Science.gov

Sample records for aluminum alloys part

  1. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-08-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.

  2. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  3. Conducting polymers and corrosion: Part 2 -- Polyaniline on aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, D.E.; Pae, Y.; Bierwagen, G.P.

    2000-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of conducting polyaniline coatings on various aluminum alloys subjected to immersion in dilute Harrison solution (0.35% ammonium sulfate [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}], 0.05% sodium chloride [NaCl]) was studied. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) of polyaniline-coated alloys increased as a function of immersion time. Polyaniline-coated platinum did not exhibit a significant increase in impedance under similar conditions, indicating that an active metal in contact with the polyaniline is required for the observed increase in R{sub ct}. A similar pattern of increasing R{sub ct} was observed for Alodine (Product A)-treated Al 7075T-6 (UNS A97075) alloys. Mean current and mean potential values obtained from electrochemical noise measurements also suggest a substantial electrochemical interaction between the polyaniline and the aluminum alloy during the early stages of immersion. Polarization experiments and open-circuit potential measurements revealed an ennobling of aluminum alloys to higher potential in the presence of polyaniline coatings. The corrosion protection afforded by a polyaniline/epoxy two-coat system on Al 2024T-3 (UNS A92024) alloy also was evaluated using impedance spectroscopy and compared with that for a single coat of epoxy on untreated and Product A-treated Al2024T-3 alloy. The Product A treatment and the polyaniline coating were found to increase the lifetime of the epoxy topcoat, although these two-coating systems exhibited rather different variations in low-frequency impedance with immersion time. A mechanism consistent with these observations was suggested.

  4. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it must

  5. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  6. Creep crack growth behavior of aluminum alloy 2519. Part 2: Numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.E.; Hamilton, B.C.; McDowell, D.L.; Saxena, A.

    1997-12-31

    The experimental analysis of high temperature fracture in Aluminum Alloy 2519-T87 presented in Part 1 of this paper highlighted the creep-brittle fracture characteristics of the material and showed reasonable correlation of crack growth rates with the stress intensity factor K. Part 2 continues this investigation numerically using growing crack finite element analyses. Experimentally observed crack growth histories of four aluminum 2519-T87 compact specimens are enforced by controlling the rate of release of finite element nodes along the crack growth path to gain insight into the relation of the crack tip fields to far field fracture parameters and to crack growth rates. A variable time-step, nodal-release algorithm is presented to model the high strain rates that occur during the initial stages of crack growth. The numerical results indicate an initial transient period of crack growth followed by a quasi-steady-state crack growth regime in which the crack tip fields change slowly with increasing crack length. Transition of crack growth to the quasi-steady-state regime, where similitude and small-scale creep conditions roughly exist, is given by a transition time t{sub g} that depends on the crack growth history and material properties. Excellent correlation of the stress intensity factor K with the crack growth rates is observed after time t{sub g}. Experimental difficulties in measuring the creep component of the load-line deflection rate are also discussed.

  7. Microstructural characterization of aluminum alloys using Weck's reagent, part I: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Li; Harada, Yohei; Kumai, Shinji

    2015-09-15

    This paper focuses on the applications of a color etchant for aluminum alloys named Weck's reagent. The Al phase shows different colors from location to location after being etched by Weck's reagent. It is proved that Weck's reagent is very sensitive to the micro-segregations of Ti, Si and Mg in Al alloys so that characterization of the micro-segregations can be qualitatively realized which is usually done by electronic probe techniques. With the help of this characterization method, we are able to evaluate solid fractions for the semi-solid processed Al alloy with a better accuracy by excluding the Al grain growth during water quenching. To understand this reagent better, the color change during etching is investigated by applying different etching times at room temperature (25 °C). Among those results, 12 s shows the best color contrast after etching. Finally, we repeat the 12 second etching for four times through repeating a polishing–etching process. The result exhibits that Weck's reagent has a satisfying re-producibility with stable color and color distribution for the four times etching result. The second part of this study covers the coloring mechanism of Weck's reagent by characterizing the etched surface via various characterization methods. - Highlights: • The applications of Weck's reagent for Al alloys are introduced in detail. • Detailed relationship between micro-segregations in Al phase and the color difference revealed by Weck's reagent are studied. • Etching time has a strong influence on the color revealed by Weck's reagent. • Besides micro-segregation, grain boundaries can also be visualized by Weck's reagent, which was proved by EBSD analysis.

  8. Part A - low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum alloys. Part B - commercial-scale melting and processing of FAPY alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R.; Hall, F.; Valykeo, J.

    1996-06-01

    The FAPY is a Fe-16 at. % Al alloy of nominal composition. The aluminum content of the alloy is such that it remains single phase ({alpha}) without the formation of an ordered phase (DO{sub 3}). The alloy has good oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 1000{degrees}C and has shown significantly superior performance as heating elements as compared to the commonly used nickel-based alloy, Nichrome. Although wire for the heating elements has been fabricated from small (15-1b) laboratory heats, for its commercial applications, the wire needs to be producible from large (1200 to 1500-1b) air-melted heats. The purpose of this study was to produce commercial size heats and investigate their mechanical properties and microstructure in the as-cast, hot-worked, and cold-worked conditions. The results of this study are expected to provide: (1) insight into processing steps for large heats into wire under commercial conditions, and (2) the mechanical properties data on commercial size heats in various product forms.

  9. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  10. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  11. Relationship between fracture toughness, fracture path, and microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. Part 1: Quantitative characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.U.; Gokhale, A.M.; Denzer, D.K.; Liu, J.

    1998-04-01

    The fracture toughness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-based 7XXX aluminum alloys decreases with an increase in the extent of recrystallization. In this contribution, the fracture path of plane-strain fracture-toughness specimens of 7050 alloy (a typical alloy of the 7XXX series) is quantitatively characterized as a function of degree of recrystallization, specimen orientation, and aging condition. The fracture path is quantitatively correlated to fracture toughness, and the bulk microstructural attributes estimated via sterological analysis. In the companion article, these quantitative data are used to develop and verify a multiple-fracture micromechanism-based model that relates the fracture toughness to a number of microstructural parameters of the partially recrystallized alloy plate.

  12. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  13. X-ray diffractometry of lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1988-08-08

    X-ray diffractometry provides much useful information on LANA alloys that complements data obtained by SEM and Electron Microprobe Analysis. Accurate measurements of the hexagonal lattice parameters of the primary LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly phase reveal the aluminum content (y) and allow the prediction of desorption pressures for the hydrogen isotopes. A study of the broadening of x-ray diffraction lines of the LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly primary phase caused by cyclic absorption and desorption of hydrogen suggests that substitution of aluminum for nickel stabilizes the primary phase with respect to formation of antistructure defects that could cause undesirable trapping of hydrogen isotopes. Correlation of XRD with SEM and EMPA results has helped identify secondary phases, determine their abundances in volume percent, and reveal how they react with hydrogen and the atmosphere. Characterizations of LANA alloys used in process development has provided the bases for development of specifications for alloys to be used in the Replacement Trittium Facility. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  14. Creep crack growth behavior of aluminum alloy 2519. Part 1: Experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.C.; Saxena, A.; McDowell, D.L.; Hall, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The discipline of time-dependent fracture mechanics has traditionally focused on the creep crack growth behavior of high-temperature materials that display creep-ductile behavior, such as stainless steels and chromium-molybdenum steels. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys, however, have been developed that exhibit creep-brittle behavior; in this case, the creep crack growth rate correlates with the stress intensity factor, K. The fracture characteristics of aluminum alloy 2519-T87 were studied at 135 C, and the creep and creep crack growth behavior were characterized utilizing experimental and numerical methods. The strain to failure for creep deformation specimens was limited to only 1.2 to 2.0%. Creep crack growth tests revealed a unique correlation between the creep crack growth rate and K, a result consistent with creep-brittle behavior. No experimental correlation was found between the creep crack growth rate and the C{sub t} parameter. Microscopy of fracture surfaces revealed distinct regions of intergranular and transgranular fracture, and the transition between the fracture regions was found to occur at a critical K-level. Experimental results also appeared to show that initiation of crack growth (incubation) is controlled by the accumulation of a critical amount of damage ahead of the crack tip and that a correlation exists between the incubation time and K. Total time to failure is viewed as a summation of the incubation period and the crack growth period, and the design importance of incubation time is discussed.

  15. Modeling the microstructural changes during hot tandem rolling of AA5 XXX aluminum alloys: Part I. Microstructural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. A.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Lloyd, D. J.

    1998-06-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of the hot tandem rolling process for aluminum alloys has been developed. Reflecting the complex thermomechanical and microstructural changes effected in the alloys during rolling, the model incorporated heat flow, plastic deformation, kinetics of static recrystallization, final recrystallized grain size, and texture evolution. The results of this microstructural engineering study, combining computer modeling, laboratory tests, and industrial measurements, are presented in three parts. In this Part I, laboratory measurements of static recrystallization kinetics and final recrystallized grain size are described for AA5182 and AA5052 aluminum alloys and expressed quantitatively by semiempirical equations. In Part II, laboratory measurements of the texture evolution during static recrystallization are described for each of the alloys and expressed mathematically using a modified form of the Avrami equation. Finally, Part III of this article describes the development of an overall mathematical model for an industrial aluminum hot tandem rolling process which incorporates the microstructure and texture equations developed and the model validation using industrial data. The laboratory measurements for the microstructural evolution were carried out using industrially rolled material and a state-of-the-art plane strain compression tester at Alcan International. Each sample was given a single deformation and heat treated in a salt bath at 400 °C for various lengths of time to effect different levels of recrystallization in the samples. The range of hot-working conditions used for the laboratory study was chosen to represent conditions typically seen in industrial aluminum hot tandem rolling processes, i.e., deformation temperatures of 350 °C to 500 °C, strain rates of 0.5 to 100 seconds and total strains of 0.5 to 2.0. The semiempirical equations developed indicated that both the recrystallization kinetics and the final recrystallized

  16. Method of producing complex aluminum alloy parts of high temper, and products thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, I. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Fully annealed aluminum sheet is first stretch formed to the complex, doubly compound shape of a previously prepared forming die, e.g., an ejection seat blowout panel of a shuttlecraft. The part is then marked with a series of grid lines for monitoring later elongation. Thereafter it is solution heat treated and refrigerated to retard hardening. While still soft, it is stretched a second time on the same die to induce a modicum of work hardening, after which it is aged to the desired stress corrosion resistant temper, preferably the T8 level, to provide the desired hardness and stress corrosion resistance.

  17. Development of corrosion resistant aluminum heat exchanger, Part 1: Development of new aluminum alloy sheets for sacrificial anode

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, M.; Baba, Y.; Tanabe, Z.; Miura, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iijima, K.

    1986-01-01

    The sacrificial anodic effect of Al-Zn alloy reduced markedly in aluminium heat exchanger as car air conditioner manufactured by vacuum brazing conventionally used, as zinc elements preferentially evaporate in vacuum-heating. It was found that Al-Sn alloy had superior electrochemical characteristics than Al-Zn alloy (AA7072) as the sacrificial anodic material used in vacuum brazing. According to many experimental results, the new brazing sheet-fin with Al-Mn-Sn alloy core metal has been developed. This fin has favorable formability and prominent sacrificial anodic effect. Therefore, this fin is excellent material for car air conditioner manufactured by vacuum brazing.

  18. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  19. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples. PMID:18669265

  20. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  1. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  2. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - Part II: Finite Element Analyses of Nugget Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes work on finite element modeling of nugget growth for resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy to steel. It is a sequel to a previous paper on experimental studies of resistance spot welding of aluminum to steel using a transition material. Since aluminum alloys and steel cannot be readily fusion welded together due to their drastically different thermal physical properties, a cold-rolled clad material was introduced as a transition to aid the resistance welding process. Coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical finite element analyses were performed to simulate the nugget growth and heat generation patterns during the welding process. The predicted nugget growth results were compared to the experimental weld cross sections. Reasonable comparisons of nugget size were achieved. The finite element simulation procedures were also used in the electrode selection state to help reduce weld expulsion and improve weld quality.

  3. Influence of embedded nanocontainers on the efficiency of active anticorrosive coatings for aluminum alloys part II: influence of nanocontainer position.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Dimitriya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2013-01-01

    The present work contributes to the coating design of active anticorrosive coatings for the aluminum alloy, AA2024-T3. Part II is a continuation of Part I: Influence of Nanocontainer Concentration and describes further surprising aspects of the design of nanocontainer based active anticorrosive coatings, which influence their performance. The studied coating system consists of a passive sol-gel (SiO(x)/ZrO(x)) matrix and inhibitor (2-mercaptobenzothiazole) loaded mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MBT@NCs), which are dispersed only in half of the coating volume. Varying position and concentration of MBT@NCs the synergetic effect of inhibitor amount and path length on the metal surface were analyzed, considering the balance between optimum barrier properties, active protection and adhesion. The impact of MBT@NC position on passive and active corrosion resistance was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique. Increasing the distance between MBT@NCs and metal surface led to better barrier properties but worse active corrosion inhibition. These findings improve the understanding of the factors influencing the overall performance of active anticorrosive coatings and enable the development of a coating system with optimum anticorrosion efficiency. PMID:23237235

  4. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity

  5. Modeling the microstructural changes during hot tandem rolling of AA5XXX aluminum alloys. Part 2: Textural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.A.; Samarasekera, I.V.; Brimacombe, J.K.; Hawbolt, E.B.; Lloyd, D.J.

    1998-06-01

    In Part 2 of this article, the experimental work undertaken to measure the effect of deformation parameters (temperature, strain, and strain rate) on the texture formation during hot deformation and the evolution during subsequent recrystallization is described. In addition, the isothermal kinetics of development of individual texture components were also determined. A neutron diffractometer was used to measure the texture in the as-hot-deformed aluminum samples, and the samples were then heat treated in a 400 C salt bath for various lengths of time, with the texture being remeasured at various stages in the recrystallization process. Using data from the experimental program, the texture evolution during recrystallization was modeled by applying a modified form of the Avrami equation. Results indicated that, of the deformation parameters studied, textural development was most sensitive to the deformation temperature for both alloys. In addition, modeling results revealed that the Cu component ({l_brace}112{r_brace}<111>) was the first to recrystallize, typically followed by the S ({l_brace}1232{r_brace}<634>) and Bs ({l_brace}110{r_brace}<112>) components. This is in agreement with earlier work which indicated that the Bs component was the hardest to recrystallize, possibly because it is able to deform on very few slip systems and, hence, the dislocation interaction may be low.

  6. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbook on aluminum alloy 7075 includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures, and other pertinent engineering information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  7. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  8. Superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T. G.

    1997-12-01

    We have characterized in the Al-Mg system the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy. The alloy exhibited superplasticity at relatively high strain rates (about 10-2 s-1). At a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 there exists a wide temperature range (475-520`C) within which the tensile elongation is over 1000%. There also exists a wide strain rate range (10-3 - 10-1 s-1) within which the tensile elongation is over 500%. The presence of Sc in the alloy results in a uniform distribution of fine coherent Al3SC precipitates which effectively pin grain and subgrain boundaries during static and continuous recrystallization. As a result, the alloy retains its fine grain size (about 7 micron), even after extensive superplastic deformation (>1000%). During deformation, dislocations Mg with a high Schmidt factor slip across subgrains but are trapped by subgrain boundaries, as a result of the strong pining of Al3Sc. This process leads to the conversion of low-angled subgrain boundaries to high-angled grain boundaries and the subsequent grain boundary sliding, which produces superelasticity. A model is proposed to describe grain boundary sliding accommodated by dislocation glide across grains with a uniform distribution of coherent precipitates. The model predictions is consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors. PMID:10592801

  10. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  12. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  13. Aqueous recovery of actinides from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Chostner, D.F.; Gray, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the 1980's, a joint Rocky Flats/Savannah River program was established to recover actinides from scraps and residues generated during Rocky Flats purification operations. The initial program involved pyrochemical treatment of Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) chloride salts and Electrorefining (ER) anode heel metal to form aluminum alloys suitable for aqueous processing at Savannah River. Recently Rocky Flats has expressed interest in expanding the aluminum alloy program to include treatment of chloride salt residues from a modified Molten Salt Extraction process and from the Electrorefining purification operations. Samples of the current aluminum alloy buttons were prepared at Rocky Flats and sent to Savannah River Laboratory for flowsheet development and characterization of the alloys. A summary of the scrub alloy-anode heel alloy program will be presented along with recent results from aqueous dissolution studies of the new aluminum alloys. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Reinforcing aluminum alloys with high strength fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolpashnikov, A. I.; Manuylov, V. F.; Chukhin, B. D.; Shiryayev, Y. V.; Shurygin, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    A study is made of the possibility of reinforcing aluminum and aluminum based alloys with fibers made of high strength steel wire. The method of introducing the fibers is described in detail. Additional strengthening by reinforcement of the high alloy system Al - An - Mg was investigated.

  15. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  16. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  17. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1969-01-01

    Comprehensive compilation of technical data on aluminum alloy 6061 is presented in handbook form. The text includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures and other pertinent information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  18. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  19. Low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Baldwin, R.H.; Howell, C.R.

    1993-07-01

    The low room-temperature ductility Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is associated with their environmental embrittlement. Reducing the aluminum level from 29 to 16 at % has been found to be an effective method in essentially eliminating the environmental-embrittlement effect and increasing the room-temperature ductility value to over 25%. This paper will present data on alloy compositions, melting, casting and processing methods, and mechanical properties. Plans for future work on these alloys will also be described.

  20. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  1. Surface alloying of silicon into aluminum substrate.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    1998-10-28

    Aluminum alloys that are easily castable tend to have lower silicon content and hence lower wear resistance. The use of laser surface alloying to improve the surface wear resistance of 319 and 320 aluminum alloys was examined. A silicon layer was painted onto the surface to be treated. A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiberoptic beam delivery was used to carry out the laser surface treatment to enhance the silicon content. Process parameters were varied to minimize the surface roughness from overlap of the laser beam treatment. The surface-alloyed layer was characterized and the silicon content was determined.

  2. Effects of Different Modes of Hot Cross-Rolling in 7010 Aluminum Alloy: Part I. Evolution of Microstructure and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chandan; Singh, A. K.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-06-01

    The current study describes the evolution of microstructure and texture in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-based 7010 aluminum alloy during different modes of hot cross-rolling. Processing of materials involves three different types of cross-rolling. The development of texture in the one-step cross-rolled specimen can be described by a typical β-fiber having the maximum intensity near Copper (Cu) component. However, for the multi-step cross-rolled specimens, the as-rolled texture is mainly characterized by a strong rotated-Brass (Bs) component and a very weak rotated-cube component. Subsequent heat treatment leads to sharpening of the major texture component ( i.e., rotated-Bs). Furthermore, the main texture components in all the specimens appear to be significantly rotated in a complex manner away from their ideal positions because of non-symmetric deformations in the two rolling directions. Detailed microstructural study indicates that dynamic recovery is the dominant restoration mechanism operating during the hot rolling. During subsequent heat treatment, static recovery dominates, while a combination of particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) and strain-induced grain boundary migration (SIBM) causes partial recrystallization of the grain structure. The aforementioned restoration mechanisms play an important role in the development of texture components. The textural development in the current study could be attributed to the combined effects of (a) cross-rolling and inter-pass annealing that reduce the intensity of Cu component after each successive pass, (b) recrystallization resistance of Bs-oriented grains, (c) stability of Bs texture under cross-rolling, and (d) Zener pinning by Al3Zr dispersoids.

  3. Mechanical properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens for a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The first of the new alloys was a simple ternary alloy with iron, aluminum, and chromium contents that matched the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. Three heats were produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. Additions of titanium or yttrium were included. The ductile-to brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with the yttrium addition showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of over 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150{degrees}C, compared to approximately 300{degrees}C for FA-129.

  4. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  5. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum 2219 alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  6. Weldable aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlund, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    Weldable aluminum alloy has good resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, shows unchanged strength and formability after storage at room temperature, and can be pre-aged, stretched, and aged. Since toxic fumes of cadmium oxide are evolved when the new alloy is welded, adequate ventilation must be provided.

  7. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Piascik, R. S.; Dicus, D. L.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews fracture mechanics based, damage tolerant characterizations and predictions of fatigue crack growth in aerospace aluminum alloys. The results of laboratory experimentation and modeling are summarized in the areas of: (1) fatigue crack closure, (2) the wide range crack growth rate response of conventional aluminum alloys, (3) the fatigue behavior of advanced monolithic aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites, (4) the short crack problem, (5) environmental fatigue, and (6) variable amplitude loading. Remaining uncertainties and necessary research are identified. This work provides a foundation for the development of fatigue resistant alloys and composites, next generation life prediction codes for new structural designs and extreme environments, and to counter the problem of aging components.

  9. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  10. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.; Rahman, T.S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms by their group on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  11. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys. Part 2: Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Prasso, D.C.; Evans, J.W.; Wilson, I.J.

    1995-12-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part 1 (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part 1) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  12. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  13. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  14. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H.; Haga, T.; Watari, H.; Kumai, S.

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.

  15. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann; Burkholder, Jonathon

    2011-01-01

    NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program fs ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self ] Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR ]FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR ]FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process fs limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  16. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  17. FABRICATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for producing a workable article of a uranium- aluminum alloy in which the uranium content is between 14 and 70% by weight; aluminum powder and powdered UAl/sub 2/, UAl/sub 3/, UAl/sub 5/, or UBe/sub 9/ are mixed, and the mixture is compressed into the shape desired and sintered at between 450 and 600 deg C.

  18. Corrosion potential for aluminum alloys measured by ASTM G 69

    SciTech Connect

    Burleigh, T.D. ); Bovard, F.S. ); Rennick, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    ASTM G 69, [open quotes]Standard Practice for Measurement of Corrosion Potentials of Aluminum Alloys[close quotes], is a useful method to discern the temper of a given aluminum alloy. Corrosion potentials (E[sub corr]) often can be used to differentiate between different alloys since copper or zinc in solid solution will cause significant differences in E[sub corr]. Measured E[sub corr] of various aluminum alloys and other non-aluminum metals were listed.

  19. Phase transformations in ternary monotectic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Joachim; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer

    2005-09-01

    Monotectic aluminum alloys are of interest for the development of new alloys for technological applications such as self-lubricating bearings. In contrast to the well-known binary phase diagrams, many of the ternary systems are not well established. Moreover, in a ternary monotectic alloy one may encounter the four-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1+solid2, whereas in a binary system only a three-phase equilibrium L‧+L″+solid1 is possible. This opens a window for generating entirely new monotectic microstructures. The basis for such developments is the knowledge of the ternary phase diagrams and the conditions under which such four-phase reactions or different extensions of the binary monotectic reactions may form. This work presents a systematic classification of monotectic ternary aluminum alloys, illustrated by real systems. The study employs thermodynamic calculations of the ternary phase diagrams.

  20. Aluminum-lithium alloys in helicopters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.F.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are widely applied on the EH101 helicopter, designed and built jointly by GKN Westland Helicopters of England and Agusta S.p.A. of Italy. With the exception of the powder metallurgy alloy AA 5091, all the current commercially available aluminum-lithium alloys are produced by direct-chill casting, and require a precipitation-aging heat treatment to achieve the required properties. In aluminum-lithium alloys containing greater than 1.3% (by weight) of lithium, the intermetallic phase {delta}{prime}-Al{sub 3}Li precipitates upon natural or artificial aging, but the associated strengthening effect is insufficient to meet the medium or high strength levels usually required (the damage tolerant temper in AA 8090 is an exception).

  1. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.

  2. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  3. Machinability of hypereutectic silicon-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Akasawa, T.

    1999-08-01

    The machinability of high-silicon aluminum alloys made by a P/M process and by casting was compared. The cutting test was conducted by turning on lathes with the use of cemented carbide tools. The tool wear by machining the P/M alloy was far smaller than the tool wear by machining the cast alloy. The roughness of the machined surface of the P/M alloy is far better than that of the cast alloy, and the turning speed did not affect it greatly at higher speeds. The P/M alloy produced long chips, so the disposal can cause trouble. The size effect of silicon grains on the machinability is discussed.

  4. Dry machinability of aluminum alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Shareef, I.; Natarajan, M.; Ajayi, O. O.; Energy Technology; Department of IMET

    2005-01-01

    Adverse effects of the use of cutting fluids and environmental concerns with regard to cutting fluid disposability is compelling industry to adopt Dry or near Dry Machining, with the aim of eliminating or significantly reducing the use of metal working fluids. Pending EPA regulations on metal cutting, dry machining is becoming a hot topic of research and investigation both in industry and federal research labs. Although the need for dry machining may be apparent, most of the manufacturers still consider dry machining to be impractical and even if possible, very expensive. This perception is mainly due to lack of appropriate cutting tools that can withstand intense heat and Built-up-Edge (BUE) formation during dry machining. The challenge of heat dissipation without coolant requires a completely different approach to tooling. Special tooling utilizing high-performance multi-layer, multi-component, heat resisting, low friction coatings could be a plausible answer to the challenge of dry machining. In pursuit of this goal Argonne National Labs has introduced Nano-crystalline near frictionless carbon (NFC) diamond like coatings (DLC), while industrial efforts have led to the introduction of composite coatings such as titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) and others. Although, these coatings are considered to be very promising, they have not been tested either from tribological or from dry machining applications point of view. As such a research program in partnership with federal labs and industrial sponsors has started with the goal of exploring the feasibility of dry machining using the newly developed coatings such as Near Frictionless Carbon Coatings (NFC), Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiAlN), and multi-layer multicomponent nano coatings such as TiAlCrYN and TiAlN/YN. Although various coatings are under investigation as part of the overall dry machinability program, this extended abstract deals with a systematic investigation of dry

  5. [The corrosion resistance of aluminum and aluminum-based alloys studied in artificial model media].

    PubMed

    Zhakhangirov, A Zh; Doĭnikov, A I; Aboev, V G; Iankovskaia, T A; Karamnova, V S; Sharipov, S M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum and its alloys, designed for orthodontic employment, were exposed to 4 media simulating the properties of biologic media. The corrosion resistance of the tested alloys was assessed from the degree of aluminum migration to simulation media solutions, which was measured by the neutron activation technique. Aluminum alloy with magnesium and titanium has shown the best corrosion resistance. PMID:1799002

  6. Relationship between fracture toughness, fracture path, and microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. Part 2: Multiple micromechanisms-based fracture toughness model

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, A.M.; Deshpande, N.U.; Denzer, D.K.; Liu, J.

    1998-04-01

    A multiple micromechanisms-based model is developed to quantitatively relate the fracture toughness of partially recrystallized 7XXX aluminum alloys to their fracture surface morphology. The model is verified using the experimental data on partially recrystallized 7050 alloy reported in the companion article. It is then used to obtain a quantitative relationship between the fracture toughness and microstructural attributes. The model relates fracture toughness to microstructural parameters such as degree of recrystallization, grain size of recrystallized grains, thickness of recrystallized regions, total surface area of the constituent particles per unit volume, and microstructural anisotropy. The model predicts the changes in the fracture toughness with the specimen orientation.

  7. The Surface Tension of Pure Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Ian Frank; Taylor, John Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The surface tension of high purity and commercial purity aluminum in vacuo was determined using the sessile drop method and the results were found to compare favorably with published data. The effects of holding atmosphere, substrate, and "surface fracture" of the sessile drop on the measured surface tension values were investigated together with the effects of different solute elements commonly present in commercial aluminum alloys. The results obtained suggest that the nature of the surface oxide film formed on the droplets (affected by alloy composition and atmosphere) and the rupture of this film are the dominant factors influencing the surface tension values obtained. Changes in surface tension values of up to 60 pct were observed. The possible effect of this variable surface tension on practical casting processes, such as direct chill casting, is suggested.

  8. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  9. Materials data handbooks on aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Five handbooks have been prepared which describe up-to-date properties of the following wrought-aluminum alloys: 2014, 2219, 5456, 6061, and 7075. Each handbook is divided into twelve chapters. Scope of information presented includes physical- and mechanical-property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures.

  10. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not

  11. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  12. Issues for conversion coating of aluminum alloys with hydrotalcite

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrotalcite coatings on aluminum alloys are being developed for corrosion protection of aluminum in aggressive saline environments. Coating bath composition, surface pretreatment, and alloying elements in aluminum all influence the performance of these coatings during salt spray testing. The coating bath, comprised of lithium carbonate, requires aging by dissolution of aluminum into the bath in order to grow corrosion resistant coatings. Coatings formed in non- aged baths do not perform well in salt spray testing. The alloying elements in aluminum alloys, especially copper, influence the coating growth and formation leading to thin coatings. The effect of the alloy elements is to limit the supply of aluminum to the coating/electrolyte interface and hinder growth of hydrotalcite upon aluminum alloys.

  13. Precipitation of dispersoids in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Last, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of alloy composition and preheat treatment on the precipitation of the metastable Al{sub 3}Zr, {beta}{prime}, phase in ternary alloys and the subsequent recrystallization behavior was investigated. The ternary alloys contained zirconium and one of the following elements: copper, manganese, zinc, or silicon. Diffusion couples were constructed and the values for the interdiffusion coefficient for several elements in aluminum were calculated. The calculated values for the interdiffusion coefficients were used in a finite difference model for the prediction of the homogenization of an as-cast microstructure during preheating. {beta}{prime} was observed to precipitate on defects such as dislocations and low-angle boundaries when a critical solute level in all ternary alloys was reached. The critical solute level was system dependent. Homogeneous nucleation of {beta}{prime} occurred in Al-Si-Zr alloys. In Al-Zn-Zr alloys the shape of the {beta}{prime} deviated from its usual spherical shape to a cube shape when the zinc level exceeds approximately 4 wt. %. When compared to other alloying element additions, small amounts of silicon (between 0.25 and 0.5 wt %) had the greatest influence on not only the recrystallization behavior of the alloy, but also the precipitation of {beta}{prime}.

  14. Metallography of Aluminum and Its Alloys : Use of Electrolytic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquet, Pierre A

    1955-01-01

    Recent methods are described for electropolishing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Numerous references are included of electrolytic micrographic investigations carried out during the period 1948 to 1952. A detailed description of a commercial electrolytic polishing unit, suitable for micrographic examination of aluminum and its alloys, is included.

  15. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  16. Diffusion bonding of superplastic aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    Ability to diffusion bond aluminum alloys, in particular superplastic aluminum alloys, will complete the technology-base that is strongly needed to enhance the use of superplastic forming (SPF) technology. Concurrent diffusion bonding (DB)-SPF is considered to be an energy-saving manufacturing process since it simplifies the production of complex components. Moreover, because of increased design flexibility, overall manufacturing cost and component weight are significantly reduced. Diffusion bonding is an attractive manufacturing option for applications where the preservation of the base metal microstructure and, in turn, mechanical properties is imperative in the bond area. The process utilizes either the solid state or transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding to produce a bond with microstructure continuity in the joint. In addition, there is no localized thermal gradient present to induce distortion or to create residual stresses in the component, thereby increasing structural integrity.

  17. Dimensional control of quasisingle crystals of aluminum alloy in production

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, A.I.; Karuskevich, M.V.; Naim, V.R.

    1995-01-01

    The article deals with a method of controlling the dimensions of quasisingle crystal grains of an aluminum alloy used instead of single crystal specimens in static fatigue tests with the object of substantiating a discrete probabilistic model of the fatigue of metals and alloys. We obtained a mathematical model of dimensional control of quasisingle crystals of the aluminum alloy.

  18. Corrosion of aluminum alloys by chlorinated hydrocarbon/methanol mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Forest, W. S.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory investigations show that water-free mixtures of Freon MF /trichlorofluoromethane/ and methanol vigorously attack aluminum alloys which contain significant amounts of copper. Freon MF alone did not attack the aluminum alloys at room temperature. Pure methanol had only a slight corrosive effect on the alloy.

  19. Torsional Stability of Aluminum Alloy Seamless Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Paul, D A

    1939-01-01

    Torsion tests were made on 51ST aluminum-alloy seamless tubes having diameter-to-thickness ratios of from 77 to 139 and length-to-diameter ratios of from 1 to 60. The torsional strengths developed in the tubes which failed elastically (all tubes having lengths greater than 2 to 6 times the diameter) were in most cases within 10 percent of the value indicated by the theories of Donnel, Timoshenko, and Sturm, assuming a condition of simply supported ends.

  20. Warm formability of aluminum-magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Henshall, G.A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-27

    Manufacturers have become increasingly interested in near-net-shape forming of aluminum alloys as a means to reduce production costs and the weight of aircraft and automotive structures. To achieve the ductilities required for this process, we have examined extended ductility of Al-Mg alloys in the warm forming, or Class I creep, regime. We have studied a high-purity, binary alloy of Al-2.8Mg and ternary alloys of Al-xMg-0.5Mn with Mg concentrations from 1.0 to 6.6 wt. %. Tensile tests, including strain rates-change tests, have been performed with these materials at temperatures of 300 and 400C over a range 10{sup {minus}4} to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A maximum tensile failure strain of 325% for the binary alloy and a maximum of 125% in the ternary alloys have been measured. The experimental results have been used to evaluate the effects of solute concentration, microstructure, temperature, and strain rate on flow stress ({sigma}), elongation to failure (e{sub f}), and strain-rate sensitivity (m) of these alloys.

  1. Grain size control and superplasticity in 6013-type aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troeger, Lillianne Plaster Whitelock

    Aluminum alloys have been the material of choice for aircraft construction since the 1930's. Currently, the automotive industry is also showing an increasing interest in aluminum alloys as structural materials. 6xxx aluminum alloys possess a combination of strength and formability which makes them attractive to both industries. In addition, 6xxx alloys are highly weldable, corrosion resistant, and low in cost as compared with the 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys. Superplastic forming (SPF) is a manufacturing process which exploits the phenomenon of superplasticity in which gas pressure is used to form complex-shaped parts in a single forming operation. This reduces part counts and the need for fasteners and connectors, resulting in reduced product weight. Reduced product/vehicle weight improves fuel economy. Most alloys must be specially processed for superplasticity. Much research effort has been directed at the development of thermomechanical processes for the grain refinement of aluminum alloys by static or dynamic recrystallization. to induce superplasticity. While large numbers of studies have been conducted on 2xxx, 5xxx, 7xxx, and 8xxx aluminum alloys, very few studies have been focused on the grain refinement of 6xxx aluminum alloys for superplasticity. The current research describes a new thermomechanical process for application to 6xxx aluminum alloys for grain refinement and superplasticity. The process is shown to successfully refine and induce superplasticity in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy which falls within the compositional limits of both 6013 and 6111. The grain refinement is by particle-stimulated nucleation of recrystallization. The microstructural evolution during the thermomechanical processing is characterized in terms of precipitate size, shape, distribution and composition; texture; recrystallization; and grain size, shape, and thermal stability. The new process produces a statically-stable, weakly-textured, equiaxed grain structure with an average

  2. Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, George R.; Clark, Ronald K.; Robinson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

  3. Three year performance of aluminum alloy galvanic cathodic protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Funahashi, M.; Young, W.T.

    1999-07-01

    A newly developed aluminum alloy galvanic cathodic protection system was installed on selected prestressed concrete piles. The piles were instrumented to measure the aluminum alloy anode performance. To evaluate the new anode, the pure zinc anode was used for the comparison purpose. The anode performance was monitored for the three years since the system was installed in June, 1996. This paper discusses the results of the performance of the new aluminum alloy anode.

  4. Tin soldering of aluminum and its alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Gino

    1921-01-01

    A method is presented for soldering aluminum to other metals. The method adopted consists of a galvanic application to the surface of the light-metal parts to be soldered, of a layer of another metal, which, without reacting electrolytically on the aluminum, adheres strongly to the surface to which it is applied, and is, on the other hand, adapted to receive the soft solder. The metal found to meet the criteria best was iron.

  5. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  6. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  7. Aluminum alloys for satellite boxes : engineering guidelines for obtaining adequate strength while minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    This report provides strategies for minimizing machining distortion in future designs of aluminum alloy satellite boxes, based in part on key findings from this investigation. The report outlines types of aluminum alloys and how they are heat treated, how residual stresses develop during heat treatment of age hardening alloys, ways residual stresses can be minimized, and the design of machining approaches to minimize distortion in parts that contain residual stresses. Specific recommendations are made regarding alloy selection, heat treatment, stress relieving, and machining procedures for boxes requiring various strength levels with emphasis on 6061 and 7075 aluminum alloys.

  8. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  9. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new high strength and wear resistant aluminum cast alloy invented by NASA-MSFC for high temperature applications will be presented. Developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low-exhaust emission, the novel NASA 398 aluminum-silicon alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (500 F-800 F), enabling new pistons to utilize less material, which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance. NASA 398 alloy also offers greater wear resistance, surface hardness, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys for several commercial and automotive applications. The new alloy can be produced economically using permanent steel molds from conventional gravity casting or sand casting. The technology was developed to stimulate the development of commercial aluminum casting products from NASA-developed technology by offering companies the opportunity to license this technology.

  10. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, W.N. )

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  11. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  12. Laser perforation of aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliore, Leonard; Nazary, George

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances in the design of gain modules for diode-pumped solid-state lasers have allowed the manufacture of high-powered Q-switched products. The high available pulse energy and good mode quality enable highly efficient harmonic conversion, enabling the generation of several hundred watts of average power at a wavelength of 532nm. Among the applications for which this class of product may be suited is the rapid drilling of small-diameter holes in aluminum sheet. To investigate this application, plates of several aluminum alloys were drilled under a variety of conditions. The drilled plates were sectioned and subjected to analysis by optical metallography. The initial results indicate ways in which the process may be optimized.

  13. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  14. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloys 5083 and 5383

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Jeoom Kee

    2009-09-01

    The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW), laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW), FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base) alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009), jointly funded by its member agencies

  16. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  17. Ion implantation and diamond-like coatings of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Malaczynski, G.W.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Qiu, X.

    1997-04-01

    In an attempt to increase the wear resistance of some key automotive components, General Motors Research and Development Center initiated a study to determine the potential of surface modification as a means of improving the tribological properties of automotive parts, and to investigate the feasibility of mass producing such parts. This paper describes the plasma immersion ion implantation system that was designed for the study of various options for surface treatment, and it discusses bench testing procedures used for evaluating the surface-treated samples. In particular, both tribological and microstructural analyses are discussed for nitrogen implants and diamond-like hydrocarbon coatings of some aluminum alloys.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  3. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-15

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO{sub 2}) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO{sub 2} tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO{sub 2} cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests.

  4. Aluminum additions in polycrystalline iron-gallium (Galfenol) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, M. D.; Summers, E.; Meloy, R.; Mosley, J.

    2008-03-01

    Galfenol alloys show promise as a new magnetically activated smart material based on their unique combination of relatively high magnetostrictive performance and good mechanical robustness. Investigations of aluminum additions to single crystal iron-gallium alloys have been done previously, and the magnetostrictive response seems to follow the rule of mixtures with decreasing saturation magnetostriction with increasing aluminum content. Aluminum is assumed to substitute for Ga directly in the alloy. Directionally solidified polycrystalline Galfenol alloys with aluminum additions were produced to determine the effects on the magnetic properties. Iron-gallium-aluminum alloys were investigated for two primary reasons: (1) Fe-Al alloys are well established and are typically manufactured using conventional thermo-mechanical processing techniques such as rolling; it is anticipated that aluminum additions will aid in the development of Galfenol alloy rolled sheets (2) Gallium prices continue to rise and a cost effective alternative needs to be investigated. Several Fe-Ga-Al alloy compositions were prepared using the Free Stand Zone Melting (FSZM) directional solidification technique. Alloy composition ranges investigated include: Fe 80.5Ga xAl 19.5-x (4.9<=x<=13), Fe 81.6Ga yAl 18.4-y (4.6<=y<=13.8), and Fe 85Ga zAl 15-z (3.75<=z<=11.25). Alloys were studied using EDS (chemistry verification), EBSD (crystallite orientation), and magnetic characterization techniques to determine the effect of aluminum addition on the polycrystalline binary Fe-Ga system. Magnetic properties such as saturation magnetostriction (λ sat), piezomagnetic constant (d 33), and relative magnetic permeability (μ r) of directionally solidified Fe-Ga-Al polycrystalline alloys will be compared to binary Fe-Ga alloys including investigations into the crystal orientation effects on these properties. Results suggest that up to 50% aluminum can be substituted in the alloy while maintaining considerable

  5. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  6. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  7. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  8. Biaxial Testing of 2195 Aluminum Lithium Alloy Using Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. M.; Pollock, W. D.; Dawicke, D. S.; Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A cruciform biaxial test specimen was used to test the effect of biaxial load on the yield of aluminum-lithium alloy 2195. Fifteen cruciform specimens were tested from 2 thicknesses of 2195-T8 plate, 0.45 in. and 1.75 in. These results were compared to the results from uniaxial tensile tests of the same alloy, and cruciform biaxial tests of aluminum alloy 2219-T87.

  9. Texture, microstructure and formability of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang-Ming

    Texture, microstructure and formability were studied in Direct Chill Cast (DC) and Strip Cast (SC) aluminum alloys with regard to crystallographic anisotropy, the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect and aging softening behavior. It was found that material properties change greatly with manufacturing processes (DC vs. SC) and chemical composition (3xxx vs. 5xxx alloys). DC cast hot band materials are usually fully recrystallized and have strong softening textures while SC hot band materials have a rolling structure with strong deformation textures. Softening textures cause 90° earing, while deformation textures result in 45° earing after deep drawing. During cold rolling, 90° earing in DC cast hot band materials decreases and eventually changes to 45° earing after certain degrees of cold reduction. Correspondingly, the intensity of the softening texture components in DC cast hot band materials decreases while the intensity of deformation texture components increases with increasing degrees of cold reduction. These two kinds of textures interact and attempt to balance each other during cold rolling which produces resultant earing. However, this is not true for SC hot band materials since it's hard to obtain strong softening textures and thus 90° earing in these materials. 5xxx Al-Mg alloys are more difficult to work than 3xxx aluminum alloys. Elevated temperature annealing, which greatly reduces the strength (hardness), improves significantly the workability of Al-Mg alloys. On the other hand, the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect and aging softening behavior are stronger in Al-Mg alloys than in 3xxx aluminum alloys, and both increase with increasing cold reduction and with increasing Mg content. An apparent tensile anisotropy exists in as received SC hot band materials. The tensile yield strength (YS) is smaller in the QD (45° to the rolling direction) and larger in the RD (rolling direction) and the TD (transverse direction). There is no obvious difference in YS between

  10. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  11. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  12. Heat treatment study of aluminum casting alloy M45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1967-01-01

    Study determines the heat treatment cycle of aluminum casting alloy M-45 which will increase the strength levels of the alloy while maintaining optimum stress corrosion resistance. Evidence indicates that present production castings are overaged too severely to take full advantage of the strength of the alloy.

  13. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  14. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  15. Predicting fracture behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.T.; Cordes, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A computational method has been developed to predict the material fracture failure process in flawed or cracked specimens. This method does not require experimental material fracture data. Finite element technique is employed to model the physical shape of the specimen. Nonlinear spring elements are introduced to model the material damage behavior near a flaw or a crack tip. Crack initiation and crack propagation conditions are developed to predict the crack initiation load, the extent of material damage, and the crack growth behavior. The introduction of nonlinear spring elements and the development of crack initiation and crack growth conditions are unique features for fracture prediction with the development of this method. To prove the feasibility of the method, two types of specimen made by two aluminum alloys with similar material stress-strain data were studied. Fracture predictions by this method are comparable to experimental data.

  16. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  17. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  18. Failure analysis of aluminum alloy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johari, O.; Corvin, I.; Staschke, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of six service failures in aluminum alloy components which failed in aerospace applications is reported. Identification of fracture surface features from fatigue and overload modes was straightforward, though the specimens were not always in a clean, smear-free condition most suitable for failure analysis. The presence of corrosion products and of chemically attacked or mechanically rubbed areas here hindered precise determination of the cause of crack initiation, which was then indirectly inferred from the scanning electron fractography results. In five failures the crack propagation was by fatigue, though in each case the fatigue crack initiated from a different cause. Some of these causes could be eliminated in future components by better process control. In one failure, the cause was determined to be impact during a crash; the features of impact fracture were distinguished from overload fractures by direct comparisons of the received specimens with laboratory-generated failures.

  19. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  20. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. T. V.; Ritchie, R. O.; Piascik, R. S.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The principal mechanisms which govern the fatigue crack propagation resistance of aluminum-lithium alloys are investigated, with emphasis on their behavior in controlled gaseous and aqueous environments. Extensive data describe the growth kinetics of fatigue cracks in ingot metallurgy Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 and in powder metallurgy alloys exposed to moist air. Results are compared with data for traditional aluminum alloys 2024, 2124, 2618, 7075, and 7150. Crack growth is found to be dominated by shielding from tortuous crack paths and resultant asperity wedging. Beneficial shielding is minimized for small cracks, for high stress ratios, and for certain loading spectra. While water vapor and aqueous chloride environments enhance crack propagation, Al-Li-Cu alloys behave similarly to 2000-series aluminum alloys. Cracking in water vapor is controlled by hydrogen embrittlement, with surface films having little influence on cyclic plasticity.

  2. Simulating weld-fusion boundary microstructures in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios D.; Lippold, John C.

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental study of weld-fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys was conducted in an effort to understand equiaxed grain zone formation and fusion boundary nucleation and growth phenomena. In addition to commercial aluminum alloys, experimental Mg-bearing alloys with Zr and Sc additions were studied along with the widely used Cu- and Licontaining alloy 2195-T8. This article describes work conducted to clarify the interrelation among composition, base metal substrate, and temperature as they relate to nucleation and growth phenomena at the fusion boundary.

  3. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  4. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  5. The development of recycle-friendly automotive aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh K.; Green, J. A. S.; Kaufman, J. Gilbert

    2007-11-01

    The continuing growth of aluminum alloy usage in transportation applications, notably passenger automobiles and minivans, and the demonstrated economic benefits of recycling aluminum-rich vehicles increase the need to seriously consider the desirability of designing recycling-friendly alloys. This article focuses on that aspect of the recycling process for passenger vehicles. The goals are to illustrate the opportunities afforded by identifying and taking full advantage of potential metal streams in guiding the development of new alloys that use those streams. In speculating on several possible aluminum recovery practices and systems that might be used in recycling passenger vehicles, likely compositions are identified and preliminary assessments of their usefulness for direct recycling are made. Specific compositions for possible new recycle-friendly alloys are suggested. In addition, recommendations on how the aluminum enterprise, including industry, academia, and government, can work together to achieve the aggressive but important goals described here are discussed.

  6. Measurement of Thermodynamic Properties of Titanium Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Gopal

    1995-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the work done by Professor Mehrotra at NASA Lewis Research Center. He has worked extensively on the measurement of thermodynamic properties of titanium aluminum alloys over the past six years.

  7. Selecting an Algicide for Use with Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-03-15

    This paper discusses the testing and results of five relatively noncorrosive commercially available compounds compared with one another and with sodium hypochlorite for their potential applicability as algicides in water systems containing aluminum alloys.

  8. Stress-corrosion-induced property changes in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, B. F.; Clotfelter, W. N.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of electrical conductivity, ultrasonic surface wave attenuation, and internal friction loss were made on aluminum alloys 7079-T6, 2219-T31, and 2219-T81 as a function of the onset of stress corrosion.

  9. Paint-Bonding Improvement for 2219 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daech, Alfred F.; Cibula, Audrey Y.

    1987-01-01

    Bonding of adhesives and primers to 2219 aluminum alloy improved by delaying rinse step in surface-treatment process. Delaying rinse allows formation of rougher surface for stronger bonding and greater oxide buildup.

  10. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  11. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  12. Thermal stress-relief treatments for 2219 aluminum alloy are evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Evaluation of three thermal stress relief treatments for 2219 aluminum alloy in terms of their effect on residual stress, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion resistance. The treatments are post aging and stress relieving fullscale and subscale parts formed in the aged T81 condition, and aging subscale parts formed in the unaged T31 condition.

  13. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-10-18

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/alumnum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  14. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  15. Aluminum-silver alloy films for solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. O.; Nordin, C. W.; Masterson, K. D.

    1980-05-01

    Films of aluminum silver alloys were formed using triode sputtering. Films with a wide variety of composition were produced and evaluated. Films deposited at low substrate temperatures had a high specular reflectance. At higher temperatures two phase alloys formed which had rough low reflecting surfaces.

  16. Aluminum alloy clad fiber optic corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Paul S.; Ikegami, Roy; Shrader, John E.; Sherrer, David; Zabaronick, Noel; Zeakes, Jason S.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1997-06-01

    Life extension programs for military metallic aircraft are becoming increasingly important as defense budgets shrink and world economies realign themselves to an uncertain future. For existing military weapon systems, metallic corrosion damage costs as estimated $DOL8 billion per year. One approach to reducing this cost is to develop a reliable method to detect and monitor corrosion in hidden metallic structure with the use of corrosion sensors which would give an early indication of corrosion without significant disassembly, thereby reducing maintenance costs. This presentation describes the development, analysis, and testing of a fiber optic corrosion sensor developed jointly with the Virginia Polytechnic Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center and sponsored by Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate. In the sensor which was researched, the normal cladding is removed in the sensor region, and replaced with aluminum alloy and allowed to corrode on coupons representative of C/KC-135 body structure in an ASTM B117 salt spray chamber and a Boeing developed Crevice Corrosion Cell. In this approach, the optical signal output of the sensor was originally designed to increase as corrosion takes place, however interaction with the corrosion byproducts yielded different results than anticipated. These test results to determine a correlation between the sensor output and the structural degradation due to corrosion are discussed.

  17. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  18. An investigation of plastic fracture in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, J. R., Jr.; Vanstone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The brittle fracture of many high strength alloys such as steel, titanium, and aluminum was shown to occur by a process called plastic fracture. According to this process microscopic voids form at impurity particles, then grow and coalesce to cause the final rupture. To further understand the role of impurities, four aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T851, 2124-T851, 7075-T7351 and 7079-T651. Fractography, quantitative metallography, and microprobe studies assessed the roles of various impurity particles relative to these alloys.

  19. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys. PMID:17620189

  20. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2014, 2nd edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A revised edition of the materials data handbook on the aluminum alloy 2014 is presented. The scope of the information presented includes physical and mechanical property data at cryogenic, ambient and elevated temperatures, supplemented with useful information in such areas as material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication and joining techniques. Design data are presented, as available, and these data are complemented with information on the typical behavior of the alloy.

  1. Microstructure Development and Characteristics of Semisolid Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Merton Flemings; srinath Viswanathan

    2001-05-15

    A drop forge viscometer was employed to investigate the flow behavior under very rapid compression rates of A357, A356 diluted with pure aluminum and Al-4.5%Cu alloys. The A357 alloys were of commercial origin (MHD and SIMA) and the rheocast, modified A356 and Al-4.5Cu alloys were produced by a process developed at the solidification laboratory of MIT.

  2. Preparation of cast aluminum alloy-mica particle composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deonath, MR.; Bhat, R. T.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    A method for making aluminum-mica particle composites is presented in which mica particles are stirred in molten aluminum alloys followed by casting in permanent molds. Magnesium is added either as an alloying element or in the form of pieces to the surface of the alloy melts to disperse up to 3 wt% mica powders in the melts and to obtain high recoveries of mica in the castings. The mechanical properties of the aluminum alloy-mica composite decrease with increasing mica content; however, even at 2.2% it has a tensile strength of 14.22 kg/sq mm with 1.1% elongation, a compression strength of 42.61 kg/sq mm, and an impact strength of 0.30 kgm/sq cm. Cryogenic and self-lubricating bearing are mentioned applications.

  3. Low-cycle fatigue resistance of AD1 aluminum and AMg5 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodilo, A.A.; Balyuk, L.M.; Modestova, R.V.

    1985-02-01

    This paper reports on investigations carried out by the Severodonetsk branch of the Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Chemical Engineering into the low-cycle fatigue resistance of aluminum AD1 and AMg/sup 5/ aluminum alloy. The cylindrical specimens were tested in an UME-1oTM machine with recording of the cyclic deformation diagram. It is concluded that the Landger equation can be used to construct the calculation curves of low-cycle fatigue of the aluminum alloys; the quality of the welded joints plays the controlling role in the resistance of the vessels and plant to low-cycle fracture.

  4. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  5. Synthesis of aluminum-based scandium-yttrium master alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhin, V. Yu.; Kosov, Ya. I.; Lobacheva, O. L.; Dzhevaga, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    The preparation technology for an Al-2% Sc-0.5% Y master alloy using aluminum-manganese alloys has been developed and tested. The microstructure of the prepared master alloy is studied and the compositions of intermetallics is determined. The efficient technological parameters of the synthesis are determined. It is shown that varying the compositions of starting reagents and alloying additions and optimizing the process conditions (temperature, mixing, etc.) allow us to forecast the manufacturing and operating characteristics of aluminum-based master alloys. Joint additions of scandium and yttrium oxides to a charge favor a substantial decrease in the grain size of the formed intermetallics; this effect appears to the utmost in the case of microallying with yttrium up to 0.5 wt %.

  6. The Cleaning of OAB Universal Covers - An Origin of Smut in Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T

    2002-05-14

    The smut that appeared on the universal covers after the OAB cleaning process consists of sub-micron size aluminum particles originating from the machining of these parts prior to cleaning. The rigorous gross and precision cleanings with Brulin in the OAB cleaning process could not completely wash these fine particles away from the surfaces. However, applying a phosphoric acid etch before the cleaning helped to remove these fine aluminum particles. Experimental results again showed that an acid etching before cleaning is essential in preventing the occurrence of smut in aluminum alloy after gross/precision cleaning. A mechanism, based on the electrostatic {zeta}-potential, is proposed to explain the occurrence of smut that is often encountered during the cleaning of aluminum alloys.

  7. Tensile and impact properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-12-31

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens from a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys [based on Fe-8Al (wt %)] had lower transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al-type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with yttrium showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150 C, compared to approximately 300 C for FA-129. In general, the microstructures were coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  8. A study of aluminum-lithium alloys: Strength profile in 2090 aluminum-lithium-copper-magnesium-zirconium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Soepriyanto, S.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum-containing lithium alloys are undergoing intensive development as replacements for conventional aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 in aircraft structural applications. Lithium is a very reactive metal so that an elevated temperature heat treatments can cause lithium diffusion to the surface and reaction with the atmosphere. Solid state diffusion of lithium within the 2090 alloy and subsequent surface oxidation during solution heat treatment were investigated. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses were used to evaluate the alloy's thermal oxidation behavior. A mathematical model based on simultaneous diffusion and surface oxidation of lithium was developed to predict lithium concentration profiles across the specimen. Agreement was obtained between the predicted lithium concentration profiles and their corresponding experimental results. Microhardness and yield strength profiles were found also to follow the corresponding lithium concentration profiles. Various heat treatment procedures were studied on this 2090 alloy to give a greater understanding of precipitate strengthening.

  9. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  10. Fracturing behavior of aluminum alloys with welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Salita, D. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Lependin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys with welded joints are investigated. The joints are produced by the friction stir welding under various conditions. This fact is used for studying the principles and patterns of defect structure development. Mechanical properties are evaluated by static tension tests. The impact of welding process conditions on loading curves and strength properties is analysed. Fracture surface structures for samples with and without welded joints are studied, and results are compared. It is revealed, that differences in deformation behavior and mechanical properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys produced under different welding process conditions are caused by developing of structure defects in a welded joints, mostly, nonuniformities/discontinuities of various types. The obtained results can be used for improvement and development of new welding process conditions for aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  11. MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION MODELING FOR SOLUTION TREATMENT OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hebi; Sabau, Adrian S; Skszek, Timothy; Niu, X

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure evolution during solution treatment plays an important role in mechanical properties of heat-treated aluminum alloys. In this paper, models were reviewed that can predict the microstructure evolution during the solutionizing process of the aging heat treatment of aluminum alloys. The dissolution of Mg2Si particles has been modeled as a diffusion process of Mg in the -Al matrix. The evolution of volumetric fraction of fragmented silicon as a function of time and temperature was also considered. The growth and coarsening of silicon particles during the heat treatment was considered. It was found that constitutive equations and required property data for most of the phenomena that need to be considered are available. Several model parameters that need to be obtained from material characterization were identified. Pending the availability of these model parameters, this comprehensive model can be used to describe the microstructure evolution of aluminum alloys in order to optimize the solutionizing heat treatment for energy savings.

  12. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  13. Improved thermal treatment of aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.

    1968-01-01

    Newly developed tempering treatment considerably increases the corrosion resistance of 7075-T6 alloy and concomitantly preserves its yield strength. The results of tests on samples of the alloy subjected to the above treatments show that when the overaging period is 12 hours /at 325 degrees F/, the alloy exhibits a yield strength of 73,000 psi.

  14. Environment enhanced fatigue of advanced aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, Donald C.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to characterize and understand the environmental fatigue crack propagation behavior of advanced, high stiffness and strength, aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites. Those gases and aqueous electrolytes which are capable of producing atomic hydrogen by reactions on clean crack surfaces are emphasized. Characterizations of the behavior of new materials are sought to provide data for damage tolerant component life prediction. Mechanistic models are sought for crack tip damage processes which are generally applicable to structural aluminum alloys. Such models will enable predictions of cracking behavior outside of the data, metallurgical improvements in material cracking resistance, and insight on hydrogen compatibility.

  15. Stress corrosion of high strength aluminum alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.; Brummer, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out to examine the relationship of the observed chemical and mechanical properties of Al-Cu and Al-Zn-Mg alloys to the stress corrosion mechanisms which dominate in each case. Two high purity alloys and analogous commercial alloys were selected. Fundamental differences between the behavior of Al-Cu and of Al-Zn-Mg alloys were observed. These differences in the corrosion behavior of the two types of alloys are augmented by substantial differences in their mechanical behavior. The relative cleavage energy of the grain boundaries is of particular importance.

  16. Numerical investigation for formability of aluminum 6016 alloy under non-isothermal warm forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Dai, M. H.; Ying, L.; Shi, D. Y.; Zhao, K. M.; Lu, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The warm forming technology of aluminum alloy has attracted attention from worldwide automotive engineering sector in recent years, with which the complex geometry parts can be realized at elevated temperature. A non-isothermal warm forming process for the heat treatable aluminum can quickly carry out its application on traditional production line by adding a furnace to heat up the aluminum alloy sheet. The 6000 aluminum alloy was investigated by numerical simulation and experiment using the Nakajima test model in this paper. A modified Fields-Backofen model was introduced into numerical simulation process to describe the thermo-mechanical flow behavior of a 6000 series aluminum alloy. The experimental data was obtained by conducting thermal-mechanical uniaxial tensile experiment in temperatures range of 25˜400°C to guarantee the numerical simulation more accurate. The numerical simulation was implemented with LS_DYNA software in terms of coupled dynamic explicit method for investigating the effect of initial forming temperature and the Binder Holder Force (BHF), which are critical process parameters in non-isothermal warm forming. The results showed that the optimal initial forming temperature range was 300°C˜350°C. By means of conducting numerical simulation in deep drawing box model, the forming window of BHF and temperature around the optimal initial forming temperature (275°, 300° and 325°) are investigated, which can provide guidance to actual experiment.

  17. Thermodynamics of Titanium-Aluminum-Oxygen Alloys Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium-aluminum alloys are promising intermediate-temperature alloys for possible compressor applications in gas-turbine engines. These materials are based on the a2-Ti3Al + g-TiAl phases. The major issue with these materials is high oxygen solubility in a2-Ti3Al, and oxidation of unsaturated alloys generally leads to mixed non-protective TiO2+Al2O3 scales. From phase diagram studies, oxygen saturated a2-Ti3Al(O) is in equilibrium with Al2O3; however, oxygen dissolution has a detrimental effect on mechanical properties and cannot be accepted. To better understand the effect of oxygen dissolution, we examined the thermodynamics of titanium-aluminum-oxygen alloys.

  18. Aluminum alloy 6013 sheet for new U.S. Navy aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, R. S.; Bakow, L.; Lee, E. W.

    1990-05-01

    The recently developed aluminum alloy 6013-T6 has been selected for the fuselage skin and other applications on the U.S. Navy's P-7A airplane, in place of the traditional 2024-T3 clad sheet. Alloy 6013-T6 is naturally corrosion resistant, like the well-established alloy 6061, and hence is used unclad. Its fatigue strength, fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness compare favorably with 2024-T3. Replacement of alloy 2024 with alloy 6013 also reduces manufacturing costs for formed parts, because 6013 is readily formed in the T4 temper, then simply aged to T6, thus avoiding the costly heat treatments and straightening required for alloy 2024.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloys 1460 and 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were employed to characterize the precipitate distributions in lithium-containing aluminum alloys 1460 and 2195 in the T8 condition. TEM examinations revealed delta prime and T1 as the primary strengthening precipitates in alloys 1460 and 2195 respectively. TEM results showed a close similarity of the Russian alloy 1460 to the U.S. alloy 2090, which has a similar composition and heat treatment schedule. DSC analyses also indicate a comparable delta prime volume fraction. TEM study of a fractured tensile sample of alloy 1460 showed that delta prime precipitates are sheared by dislocations during plastic deformation and that intense stress fields arise at grain boundaries due to planar slip. Differences in fracture toughness of alloys 1460 and 2195 are rationalized on the basis of a literature review and observations from the present study.

  20. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Section 1 of this report records the progress achieved on NASA-LaRC Grant NAG-1-745 (Environment Assisted Degradation Mechanisms in Al-Li Alloys), and is based on research conducted during the period April 1 to November 30, 1987. A discussion of work proposed for the project's second year is included. Section 2 provides an overview of the need for research on the mechanisms of environmental-mechanical degradation of advanced aerospace alloys based on aluminum and lithium. This research is to provide NASA with the basis necessary to permit metallurgical optimization of alloy performance and engineering design with respect to damage tolerance, long term durability and reliability. Section 3 reports on damage localization mechanisms in aqueous chloride corrosion fatigue of aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 4 reports on progress made on measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 5 provides a detailed technical proposal for research on environmental degradation of Al-Li alloys, and the effect of hydrogen in this.

  1. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  2. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration. PMID:12159968

  3. High Strength Aluminum Alloy For High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The cast article has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 6.0-25.0, Copper 5.0-8.0, Iron 0.05-1.2, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0.05-1.2, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.05-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Phosphorus 0.001-0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10-25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4-15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2 crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  4. Study made of ductility limitations of aluminum-silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. A.; Frederick, S. F.

    1967-01-01

    Study of the relation between microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys determines the cause of the variations in properties resulting from differences in solidification rate. It was found that variations in strength are a consequence of variations in ductility and that ductility is inversely proportional to dendrite cell size.

  5. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  6. Characteristics of the aluminum alloy sheets for forming and application examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uema, Naoyuki; Asano, Mineo

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and application examples of aluminum alloy sheets developed for automotive parts by Sumitomo Light Metal are described. For the automotive closure panels (ex., hood, back-door), an Al-Mg-Si alloy sheet having an excellent hemming performance was developed. The cause of the occurrence and the propagation of cracks by bending were considered to be the combined effect of the shear bands formed across several crystal grains and the micro-voids formed around the second phase particles. By reducing the shear band formation during bending by controlling the crystallographic texture, the Al-Mg-Si alloy sheets showed an excellent hemming performance. For the automotive outer panels (ex., roof, fender, trunk-lid), an Al-Mg alloy sheet, which has both a good hot blow formability and excellent surface appearance after hot blow forming was developed, and hot blow forming technology was put to practical use using this developed Al-Mg alloy sheet. For automotive heat insulators, a high ductile Al-Fe alloy sheet was developed. The heat insulator, which integrated several panels, was put into practical use using this developed Al-Fe alloy sheet. The textured sheet was often used as a heat insulator in order to reduce the thickness of the aluminum alloy sheet and obtain good press formability. The new textured sheet, which has both high rigidity and good press formability for heat insulators, was developed by FE analysis.

  7. Materials Design for Joinable, High Performance Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamm, Ryan James

    An aluminum alloy compatible with friction stir welding is designed for automotive and aerospace structural applications. Current weldable automotive aluminum alloys do not possess the necessary strength to meet safety standards and therefore are not able to replace steel in the automotive body. Significant weight savings could be achieved if steel components are replaced with aluminum. Current aerospace alloys are not weldable, requiring machining of large pieces that are then riveted together. If an aerospace alloy could be friction stir welded, smaller pieces could be welded, reducing material waste. Using a systems approach for materials design, property goals are set from performance objectives. From previous research and computational predictions, a structure is designed for a prototype alloy containing dynamic precipitates to readily dissolve and re-precipitate and high stability precipitates to resist dissolution and coarsening in the weld region. It is found that a Ag modified Al-3.9Mg-0.04Cu (at. %) alloy enhanced the rate and magnitude of hardening during ageing, both beneficial effects for dynamic precipitation. In the same alloy, ageing at 350°C results in hardening from Al 3(Sc,Zr) precipitates. Efforts to effectively precipitate both populations simultaneously are unsuccessful. The Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitation hardened prototype is friction stir processed and no weak zones are found in the weld hardness profile. An aerospace alloy design is proposed, utilizing the dual precipitate structure shown in the prototype. The automotive alloy is designed using a basic strength model with parameters determined from the initial prototype alloy analysis. After ageing to different conditions, the alloy is put through a simulated heat affected zone thermal cycle with a computer controlled induction heater. The aged samples lose hardness from the weld cycle but recover hardness from a post weld heat treatment. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron

  8. Materials data handbooks prepared for aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456, and stainless steel alloy 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbooks summarize all presently known properties of commercially available structural aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456 and structural stainless steel alloy 301. The information includes physical and mechanical property data and design data presented in tables, illustrations, and text.

  9. Formation of Brittle Phases During Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Titanium to Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shouzheng; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan; Liu, Kun

    2014-04-01

    Welding of titanium alloy TA15 to aluminum alloy Al 2024 was conducted by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding using AlSi12 filler metal. Formation process of phases near the Ti/Al interface was discussed. Titanium and aluminum were partially fusion welded in the upper part while brazed together in the middle and bottom parts of the joint. In the upper part of the joint, intermetallics Ti3Al + Ti5Si3, TiAl + Ti5Si3, and TiAl3 were formed as three layers orderly from the titanium side to the weld metal. In the middle and bottom parts of the joint, intermetallics Ti5Si3 and TiAl3 were formed as two layers near the Ti/Al interface.

  10. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  11. Ultrasonic texture characterization of aluminum, zirconium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.J.

    1997-10-08

    This work attempts to show the feasibility of nondestructive characterization of non-ferrous alloys. Aluminum alloys have a small single crystal anisotropy which requires very precise ultrasonic velocity measurements for derivation of orientation distribution coefficients (ODCs); the precision in the ultrasonic velocity measurement required for aluminum alloys is much greater than is necessary for iron alloys or other alloys with a large single crystal anisotropy. To provide greater precision, some signal processing corrections need to be applied to account for the inherent, half-bandwidth offset in triggered pulses when using a zero-crossing technique for determining ultrasonic velocity. In addition, alloys with small single crystal anisotropy show a larger dependence on the single crystal elastic constants (SCECs) when predicting ODCs which require absolute velocity measurements. Attempts were made to independently determine these elastics constants in an effort to improve correlation between ultrasonically derived ODCs and diffraction derived ODCs. The greater precision required to accurately derive ODCs in aluminum alloys using ultrasonic nondestructive techniques is easily attainable. Ultrasonically derived ODCs show good correlation with derivations made by Bragg diffraction techniques, both neutron and X-ray. The best correlation was shown when relative velocity measurements could be used in the derivations of the ODCs. Calculation of ODCs in materials with hexagonal crystallites can also be done. Because of the crystallite symmetries, more information can be extracted using ultrasonic techniques, but at a cost of requiring more physical measurements. Some industries which use materials with hexagonal crystallites, e.g. zirconium alloys and titanium, have traditionally used texture parameters which provide some specialized measure of the texture. These texture parameters, called Kearns factors, can be directly related to ODCs.

  12. Fabrication of superhydrophobic nanostructured surface on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, R.; Farzaneh, M.

    2011-01-01

    A superhydrophobic surface was prepared by consecutive immersion in boiling water and sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon®) on the surface of an aluminum alloy substrate. Immersion in boiling water was used to create a micro-nanostructure on the alloy substrate. Then, the rough surface was coated with RF-sputtered Teflon film. The immersion time in boiling water plays an important role in surface morphology and water repellency of the deposited Teflon coating. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a "flower-like" structure in first few minutes of immersion. And as the immersion time lengthened, a "cornflake" structure appeared. FTIR analyses of Teflon-like coating deposited on water treated aluminum alloy surfaces showed fluorinated groups, which effectively reduce surface energy. The Teflon-like coating deposited on a rough surface achieved with five-minute immersion in boiling water provided a high static contact angle (˜164°) and low contact angle hysteresis (˜4°).

  13. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum Alloys in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Ramli, Rosliza; Seoh, S. Y.; Nik, W. B. Wan; Senin, H. B.

    2007-05-09

    The corrosion inhibition of Al and its alloys are the subject of tremendous technological importance due to the increased industrial applications of these materials. This study will report the results of weight loss, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on the corrosion inhibition of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in acidic media using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. The results showed that addition of sodium benzoate retards the rate of dissolution and hence inhibits the corrosion of the aluminum alloy in acidic media. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of immersion time in acetic acid however it displays a different behavior in sulfuric acid. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data. EIS studies showed that there was a significant increase in overall resistance after addition of sodium benzoate, when compared to the case without inhibitor. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data.

  14. Laser welding of aeronautical and automobile aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukha, Z.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Amaya-Vázquez, M. R.; González-Rovira, L.; Botana, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Laser beam welding (LBW) show clear advantages compared with other techniques, as the low heat input, the high localization ability, the high welding speed, the high flexibility, the high weld quality and the high production rate. However, its applicability to aluminum alloys is limited, as they generally have high reflectivity, high thermal conductivity and low viscosity. In the present study, it is analyzed the laser weldability of four aluminum alloys (2024, 5083, 6082 and 7075). High penetration butt welds could be obtained with a high power diode laser under conduction regime. The properties of the weld beads such as the microstructure and microhardness were analyzed. A linear function between the input laser fluence and the volume of melted material was obtained for the four alloys.

  15. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  16. Hard particle reinforced aluminum-alloys for aircraft applications EWISCO 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.; Remer, P.; Yushchenko, K.; Borisov, Y.; Vitiaz, P.; Steinhaeuser, S.

    1994-12-31

    Light metals such as aluminum, titanium, magnesium are widely used as structural materials in industrial parts. Their low density combined with reasonable physical properties are the main advantages of these materials that have led to a wide range of applications in transportation, particularly in the fabrication of aircrafts. Some of the disadvantages of these light metals and alloys are low wear resistance, high reactivity and low thermal tolerance. Thermal sprayed coatings are required to protect these structures and to broaden the use of these materials. The goal of this collaborative research work was to improve wear and corrosion properties of common Al-alloys. Five hard particle reinforced aluminum based powders were sprayed with different thermal spray processes. In order to optimize the wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings different spray processes and spray parameters were investigated. The coatings were produced mainly using atmospherical plasma spraying and CDS (continuous detonation spraying). Further tests with two ukrainian types of flame spraying were carried out. The aluminum alloy 7075 [AlZnMgCu1,5] was used as substrate material. Powder and coating morphology, porosity and homogeneity were investigated. Several tests for wear, corrosion behavior, bond strength and hardness were also carried out. The results of this investigation illustrate the excellent properties of thermal sprayed surface coatings in the field of wear and corrosion protection which expands the future applications of these aluminum alloys. This paper presents the results obtained at the Materials Science Institute, Aachen.

  17. Investigation of diamond turning: of rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Olufayo, Oluwole; Otieno, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum 6061 is often considered the preferred material for manufacturing optical components for ground-based astronomical applications. One reason for using this material is its high specific stiffness and excellent thermal properties. Moreover, a large amount of data exists for this material and commercially available aluminum 6061 can be diamond turned to achieve surface roughness values of approximately 4 to 8 nm, which is adequate for applications that involve the infrared spectral range, but not for the near-ultraviolet wavelength (NUV) spectral range. In this study, we used a novel aluminum material, fabricated using a rapid solidification process that is equivalent to the conventional aluminum 6061 alloy grade. Using rapidly solidified aluminum (RSA) can achieve improved surface finish and enhanced optical performance. The rapid solidification process was realized using a melt spinning operation, which achieves a high cooling rate to yield a fine microstructure. The properties of RSA 6061 are similar to those of conventional aluminum 6061, but its grain size is extremely small. In this paper, the background of RSA is introduced, and the diamond turnability characteristics and coating processes for both traditional aluminum 6061 and RSA are discussed. The surface roughness and grain structure of RSA were evaluated using white light interferometers and the surface roughness during coating of the reflectance multilayers of samples were analyzed using near-ultraviolet wavelengths. Finally, indicators such as optimal cutting parameters and optical performance are discussed.

  18. Microstructural and superplastic characteristics of friction stir processed aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charit, Indrajit

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is an adapted version of friction stir welding (FSW), which was invented at The Welding Institute (TWI), 1991. It is a promising solid state processing tool for microstructural modification at localized scale. Dynamic recrystallization occurs during FSP resulting in fine grained microstructure. The main goal of this research was to establish microstructure/superplasticity relationships in FSP aluminum alloys. Different aluminum alloys (5083 Al, 2024 Al, and Al-8.9Zn-2.6Mg-0.09Sc) were friction stir processed for investigating the effect of alloy chemistry on resulting superplasticity. Tool rotation rate and traverse speeds were controlled as the prime FSP parameters to produce different microstructures. In another study, lap joints of 7475 Al plates were also studied to explore the possibility of developing FSW/superplastic forming route. Microstructures were evaluated using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile testing. FSP 2024 Al (3.9 mum grain size) exhibited an optimum ductility of 525% at a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 and 430°C. Grain boundary sliding mechanism was found to be the dominant mode of deformation in this alloy. In 5083 Al alloy, it was found that changing the process parameters, grain sizes in the range of 3.5--8.5 mum grain size could be obtained. Material processed with colder processing parameters showed a decrease in ductility due to microstructural instability, and followed solute drag dislocation glide mechanism. On the other hand, materials processed with hotter parameter combinations showed mode of deformation related to grain boundary sliding mechanism. FSP of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Sc alloy resulted in ultrafine grains (0.68 mum) with attractive combination of high strain rate and low temperature superplasticity. This also demonstrated that superplastic microstructures could be

  19. Investigation of machining damage and tool wear resulting from drilling powder metal aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the cutting of aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) parts for the North Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The parts, an aluminum powder metal formulation, were supplied by Sinter Metals Inc., of Conover, North Carolina. The intended use of the alloy is for automotive components. Machining tests were conducted at Y-12 in the machine shop of the Skills Demonstration Center in Building 9737. Testing was done on June 2 and June 3, 1997. The powder metal alloy tested is very abrasive and tends to wear craters and produce erosion effects on the chip washed face of the drills used. It also resulted in huge amounts of flank wear and degraded performance on the part of most drills. Anti-wear coatings on drills seemed to have an effect. Drills with the coating showed less wear for the same amount of cutting. The usefulness of coolants and lubricants in reducing tool wear and chipping/breakout was not investigated.

  20. Hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. W.; Scully, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A program is described which seeks to develop an understanding of the effects of dissolved and trapped hydrogen on the mechanical properties of selected Al-Li-Cu-X alloys. A proposal is made to distinguish hydrogen (H2) induced EAC from aqueous dissolution controlled EAC, to correlate H2 induced EAC with mobile and trapped concentrations, and to identify significant trap sites and hydride phases (if any) through use of model alloys and phases. A literature review shows three experimental factors which have impeded progress in the area of H2 EAC for this class of alloys. These are as listed: (1) inter-subgranular fracture in Al-Li alloys when tested in the S-T orientation in air or vacuum make it difficult to readily detect H2 induced fracture based on straight forward changes in fractography; (2) the inherently low H2 diffusivity and solubility in Al alloys is further compounded by a native oxide which acts as a H2 permeation barrier; and (3) H2 effects are masked by dissolution assisted processes when mechanical testing is performed in aqueous solutions.

  1. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  2. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  3. Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2014-09-14

    High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

  4. Laser treatment of aluminum copper alloys: A mechanical enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    De Mol van Otterloo, J.L.; De Hosson, J.T. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-02-15

    Aluminum-copper alloys are commonly used as structural components for the car and aircraft industry. They combine low density, high strength, high fracture toughness and good machinability. Moreover, the strength and wear-resistance of the surface of alloys are improved by a high power laser beam. In this way the molten surface will be self-quenched by conduction of heat into the bulk. This technique ensures solidification velocities of 0.01--1 m/s. These high solidification velocities have a significant influence on the size and distribution of the morphology. This work concentrates on Al-Cu alloys, in which the Cu content ranges between 0--40 wt.%, and is aimed at describing the mechanical and microstructural properties of these alloys upon variation of the laser scan velocity in the range of 0.0125 to 0.125 m/s.

  5. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation in hypermonotectic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simple casting experiments were set up to solve the question, if heterogeneous nucleation of the liquid-liquid decomposition in monotectic systems is possible. Al-Pb alloys with different inoculants were solidified, and the resulting microstructure was analysed by SEM and X-ray microtomography. Pronounced changes in the distribution of the lead precipitations indicate that it is possible to trigger the nucleation.

  7. Internal corrosion testing of aluminum radiator tube alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.; Hindin, B.S.

    1998-12-31

    Aluminum radiator tubes must have several demanding properties to be successful including good heat transfer, high strength to withstand internal pressures, brazeability for attaching external fins and headers, corrosion resistance to cooling fluids, and long service life. Tubes having a wall thickness of approximately 320 microns (11.8 mils) must meet all these properties. A modified simulated service test (SST) of various aluminum radiator tube alloys was conducted to determine how well coolant-side alloys of eight different composite materials resisted corrosion. Both coupons and actual radiator tubes were used in these tests. Coolant-side alloys that were examined included 1145, low-copper 7072, low-iron 3003, 3003 plus zinc, and 3005. The results of these tests indicate that corrosion will tend to proceed laterally along the tube surface when it is anodic to the core alloy. A coolant-side alloy consisting of 3003 plus zinc exhibited advantages over 7072 because its pit density was lower. The role of microstructure in the corrosion behavior of composite brazing sheets is discussed.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Lynn; Malone, Tina; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  9. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, L.; Malone, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  10. Solid-state Bonding of Superplastic Aluminum Alloy 7475 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, T. D. S.; Vastava, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental works were carried out to study the feasibility of solid state bonding of superplastic aluminum 7475 sheet. Amount of deformation, bonding time, surface cleaning method and intermediate layer were the process parameters investigated. Other parameters, held constant by the superplastic forming condition which is required to obtain a concurrent solid state bonding, are bonding temperature, bonding pressure and atmosphere. Bond integrity was evaluated through metallographic examination, X-ray line scan analysis, SEM fractographic analysis and lap shear tests. The early results of the development program indicated that sound solid state bonding was accomplished for this high strength 7475 alloy with significant amounts of deformation. A thin intermediate layer of the soft 5052 aluminum alloy aided in achieving a solid state bonding by reducing the required amount of plastic deformation at the interface. Bond strength was substantially increased by a post bond heat treatment.

  11. Modeling aluminum-lithium alloy welding characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a finite element model of the heat-affected zone in the vicinity of a weld line on a plate in order to determine an accurate plastic strain history. The resulting plastic strain increments calculated by the finite element program were then to be used to calculate the measure of damage D. It was hoped to determine the effects of varying welding parameters, such as beam power, efficiency, and weld speed, and the effect of different material properties on the occurrence of microfissuring. The results were to be compared first to the previous analysis of Inconel 718, and then extended to aluminum 2195.

  12. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  13. Friction and wear of titanium alloys and copper alloys sliding against titanium 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy in air at 430 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the friction and wear characteristics of aluminum bronzes and copper-tin, titanium-tin, and copper-silver alloys sliding against a titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Hemispherically tipped riders of aluminum bronze and the titanium and copper alloys were run against Ti-6Al-4V disks in air at 430 C. The sliding velocity was 13 cm/sec, and the load was 250 g. Results revealed that high tin content titanium and copper alloys underwent significantly less wear and galling than commonly used aluminum bronzes. Also friction force was less erratic than with the aluminum bronzes.

  14. Surface engineering of aluminum alloys for automotive engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S.; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2004-01-01

    The modification and refinement of surface and subsurface microstructure in Al-Si-based cast alloys via laser-induced rapid solidification can create a natural topography suitable for engine applications. The differential wear of the soft aluminum phase, hard silicon, and CuAl in the cell, along with the divorced eutectic nanostructure in the intercellular region, is expected to produce and replenish microfluidic channels and pits for efficient oil retention, spreading, and lubrication.

  15. Accelerated corrosion test for aluminum-zinc alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, T.C. . Homer Research Labs.)

    1993-07-01

    An electrochemically monitored etching method has been developed to enable accelerated service life testing of aluminum/zinc alloy coatings with a dendritic microstructure. The method involved pre-exposure of materials to the etching solution to remove the most active phases from the coatings. This process simulated the early phases of atmospheric corrosion. The method significantly shortened the time required for an atmospheric exposure test. Historical performance data and data collected using the accelerated test method agreed.

  16. Linear Anomaly in Welded 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1987-01-01

    Study of causes and significance of two types of linear anomalies sometimes appearing in radiographs of welds described in preliminary report. Manifested as light or dark linear features parallel to weld line in radiograph of weld. Contains diagrams and descriptions of phenomena occurring during welding process. Includes microdensitometer traces from x-radiographs of actual welds and from computer simulations based calculation of x-ray transmission through assumed weld structures. Concludes anomalies not unique to 2219-T87 aluminum alloy.

  17. Fatigue-Crack Propagation in Aluminum-Alloy Tension Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whaley, Richard E.; Kurzhals, Peter R.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of fatigue tests to study crack propagation and the resulting stress distributions in tension panels. The panels were all of the same general design, and configurations varied mainly in the relative amount of cross-sectional area in the skin, stiffeners, and flanges. The panels were constructed of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys. It was found that the average rate of crack growth was slower in panels made of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy than in panels made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. All cracks initiated in the skin, and the slowest crack growth was measured in configurations where the highest percentage of cross-sectional area was in the stiffeners. Strain-gage surveys were made to determine the redistribution of stress as the crack grew across the panels. As a crack approached a given point in the skin, the stress at that point increased rapidly. The stress in the stiffeners also increased as the crack approached the stiffeners. During the propagation of the crack the stress was not distributed uniformly in the remaining area.

  18. Electrochemical noise measurements during exfoliation of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Damborenea, J. de; Fernandez, B.

    1996-12-31

    Aluminum alloys are one of the most widely used materials in the aerospace industry because of their intrinsic low density, high mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance. The performance of aircraft is improved by the use of lighter materials. Electrochemical noise measurements (ENMs) have been carried out during exfoliation corrosion of an aluminum-lithium alloy (8090) in the EXCO (ASTM Test Method for Exfoliation Corrosion Susceptibility in 2XXX and 7XXX Series Aluminum Alloys [EXCO Test] [G 34]) test solution. By means of the maximum entropy method (MEM), the potential and current fluctuations were converted into power spectral density (PSD) plots to study the specific variables related to electrochemical noise (low frequency amplitude, slopes). Noise resistance obtained from the standard deviation of potential and current was compared with the charge transference resistance (R{sub ct}) from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The results show that ENM can be used to detect early stages in localized corrosion. However, when the solution is very aggressive, indications of localized corrosion can be masked by uniform corrosion.

  19. Nanostructured lithium-aluminum alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, Nicholas S.; Huber, Dale L.

    2010-12-01

    Electrodeposited aluminum films and template-synthesized aluminum nanorods are examined as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-aluminum alloying reaction is observed electrochemically with cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling in lithium half-cells. The electrodeposition reaction is shown to have high faradaic efficiency, and electrodeposited aluminum films reach theoretical capacity for the formation of LiAl (1 Ah/g). The performance of electrodeposited aluminum films is dependent on film thickness, with thicker films exhibiting better cycling behavior. The same trend is shown for electron-beam deposited aluminum films, suggesting that aluminum film thickness is the major determinant in electrochemical performance regardless of deposition technique. Synthesis of aluminum nanorod arrays on stainless steel substrates is demonstrated using electrodeposition into anodic aluminum oxide templates followed by template dissolution. Unlike nanostructures of other lithium-alloying materials, the electrochemical performance of these aluminum nanorod arrays is worse than that of bulk aluminum.

  20. Activity and diffusion of metals in binary aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jao, C. S.

    1980-12-01

    To determine the activity of zinc in Zn-Al alloys, the electromotive force (emf) of the cell: Zn/ZnCl/sub 2/-KC1 (eut)/Zn,Al was measured at temperatures between 569.5 K (296.5C) and 649.5 K (376.5C). The applicability of a two-suffix Margules equation was demonstrated, in good agreement with theoretical expectations. The diffusion coefficient of Zn in Al determined from a planar diffusion model for the experimental data was about 3 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//sec to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//sec in the range of temperature studied. This is higher than that found in the literature. The most plausible reason appears to be the high alumina concentration in the working electrode because of partial oxidation. Oxidation of the alloying metals was the primary cause of poor alloying between calcium/or zinc and aluminum, thereby frustrating similar measurements at a Ca-Al/or Zn-Al alloy. The literature on the activity of calcium and zinc is aluminum is reviewed.

  1. In-situ processing of aluminum nitride particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingjun

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites (DRACs) have potential applications in automotive, electronic packaging, and recreation industries. Conventional processing of DRACs is by incorporation of ceramic particles/whiskers/fibers into matrix alloys. Because of the high cost of ceramic particles, DRACs are expensive. The goal of this work was to develop a low-cost route of AlN-Al DRACs processing through bubbling and reacting nitrogen and ammonia gases with aluminum alloy melt in the temperature range of 1373--1523 K. Thermodynamic analysis of AlN-Al alloy system was performed based on Gibbs energy minimization theory. AlN is stable in aluminum, Al-Mg, Al-Si, Al-Zn, and Al-Li alloys over the whole temperature range for application and processing of DRACs. Experiments were carried out to form AlN by bubbling nitrogen and ammonia gases through aluminum, Al-Mg, and Al-Si alloy melts. Products were characterized with XRD, SEM, and EDX. The results showed that in-situ processing of AlN reinforced DRACs is technically feasible. Significant AlN was synthesized by bubbling deoxidized nitrogen and ammonia gases. When nitrogen gas was used as the nitrogen precursor, the AlN particles formed in-situ are small in size, (<10 mum). The formation of AlN is strongly affected by the trace oxygen impurities in the nitrogen gas. The deleterious effect of oxygen impurities is due to their inhibition to the chemisorption of nitrogen gas at the interface. In comparison with nitrogen gas, bubbling ammonia led to formation of AlN particles in smaller size (about 2 mum or less) at a significantly higher rate. Ammonia is not stable and dissociated into nitrogen and hydrogen at reaction temperatures. The hydrogen functions as oxygen-getter at the interface and benefits chemisorption of nitrogen, thereby promoting the formation of AlN. The overall process of AlN formation was modeled using two-film model. For nitrogen bubbling gas, the whole process is controlled by chemisorption

  2. Enhancement of superplastic formability in a high strength aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, S. P.; Turk, G. R.; Vastava, R.

    1988-01-01

    A 7475 aluminum alloy was developed for superplastic forming (SPF). By lowering the Fe and Si contents in this alloy significantly below their normal levels and optimizing the thermomechanical processing to produce sheet, over 2000 percent thickness strain to failure was obtained. The microstructure, elevated-temperature uniaxial and biaxial tension, and cavitation behavior of the alloy were determined. In addition, a constitutive model was used to form a generic structural shape from which mechanical test specimens were removed and post-SPF characteristics were evaluated. The constitutive model included both material strain hardening and strain rate hardening effects, and was verified by accurately predicting forming cycles which resulted in successful component forming. Stress-life fatigue, stress rupture, and room and elevated temperature tensile tests were conducted on the formed material.

  3. Elevated temperature fracture of RS/PM aluminum alloy 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Yang, Leng; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The fracture behavior of advanced powder metallurgy Al-Fe-V-Si alloy 8009 (previously called FVS0812) is being characterized under monotonic loads, as a function of temperature. Particular attention is focused on contributions to the fracture mechanism from the fine grained dispersoid strengthened microstructure, dissolved solute from rapid solidification, and the moist air environment. Time-dependent crack growth is characterized in advanced aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures with the fracture mechanics approach, and cracking mechanisms are examined with a metallurgical approach. Specific tasks were to obtain standard load crack growth experimental information from a refined testing system; to correlate crack growth kinetics with the j-integral and time dependent C(sub t)(t); and to investigate the intermediate temperature embrittlement of 8009 alloy in order to understand crack growth mechanisms.

  4. Degradation Modeling of 2024 Aluminum Alloy During Corrosion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidaparti, Ramana M.; Aghazadeh, Babak Seyed

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion is one of the most damaging mechanisms in aluminum alloys used in aerospace engineering structures. In this article, the degradation behavior of AA 2024-T3 as a function of time under corrosive conditions is studied through experiments and modeling. Corrosion experiments were conducted on AA 2024-T3 specimens under controlled electrochemical conditions. The chemical element alloy map was investigated through EDS technique for evaluation purposes. Based on the experimental data, an analytical model is developed relating the material loss to the degradation during the corrosion process. The analytical model uses genetic algorithms (GAs) to map the relationship through optimization. The results obtained from GAs were compared with a standard non-linear regression model. The results obtained indicate that a quadratic relationship exists in time between the material loss due to corrosion and the degradation behavior of the alloy. Based on the good results obtained, the present approach of degradation modeling can be extended to other metals.

  5. Superplastic Behavior of Copper-Modified 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ravi; Kim, Sooho

    2007-04-01

    An AA5083 aluminum alloy was modified with two different levels of Cu additions, cast by direct-chill method, and thermo-mechanically processed to sheet gauge. Copper additions reduced sheet grain size, decreased tensile flow stress and significantly increased tensile elongation under most elevated temperature test conditions. The high-Cu (0.8 wt.%) alloy had the finest grain size 5.3 μm, a peak strain-rate sensitivity of 0.6 at a strain-rate of 1 × 10-2 s-1, and tensile elongation values between 259 and 584% over the temperature range, 400-525 °C, and the strain rate range, 5 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-2 s-1, investigated. In biaxial pan forming tests, only the Cu-containing alloys successfully formed pans at the higher strain rate 10-2 s-1. The high-Cu alloy showed the least die-entry thinning. Comparison of ambient temperature mechanical properties in O-temper state showed the high-Cu alloy to have significantly higher yield strength, ultimate strength, and ductility compared to the base 5083 alloy.

  6. Radiation Damages in Aluminum Alloy SAV-1 under Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhbaev, Umar; Akhmedzhanov, Farkhad; Alikulov, Sherali; Baytelesov, Sapar; Boltabaev, Azizbek

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of neutron irradiation on the kinetics of radiation damages in the SAV-1 alloy, which belongs to the group of aluminum alloys of the ternary system Al-Mg-Si. For fast-neutron irradiation by different doses up to fluence 1019 cm-2 the SAV-1 samples were placed in one of the vertical channels of the research WWR type reactor (Tashkent). The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of the alloy samples was investigated in the range 290 - 490 K by the four-compensation method with an error about 0.1%. The experimental results were shown that at all the temperatures the dependence of the SAV-1 alloy resistivity on neutron fluence was nonlinear. With increasing neutron fluence the deviation from linearity and the growth rate of resistivity with temperature becomes more appreciable. The observed dependences are explained by means of martensitic transformations and the radiation damages in the studied alloy under neutron irradiation. The mechanisms of radiation modification of the SAV-1 alloy structure are discussed.

  7. Fretting fatigue of 2XXX series aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giummarra, Cindie

    Fretting is a wear mechanism that occurs at the contact region between two materials subject to minute cyclic relative motion. Fretting causes the initiation of surface cracks within the first few thousand cycles, which in the presence of a fatigue stress, grow to cause material failure approximately 10 to 100 times earlier than expected under standard fatigue conditions. Examples of fretting fatigue have been seen in joints in aircraft, and the aerospace industry acknowledges the possibility of catastrophic failure from this mechanism. Improvements in a material's resistance to fretting would benefit aluminum alloys in aerospace applications. This research investigated the effect of microstructural properties on the fretting response in 2XXX series aerospace aluminum alloys. Fretting wear and fretting fatigue tests were conducted to determine the influence of slip characteristics, alloy purity, grain orientation and yield strength on fretting crack initiation and growth. Crack length measurements and micrographs of the fretting indicated there was no significant difference in the fretting response of these alloys based on their microstructural characteristics. Results showed that fretting initiated cracks in the first 1--8% of the life while standard fatigue initiation took around 90% of the life. This reduction in initiation resulted in a shorter life under fretting conditions. Additionally, fretting normalized the initiation time in all alloys which eliminated any intrinsic initiation resistance. The alloys with the highest stress-life (S-N) fatigue properties exhibiting a greater reduction in fatigue strength under fretting conditions. The fretting stresses appeared to influence the crack growth to a distance below the surface of approximately 17mum under fretting fatigue conditions, after which some cracks changed direction and propagated under the influence of the fatigue stress. Under fretting wear conditions, the cracks tended to arrest at a depth of 8

  8. Effect of vapor phase corrosion inhibitor on microbial corrosion of aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Ku, C H; Bor, H J; Lin, Y T

    1996-02-01

    Vapor phase corrosion inhibitors were used to investigate the antimicrobial activities and anticorrosion of aluminum alloy. Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, A. versicolor, Chaetomium globosum and Penicillium funiculosum had moderate to abundant growth on the aluminum alloy AA 1100 at Aw 0.901, while there was less growth at Aw 0.842. High humidity stimulated microbial growth and induced microbial corrosion. Dicyclohexylammonium carbonate had a high inhibitory effect on the growth of test fungi and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy, dicyclohexylammonium caprate and dicyclohexylammonium stearate were the next. Aluminum alloy coating with vapor phase corrosion inhibitor could prevent microbial growth and retard microbial corrosion. PMID:10592784

  9. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  10. Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C.

    1998-02-03

    Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

  11. Boron-doped back-surface fields using an aluminum-alloy process

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Bode, M.D.; Silva, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Boron-doped back-surface fields (BSF`s) have potentially superior performance compared to aluminum-doped BSF`s due to the higher solid solubility of boron compared to aluminum. However, conventional boron diffusions require a long, high temperature step that is both costly and incompatible with many photovoltaic-grade crystalline-silicon materials. We examined a process that uses a relatively low-temperature aluminum-alloy process to obtain a boron-doped BSF by doping the aluminum with boron. In agreement with theoretical expectations, we found that thicker aluminum layers and higher boron doping levels improved the performance of aluminum-alloyed BSF`s.

  12. Mechanical properties of anodized coatings over molten aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Grillet, Anne M; Gorby, Allen D; Trujillo, Steven M; Grant, Richard P; Hodges, V Carter; Parson, Ted B; Grasser, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    A method to measure interfacial mechanical properties at high temperatures and in a controlled atmosphere has been developed to study anodized aluminum surface coatings at temperatures where the interior aluminum alloy is molten. This is the first time that the coating strength has been studied under these conditions. We have investigated the effects of ambient atmosphere, temperature, and surface finish on coating strength for samples of aluminum alloy 7075. Surprisingly, the effective Young's modulus or strength of the coating when tested in air was twice as high as when samples were tested in an inert nitrogen or argon atmosphere. Additionally, the effective Young's modulus of the anodized coating increased with temperature in an air atmosphere but was independent of temperature in an inert atmosphere. The effect of surface finish was also examined. Sandblasting the surface prior to anodization was found to increase the strength of the anodized coating with the greatest enhancement noted for a nitrogen atmosphere. Machining marks were not found to significantly affect the strength. PMID:17945243

  13. Fundamental studies on electrochemical production of dendrite-free aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata

    A novel dendrite-free electrorefining of aluminum scrap was investigated by using AlCl3-1-Ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquid electrolyte. Electrodeposition of aluminum were conducted on copper/aluminum cathodes at voltage of 1.5 V, temperatures (50-110°C), stirring rate (0-120 rpm), molar ratio (MR) of AlCl3:EMIC (1.25-2.0) and electrode surface modification (modified/unmodified). The study was focused to investigate the effect of process variables on deposit morphology, cathode current density and their role in production of dendrite-free aluminum. The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Modified electrodes and stirring rate (60 rpm) eliminate dendritic deposition by reducing cathode overpotential below critical overpotential (etacrt≈ -0.54 V) for dendrite formation. Pure aluminum (>99%) was deposited with current efficiency of 84-99%. Chronoamperometry study was conducted using AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-1-Butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (BMIC) (MR = 1.65:1) at 90°C to understand the mechanism of aluminum electrodeposition and find out diffusion parameter of electroactive species Al2C 7-. It was concluded that electrodeposition of aluminum is a diffusion controlled instantaneous nucleation process and diffusion coefficient of Al2C7- was found to be 5.2-6.9 x 10-11 m2/s and 2.2 x 10-11 m2/s for AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-BMIC, respectively. A novel production route of Ti-Al alloys was investigated using AlCl 3-BMIC-TiCl4 (MR = 2:1:0.019) and AlCl3-BMIC (MR = 2:1) electrolytes at constant voltages of 1.5-3.0 V and temperatures (70-125°C). Ti sheet was used as anode and cathode. Characterization of electrodeposited Ti-Al alloys was carried out using SEM, EDS, XRD and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Effect of voltage and temperature on cathode current density, current efficiency, composition and morphology of Ti

  14. Component- and Alloy-Specific Modeling for Evaluating Aluminum Recycling Strategies for Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modaresi, Roja; Løvik, Amund N.; Müller, Daniel B.

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that the availability of mixed shredded aluminum scrap from end-of-life vehicles (ELV) is likely to surpass the capacity of secondary castings to absorb this type of scrap, which could lead to a scrap surplus unless suitable interventions can be identified and implemented. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing potential solutions to this problem, among others, because of a lack of component- and alloy-specific information in the models. In this study, we developed a dynamic model of aluminum in the global vehicle stock (distinguishing 5 car segments, 14 components, and 7 alloy groups). The forecasts made up to the year 2050 for the demand for vehicle components and alloy groups, for the scrap supply from discarded vehicles, and for the effects of different ELV management options. Furthermore, we used a source-sink diagram to identify alloys that could potentially serve as alternative sinks for the growing scrap supply. Dismantling the relevant components could remove up to two-thirds of the aluminum from the ELV stream. However, the use of these components for alloy-specific recycling is currently limited because of the complex composition of components (mixed material design and applied joining techniques), as well as provisions that practically prevent the production of safety-relevant cast parts from scrap. In addition, dismantling is more difficult for components that are currently penetrating rapidly. Therefore, advanced alloy sorting seems to be a crucial step that needs to be developed over the coming years to avoid a future scrap surplus and prevent negative energy use and emission consequences.

  15. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic

  16. Aluminum rich alloys for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Go

    The recent environmental problem and depletion of natural power resources have intensified the search for clean and renewable energy which has become one of the major issues of the Twenty-first century. Furthermore, global demand for freshwater has been increasing, raising concerns for water insufficiency. The goal of this research is to seek and introduce a viable technology that could potentially solve both energy and water crises. It has been investigated that Al-Ga-In-Sn quaternary system alloys can split water and produce hydrogen and heat. This paper focuses on the aluminum-rich Al-Ga-In-Sn quaternary system alloys, exploring the mystery behind the mechanism. As the paper will show, this technology can be applied to both salt water and sea water, and is thus a potential solution for marine applications and desalination. However, it has been shown that the alloy reacts differently depending on the fabrication method and environmental conditions. Various experiments were conducted to understand this phenomenon. This paper discusses several different reactions caused by various cooling rates and compositions, which effectively changes the crystal structure of the alloy and its liquid phase. Characteristics of the liquid phase define the alloy and determine its applications.

  17. Bearing Strengths of Some Wrought-aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1943-01-01

    Although a number of investigations of the bearing strength of aluminum alloys have been made, the problem remains one of considerable interest to the aircraft industry. For this reason it has seemed advisable to make additional tests of the commonly used aircraft alloys in an effort to establish a better basis for the selection of allowable bearing values. Current design practice does not recognize the effect of edge distance upon bearing strengths, and for this reason edge distance was one of the principal variables considered in this investigation. The increasing emphasis being placed upon permanent set limitations makes it essential that more information on bearing yield phenomena be obtained. The object of this investigation was to determine bearing yield and ultimate strengths of the following aluminum alloy products: 17S-T, 24S-T, Alclad 24S-T, 24S-RT, 52S-0, 52S-1/2H, 52S-H, 53S-T, and 61S-T extrusions. Ratios of these bearing properties to tensile properties were also determined.

  18. Direct-soldering 6061 aluminum alloys with ultrasonic coating.

    PubMed

    Ding, Min; Zhang, Pei-lei; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Yao, Shun

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the authors applied furnace soldering with ultrasonic coating method to solder 6061 aluminum alloy and investigated the effects of both coating time and soldering temperature on its properties. The following results were obtained: firstly, the solder region mainly composed of four kinds of microstructure zones: rich Sn zone, rich-Pb zone, Sn-Pb eutectic phase and rich Al zone. Meanwhile, the microanalysis identified a continuous reaction product at the alumina-solder interface as a rich-Pb zone. Therefore, the joint strength changed with soldering time and soldering temperature. Secondly, the tensile data had significantly greater variability, with values ranging from 13.99MPa to 24.74MPa. The highest value was obtained for the samples coated with Sn-Pb-Zn alloy for 45s. Fractures occurred along the solder-alumina interface for the 6061 aluminum alloy with its surface including hybrid tough fracture of dimple and tear ridge. The interface could initially strip at the rich Bi zone with the effect of shear stress. PMID:19900830

  19. Metastable phases in mechanically alloyed aluminum germanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, P.J.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1993-03-01

    Aluminum and germanium form a simple eutectic system with no stable intermetallic phase, and limited mutual solubility. We report the formation of a metastable rhombohedral,{gamma}{sub 1} phase by mechanically alloying aluminum and germanium powders. This phase, which appears for compositions between 20 and 50 at. % germanium, has also been observed in rapidly quenched alloys, but there is disagreement as to its composition. By measuring the heat of crystallization as a function of composition, we determined the composition of the {gamma}{sub 1} phase to be Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30}. We also produced Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30} by arc melting the pure elements, followed by splat-quenching at a cooling rate in the range of 10{sup 8} K s{sup {minus}1}. This method produced two metastable phases, one of which was found to be the {gamma}{sub 1} phase obtained by mechanical alloying. The other was a monoclinic phase reported earlier in the literature as {gamma}{sub 2}.

  20. X-ray diffractometry of lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1988-08-08

    X-ray diffractometry provides much useful information on LANA alloys that complements data obtained by SEM and Electron Microprobe Analysis. Accurate measurements of the hexagonal lattice parameters of the primary LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly phase reveal the aluminum content (y) and allow the prediction of desorption pressures for the hydrogen isotopes. A study of the broadening of x-ray diffraction lines of the LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly primary phase caused by cyclic absorption and desorption of hydrogen suggests that substitution of aluminum for nickel stabilizes the primary phase with respect to formation of antistructure defects that could cause undesirable trapping of hydrogen isotopes. Correlation of XRD with SEM and EMPA results has helped identify secondary phases, determine their abundances in volume percent, and reveal how they react with hydrogen and the atmosphere. Characterizations of LANA alloys used in process development has provided the bases for development of specifications for alloys to be used in the Replacement Trittium Facility. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  1. Textures, microstructures, anisotropy and formability of aluminum-manganese-magnesium and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiantao

    In this dissertation work, the microstructure and texture evolution of continuous cast (CC) and direct chill (DC) cast Al-Mn-Mg (AA 3105 and AA 3015) and Al-Mg (AA 5052) alloys during cold rolling and annealing are systematically investigated. Macrotexture analyses were based on three-dimensional orientation distribution functions (ODFs) calculated from incomplete pole figures from X-ray diffraction by using arbitrarily defined cell (ADC) and series expansion methods. A new technique, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), was adopted for microtexture and mesotexture investigation. The anisotropy and formability of Al-Mn-Mg and Al-Mg alloys are correlated to the texture results. For aluminum alloys studied in this work, a stronger Cube orientation is observed in DC hot band than in CC hot band after complete recrystallization. alpha and beta fibers become well developed beyond 50% cold rolling in both CC and DC aluminum alloys. The highest intensity along the beta fiber (skeleton line) is located between the Copper and the S orientations in both materials after high cold rolling reductions. In both CC and DC aluminum alloys, a cell structure develops with the indication of increasing CSL Sigma1 boundaries during the early stages of cold rolling. There is no evidence of the development of twin boundaries (Sigma3, Sigma9, Sigma27a & 27b) in either CC or DC aluminum alloys when the cold rolling reductions are less than 40%. The R and Cube textures are dominant recrystallization texture components in CC and DC AA 5052 alloys. The volume fraction of the Cube component is increased by increasing cold rolling reduction and annealing temperature but not by increasing annealing time while the volume fraction of the R component is only increased by increasing cold rolling reduction. Stronger Cube and R orientations are found at the surface layer than at half-thickness layer of cold rolled hot bands after annealing. The Cube and P textures are dominant recrystallization

  2. Fatigue damage study in aluminum-2024 T3 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1992-01-01

    The grain structure of aluminum 2024, a commonly used commercial alloy is investigated, and these findings are correlated with the fatigue property of the material. Samples of aluminum 2024 were polished and etched in different reagents. Optical micrographs (at 500X) of samples etched in Keller's reagent revealed grain boundaries as well as some particles present in the microstructure. Normal x-ray scans of samples etched for different intervals of time in Keller's reagent indicate no significant variations in diffraction peak positions; however, the width of the rocking curve increased with the time of etching. These results are consistent with the direct dependence of the width of the rocking curve on the range of grain orientation. Etching removes the preferred orientation layer of the sample produced by polishing; thereby, causing the width to increase.

  3. Thermodynamics of iron-aluminum alloys at 1573 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Mehrotra, Gopal M.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of iron and aluminum were measured in Fe-Al alloys at 1573 K, using the ion-current-ratio technique in a high-temperature Knudsen cell mass spectrometer. The Fe-Al solutions exhibited negative deviations from ideality over the entire composition range. The activity coefficients gamma(Fe), and gamma(Al) are given by six following equations as a function of mole fraction, X(Fe), X(Al). The results show good agreement with those obtained from previous investigations at other temperatures by extrapolation of the activity data to 1573 K.

  4. FRICTION STIR SPOT WELDING OF 6016 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Rajiv S.; Webb, S.; Freeney, T. A.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-01-08

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 6016 aluminum alloy was evaluated with conventional pin tool and new off-center feature tools. The off-center feature tool provides significant control over the joint area. The tool rotation rate was varied between 1000 and 2500 rpm. Maximum failure strength was observed in the tool rotation range of 1200-1500 rpm. The results are interpreted in the context of material flow in the joint and influence of thermal input on microstructural changes. The off-center feature tool concept opens up new possibilities for plunge-type friction stir spot welding.

  5. Outgassing measurement of the aluminum alloy UHV chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Itoh, T.; Komaki, S.; Narushima, K.; Ishimaru, H.

    1986-01-01

    A large vacuum chamber (580 mm diameter) was fabricated from an aluminum alloy surface treated by a special process normally used on small chambers. The chamber was tested unbaked and baked at various temperatures, pressures, and holding periods. The chamber was filled with N2 gas, and the outgassing rate was measured after one hour. Then the ultimate pressure was measured. Outgassing rates for baked and unbaked groups were compared. It is concluded that the same surface treatment technique can be used on both large and small chambers produced by the same special extrusion process.

  6. Effects of Machining on the Microstructure of Aluminum Alloy 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, A.; Liang, S. Y.; Garmestani, H.

    Experimental investigations show that depending on the parameters, aggressive machining of aluminum alloy 7075 can trigger several microstructural phenomena including recrystallization, grain growth and crystallographic texture modifications below the machined surface. Increasing the depth of cut will lead to a significant recrystallization and consequently grain refinement. On the other hand, increasing the feed rate will result into development of a unique crystallographic texture. The mechanical and thermal loads imposed to the material experiences by machining leads to such microstructural phenomena. Finite element analysis is used to determine these loads.

  7. Corrosion fatigue of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue studies were conducted on bare, chemical conversion coated, and anodized 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. These tests were performed using a rotating beam machine running at a velocity of 2500 rpm. The corrosive environments tested were distilled water, 100 ppm NaCl, and 3.5 percent NaCl. Results were compared to the endurance limit in air. An evaluation of the effect of protective coatings on corrosion fatigue was made by comparing the fatigue properties of specimens with coatings to those without.

  8. Computer simulation of resistance spot welding in aluminum: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.J.; Chandler, H.W.; Evans, J.T.; Wen, J.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-based model of resistance spot welding with hemispherical electrode tips has been developed to include simulation of elastic-plastic mechanical deformation as well as ohmic heating and thermal conduction. The primary effect of the mechanical deformation is in its influence on the contact read and current density developed at the faying surface. The model was used to simulate spot welding in aluminum alloys. Preliminary results show the effects of variations in input current, contact resistance, applied force and position of the cooling water with respect to the electrode tip. It is shown that the value of the contact resistance has a large effect on nugget formation in the spot welding of aluminum alloys and that the applied force has a significant effect arising from its effect on the area of contact at the faying surface. The formation of a resistance spot weld in aluminum is also sensitive to the position of the cooling water-electrode interface because of the high thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys.

  9. The Weathering of Aluminum Alloy Sheet Materials Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutchler, Willard

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the corrosion of aluminum alloy sheet materials used in aircraft. It has for its purpose to study the causes of corrosion embrittlement in duralumin-type alloys and the development of methods for its elimination. The report contains results, obtained in an extensive series of weather-exposure tests, which reveal the extent to which the resistance of the materials to corrosion was affected by variable factors in their heat treatment and by the application of various surface protective coatings. The results indicate that the sheet materials are to be regarded as thoroughly reliable, from the standpoint of their permanence in service, provided proper precautions are taken to render them corrosion-resistant.

  10. Corrosive wear behavior of 2014 and 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, S.K.; Andrews, S.; Vasquez, G.

    1999-02-01

    Alloys of 2014 and 6061 aluminum reinforced with 0.1 volume fraction of alumina particles (VFAP) were subjected to impact scratching during a corrosive wear process. The transient currents generated due to the impact were measured in the two composites as well as in their respective monoliths. The effect of solutionizing time on the transient currents was correlated to the near surface microstructures, scratch morphology, concentration of quenched-in vacancies, and changes in grain sizes. It was observed that the transient current values increase with an increase in solutionizing time, indicating that the corrosive wear behavior is not strongly affected by the grain boundaries. However, a combination of pitting and the galvanic corrosion may account for the typical corrosive wear behavior exhibited by the alloys and the composites of this study.

  11. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  12. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  13. The Cryogenic Tensile Properties of an Extruded Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties; i.e., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus, were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMet162, at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F)) temperatures. The material evaluated was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions."

  14. Standard specification for aluminum and aluminum-alloy seamless condenser and heat-exchanger tubes with integral fins. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-7 on Light Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B07.03 on Aluminum Alloy Wrought Products. Current edition approved May 15, 1995. Published July 1995. Originally published as B 404-63T. Last previous edition B 404-92a.

  15. The use of surface modification techniques for the corrosion protection of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natishan, P.M.; McCafferty, E.; Donovon, E.P.; Hubler, G.K.

    1995-12-31

    Surface modification techniques such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offer a means to produce surfaces with unique and improved properties. This paper reviews the advantages of the IBAD and PECVD processes and discusses the preparation and pitting corrosion behavior of IBAD modified aluminum surfaces and PECVD coatings on a 7075 aluminum alloy. Pitting potential values for the base materials and for the base materials with silicon nitride IBAD, tantalum oxide IBAD, or PECVD diamond-like carbon coatings were determined in deaerated 0.1M NaCl solutions. The thickness of the modified region ranged from 0.01 to 5.0 {micro}m. All three coatings improved the resistance to pit initiation.

  16. High-Temperature Workability of Thixocast A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; Chattopadhyay, K.; Dutta, Pradip

    2015-07-01

    The present work highlights the role of globular microstructure on the workability of A356 aluminum alloy at elevated temperature. The hot deformation behavior was studied by isothermal hot compression tests in the temperature range 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C) and strain rate range of 0.001 to 10 s-1. The flow stress data obtained from the tests were used to estimate the strain rate sensitivity and strain rate hardening. Flow stress analysis of the alloy shows that the effect of temperature on strain hardening is more significant at lower strain levels and strain rate sensitivity is independent of strain. The results also reveal that the flowability of conventionally cast alloy increases after changing the dendritic microstructure into a globular structure through semisolid processing route. Thixocast alloy exhibits lower yield strength and higher elongation at elevated temperature in comparisons to conventionally cast values. This property has an important implication toward thixo-forming at an elevated temperature.

  17. A study of spectrum fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloys. I - Spectrum simplification. II - Influence of microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack propagation FCP behavior of two aluminum alloys is performed to simulate spectrum loading conditions found at critical locations in high performance fighter aircraft. Negative loads are shown to be eliminated for the tension-compression spectrum for low to intermediate maximum stress intensities, and load interactions are found to be more significant at higher stress intensities and with more plasticity at the crack tip. In the second part, the influence of microstructural features including grain size, inclusions, and dispersoids on constant amplitude and spectrum crack growth behavior in aluminum alloys is studied. At low stress intensities the I/M alloy demonstrated better FCP resistance than the P/M 7091 alloy for both constant amplitude and spectrum testing, and the inhomogeneous planar slip and large grain size of 7050 limit dislocation interactions, thereby improving FCP performance.

  18. Development of Enriched Borated Aluminum Alloy for Basket Material of Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Katsura Kajihara; Yasuhiro Aruga; Jun Shimojo; Hiroaki Taniuchi; Tsutomu Takeda; Masatosi Sasaki

    2002-07-01

    New enriched borated aluminum alloys manufactured by melting process are developed, which resulted in supplying structural basket materials for spent nuclear fuel packagings. In this process, the borated aluminum alloys were melted in a vacuum induction furnace at elevated temperature than that of ordinary aluminum melting processes. Boron dissolves into the matrix at the temperature of 1273 K or more, and fine aluminum diboride is precipitated and uniformly dispersed upon cooling rapidity. It is confirmed that boron is homogeneously dispersed with the fine particles of approximate 5 in average size in the product. Tensile strength and creep property at elevated temperature in 1 mass-%B 6061-T651 plate and 1 mass-%B 3004 extruded rectangular pipe as structural materials are examined. It is confirmed that the both of borated aluminum alloys have stable strength and creep properties that are similar to those of ordinary aluminum alloys. (authors)

  19. Study of Plastic Deformation in Binary Aluminum Alloys by Internal-Friction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, E. C.; Maringer, R. E.; Marsh, L. L.; Manning, G. K.

    1959-01-01

    The damping capacity of several aluminum-copper alloys has been investigated during tensile elongation. This damping is shown to depend on strain rate, strain, temperature, alloy content, and heat treatment. A tentative hypothesis, based on the acceleration of solute atom diffusion by deformation-produced vacancies, is proposed to account for the observed behavior. Internal-friction maxima are observed in deformed aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys at -70 deg and -50 deg C. The peaks appear to be relatively insensitive to frequency and alloy content, but they disappear after annealing at temperatures nearing the recrystallization temperature.

  20. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  1. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  2. Dynamic response of two strain-hardened aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boteler, J. M.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2006-09-01

    Despite their common usage in armor applications such as lightweight armored vehicles, the dynamic material response of 5083-H131 and 5083-H32 strain-hardened aluminum alloys has not been previously reported in the open literature. Measurement of the dynamic material properties, including the shock Hugoniot equation of state (EOS), provides hydrocode modelers with critical information required for accurate modeling of material response to intense loading. In the work reported here we investigate the Hugoniot EOS and Hugoniot elastic limit over the stress range of 1.5-8.0GPa. All experiments were performed on the Army Research Laboratory 102mm bore single-stage light gas gun. Impact conditions were uniaxial and planar to within 1mrad of tilt. Both direct-impact- and shock-transmission-type experiments were performed using velocity interferometry diagnostics to record particle velocity histories with 0.5ns temporal resolution. The shock Hugoniot for 5083-H131 is extrapolated to 50GPa and compared to the previous high pressure results of Hauver and Melani (1973) [Ballistic Research Laboratory December Technical Report No. BRL 2345, 1973] and to prior shock studies of 5083-O aluminum alloy.

  3. and Carbon Fiber Reinforced 2024 Aluminum Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmar, Jacek W.; Naplocha, Krzysztof; Morgiel, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy composite materials strengthened with Al2O3 Saffil fibers or together with addition of carbon fibers were investigated. The fibers were stabilized in the preform with silica binder strengthened by further heat treatment. The preforms with 80-90% porosity were infiltrated by direct squeeze casting method. The microstructure of the as-cast specimens consisted mainly of α-dendrites with intermetallic compounds precipitated at their boundaries. The homogenization treatment of the composite materials substituted silica binder with a mixture of the Θ phase and silicon precipitates distributed in the remnants of SiO2 amorphous phase. Outside of this area at the binder/matrix interface, fine MgO precipitates were also present. At surface of C fibers, a small amount of fine Al3C4 carbides were formed. During pressure infiltration of preforms containing carbon fibers under oxygen carrying atmosphere, C fibers can burn releasing gasses and causing cracks initiated by thermal stress. The examination of tensile and bending strength showed that reinforcing of aluminum matrix with 10-20% fibers improved investigated properties in the entire temperature range. The largest increase in relation to unreinforced alloy was observed for composite materials examined at the temperature of 300 °C. Substituting Al2O3 Saffil fibers with carbon fibers leads to better wear resistance at dry condition with no relevant effect on strength properties.

  4. Laser shocking of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.; Slater, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of laser generated stress waves on the microstructure, hardness, strength and stress corrosion resistance of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys was investigated. Pulsed CO2 and neodymium-glass lasers were used to determine the effect of wavelength and pulse duration on pressure generation and material property changes. No changes in material properties were observed with CO2 laser. The strength and hardness of 2024-T351 and the strength of 7075-T73 aluminum alloys were substantially improved by the stress wave environments generated with the neodymium-glass laser. The mechanical properties of 2024-T851 and 7075-T651 were unchanged by the laser treatment. The correlation of the laser shock data with published results of flyer plate experiments demonstrated that a threshold pressure needed to be exceeded before strengthening and hardening could occur. Peak pressures generated by the pulsed laser source were less than 7.0 GPa which was below the threshold pressure required to change the mechanical properties of 2024-T851 and 7075-T651. Corrosion studies indicated that laser shocking increased the resistance to local attack in 2024-T351 and 7075-T651.

  5. Transverse flux induction heating of aluminum alloy strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggott, R.; Walker, D. J.; Gibson, R. C.; Johnson, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    Transverse flux induction heating, an efficient electrical technique particularly suited to the continuous heat treatment of metal strip, is explained. Also described is a 1MW transverse flux inductor designed and built at the Electricity Council Research Centre, Capenhurst, and installed in a tension leveller line at Alcan Plate Ltd., Birmingham, UK. It has been successfully used for the continuous heat treatment of wide (1200-1250 mm) aluminum alloy strip, involving full and partial annealing at line speeds up to 2/ms as well as the solution treatment of certain high strength aluminum alloys. The advantages of this form of induction heating are compactness, controllability, hence ease of automation, and high efficiency. As a consequence, compared with existing batch and continuous heat treatment equipment, major economies in plant operation result due to reduced energy consumption as well as reduced capital and labor costs. The compactness of the technique allows the possibility of introducing transverse flux induction heat treatment furnaces into existing process lines.

  6. Hole Expansion of Aluminum Alloys for the Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, M.; Bhattacharya, R.; Dargue, I.; Aylmore, R.; Williams, G.

    2011-05-01

    The introduction of Aluminum alloys in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-weight ratio has brought with it a number of technical hurdles which require overcoming in order that their full potential may be realized. One of the issues that require addressing is that of edge cracking, a phenomenon which is particularly difficult to predict. This is often observed during the initial drawing operation in a traditional automotive stamping plant. A useful measure of a materials susceptibility to edge cracking is the Hole Expansion Ratio. Currently there is a standard (ISO 16630) which provides for holes to be expanded by a conical punch, where the original hole is introduced via punching. This reflects the traditional processing route within the automotive industry. Investigations have been conducted using both conical and flat-topped punches, as well as using drilling and reaming, and CNC machining to introduce the initial hole for comparison with the standard punched route in order to understand the effect of different processes on the susceptibility to edge cracking. The hole expansion ratio for a number of aluminum alloys, both 5xxx and 6xxx series, has been determined. Regression analyses of hole expansion ratios against material thickness and UTS have been conducted, and a relationship has been established for the different punch and hole types. Consideration is also given to combining a materials hole expansion ratio with its Forming Limit Curve (FLC), with a focus on tool design and tool buy-off being presented.

  7. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  8. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  9. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-03-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  10. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.