    A. Schenker

    2000-12-08

    The US DOE must provide a reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) potential radioactive-waste repository can be achieved for a 10,000-year post-closure period. The guidance that mandates this direction is under the provisions of 10 CFR Part 63 and the US Department of Energy's ''Revised Interim Guidance Pending Issuance of New US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulations (Revision 01, July 22, 1999), for Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (Dyer 1999 and herein referred to as DOE's Interim Guidance). This assurance must be demonstrated in the form of a performance assessment that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the performance of the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of such FEPs on the performance of the potential geologic repository; (3) estimates the expected annual dose to a specified receptor group; and (4) provides the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs.

  12. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  13. Analysis of Ag/FEP Thermal Control Blanket Performance From Multiple Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Gary; Normand, E.; Woll, S.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Materials performance data from operational spacecraft and spacecraft experiments has slowly accumulated over the years. Much of this data is obtained indirectly by analyzing temperature measurements telemetered to ground. Due to the Space Transportation System (STS) program, materials performance data has also been obtained by flying materials on satellites, or on the Space Shuttle itself, for limited periods of time, and then returning the materials to ground for post-flight examination. During the course of NASA contract NAS8-98213, the authors have extended the analysis of data reported for selected materials flown on a variety of spacecraft over the past 30 years. In this paper we discuss changes in two properties of silver- or aluminum-backed (metallized) FEP Teflon due to exposure to specific environmental factors on-orbit. First, the change in solar absorptance (alpha(sub s)) of metallized FEP Teflon as a function of particulate radiation will be discussed. Data providing the change in solar absorptance of metallized FEP as a function of days on orbit has been published for NTS-2 satellite, several NavStar Global Positioning Satellites (GPS), the SCATHA experiment, and the ML-101 satellite. The unique approach that we have taken is to calculate the absorbed radiation dose within the Ag/FEP for the various satellite orbits, and to plot the change in solar absorptance, alpha(sub s), as a function of the dose; the behavior agrees with the same data from laboratory tests. Second, the variation of the atomic oxygen induced material recession rate of metallized FEP will be discussed. Data from certain Space Shuttle flights, a Lockheed experiment [approximately 105 days in low Earth orbit (LEO)], and the Long Duration Exposure Facility allows the variation of the material recession rate of Ag/FEP to be estimated under conditions that include atomic oxygen exposure.

  14. Analysis of Silverized Teflon Thermal Control Material Flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    Silver backed teflon (Ag/FEP) material used for thermal control on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has been examined in detail. Optical, mechanical, and chemical properties were characterized for specimens exposed to a variety of space environmental conditions. Recession rates were determined for this material. Samples were obtained from virtually every LDEF location except the Earth-end. Atomic oxygen exposed regions changed from specular to diffusely reflective.

  15. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  16. Degradation studies of SMRM teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ranty H.; Oda, Keri L.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    Teflon samples returned from the Solar Max Satellite (SMS) suffered noticeable damage such as cracking and yellowing. This is in contrast to teflon exposed aboard STS-5 and STS-8 which showed no detectable changes. Selected teflon tape samples from SMS were studied to evaluate the extent and mechanism of degradation. ESCA studies revealed that these teflon samples contain hydrocarbon segments which were susceptible to oxygen atom degradation. Mechanical measurements also showed bulk property changes as a result of LEO exposure. A molecular model of material and energetic oxygen atom interaction was proposed. SMS data and the importance of developing correlation between accelerated exposure data from STS and ground-based testing and real time data will be presented.

  17. Teflon lubrication of liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Ball bearings with glass fiber reinforced Teflon ball retainers from hot-fired liquid oxygen turbopumps were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the extent of Teflon transfer and/or chemical reaction at the bearing surface. No Teflon, but metal fluorides could be found on the metal surface. This indicates that Teflon decomposes and reacts with the bearing steel to form fluorides. Hence, Teflon does not appear to function directly as a lubricant under these operating conditions.

  18. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  19. 29 CFR 1601.80 - Certified designated FEP agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certified designated FEP agencies. 1601.80 Section 1601.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.80 Certified designated FEP agencies. The designated FEP agencies receiving certification by...

  20. 29 CFR 1601.80 - Certified designated FEP agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certified designated FEP agencies. 1601.80 Section 1601.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.80 Certified designated FEP agencies. The designated FEP agencies receiving certification by...

  1. Thermal anomalies in stressed Teflon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Wulff, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) as a calorimetric gasketing material, serendipity revealed a thermal anomaly in stressed film that occurs concomitantly with the well-documented 25 C transition. The magnitude of the excess energy absorption - about 35 cal/g - is suggested to be related to the restricted thermal expansion of the film.

  2. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation/atomic oxygen synergism in fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Brinza, David E.; Laue, Eric G.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1992-01-01

    A micrographic investigation is reported of samples of the fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon thermal-blanketing materials recovered from the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite. The samples are taken from the trailing edge and row 8 which correspond to exposures to vacuum UV (VUV) and VUV + atomic O, respectively. Data are taken from SEM and IR-spectra observations, and the LDEF leading-edge FEP shows a high degree of erosion, roughening, and sharp peaks angled in the direction of the flow of atomic O. The trailing edge sample influenced primarily by VUV shows a hard brittle layer and some cracked mosaic patterns. Comparisons to a reference sample suggest that the brittle layer is related to exposure to VUV and is removed by atomic-O impingement. Polymers that are stable to VUV radiation appear to be more stable in terms of atomic oxygen.

  3. Optical and electrical properties of ion beam textured Kapton and Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch polyimide (Kapton) and fluorinated ethylene, FEP (Teflon). Samples of polyimide and FEP were exposed to (0.5-1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (1.0-1/8) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. Changes in the optical and electrical properties of the samples were used to characterize the exposure. Spectral reflectance and transmittance measurements were made between 0.33 and 2.16 micron m using an integrating sphere after each exposure. From these measurements, values of solar absorptance were obtained. Total emittance measurements were also recorded for some samples. Surface resistivity was used to determine changes in the electrical conductivity of the etched samples. A scanning electron microscope recorded surface structure after exposure. Spectral optical data, resistivity measurements, calculated absorptance and emittance measurements are presented along with photomicrographs of the surface structure for the various exposures to Ar ions.

  4. Impact penetration experiments in teflon targets of variable thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Cintala, M. J.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 20.4 sq m of Teflon thermal blankets on the nonspinning Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were exposed to the orbital debris and micrometeoroid environment in low-Earth orbit (LEO) for approximately 5.7 years. Each blanket consisted of an outer layer (approximately 125 micron thick) of FEP Teflon that was backed by a vapor-deposited metal mirror (Inconel; less than 1 micron thick). The inner surface consisted of organic binders and Chemglaze thermal protective paint (approximately 50 micron thick) resulting in a somewhat variable, total blanket thickness of approximately 180 to 200 microns. There was at least one of these blankets, each exposing approximately 1.2 sq m of surface area, on nine of LDEF's 12 principal pointing directions, the exceptions being Rows 3, 9, and 12. As a consequence, these blankets represent a significant opportunity for micrometeoroid and debris studies, in general, and specifically they provide an opportunity to address those issues that require information about pointing direction (i.e., spatial density of impact events as a function of instrument orientation). During deintegration of the LDEF spacecraft at KSC, all penetration holes greater than or equal to 300 micron in diameter were documented and were recently synthesized in terms of spatial density as a function of LDEF viewing direction by. The present report describes ongoing cratering and penetration experiments in pure Teflon targets, which are intended to establish the relationships between crater or penetration-hole diameters and the associated projectile dimensions at laboratory velocities (i.e., 6 km/s). The ultimate objective of these efforts is to extract reliable mass-frequencies and associated fluxes of hypervelocity particles in LEO.

  5. Technique for stripping Teflon insulated wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, B. D.

    1967-01-01

    Cryogenic stripping of Teflon insulated wire leaves no residue and produces no physical damage. After the wire is immersed in liquid nitrogen, bent slightly, and returned to room temperature, the Teflon is removed by fingernails or flat-nosed pliers.

  6. Degradation of FEP thermal control materials returned from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuby, Thomas M.; Degroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1995-01-01

    After an initial 3.6 years of space flight, the Hubble Space Telescope was serviced through a joint effort with the NASA and the European Space Agency. Multi-layer insulation (MLI) was retrieved from the electronics boxes of the two magnetic sensing systems (MSS), also called the magnetometers, and from the returned solar array (SA-I) drive arm assembly. The top layer of each MLI assembly is fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP, a type of Teflon). Dramatic changes in material properties were observed when comparing areas of high solar fluence to areas of low solar fluence. Cross sectional analysis shows atomic oxygen (AO) erosion values up to 25.4 mu m (1 mil). Greater occurrences of through-thickness cracking and surface microcracking were observed in areas of high solar exposure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed increases in surface microhardness measurements with increasing solar exposure. Decreases in FEP tensile strength and elongation were measured when compared to non-flight material. Erosion yield and tensile results are compared with FEP data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility. AO erosion yield data, solar fluence values, contamination, micrometeoroid or debris impact sites, and optical properties are presented.

  7. Infusion thrombophlebitis: a prospective comparison of 645 Vialon and Teflon cannulae in anaesthetic and postoperative use.

    PubMed

    Gaukroger, P B; Roberts, J G; Manners, T A

    1988-08-01

    A prospective study of the incidence and severity of infusion thrombophlebitis in peripheral intravenous infusions used for anaesthetic and postoperative purposes in 645 patients was conducted over a four-month period. Conditions of insertion were carefully controlled while ward management was according to standard practice. A total of 330 polyurethane Vialon and 315 FEP-A Teflon cannulae were used. The results show that the nature of the cannula was the single most important factor in the incidence and severity of infusion thrombophlebitis, Vialon cannulae being associated with a 46% lower incidence than the Teflon type. Less important but significant factors included intravenous antibiotics, duration of infusion, cannula tip damage and caesarean section. Factors not associated with infusion thrombophlebitis included potassium therapy, blood transfusion or site of insertion in the upper limb. Heparinisation increased duration of infusion without affecting the incidence of infusion thrombophlebitis. PMID:3189736

  8. Degradation studies of SMRM Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.; Oda, K. L.; Chung, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A working group was organized to study materials and components of the Solar Max Satellite (SMS) that was returned by the STS 41C. These materials were exposed in space for 50 months and represent the only real time long term exposure data available to date. In the molecular modeling of material and energetic oxygen atom interaction, it is pointed out that the importance of developing correlation between accelerated exposure data from STS and some real time data. In particular, it was predicted that Teflon which showed no detectable degradation on various STS flights may be susceptible to atomic oxygen degradation under real time conditions. Initial inspection of returned SMS samples showed that Teflon suffered visual damage such as cracking and yellowing. The results of examination of these samples are given.

  9. Duplex aluminized coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  10. Thermal Contributions to the Degradation of Ground Laboratory and Space Irradiated Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2003-01-01

    The aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene outer most layer of the multilayer insulation blankets on the Hubble Space Telescope has become embrittled resulting in severe on-orbit cracking. During the second servicing mission, a piece of aluminized fluorinated ethylene propylene was retrieved that had curled, exposing the back-surface aluminum to space. This extremely embrittled piece reached 200 C on-orbit, 150 C higher than the nominal temperature extreme. Therefore, experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of fluorinated ethylene propylene that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on Hubble Space Telescope. Samples of pristine, x-ray irradiated and Hubble Space Telescope retrieved fluorinated ethylene propylene were heat treated from 50 to 200 C at 25 C intervals in a high vacuum facility and tensile tested. Density measurements were also obtained. Results indicate that heating does not embrittle non-irradiated Teflon. However, there is a significant dependence of the embrittlement of irradiated Teflon on heating temperature, with near complete loss of elongation at 100 C and higher. Rate of degradation changes, which were consistent with the glass transition temperature for fluorinated ethylene propylene, were present in the data. The results support chain scission as the primary mechanism of degradation of fluorinated ethylene propylene on Hubble Space Telescope, and indicate the significance of the on-orbit temperature of fluorinated ethylene propylene with respect to its degradation in the space environment.

  11. Preventing Delamination of Silverized FEP Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domnikov, L.; May, J.; Gallego, R.

    1986-01-01

    Edge treatment inhibits attack by moisture. New technique prevents delamination by sealing edges where delamination starts. Samples of aluminum/FEP/silver laminate survive humidity tests and other environmental tests when edges of layers are covered by epoxy bead. Untreated laminates, in contrast, deteriorated seriously during such tests.

  12. Laser processing of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hong, Ming Hui; Lu, Yong Feng; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (non-flammable, anti-adhesive, heat-resistant and bio-compatible). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of Teflon by Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs), Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 7 ns) and CO2 laser (10.6 μm, 10 μs) has been investigated. For femtosecond laser processing, clear ablation takes place and provides high-quality groove on Teflon surface. Both the groove depth and the width increase as the laser fluence increase, and decrease almost linearly as the scanning speed increase for laser fluence below 5.0 J/cm2. For Nd:YAG processing, Teflon surface roughness is improved but no clean ablation is accessible, which makes it difficult to micromachine Teflon by Nd:YAG laser. For CO2 laser processing, laser-induced bumps were formed on Teflon surface with controlled laser parameters. The physics mechanisms for different pulse duration laser processing of Teflon are also discussed.

  13. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  14. Viscoelastic Properties of Fluorinated Ethylene-Propylene (FEP) Random Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Megan; Wright, Benjamin; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Florinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) random copolymers contain tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and hexafluoropropylene (HFP) repeat units. FEP is an excellent alternative to poly(tetrafluoroethylene), PTFE, which cannot be melt processed due to its high molecular weight and extensive crystallinity. On the other hand, FEP is a melt processible polymer and offers similar if not the same properties as PTFE. Many studies have been performed on FEP over the years, however, the properties of these polymers strongly depend on the HFP concentration and molecular weight (distribution). Just like PTFE, FEP cannot be dissolved in many solvents, therefore, obtaining molecular weight distribution of these polymers is not possible with commonly used methods. In the current study, we perform rheological analysis of various FEPs and obtain their molecular weight distributions by employing the Tuminello method. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  15. A Model For The Burning of Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Beeson, Harold D.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Teflon has been identified as suitable material for use in oxygen-enriched atmospheres because of its low specific enthalpy of combustion that is, less than 1500 cal/gram. However, once ignited, Teflon burns in a heterogeneous reaction until total consumption or depletion of oxygen occurs. A model is developed for the burning of Teflon in pure, high-pressure oxygen, 3.4 to 68.9 MPa. The Teflon polymer chain dissociates via monomer units due to pyrolysis. These monomer units diffuse to the surface due to free convection. The model consists of coupled mass and energy balances for the polymer and an energy balance for the free convection of product gases. The model is used to obtain appropriate kinetic parameters for the dissociation and surface reactions. The model is validated against experimental measurements of Teflon discs supported on aluminum rods (2216) at oxygen pressures of 3.4, 6.8, 34.4, and 68.9 MPa. The model simulates the temperature distribution in the product gases above burning Teflon.

  16. Biphasic binding kinetics between FepA and its ligands.

    PubMed

    Payne, M A; Igo, J D; Cao, Z; Foster, S B; Newton, S M; Klebba, P E

    1997-08-29

    The Escherichia coli FepA protein is an energy- and TonB-dependent, ligand-binding porin that functions as a receptor for the siderophore ferric enterobactin and colicins B and D. We characterized the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters associated with the initial, energy-independent steps in ligand binding to FepA. In vivo experiments produced Kd values of 24, 185, and 560 nM for ferric enterobactin, colicin B, and colicin D, respectively. The siderophore and colicin B bound to FepA with a 1:1 stoichiometry, but colicin D bound to a maximum level that was 3-fold lower. Preincubation with ferric enterobactin prevented colicin B binding, and preincubation with colicin B prevented ferric enterobactin binding. Colicin B release from FepA was unexpectedly slow in vivo, about 10-fold slower than ferric enterobactin release. This slow dissociation of the colicin B.FepA complex facilitated the affinity purification of FepA and FepA mutants with colicin B-Sepharose. Analysis of a fluorescent FepA derivative showed that ferric enterobactin and colicin B adsorbed with biphasic kinetics, suggesting that both ligands bind in at least two distinct steps, an initial rapid stage and a subsequent slower step, that presumably establishes a transport-competent complex. PMID:9268330

  17. A Study to Analyze the Permeation of High Density Gases and Propellant Vapors Through Single Layer Teflon or Teflon Structure Materials and Laminations. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Young, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1967-01-01

    This report contains the results of a fifteen month analytical and experimental study of the leakage rate of the pressurant gases (N2, He) and the propellant vapors (N2O4,N2H4) through bladder structures consisting of two layers of Teflon separated by a metallic foil diffusion barrier containing microscopic or larger holes. Results were obtained for the steady state leakage rate through circular holes and long rectangular openings in the barrier for arbitrary thicknesses of the two Teflon layers. The effect of hole shape and relative hole position on the leakage rate were studied. The transient problem was analyzed and it was shown that steady state calculations are adequate for estimating the leakage rate. A computer program entitled "Diffusion Analyzer Program" was developed to calculate the leakage rate, both transient and steady state. Finally, the analytical results were compared to experimentally determined values of the leakage rate through a model laminated bladder structure. The results of the analysis are in good agreement with experiment. The experimental effort (Part II of the Bladder Permeation Program) measured the solubility, diffusion coefficient and permeability of helium, nitrogen and nitrogen tetroxide vapor through Teflon TFE and FEP membranes. Data were obtained in the temperature range of 25 to 100 C at pressures ranging from near vacuum to about 20 atmospheres. Results of the experimental effort were compared with the limited data previously reported. As a verification to the applicability of results to actual bladder systems, counter diffusion tests were performed with a laminated sample containing aluminum foil with a selected group of holes.

  18. Cratering and penetration experiments in Teflon targets at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cintala, Mark J.; See, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 20 sq m of protective thermal blankets, largely composed of Teflon, were retrieved from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) after the spacecraft had spent approximately 5.7 years in space. Examination of these blankets revealed that they contained thousands of hypervelocity impact features ranging from micron-sized craters to penetration holes several millimeters in diameter. We conducted impact experiments in an effort to reproduce such features and to -- hopefully -- understand the relationships between projectile size and the resulting crater or penetration-hole diameter over a wide range of impact velocity. Such relationships are needed to derive the size- and mass-frequency distribution and flux of natural and man-made particles in low-Earth orbit. Powder propellant and light-gas guns were used to launch soda-lime glass spheres of 3.175 mm (1/8 inch) nominal diameter (Dp) into pure Teflon FEP targets at velocities ranging from 1 to 7 km/s. Target thickness (T) was varied over more than three orders of magnitude from infinite halfspace targets (Dp/T less than 0.1) to very thin films (Dp/T greater than 100). Cratering and penetration of massive Teflon targets is dominated by brittle failure and the development of extensive spall zones at the target's front and, if penetrated, the target's rear side. Mass removal by spallation at the back side of Teflon targets may be so severe that the absolute penetration-hole diameter (Dh) can become larger than that of a standard crater (Dc) at relative target thicknesses of Dp/T = 0.6-0.9. The crater diameter is infinite halfspace Teflon targets increases -- at otherwise constant impact conditions -- with encounter velocity by a factor of V0.44. In contrast, the penetration-hole size is very thin foils (Dp/T greater than 50) is essentially unaffected by impact velocity. Penetrations at target thicknesses intermediate to these extremes will scale with variable exponents of V. Our experimental matrix is

  19. Teflon lined process pumps save over $25,000/yr in acid regeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, L.; Gaines, A.

    1982-03-01

    Armco's Eastern Steel Division Works in Ashland, KY includes an acid regeneration plant that uses the spray/roaster process to recover hydrochloric acid and high purity iron oxides from spent pickling liquor. Two centrifugal pumps, one operating and one on standby, were used to pump the corrosive and erosive mixture at 175-200/sup 0/F to the spray nozzles in the roaster. The impeller, casing and other wetted parts were of an acid resistant exotic metal, but the pumps had a service life of only 2 to 3 months. The impellers had to be replaced after about six weeks because of wear that reduced the discharge pressure and impaired the performance of the spray nozzles. Maintaining the pumps and replacing them several times a year was extremely expensive, since each pump cost about $6000. A 3 X 1 1/2 X 8 1/2'' centrifugal pump specifically designed for severe corrosive service was installed on a trial basis in February 1980. The process pump is built to AVS standards and features a 3/16'' thick fluoropolymer liner molded in place to the ductile iron case, and a fully open faced ductile iron impeller encapsulated with fluoropolymer. The pumps have been available for a number of years with liners and impeller coverings of Du Pont's Teflon-FEP fluorocarbon, and the acid regenerating plant has been using them in various corrosive applications since the startup in 1972. The acid regeneration plant is very pleased with the trouble-free performance of the Teflon-FEP lined pumps. They are reliable, essentially maintenance free, and maintain the discharge pressures required for efficient operation of the spray nozzles.

  20. Fatigue testing of corrugated and Teflon hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Swanson, Theodore D.; Costello, Frederick A.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two-phase heat transport systems for the thermal control of large space facilities require fluid lines that traverse joints and either rotate or move in some other manner. Flexible hoses are being considered as one means of traversing these joints. To test the resilience of flexible hoses to bending stress, a test assembly was constructed to determine the number of flexing cycles the hoses could withstand before losing their ability to maintain a constant pressure. Corrugated metal hoses and Teflon hoses were tested at different pressures with nitrogen gas. The metal hoses had lives ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 flexing cycles. But, even after 400,000 cycles, the Teflon hoses remained essentially intact, though some leakage in the convoluted Teflon is noted.

  1. Mars containers - Dust on teflon sealing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Allton, J. H.

    As part of an evaluation of suitable hermetic seals for containers for Martian rock and soil samples, teflon o-ring static face seals were challenged with silica gel, basalt, and bentonite dust in several size ranges: 20-45 microns, 45-75 microns, and 75-125 microns. Seals were most tolerant of the soft bentonite dust and least tolerant of angular silica gel dust. Small amounts of 75-125 micron size particles can be accommodated by the teflon o-ring; however, the seals do not work well if smaller particles are concentrated enough to form layers more than 1 grain thick.

  2. Solar Effects on Tensile and Optical Properties of Hubble Space Telescope Silver-Teflon(Registered Trademark) Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim, K.; Dever, Joyce A.; Snyder, Aaron; Kaminski, Sharon; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Rapoport, Alison L.; Rucker, Rochelle N.

    2006-01-01

    A section of the retrieved Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array drive arm (SADA) multilayer insulation (MLI), which experienced 8.25 years of space exposure, was analyzed for environmental durability of the top layer of silver-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Ag-FEP). Because the SADA MLI had solar and anti-solar facing surfaces and was exposed to the space environment for a long duration, it provided a unique opportunity to study solar effects on the environmental degradation of Ag-FEP, a commonly used spacecraft thermal control material. Data obtained included tensile properties, solar absorptance, surface morphology and chemistry. The solar facing surface was found to be extremely embrittled and contained numerous through-thickness cracks. Tensile testing indicated that the solar facing surface lost 60% of its mechanical strength and 90% of its elasticity while the anti-solar facing surface had ductility similar to pristine FEP. The solar absorptance of both the solar facing surface (0.155 plus or minus 0.032) and the anti-solar facing surface (0.208 plus or minus 0.012) were found to be greater than pristine Ag-FEP (0.074). Solar facing and anti-solar facing surfaces were microscopically textured, and locations of isolated contamination were present on the anti-solar surface resulting in increased localized texturing. Yet, the overall texture was significantly more pronounced on the solar facing surface indicating a synergistic effect of combined solar exposure and increased heating with atomic oxygen erosion. The results indicate a very strong dependence of degradation, particularly embrittlement, upon solar exposure with orbital thermal cycling having a significant effect.

  3. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  4. Method of processing aluminous ores

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Keller, Rudolf; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1981-01-01

    A method of producing aluminum chloride from aluminous materials containing compounds of iron, titanium and silicon comprising reacting the aluminous materials with carbon and a chlorine-containing gas at a temperature of about 900.degree. K. to form a gaseous mixture containing chlorides of aluminum, iron, titanium and silicon and oxides of carbon; cooling the gaseous mixture to a temperature of about 400.degree. K. or lower to condense the aluminum chlorides and iron chlorides while titanium chloride and silicon chloride remain in the gas phase to effect a separation thereof; heating the mixture of iron chlorides and aluminum chlorides to a temperature of about 800.degree. K. to form gaseous aluminum chlorides and iron chlorides; passing the heated gases into intimate contact with aluminum sulfide to precipitate solid iron sulfide and to form additional gaseous aluminum chlorides; and separating the gaseous aluminum chloride from the solid iron sulfide.

  5. Effects of the LDEF environment on the Ag/FEP thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, Francois; Pippin, H. Gary

    1992-01-01

    This presentation was made by Francois Levadou at the NASA Langley Research Center LDEF materials workshop, November 19-22, 1991. It represents the results to date on the examination of silvered teflon thermal blankets primarily from the Ultra-heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment and also from the blanket from the Park Seed Company experiment. ESA/ESTEC and Boeing conducted a number of independent measurements on the blankets and in particular on the exposed fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) layer of the blankets. Mass loss, thickness, and thickness profile measurements have been used by ESA, Boeing, and NASA LeRC to determine recession and average erosion yield under atomic oxygen exposure. Tensile strength and percent elongation to failure data, surface characterization by ESCA, and SEM images are presented. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory analysis of vacuum radiation effects is also presented. The results obtained by the laboratories mentioned and additional results from the Aerospace Corporation on samples provided by Boeing are quite similar and give confidence in the validity of the data.

  6. A study of the UV and VUV degradation of FEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Graeme A.; Hill, David J. T.; Odonnell, James H.; Pomery, Peter J.; Rasoul, Firas A.

    1993-01-01

    UV and VUV degradation of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer was studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ESR study revealed the formation of a terminal polymer radical. The stability of this radical was investigated under different environments. An XPS study of FEP film exposed to VUV and atomic oxygen showed that oxidation takes place on the polymer surface. The study revealed also that the percentage of CF2 in the polymer surface decreased with exposure time and the percentage of CF, CF3, and carbon attached to oxygen increased. SEM micrographs of FEP film exposed to VUV and atomic oxygen identified a rough surface with undulations similar to sand dunes.

  7. Comparison of type A and C Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) as cover materials for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broder, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Fluorinated ethylene propylene film (FEP, 0.0127 cm thick) was heat and pressure laminated to silicon solar cells as a low cost substitute for quartz covers. The FEP-C, treated on one side for bonding, was compared to FEP-A, an untreated FEP. With FEP-A, a silane adhesion promoter was applied to the cells. The FEP-C covers delaminated during accelerated temperature-humidity testing and Earth environmental exposure testing; FEP-A covers were unchanged. No differences were observed in peel tests, but FEP-A is superior in its resistance to tearing and in retention of transmission properties after exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

  8. DYNAMIC LOADING OF TEFLON AT 200?C

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F

    2007-06-13

    Dynamic loading experiments were performed on inert Teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene) samples, initially heated to the temperature of 200 C, to test its behavior under these conditions for its use in other heated experiments. Tests were performed in the 100 mm diameter bore propellant driven gas gun with piezo-resistive manganin pressure gauges imbedded into the samples to measure loading pressures. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity - particle velocity relationship for the heated material and showed no adverse effect of temperature on the insulating properties of the material.

  9. Barriers to flashover discharge arcs on Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gossland, M.; Balmain, K. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of various barriers (empty gap, copper, Mylar, and nickel mesh) on the probability of simultaneous arc discharging of two physically separated pieces of electron-beam-charged Teflon was studied. For the empty gap barrier, it was found that simultaneous discharges rarely occur when the separation between the samples is greater than approximately 0.4 times the length of their common edge when this length is of the order of 1 cm. Evidence suggests that electromagnetic fields play a larger role than electrons in influencing the occurrence of simultaneous arc discharges.

  10. Unique Charge Storage Characteristics of FEP/THV/FEP Sandwich Electret Membrane Polarized by Thermally Charging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Lei, Ming-Feng; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Wu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing the synergy of three processes (space charge injection, dipole orientation and interfacial polarization) which determine the electret properties, a sandwich electret membrane FEP/THV/FEP (FEP: fluorinated ethylene propylene, THV: tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene-vinylidene) is prepared by the laminating method and the thermal charging technology. The surface potential measurement indicates that the sandwich electret membrane exhibits excellent charge storage stability. When washing the sample surface with alcohol, its surface potential first undergoes decay to zero, and then quickly restores to a high value. The surface potential value is associated with the charging electric field and temperature. The best charging condition is 18.75 MV·m-1 and 130°C. A charge storage profile is proposed, and the experimental results are in good agreement with this profile.

  11. Hole schubweg in FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintle, H. J.

    We discuss four models to account for observations of a constant hole schubweg in FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer). Inhomogeneity in the sample and one-dimensional chain transport seem unlikely, while conventional semiconductor theory demands a particular combination of properties. Tunnelling, influenced by the field to yield essentially unidirectional transport, matches the observations and gives a reasonable trap density ( N ≈ 10 19 cm -3, with wide limits of uncertainty).

  12. HNS/Teflon, a new heat resistant explosive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, H.; Bertram, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    HNS/Teflon (90/10) is a new pressed explosive developed for use in the Apollo program. The major advantages of HNS/Teflon are (1) excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures, (2) superior resistance to sublimation at high temperatures and low pressures and (3) ease of molding powder preparation, pressing and machining. The impact sensitivity of HNS/Teflon is between that of Comp B and Comp A-3 while its explosive performance is about the same as TNT. Under the severe environmental conditions of the moon's surface, this explosive successfully performed its intended function of generating seismic waves in the Apollo ALSEP and LSPE experiments. (Modified author abstract)

  13. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    K. Mon

    2004-10-11

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts.

  14. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-20

    In the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, three compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10}(also expressed as-Mg{sub 0.4}Al{sub 2.4}O{sub 4}) and MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} were formed in a single step, while MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} by rare earth ions like Ce{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} and ns{sup 2} ion Pb{sup 2+} could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  15. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    In the system MgO-Al2O3, three compounds MgAl2O4, MgAl6O10 (also expressed as- Mg0.4Al2.4O4) and MgAl26O40 are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl2O4 ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl2O4 is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl6O10 has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl2O4 and MgAl6O10 were formed in a single step, while MgAl26O40 was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl6O10 by rare earth ions like Ce3+, Eu3+ and Tb3+ and ns2 ion Pb2+ could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl6O10 are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl2O4.

  16. Kinetics of pack aluminization of nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seigle, L. L.; Gupta, B. K.; Shankar, R.; Sarkhel, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of pack aluminization of unalloyed nickel in packs of varying aluminum activity with various halide activators were studied. Surface compositions of the coatings as functions of time, temperature, and pack composition were obtained in order to establish the boundary conditions for diffusion in the system. The structure of the packs was also examined in order to clarify the mechanism of aluminum transport. The results indicate that the kinetics of pack aluminization are controlled jointly by gas diffusion in the pack and solid diffusion in the coating. Levine and Caves' model for gas diffusion was combined with calculations of rates of diffusion in the solid to formulate a more complete theory for the kinetics of pack aluminization.

  17. Pitting corrosion of aluminized seals in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.F.; Bloom, I.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the corrosion of the aluminized type 316 stainless steel employed in the seal areas of the molten carbonate fuel cell. The seals are formed between the aluminized Type 316 SS surface and the electrolyte (generally a mixture of molten alkali carbonates and lithium aluminate).

  18. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, C.; Baker, E. L.; Nicolich, S.; Balas, W.; Pincay, J.; Stiel, L. I.

    2007-12-01

    Theory and performance for recently developed combined—effects aluminized explosives are presented. Our recently developed combined-effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing, as well as high blast energies. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder and wall velocities and Gurney energies. Eigenvalue detonation explains the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. Cylinder expansion data and thermochemical calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH) verify the eigenvalue detonation behavior.

  19. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  20. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  1. Cratering and penetration experiments in aluminum and teflon: Implications for space-exposed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörz, Friedrich

    2012-04-01

    Whether a target is penetrated or not during hypervelocity impact depends strongly on typical impactor dimensions (Dp) relative to the absolute target thickness (T). We have therefore conducted impact experiments in aluminum1100 and TeflonFEP targets that systematically varied Dp/T (=D*), ranging from genuine cratering events in thick targets (Dp << T) to the nondisruptive passage of the impactor through very thin films (Dp >> T). The objectives were to (1) delineate the transition from cratering to penetration events, (2) characterize the diameter of the penetration hole (Dh) as a function of D*, and (3) determine the threshold target thickness that yields Dh = Dp. We employed spherical soda-lime glass (SLG) projectiles of Dp = 50-3175 μm at impact velocities (V) from 1 to 7 km s-1, and varied target thicknesses from microns to centimeters. The transition from cratering to penetration processes in thick targets forms a continuum in all morphologic aspects. The entrance side of the target resembles that of a standard crater even when the back of the target suffers substantial, physical perforations via spallation and plastic deformation. We thus suggest that the cratering-to-penetration transition does not occur when the target becomes physically perforated (i.e., at the "ballistic limit"), but when the shock pulse duration in the projectile (tp) is identical to that in the target (tt), i.e., tp = tt. This condition is readily calculated from equation-of-state data. As a consequence, in reconstructing impactor dimensions from observations of space-exposed substrates, we recommend that crater size (Dc) be used for the case of tp < tt, and that penetration hole diameter (Dh) be used when tp > tt. The morphologic evolution of the penetration hole and its size also forms a continuum that strongly depends on both the scaled parameter D* and on V, but it is independent of the absolute scale. The condition of Dh = Dp is approached at D* > 50. The dependence of Dh on T

  2. Embossed Teflon AF Laminate Membrane Microfluidic Diaphragm Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; Hunt, Brian; White,Victor; Grunthaner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed to survive spaceflight and to function autonomously on the Martian surface. It manipulates microscopic quantities of liquid water and performs chemical analyses on these samples to assay for the presence of molecules associated with past or present living processes. This technology lies at the core of the Urey Instrument, which is scheduled for inclusion on the Pasteur Payload of the ESA ExoMars rover mission in 2013. Fabrication processes have been developed to make the microfabricated Teflon-AF microfluidic diaphragm pumps capable of surviving extreme temperature excursions before and after exposure to liquid water. Two glass wafers are etched with features and a continuous Teflon membrane is sandwiched between them (see figure). Single valves are constructed using this geometry. The microfabricated devices are then post processed by heating the assembled device while applying pneumatic pressure to force the Teflon diaphragm against the valve seat while it is softened. After cooling the device, the embossed membrane retains this new shape. This solves previous problems with bubble introduction into the fluid flow where deformations of the membrane at the valve seat occurred during device bonding at elevated temperatures (100-150 C). The use of laminated membranes containing commercial Teflon AF 2400 sheet sandwiched between spun Teflon AF 1600 layers performed best, and were less gas permeable than Teflon AF 1600 membranes on their own. Spinning Teflon AF 1600 solution (6 percent in FLOURINERT(Registered TradeMark) FC40 solvent, 3M Company) at 500 rpm for 1.5 seconds, followed by 1,000 rpm for 3 seconds onto Borofloat glass wafers, results in a 10-micron-thick film of extremely smooth Teflon AF. This spinning process is repeated several times on flat, blank, glass wafers in order to gradually build a thick, smooth membrane. After running this process at least five times, the wafer and Teflon coating are heated under vacuum

  3. Theoretical equation of state for aluminized nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H.D.; Zerilli, F.J. )

    1991-04-01

    The simple fluid constituents of the reaction products of an aluminized nitromethane explosive are described by a perturbation technique based on their intermolecular interactions. Liquid metal constituents are treated with a Grover scaling model. Standard solid-state approaches are applied to the solid components of the reaction products. Calculated detonation velocities compared favorably with experimental data.

  4. The Enhanced Plan for Features, Events, and Processes (FEPS) at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    G. Freeze

    2002-03-25

    A performance assessment is required to demonstrate compliance with the post-closure performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), as stated in 10 CFR Part 63.1 13 (66 FR 55732, p. 55807). A performance assessment is defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (66 FR 55732, p. 55794) as an analysis that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of those FEPs upon the performance of the potential geologic repository; and (3) estimates the expected dose incurred by a specified reasonably maximally exposed individual as a result of releases caused by significant FEPs. The performance assessment must also provide the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs in the performance assessment as stated in 10 CFR 63.114 (66 FR 55732, p. 55807). An initial approach for FEP development, in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000e), was documented in Freeze et al. (2001). The development of a comprehensive list of FEPs potentially relevant to the post-closure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is an ongoing, iterative process based on site-specific information, design, and regulations. Although comprehensiveness of the FEPs list cannot be proven with absolute certainty, confidence can be gained through a combination of formal and systematic reviews (both top-down and bottom-up), audits, and comparisons with other FEP lists and through the application of more than one classification scheme. To support TSPA-SR, DOE used a multi-step approach for demonstrating comprehensiveness of the initial list of FEPs. Input was obtained from other international radioactive waste disposal programs as compiled by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to establish a general list of FEPs. The list was subsequently refined to include YMP

  5. Recession of FEP specimens from trays D11 and B7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. Gary

    1992-01-01

    We report work done at Boeing Defense and Space Group on analysis of silvered teflon specimens taken from selected locations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility under support from a contract provided by NASA LaRC. The samples discussed in this presentation were taken from the unexposed side of D11 and extended through the folded area of this blanket into the exposed area. Two similar areas were cut from blanket B7, one from the edge of the blanket near row six and one from the edge of the blanket near row eight and within a few centimeters of the copper grounding strap for B7. The specimens were each divided into three sections by cutting with a scapel. Two of the sections were mounted in a potting compound, which was cut and polished such that the cross-sectional thickness of each was exposed. One piece was mounted straight and the other was mounted in an attempt to configure the specimens such that it was bent with a radius of curvature similar to the on-orbit configuration. The third portion of each specimen was used for SEM images to help define the angle of exposure with respect to the ram at each location on the specimen. Photomicrographs were taken in cross section from the edge of the blanket through the curved transition region into the exposed area of the blanket. The thickness of the Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) layer was determined at known distances from the edge of the blanket. SEM images were obtained at known distances to help define the angle with respect to ram and therefore establish the atomic oxygen fluence on each location and correlate this exposure with thickness. Thickness measurements made with a two to three centimeter distance minimized the uncertainty arising from variations in the as-manufactured thickness of each blanket. The nominal angle from ram of the exposed portion of each blanket, and the fact that the unexposed edge portions are approximately at right angles to the exposed portion were also used to help define the

  6. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  7. Temperature characteristics of microfiber coil resonators embedded in teflon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Ming, Yang; Guo, Wei; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the temperature characteristic of an optical microfiber coil resonator (OMCR) which is wrapped on Teflon coated PMMA rob and embedded in low index polymer Teflon. The micro fiber used to fabricated the OMCR was 4 ~ 5μm in diameter and 14 mm in waist region length. The PMMA rob has a diameter of 2 mm. Our sample shows high temperature sensitivity as much as 80 pm/°C. The test result suggests OMCR could be of good value in application of temperature sensing.

  8. Protoporphyrin (FEP/ZPP) screening in industrial lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Saryan, L.A.

    1988-11-01

    Lead-acid battery manufacturers, as a group, are among the largest industrial users of lead in the United States, and every industry using this metal is confronted with a maze of federal regulations governing workplace conditions and employee health. In the biological testing category, particular emphasis has been placed on the periodic testing of blood for lead, to assess absorption of the metal, and protoporphyrin (abbreviated ZPP or FEP) testing as a means of monitoring the biological effects resulting from lead exposure. The protoporphyrin test, however, remains a matter of general confusion among industry managers and medical directors, and this article attempts to provide a concise and understandable explanation of this topic. 10 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Measurements of Gas-Wall Partitioning of Oxidized Species in Environmental Smog Chambers and Teflon Sampling Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Pagonis, D.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental "smog" chambers have played an integral role in atmospheric aerosol research for decades. Recently, many works have demonstrated that the loss of gas-phase material to fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) chamber walls can have significant effects on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield results. The effects of gas-wall partitioning on highly oxidized species is still controversial, however. In this work we performed a series of experiments examining the losses of oxidized gas-phase compounds that were generated in-situ­ in an environmental chamber. The loss of species to the walls was measured using three chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques: proton-transfer-reaction (PTR), nitrate (NO3-) ion, and iodide (I-). Many oxidized species have wall loss timescales ranging between 15 to 45 minutes and scale according to the molecule's estimated saturation concentration c* and functional groups. By comparing results of the different techniques, and in particular by the use of the "wall-less" NO3- source, we find that measuring species with high chamber wall-loss rates is complicated by the use of a standard ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region, as well as long Teflon sampling lines, which can be important sinks for gas-phase species. This effect is observed even for semi-volatile species and could have significant effects on ambient sampling techniques that make highly time-resolved measurements using long sampling lines, such as eddy covariance measurements.

  10. Isolation of Human Monocytes by Double Gradient Centrifugation and Their Differentiation to Macrophages in Teflon-coated Cell Culture Bags

    PubMed Central

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages. PMID:25226391

  11. Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek; P. Rogers

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of biosphere features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP along with the corresponding technical basis for the excluded FEPs and the descriptions of how the included FEPs were incorporated in the biosphere model. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report concern characteristics of the reference biosphere, the receptor, and the environmental transport and receptor exposure pathways for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios considered in biosphere modeling. This revision provides the summary of the implementation of included FEPs in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included); for excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report is one of the 10 documents constituting the biosphere model documentation suite. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' describes in detail the biosphere conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters and their development. Outputs from these six reports are used in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis and Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' to generate the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs), which are input parameters for

  12. In situ high-pressure study of FeP: Implications for planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tingting; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2011-02-01

    FeP with MnP-type structure is isostructural with high-pressure FeS polymorphs (both post-troilite FeS and FeS VI), which are believed to exist in planetary cores. Due to similar PTX phase diagrams of binary Fe-P and Fe-S, phosphorus can incorporate with iron-sulfur at planetary core conditions. To understand such substitution and the high-pressure behavior of FeP, we investigate the structural stability of FeP up to 15.6 GPa and 1800 ± 200 K by combined in situ powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that FeP remains the MnP-type structure throughout the PT range covered. Isothermal equation of state of FeP is obtained with V0 of 92.91(8) Å 3, B0 of 205(7) GPa, and B0 of 4. The shortest axis of the MnP-type FeP cell, the b-axis, is the most compressible, due to the soft edge-sharing octahedra along the b-axis. Mössbauer results show that no electronic structure changes occur up to 15.6 GPa, but indicate decreasing distortion of FeP 6 octahedron with pressure increasing. The behavior of FeP is quite different from that of FeS under high pressure and high temperature, suggesting that phosphorus will have a significant impact on stability and electronic properties of FeS within terrestrial planet cores.

  13. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, Christos; Baker, Ernest; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steven; Stiel, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of theory and performance for recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives. Traditional high energy explosives used for metal pushing incorporate high loading percentages of HMX or RDX, whereas blast explosives incorporate some percentage of aluminum. However, the high blast explosives produce increased blast energies, with reduced metal pushing capability due to late time aluminum reaction. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder wall velocities and Gurney energies. Our Recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing and high blast energies. Traditional Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. This work demonstrates, with the use of cylinder expansion data and thermochemical code calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH), that eigenvalue detonation theory explains the observed behavior.

  14. Status of FEP encapsulated solar cell modules used in terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has been engaged in transferring the FEP encapsulated solar cell technology developed for the space program to terrestrial applications. FEP encapsulated solar cell modules and arrays were designed and built expressly for terrestrial applications. Solar cell power systems were installed at three different land sites, while individual modules are undergoing marine environment tests. Four additional power systems are being completed for installation during the summer of 1974. These tests have revealed some minor problems which have been corrected. The results confirm the inherent utility of FEP encapsulated terrestrial solar cell systems.

  15. Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors, Version 4. 0

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.K.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T. )

    1992-05-01

    The Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors allow the user to graphically build and edit fault trees, event trees, and piping instrumentation diagrams (P IDs). The software is designed to enable the use of graphical-based editors found in the Integrated Reliability and Risk Assessment System (IRRAS). FEP is made up of three separate editors (Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping Instrumentation Diagram) and a utility module. This reference manual provides a screen-by-screen walkthrough of the entire FEP System.

  16. Mussel-inspired block copolymer lithography for low surface energy materials of teflon, graphene, and gold.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Hoon; Lee, Duck Hyun; Kim, Ju Young; Shin, Dong Ok; Jeong, Hu Young; Hong, Seonki; Yun, Je Moon; Koo, Chong Min; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-12-15

    Mussel-inspired interfacial engineering is synergistically integrated with block copolymer (BCP) lithography for the surface nanopatterning of low surface energy substrate materials, including, Teflon, graphene, and gold. The image shows the Teflon nanowires and their excellent superhydrophobicity. PMID:22021119

  17. The aluminizing in powder technology of AISI 304 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Băitanu, D. B.; Găluşcă, D. G.; Achiţei, D. C.; Minciună, M. G.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a study about the aluminizing treatments applied to AISI 304 stainless steel, with the purpose to improve the corrosion resistance. The aluminizing is realized in a powder medium, composed by aluminium powder (with 99.95% purity), aluminium oxide Al2O3 and ammonium chloride NH4Cl. The structural characterization was made by scanning electronic microscopy to highlight the structure of layer after aluminizing, at different magnitudes.

  18. Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-10-09

    The purpose of this report is to document the evaluation of biosphere features, events, and processes (FEPs) that relate to the license application (LA) process as required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The evaluation determines whether specific biosphere-related FEPs should be included or excluded from consideration in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This analysis documents the technical basis for screening decisions as required at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. For FEPs that are included in the TSPA, this analysis provides a TSPA disposition, which summarizes how the FEP has been included and addressed in the TSPA model, and cites the analysis reports and model reports that provide the technical basis and description of its disposition. For FEPs that are excluded from the TSPA, this analysis report provides a screening argument, which identifies the basis for the screening decision (i.e., low probability, low consequence, or by regulation) and discusses the technical basis that supports that decision. In cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP analysis reports, this analysis may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for these shared FEPs is addressed collectively by all FEP analysis reports that cover technical disciplines sharing a FEP. FEPs must be included in the TSPA unless they can be excluded by low probability, low consequence, or regulation. A FEP can be excluded from the TSPA by low probability per 10 CFR 63.114(d) [DIRS 156605], by showing that it has less than one chance in 10,000 of occurring over 10,000 years (or an approximately equivalent annualized probability of 10{sup -8}). A FEP can be excluded from the TSPA by low consequence per 10 CFR 63.114 (e or f) [DIRS 156605], by showing that omitting the FEP would not significantly change the magnitude and

  19. Fabrication and characterization of calcium aluminate glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Paul R.

    Calcium aluminate glasses (CAG) offer excellent chemical durability, high strength, broad spectral transparency, and a refractory nature. This makes them ideal candidates for fiber optic power delivery and sensor systems in the infrared spectrum. CAG also have the potential to form ultra-low loss optical materials. The fabrication of glass optical fibers from CAG was investigated in this study. High quality bulk glasses were obtained from the best industrial sources available. These glasses included silica and baria doped CAG compositions. A preform fabrication method was developed to obtain drawing samples. An optical fiber draw furnace was specially modified to achieve fiber drawing. A novel drawing method was also developed. Solid and hollow CAG waveguides, and CAG core/silica clad waveguides were obtained from drawing preforms. This represents the first successful fiber drawing of this glass system. Teflon coating for optical cladding and strength protection was also investigated. Infrared Spectroscopy was used to assess the attenuation in the drawn fibers. 7 dB/m at 2.7 mum with the baria doped CAG solid waveguide was recorded. This represents the lowest loss documented for fibers fabricated from CAG. Laser power propagation through solid and hollow waveguides was investigated. 24 Watts of CO2 laser power was delivered into a hollow baria doped CAG waveguide. 10.13 J/mm2 of 2.94 mum Erbium YAG laser power was delivered through solid baria doped CAG waveguide. Fiber strength testing was performed on the CAG fibers through four point bend testing. The best strength obtained was 1290 MPa for baria doped CAG. Glass stability was assessed using Differential Thermal Analysis. Fiber surface crystallization products were characterized using Energy Dispersive Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, a specially modified Hot Stage X-Ray, and Guinier Camera X-Ray Analysis. The surface crystallization analysis revealed the formation of Ca3Al2O6 in the silica doped CAG

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT FEATURE, EVENT, AND PROCESS (FEP) DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    G. Freeze; P. Swift; N. Brodsky

    2000-10-11

    A Total System Performance Assessment for Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) has recently been completed (CRWMS M&O, 2000b) for the potential high-level waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The TSPA-SR is an integrated model of scenarios and processes relevant to the postclosure performance of the potential repository. The TSPA-SR scenarios and model components in turn include representations of all features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified as being relevant (i.e., screened in) for analysis. The process of identifying, classifying, and screening potentially relevant FEPs thus provides a critical foundation for scenario development and TSPA analyses for the Yucca Mountain site (Swift et al., 1999). The objectives of this paper are to describe (a) the identification and classification of the comprehensive list of FEPs potentially relevant to the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository, and (b) the development, structure, and use of an electronic database for storing and retrieving screening information about the inclusion and/or exclusion of these Yucca Mountain FEPs in TSPA-SR. The FEPs approach to scenario development is not unique to the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). General systematic approaches are summarized in NEA (1992). The application of the FEPs approach in several other international radioactive waste disposal programs is summarized in NEA ( 1999).

  1. Near-infrared laser ablation of poly tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) sensitized by nanoenergetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yanqiang; Wang Shufeng; Sun Zhaoyong; Dlott, Dana D.

    2004-08-30

    Laser ablation of Teflon doped with size-selected (30-250 nm) Al nanoparticles is studied. Unlike pure Teflon, which requires a vacuum-ultraviolet or femtosecond excimer laser for ablation, this sensitized Teflon can be ablated with a near-infrared laser. Using 100 ps duration pulses, near-infrared ablation thresholds are lower by about a factor of 10 from excimer ablation of pure Teflon. A mechanism is discussed that involves Teflon decomposition by spherical shock fronts originating at each irradiated nanoparticle. Studies of the distance dependence of this process as a function of particle diameter and oxide layer thickness suggest ways of optimizing the ablation process.

  2. Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Spontaneous Wrinkling of Teflon AF.

    PubMed

    Scarratt, Liam R J; Hoatson, Ben S; Wood, Elliot S; Hawkett, Brian S; Neto, Chiara

    2016-03-16

    We report the fabrication of both single-scale and hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces, created by exploiting the spontaneous wrinkling of a rigid Teflon AF film on two types of shrinkable plastic substrates. Sub-100 nm to micrometric wrinkles were reproducibly generated by this simple process, with remarkable control over the size and hierarchy. Hierarchical Teflon AF wrinkled surfaces showed extremely high water repellence (contact angle 172°) and very low contact angle hysteresis (2°), resulting in droplets rolling off the surface at tilt angles lower than 5°. The wrinkling process intimately binds the Teflon AF layer with its substrate, making these surfaces mechanically robust, as revealed by macroscale and nanoscale wear tests: hardness values were close to that of commercial optical lenses and aluminum films, resistance to scratch was comparable to commercial hydrophobic coatings, and damage by extensive sonication did not significantly affect water repellence. By this fabrication method the size of the wrinkles can be reproducibly tuned from the nanoscale to the microscale, across the whole surface in one step; the fabrication procedure is extremely rapid, requiring only 2 min of thermal annealing to produce the desired topography, and uses inexpensive materials. The very low roll-off angles achieved in the hierarchical surfaces offer a potentially up-scalable alternative as self-cleaning and drag-reducing coatings. PMID:26910574

  3. Mobility of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, J. R.; Sonder, E.; Weeks, R. A.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    Transport of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel due to an applied electric field at approximately 1000 °C has been measured by observing changes in elemental concentrations near the cathode and anode surfaces using ion backscattering techniques. The results indicate that magnesium ions are the mobile species at 1000 °C and that these ions combine with ambient oxygen at the cathode surface to form a MgO layer. Quantitative interpretation of the data leads to the conclusion that the ionic transference number of spinel becomes approximately 0.5 after treatment in an electric field.

  4. Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Tappen

    2003-02-16

    The purpose of this revision of ''Evaluation of the Applicability of Biosphere-Related Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs)'' (BSC 2001) is to document the screening analysis of biosphere-related primary FEPs, as identified in ''The Development of Information Catalogued in REV00 of the YMP FEP Database'' (Freeze et al. 2001), in accordance with the requirements of the final U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR Part 63. This database is referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) FEP Database throughout this document. Those biosphere-related primary FEPs that are screened as applicable will be used to develop the conceptual model portion of the biosphere model, which will in turn be used to develop the mathematical model portion of the biosphere model. As part of this revision, any reference to the screening guidance or criteria provided either by Dyer (1999) or by the proposed NRC regulations at 64 FR 8640 has been removed. The title of this revision has been changed to more accurately reflect the purpose of the analyses. In addition, this revision will address Item Numbers 19, 20, 21, 25, and 26 from Attachment 2 of ''U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission/U.S. Department of Energy Technical Exchange and Management Meeting on Total System Performance Assessment and Integration (August 6 through 10, 2001)'' (Reamer 2001). This Scientific Analysis Report (SAR) does not support the current revision to the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001). Subsequent to the release of the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001), a series of reviews was conducted on both the FEP processes used to support Total System Performance Assessment for Site Recommendation and to develop the YMP FEP Database. In response to observations and comments from these reviews, particularly the NRC/DOE TSPA Technical Exchange in August 2001 (Reamer 2001), several Key Technical Issue (KTI) Agreements were developed. ''The Enhanced Plan for Features, Events and Processes

  5. The iron uptake repressor Fep1 in the fission yeast binds Fe-S cluster through conserved cysteines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Lok; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2016-09-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated since iron is an essential but toxic element in the cell. The GATA-type transcription factor Fep1 and its orthologs contribute to iron homeostasis in many fungi by repressing genes for iron uptake when intracellular iron is high. Even though the function and interaction partners of Fep1 have been elucidated extensively In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the mechanism behind iron-sensing by Fep1 remains elusive. It has been reported that Fep1 interacts with Fe-S-containing monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and Grx4-Fra2 complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Fep1 also binds iron, in the form of Fe-S cluster. Spectroscopic and biochemical analyses of as isolated and reconstituted Fep1 suggest that the dimeric Fep1 binds Fe-S clusters. The mutation study revealed that the cluster-binding depended on the conserved cysteines located between the two zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. EPR analyses revealed [Fe-S]-specific peaks indicative of mixed presence of [2Fe-2S], [3Fe-4S], or [4Fe-4S]. The finding that Fep1 is an Fe-S protein fits nicely with the model that the Fe-S-trafficking Grx4 senses intracellular iron environment and modulates the activity of Fep1. PMID:27444384

  6. Pack aluminization of nickel anode for molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, H. S.; Park, G. P.; Lim, J. H.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. K.; Moon, K. H.; Youn, J. H.

    1994-04-01

    The aluminum pack cementation (pack aluminization) process on a porous nickel anode for molten carbonate fuel cells has been studied to improve anode creep resistance. The porous nickel substrates used in this study were fabricated by doctor blade equipment followed by sintering (850 C). Packs surrounding the Ni anode were made by mixing Al2O3 powder, Al powder, and NaCl as activator. The pack aluminization was performed at 700 to 850 C for 0.5-5.0 h. After pack aluminization, the principal Ni-Al intermetallic compounds detected were Ni3Al at 700 C, NiAl at 750 C and Ni3Al2 at 800 C. The aluminum content in the aluminized Ni anode was proportional to the square root of pack aluminizing time. With increasing the Al content in the anode, the creep of the anode decreased. It was nearly constant (2.0%) when the Al content was above 5.0%. Although the exchange current density (24 mA/sq cm) for the aluminized (2.5 wt.%) Ni anode was somewhat lower than that of the pure Ni anode (40 mA/sq cm), the performance of a single cell using an aluminized Ni anode was similar to that of the one with pure Ni anode.

  7. Characterization of the Cobalamin and Fep Operons in Methylobium petrolphilum PM1

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J

    2005-09-06

    The bacterium Methylobium petroleophilum PM1 is economically important due to its ability to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a fuel additive. Because PM1 is a representative of all MTBE degraders, it is important to understand the transport pathways critical for the organism to survive in its particular environment. In this study, the cobalamin pathway and select iron transport genes will be characterized to help further understand all metabolic pathways in PM1. PM1 contains a total of four cobalamin operons. A single operon is located on the chromosome. Located on the megaplasmid are two tandem repeats of cob operons and a very close representative of the cob operon located on the chromosome. The fep operon, an iron transport mechanism, lies within the multiple copies of the cob operon. The cob operon and the fep operon appear to be unrelated except for a shared need for the T-on-B-dependent energy transduction complex to assist the operons in moving large molecules across the outer membrane of the cell. A genomic study of the cob and the fep operons with that of phylogenetically related organisms helped to confirm the identity of the cob and fep operons and to represent the pathways. More study of the pathways should be done to find the relationship that positions the two seemingly unrelated cob and fep genes together in what appears to be one operon.

  8. Sulfur and phosphorus in the Earth's core: The Fe-P-S system at 23 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, A. J.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2007-07-01

    Phosphorus is an important element believed to be present in the Earth's core. As a non-metal, its solubility in iron is limited, leading to the precipitation of phosphides at high concentrations. Here we present experimental results for the iron-rich portions of the Fe-P and Fe-P-S systems at 23 GPa. We find a Fe-P eutectic point occurring at 9 wt% P and 1275°C at 23 GPa. Up to 4 wt% P is soluble in the Fe-rich solid coexisting with the eutectic liquid at these conditions. The ternary Fe-P-S system displays a simple cotectic between the Fe-P and Fe-S binary eutectics with minimum melting temperature on the S-side at 1075°C. At subsolidus conditions there is complete solid solution between Fe3P and Fe3S. The high solubility of phosphorus in iron along with its miscibility in Fe3S and iron-sulfur liquids at high pressures, combined with expectation of only minor concentrations in planetary cores, indicate phosphorus will not form a distinct phase within terrestrial planet cores.

  9. Experimental impacts into Teflon targets and LDEF thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) exposed approximately 20 sq m of identical thermal protective blankets, predominantly on the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE). Approximately 700 penetration holes greater than 300 micron in diameter were individually documented, while thousands of smaller penetrations and craters occurred in these blankets. As a result of their 5.7 year exposure and because they pointed into a variety of different directions relative to the orbital motion of the nonspinning LDEF platform, these blankets can reveal important dynamic aspects of the hypervelocity particle environment in near-earth orbit. The blankets were composed of an outer teflon layer (approximately 125 micron thick), followed by a vapor-deposited rear mirror of silver (less than 1000 A thick) that was backed with an organic binder and a thermal protective paint (approximately 50 to 75 micron thick), resulting in a cumulative thickness (T) of approximately 175 to 200 microns for the entire blanket. Many penetrations resulted in highly variable delaminations of the teflon/metal or metal/organic binder interfaces that manifest themselves as 'dark' halos or rings, because of subsequent oxidation of the exposed silver mirror. The variety of these dark albedo features is bewildering, ranging from totally absent, to broad halos, to sharp single or multiple rings. Over the past year experiments were conducted over a wide range of velocities (i.e., 1 to 7 km/s) to address velocity dependent aspects of cratering and penetrations of teflon targets. In addition, experiments were performed with real LDEF thermal blankets to duplicate the LDEF delaminations and to investigate a possible relationship of initial impact conditions on the wide variety of dark halo and ring features.

  10. Terrestrial applications of FEP-encapsulated solar cell modules. [power systems using Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center program of transferring the FEP-encapsulated solar cell technology developed for the space program to terrestrial applications is presented. The electrical power system design and the array mechanical design are described, and power systems being tested are discussed. The latter are located at NOAA-RAMOS weather stations at Sterling, Va., and Mammoth Mountain, Calif.; on the roof of the Lewis Research Center; on a NOAA-Coast Guard buoy in the Gulf of Mexico; in a U.S. Forest Service mountaintop voice repeater station in the Inyo National Forest, Calif., and in a backpack charger for portable transmitter/receivers being used in the same place. Preliminary results of testing are still incomplete, but show that rime ice can cause cracks in modular cells without damaging the FEP though, which keeps the grid lines intact, and that electrically active elements of the module must be completely sealed from salt water to prevent FEP delamination.

  11. Modified Pechini synthesis of tricalcium aluminate powder

    SciTech Connect

    Voicu, Georgeta Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2012-11-15

    Tricalcium aluminate (Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}-C{sub 3}A) was obtained by a modified Pechini synthesis in order to eliminate successive thermal treatments and intermediate grinding usually performed between the two sintering steps and in order to reduce the sintering temperature. Our results indicated that pure C{sub 3}A was obtained, by a single step thermal treatment at 1300 Degree-Sign C for 4 h and 1350 Degree-Sign C for 1 h. The synthesis was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR and free lime analyses. The morphology of synthesised C{sub 3}A was assessed by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, HRTEM) and it was observed a high tendency of the particles to form aggregates and the individual particles seem to be single crystals. The bioactivity was assessed by specimen soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days; the hydrate (i.e. 3CaO Bullet-Operator Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Bullet-Operator 6H{sub 2}O formed at the C{sub 3}A surface), can act as nucleation centers for the resulted phosphate phases. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Pechini synthesis was used for obtained of tricalcium aluminate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A was obtained at 1300 Degree-Sign C/4 h and 1350 Degree-Sign C/1 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Were eliminated successive thermal treatments and intermediate grinding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of synthesised C{sub 3}A was assessed by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Was observed a high tendency of the particles to form aggregates.

  12. Roadmaps through free energy landscapes calculated using the multi-dimensional vFEP approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K; Huang, Ming; Wong, Kin-Yiu; York, Darrin M

    2014-01-14

    The variational free energy profile (vFEP) method is extended to two dimensions and tested with molecular simulation applications. The proposed 2D-vFEP approach effectively addresses the two major obstacles to constructing free energy profiles from simulation data using traditional methods: the need for overlap in the re-weighting procedure and the problem of data representation. This is especially evident as these problems are shown to be more severe in two dimensions. The vFEP method is demonstrated to be highly robust and able to provide stable, analytic free energy profiles with only a paucity of sampled data. The analytic profiles can be analyzed with conventional search methods to easily identify stationary points (e.g. minima and first-order saddle points) as well as the pathways that connect these points. These "roadmaps" through the free energy surface are useful not only as a post-processing tool to characterize mechanisms, but can also serve as a basis from which to direct more focused "on-the-fly" sampling or adaptive force biasing. Test cases demonstrate that 2D-vFEP outperforms other methods in terms of the amount and sparsity of the data needed to construct stable, converged analytic free energy profiles. In a classic test case, the two dimensional free energy profile of the backbone torsion angles of alanine dipeptide, 2D-vFEP needs less than 1% of the original data set to reach a sampling accuracy of 0.5 kcal/mol in free energy shifts between windows. A new software tool for performing one and two dimensional vFEP calculations is herein described and made publicly available. PMID:24505217

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hong, M. H.; Lu, Y. F.; Wu, D. J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T. C.

    2003-05-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences.

  14. Teflon Implants Versus Titanium Implants in Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    Otosclerosis is the most common cause of bilateral gradually progressive conductive hearing loss with normal tympanic membrane and Eustachian tube. Otosclerosis surgical treatment is one of the most gratifying operations in Otorhinolaryngology. It is not only the surgical techniques but also the prosthesis which are evolving in the attempt of providing best hearing results. Teflon piston is the most commonly employed prosthesis in stapes surgery. Titanium pistons are relatively the new development in the evolution of stapes prosthesis. The aim of this review article is to know and compare the surgical technicalities and postoperative outcomes including hearing improvement after the use of Teflon and titanium stapes piston. The adverse reactions occurred during follow-up were taken into consideration. The data in this article are supported by a Medline search. The use of both the prosthesis gave good results in cases of otosclerosis. The placement of titanium soft clip design was found easier than the earlier àWengen design of clip piston. PMID:27066403

  15. Proton Radiography of Shape Charge Jets Penetrating Teflon and Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferm, Eric N.; Burkett, Michael W.; Hull, Larry M.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; McNeil, Wendy V.; Morris, Chris L.; Rightley, Paul M.; Lansce Proton Radiography Team

    2011-06-01

    We have used proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to observe viper shaped charge jets penetrating inert and explosive materials. A viper jet was observed penetrating both Teflon and PBX 9501. Radiographs captured the penetration events at several times and are analyzed to determine the density of the materials imaged at each time. The interfaces and shock waves in the flow are clearly evident in the images. Multiple time images allow the determination of the velocities of the interfaces and shock waves. Comparisons are made in the Teflon case with estimates of penetration rates and densities using the quasi-steady approximation analysis used in many terminal ballistics models. The PBX 9501 clearly detonated from the impact of the shape charge jet tip traveling at 9.1 mm/s. The detonation wave is examined to see what support it obtains from the pursing jet and the jet is examined to find the influence of the explosive products on penetration velocity. This experiment gives us experimental results of in-situ penetration process that can be used to verify common modeling techniques and fluid mechanic calculations of the penetration process.

  16. [Study on the compatibility of slip casting aluminous ceramic crowns

    PubMed

    Wan, Q B; Xue, M; You, L; Du, C S; Chao, Y L

    1997-03-01

    One of the key factors for a good slip casting aluminous ceramic crown is good compatibility between its core material and the veneering porcelain.The chemical and thermal compatibility of two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems(In-Ceram and GI-I) were investigated by means of SEM and EDAX,thermal shock tests were also performed to evaluate the crazing resistance.The results showed: the crazing resistance of In-Ceram was 158 degrees centigrade,and that of GI-I was degrees centigrade;there existed tightly bonded interfaces between the slip casting aluminous ceramic cores and the veneering porcelains in both of the two systems,where ion transferences were found.The results also suggested good compatibility of the two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems. PMID:15159959

  17. Determination of neutron absorbed doses in lithium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Delfín Loya, A; Carrera, L M; Ureña-Núñez, F; Palacios, O; Bosch, P

    2003-04-01

    Lithium-based ceramics have been proposed as tritium breeders for fusion reactors. The lithium aluminate (gamma phase) seems to be thermally and structurally stable, the damages produced by neutron irradiation depend on the absorbed dose. A method based on the measurement of neutron activation of foils through neutron capture has been developed to obtain the neutron absorbed dose in lithium aluminates irradiated in the thermal column facility and in the fixed irradiation system of a Triga Mark III Nuclear Reactor. PMID:12672632

  18. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei Zhao Qinglin Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  19. Degradation of Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) Retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohammed, Jelila S.; deGroh, Kim, K.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) returned during Servicing Mission 4 are still being analyzed. Analysis has revealed degradation of optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, increased crystallinity, and reduction in fluorine/carbon ratio of aluminized-Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) FEP. These material properties can be affected by high temperatures on orbit, increased radiation exposure, and in some cases contamination from materials in close proximity to the insulation on orbit. Preliminary results support conclusions of previous studies: areas of Al-FEP that received higher levels of solar exposure show more degradation (high temperatures and radiation combined).

  20. 77 FR 48107 - Workshop on Performance Assessments of Near-Surface Disposal Facilities: FEPs Analysis, Scenario...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Radioactive Waste.'' These regulations were published in the Federal Register on December 27, 1982 (47 FR..., Environmental Protection and Performance Assessment Directorate, Division of Waste Management and Environmental...-Surface Disposal Facilities: FEPs Analysis, Scenario and Conceptual Model Development, and Code...

  1. A wood and bark fuel economics computer program (FEP). Forest service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harpole, G.B.; Ince, P.J.; Tschernitz, J.L.; Bilek, E.

    1982-09-01

    Forest products harvesting and manufacturing processes are expected to provide large and continuing supplies of wood and bark residues. At the same time, the demand for wood residue-type materials for production of wood-fiber based products as well as wood and bark fuels is expected to create competing utilization alternatives. Primary objectives of the fuel economics computer program (FEP) presented here are: (1) to provide a means for assessing the relative energy values of fossil fuels and wood/bark fuels, and (2) to provide pre-engineering assessments of the potential investment that may be justified by benefits gained through modification of systems to burn wood/bark fuels. The FEP computer program utilizes readily available fuel and economics information, standard combustion equations, and discounted cash flow analytic techniques. Because the FEP program is designed for preliminary assessments of wood/bark fuel use opportunities it is suggested that more advanced engineering and financial analytic methods be used for further evaluation whenever favorable venture likelihoods are indicated by the FEP program.

  2. Effective ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates in teflon bags

    SciTech Connect

    Capon, S.M.; Sacher, R.A.; Deeg, H.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Several plastic materials used in blood storage were evaluated for their ability to transmit ultraviolet B (UVB) light. A plastic bag manufactured from sheets of transparent Teflon efficiently (78-86%) transmitted UVB light and was employed in subsequent functional studies of lymphocytes and platelets exposed to UVB light while contained in these bags. In vitro experiments showed a UVB dose-dependent abrogation of lymphocyte responder and stimulator functions, with concurrent preservation of platelet aggregation responses. In a phase I pilot study, UVB-treated platelet concentrates were administered to four bone marrow transplant recipients. Adverse effects attributable to the transfusions were not observed, and patients showed clinically effective transfusion responses. No patient developed lymphocytotoxic HLA or platelet antibodies. These studies suggest that platelets can be effectively irradiated with UVB light in a closed system. However, numerous variables, including container material, volume and composition of contents, steady exposure versus agitation, and exact UV wavelength, must be considered.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. W.; Lu, Y. H.; Yi, J. B.; Feng, Y. P.; Herng, T. S.; Liu, X.; Gao, D. Q.; Xue, D. S.; Xue, J. M.; Ouyang, J. Y.; Ding, J.

    2012-03-01

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  4. Durability of monopolar Teflon-coated electromyographic needles.

    PubMed

    Mikolich, L M; Waylonis, G W

    1977-10-01

    The results of a two-year study on durability and cause of failure of electromyographic monopolar electrodes are reported. The electrodes were obtained from the regular stock of three different manufacturing sources. Durability is defined on the basis of the number of patients that could be examined before failure. The range was 3 to 110 with the averages 19.7, 33.8, and 62.5 for the three different manufacturers. Common causes of electrode failure included: Teflon retraction, 40.6%; tip dullness or burrs, 34.8%; structural failure of wire or pin, 13.1%; electrical artifacts, 9.7%; and bending of needle shank, 5.7%. Variations in manufactures' tip contour and bevel correlated with tip durability. PMID:907451

  5. Electrical properties of teflon and ceramic capacitors at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, A. N.; Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Overton, E.

    1992-01-01

    Space power systems and components are often required to operate efficiently and reliably in harsh environments where stresses, such as high temperature, are encountered. These systems must, therefore, withstand exposure to high temperature while still providing good electrical and other functional properties. Experiments were carried out to evaluate Teflon and ceramic capacitors for potential use in high temperature applications. The capacitors were characterized in terms of their capacitance and dielectric loss as a function of temperature, up to 200 C. At a given temperature, these properties were obtained in a frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kHz. DC leakage current measurements were also performed in a temperature range from 25 to 200 C. The results obtained are discussed and conclusions are made concerning the suitability of the capacitors studied for high temperature applications.

  6. Heat-enhanced peptide synthesis on Teflon-patterned paper.

    PubMed

    Deiss, Frédérique; Yang, Yang; Matochko, Wadim L; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-06-14

    In this report, we describe the methodology for 96 parallel organic syntheses of peptides on Teflon-patterned paper assisted by heating with an infra-red lamp. SPOT synthesis is an important technology for production of peptide arrays on a paper-based support for rapid identification of peptide ligands, epitope mapping, and identification of bio-conjugation reactions. The major drawback of the SPOT synthesis methodology published to-date is suboptimal reaction conversion due to mass transport limitations in the unmixed reaction spot. The technology developed in this report overcomes these problems by changing the environment of the reaction from static to dynamic (flow-through), and further accelerating the reaction by selective heating of the reaction support in contact with activated amino acids. Patterning paper with Teflon allows for droplets of organic solvents to be confined in a zone on the paper array and flow through the paper at a well-defined rate and provide a convenient, power-free setup for flow-through solid-phase synthesis and efficient assembly of peptide arrays. We employed an infra-red (IR) lamp to locally heat the cellulosic support during the flow-through delivery of the reagents to each zone of the paper-based array. We demonstrate that IR-heating in solid phase peptide synthesis shortened the reaction time necessary for amide bond formation down to 3 minutes; in some couplings of alpha amino acids, conversion rates increased up to fifteen folds. The IR-heating improved the assembly of difficult sequences, such as homo-oligomers of all 20 natural amino acids. PMID:27184468

  7. Secondary electron emission from electrically charged fluorinated-ethylene-propylene Teflon for normal and non-normal electron incidence. M.S. Thesis; [spacecraft thermal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budd, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary electron emission coefficient was measured for a charged polymer (FEP-Teflon) with normally and obliquely incident primary electrons. Theories of secondary emission are reviewed and the experimental data is compared to these theories. Results were obtained for angles of incidence up to 60 deg in normal electric fields of 1500 V/mm. Additional measurements in the range from 50 to 70 deg were made in regions where the normal and tangential fields were approximately equal. The initial input angles and measured output point of the electron beam could be analyzed with computer simulations in order to determine the field within the chamber. When the field is known, the trajectories can be calculated for impacting electrons having various energies and angles of incidence. There was close agreement between the experimental results and the commonly assumed theoretical model in the presence of normal electric fields for angles of incidence up to 60 deg. High angle results obtained in the presence of tangential electric fields did not agree with the theoretical models.

  8. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, J. L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430 C (806 F) was to 30 to 40 percent lower. The strength at 900 C (1652 F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900 C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  9. Modeling spherical explosions with aluminized energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoni, J.; Saurel, R.; Lefrançois, A.; Baudin, G.

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution and validation of a reactive flow model dedicated to the study of spherical explosions with an aluminized energetic material. Situations related to air blast as well as underwater explosions are examined. Such situations involve multiscale phenomena associated with the detonation reaction zone, the aluminium reaction zone, the shock propagation distance and the bubble oscillation period. A detonation tracking method is developed in order to avoid the detonation structure computation. An ALE formulation is combined to the detonation tracking method in order to solve the material interface between detonation products and the environment as well as shock propagation. The model and the algorithm are then validated over a wide range of spherical explosions involving several types of explosives, both in air and liquid water environment. Large-scale experiments have been done in order to determine the blast wave effects with explosive compositions of variable aluminium content. In all situations the agreement between computed and experimental results is very good.

  10. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430{degrees}C (806{degrees}F) was to 30 to 40% lower. The strength at 900{degrees}C (1652{degrees}F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900{degrees}C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  11. FT-IR TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR QUANTITATION OF AMMONIUM BISULFATE IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED ON TEFLON FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative measurement method for fine particle bisulfatein ammonium bisulfate collected from the ambient air onto Teflon filters is described. nfrared absorbance measurements of the Teflon filters are made before and after particle collection. ubtraction of the two spectra r...

  12. Neutron irradiation of polycrystalline yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and α-alumina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeft, E. A. C.; Konings, R. J. M.; Bakker, K.; Boshoven, J. G.; Hein, H.; Schram, R. P. C.; van Veen, A.; Conrad, R.

    1999-08-01

    Polycrystalline pellets of yttrium aluminate garnet (Y 3Al 5O 12), magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) and α-alumina (α-Al 2O 3) have been irradiated in the high flux reactor (HFR) at Petten to a neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10 26 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at a temperature of about 815 K. Volume changes smaller than 1% have been measured for Y 3Al 5O 12 and MgAl 2O 4. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results of Y 3Al 5O 12 show no difference between the unirradiated TEM samples and neutron-irradiated samples. For MgAl 2O 4, dislocation loops in some grains are found in the irradiated samples. TEM results of Al 2O 3 show a dense network of dislocation loops after neutron irradiation. The increase in volume is 4.2% for a neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10 26 m -2.

  13. Surface Modification of Nickel Foams by a Slurry Aluminizing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, H.; Papanastasiou, N.; Psyllaki, P.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsipas, D. N.; Tsipas, S. A.; Michailidis, N.

    2010-01-21

    A novel slurry-based process for aluminizing nickel foams while improving the mechanical properties and conserving the excellent ductility is reported. Cellular unalloyed nickel foams with 92% porosity and uniform pore size and distribution were used as a starting material. Several slurries of different compositions were examined to investigate the possibility of developing an aluminide-nickel intermetallic coating on a Ni foam without considerably degrading the original ductile properties of the foam. The process temperature was varying from 400 to 850 deg. C and the process holding time was ranging between 2h to 6h. Scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-Ray diffraction were applied to assess the effectiveness of the aluminizing process and determine both the optimum parameters of the procedure (slurry composition, holding temperature and time) and the concentration profiles across the coating cross-section. The mechanical behavior of the aluminized Ni-foams was evaluated by the conduction of micro-tension tests. The resulting Ni-foams after aluminization retain the pore structure of original Ni-foams and present a thick outer surface layer which consists of a range of aluminide phases. The mechanical properties of the Ni-foams aluminized in low process temperature were insignificantly affected.

  14. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  15. Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors, Version 4.0. Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.K.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T.

    1992-05-01

    The Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping & Instrumentation Diagram (FEP) editors allow the user to graphically build and edit fault trees, event trees, and piping & instrumentation diagrams (P & IDs). The software is designed to enable the use of graphical-based editors found in the Integrated Reliability and Risk Assessment System (IRRAS). FEP is made up of three separate editors (Fault Tree, Event Tree, and Piping & Instrumentation Diagram) and a utility module. This reference manual provides a screen-by-screen walkthrough of the entire FEP System.

  16. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  17. Parallel Syntheses of Peptides on Teflon-Patterned Paper Arrays (SyntArrays).

    PubMed

    Deiss, Frédérique; Yang, Yang; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-01

    Screening of peptides to find the ligands that bind to specific targets is an important step in drug discovery. These high-throughput screens require large number of structural variants of peptides to be synthesized and tested. This chapter describes the generation of arrays of peptides on Teflon-patterned sheets of paper. First, the protocol describes the patterning of paper with a Teflon solution to produce arrays with solvophobic barriers that are able to confine organic solvents. Next, we describe the parallel syntheses of 96 peptides on Teflon-patterned arrays using the SPOT synthesis method. PMID:26614081

  18. Development of aluminized coatings for MCFC wet seal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Singh, P.; Paetsch, L.; Maru, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) wet seal are has been found to experience accelerated corrosion in the presence of molten electrolyte because of simultaneous exposure to reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. Development of protective coatings plays an important role in minimizing this corrosion. Various aluminizing processes, such as flame spraying, slurry spraying, pack cementation, and ion vapor deposition, have been evaluated for their effectiveness. Continuous interdiffusion of aluminum and substrate Fe, Ni, and Cr occurred during high-temperature corrosion tests. Among the four aluminizing methods, ion-vapor deposition (IVD) with subsequent diffusion bonding appears to provide the most protective coating in the MCFC wet seal environment.

  19. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  20. Improvements in UV stability for FEP/Ag based thermal control materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieser, James; Maas, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    Darkening of FEP/Ag based Thermal Control (TC) materials after UV exposure has been documented for several years. This End of Life (EOL) Solar Absorptance (α) increase and the corresponding performance degradation must be taken into account in the preliminary design of spacecraft. Astral Technology Unlimited, Inc. (ATU) has developed new processes and coatings to improve the UV stability of FEP/Ag based TC materials. Test results of this development effort are presented. Data for several new coating combinations along with data on the current "Industry Standard" material are compared for up to 27,000 Equivalent Sun Hours (ESH) of UV exposure. The resulting solar absorptance improvements are very dramatic and should allow future satellite designs with the EOL solar alpha to be nearly identical to the Beginning of Life (BOL) values. Satellites using these new TC materials can have optimum thermal-optical performance for the life of the spacecraft.

  1. Development of sulfonated FEP Nafion hybrid proton exchange membranes for PEFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Fujii, K.; Mitani, N.; Matsuura, A.; Kakigi, T.; Muto, F.; Li, J.; Oshima, A.; Washio, M.

    2007-12-01

    The performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is affected by an interfacial property between a proton exchange membrane (PEM) and electrodes. Thus, to develop a well-laminated membrane electrode assembly (MEA), a hybrid PEM (FN) was fabricated by mixing a radiation grafted membrane (sulfonated FEP) with ionomer (Nafion ® dispersion) which is applied to coat the interface of the PEM and electrodes. The obtained FN, sulfonated FEP and Nafion ®112 were characterized in terms of water uptake, ion exchange capacity (IEC), polarization performance and electrochemical impedance. FN showed high IEC and water uptake, which would induce the highest ionic conductivity (IC) among tested PEMs. In terms of FN, the interface between the PEM and electrodes should have been improved because FN showed the lowest charge transfer resistance than other tested PEMs. The high IC and improved interface between the PEM and electrodes resulted in the best cell performance of FN in tested PEMs.

  2. IMPACT OF INCREASED ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2007-10-12

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. The protocols developed in this variability study are ideally suited as a tool to assess the impact of proposed changes to the processing flow sheet for Liquid Waste Operations (LWO). One such proposal that is currently under consideration is to introduce a leaching step in the treatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) sludge to remove aluminum prior to vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This leachate would significantly increase the soluble aluminate concentrations as well as the free hydroxide ion concentration in the salt feed that will be processed at the Saltstone Processing Facility (SPF). Consequently, an initial study of the impact of increased aluminate concentration on the Saltstone grout properties was performed. The projected compositions and ranges of the aluminate rich salt stream (which includes the blending strategy) are not yet available and consequently, in this initial report, two separate salt stream compositions were investigated. The first stream starts with the previously projected baseline composition of the salt solution that will be fed to SPF from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The second stream is the solution that results from washing of the current Tank 51 sludge and subsequent transfer of the salt solution to Tank 11. The SWPF simulant has higher nitrate and lower free hydroxide than the Tank 11 simulant. In both of these cases, the aluminate was varied up to a maximum of 0.40 to 0.45M aluminate in order to evaluate the impact of increasing aluminate ion concentration on the grout properties. In general, the fresh grout properties of mixes made with SWPF and Tank 11 simulants were relatively insensitive to an increase in aluminate concentration in the salt solutions. However, the overall

  3. Evidence of Ball-and-chain Transport of Ferric Enterobactin through FepA*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Kaserer, Wallace; Annamalai, Rajasekeran; Scott, Daniel C.; Jin, Bo; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Qiaobin; Maymani, Hossein; Massis, Liliana Moura; Ferreira, Luiz C. S.; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli iron transporter, FepA, has a globular N terminus that resides within a transmembrane β-barrel formed by its C terminus. We engineered 25 cysteine substitution mutations at different locations in FepA and modified their sulfhydryl side chains with fluorescein maleimide in live cells. The reactivity of the Cys residues changed, sometimes dramatically, during the transport of ferric enterobactin, the natural ligand of FepA. Patterns of Cys susceptibility reflected energy- and TonB-dependent motion in the receptor protein. During transport, a residue on the normally buried surface of the N-domain was labeled by fluorescein maleimide in the periplasm, providing evidence that the transport process involves expulsion of the globular domain from the β-barrel. Porin deficiency much reduced the fluoresceination of this site, confirming the periplasmic labeling route. These data support the previously proposed, but never demonstrated, ball-and-chain theory of membrane transport. Functional complementation between a separately expressed N terminus and C-terminal β-barrel domain confirmed the feasibility of this mechanism. PMID:17056600

  4. Passive immunization by recombinant ferric enterobactin protein (FepA) from Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Larrie-Bagha, Seyed Mehdi; Rasooli, Iraj; Mousavi-Gargari, Seyed Latif; Rasooli, Zohreh; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been recognized as a major food borne pathogen responsible for frequent hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Cattle are important reservoirs of E. coli O157:H7, in which the organism colonizes the intestinal tract and is shed in the feces. Objective Vaccination of cattle has significant potential as a pre-harvest intervention strategy for E. coli O157:H7. The aim of this study was to evaluate active and passive immunization against E. coli O157:H7 using a recombinant protein. Materials and Methods The recombinant FepA protein induced by IPTG was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Antibody titre was determined by ELISA in FepA immunized rabbits sera. Sera collected from vaccinated animals were used for bacterial challenge in passive immunization studies. Results The results demonstrate that passive immunization with serum raised against FepA protects rabbits from subsequent infection. Conclusion Significant recognition by the antibody of ferric enterobactin binding protein may lead to its application in the restriction of Enterobacteriaceae propagation. PMID:23825727

  5. Theoretical study of atomic transport via interstitials in dilute Fe-P alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Fu, Chu-Chun; Barbu, A.; Gao, F.; Willaime, F.

    2007-03-01

    By combining density functional theory, empirical potential, and atomic transport model approaches, we investigate the energetics and the diffusion properties of P interstitials in dilute Fe-P alloys. Although P is a substitutional impurity in α -iron, when a self-interstitial atom (SIA) approaches a substitutional P, the P atom becomes interstitial with an energy gain of up to 1.0eV . The octahedral and the ⟨110⟩ mixed dumbbell are the lowest-energy configurations with similar stabilities. The P atoms are highly mobile in both configurations. The transitions between these two configurations also require low activation energies. The most likely mechanisms leading to long-distance diffusion of a P interstitial are proposed by ab initio calculations. The resulting effective diffusion energy estimated by the transport model is 0.19eV , which agrees with the result from resistivity recovery experiments, suggesting that the Fe-P mixed dumbbells are more mobile than the SIAs. The fast-migrating P interstitial can be deeply trapped by a substitutional P atom. The resulting complexes are very stable with a binding energy of around 1.0eV . Their mobilities are investigated by means of the dimer method using an Fe-P empirical potential. A comparison between the present predictions and existing experimental results is also discussed.

  6. Analysis of Ag/FEP Control Blanket Performance from Multiple Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Normand, E.; Wol, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Published data reporting the change in solar absorptance as a function of time on orbit for certain satellites has been re-examined. The optical property change of metallized FEP as a function of total particulate radiation dose received by specific satellites has been estimated. Results tend to follow a common trend and a design curve has been constructed to estimate solar absorptance change as a function of radiation dose for metallized FEP at any altitude. Effects due to apparent contamination on several of the satellites are addressed and taken into account in determining property changes. Data from LDEF, ML-101, NavStar 1-5, NTS-2, the SCATHA experiment, and SOLRAD 11 are used as the basis of the design curve. A similar comparison is made between published atomic oxygen recession data from numerous Space Shuttle flights, a LEO experiment flown by Lockheed, and LDEF results. Variation of atomic oxygen recession rate of FEP as a function of exposure conditions is determined.

  7. Evaluation of non-specular reflecting silvered Teflon and filled adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, G.; Cox, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A non-specular silver-Teflon tape thermal control coating was tested to provide the data necessary to qualify it for use on the Space Shuttle Orbiter radiators. Effects of cure cycle temperature and pressure on optical and mechanical properties on the silver-Teflon tape were evaluated. The baseline Permacel P-223 adhesive, used with the specular silver-Teflon tape initially qualified for the Orbiter radiators, and four alternate metal-filled and unfilled adhesives were evaluated. Tests showed the cure process has no effect on the silver-Teflon optical properties, and that the baseline adhesive cure cycle gives best results. In addition the P-223 adhesive bond is more reproducible than the alternates, and the non-specular tape meets both the mechanical and the optical requirements of the Orbiter radiator coating specification. Existing Orbiter coating techniques were demonstrated to be effective in aplying the non-specular tape to a curved panel simulating the radiators. Author

  8. Deposition of superhydrophobic nanostructured Teflon-like coating using expanding plasma arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyaprasad, A.; Jain, V.; Nema, S. K.

    2007-04-01

    A novel approach was used to grow nanostructured Teflon-like superhydrophobic coatings on stainless steel (SS). In this method Teflon tailings were pyrolyzed to generate fluorocarbon precursor molecules, and an expanding plasma arc (EPA) was used to polymerize these precursors to deposit Teflon-like coating. The coating shows super hydrophobic behavior with water contact angle (WCA) of 165°. The coating was observed to be uniform. It consists of nanostructured (˜80-200 nm) features, which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The chemical bond state of the film was determined by XPS and FTIR, which indicate the dominance of -CF 2 groups in the deposited coating. The combination of nanofeature induced surface roughness and the low surface energy imparted by Teflon-like coating is responsible for the observed superhydrophobic nature.

  9. The development of an inert simulant for HNS/teflon explosive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elban, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    The report describes the development and evaluation of an inert simulant for the thermally stable, heat-resistant plastic-bonded explosive HNS/Teflon. The simulant is made by dry blending vinylidene fluoride, melamine and Teflon which when compared has a pressed density and thermal properties corresponding closely to the explosive. In addition, the machinability and handling characteristics of the simulant are similar to the explosive.

  10. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature. he nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C, where sintering progresses rapidly. The kinetics of the...

  11. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing Al(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (III-VII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation (pH 10-14) of actinides in presence of Al(III) formation of alumi...

  12. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  13. A phase-field study of the aluminizing of nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, T.; Erdeniz, D.; Dunand, D. C.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative phase-field approach for multiphase systems that is based upon CALPHAD free energies is used to model the aluminization of nickel wires, wherein vapour-phase alloying is used to deposit Al on the surface of the Ni wire and then the wire is annealed so that to remove all Al gradients and achieve a homogenous Ni-Al alloy. Both processes are modelled and numerical results are compared with experiments. It is found that the kinetics of both processes is controlled by bulk diffusion. During aluminization at 1273 K, formation and growth of intermetallics, Ni2Al3 NiAl and Ni3Al, are strongly dependent on the Al content in the vapour phase. Ni2Al3 growth is very fast compared with NiAl and Ni3Al. It is also found that an intermediate Al content in the vapour phase is preferable for aluminization, since the Ni2Al3 coating thickness is difficult to control. Ni2Al3 is found to disappear in a few minutes during homogenization at 1373 K. Thereafter, the NiAl phase, in which the composition is highly non-uniform after aluminization, continues growing until the supersaturation in this phase vanishes. Then, NiAl coating disappears concomitantly with the growth of Ni3Al, which disappears thereafter. Finally, the Al concentration profile in Ni(Al) homogenizes.

  14. DNA adsorption onto calcium aluminate and silicate glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Krista; Flick, Lisa; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common technique for small-scale isolation of genomic DNA is via adsorption of the DNA molecules onto a silica scaffold. In this work, the isolation capacities of calcium aluminate based glasses were compared against a commercially available silica scaffold. Silica scaffolds exhibit a negative surface at the physiological pH values used during DNA isolation (pH 5-9), while the calcium aluminate glass microspheres exhibit a positive surface charge. Isolation data demonstrates that the positively charged surface enhanced DNA adsorption over the negatively charged surface. DNA was eluted from the calcium aluminate surface by shifting the pH of the solution to above its IEP at pH 8. Iron additions to the calcium aluminate glass improved the chemical durability without compromising the surface charge. Morphology of the glass substrate was also found to affect DNA isolation; 43-106 μm diameter soda lime silicate microspheres adsorbed a greater quantity of genomic DNA than silica fibers with an average diameter of ∼2 μm. PMID:24309135

  15. The effect of Teflon coating on the resistance to sliding of orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Giampietro; Maijer, Rolf; Carìa, Maria Paola; Esposito, Luca; Alberzoni, Dario; Cacciatore, Giorgio

    2012-08-01

    Teflon is an anti-adherent and aesthetic material. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the influence of Teflon coating on the resistance to sliding (RS) of orthodontic archwires. For this purpose, Teflon-coated archwires were examined using frictional resistance tests by means of a universal testing machine and compared with conventional uncoated wires. Twelve types of archwires with round and rectangular sections (0.014, 0.018, and 0.018 × 0.025 inches) and of different materials (stainless steel and nickel-titanium) were tested with two passive self-ligating brackets (SmartClip™ and Opal(®)) and one active self-ligating bracket (Quick(®)). Each archwire-bracket combination was tested 10 times under 8 simulated clinical scenarios. Statistical comparisons were conducted between the uncoated and Teflon-coated archwires using Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests, and linear regression analysis. For all bracket-archwire combinations, Teflon-coated archwires resulted lower friction than the corresponding uncoated archwires (P < 0.01). The results showed that Teflon coating has the potential to reduce RS of orthodontic archwires. PMID:21478301

  16. Application of FEPs analysis to identify research priorities relevant to the safety case for an Australian radioactive waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.E.; McGlinn, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has established a project to undertake research relevant to the safety case for the proposed Australian radioactive waste facility. This facility will comprise a store for intermediate level radioactive waste, and either a store or a near-surface repository for low-level waste. In order to identify the research priorities for this project, a structured analysis of the features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to the performance of the facility was undertaken. This analysis was based on the list of 137 FEPs developed by the IAEA project on 'Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities' (ISAM). A number of key research issues were identified, and some factors which differ in significance for the store, compared to the repository concept, were highlighted. For example, FEPs related to long-term groundwater transport of radionuclides are considered to be of less significance for a store than a repository. On the other hand, structural damage from severe weather, accident or human interference is more likely for a store. The FEPs analysis has enabled the scientific research skills required for the inter-disciplinary project team to be specified. The outcomes of the research will eventually be utilised in developing the design, and assessing the performance, of the future facility. It is anticipated that a more detailed application of the FEPs methodology will be undertaken to develop the safety case for the proposed radioactive waste management facility. (authors)

  17. Higher stabilities of positive and negative charge on tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) electrets treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, D.; Rychkov, A.; Efimov, N.; Malygin, A.; Gerhard, R.

    2013-08-01

    Tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films were treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor in a molecular-layer deposition process. As a result of the surface treatment, significant improvements of the thermal and temporal charge stability were observed. Charge-decay measurements revealed enhancements of the half-value temperatures and the relaxation times of positively charged FEP electrets by at least 120 °C and two orders of magnitude, respectively. Beyond previous publications on fluoropolymer electrets with surface modification, we here report enhanced charge stabilities of the FEP films charged in negative as well as in positive corona discharges. Even though the improvement for negatively charged FEP films is moderate (half-value temperature about 20 °C higher), our experiments show that the asymmetry in positive and negative charge stability that is typical for FEP electrets can be overcome by means of chemical surface treatments. The results are discussed in the context of the formation of modified surface layers with enhanced charge-trapping properties.

  18. Bonding of teflon to metals. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the adhesion of Teflon to metal. Adhesion strength, bond mechanisms, and the effects on friction and lubrication are discussed. Metal films applied to Teflon products and Teflon films joined to metal are discussed. Joining processes, surface treatments, and reasons for failure are examined. Applications discussed include bearings, pipe linings, and bridge coatings. (Contains a minimum of 75 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. [Teflon granuloma after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root in a patient with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, D A; Kulikova, E V; Moysak, G I; Voronina, E I; Ageeva, T A

    2016-01-01

    The use of a Teflon implant for Jannetta surgery in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is complicated in rare cases by the development of a Teflon granuloma and can cause recurrent facial pain. The article presents a clinical case of a Teflon granuloma developed after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root, describes the surgical findings and histological picture, and analyzes the literature, causes of granuloma development, and recommendations for treatment of these patients. PMID:27070261

  20. Nylon and teflon scribe effect on NBR to Chemlok 233 and NBR to NBR bond interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study was requested by Manufacturing Engineering to determine what effects marking with nylon (6/6) and Teflon scribes may have on subsequent bonding. Witness panel bond specimens were fabricated by the development lab to test both acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to Chemlok and NBR to NBR after controlled exposure. The nylon rod used as a scribe tool demonstrates virtually no bond deterioration when used to scribe lines on either the Chemlok to NBR surfaces or the NBR to NBR interface. Lab test results indicate that the nylon rod-exposed samples produce tensile and peel values very similar to the control samples and the Teflon exposed samples produce tensile and peel values much lower than the control samples. Visual observation of the failure surfaces of the tested samples shows that Teflon scribing produces an obvious contamination to the surface and the nylon produces no effect. Photographs of test samples are provided. It is concluded that Teflon stock used as a scribe tool on a Chemlok 233 to NBR surface or an NBR to NBR surface has a detrimental effect on the bond integrity on either of these bond interfaces. Therefore, it is recommended that the nylon rod continue to be used where a scribe line is required in the redesigned solid rocket motor segment insulation layup operations. The use of Teflon scribes should not be considered.

  1. Effect of X irradiation on optical properties of Teflon-AF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, M. S.; Ermer, D. R.; Cooke, D. W.

    1993-03-01

    Radiation effects in optical-grade amorphous fluoropolymer, Teflon-AF, is investigated by UV-visible absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. When irradiated with low-energy (40 kVp) X-rays at room temperature in air, Teflon-AF is found to develop a broad, structureless UV-absorption band in the wavelength interval 200-350 nm. While the UV absorption increases as a function of X-ray dose, with relative rates of approx 2 × 10 -5 Gy -1 (1 × 10 -5 Gy -1) in Teflon-AF 1600 (Teflon-AF 2400), its optical transparency for a given dose of 67.5 kGy, however, remains unaffected. Additional measurements conducted using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique reveal that the observed UV absorption is caused by the X-ray induced peroxy radical (POO .˙). The results also suggest that the inclusion of dioxole monomer in the PTFE chain not only improves the optical clarity of Teflon-AF, as reported, but also increases its radiation tolerance. During a post-irradiation storage in air at RT for about 30 days the peroxy radical is observed to decay, with a concomitant decrease in UV absorption. A tentative model is proposed to explain the radiation damage and recovery mechanisms.

  2. Convenient surface functionalization of whole-Teflon chips with polydopamine coating

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo; Xiong, Bin; Wu, Hongkai

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a convenient strategy to modify the surface of whole-Teflon microfluidic chips by coating the channel walls with a thin layer of polydopamine (PDA) film, which is formed by oxidation-induced self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline solution. Two coating strategies, static incubation and dynamic flow, are demonstrated and used for tuning the physical and chemical properties of the coated channel walls. The functionalized surfaces were investigated with the contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy measurements. The coating time was optimized according to the fluorescent intensity of the green fluorescent protein immobilized on the modified surface. Applications of the PDA-modified Teflon microchips in bioanalysis were demonstrated with a typical sandwich immunoassay. Moreover, long-term cell culture experiments on modified and native Teflon chips revealed that the chip biocompatibility can be greatly improved with PDA coating. The results indicate that the surface properties of the Teflon can be easily controlled by the PDA modification, thus greatly expanding the application scope of whole-Teflon chips for various chemical and biological research fields. PMID:26339312

  3. Study of Detonation and Cylinder Velocities for Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest

    2005-07-01

    The detonation properties of aluminized explosives have been studied using experimental data available in the literature and EXP-6 thermo-chemical potential calculations with the JAGUAR computer program. It has been found that the observed detonation velocity behavior for aluminized explosives can be accurately represented by a reaction zone model in which unreacted aluminum is initially in equilibrium with H-C-N-O compounds. The JAGUAR procedures have been modified to represent the aluminum reaction zone behavior and to enable specified temperature differences between the gas and aluminum particles in the initial portion of this reaction zone. The modified procedures enable isentropic expansion for incomplete or complete aluminum reaction in the zone, and result in close agreement with experimental cylinder test data for several explosives. In order to aid in the application of the model, constants of thermodynamic equations of state are related to the extent of aluminum reaction.

  4. Study of Detonation and Cylinder Velocities for Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard I.; Baker, Ernest L.; Capellos, Christos

    2006-07-01

    The detonation properties of aluminized explosives have been studied using experimental data and EXP-6 thermo-chemical potential calculations with the JAGUAR computer program. It has been found that the observed detonation velocity behavior for aluminized explosives can be accurately represented by a reaction zone model in which unreacted aluminum is initially in equilibrium with H-C-N-O compounds. The JAGUAR procedures have been modified to represent the reaction zone behavior and to enable specified temperature differences between the gas and aluminum particles in the initial portion of this reaction zone. The modified procedures enable isentropic expansion for incomplete or complete aluminum reaction in the zone, and result in close agreement with experimental cylinder test data.

  5. A reactive flow model for heavily aluminized cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bohoon; Lee, Kyung-Cheol; Yoh, Jack J.; Park, Jungsu

    2014-07-14

    An accurate and reliable prediction of reactive flow is a challenging task when characterizing an energetic material subjected to an external shock impact as the detonation transition time is on the order of a micro second. The present study aims at investigating the size effect behavior of a heavily aluminized cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX) which contains 35% of aluminum by using a detonation rate model that includes ignition and growth mechanisms for shock initiation and subsequent detonation. A series of unconfined rate stick tests and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are conducted to construct the size effect curve which represents the relationship between detonation velocity and inverse radius of the charge. A pressure chamber test is conducted to further validate the reactive flow model for predicting the response of a heavily aluminized high explosive subjected to an external impact.

  6. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  7. Statistical Modeling of the Industrial Sodium Aluminate Solutions Decomposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, Živan; Mihajlović, Ivan; Djurić, Isidora; Štrbac, Nada

    2010-10-01

    This article presents the results of the statistical modeling of industrial sodium aluminate solution decomposition as part of the Bayer alumina production process. The aim of this study was to define the correlation dependence of degree of the aluminate solution decomposition on the following parameters of technological processes: concentration of the Na2O (caustic), caustic ratio and crystallization ratio, starting temperature, final temperature, average diameter of crystallization seed, and duration of decomposition process. Multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used as the tools for the mathematical analysis of the indicated problem. On the one hand, the attempt of process modeling, using MLRA, resulted in a linear model whose correlation coefficient was equal to R 2 = 0.731. On the other hand, ANNs enabled, to some extent, better process modeling, with a correlation coefficient equal to R 2 = 0.895. Both models obtained using MLRA and ANNs can be used for the efficient prediction of the degree of sodium aluminate solution decomposition, as the function of the input parameters, under industrial conditions of the Bayer alumina production process.

  8. Aluminum hydroxide nucleation kinetics and mechanism during the electrodialysis decomposition of aluminate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Yu. A.; Gorichev, I. G.; Todorov, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    The kinetic laws of the electrodialysis decomposition of strong aluminate solutions are considered. Mathematical simulation is performed using the equations of the heterogeneous kinetics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation for the electrodialysis of aluminate solutions, and this simulation shows that the nature of the limiting stage is related to the instantaneous nucleation during the three-dimensional coalescence of particles. The electrodialysis precipitate is analyzed, and the possible commercial application of the decomposition of strong aluminate solutions by electrodialysis is considered.

  9. [Case of polymer fume fever with interstitial pneumonia caused by inhalation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon)].

    PubMed

    Son, Masami; Maruyama, Eiichi; Shindo, Yuichiro; Suganuma, Nobukazu; Sato, Shinji; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    A 30-year old man was admitted to our hospital with cough, slight fever, and dyspnea that he had developed several hours after inhaling the fumes produced from a Teflon-coated pan, after evaporation of the water in the pan. Chest radiography revealed diffuse infiltrations, and a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed patchy interstitial shadows in both lungs. In pulmonary function tests, the diffusing capacity of the lungs showed a moderate decrease. Leukocytosis and slight hypoxemia were observed. The patient recovered clinically in a few days without any specific treatment. We speculated that the pulmonary problems in this patient may have been induced by the products of thermal degradation of Teflon that were present in the fumes. When Teflon is heated, the fumes generated cause an influenza like syndrome (polymer fume fever) or cause severe toxic effects such as pulmonary edema, pneumonitis, and death in the exposed individual. PMID:16922460

  10. Mechanical impact tests of materials in oxygen effects of contamination. [Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of contaminants on the mechanical impact sensitivity of Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum in a high-pressure oxygen environment was investigated. Uncontaminated Teflon did not ignite under the test conditions. The liquid contaminants - cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmaker dye - caused Teflon to ignite. Raising the temperature lowered the impact energy required for ignition. Stainless steel was insensitive to ignition under the test conditions with the contaminants used. Aluminum appeared to react without contaminants under certain test conditions; however, contamination with cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmakers dye increased the sensitivity of aluminum to mechanical impact. The grit contaminants silicon dioxide and copper powder did not conclusively affect the sensitivity of aluminum.

  11. Thin teflon-like films for eliminating adhesion in released polysilicon microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.K.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a method for depositing thin Teflon-like films using a commercial plasma reactor to eliminate adhesion or stiction in released polysilicon microstructures. A Lam 384T oxide etch system is used in a remote plasma mode with commercially available trifluoromethane (CHF{sub 3}) to deposit thin hydrophobic films around and under released microstructures. Hard, uniform, Teflon-like films which penetrate into undercuts beneath structures have been produced. Thus far, surfaces beneath gears as large as 1600 micron diameter with a gap of 2.0 microns are hydrophobic after being exposed to plasma treatment. These Teflon-like coatings have been shown to reduce the coefficient of friction from 1.0 to 0.07.

  12. Fluoresceination of FepA during Colicin B Killing: Effects of Temperature, Toxin and TonB

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Chuck R.; Marco, Amparo Gala; Xiao, Qiaobin; Trinh, Vy; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the reactivity of 35 genetically engineered Cys sulfhydryl groups at different locations in Escherichia coli FepA. Modification of surface loop residues by fluorescein maleimide (FM) was strongly temperature-dependent in vivo, whereas reactivity at other sites was much less affected. Control reactions with bovine serum albumin showed that the temperature dependence of loop residue reactivity was unusually high, indicating that conformational changes in multiple loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7, L8, L10) transform the receptor to a more accessible form at 37 °C. At 0 °C colicin B binding impaired or blocked labeling at 8 of 10 surface loop sites, presumably by steric hindrance. Overall, colicin B adsorption decreased the reactivity of more than half of the 35 sites, in both the N - and C- domains of FepA. However, colicin B penetration into the cell at 37 °C did not augment the chemical modification of any residues in FepA. The FM modification patterns were similarly unaffected by the tonB locus. FepA was expressed at lower levels in a tonB host strain, but when we accounted for this decrease its FM-labeling was comparable whether TonB was present or absent. Thus we did not detect TonB-dependent structural changes in FepA, either alone or when it interacted with colicin B at 37 °C. The only changes in chemical modification were reductions from steric hindrance when the bacteriocin bound to the receptor protein. The absence of increases in the reactivity of N-domain residues argues against the idea (Devanathan and Postle, Mol. Microbiol. 65: 441–453, 2007) that the colicin B polypeptide traverses the FepA channel. PMID:19432807

  13. MUTAGENICITY OF TEFLON-COATED GLASS FIBER FILTERS: A POTENTIAL PROBLEM AND SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Teflon-coated glass fiber filters, used in studies of airborne particulate matter, were tested for mutagenic activity using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome (Ames) assay. For each sample, eight blank filters were simultaneously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), and the extr...

  14. Electroejaculation using standard nerve stimulation equipment and Teflon-coated needles.

    PubMed

    Ozkurkcugil, C; Cardenas, D; Hartsell, C; Berger, R E

    1993-12-01

    We attempted transperineal needle electroejaculation using a Digistim nerve stimulator and Teflon-coated needles in 12 anejaculatory men. We obtained semen in 11 men. Five of the 12 men also underwent electroejaculation using a transrectal probe. Comparable semen parameters were obtained by transrectal probe and transperineal needles. PMID:8243692

  15. An investigation of the adhesive bonding of Teflon solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayl, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of introducing organic agents into silicone resins to stabilize these materials against the ravages of ultraviolet radiation is presented. A screening of coating materials, cover materials and ultraviolet screening agents is described. Fabrication processes were developed for the application of thin 25 micrometer coatings to Teflon. Temperature shock and temperature-humidity tests were conducted.

  16. Placement of Teflon Sponges in Microvascular Decompression Procedure for Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm.

    PubMed

    Nan-Xiang, Xiong; Lv-An, Chen; Zhi-Jun, Chen; Hong-Yang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Background Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is generally treated by microvascular decompression (MVD). Inadequate separation of vessel and nerve or adhesive inflammation surrounding the nerve root may cause recurrence. Objective To explore a method to reduce the incidence of adhesions and to ensure sufficient separation of the offending vessel and nerve during MVD. Methods Fifty-one patients diagnosed with HFS were studied. During the MVD procedure, Teflon sponges were placed between the offending vessels and medulla oblongata to push compressing vessels away from the facial nerve without contacting the nerve. Results Our method of placement of the Teflon sponge effectively shifts the compressing artery and ensures that both the Teflon sponge and offending vessels do not contact the root exit zone. This method also ensures that the Teflon sponge is fixed in place. Conclusion The technique described for the treatment of HFS provides an effective, safe, and durable resolution to patient symptoms that minimizes surgical complications and may be useful in treating HFS. PMID:25798798

  17. Demonstrating a Lack of Reactivity Using a Teflon-Coated Pan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates the chemical resistance of polytetrafluoroethene to mineral acids using an ordinary Teflon-coated frying pan. The demonstration can also be used to lead to a discussion of the long lifetimes of fluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere and their roles in the breakdown of the ozone layer. (AIM)

  18. Complications of intravenous therapy: a randomized prospective study--Vialon vs. Teflon.

    PubMed

    McKee, J M; Shell, J A; Warren, T A; Campbell, V P

    1989-01-01

    For the past two decades, the vast majority of vascular-access devices used in I.V. catheterization have been made of Teflon material. More recent developments in material science have produced the Vialon biomaterial currently used in the Insyte I.V. catheter. This prospective, randomized study compared the length of venous dwell time and rate of I.V.-related complications of Teflon peripheral I.V. catheters and Vialon peripheral I.V. catheters. The study population included only the most difficult peripheral I.V. access patients. Conditions of insertion, monitoring, and care were carefully controlled by the investigators. An alternate assignment scheme was used for randomization of eligible patients. Of 247 catheters evaluated over a six-week period in a 550-bed community tertiary care hospital, 191 were evaluable; of these, equivalent numbers were made of Vialon and Teflon. This investigation found that the incidence of phlebitis in the group receiving Vialon I.V. catheters was 36 percent lower than that of the group receiving Teflon I.V. catheters. PMID:2677289

  19. Evaluation of commercially supplied silver coated Teflon for spacecraft temperature control usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A series of tests are described which were performed to evaluate the acceptability of a commercially supplied silver backed teflon thermal control coating relative to teflon previously coated at GSFC. Optical measurements made on numerous samples indicate that the commercial material possesses an average solar absorptance of 0.085, an emittance of 0.76 and an average alpha/epsilon equal to 0.112, all of which are equivalent to the GSFC coated teflon. The emittance of the protective inconel backing was found to be 0.037. The coating is shown to have good adhesion at the Ag-teflon interface and exposure to UV irradiation uncovered no coating irregularities. Temperature cycling over the range -135 C to +200 C produced crazing in the evaporated Ag layer as expected but no delamination was observed. The suitability of Mystik no. 7366 and 3M no. 467 adhesives as bonding agents for the metallized polymer is demonstrated. Various problems associated with production reproducibility and selection of a proper bonding process are discussed.

  20. Sorption of Water/Methanol on Teflon and Hydrocarbon Proton Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Chenfeng; Mighri, Frej; Guiver, Michael D; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2016-05-18

    The sorption of water and methanol droplets on Teflon films, as well as on various representative classes of hydrocarbon-based proton exchange membranes (PEMs) was investigated using contact angle measurement (drop shape method) during wetting under ambient open-air conditions. Teflon films exhibited constant hydrophobic surfaces when contacted with water, but a significant sorption of methanol. The PEMs showed slow sorption of water, and a significant sorption of methanol. The differences in sorption of water and methanol on Teflon and PEMs arose from the match/compatibility in the surface free energies as well as polarities between a liquid and a membrane. The significant discrepancies in surface free energies and polarities between water (72.0 mJ m(-2) and 70.1%, respectively) and Teflon film (14.0 mJ m(-2) and 4.9%, respectively) lead to a highly hydrophobic surface and no discernible sorption of water on Teflon films, while the relative similarity or minor discrepancy in surface free energies and polarities between methanol (22.5 mJ m(-2) and 17.0%, respectively) and Teflon film (14.0 mJ m(-2) and 4.9%, respectively) results in a significant sorption of methanol on Teflon. The surface free energies of PEMs were calculated using the harmonic-mean approach, based on contact angle measurements using both water and diiodomethane as probes. The results show that PEMs have initial surface free energies ranging from 44.1 to 54.0 mJ m(-2) along with polarities in the range of 20.8 to 29.1%, for a selection of typical sulfonated polymers. The surface free energies of ionomers were principally contributed to by the nonpolar component, but the presence of polar groups in the polymer increased the polar component, leading to an increase in surface free energy. Of the PEMs investigated, sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether nitrile) has a higher surface energy than those of other ionomers with similar sulfonate contents. The compatibility between water/methanol and PEMs was

  1. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... earth doped (generic). 721.10423 Section 721.10423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  2. Biocompatibility and durability of Teflon-coated platinum-iridium wires implanted in the vitreous cavity.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Xie, Ping; Terasawa, Yasuo; Ozawa, Motoki; Kamei, Motohiro; Nishida, Kohji

    2011-12-01

    Teflon-coated platinum-iridium wires are placed in the vitreous as electrodes in artificial vision systems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these wires have toxicity in the vitreous cavity, and to examine the durability of their coating when grasped by forceps. Rabbits were implanted with platinum-iridium wires that were 50 μm in diameter and coated with Teflon to a total diameter of 68 or 100 μm. To examine the biocompatibility, electroretinograms (ERGs) and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed before and 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the implantation of the electrode. After 6 months, the eyes were histologically examined with light microscopy. To check the durability, the surface of a coated wire was examined with scanning electron microscopy after grasping with different types of forceps. At all times after the implantation the amplitudes and implicit times of the ERGs recorded were not significantly different from those recorded before the implantation (P > 0.05). FA showed no notable change during the follow-up periods. Histological studies showed that the retinas were intact after 6 months of implantation. There was no damage to the Teflon-coated wire after grasping the wire with forceps with silicon-coated tips, while surface damage of the Teflon that did not extend to the platinum-iridium wire was found when grasped by vitreoretinal forceps. We conclude that Teflon-coated platinum-iridium wire is highly biocompatible in the vitreous for at least 6 months. Wires should be handled with vitreoretinal forceps with silicone-coated tips in order to avoid causing damage during wire manipulation. PMID:21769688

  3. Monolithic Teflon membrane valves and pumps for harsh chemical and low-temperature use.

    PubMed

    Willis, Peter A; Hunt, Brian D; White, Victor E; Lee, Michael C; Ikeda, Michael; Bae, Sam; Pelletier, Michael J; Grunthaner, Frank J

    2007-11-01

    Microfluidic diaphragm valves and pumps capable of surviving conditions required for unmanned spaceflight applications have been developed. The Pasteur payload of the European ExoMars Rover is expected to experience temperatures ranging between -100 degrees C and +50 degrees C during its transit to Mars and on the Martian surface. As such, the Urey instrument package, which contains at its core a lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis analysis system first demonstrated by Mathies et al., requires valving and pumping systems that are robust under these conditions before and after exposure to liquid samples, which are to be analyzed for chemical signatures of past or present living processes. The microfluidic system developed to meet this requirement uses membranes consisting of Teflon and Teflon AF as a deformable material in the valve seat region between etched Borofloat glass wafers. Pneumatic pressure and vacuum, delivered via off-chip solenoid valves, are used to actuate individual on-chip valves. Valve sealing properties of Teflon diaphragm valves, as well as pumping properties from collections of valves, are characterized. Secondary processing for embossing the membrane against the valve seats after fabrication is performed to optimize single valve sealing characteristics. A variety of different material solutions are found to produce robust devices. The optimal valve system utilizes a membrane of mechanically cut Teflon sandwiched between two thin spun films of Teflon AF-1600 as a composite "laminated" diaphragm. Pump rates up to 1600 nL s(-1) are achieved with pumps of this kind. These high pumping rates are possible because of the very fast response of the membranes to applied pressure, enabling extremely fast pump cycling with relatively small liquid volumes, compared to analogous diaphragm pumps. The developed technologies are robust over extremes of temperature cycling and are applicable in a wide range of chemical environments. PMID:17960273

  4. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell. [lithium aluminate

    DOEpatents

    Singh, R.N.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-27

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H/sub 2/ and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55 to 65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  5. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W

    2015-11-03

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices during operation at high temperature that can degrade performance.

  6. Shock-induced cation disorder in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. Y.; Meng, C. M.; Lu, T. C.; Xu, M.; Qi, J. Q.; Tan, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    An increase in lattice constants and an order-disorder phase transition were observed in the magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) powders after shock compression. Theoretical calculations on the basis of density functional theory confirm that the remarkable volume expansion in shocked MgAl2O4 powders is closely related to the substantial site disorder in the MgAl2O4 lattice. The calculations also show that the partially inverse MgAl2O4 spinel with an inversion index of 0.7 represents the greatest disordered metastable phase and the most unstable structure.

  7. Corrosion Evaluation and Durability Estimation of Aluminized Steel Drainage Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondan, Mersedeh

    Aluminized steel pipes are expected to have a long service life, e.g. 75 years. Spiral ribbed aluminized pipes (SRAP) have been widely specified and used by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for drainage of runoff water. Confidence in the long term durability of SRAP has been challenged by recent unexpected early corrosion failures in various Florida locations. SRAP premature corrosion incidents have occurred in two modalities. Mode A has taken place in near-neutral soil environments and has often been associated with either gross manufacturing defects (i.e. helical cuts) or corrosion concentration at or near the ribs. Mode B took place in pipes in contact with limestone backfill and corrosion damage was in the form of perforations, not preferentially located at the ribs, and not necessarily associated with other deficiencies. These failures motivated this research. The objectives of this work are to establish to what extent the Mode A corrosion incidents can be ascribed to manufacturing defects, that can be rectified by appropriate quality control, as opposed to an intrinsic vulnerability to corrosion of regularly produced SRAP due to ordinary forming strains and to determine the mechanism responsible for Mode B corrosion including the role that limestone backfill played in that deterioration. To achieve those objectives, laboratory experiments were conducted to replicate the conditions for Mode A and Mode B. Overall, the findings of this and previous work suggest that much of the corrosion damage observed in the Mode A incidents were promoted more by manufacturing deficiencies and less by any possible inherent susceptibility of corrosion at the ribs of SRAP that was produced following appropriate quality control. Experiments to explore the causes of Mode B corrosion showed that high pH values, sufficient to cause dissolution of the passive film on aluminum, can develop under exposure of limestone to flowing natural water. The findings substantiate

  8. Noncontact temperature measurement of aluminized polymer for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, William, Jr.; Hannas, Benjamin

    2002-03-01

    An existing fiber-optic/infrared (F-O/IR) temperature measurement system was adapted to measure the surface temperature of a thin-film aluminized polymer. The polymer under study, Kapton by Dupont, is used commonly in the aerospace industry for applications such as solar sails and solar shields. A cold plate was developed and implemented to control environmental effects on infrared data. Spectral characterization of the optical properties of Kapton was conducted to improve measurement accuracy. The instrument provides a non-contact means for accurate temperature measurement of very thin polymer membranes without distorting surface contour.

  9. Thermal Properties of Double-Aluminized Kapton at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J.; DiPirro, M.; Canavan, E.; Hait, T.

    2008-03-01

    Double-aluminized kapton (DAK) is commonly used in multi-layer insulation blankets in cryogenic systems. NASA plans to use individual DAK sheets in lightweight deployable shields for satellites carrying instruments. A set of these shields will reflect away thermal radiation from the sun, the earth, and the instrument's warm side and allow the instrument's cold side to radiate its own heat to deep space. In order to optimally design such a shield system, it is important to understand the thermal characteristics of DAK down to low temperatures. We describe experiments which measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity down to 4 Kelvin and the emissivity down to 10 Kelvin.

  10. Aluminized film, seam sealing tests and observations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate various seam sealing techniques, reinforcing methods, fitting installations, seam tolerances and geometric configurations pertinent to an aluminized plastic laminate. The program seeks a successful fabricating method for producing low-diffusion, cylindrical, spar liners to contain pressurized GH{sub 2} and GO{sub 2}. The test plan included: (1) seaming techniques on metallized Mylar film; (2) ``double patches`` for end fittings; (3) stainless steel bulkhead fitting assembly with seals; (4) minimum run tolerance on linear shear seam; (5) peel seam vs. inverted seal seam fabrication.

  11. Thermal Properties of Double-Aluminized Kapton at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, J.; DiPirro, M.; Canavan, E.; Hait, T.

    2007-01-01

    Double-aluminized kapton (DAK) is commonly used in multi-layer insulation blankets in cryogenic systems. NASA plans to use individual DAK sheets in lightweight deployable shields for satellites carrying instruments. A set of these shields will reflect away thermal radiation from the sun, the earth, and the instrument's warm side and allow the instrument's cold side to radiate its own heat to deep space. In order to optimally design such a shield system, it is important to understand the thermal characteristics of DAK down to low temperatures. We describe experiments which measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity down to 4 Kelvin and the emissivity down to 10 Kelvin.

  12. High energy excitations measured by neutron spectroscopy in FePS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, K C; Wildes, A R; Bewley, R I; Visser, D; Hicks, T J

    2009-03-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet FePS3 has been investigated using inelastic neutron spectroscopy with the time-of-flight spectrometer HET at the ISIS spallation neutron source. In the paramagnetic regime, two clearly resolved, high energy excitations were observed in the low scattering angle detector banks at 195(5) meV and 430(10) meV. The absence of these transitions from the high angle detector banks indicates that they are likely to be due to the crystal fields and magnetic in origin. The two transitions most probably represent electronic transitions in the Fe2+ ion among the low lying crystal field and spin-orbit split levels raised from the ground state. It has not yet been determined why the energies are greater than those observed in a comparable Raman experiment.

  13. High energy excitations measured by neutron spectroscopy in FePS(3).

    PubMed

    Rule, K C; Wildes, A R; Bewley, R I; Visser, D; Hicks, T J

    2009-03-25

    The quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet FePS(3) has been investigated using inelastic neutron spectroscopy with the time-of-flight spectrometer HET at the ISIS spallation neutron source. In the paramagnetic regime, two clearly resolved, high energy excitations were observed in the low scattering angle detector banks at 195(5) meV and 430(10) meV. The absence of these transitions from the high angle detector banks indicates that they are likely to be due to the crystal fields and magnetic in origin. The two transitions most probably represent electronic transitions in the Fe(2+) ion among the low lying crystal field and spin-orbit split levels raised from the ground state. It has not yet been determined why the energies are greater than those observed in a comparable Raman experiment. PMID:21817456

  14. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Chuck R.; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W.; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles. PMID:24981231

  15. On the kinetics of the pack - Aluminization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the aluminization of unalloyed Ni in fluoride-activated packs of varying Al activity. In packs of low Al activity, in which the ratio of Al to Ni was less than 50 at. pct, the specimen surface quickly came to equilibrium with the pack and remained close to equilibrium for the duration of normal coating runs. In these packs the kinetics of aluminization was controlled by diffusion in the solid. In packs of higher Al activity the surface of the specimen did not come to equilibrium with the pack and the kinetics of the process was governed by a combination of solid and gas diffusion rates. Under most conditions however, the surface composition was time-invariant and a steady-state appeared to exist at the pack-coating interface. By combining Levine and Caves' model for gaseous diffusion in pure-Al packs with calculations of solid diffusion rates some success has been achieved in explaining the results.

  16. High-temperature oxidation behavior of aluminized AISI 4130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaruddin, Mohammad; Wang, Chaur Jeng; Wardono, Herry; Tarkono, Asmi, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    AISI 4130 steel was dipped into a molten aluminum bath at 700°C for 16 s to produce an aluminide coating on the steel substrate. The coating, which consisted of an Al-rich layer and an FeAl3 and Fe2Al5 intermetallic layer, strongly adhered to the steel substrate. High-temperature oxidation of the bare steel and aluminized steel was performed by thermogravimetry at 850°C for 49 h in static air. The oxidation products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The aluminide coating could increase the oxidation resistance of the bare steel by a factor of ˜19. The increase in high-temperature oxidation resistance of the aluminized steel is attributed to the formation of protective alumina scale (α-Al2O3). Although iron oxide nodules grew on the aluminide coating surface, the oxidation rate of the aluminide coatings was very low. After 49 h of oxidation, agglomerates of α-Al2O3 fine grains grew on the rod-shaped FeAl phases.

  17. Atomic oxygen undercutting of LDEF aluminized Kapton multilayer insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroh, Kim K.

    1991-06-01

    Atomic oxygen undercutting is a potential threat to vulnerable spacecraft materials which have been shielded with an atomic oxygen protective coating. This is due to atomic oxygen attack of oxidizable materials at the point of microscopic defects in the protective coatings which occur during fabrication and handling, or from micrometeoroid and debris bombardment in space. An aluminized Kapton multilayer insulation sample which was flown on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was used to study low Earth orbit (LEO) directed ram oxygen undercutting. Cracks in the aluminized coatings around the vent holes provided excellent locations for evaluation of atomic oxygen undercutting. The undercutting profiles were compared to Monte Carlo models which predict LEO ram atomic oxygen attack. The shape of the undercurrent profile was found to vary with crack width, which is proportional to the number of atomic oxygen atoms entering the crack. The resulting atomic oxygen undercut profiles which occurred on LDEF indicated wide undercut cavities in spite of the fixed ram orientation. Potential causes of the observed undercutting profiles will be presented. Implications of the undercutting profiles relevant to Space Station Freedom will also be discussed.

  18. Cratering and penetration experiments in teflon targets at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry; Knight, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Approximately 20 sq m of protective thermal blankets, largely composed of Teflon, were retrieved from the Long Duration Exposure Facility after the spacecraft spent approximately 5.7 years in space. Examination of these blankets revealed that they contained thousands of hypervelocity impact features ranging from micron-sized craters to penetration holes several millimeters in diameter. We conducted impact experiments to reproduce such features and to understand the relationships between projectile size and the resulting crater or penetration hole diameter over a wide range of impact velocities. Such relationships are needed to derive the size and mass frequency distribution and flux of natural and man-made particles in low-earth orbit. Powder propellant and light-gas guns were used to launch soda-lime glass spheres into pure Teflon targets at velocities ranging from 1 to 7 km/s. Target thickness varied over more than three orders of magnitude from finite halfspace targets to very thin films. Cratering and penetration of massive Teflon targets is dominated by brittle failure and the development of extensive spall zones at the target's front and, if penetrated, the target's rear side. Mass removal by spallation at the back side of Teflon targets may be so severe that the absolute penetration hole diameter can become larger than that of a standard crater. The crater diameter in infinite halfspace Teflon targets increases, at otherwise constant impact conditions, with encounter velocity by a factor of V (exp 0.44). In contrast, the penetration hole size in very thin foils is essentially unaffected by impact velocity. Penetrations at target thicknesses intermediate to these extremes will scale with variable exponents of V. Our experimental matrix is sufficiently systematic and complete, up to 7 km/s, to make reasonable recommendations for velocity-scaling of Teflon craters and penetrations. We specifically suggest that cratering behavior and associated equations apply

  19. Late ureteral obstruction in an adult who had STING/Teflon in childhood: Should we expect an epidemic?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shilo; Lorber, Amitay; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Hidas, Guy; Duvdevani, Mordechai; Sfoungaristos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of left renal colic in a 25-year-old female patient. She had subureteral injection of Teflon (STING) at the age of 10 due to vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) disease and recurrent urinary tract infections. Renal colic was the result of late ureteral obstruction due to Teflon-induced periureteral foreign body reaction. To our knowledge, this is the longest interval between STING and ureteral obstruction reported and the first case of delayed ureteral obstruction caused by Teflon. Monitoring the upper tracts of patients after STING should go beyond childhood. PMID:26664516

  20. Single versus double occlusive dressing technique to minimize infusion thrombophlebitis: Vialon and Teflon cannulae reassessed.

    PubMed

    Myles, P S; Buckland, M R; Burnett, W J

    1991-11-01

    Infusion thrombophlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous cannulation. This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate a double-occlusive dressing technique and a new cannula, bismuth oxide-Teflon (Critikon Inc., Aust.), comparing it to Vialon (Deseret Medical Inc., Utah, USA). The study group of two hundred patients had a 16 gauge intravenous cannula inserted in theatre using a standard technique. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was determined on a daily basis. Cannula tips were sent for culture on removal. Vialon was found to be superior to Teflon after day 1. Although a double-occlusive dressing technique increased the duration of cannulation (50.9 vs. 41.9 hours, P less than 0.05), there was no difference in the incidence of thrombophlebitis. Neither cannula material nor dressing technique had an influence on the results of cannula tip culture (6% incidence). There was no evidence of bacteraemia in any case. PMID:1750632

  1. Teflon cylindrical phantom for delivery quality assurance of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).

    PubMed

    Lack, Danielle W; Kakakhel, Ali; Starin, Ross; Snyder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    At our institution the standard delivery quality assurance (DQA) procedure for tomotherapy plans is accomplished with a water equivalent phantom, EDR2 film, and ion chamber point-dose measurements. Most plans deliver at most 5 Gy to the dose plane; however, recently a stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) protocol has produced plans delivering upwards of 12 Gy to the film plane. EDR2 film saturates at a dose of ~ 7 Gy, requiring a modification of our DQA procedure for SBRT plans. To reduce the dose to the film plane and accommodate a possible move to SBRT using Varian RapidArc, a Teflon phantom has been constructed and tested. Our Teflon phantom is cylindrical in shape and of a similar design to the standard phantom. The phantom was MVCT scanned on the TomoTherapy system with images imported into the TomoTherapy and Varian Eclipse planning systems. Phantom images were smoothed to reduce artifacts for treatment planning purposes. Verification SBRT plans were delivered with film and point-dose benchmarked against the standard procedure. Verification tolerance criteria were 3% dose difference for chamber measurements and a gamma pass rate > 90% for film (criteria: 3 mm DTA, 3% dose difference, 10% threshold). The phantom sufficiently reduced dose to the film plane for DQA of SBRT plans. Both planning systems calculated accurate point doses in phantom, with the largest differences being 2.4% and 4.4% for TomoTherapy and Rapid Arc plans. Measured dose distributions correlated well with planning system calculations (γ < 1 for > 95%). These results were comparable to the standard phantom. The Teflon phantom appears to be a potential option for SBRT DQA. Preliminary data show that the planning systems are capable of calculating point doses in the Teflon, and the dose to the film plane is reduced sufficiently to allow for a direct measured DQA without the need for dose rescaling. PMID:24423855

  2. A rotating-disk study on Teflon-bonded porous zinc electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, A.; Mitchell, P. J.; Hampson, N. A.; Kumar, N.; Shield, D. W.

    1985-07-01

    Microcomputer-controlled, rotating-disk experiments have been carried out on Teflon-bonded porous electrodes fabricated from a 5 percent PTFE suspension + ZnO. The effect of using 1 percent mercuric oxide as an additive on this type of electrode has been examined. Plots of i exp -1 vs omega exp -1/2 on electrodes containing mercuric oxide show intercepts through the origin for low overpotentials, implying that quasi-reversible kinetics prevail.

  3. Penetration experiments in aluminum and Teflon targets of widely variable thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.

    1994-01-01

    The morphologies and detailed dimensions of hypervelocity craters and penetration holes on space-exposed surfaces faithfully reflect the initial impact conditions. However, current understanding of this postmortem evidence and its relation to such first-order parameters as impact velocity or projectile size and mass is incomplete. While considerable progress is being made in the numerical simulation of impact events, continued impact simulations in the laboratory are needed to obtain empirical constraints and insights. This contribution summarizes such experiments with Al and Teflon targets that were carried out in order to provide a better understanding of the crater and penetration holes reported from the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellites. A 5-mm light gas gun was used to fire spherical soda-lime glass projectiles from 50 to 3175 microns in diameter (D(sub P)), at a nominal 6 km/s, into Al (1100 series; annealed) and Teflon (Teflon(sup TFE)) targets. Targets ranged in thickness (T) from infinite halfspace targets (T approx. equals cm) to ultrathin foils (T approx. equals micron), yielding up to 3 degrees of magnitude variation in absolute and relative (D(sub P)/T) target thickness. This experimental matrix simulates the wide range in D(sub P)/T experienced by a space-exposed membrane of constant T that is being impacted by projectiles of widely varying sizes.

  4. Thin teflon-like films for MEMS: Film properties and reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.K.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Brown, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    This work presents film properties and initial reliability studies for thin Teflon-like films applied to a unique test vehicle, the Sandia-designed and fabricated microengine. Results on microengines coated with the film show a factor of three improvement in their lifetime and an order of magnitude reduction in the coefficient of friction when compared to uncoated samples. Coefficients Of Friction (COF) of 0.07 for the Teflon-like film and 1.0 for uncoated samples are extracted from models which match the measured behavior of working microengines. These films, deposited form a plasma source, exhibit the ability to penetrate into very narrow, deep channels common to many MEMS devices. For as-deposited film, both the refractive index at 1.4 and the contact angle with water at 108{degree} show the film to be very similar to bulk Teflon PTFE. Film stability as a function of temperature has been examined using Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The film structure as observed by the fluorine-carbon (F-C) peak is stable up to 200 C, but starts decomposing above 250 C. Film composition has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and is quite different for directly exposed surfaces compared with deep, narrow channels where the deposition process is diffusion limited.

  5. Multi-domain CGFS-type glutaredoxin Grx4 regulates iron homeostasis via direct interaction with a repressor Fep1 in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2011-05-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 allows Fep1-mediated de-repression of iron uptake genes at low iron. {yields} Grx4 directly interacts with Fep1 in vivo and in vitro. {yields} The Cys172 in the CGFS motif of Grx4 is necessary for cell proliferation and iron regulation. {yields} The Cys172 of Grx4 is required for normal interaction with Fep1. -- Abstract: The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins, Grx4 and Grx5, which are localized primarily in the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. We observed involvement of Grx4 in regulating iron-responsive gene expression, which is modulated by a repressor Fep1. Lack of Grx4 caused defects not only in growth but also in the expression of both iron-uptake and iron-utilizing genes regardless of iron availability. In order to unravel how Grx4 is involved in Fep1-mediated regulation, interaction between them was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) revealed that Grx4 physically interacts with Fep1 in vivo. BiFC revealed localized nuclear dots produced by interaction of Grx4 with Fep1. Mutation of cysteine-172 in the CGFS motif to serine (C172S) produced effects similarly observed under Grx4 depletion, such as the loss of iron-dependent gene regulation and the absence of nuclear dots in BiFC analysis. These results suggest that the ability of Grx4 to bind iron, most likely Fe-S cofactor, could be critical in interacting with and modulating the activity of Fep1.

  6. Development of a communications Front End Processor (FEP) for the VAX-11/780 using an LSI-11/23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masty, A. F.

    1983-12-01

    A Communications Front-End Processor (FEP) was implemented for a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX-11/780 using a DEC LSI-11/23 microcomputer. The LSI-11/23 serviced eight DEC VT-100 terminals and communicated with the VAX-11/780 over an Able Computer Technology, Inc. Direct Memory Access (DMA) interface. This investigation proceeded from a FEP design provided in a previous work and culminated in the Telecon "C' compiler language coding of those design specifications. The design was translated into structure charts defining software module functions and interfaces. Program Design Language (PDL) was then used to outline the processing steps in a structured programming format for each software module. A data dictionary was constructed to document the data and functional module interfaces. The code was implemented in a "top-down' manner.

  7. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, R.O.; Keller, R.; Yao, N.P.

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (A1S) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  8. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Keller, Rudolf; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1981-01-01

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  9. Lattice site of helium implanted in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alien, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The lattice site of helium implanted at 60 keV in magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) has been investigated with channeling effect measurements that apply the ion-induced 3He(d, p) 4He nuclear reaction. Within the spinel crystal structure, numerous interstices characterized by octahedral anion coordination are intrinsically unfilled by cations. For implantation at 300 K, a typical helium atom locates centrally in one of these vacant octahedral interstices with a probability of approximately 95%. Significant occupation of other lattice sites of either high or low symmetry was rejected. In particular, helium neither clusters in defect complexes nor locates in tetrahedral interstices or substitutional sites.

  10. On the Compressive and Tensile Strength of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, V.; Hayun, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.; Zaretsky, E.

    2009-12-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel is a strong polycrystalline transparent ceramic. Spinel is an attractive material for armor applications and its behavior under shock wave loading is of obvious interest. The purpose of the present study was to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of this material, its Hugoniot response above the HEL, and its spall strength. Planar impact experiments were performed over the 2 to 40 GPa stress range using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) as a principal diagnostics tool. According to these tests, spinel has a HEL of about 11.3 GPa. The spall strength of the material was found to be close to zero at low, about 2 GPa, impact stress.

  11. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeet, Suninder; Sharma, Manoj; Pandey, O. P.

    2015-05-01

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl10O17(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl2O4(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f6 5d → 4f7 transition of Eu2+ which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  12. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  13. Free Energy Perturbation Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP\\H-REMD) for absolute ligand binding free energy calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Roux, B.

    2010-09-01

    Free Energy Perturbation with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP/REMD) offers a powerful strategy to improve the convergence of free energy computations. In particular, it has been shown previously that a FEP/REMD scheme allowing random moves within an extended replica ensemble of thermodynamic coupling parameters '{lambda}' can improve the statistical convergence in calculations of absolute binding free energy of ligands to proteins [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 2583]. In the present study, FEP/REMD is extended and combined with an accelerated MD simulations method based on Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD (H-REMD) to overcome the additional problems arising from the existence of kinetically trapped conformations within the protein receptor. In the combined strategy, each system with a given thermodynamic coupling factor {lambda} in the extended ensemble is further coupled with a set of replicas evolving on a biased energy surface with boosting potentials used to accelerate the interconversion among different rotameric states of the side chains in the neighborhood of the binding site. Exchanges are allowed to occur alternatively along the axes corresponding to the thermodynamic coupling parameter {lambda} and the boosting potential, in an extended dual array of coupled {lambda}- and H-REMD simulations. The method is implemented on the basis of new extensions to the REPDSTR module of the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM. As an illustrative example, the absolute binding free energy of p-xylene to the nonpolar cavity of the L99A mutant of the T4 lysozyme was calculated. The tests demonstrate that the dual {lambda}-REMD and H-REMD simulation scheme greatly accelerates the configurational sampling of the rotameric states of the side chains around the binding pocket, thereby improving the convergence of the FEP computations.

  14. Synthesis of Li2FeP2O7/Carbon nanocomposite as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Izumi

    2015-12-01

    A Li2FeP2O7/Carbon (C) nanocomposite was successfully synthesized via a combination of spray pyrolysis and wet ball milling followed by annealing from a precursor solution; in which LiNO3, H3PO4 and Fe(NO3)3·9H2O were stoichiometrically dissolved into distilled water. Ascorbic acid was added to the precursor solution as a reduction agent. The peaks of the Li2FeP2O7/C nanocomposite obtained by X-ray diffraction analysis were indexed to the monoclinic structure with the space group P21/c. The Li2FeP2O7/C nanocomposite cathode delivered a first discharge capacity of 100 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C, which corresponded to 91% of its theoretical capacity. After various higher discharge rates from 0.05 to 2 C in the cycle performance test, a discharge capacity of 93 mAh g-1 was achieved at 0.05 C, which showed an excellent capacity retention (93%) after 29 cycles.

  15. Formation of copper aluminate spinel and cuprous aluminate delafossite to thermally stabilize simulated copper-laden sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ching-Yao; Shih, Kaimin; Leckie, James O

    2010-09-15

    The study reported herein indicated the stabilization mechanisms at work when copper-laden sludge is thermally treated with gamma-alumina and kaolinite precursors, and evaluated the prolonged leachability of their product phases. Four copper-containing phases - copper oxide (CuO), cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), copper aluminate spinel (CuAl(2)O(4)), and cuprous aluminate delafossite (CuAlO(2)) - were found in the thermal reactions of the investigated systems. These phases were independently synthesized for leaching by 0.1M HCl aqueous solution, and the relative leachabilities were found to be CuAl(2)O(4)

  16. The effects of aluminum particle size on aluminized propellant combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokhan, Allan

    The goal of this thesis was to: test current ideas regarding the complex behavior of aluminized propellant combustion, extend understanding to conditions not previously clarified, and demonstrate the applicability of the results in the tailoring of propellant formulations to specific applicational needs. The study focused on ammonium perchlorate (AP), hydrocarbon binder, aluminum (Al) formulations. All formulations had 11% polybutadiene (PBAN) binder and 89% solids (i.e., 18% Al and 71% AP). The primary propellant formulations were Al and fine AP (fAP) particle sizes. The values of these variables were chosen according to current practical standards and ideas on how to tailor the Al behavior. Bimodal size distributions were used for AP and Al. For bimodal Al formulations, the coarse Al particle size was 30mum (nominal) and the fine Al particle size was 0.1mum (nominal), and for bimodal AP, the cAP particle size was 400mum (nominal) and the fAP particle size was either 82.5mum or 10mum (nominal). The effects of the Al particle size, Al c/f ratio, fAP particle size and the AP c/f ratio were examined for monomodal and bimodal aluminized propellants. This experimental investigation challenges conventional thinking with regards to the mechanisms involved with Al combustion and provides guidelines in formulating propellants with minimal losses in performance. The results showed the existence of an intense aluminized burning region (ABR) very close to the propellant surface with ultra-fine Al (UFAl) and 3mum Al that encouraged heat feedback to the flame front and to the propellant surface in the form of radiation and conduction. The high burning rates observed with UFAl were part of a continuum of reducing the size of the Al particles, which also lead to the presence of a dense ABR close to the propellant surface. It was also shown that major modification to the burning rates could be achieved by moderate amounts of UFAl and/or significant reduction in the AP c/f ratio. A

  17. Teflon probing for the flow characterization of arc-heated wind tunnel facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulli, Stefano; Ground, Cody; Crisanti, Matthew; Maddalena, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The experimental flow characterization of the arc-heated wind tunnel of the University of Texas at Arlington is investigated in this work using ablative Teflon probes in combination with total pressure measurements. A parallel analytical work, focused on the dimensional analysis of the ablation process, has been conducted with the purpose of improving existing semi-empirical correlations for the heat blockage due to the mass injection inside the boundary layer. A control volume analysis at the receding surface of the specimens is used to calculate the wall heat transfer for a non-ablating probe by including the blockage effect. The new correlations, obtained for the convective blockage, show an improvement of the correlation coefficient of 110 % with respect to those available in literature, once a new blowing parameter containing the stagnation pressure is introduced. A correlation developed by NASA during the Round-Robin program, which relates the Teflon mass loss rate to the total pressure and cold-wall heat flux measured experimentally, is also used to predict the wall heat transfer referred to the ablation temperature of Teflon. For both approaches, a simplified stagnation point convective heat transfer equation allows the average stagnation enthalpy to be calculated. Several locations downstream of the nozzle exit have been surveyed, and selected points of the facility's performance map have been used for the experimental campaign. The results show that both approaches provide similar results in terms of stagnation heat flux and enthalpy prediction with uncertainties comparable to those provided by standard intrusive heat flux probes ( δ q max < 25 %). The analysis of the Teflon's ablated surface does not reveal significant flow non-uniformities, and a 1.14 heat flux enhancement factor due to the shock-shock interaction is detectable at x = 3.5 in. from the nozzle exit plane. The results show the use of ablative probes for the flow characterization of arc

  18. Fast surface temperature measurement of Teflon propellant-in-pulsed ablative discharges using HgCdTe photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Erik L.; Burton, Rodney L.; Reed, Garrett A.; Spanjers, Gregory G.

    2006-10-15

    High-speed mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors, sensitive to infrared emission, are investigated as a means of measuring surface temperature on a microsecond time frame during pulsed ablative discharges with Teflon trade mark sign as the ablated material. Analysis is used to derive a governing equation for detector output voltage for materials with wavelength dependent emissivity. The detector output voltage is experimentally calibrated against thermocouples embedded in heated Teflon. Experimental calibration is performed with Teflon that has been exposed to {approx}200 pulsed discharges and non-plasma-exposed Teflon and is compared to theoretical predictions to analyze emissivity differences. The diagnostic capability is evaluated with measurements of surface temperature from the Teflon propellant of electric micropulsed plasma thrusters. During the pulsed current discharge, there is insufficient information to claim that the surface temperature is accurately measured. However, immediately following the discharge, the postpulse cooling curve is measured. The statistical spread of postpulse surface temperature from shot to shot, most likely due to arc constriction and localization, is investigated to determine an operational envelope for postpulse temperature and mass ablation. This information is useful for determining postpulse ablation contributions to mass loss as well as evaluation of theoretical discharge models currently under development.

  19. Reducing DRIFT backgrounds with a submicron aluminized-mylar cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Daw, E.; Dorofeev, A.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Fox, J. R.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Gold, M.; Harmon, L.; Harton, J.; Lafler, R.; Landers, J.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.; Matthews, J.; Miller, E. H.; Mouton, F.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Schuckman, F. G.; Snowden-Ifft, D.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Walker, D.

    2015-09-01

    Background events in the DRIFT-IId dark matter detector, mimicking potential WIMP signals, are predominantly caused by alpha decays on the central cathode in which the alpha particle is completely or partially absorbed by the cathode material. We installed a 0.9 μm thick aluminized-mylar cathode as a way to reduce the probability of producing these backgrounds. We study three generations of cathode (wire, thin-film, and radiologically clean thin-film) with a focus on the ratio of background events to alpha decays. Two independent methods of measuring the absolute alpha decay rate are used to ensure an accurate result, and agree to within 10%. Using alpha range spectroscopy, we measure the radiologically cleanest cathode version to have a contamination of 3.3±0.1 ppt 234U and 73±2 ppb 238U. This cathode reduces the probability of producing an RPR from an alpha decay by a factor of 70±20 compared to the original stainless steel wire cathode. First results are presented from a texturized version of the cathode, intended to be even more transparent to alpha particles. These efforts, along with other background reduction measures, have resulted in a drop in the observed background rate from 500/day to 1/day. With the recent implementation of full-volume fiducialization, these remaining background events are identified, allowing for background-free operation.

  20. Structure and mechanical properties of irradiated magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanathan, R.; Yu, N.; Sickafus, K. E.; Nastasi, M.

    1996-09-01

    The relationship between structure and mechanical properties of MgAl 2O 4 spinel single crystals following 400 keV Xe 2+ irradiation at 100 K to doses up to 1 × 10 20 ions/m 2 was examined. The structural changes in the irradiated layer were studied using electron diffraction from cross-sectional samples. The nano-indentation technique was used to determine the mechanical properties. At low doses, the material transformed into a metastable crystalline phase characterized by the rearrangement of cations. At the onset of this transformation, the Young's modulus and hardness rose to values about 10 and 15% higher, respectively, than those of the unirradiated crystal. Upon further irradiation, the metastable crystal became amorphous. The Young's modulus and hardness of the amorphous state were about 30 and 60% less, respectively, than the corresponding values of unirradiated spinel. These results, in conjunction with the findings of a recent computer simulation study, provide important insights into the exceptional radiation resistance of magnesium aluminate spinel.

  1. Sintering and sulfation of calcium silicate: Calcium aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Borgwardt, R.H.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independently in terms of the common variables, temperature and specific surface area. Surface reduction parameters were evaluated by the German-Munir sinter model, modified to account for a strong catalytic effect of H2O vapor. Sulfation parameters were determined from a series of conversion vs. time measurements at various temperatures using calcined solids of known surface area. These show product layer diffusion through CaSO4 to be the probable controlling process above 670 C and diffusion through a mixture of CaSO3 and CaSO4 controlling below that temperature. Like sintering, sulfation was enhanced by the presence of H2O in the feed gas. With 7% H2O vapor, the enhancement factor for sulfation was 1.5 at 665 C and estimated to be 5.0 at higher temperatures where only CaSO4 is formed. A combined sinter/sulfation model, based on the parameters evaluated for the independent processes, is compared to sulfation rates measured for the uncalcined solid when sintering is occurring simultaneously.

  2. Hard transparent domes and windows from magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGiovanni, Anthony A.; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Roy, Don W.

    2005-05-01

    Transparent magnesium aluminate spinel is an attractive material for use in a wide range of optical applications including windows, domes, armor, and lenses, which require excellent transmission from the visible through to the mid IR. Theoretical transmission is very uniform and approaches 87% between 0.3 to 5 microns. Transmission characteristics rival that of ALON and sapphire in the mid-wave IR, making it especially attractive for the everincreasing performance requirements of current and next-generation IR imaging systems. Future designs in missile technology will require materials that can meet stringent performance demands in both optical and RF wavelengths. Loss characteristics for spinel are being investigated to meet those demands. Technology Assessment and Transfer Inc. (TA&T), have established a 9000 ft2 production facility for optical quality spinel based on the traditional hot-pressing followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) route. Additionally, TA&T is developing pressureless sintering - a highly scalable, near net shape processing method based on traditional ceramic processing technology - to fabricate optical components. These two main processing approaches allow the widest variety of applications to be addressed using a range of optical components and configurations. The polycrystalline nature of spinel facilitates near net shape processing, which provides the potential to fabricate physically larger optical parts or larger quantities of parts at significantly lower costs compared to single crystal materials such as sapphire. Current research is focused at optimizing the processing parameters for both synthesis routes to maximize strength and transparency while minimizing the cost of fabrication.

  3. Double mutagenesis of a positive charge cluster in the ligand-binding site of the ferric enterobactin receptor, FepA.

    PubMed

    Newton, S M; Allen, J S; Cao, Z; Qi, Z; Jiang, X; Sprencel, C; Igo, J D; Foster, S B; Payne, M A; Klebba, P E

    1997-04-29

    Siderophores and colicins enter bacterial cells through TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins. Using site-directed substitution mutagenesis, we studied ligand recognition by a prototypic Escherichia coli siderophore receptor, FepA, that binds the iron chelate ferric enterobactin and colicins B and D. These genetic experiments identified a common binding site for two of the three ligands, containing multiple positive charges, within cell surface residues of FepA. Elimination of single residues in this region did not impair the adsorption or transport of ferric enterobactin, but double mutagenesis in the charge cluster identified amino acids (Arg-286 and Arg-316) that participate in siderophore binding and function in FepA-mediated killing by colicins B and D. Ferric enterobactin binding, furthermore, prevented covalent modification of FepA within this domain by either a fluorescent probe or an arginine-specific reagent, corroborating the involvement of this site in ligand recognition. These results identify, for the first time, residues in a TonB-dependent outer membrane protein that participate in ligand binding. They also explain the competition between ferric enterobactin and the colicins on the bacterial cell surface: all three ligands interact with the same arginine residues within FepA during their penetration through the outer membrane. PMID:9114029

  4. Medicated Janus fibers fabricated using a Teflon-coated side-by-side spinneret.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deng-Guang; Yang, Chen; Jin, Miao; Williams, Gareth R; Zou, Hua; Wang, Xia; Bligh, S W Annie

    2016-02-01

    A family of medicated Janus fibers that provides highly tunable biphasic drug release was fabricated using a side-by-side electrospinning process employing a Teflon-coated parallel spinneret. The coated spinneret facilitated the formation of a Janus Taylor cone and in turn high quality integrated Janus structures, which could not be reliably obtained without the Teflon coating. The fibers prepared had one side consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K60 and ketoprofen, and the other of ethyl cellulose (EC) and ketoprofen. To modulate and tune drug release, PVP K10 was doped into the EC side in some cases. The fibers were linear and had flat morphologies with an indent in the center. They provide biphasic drug release, with the PVP K60 side dissolving very rapidly to deliver a loading dose of the active ingredient, and the EC side resulting in sustained release of the remaining ketoprofen. The addition of PVP K10 to the EC side was able to accelerate the second stage of release; variation in the dopant amount permitted the release rate and extent this phase to be precisely tuned. These results offer the potential to rationally design systems with highly controllable drug release profiles, which can complement natural biological rhythms and deliver maximum therapeutic effects. PMID:26674839

  5. UV and IR laser radiation's interaction with metal film and teflon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Alekseev, S. B.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Lipatov, E. I.; Orlovskii, V. M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) and XeCl (0.308 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of metal and TiN-ceramic coatings on glass and steel substrates has been studied. Correlation between parameters of surface erosion versus laser-specific energy was investigated. Monitoring of laser-induced erosion on smooth polished surfaces was performed using optical microscopy. The correlation has been revealed between characteristic zones of thin coatings damaged by irradiation and energy distribution over the laser beam cross section allowing evaluation of defects and adhesion of coatings. The interaction of pulsed periodical CO2 ([lambda] [similar] 10.6 [mu]m), and Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene—PTFE) has been studied. Monitoring of erosion track on surfaces was performed through optical microscopy. It has been shown that at pulsed periodical CO2-radiation interaction with teflon the sputtering of polymer with formation of submicron-size particles occurs. Dependencies of particle sizes, form, and sputtering velocity on laser pulse duration and target temperature have been obtained.

  6. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Mouzas, Ioannis; Bezzi, Mario; Kouroumalis, Elias; Pasariello, Roberto; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  7. Regions of Escherichia coli TonB and FepA proteins essential for in vivo physical interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, R A; Foster-Hartnett, D; McIntosh, M A; Postle, K

    1997-01-01

    The transport of Fe(III)-siderophore complexes and vitamin B12 across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli is an active transport process requiring a cognate outer membrane receptor, cytoplasmic membrane-derived proton motive force, and an energy-transducing protein anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane, TonB. This process requires direct physical contact between the outer membrane receptor and TonB. Previous studies have identified an amino-terminally located region (termed the TonB box) conserved in all known TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors as being essential for productive energy transduction. In the present study, a mutation in the TonB box of the ferric enterochelin receptor FepA resulted in the loss of detectable in vivo chemical cross-linking between FepA and TonB. Protease susceptibility studies indicated this effect was due to an alteration of conformation rather than the direct disruption of a specific site of physical contact. This suggested that TonB residue 160, implicated in previous studies as a site of allele-specific suppression of TonB box mutants, also made a conformational rather than a direct contribution to the physical interaction between TonB and the outer membrane receptors. This possibility was supported by the finding that TonB carboxyl-terminal truncations that retained Gln-160 were unable to participate in TonB-FepA complex formation, indicating that this site alone was not sufficient to support the physical interactions involved in energy transduction. These studies indicated that the final 48 residues of TonB were essential to this physical interaction. This region contains a putative amphipathic helix which could facilitate TonB-outer membrane interaction. Amino acid replacements at one site in this region were found to affect energy transduction but did not appear to greatly alter TonB conformation or the formation of a TonB-FepA complex. The effects of amino acid substitutions at several other TonB sites were also examined

  8. Structural Characterization of Spinel Zinc Aluminate Nanoparticles Prepared By Coprecipitation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunder, Shyam; Rohilla, Sunil; Kumar, Sushil; Aghamkar, Praveen

    2011-12-01

    Zinc aluminate is well known wide bandgap semiconductor with cubic spinel structure and transparent for wavelength greater than 320 nm. Therefore, ZnAl2O4 can be used for ultraviolet photoelectronic devices. Furthermore, spinel zinc aluminate is useful in many reactions as catalytic support. Moreover, zinc aluminate can be used as second phase in glaze layer of white ceramics to improve wear resistance and to preserve whiteness. In present study cubic spinel zinc aluminate nanoparticles have been synthesized from aqueous solution of Zn(NO3)2.6H2O (0.1 M) and Al(NO3)2.9H2O (0.2 M) using chemical coprecipitation technique. Ammonium hydroxide was used as precipitating agent and pH was maintained between 8 to 9. The precipitated slurry was filtered and washed several times with deionized double distilled water and dried at 110 °C. The fine powder was annealed at different temperatures from 600 °C to 900 °C for 4h in temperature controlled furnace. Structural characterization of annealed samples was carried out via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). XRD patterns reveal that zinc aluminate samples were cubic spinel nanoparticles and grain size determined by Debye-Scherrer formula is from 5 to 16 nm.

  9. Amorphization of rare earth aluminate garnets by ionic irradiation and decay of 244Cm admixture

    SciTech Connect

    Livshits, T. S.; Lizin, A. A.; Zhang, J. M.; Ewing, R. C.

    2010-08-29

    The stability of synthetic REE-aluminate garnets irradiated by accelerated Kr2+ ions and affected by alpha decay of ²⁴⁴Cm (T1/2 = 18.1 yr) has been studied. The dose of irradiation sufficient for the complete disordering of the aluminate garnet structure is 0.40–0.55 displacements per atom. This value increases with rising temperature due to the increasing intensity of recovery from radiation damage to the lattice by heating. The critical temperature above which the structure of REE-aluminate is not damaged by radiation is 550°C. The amorphization dose for aluminates with garnet structure is two to three times higher than of that previously studied ferrites; the critical temperature of both is similar. In resistance to radiation, aluminate garnets do not yield to zirconolite and exceed titanate pyrochlore. Heating to 250°C does not lead to substantial recovery from radiation defects in the garnet structure. The radiation impact on matrices of real actinide (An) wastes is lower than that related to ion irradiation and ²⁴⁴Cm doping, and this facilitates a higher radiation resistance of garnets containing HLW.

  10. Rugae-like FeP nanocrystal assembly on a carbon cloth: an exceptionally efficient and stable cathode for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiulin; Lu, Ang-Yu; Zhu, Yihan; Min, Shixiong; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Han, Yu; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Li, Lain-Jong

    2015-06-01

    There is a strong demand to replace expensive Pt catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen generation in water electrolysis. Earth-abundant Fe can be electroplated on carbon cloth (CC) to form high surface area rugae-like FeOOH assembly. Subsequent gas phase phosphidation converts the FeOOH to FeP or FeP2 and the morphology of the crystal assembly is controlled by the phosphidation temperature. FeP prepared at 250 °C presents lower crystallinity and that prepared at higher temperatures of 400 °C and 500 °C possesses higher crystallinity, but lower surface area. The phosphidation at 300 °C produces nanocrystalline FeP and preserves the high-surface area morphology; thus, it exhibits the highest HER efficiency in 0.5 M H2SO4, i.e., the required overpotential to reach 10 and 20 mA cm-2 is 34 and 43 mV, respectively. These values are lowest among the reported non-precious metal phosphides on CC. The Tafel slope for FeP prepared at 300 °C is around 29.2 mV dec-1, which is comparable to that of Pt/CC; this indicates that the hydrogen evolution for our best FeP is limited by the Tafel reaction (same as Pt). Importantly, the FeP/CC catalyst exhibits much better stability in a wide-range working current density (up to 1 V cm-2), suggesting that it is a promising replacement of Pt for HER.There is a strong demand to replace expensive Pt catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen generation in water electrolysis. Earth-abundant Fe can be electroplated on carbon cloth (CC) to form high surface area rugae-like FeOOH assembly. Subsequent gas phase phosphidation converts the FeOOH to FeP or FeP2 and the morphology of the crystal assembly is controlled by the phosphidation temperature. FeP prepared at 250 °C presents lower crystallinity and that prepared at higher temperatures of 400 °C and 500 °C possesses higher crystallinity, but lower surface area. The phosphidation at 300 °C produces nanocrystalline FeP and preserves the high