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Sample records for aluminum barium calcium

  1. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  6. Both barium and calcium activate neuronal potassium currents

    SciTech Connect

    Ribera, A.B.; Spitzer, N.C.

    1987-09-01

    Amphibian spinal neurons in culture possess both rapidly inactivating and sustained calcium-dependent potassium current components, similar to those described for other cells. Divalent cation-dependent whole-cell outward currents were isolated by subtracting the voltage-dependent potassium currents recorded from Xenopus laevis neurons in the presence of impermeant cadmium from the currents produced without cadmium but in the presence of permeant divalent cations. These concentrations of permeant ions were low enough to avoid contamination by macroscopic inward currents through calcium channels. Calcium-dependent potassium currents were reduced by 1 ..mu..M tetraethylammonium. These currents can also be activated by barium or strontium. Barium as well as calcium activated outward currents in young neurons (6-8 hr) and in relatively mature neurons (19-26 hr in vitro). However, barium influx appeared to suppress the sustained voltage-dependent potassium current in most cells. Barium also activated at least one class of potassium channels observed in excised membrane patches, whole blocking others. The blocking action may have masked and hindered detection of the stimulatory action of barium in other systems.

  7. Barium can replace calcium in calmodulin-dependent contractions of skinned renal arteries of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kreye, V A; Hofmann, F; Mühleisen, M

    1986-03-01

    Renal arteries of the rabbit were chemically skinned using Triton X-100. In EGTA-buffered solutions containing calmodulin and ATP, small strips of the skinned preparations were found to develop contractile force which was dependent on the concentrations of either free calcium or of free barium. However, a 220 times greater concentration of barium than of calcium was necessary for comparable effects. Quantitatively, the response to barium was dependent on the concentration of calmodulin added to the test solutions. The contractile effect of barium was partly antagonized by the calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. PMID:3960707

  8. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  12. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  19. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions.

  20. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  1. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  2. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  3. The thermophysical properties of calcium and barium zirconium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Daniel J.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Triani, Gerry; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Vance, Eric R.

    2013-10-01

    The thermophysical and structural properties of calcium and barium zirconium phosphate ceramics (CZP and BZP) have been investigated for their potential candidacy as actinide hosts for inert matrix fuels (IMF) in nuclear reactors. These phosphate ceramics, which can accommodate minor actinides as well as the resulting fission products, are found to be thermally stable to 1600 °C in air, however they begin to decompose in an inert atmosphere above approximately 1400 °C. The heat capacity, thermal conductivity and bulk thermal-expansion were measured from room temperature up to 1200 °C. Structural changes in this temperature region as well as the anisotropic thermal-expansion behaviour were studied using high-temperature X-ray diffraction. A phase change from R-3 to R-3c was identified for Ba0.5Zr2(PO4)3 near 880 °C. The thermal conductivity for these ceramics at 1000 °C was found to be 1.0 W m-1 K-1, a relatively low thermal conductivity that was increased to 5.0 W m-1 K-1 at 1000 °C for BZP:Ni (25:75 mass ratio) cermet composites.

  4. Reactive coating on alumina substrates: Calcium and barium hexa aluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, J.S.; Aza, A.H. de; Steier, H.P.; Requena, J.; Pena, P. . Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio)

    1994-10-15

    Modifying the surface of ceramics by coating with a substance different from that of the bulk is currently an important technological issue in structural as well as in functional applications (microelectric, environment, sensors, thermal and chemical barriers, catalysis, etc). About 80% of all advanced ceramics are based on alumina. In the present work the authors introduce reactive coating as a feasible route to design an appropriate surface layer in dense alumina compacts, i.e. CaO[center dot]6Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] (CA[sub 6]) and BaO[center dot]6Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] (BA[sub 6]). Doloma (CaO[center dot]MgO), calcium carbonate (CaCO[sub 3]) and barium carbonate (BaCO[sub 3]) reactive coatings on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] substrates have been studied; the results have been discussed on the base of the high-temperature reactions predicted by the corresponding phase equilibrium diagrams.

  5. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  6. Effect of chloride incorporation on the crystallization of zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, G. F.; Smith, G. L.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    One aspect of the influence of preparation procedure on the crystallization behavior of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass was studied. The crystallization pattern of this glass may be affected by the chlorine concentration within it. In particular, when such glasses are heated at low temperatures, the alpha-Ba-Zr-F6 crystalline phase forms only in those glasses which contain chloride.

  7. Precipitation of Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium and Barium in Tissues of Four Acacia Species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium in plants is common. There are abundant studies on the uptake and content of magnesium, strontium and barium, which have similar chemical properties to calcium, in comparison with those of calcium in plants, but studies on co-precipitation of these elements with calcium in plants are rare. In this study, we compared morphologies, distributional patterns, and elemental compositions of crystals in tissues of four Acacia species grown in the field as well as in the glasshouse. A comparison was also made of field-grown plants and glasshouse-grown plants, and of phyllodes of different ages for each species. Crystals of various morphologies and distributional patterns were observed in the four Acacia species studied. Magnesium, strontium and barium were precipitated together with calcium, mainly in phyllodes of the four Acacia species, and sometimes in branchlets and primary roots. These elements were most likely precipitated in forms of oxalate and sulfate in various tissues, including epidermis, mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex. In most cases, precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium was biologically induced, and elements precipitated differed between soil types, plant species, and tissues within an individual plant; the precipitation was also related to tissue age. Formation of crystals containing these elements might play a role in regulating and detoxifying these elements in plants, and protecting the plants against herbivory. PMID:22848528

  8. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  9. Barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate ceramics via sol-gel process: novel high-energy-density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas Puli, Venkata; Kumar, Ashok; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Tomozawa, M.; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2011-10-01

    Lead-free barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate, [(BaZr0.2Ti0.80)O3]1-x-[(Ba0.70Ca0.30)TiO3]x (x = 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) (BZT-BCT) ceramics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and moderate electric breakdown field were prepared by the sol-gel synthesis technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed tetragonal crystal structure and this was further confirmed by Raman spectra. Well-behaved ferroelectric hysteresis loops and moderate polarizations (spontaneous polarization, Ps ~ 3-6 µC cm-2) were obtained in these BZT-BCT ceramics. Frequency-dependent dielectric spectra confirmed that ferroelectric diffuse phase transition (DPT) exists near room temperature. Scanning electron microscope images revealed monolithic grain growth in samples sintered at 1280 °C. 1000/ɛ versus (T) plots revealed ferroelectric DPT behaviour with estimated γ values of ~1.52, 1.51 and 1.88, respectively, for the studied BZT-BCT compositions. All three compositions showed packing-limited breakdown fields of ~47-73 kV cm-1 with an energy density of 0.05-0.6 J cm-3 for thick ceramics (>1 mm). Therefore these compositions might be useful in Y5V-type capacitor applications.

  10. Calcium citrate without aluminum antacids does not cause aluminum retention in patients with functioning kidneys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Wabner, C. L.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Copley, J. B.; Pak, L.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that calcium citrate might enhance aluminum absorption from food, posing a threat of aluminum toxicity even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore measured serum and urinary aluminum before and following calcium citrate therapy in patients with moderate renal failure and in normal subjects maintained on constant metabolic diets with known aluminum content (967-1034 mumol/day, or 26.1-27.9 mg/day, in patients and either 834 or 1579 mumol/day, or 22.5 and 42.6 mg/day, in normal subjects). Seven patients with moderate renal failure (endogenous creatinine clearance of 43 ml/min) took 50 mmol (2 g) calcium/day as effervescent calcium citrate with meals for 17 days. Eight normal women received 25 mmol (1 g) calcium/day as tricalcium dicitrate tablets with meals for 7 days. In patients with moderate renal failure, serum and urinary aluminum were normal before treatment at 489 +/- 293 SD nmol/l (13.2 +/- 7.9 micrograms/l) and 767 +/- 497 nmol/day (20.7 +/- 13.4 micrograms/day), respectively. They remained within normal limits and did not change significantly during calcium citrate treatment (400 +/- 148 nmol/l and 600 +/- 441 nmol/day, respectively). Similarly, no significant change in serum and urinary aluminum was detected in normal women during calcium citrate administration (271 +/- 59 vs 293 +/- 85 nmol/l and 515 +/- 138 vs 615 +/- 170 nmol/day, respectively). In addition, skeletal bone aluminum content did not change significantly in 14 osteoporotic patients (endogenous creatinine clearance of 68.5 ml/min) treated for 24 months with calcium citrate, 10 mmol calcium twice/day separately from meals (29.3 +/- 13.9 ng/mg ash bone to 27.9 +/0- 10.4, P = 0.727). In them, histomorphometric examination did not show any evidence of mineralization defect. Thus, calcium citrate given alone without aluminum-containing drugs does not pose a risk of aluminum toxicity in subjects with normal or functioning kidneys, when it is administered on an empty stomach at a recommended dose of 20 mmol calcium/day.

  11. Assessment of the solubility and bioaccessibility of barium and aluminum in soils affected by mine dust deposition.

    PubMed

    Shock, S S; Bessinger, B A; Lowney, Y W; Clark, J L

    2007-07-01

    Barium is a heavy metal to which human and animal receptors may be exposed in various settings--for example, in mineral extraction industries where the mining and milling of ores occurs. Aluminum is also an element abundant in soil and dust to which human and animal receptors may be exposed in association with such industries. This study investigated the solubility and bioaccessibility of barium and aluminum in simulated gastric fluids using an in vitro test method previously validated for lead. Soil samples were collected from the vicinity of a mine and transport road that generated fugitive dust containing barium as barite (BaSO4). It was found that barium bioaccessibility in different tundra soil and fugitive dust source materials varied greatly, between 0.07 and 66.0%, depending on sample location, grain size, solid-to-fluid ratio used in the in vitro experiments, and the analytical method selected for determining total barium concentrations in the sample substrates. For X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) analytical methods and a solid-to-fluid ratio of 1:100, barium bioaccessibility from the barite-rich mine waste rock and gyro crusher ore dust source materials was very low (0.07-0.36%). By contrast, the bioaccessibility of barium in tundra soil samples affected by fugitive dust deposition ranged from 3.8 to 19.5%. The relative solubility of barium measured in the simulated gastric fluids of this study is consistent with time-dependent dissolution of barite in mine waste rock and ore dust, and the presence of more soluble chemical forms in tundra soil. Laboratory XRF analysis was the only analytical method used in this study that accurately characterized total barium concentrations for all sample substrates. Aluminum bioaccessibility was distinguished from barium bioaccessibility by its generally lower values and smaller dependence on grain size and solid-to-fluid ratios. The range of aluminum bioaccessibility values (0.31-4.0%) is consistent with the predominance of aluminum in relatively insoluble aluminosilicate minerals. PMID:17695934

  12. Curie temperature and magnetic properties of aluminum doped barium ferrite particles prepared by ball mill method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daming; Harward, Ian; Baptist, Joshua; Goldman, Sara; Celinski, Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Barium ferrite has attracted considerable interest in the fields of permanent magnets and perpendicular magnetic recording due to its strong uniaxial anisotropy and high Curie temperature (Tc). We prepared aluminum doped barium ferrite ceramics (BaAlxFe12-xO19, 0≤x≤6) by the ball mill method. The powder was milled for 96 h, and after forming pellets, annealed for 48 h in air at 1000 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) data show that there are only single hexagonal phases in the samples without any impurity phase. The crystal lattice constants, a and c, were calculated by Cohen's method. Both a and c decrease with increasing x, ranging from 0.588 nm and 2.318 nm to 0.573 nm and 2.294 nm, respectively. A Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) were used to investigate Tc and magnetic properties of BaFe12-xAlxO19. It is found that Tc decreases with increasing x, from 425 °C to 298 °C. It is also found that the saturated magnetization (4πMs) decreases with increasing x, while the coercivity (Hc) increases with the increase in x. The anisotropy field was also determined from the SQUID measurement.

  13. Efficient ionisation of calcium, strontium and barium by resonant laser pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient ionization has been observed when an atomic vapor of strontium, barium or calcium was illuminated with a long pulse tunable laser at the frequency of the atomic resonance line. The variation in the degree of ionization with neutral density and laser intensity has been measured using the 'hook' method. The maximum ionization observed was 94%. Excited state populations were measured yielding an excitation temperature (depending on exact experimental conditions) in the region of 0.4 eV. The decay of ion density after the laser pulse was monitored and the recombination coefficients determined. The results are interpreted in terms of an electron heating model.

  14. Preparation and characterization of uniform particles of flufenamic acid and its calcium and barium salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amr Ali; Matijević, Egon

    2012-09-01

    Uniform fully dispersed particles of flufenamic acid, a widely used anti-inflammatory drug, were prepared by two different methods. In the first one, the drug solution in organic solvents was added to a non-solvent (water or aqueous solutions of stabilizers); while in the second procedure the drug was precipitated by acidifying its basic aqueous solutions. In addition calcium and barium salts of uniform spherical particles were obtained by precipitation in aqueous basic solutions of the drug. These salts are supposed to improve the drug reactivity. The prepared dispersions of the drug and its salts were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and electrophoresis. PMID:22703985

  15. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of aluminum, magnesium, and calcium in molten silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Takahiro; Morita, Kazuki; Sano, Nobuo |

    1998-10-01

    The thermodynamic properties of aluminum, magnesium, and calcium in molten silicon were investigated using a chemical equilibration technique at 1723 to 1848 K, 1698 to 1798 K, and 1723 to 1823 K, respectively. The activity coefficient of aluminum in molten silicon was determined by equilibrating molten silicon-aluminum alloys with solid Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 6}Si{sub 2}O{sub 13}, that of magnesium was determined by equilibrating molten silicon-magnesium alloys and MgO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melts doubly saturated with MdSiO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}, and that of calcium was determined by equilibrating molten silicon-calcium alloys with SiO{sub 2}-saturated CaO-SiO{sub 2} melts. The activity coefficients at infinite dilution relative to the pure liquid state were determined as follows: log {gamma}{sub Al({ell})in Si}{sup o} = {minus} 1570/T + 0.236, (1723 to 1848 K); log {gamma}{sub Mg({ell}) in Si}{sup o} = {minus} 4900/T + 1.96, (1698 to 1798 K); and log {gamma}{sub Ca({ell})in Si}{sup o} = {minus} 7670/T + 1.53, (1723 to 1823 K).

  17. Interaction Studies Between Crofer-22APU Alloy And P{sub 2}O{sub 5} Containing Barium Calcium Alumino-borosilicate (BCABS) Sealant Glass-Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present the effect of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition on barium calcium aluminum borosilicate BCABS glasses of composition (mol %)35BaO-15CaO-5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(37-x)SiO{sub 2}-8B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xP{sub 2}O{sub 5}(0{<=}x{<=}5). The incorporation of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} increased network polymerization and crystallization tendency. However, addition of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} leads to the formation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the interface, saturating it in the ions of the metal. This improves glass-to-metal bonding.

  18. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  19. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Heat Resistant Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Paxton, Dean M.; Xia, Guanguang; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2003-01-02

    In most planar SOFC stacks operating at an intermediate temperature (700-800 degrees C), the interconnect is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel and has to be hermitically sealed to its adjacent components, such as the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To large extent the seal performance relies on the chemical compatibility of the sealing glass with the metallic interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were chosen as examples to investigate the chemical interactions or corrosions at the sealing glass interface with the ferritic stainless steels. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel depended on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligning along the interface. The pore formation along the interface of sealing glass and ferritic stainless steel however could be avoided through a pre-heat treatment of the ferriitc stainless steel.

  20. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  1. The effect of drugs on the constriction of isolated depolarized blood vessels in response to calcium or barium

    PubMed Central

    Northover, B. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. The rat isolated anterior mesenteric artery was perfused at a constant rate with a calcium-free depolarizing solution. Injection close to the cannula of 0.05-0.1 ml. of solutions of CaCl2 (117 mM) or BaCl2 (100 mM) caused a rise in perfusion pressure. 2. The responses to injected CaCl2 solution could be obtained repeatedly but those to successive injections of BaCl2 solution slowly declined. When the responsiveness to barium had almost disappeared, it could be restored by the addition to the perfusing fluid of a small amount of calcium (0.05 mM). 3. The contractile effects of calcium or barium were antagonized by the addition to the perfusing fluid of several anti-inflammatory substances, certain local anaesthetics and certain spasmolytic drugs. 4. Perfusion of the mesenteric artery with a depolarizing solution containing 0.2 mM-CaCl2 caused a persistent rise of the perfusion pressure. This was rapidly and completely reversed by the addition of indomethacin (4 mg/100 ml.) or cinchocaine hydrochloride (2 mg/100 ml.) to the perfusing fluid. 5. The uptake of 45Ca by rat aorta depleted of calcium was reduced by amethocaine hydrochloride (10 mg/100 ml.) or cinchocaine hydrochloride (2 mg/100 ml.) but not by indomethacin (10 mg/100 ml.) or desipramine hydrochloride (1 mg/100 ml.). PMID:5687595

  2. ALUMINUM ALTERS CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium is actively transported into intracellular organelles and out of the cytoplasm by Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPases located in the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes. he effects of aluminum on calcium transport were examined in the adult rat brain. 5Ca-uptake was examined in micr...

  3. Study of the Influence Between Barium Ions and Calcium Ions on Morphology and Size of Coprecipitation in Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nong; Meng, Qing Luo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we systematically drew a series of inverse-microemulsion quasi-ternary system phase diagrams of OP-10+C8H17OH+C6H12+brine (CaCl2/BaCl2) by adjusting the ratio of CaCl2 and BaCl2. On this basis, microemulsions have been prepared with seven different molar ratios of Ca2+/Ba2+, and calcium carbonate and barium carbonate coprecipitation products were obtained by reaction with an equimolar amount of sodium carbonate. The influence of barium ion to morphology and composition of nanometer calcium carbonate were studied. These samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM photographs indicated that when the content of Ca2+ was higher, some incomplete large cube of coprecipitation particles were formed in solution, but with the content of Ba2+ increased gradually, they formed a large number of small spherical particles, with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration, the particles mainly had structures of irregular polyhedron eventually. The measurement results of FTIR and XRD indicated that CaCO3 coprecipitation products gradually changed from calcite to the vaterite, eventually turned into being aragonite with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration.

  4. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-01

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel, is hermitically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize degradation of the stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the stainless steel interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were selected as examples to increase the understanding the chemical compatibility issues in SOFC. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel was dependent on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligned along the interface. It appears the pore formation along the interface can be avoided through a pre-heat treatment.

  5. Histamine release by exocytosis from rat mast cells on reduction of extracellular sodium: a secretory response inhibited by calcium, strontium, barium or magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, D E; Douglas, W W

    1976-01-01

    1. Histamine release from peritoneal mast cells of the rat was stimulated when the cells were exposed for 10 min to sodium-deficient media where all NaCl had been replaced by KC1, RbC1, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, or Tris, provided calcium was less than about 0-5 mM. 2. Light and electron microscopy showed the response to be exocytosis. 3. The chelating agents, EDTA and EGTA, abolished the response to sodium lack and their inhibitory effects were reversed by re-incubating cells with calcium but not magnesium. 4. The response was inhibited by dinitrophenol combined with glucose-deprivation. 5. The response was inversely related to the concentrations of sodium and calcium below 137-5 and 0-5 mM respectively. 6. The related alkaline earth metals, barium, strontium, and magnesium, resembled calcium in inhibiting the response to sodium lack. 7. No secretory response was seen when the cells were exposed for 10 min to calcium-free medium in which lithium replaced sodium. Exposure to this medium for 60 min, however, elicited secretion. 8. It is concluded that when extracellular calcium is low, a reduction in extracellular sodium induces a conventional exocytotic secretory response dependent on energy and cellular calcium. It is suggested that sodium lack may mobilize calcium from a cellular site possibly the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. Images A B C D E F G H PMID:59804

  6. Protective effect of a calcium channel blocker "diltiazem" on aluminum chloride-induced dementia in mice.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anu; Neha; Sodhi, Rupinder K; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2015-11-01

    Many studies report that heavy metals such as aluminum are involved in amyloid beta aggregation and neurotoxicity. Further, high concentration of aluminum in the brain deregulates calcium signaling which contributes to synaptic dysfunction and halts neuronal communication which ultimately leads to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker clinically used in angina, is reported to decrease amyloid beta production by inhibiting calcium influx, decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress. However, the probable role of this drug in aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced experimental dementia is yet to be explored. Therefore, the present study is designed to investigate the effect of AlCl3-induced dementia in mice. Morris water maze test and elevated plus maze were utilized to evaluate learning and memory. Various biochemical estimations including brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), brain total protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) level, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, nitrate/nitrite, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. AlCl3 significantly impaired learning and memory and increased brain AChE, brain total protein, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite and decreased brain GSH or SOD. On the other hand, treatment with diltiazem significantly reversed AlCl3-induced behavioral and biochemical deficits. The present study indicates the beneficial role of diltiazem in AlCl3-induced dementia. PMID:26142889

  7. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway. PMID:26259903

  8. Oxygen isotopic abundances in calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions from ordinary chondrites: implications for nebular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    McKeegan, K D; Leshin, L A; Russell, S S; MacPherson, G J

    1998-04-17

    The oxygen isotopic compositions of two calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites Quinyambie and Semarkona are enriched in 16O by an amount similar to that in CAIs from carbonaceous chondrites. This may indicate that most CAIs formed in a restricted region of the solar nebula and were then unevenly distributed throughout the various chondrite accretion regions. The Semarkona CAI is isotopically homogeneous and contains highly 16O-enriched melilite, supporting the hypothesis that all CAI minerals were originally 16O-rich, but that in most carbonaceous chondrite inclusions some minerals exchanged oxygen isotopes with an external reservoir following crystallization. PMID:9545215

  9. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong Liu, Yunfei

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  10. Searching for calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in cometary particles with Rosetta/COSIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, John A.; Engrand, Cecile; Stenzel, Oliver; Hilchenbach, Martin; Kissel, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    The calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) found in chondritic meteorites are probably the oldest solar system solids, dating back to 4567.30 ± 0.16 million years ago. They are thought to have formed in the protosolar nebula within a few astronomical units of the Sun, and at a temperature of around 1300 K. The Stardust mission found evidence of CAI-like material in samples recovered from comet Wild 2. The appearance of CAIs in comets, which are thought to be formed at lower temperatures and larger distances from the Sun, is only explicable if some mechanism allows the efficient transfer of such objects from the inner solar nebula to the outer solar nebula. Such mechanisms have been proposed such as an X-wind or turbulence. In this work, particles collected from within the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are examined for compositional evidence of the presence of CAIs. COSIMA (the Cometary Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer) uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to analyze the composition of cometary dust captured on metal targets. While CAIs can have a radius of centimeters, they are more typically a few hundred microns in size, and can be smaller than 1 μm, so it is conceivable that particles visible on COSIMA targets (ranging in size from about 10 μm to hundreds of microns) could contain CAIs. Using a peak fitting technique, the composition of a set of 13 particles was studied, looking for material rich in both calcium and aluminum. One such particle was found.

  11. An Isotopic and Petrologic Study of Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions from CO3 Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, S. S.; Huss, G. R.; Fahey, A. J.; Greenwood, R. C.; Hutchison, R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1998-02-01

    We have studied the mineralogy and petrology of 229 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from ten CO3 meteorites of petrologic types 3.0-3.7. Subsets of these inclusions were measured by ion probe for magnesium, calcium, and titanium isotopes and REE abundances. Most CAIs from CO3 meteorites fall into three major types: (1) melilite-rich inclusions, which also contain spinel/hercynite, perovskite, and occasionally hibonite; (2) spinel-pyroxene inclusions; and (3) hibonite-hercynite inclusions. In addition, several isolated hibonite grains, two grossite (CaAl 4O 7) bearing CAIs, two hibonite-fassaite microspherules, and one anorthite-spinel-pyroxene inclusion were found. CAIs from CO3 meteorites exhibit all of the REE patterns commonly seen in inclusions from CV3 and CM2 chondrites. Most exhibit evidence of 26Al, and many have inferred ( 26Al/ 27Al) o ≈ 5 × 10 -5. The relative abundances of different types of CAIs in CO3 chondrites differ from those in CV3 and CM2 chondrites. CAIs in CO3 chondrites have experienced considerable secondary alteration, both before and after accretion. Signatures of nebular alteration include Wark-Lovering rims and the high Fe contents in spinels from all hibonite/hercynite inclusions. Occasionally, melilite and anorthite show evidence of nebular alteration to feldspathoids and pyroxene. The magnesium-aluminum systematics of some melilite-rich inclusions were apparently disturbed prior to final accretion of the parent body. Parent body alteration is indicated by correlations between CAI characteristics and the petrologic type of the host meteorite. Spinel in melilite-rich and coarse-grained spinel-pyroxene inclusions becomes more Fe rich, with the development of relatively homogeneous hercynitic spinel (˜50-60 mol%) in CAIs from metamorphic grades >3.4. Perovskite has been converted to ilmenite in types >3.4. Melilite-rich inclusions are abundant in CO3.0-3.3 meteorites, rare in 3.4 meteorites, and absent meteorites of types 3.5-3.7; melilite-rich CAIs are probably replaced by inclusions rich in feldspathoids, pyroxene, and Fe-rich spinel. Isotopic disturbance of the magnesium-aluminum systematics may be more severe in higher petrologic types. Hibonite seems to be unaffected by this level of metamorphism. Three isotopically unusual inclusions were found. One single-crystal hibonite, Isna SP16, has a REE pattern strongly depleted in Ce and Y, ( 26Al/ 27Al) o = (2.4 ± 0.3) × 10 -5, and mass fractionated calcium (F Ca = +12 ± 2‰/amu), but no resolvable nuclear anomalies in neutron-rich calcium isotopes. The REE pattern, which is thought to reflect nebular conditions, and mass-fractionated calcium, indicative of evaporation, are similar to those of the FUN inclusion, HAL, and related hibonites, indicating similar formation conditions. The absence in Isna SP16 of the nuclear anomalies observed in HAL and the difference in ( 26Al/ 27Al) o between HAL and Isna SP16 indicate that the processes that produced HAL-type hibonites operated on diverse materials. Two hibonite-bearing microspherules, Colony SP1 and ALH82101 SP15, exhibit nearly flat REE patterns with negative europium anomalies and slightly negative δ 26Mg. ALH82101 SP15 has resolved excesses of 48Ca and 50Ti. These characteristics are similar to those of previously described microspherules from Murchison and Lance, implying that the microspherules formed via a single process from related, but not identical source materials.

  12. Role of Accumulated Calcium in Alleviating Aluminum Injury in Wheat Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Alamgir; Ashrafuzzaman, M.; Hossain, A. K. M. Zakir; Ismail, Mohd. Razi; Koyama, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) sensitive wheat cultivar kalyansona was grown for 14 d in a range of Ca solution (125, 625, and 2500 μM) plus other nutrients without Al. At 14 d after Ca treatment, half of these plants were harvested (H1), and the rest of the plants were exposed to 100 μM Al for additional 6 d and harvested (H2). Severe Al injury was found only in the plants with the lowest supply of Ca before Al treatment. Aluminum concentration in the apoplastic fluid was very high at 125 μM Ca probably because the plasma membrane of some of the cells was destroyed due to the attack of 100 μM Al. Aluminum content in roots decreased with increasing supply of Ca before Al treatment. Calcium content decreased drastically at harvest (H2) in the plants with 100 μM Al. Under Al stress conditions, the plant responded to Al in different ways due to not only the different Ca supply but also the variation of Ca content in the plant tissues. Actually, the plants having the largest Ca content in the roots before Al treatment can receive less Al injury during Al treatment. To substantiate this idea, a companion study was conducted to investigate the effects of 2500 μM Ca supply during, before, and after 100 μM Al treatment on root growth. The results indicated clearly that exogenous Ca supply before Al treatment is able to alleviate Al injury but less effective than Ca supply during Al treatment. PMID:24701169

  13. Datasets depicting mobility retardation of NCS proteins observed upon incubation with calcium, but not with magnesium, barium or strontium.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Scully, Jenna; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-06-01

    In this data article we show the specificity of the Ca(2+)-induced mobility shift in three proteins that belong to the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) protein family: Hippocalcin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. These proteins did not display a shift in mobility in native gels when incubated with divalent cations other than Ca(2+) - such as Mg(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), even at 10× concentrations. The data is similar to that obtained with another NCS protein, neurocalcin delta (Viviano et al., 2016, "Electrophoretic Mobility Shift in Native Gels Indicates Calcium-dependent Structural Changes of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins", [1]). PMID:27222862

  14. Datasets depicting mobility retardation of NCS proteins observed upon incubation with calcium, but not with magnesium, barium or strontium

    PubMed Central

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Scully, Jenna; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    In this data article we show the specificity of the Ca2+-induced mobility shift in three proteins that belong to the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) protein family: Hippocalcin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. These proteins did not display a shift in mobility in native gels when incubated with divalent cations other than Ca2+ – such as Mg2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+, even at 10× concentrations. The data is similar to that obtained with another NCS protein, neurocalcin delta (Viviano et al., 2016, “Electrophoretic Mobility Shift in Native Gels Indicates Calcium-dependent Structural Changes of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins”, [1]). PMID:27222862

  15. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in the Allende meteorite - Evidence for a liquid origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blander, M.; Fuchs, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    We have made a detailed examination of the mineralogy, textures, and assemblages of six calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAI) in the Allende meteorite. They can be classified into four types - hibonite-bearing, fassaite- and olivine-bearing, feldspathoid-bearing and fassaite-bearing CAI that are hibonite and olivine free. Examples of each type appear to have crystallized from a liquid rather than by agglomeration of solid nebular condensates. Some lines of evidence for a liquid origin are the presence of spherical and ovoid shapes and rims containing minerals that are more refractory than minerals inside the inclusion. Thermodynamic calculations and comparisons with liquidus phase diagrams indicate that the CAI could have been produced by direct condensation to metastable subcooled liquids that subsequently crystallized or by remelting of an equilibrium high-temperature condensate by impact. The diopside rims in some hibonite-bearing CAI and the paucity of metal in fassaite-olivine-bearing CAI are more consistent with direct condensation of a liquid.

  16. Calcium and aluminum impacts on sugar maple physiology in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Halman, Joshua M; Schaberg, Paul G; Hawley, Gary J; Pardo, Linda H; Fahey, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    Forests of northeastern North America have been exposed to anthropogenic acidic inputs for decades, resulting in altered cation relations and disruptions to associated physiological processes in multiple tree species, including sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the current study, the impacts of calcium (Ca) and aluminum (Al) additions on mature sugar maple physiology were evaluated at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, NH, USA) to assess remediation (Ca addition) or exacerbation (Al addition) of current acidified conditions. Fine root cation concentrations and membrane integrity, carbon (C) allocation, foliar cation concentrations and antioxidant activity, foliar response to a spring freezing event and reproductive ability (flowering, seed quantity, filled seed and seed germination) were evaluated for dominant sugar maple trees in a replicated plot study. Root damage and foliar antioxidant activity were highest in Al-treated trees, while growth-associated C, foliar re-flush following a spring frost and reproductive ability were highest in Ca-treated trees. In general, we found that trees on Ca-treated plots preferentially used C resources for growth and reproductive processes, whereas Al-treated trees devoted C to defense-based processes. Similarities between Al-treated and control trees were observed for foliar cation concentrations, C partitioning and seed production, suggesting that sugar maples growing in native forests may be more stressed than previously perceived. Our experiment suggests that disruption of the balance of Ca and Al in sugar maples by acid deposition continues to be an important driver of tree health. PMID:24300338

  17. Use of calcium/aluminum ratios as indicators of stress in forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Cronan, C.S.; Grigal, D.F.

    1995-03-01

    The calcium/aluminum (Ca/Al) molar ratio of the soil solution provides a valuable measurement endpoint or ecological indicator for identification of approximate thresholds beyond which the risk of forest damage from Al stress and nutrient imbalances increases. The Ca/Al ratio can also be used as an indicator to assess forest ecosystem changes over time in response to acidic deposition, forest harvesting, or other processes contributing to acid soil infertility. Based on a critical review of literature on Al stress, we estimate that there is a 50:50 risk of adverse impacts on tree growth or nutrition when the soil solution Ca/Al ratio is as low as 1.0, a 75% risk when the soil solution ratio is as low as 0.5, and nearly a 100% risk when the soil solution Ca/Al molar ratio is as low as 0.2. The Ca/Al ratio of the soil solution can be corroborated with other complementary indices.

  18. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR {sup 10}Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W. E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed

    2010-12-10

    We propose a model for the incorporation of {sup 10}Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, {sup 10}Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This {sup 10}Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting {sup 10}Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of {sup 10}Be at the surface of the Sun is {approx}0.1 {sup 10}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Scaling up the contemporary {sup 10}Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10{sup 5} would increase the production rate to 10{sup 410}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model {sup 10}Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted {sup 10}Be would have been of the order of 10{sup 1210}Be g{sup -1} in CAIs, consistent with initial{sup 10}Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  19. Characterization of a novel protein in chick intestine that exhibits calcium-binding activity and regulation by dietary calcium, aluminum and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Dunn, M A; Too, S L; Ishizaki, A S

    1995-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms stimulated by vitamin D and low calcium diets that promote intestinal calcium absorption are not fully understood. In the present experiments, groups of chicks were subjected to the following treatments known to alter the efficiency of Ca absorption: vitamin D deficiency, repletion of vitamin D-deficient chicks with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3], low Ca intakes, and aluminum toxicity. Duodenal mucosal scrapings were obtained and screened for changes in protein composition using SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. The relative amount of a previously unreported 400-kDa oligomer containing 22-kDa monomeric subunits was found to vary directly with theoretical changes in the efficiency of Ca absorption, i.e., amounts increased with low Ca intakes and repletion with 1,25(OH)2D3, but were decreased by dietary aluminum and vitamin D deficiency. The oligomer was shown to have Ca-binding activity using a 45Ca overlay technique. These properties suggest 1) that the protein is regulated, at least indirectly, by 1,25(OH)2D3; 2) that the protein may play a role in promoting Ca absorption, possibly by binding Ca; and 3) that dietary aluminum interferes with the regulation of this protein, possibly by interfering with the actions of vitamin D in the intestine. PMID:7500169

  20. Optical behavior of Pr3+-doped barium titanate-calcium titanate material prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yanxue; He, Xiyun; Qiu, Pingsun; He, Qizhuang; Peng, Zifei; Sun, Dazhi

    2009-07-01

    Photoluminescence performances of Pr-doped alkaline-earth titanates (Ba,Ca)TiO3 (with rich barium) prepared by a solgel technique are investigated at room temperature. A relatively strong red luminescence is observed in (Ba0.80Ca0.20)TiO3 material when Pr-BaTiO3 material does not exhibit obvious red luminescence. The phenomenon is discussed with respect to the substitute of Ca and the two-photon luminescence effect. The red luminescence is enhanced by a fast thermal treatment. The wavelength range of luminescence near red and infrared light is broadened by the same process as well. These behaviors are ascribed to the randomization of distribution of Ca and Ba at A site in ABO3 perovskite structure. The experimental results provide not only a possible way to develop new materials with pastel visual impression, but also a potential technique to modify photoluminescence properties that can be controlled by external fields because the microscopic structure of BaTiO3, such as electric domains, can be changed by electric field, temperature, and so on.

  1. A Filtration System That Greatly Reduces Aluminum in Calcium Gluconate Injection, USP Used to Prepare Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Wesley R.; Spilling, Christopher D.; Abramov, Vasiliy P.; Lone, Jason M.; Kuhn, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to reduce aluminum (Al) in Calcium Gluconate Injection, US Pharmacopeia (USP) used in the preparation of parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions. METHODS: A flow-through filter containing an immobilized chelator that complexes Al from Calcium Gluconate Injection, USP as it flows through the filter was designed, refined by design modifications, and extensively tested. When a small-volume parenteral vial containing 100 mL of Calcium Gluconate Injection, USP is connected on the inlet side of the filter, and the outlet side is connected to an evacuated receiving vial, the filtered solution is drawn into the receiving vial. This constitutes a complete system to remove Al from Calcium Gluconate Injection, USP. RESULTS: The extent of Al removal is flow rate dependent. At a flow rate of 1 mL/min approximately 85% of the Al was removed from calcium gluconate solution. PN solutions have been reported to deliver 15 to 23 mcg/kg/day Al to neonates. Given that Calcium Gluconate Injection, USP provides 85% of the Al in neonatal PN solutions, removal of 85% of the Al from this source was calculated to reduce Al delivered to most neonates to <5 mcg/kg/day. CONCLUSIONS: A point-of-use, self-contained, single-use, disposable, Al-complexing filter has been created. It was calculated to reduce Al delivered in PN solutions by 72%, resulting in daily Al delivery below the level that results in Al accumulation associated with central nervous system and bone toxicity to all but the smallest (<1 kg) infants. PMID:25309149

  2. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts. PMID:23506358

  3. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: MAJOR BARIUM CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the production of major barium chemicals. Compounds studied include barium sulfide, barium carbonate, barium chloride, barium hydroxide, and barium sulfate. In order to evaluate potential environmental effects the source severity,...

  4. Aluminum Chloride Induces Osteoblasts Apoptosis via Disrupting Calcium Homeostasis and Activating Ca(2+)/CaMKII Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qiuyue; Sun, Xudong; Li, Yanfei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum promotes osteoblast (OB) apoptosis. Apoptosis is induced by the disordered calcium homeostasis. Therefore, to investigate the relationship between Al-induced OB apoptosis and calcium homeostasis, calvarium OBs from neonatal rats (3-4 days) were cultured and exposed to 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) or 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) combined with 5 μM BAPTA-AM (OBs were pretreated with 5 μM BAPTA-AM for 1 h, then added 0.048 mg/mL Al(3+)), respectively. Then OB apoptosis rate, intracellular calcium ions concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), mRNA expression level of calmodulin (CaM), and protein expression levels of CaM and p-CaMKII in OBs were examined. The result showed that AlCl3 increased OB apoptosis rate, and [Ca(2+)]i and p-CaMKII expression levels and decreased CaM expression levels, whereas BAPTA-AM relieved the effects. These results proved that AlCl3 induced OB apoptosis by disrupting the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and activating the Ca(2+)/CaMKII signal pathway. Our findings can provide new insights for revealing the apoptosis mechanism of OBs exposed to AlCl3. PMID:26138010

  5. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  6. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  7. Segregation and evaporation behaviors of aluminum and calcium in silicon during solidification process induced by electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dachuan; Shi, Shuang; Tan, Yi; Asghar, H. M. Noor ul Huda Khan; Qin, Shiqiang

    2015-03-01

    An experimental investigation into the removal of aluminum (Al) and calcium (Ca) from molten silicon by using electron beam melting was carried out. Based on the distributions of Al and Ca along the growth direction of the ingot under different solidification conditions, the influence of segregation and evaporation behaviors on the removal of such impurities with both high saturated vapor pressure and low segregation coefficients was investigated. The results showed that the distributions of impurities depend upon the interaction between segregation and evaporation, so that the removal efficiency can be further improved by adjusting the melting parameters. Compared with the traditional electron beam melting process, the energy consumption decreases by 20% during the whole melting and solidification process. It is considered to be a more effective way for the purification of silicon and the reduction of energy consumption by electron beam melting.

  8. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  9. Tailored Barium Swallow Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs & Services > Tests We Offer > Imaging Tests Tailored Barium Swallow Study The TBS is a special study ... close to them while the study is completed. Barium Taste Barium is heavy and has a chalky ...

  10. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  11. Mechanism of action of barium ion on rat aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T R; Dineen, D X; Petrak, R

    1984-03-01

    The mechanism of action of barium ion on the aortic smooth muscle of the normal rat was investigated using in vitro calcium-depleted aortic strips. Aortic strips were depleted of calcium by repeated exposure to norepinephrine in a calcium-free bathing solution. Although calcium depletion abrogated the response of strips to catecholamines and depolarizing agents, the response to barium chloride remained quantitatively intact. The calcium influx blocker D 600 prevented the contractile response to barium but not to catecholamines, whereas phentolamine prevented the response to catecholamines but not barium. The strip response to barium was depressed by a twofold increase in extracellular magnesium concentration whether the strip was intact or calcium depleted. Although increased concentrations of calcium in the extracellular medium inhibited the contractile response to potassium ion, increases in barium merely potentiated the potassium contracture. These findings indicate that barium produces its contractile effect on vascular smooth muscle by a direct intracellular interaction with the contractile or regulatory proteins. Barium enters these cells via calcium influx channels and is probably not sequestered in a physiologically releasable pool. Unlike calcium, barium does not stabilize the smooth muscle sarcolemma when present in high concentration. PMID:6703038

  12. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drink lactose-reduced or lactose-free milk. Vegans (vegetarians who eat no animal products) and ovo- ... osteoporosis and bone fractures. Symptoms of serious calcium deficiency include numbness and tingling in the fingers, convulsions, ...

  13. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and salmon Calcium-enriched foods such as breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice drinks, and tofu. Check ...

  14. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  15. High-calcium flue gas desulfurization products reduce aluminum toxicity in an Appalachian soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell, R.R.; Ritchey, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    An acid Appalachian soil was amended with two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products, one consisting of wallboard-quality gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}) and the other containing CaSO{sub 3}{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O as a major component. Soil columns treated with FGD by-products were leached with deionized H{sub 2}O under unsaturated conditions. Aluminum amounts leached increased 25-fold over the control when CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O FGD by-product was incorporated into the soil. Leachate pH decreased with FGD product treatment, but bulk soil pH increased, and exchangeable Al and total soil acidity decreased. Mean 4-d root lengths of sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) seedlings grown in the leached soils were as much as 440 and 310% the value of the control for CaSO{sub 3}{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O and CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O treatments, respectively. Mechanisms by which mitigation of Al toxicity occurs with addition of high-Ca FGD by-products to acid soils are discussed. 48 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Calcium and aluminum cycling in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest of the eastern USA: relative impacts of tree species, canopy state, and flux type.

    PubMed

    Levia, Delphis F; Shiklomanov, Alexey N; Van Stan, John T; Scheick, Carrie E; Inamdar, Shreeram P; Mitchell, Myron J; McHale, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Ca/Al molar ratios are commonly used to assess the extent of aluminum stress in forests. This is among the first studies to quantify Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow. Ca/Al molar ratios in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate, near-trunk soil solution, and soil water were quantified for a deciduous forest in northeastern MD, USA. Data were collected over a 3-year period. The Ca/Al molar ratios in this study were above the threshold for aluminum stress (<1). Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) had a median annual stemflow Ca/Al molar ratio of 15.7, with the leafed and leafless values of 12.4 and 19.2, respectively. The corresponding Ca/Al molar ratios for Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) were 11.9 at the annual time scale and 11.9 and 13.6 for leafed and leafless periods, respectively. Bayesian statistical analysis showed no significant effect of canopy state (leafed, leafless) on Ca/Al molar ratios. DOC was consistently an important predictor of calcium, aluminum, and Ca/Al ratios. pH was occasionally an important predictor of calcium and aluminum concentrations, but was not a good predictor of Ca/Al ratio in any of the best-fit models (of >500 examined). This study supplies new data on Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow from two common deciduous tree species. Future work should examine Ca/Al molar ratios in stemflow of other species and examine both inorganic and organic aluminum species to better gauge the potential for, and understand the dynamics of, aluminum toxicity in the proximal area around tree boles. PMID:26100445

  17. Calcium phosphate sol-gel-derived coatings on titanium-aluminum-vanadium substrate for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lu

    Osseointegration of implants to host bone is a necessary requirement for dental and orthopaedic implants. The rate and quality of osseointegration were enhanced through the use of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) films on metallic substrates. The present study investigates the characteristics of Ca-P films applied using sol-gel dip coating methods to sintered porous-surfaced implants. Ca-P films have been formed using Inorganic Route and Organic Route processes. It has been shown that both approaches resulted in the formation of carbonated hydroxyapatite but with different Ca/P ratios as well as different surface textures and film structures, the Inorganic Route-formed film being more porous at its outermost surface, and having a more irregular topography. An interfacial reaction product (calcium titanium oxide) was detected for the Inorganic Route-formed coatings while this interfacial phase was not detectable in the Organic Route-formed coatings. The interface tensile and shear adhesion strength properties of Ca-P films have been evaluated using an improved direct pull-off testing (ASTM C633) and a substrate straining method, respectively. For both Ca-P films, the adhesive tensile strength was higher than the failure stress of ˜38 MPa occurring between the Ca-P films and the glue or in the glue. A shear lag approach revealed a shear strength of 347 +/- 64MPa and 280 +/- 28MPa for the Inorganic Route and the Organic Route Ca-P films, respectively. In vivo animal model studies have been performed to compare the effect on early bone formation of sintered porous-surfaced implants that had been modified through the addition of Ca-P film. In Group I study (i.e. Inorganic Route-formed Ca-P-coated implants vs. non-coated implants), it has been found that the Inorganic Route-formed Ca-P film significantly enhances the early rate of bone ingrowth for sintered porous-surfaced implants. However, in Group II study (i.e. Organic Route-formed Ca-P-coated implants vs. non-coated implants), significant improvement was not observed for the Organic Route-formed Ca-P film. It is speculated that the slightly different surface topography and film density between the two Ca-P films result in a different amounts of protein adsorption on the implant surface at the early stage, which further affects the following processes leading to osseointegration.

  18. BARIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.

    1959-07-21

    A method of separating barium from nuclear fission products is described. In accordance with the invention, barium may be recovered from an acidic solution of neutron-irradiated fissionable material by carrying ihe barium cut of solution as a sulfate with lead as a carrier and then dissolving the barium-containing precipitate in an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine chelating reagent. The barium values together with certain other metallic values present in the diamine solution are then absorbed onto a cation exchange resin and the barium is selectively eluted from the resin bed with concentrated nitric acid.

  19. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  20. Growth of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions by coagulation and fragmentation in a turbulent protoplanetary disk: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Aléon, Jérôme; Chaumard, Noël; Baillié, Kévin; Taillifet, Esther

    2015-05-01

    Whereas it is generally accepted that calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from chondritic meteorites formed in a hot environment in the solar protoplanetary disk, the conditions of their formation remain debated. Recent laboratory studies of CAIs have provided new kind of data: their size distributions. We report that size distributions of CAIs measured in laboratory from sections of carbonaceous chondrites have a power law size distribution with cumulative size exponent between -1.7 and -1.9, which translates into cumulative size exponent between -2.5 and -2.8 after correction for sectioning. To explain these observations, numerical simulations were run to explore the growth of CAIs from micrometer to centimeter sizes, in a hot and turbulent protoplanetary disk through the competition of coagulation and fragmentation. We show that the size distributions obtained in growth simulations are in agreement with CAIs size distributions in meteorites. We explain the CAI sharp cut-off of their size distribution at centimeter sizes as the direct result from the famous fragmentation barrier, provided that CAI fragment for impact velocities larger than 10 m/s. The growth/destruction timescales of millimeter- and centimeter-sized CAIs is inversely proportional to the local dust/gas ratio and is about 10 years at 1300 K and up to 104 years at 1670 K. This implies that the most refractory CAIs are expected to be smaller in size owing to their long growth timescale compared to less refractory CAIs. Conversely, the least refractory CAIs could have been recycled many times during the CAI production era which may have profound consequences for their radiometric age.

  1. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  2. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  3. Binding and Leakage of Barium in Alginate Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, Yrr A.; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M.; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbeads of alginate cross-linked with Ca2+ and/or Ba2+ are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared to high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. In order to reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation. PMID:22700168

  4. Constraints on formation processes of two coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions: a study of mantles, islands and cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Many coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) contain features that are inconsistent with equilibrium liquid crystallization models of origin. Spinel-free islands (SFIs) in spinel-rich cores of Type B CAIs are examples of such features. One model previously proposed for the origin of Allende 5241, a Type B1 CAI containing SFIs, involves the capture and assimilation of xenoliths by a liquid droplet in the solar nebula (El Goresy et al, 1985; MacPherson et al 1989). This study reports new textural and chemical zoning data from 5241 and identifies previously unrecognized chemical zoning patterns in the melilite mantle and in a SFI. -from Author

  5. Effects of aluminum and other cations on the structure of brain and liver chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, P.R.; LeBlanc, J.; Sikorska, M.

    1989-05-02

    The reactivity of aluminum and several other divalent and trivalent metallic cations toward chromatin from rat brain and liver has been investigated. Two criteria are used to determine the relative reactivity of these cations toward chromatin. The first involves the ability of the ions to compact the chromatin fibers to the point where chromatin precipitates. The second criterion measures the ability of cations to interfere with the accessibility of exogenous structural probes (nucleases) to chromatin. Of the divalent cations tested, nickel, cobalt, zinc, cadmium, and mercury were the most reactive toward chromatin, on the basis of their ability to induce precipitation of chromatin in the micromolar concentration range. The divalent cations magnesium, calcium, copper, strontium, and barium were much less effective, although all cations precipitate chromatin if their concentration is increased. Of the trivalent cations tested, aluminum indium, and gallium were very effective precipitants, whereas iron and scandium were without effect at the concentrations tested. Of all the cations tested, aluminum was the most reactive. Aluminum's ability to alter the structure of chromatin was investigated further by testing its ability to interfere with nuclease accessibility. This test confirmed that aluminum does induce considerable changes in chromatin structure at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, chromatin from cortical areas of the brain was much more sensitive to aluminum than chromatin from liver. These results are discussed in light of the known toxicity of these cations, with particular emphasis on the possible role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Acid precipitation and food quality: Inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  7. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was recorded. Type A Zeolite produced no adverse effects on the dam, embryo, or fetus in either rats or rabbits at any dose level. Clinoptilolite had no effect on female rat reproductive performance. These ingredients were not genotoxic in the Ames bacterial test system. In primary hepatocyte cultures, the addition of Attapulgite had no significant unscheduled DNA synthesis. Attapulgite did cause significant increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat pleural mesothelial cells, but no significant increase in sister chromosome exchanges were seen. Zeolite particles (<10 microm) produced statistically significant increase in the percentage of aberrant metaphases in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cells collected by peritoneal lavage from exposed mice. Topical application of Magnesium Aluminum Silicate to human skin daily for 1 week produced no adverse effects. Occupational exposure to mineral dusts has been studied extensively. Fibrosis and pneumoconiosis have been documented in workers involved in the mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Fuller's Earth, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the extensive pulmonary damage in humans was the result of direct occupational inhalation of the dusts and noted that lesions seen in animals were affected by particle size, fiber length, and concentration. The Panel considers that most of the formulations are not respirable and of the preparations that are respirable, the concentration of the ingredient is very low. Even so, the Panel considered that any spray containing these solids should be formulated to minimize their inhalation. With this admonition to the cosmetics industry, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as currently used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel did note that the cosmetic ingredient, Talc, is a hydrated magnesium silicate. Because it has a unique crystalline structure that differs from ingredients addressed in this safety assessment, Talc is not included in this report. PMID:12851164

  8. Esophagram (Barium Swallow Study)

    MedlinePlus

    ... study is completed in a radiology (x-ray/fluoroscopy) room. If a child is having the barium ... or a Radiology Practitioner Assistant (RPA) operates the fluoroscopy equipment and takes images of the esophagus. The ...

  9. Refinement of the crystal structure of calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline from the pegmatite vein in the Sangilen Upland (Tuva Republic)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Bronzova, Yu. M.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Zolotarev, A. A.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline, which has the unique composition (Ca{sub 0.62}Na{sub 0.32}{open_square}{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 1.08}Li{sub 0.99}Fe{sub 0.66}{sup 2+} Mg{sub 0.24}Ti{sub 0.03})Al{sub 6}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}](BO{sub 3}){sub 3}(OH{sub 2.28}O{sub 0.72}) {center_dot} (F{sub 0.84}O{sub 0.16}), is refined (R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.022, S = 1.47). It is found that the O(1)(W) site is split into two sites, O(1) and O(11), which are incompletely occupied by fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively, and that the O(3)(V) site contains bivalent oxygen anions. The solid solution studied is close in composition to the liddicoatite mineral species and differs from the latter one by the Li: Al ratio in the Y octahedra and the presence of bivalent oxygen anions in the O(3) site. The tourmaline studied differs from the hypothetical oxyliddicoatite by the population of the O(1)(W) site by fluorine and accommodation of additional oxygen anions in the O(3)(V) site.

  10. Refinement of the crystal structure of calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline from the pegmatite vein in the Sangilen Upland (Tuva Republic)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Bronzova, Yu. M.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Zolotarev, A. A.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium-lithium-aluminum tourmaline, which has the unique composition (Ca{sub 0.62}Na{sub 0.32}{open_square}{sub 0.06})(Al{sub 1.08}Li{sub 0.99}Fe{sub 0.66}{sup 2+} Mg{sub 0.24}Ti{sub 0.03})Al{sub 6}[Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}](BO{sub 3}){sub 3}(OH{sub 2.28}O{sub 0.72}) . (F{sub 0.84}O{sub 0.16}), is refined (R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.022, S = 1.47). It is found that the O(1)(W) site is split into two sites, O(1) and O(11), which are incompletely occupied by fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively, and that the O(3)(V) site contains bivalent oxygen anions. The solid solution studied is close in composition to the liddicoatite mineral species and differs from the latter one by the Li: Al ratio in the Y octahedra and the presence of bivalent oxygen anions in the O(3) site. The tourmaline studied differs from the hypothetical oxyliddicoatite by the population of the O(1)(W) site by fluorine and accommodation of additional oxygen anions in the O(3)(V) site.

  11. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  12. AN ALUMINUM/CALCIUM-RICH, IRON-POOR, WHITE DWARF STAR: EVIDENCE FOR AN EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY LITHOSPHERE?

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Klein, B.; Jura, M.; Koester, D.; Dufour, P.; Melis, Carl

    2011-10-01

    The presence of elements heavier than helium in white dwarf atmospheres is often a signpost for the existence of rocky objects that currently or previously orbited these stars. We have measured the abundances of various elements in the hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs G149-28 and NLTT 43806. In comparison with other white dwarfs with atmospheres polluted by heavy elements, NLTT 43806 is substantially enriched in aluminum but relatively poor in iron. We compare the relative abundances of Al and eight other heavy elements seen in NLTT 43806 with the elemental composition of bulk Earth, with simulated extrasolar rocky planets, with solar system meteorites, with the atmospheric compositions of other polluted white dwarfs, and with the outer layers of the Moon and Earth. The best agreement is found with a model that involves accretion of a mixture of terrestrial crust and upper mantle material onto NLTT 43806. The implication is that NLTT 43806 is orbited by a differentiated rocky planet, perhaps quite similar to Earth, that has suffered a collision that stripped away some of its outer layers.

  13. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  14. Factors controlling soil water and stream water aluminum concentrations after a clearcut in a forested watershed with calcium-poor soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, M.R.; Burns, D.A.; Lawrence, G.B.; Murdoch, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    The 24 ha Dry Creek watershed in the Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York State USA was clearcut during the winter of 1996-1997. The interactions among acidity, nitrate (NO3- ), aluminum (Al), and calcium (Ca2+) in streamwater, soil water, and groundwater were evaluated to determine how they affected the speciation, solubility, and concentrations of Al after the harvest. Watershed soils were characterized by low base saturation, high exchangeable Al concentrations, and low exchangeable base cation concentrations prior to the harvest. Mean streamwater NO3- concentration was about 20 ??mol l-1 for the 3 years before the harvest, increased sharply after the harvest, and peaked at 1,309 ??mol l -1 about 5 months after the harvest. Nitrate and inorganic monomeric aluminum (Alim) export increased by 4-fold during the first year after the harvest. Alim mobilization is of concern because it is toxic to some fish species and can inhibit the uptake of Ca2+ by tree roots. Organic complexation appeared to control Al solubility in the O horizon while ion exchange and possibly equilibrium with imogolite appeared to control Al solubility in the B horizon. Alim and NO3- concentrations were strongly correlated in B-horizon soil water after the clearcut (r2 = 0.96), especially at NO3- concentrations greater than 100 ??mol l-1. Groundwater entering the stream from perennial springs contained high concentrations of base cations and low concentrations of NO3- which mixed with acidic, high Alim soil water and decreased the concentration of Alim in streamwater after the harvest. Five years after the harvest soil water NO 3- concentrations had dropped below preharvest levels as the demand for nitrogen by regenerating vegetation increased, but groundwater NO3- concentrations remained elevated because groundwater has a longer residence time. As a result streamwater NO3- concentrations had not fallen below preharvest levels, even during the growing season, 5 years after the harvest because of the contribution of groundwater to the stream. Streamwater NO3- and Alim concentrations increased more than reported in previous forest harvesting studies and the recovery was slower likely because the watershed has experienced several decades of acid deposition that has depleted initially base-poor soils of exchangeable base cations and caused long-term acidification of the soil. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Ultra-low temperature processing of barium tellurate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Do-Kyun

    Ceramics, metals and polymers have unique electrical properties that are combined for electronic devices and systems. It necessitates lower processing temperatures for ceramics to be compatible with metal and polymer systems. In this thesis, the synthesis, crystal structure, and dielectric properties of barium tellurate are studied for temperatures between 500 and 900°C. Barium tellurate dielectric ceramics (BaTe4O9, BaTe 2O5, BaTe2O6, BaTeO3, BaTeO 4, and Ba2TeO5) are extensively investigated as new LTCC (Low-Temperature Cofired Ceramics) dielectric systems integrated with low resistivity metal electrodes such as silver and aluminum for microwave application. Studies on the phase formation and crystal structure through thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analysis, DSC-TGA) and X-ray diffraction phase analysis attest that barium tellurates are formed in the temperature range of 500 ˜ 900°C, through the sequential phase formations from Te-rich to Ba-rich phases. The oxygen coordination of the tellurium ion progresses from TeO4 to TeO6 via TeO 3+1 and TeO3 with increasing barium content as confirmed by structural analysis using infrared spectroscopy. High density barium tellurate ceramics are achieved at temperatures as low as 550°C, which provides the potential to be co-fired with low-melting aluminum metal electrodes in LTCC processing. Dielectric permittivity, loss, and temperature stability of barium tellurate dielectric ceramics were measured from 100 Hz to 13 GHz. Barium tellurate ceramics exhibit excellent microwave dielectric properties with intermediate dielectric permittivities and high quality factors (Q). The dielectric properties at microwave frequencies are epsilonr = 17.5, Qxf = 54700 GHz, TCf = -90 ppm/°C for BaTe4O9, epsilonr = 21, Qxf = 50300 GHz, TCf = -51 ppm/°C for BaTe2O6, epsilonr = 10, Qxf = 34000 GHz, TCf = -54 ppm/°C for BaTeO3, and epsilonr = 17, Qx f = 49600 GHz, TCf = -124 ppm/°C for Ba 2TeO5. Co-firing studies of barium tellurate ceramics with metal electrodes establish new LTCC systems for microwave devices. Chemical compatibility of barium tellurates with silver electrodes was achieved in the barium rich compositions. Ba2TeO5 was found to be covetable with silver electrodes at 850°C by adding CuO and B2O3 as fluxing agents. During the co-firing, a thin interfacial layer of AgTe is metastable according to the thermodynamic equilibrium between the Ba2TeO5-Ag/Ag 2O pseudo-binary system. A breakthrough LTCC technology with aluminum is based upon the ultra-low processing temperature and chemical compatibility of BaTe4O 9, which enables co-firing and fabrication of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with aluminum inner electrodes. The aluminum base metal electrode (BME) BaTe4O9 MLCCs provide good dielectric properties of epsilonr = 17.5, TCepsilon = 100 ppm/°C, and tan delta = 2.1 x 10-3 (Q ≈ 500) at 1 MHz, which are suitable for the class-1 MLCCs. Aluminum microstrip ring resonators on the BaTe4O9 substrates realized good electromagnetic performance of the new materials at microwave frequency exhibiting resonant frequency of 2.97 GHz and Q factor of 278.

  16. A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE X-WIND MODEL FOR CHONDRULE AND CALCIUM-RICH, ALUMINUM-RICH INCLUSION FORMATION AND RADIONUCLIDE PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, S. J.; Morris, M. A.; Connolly, H. C.; Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-10

    Meteoritic data, especially regarding chondrules and calcium-rich, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), and isotopic evidence for short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the solar nebula, potentially can constrain how planetary systems form. Interpretation of these data demands an astrophysical model, and the 'X-wind' model of Shu et al. and collaborators has been advanced to explain the origin of chondrules, CAIs, and SLRs. It posits that chondrules and CAIs were thermally processed <0.1 AU from the protostar, then flung by a magnetocentrifugal outflow to the 2-3 AU region to be incorporated into chondrites. Here we critically examine key assumptions and predictions of the X-wind model. We find a number of internal inconsistencies: theory and observation show no solid material exists at 0.1 AU; particles at 0.1 AU cannot escape being accreted into the star; particles at 0.1 AU will collide at speeds high enough to destroy them; thermal sputtering will prevent growth of particles; and launching of particles in magnetocentrifugal outflows is not modeled, and may not be possible. We also identify a number of incorrect predictions of the X-wind model: the oxygen fugacity where CAIs form is orders of magnitude too oxidizing, chondrule cooling rates are orders of magnitude lower than those experienced by barred olivine chondrules, chondrule-matrix complementarity is not predicted, and the SLRs are not produced in their observed proportions. We conclude that the X-wind model is not relevant to chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production. We discuss more plausible models for chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production.

  17. Barium Stars: Theoretical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husti, Laura; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio

    2009-09-01

    Barium stars are extrinsic Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. They present the s-enhancement characteristic for AGB and post-AGB stars, but are in an earlier evolutionary stage (main sequence dwarfs, subgiants, red giants). They are believed to form in binary systems, where a more massive companion evolved faster, produced the s-elements during its AGB phase, polluted the present barium star through stellar winds and became a white dwarf. The samples of barium stars of Allen & Barbuy (2006) and of Smiljanic et al. (2007) are analysed here. Spectra of both samples were obtained at high-resolution and high S/N. We compare these observations with AGB nucleosynthesis models using different initial masses and a spread of 13C-pocket efficiencies. Once a consistent solution is found for the whole elemental distribution of abundances, a proper dilution factor is applied. This dilution is explained by the fact that the s-rich material transferred from the AGB to the nowadays observed stars is mixed with the envelope of the accretor. We also analyse the mass transfer process, and obtain the wind velocity for giants and subgiants with known orbital period. We find evidence that thermohaline mixing is acting inside main sequence dwarfs and we present a method for estimating its depth.

  18. Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karatasios, Ioannis . E-mail: ikarat@ims.demokritos.gr; Kilikoglou, Vassilis; Colston, Belinda; Theoulakis, Panagiotis; Watt, David

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), witherite (BaCO{sub 3}) and barium-calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material.

  19. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  20. Samarium-neodymium chronology and rubidium-strontium systematics of an Allende calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion with implications for 146Sm half-life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, N. E.; Borg, L. E.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Clayton, R. N.

    2014-11-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are primitive objects that formed within the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young Sun. Recent Pb-Pb chronologic studies have demonstrated that CAIs are the oldest solar system solids, crystallizing 4567 Ma ago (Amelin et al., 2002; Connelly et al., 2012). The isotope systematics of CAIs therefore provide critical insight into the earliest history of the Solar System. Although Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr geochronometers are highly effective tools for investigating cosmochemical evolution in the early Solar System, previous studies of CAIs have revealed evidence for isotopically disturbed systems. Here we report new age data for Allende CAI Al3S4 derived from both the long-lived (147Sm-143Nd) and short-lived (146Sm-142Nd) isotopic systems. The 147Sm-143Nd chronometer yields an age of 4560±34 Ma that is concordant with 207Pb-206Pb ages for CAIs and indicates that the Sm-Nd system was not significantly disturbed by secondary alteration or nucleosynthetic processes. The slope of the 146Sm-142Nd isochron defines the Solar System initial 146Sm/144Sm of 0.00828±0.00044. This value is significantly different from the value of 0.0094 determined by Kinoshita et al. (2012). Ages recalculated from all published 146Sm-142Nd isochron data using the traditional 103 Ma half-life and the initial 146Sm/144Sm value determined here closely match Pb-Pb and 147Sm-143Nd ages determined on the same samples. In contrast, ages recalculated using the 68 Ma half-life determined by Kinoshita et al. (2012) and either of the initial 146Sm/144Sm values are often anomalously old. This is particularly true for the youngest samples with 146Sm-142Nd isochron ages that are most sensitive to the choice of 146Sm half-life used in the age calculation. In contrast to the Sm-Nd isotope system, the Rb-Sr system is affected by alteration but yields an apparent isochron with a slope corresponding to a much younger age of 4247±110 Ma. Although the Rb-Sr system in CAIs appears to be disturbed, the initial 87Sr/86Sr value determined from the isochron is 0.698942±0.000008, and closely approximates estimates of the initial Solar System value. Although this isochron may be a mixing line, it might also record alteration on the Allende parent body in which Rb was added to the Al3S4 CAI that was initially largely devoid of Rb.

  1. An Improved Qualitative Analysis Procedure for Aluminum Subgroup Cations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistner, C. R.; Robinson, Patricia J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for the qualitative analysis of aluminum subgroup cations designed to avoid failure to obtain lead or barium chromate precipitates or failure to report aluminum hydroxide when present (due to staining). Provides a flow chart and step-by-step explanation for the new procedure, indicating significantly improved student results.…

  2. An Improved Qualitative Analysis Procedure for Aluminum Subgroup Cations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistner, C. R.; Robinson, Patricia J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for the qualitative analysis of aluminum subgroup cations designed to avoid failure to obtain lead or barium chromate precipitates or failure to report aluminum hydroxide when present (due to staining). Provides a flow chart and step-by-step explanation for the new procedure, indicating significantly improved student results.

  3. Barium Peritonitis in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    KO, Jae Jin; MANN, F. A. (Tony)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Barium peritonitis is extremely rare, but is difficult to treat and may be life-threatening. Barium suspension leakage from the gastrointestinal tract into the abdominal cavity has a time-dependent and synergistically deleterious effect in patients who have generalized bacterial peritonitis. The severity of barium peritonitis is dependent on the quantity of barium in the abdominal cavity. Barium sulfate leakage results in hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia by worsening the exudation of extracellular fluid and albumin. Abdominal fluid analysis is a useful and efficient method to diagnose barium peritonitis. Serial radiographs may not be a reliable or timely diagnostic technique. Initial aggressive fluid resuscitation and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be instituted promptly, followed quickly by celiotomy. During exploratory surgical intervention, copious irrigation and direct wiping with gauze are employed to remove as much barium as possible. Omentectomy should be considered when needed to expedite barium removal. Despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments, postoperative prognosis is guarded to poor due to complications, such as acute vascular shock, sepsis, diffuse peritonitis, hypoproteninemia, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest, small bowel obstruction related to progression of granulomas and adhesions in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, intensive postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are necessary to maximize chances for a positive outcome. For those that do survive, small bowel obstruction is a potential consequence due to progression of abdominal adhesions. PMID:24430662

  4. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a mineralizing agent and a ligand.

  5. Tungsten and barium transport in the internal plasma of hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport, and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from 8200 h and 30 352 h ion engine wear tests. Erosion and subsequent redeposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduce the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  6. Lack of effect of drinking water barium on cardiovascular risk factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wones, R.G.; Stadler, B.L.; Frohman, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities-alters the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Eleven healthy men completed a 10-week dose-response protocol in which diet was controlled. Other aspects of the subjects' lifestyles known to affect cardiac risk factors were controlled, and the barium content (as barium chloride) of the drinking water was varied from 0, to 5 ppm, to 10 ppm. Multiple blood and urine samples, morning and evening blood pressure measurements, and 48-hr electrocardiographic monitoring were performed at each dose of barium. There were no changes in morning or evening systolic or diastolic blood pressures, plasma cholesterol or lipoprotein or apolipoprotein levels, serum potassium or glucose levels, or urine catecholamine levels. There were no arrythmias related to barium exposure detected on continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. A trend was seen toward increased total serum calcium levels with exposure to barium, which was of borderline statistical significance and of doubtful clinical significance. In summary, drinking water barium at levels of 5 and 10 ppm did not appear to affect any of the known modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  7. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  8. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  9. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  10. Formation of ettringite, Ca 6Al 2(SO 4) 3(OH) 12·26H 2O, AFt, and monosulfate, Ca 4Al 2O 6(SO 4)·14H 2O, AFm-14, in hydrothermal hydration of Portland cement and of calcium aluminum oxide—calcium sulfate dihydrate mixtures studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Axel Nørlund; Jensen, Torben R.; Hanson, Jonathan C.

    2004-06-01

    In the hydration of calcium aluminum oxide-gypsum mixtures, i.e., Ca 3Al 2O 6, Ca 12Al 14O 33 and CaSO 4·2H 2O, the reaction products can be ettringite, Ca 6Al 2(SO 4) 3(OH) 12·26H 2O, monosulfate, Ca 4Al 2O 6(SO 4)·14H 2O, or the calcium aluminum oxide hydrate, Ca 4Al 2O 7·19H 2O. Ettringite is formed if sufficient CaSO 4·2H 2O is present in the mixture. Ettringite is converted to monosulfate when all CaSO 4·2H 2O is consumed in the synthesis of ettringite. The reactions were investigated in the temperature range 25-170°C using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. This technique allows the study of very fast chemical reactions that are observed here under hydrothermal conditions. A new experimental approach was developed to perform in situ mixing of the reactants during X-ray data collection.

  11. Optimized photorefractive barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warde, Cardinal; Jenssen, Hans P.

    1992-03-01

    The goal of this research program was to investigate new and modified crystal-growth techniques that would lead to high-optical-quality BaTiO3 with increased photorefractive speed and sensitivity. The research program consisted of four parts: (1) feed material purification; (2) crystal growth by the top-seeded-solution technique as well as by a barium borate flux technique; (3) new furnace design studies; and (4) photorefractive characterization experiments. Iron and nickel-doped BaTiO3 crystals were grown under the program. BaTiO3 is a promising photorefractive material due to its large electrooptic coefficient and excellent self-pumped phase conjugation. Our furnaces were limited by certain design and operating characteristics, and crystals grown in these furnaces were easily contaminated by the furnace itself. Two new furnaces, cylindrical and octagonal furnaces, were developed with commercially available parts that are cleaner, more mechanically reproducible, more uniform in temperature and more responsive to control action through reduced thermal mass. The two furnaces are equipped with precise computer control of the pulling and rotation system. The cylindrical furnace was found to be susceptible to cracking due to expansion when heated and to shrinkage after heating. To prevent cracking, expansion joints were provided and the insulation set was made of flat plates set up in an octagonal pattern.

  12. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  13. Efficient polymer light-emitting diode with air-stable aluminum cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, D.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Doumon, N. Y.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2016-03-01

    The fast degradation of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) in ambient conditions is primarily due to the oxidation of highly reactive metals, such as barium or calcium, which are used as cathode materials. Here, we report the fabrication of PLEDs using an air-stable partially oxidized aluminum (AlOx) cathode. Usually, the high work function of aluminum (4.2 eV) imposes a high barrier for injecting electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the emissive polymer (2.9 eV below the vacuum level). By partially oxidizing aluminum, its work function is decreased, but not sufficiently low for efficient electron injection. Efficient injection is obtained by inserting an electron transport layer of poly[(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazol-4,8-diyl)] (F8BT), which has its LUMO at 3.3 eV below vacuum, between the AlOx cathode and the emissive polymer. The intermediate F8BT layer not only serves as a hole-blocking layer but also provides an energetic staircase for electron injection from AlOx into the emissive layer. PLEDs with an AlOx cathode and F8BT interlayer exhibit a doubling of the efficiency as compared to conventional Ba/Al PLEDs, and still operate even after being kept in ambient atmosphere for one month without encapsulation.

  14. Microwave absorption properties of Al- and Cr-substituted M-type barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianxun; Gu, Mingyuan; Shen, Haigen

    2005-09-01

    Aluminum- and chromium-substituted barium ferrite particles with single magnetic domain were prepared using self-propagating combustion method. The crystalline structure, size, coercivity and microwave absorption property of the particles were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and vector network analyzer. The results show that the crystalline structure of BaFe 12-xAl xO 19 is still hexagonal. But when the chromium substitution amount y exceeds 0.6, the extra chromium ions cannot enter the lattice of BaFe 12-yCr yO 19. After Fe 3+ is partly substituted with Al 3+ and Cr 3+, the microwave absorption properties of barium ferrite are improved. The maximum absorption reaches 34.76 dB. The ferromagnetic resonance is an important channel of barium ferrite to absorb microwaves with high frequency. Aluminum and chromium substitutions change the ferromagnetic resonant frequency of barium ferrite. The multipeak phenomenon of the ferromagnetic resonance increases the microwave absorption capability of barium ferrite.

  15. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jerden, James L. Jr.

    2007-07-01

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group minerals react to form U(VI)- bearing aluminum phosphates. (author)

  16. Interaction between Barium Oxide and Barium Containing Chloride Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Korzun, Iraida V.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Antonov, Boris D.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal analysis was applied to determine the liquidus temperatures in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2-BaO system, with BaO concentration varied from 0 to 6 mole%. The temperature dependence of the BaO solubility in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic melt was investigated; the thermodynamic parameters of BaO dissolution were calculated. The caloric effects of melting of the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic with barium oxide and barium oxychloride additions were studied. The type, morphology, and composition of oxychloride ionic groupings in the melt were determined in situ using Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  18. Barium responsiveness of the rat aorta and femoral artery during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hart, J L

    1982-01-11

    The barium responses of isolated aortic strips and femoral arteries from non-pregnant and pregnant rats were investigated. Barium caused concentration-related increases in tension of vessels from both pregnant and non-pregnant rats. The concentration-response curves of femoral arteries from non-pregnant and 3 week pregnant rats were not different; however contractility and slopes of concentration-response lines for thoracic aortas from 1, 2 and 3 week pregnant rats were significantly less than those of aortas from non-pregnant rats. In addition, barium caused rhythmic contractions to develop in both femoral arteries and aortas of 3 week pregnant rats more frequently than vessels from non-pregnant rats. Rhythmic contractions did not develop in aortas from 3 week pregnant rats in calcium-free Krebs. Since the effects of barium on the electrical and mechanical activity of various muscles have been postulated to be similar to and/or dependent on calcium, these results may indicate that changes in calcium sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle occur during pregnancy. Such changes may contribute to the blood flow redistribution and other cardiovascular adaptations of pregnancy. PMID:7054642

  19. Determination of barium and strontium peroxides (active oxygen) in igniters in small-arms tracer ammunition.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, G; Galan, M

    1976-09-01

    A method is proposed for the determination of barium and strontium peroxides (active oxygen) in igniters in small-arms tracer ammunition. The sample is treated with dilute hydrochloric acid (1 + 9) which dissolves the magnesium powder almost instantaneously and then dissolves the barium or strontium peroxides within 10-30 min. The solution is then filtered to remove the organic substances (calcium resinate, "Parlon". Toluidine Red toner, and zinc stearate) and the peroxide is determined by means of the colour of the titanium-peroxide complex. It is shown that igniter mixes and igniters used in small-arms tracer ammunition deteriorate on storage. PMID:18961958

  20. Reverse microemulsion-mediated synthesis and structural evolution of barium hexaaluminate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zarur, A.J.; Hwu, H.H.; Ying, J.Y.

    2000-04-04

    Nanocrystalline barium hexaaluminate has been successfully synthesized through the use of a reverse microemulsion as a medium for controlled hydrolysis and polycondensation of barium and aluminum alkoxides. The nanoparticles derived were characterized with electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption analysis. This novel material possessed a well-defined particle morphology and an ultrahigh surface area, and exhibited excellent catalytic performance in methane combustion. Its structural evolution was found to be strongly dependent on synthesis parameters, such as water/alkoxide ratio and aging period. Powder recovery and drying techniques also had an important impact on particle agglomeration and structural development. Through the unique synthesis approach described, barium hexaaluminate with superb thermal stability was achieved, with surface areas in excess of 100 m{sup 2}/g retained even after calcination at 1,300 C.

  1. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  2. Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathi, L.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C.N.R.

    1984-05-01

    Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) prepared by the flux method is found to exhibit a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure similar to barium hexaaluminate. Morgan and Shaw as well as Iyi et al have recently reported the formation of a barium-rich phase of barium hexaaluminate possessing a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure of the magnetoplumbite structure. In view of the similarities between the layer structures of ..beta..-aluminas and the corresponding ferrites the authors have been carrying out electron microscopic investigations of potassium ..beta..-alumina and BaA1/sub 12/O/sub 19/ along with ferrites of similar compositions. They have obtained electron diffraction patterns of barium hexaaluminate identical to those obtained by Morgan and Shaw and Iyi et al, but more interestingly, they have found a phase of barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting the ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure.

  3. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  4. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  5. 21 CFR 82.1051 - Lakes (D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium; or (ii) a salt prepared... subpart, by combining such color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium... substratum is “D&C Red No. 9—Barium Lake”, and a lake prepared by extending the aluminum salt prepared...

  6. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... calcium: Drink more fluids. Eat high-fiber foods Switch to another form of calcium if the diet ... Washington, DC, 2010. Moyer VA; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent ...

  7. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  8. Carbonate-Foaming Agents in Aluminum Foams: Advantages and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloki, Ali; Esmailian, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Aluminum foams are commonly produced using hydride foaming agents. Carbonates are inexpensive and more convenient to handle than hydrides. In this review article, the replacement of titanium hydride by carbonate foaming agents in aluminum and aluminum alloys was studied. Carbonate-foaming agents including calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, and dolomite were investigated for the production of aluminum and aluminum alloys. The thermal decomposition behavior of the foaming agents was evaluated in conjunction with the cell structure of the aluminum foams produced. From the results, magnesium carbonate and dolomite were selected as suitable foaming agents for aluminum alloys because of lower decomposition temperature than calcium carbonate. It was clarified that dolomite resulted in a fine and homogenous cell structures.

  9. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  10. Calcium absorption and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Charles, P

    1992-02-01

    Calcium is important for bone health. It has been customary to focus on dietary calcium intake, but of central importance for the body needs in the individual patient is the actual calcium absorption. This absorption consists of an active vitamin D-mediated component and a passive diffusional component. A number of different methods are available for the evaluation of calcium absorption. At present the calcium absorption tests using calcium isotopes (radioactive or stable) appear to be the most reproducible way of determining calcium absorption. The major nutrient sources for calcium are milk and milk products, whereas some of the green vegetables have a low bioavailability of calcium. When deciding whether an increased calcium intake is advisable, the following questions must be answered. What is the calcium absorptive status of the patient? How should the calcium supplement be dispensed? What calcium salt should be used? When should calcium supplements be taken? What is the compliance of the patient? When should the treatment be evaluated? The calcium supplement might be taken as milk (or milk products) or, in patients with lactose intolerance, as calcium supplements. Quite a number of calcium supplements are available on the market, and many of them are marketed without proper knowledge of the bioavailability of the actual preparation. For the benefit of our patients it is now reasonable to demand such investigations before marketing calcium supplements. PMID:1541940

  11. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  12. Influence of Barium Hexaferrite on Magnetic Properties of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Jarupoom, P; Jaita, P

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) powders was derived from natural bovine bone by sequence of thermal processes. The barium hexaferrite (BF) find magnetic powders were added into HA powders in ratio of 1-3 vol.%. The HA-BF ceramics were prepared by a solid state reaction method and sintered at 1250 degrees C for 2 h. Effects of BF additive on structural, physical and magnetic properties of HA ceramics were investigated. X-ray diffraction revealed that all HA-BF samples showed a main phase of high purity hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] with calcium and phosphate molar ratio of 1.67. The addition of BF into HA inhibited grain growth and caused an improvement of mechanical properties. The M-H hysteresis loops also showed an improvement in magnetic behavior for higher content of BF. Moreover, in vitro bioactivity test indicated that the 2-3 vol.% sample may be suitable for biological applications. PMID:26726671

  13. Radium/Barium Waste Project

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Allen K.; Ellefson, Mark D.; McDonald, Kent M.

    2015-06-25

    The treatment, shipping, and disposal of a highly radioactive radium/barium waste stream have presented a complex set of challenges requiring several years of effort. The project illustrates the difficulty and high cost of managing even small quantities of highly radioactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-regulated waste. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research activities produced a Type B quantity of radium chloride low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in a number of small vials in a facility hot cell. The resulting waste management project involved a mock-up RCRA stabilization treatment, a failed in-cell treatment, a second, alternative RCRA treatment approach, coordinated regulatory variances and authorizations, alternative transportation authorizations, additional disposal facility approvals, and a final radiological stabilization process.

  14. Fabrication of Barium Zirconate Coated Crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wayne

    2000-05-01

    Erb et al. have shown that barium zirconate crucibles are inert to the YBCO molten flux during the crystal growth process. Since these crucibles are not commercially available and they are costly and time-consuming to fabricate, a barium zirconate coating process on inexpensive and commerically available crucibles was developed to replicate the properties of actual barium zirconate crucibles. Specifically, the coating process entailed barium zirconium isopropoxide being painted onto an alumina crucible and a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) crucible. Then the alumina crucible was fired at 1385 degrees Celcius for 53 hours and the YSZ crucible was fired at 1200 degrees Celsius for 24 hours. After the firing process, crystals were grown in these coated crucibles. The crystals were analyzed with the SQUID magnetometer to determine the transition temperature and with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the crystal composition.

  15. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. 21 CFR 82.1051 - Lakes (D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium; or (ii) a salt prepared... subpart, by combining such color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium..., gloss white, clay, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate,...

  17. 21 CFR 82.1051 - Lakes (D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium; or (ii) a salt prepared... subpart, by combining such color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium..., gloss white, clay, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate,...

  18. 21 CFR 82.1051 - Lakes (D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium; or (ii) a salt prepared... subpart, by combining such color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium..., gloss white, clay, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate,...

  19. Distribution and source of barium in ground water at Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, southwestern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Staubitz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved barium have been found in ground water from bedrock wells on the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation on Cattaraugus Creek in southwestern New York. Concentrations in 1982 were as high as 23.0 milligrams per liter , the highest found reported from any natural ground-water system in the world. The highest concentrations are in a bedrock aquifer and in small lenses of saturated gravel between bedrock and the overlying till. The bedrock aquifer is partly confined by silt, clay, and till. The high barium concentrations are attributed to dissolution of the mineral barite (BaSO4), which is present in the bedrock and possibly in overlying silt, clay, or till. The dissolution of barite seems to be controlled by action of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which alter the BaSO4 equilibrium by removing sulfate ions and permitting additional barite to dissolve. Ground water from the surficial, unconsolidated deposits and surface water in streams contain little or no barium. Because barium is chemically similar to calcium, it probably could be removed by cation exchange or treatments similar to those used for water softening. (USGS)

  20. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  1. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  2. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  3. Aluminum Pannier

    This aluminum pannier was made for the storage of meat, vegetables and other food products. The pannier could be buried in the ground or placed in water in order to keep the contents cool. It was designed by Dr. J. D. Love and made for him in 1945. For transportation, this pannier, along with two re...

  4. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  6. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  7. Constraining the oceanic barium cycle with stable barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhimian; Siebert, Christopher; Hathorne, Ed C.; Dai, Minhan; Frank, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of barium (Ba) concentrations in seawater resembles that of nutrients and Ba has been widely used as a proxy of paleoproductivity. However, the exact mechanisms controlling the nutrient-like behavior, and thus the fundamentals of Ba chemistry in the ocean, have not been fully resolved. Here we present a set of full water column dissolved Ba (DBa) isotope (δ137BaDBa) profiles from the South China Sea and the East China Sea that receives large freshwater inputs from the Changjiang (Yangtze River). We find pronounced and systematic horizontal and depth dependent δ137BaDBa gradients. Beyond the river influence characterized by generally light signatures (0.0 to + 0.3 ‰), the δ137BaDBa values in the upper water column are significantly higher (+ 0.9 ‰) than those in the deep waters (+ 0.5 ‰). Moreover, δ137BaDBa signatures are essentially constant in the entire upper 100 m, in which dissolved silicon isotopes are fractionated during diatom growth resulting in the heaviest isotopic compositions in the very surface waters. Combined with the decoupling of DBa concentrations and δ137BaDBa from the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate this implies that the apparent nutrient-like fractionation of Ba isotopes in seawater is primarily induced by preferential adsorption of the lighter isotopes onto biogenic particles rather than by biological utilization. The subsurface δ137BaDBa distribution is dominated by water mass mixing. The application of stable Ba isotopes as a proxy for nutrient cycling should therefore be considered with caution and both biological and physical processes need to be considered. Clearly, however, Ba isotopes show great potential as a new tracer for land-sea interactions and ocean mixing processes.

  8. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... All cells need calcium in order to work. Calcium helps build strong bones and teeth. It is important for heart function. It also helps with muscle contraction, nerve signaling, and blood clotting. This article discusses ...

  9. Regeneration of barium carbonate from barium sulphide in a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor and utilization for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Zvimba, J N; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L T; Maree, J

    2012-01-01

    Batch regeneration of barium carbonate (BaCO(3)) from barium sulphide (BaS) slurries by passing CO(2) gas into a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of BaCO(3) recovery in the Alkali Barium Calcium (ABC) desalination process and its use for sulphate removal from high sulphate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The effect of key process parameters, such as BaS slurry concentration and CO(2) flow rate on the carbonation, as well as the extent of sulphate removal from AMD using the recovered BaCO(3) were investigated. It was observed that the carbonation reaction rate for BaCO(3) regeneration in a bubbling column reactor significantly increased with increase in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) flow rate whereas the BaS slurry content within the range 5-10% slurry content did not significantly affect the carbonation rate. The CO(2) flow rate also had an impact on the BaCO(3) morphology. The BaCO(3) recovered from the pilot-scale bubbling column reactor demonstrated effective sulphate removal ability during AMD treatment compared with commercial BaCO(3). PMID:22233912

  10. Aluminum inhibits neurofilament protein degradation by multiple cytoskeleton-associated proteases.

    PubMed

    Shea, T B; Balikian, P; Beermann, M L

    1992-07-28

    The environmental neurotoxin aluminum exerts several distinct biochemical effects on neurofilament proteins, including subunit aggregation, disruption of the normal segregation of phosphorylated subunits within axons leading to abnormal perikaryal accumulation, and inhibition of in vitro degradation by the calcium-dependent neutral protease, calpain. In the present study, we demonstrate that exposure of mouse CNS cytoskeletal preparations to aluminum chloride inhibits the degradation of neurofilament proteins by both calcium-dependent and -independent proteases that co-purify with cytoskeletons. Aluminum inhibited both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent proteolysis of the high and middle molecular weight neurofilament subunits, but inhibited only calcium-dependent, and not calcium-independent proteolysis of the low molecular weight neurofilament subunit. These findings demonstrate that aluminum interferes with multiple aspects of neurofilament protein metabolism. PMID:1644172

  11. The solubility and thermodynamic properties of ettringite, its chromium analogs, and calcium aluminum monochromate (3CaO*Al(2)O(3)*CaCrO(4)*nH(2)O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Robert Benjamin

    Ettringite (Ca6[(Al(OH)6)]2(SO 4)3·26H2O) is a naturally-occurring mineral and an important product of the hydration of Portland cements and fly ash. Substitution of Cr(III) for Al(III) and CrO4 for SO4 in the ettringite structure has been demonstrated and may be important with respect to the fate and transport of chromium in alkaline environments. Ettringite and its chromium analogs were synthesized and their solubilities measured via dissolution and precipitation experiments over a range of temperatures between 5 and 75°C and pH values between 10 and 13. The log KSP,298 for the reaction Ca6AlOH 62SO 43˙26H2O =6Ca2++2AlOH -4 +3SO 2-4 +4OH-+26H2O is -44.9 +/- 0.3. The enthalpy and entropy of reaction are 205 +/- 12 kJ mol-1 and 170 +/- 38 J mol -1 K-1, respectively. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of formation are -15211 +/- 20, -17550 +/- 16 kJ mol-1, and 1870 +/- 59 J mol -1 K-1, respectively, based on the reaction parameters and partial molar properties for the dissolved ions. The log KSP, free energy, and enthalpy of reaction for the Cr(III) ettringite analog, bentorite, are KSP,298 = -52.9 +/- 0.8, DeltaG°r,298 = 302 +/- 10 and DeltaH°r = 320 +/- 76 kJ mol-1 based on an equivalent dissolution reaction. Dissolution of bentorite is incongruent due to precipitation of another phase tentatively identified as Ca2Cr2O5·8H 2O. The log KSP, free energy and enthalpy of reaction for the dissolution of Ca6[(Al(OH)6)]2(CrO4 )3·26H2O are KSP,298 = -41.46 +/- 0.30, DeltaG°r,298 = 236.6 +/- 3.9 and DeltaH°r = 77.5 +/- 9.6 kJ mol-1. The log KSP varies with pH unless a CaCrO4(aq) complex is included in the speciation model. A log formation constant of K = 2.77 +/- 0.16 was obtained for the reaction Ca2+ + CrO42- = CaCrO 4(aq) by minimizing the variance of the IAP for Ca6[(Al(OH) 6)]2(CrO4)3·26H2O. A secondary precipitate, identified as calcium aluminum monochromate or (3CaO·Al2O3·CaCrO4·nH 2O) was present in Cr(VI)-analog experimental residues. The log K SP for the reaction 3CaO˙Al2O3˙CaCrO4 ˙15H2O=4Ca2++2AlOH -4 + CrO42-+4OH-+ 9H2O is -30.38 +/- 0.28. Ca6[(Al(OH)6)]2(SO4(1-x) , CrO4x)3·26H2O solids were synthesized and solid-solution aqueous-solution interactions were investigated through dissolution pathway studies. Although thermodynamic equilibrium was not achieved, dissolution pathways approximated stoichiometric saturation curves when plotted on Lippman diagrams.

  12. Improved spectrophotometric analysis of barium styphnate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N E; Blasi, J A

    1983-01-01

    A spectrophotometric procedure to determine the purity of barium styphnate monohydrate based upon the absorbance of the styphnate ion at 326 and 413.3 nm has been developed. The purity is determined by comparing the absorbance of the styphnate ion in barium styphnate and in styphnic acid. Our investigation has shown that the molar absorptivity and lambda maxima of the styphnate ion are quite pH dependent; therefore, the pH is buffered to 6.8 to 7.0 with ammonium acetate. Under these conditions the molar absorptivity is 1.6 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm. Analyses following the procedure in the Navy specification WS13444A using water were found to give low molar absorptivities (1.3 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm) for the styphnic acid calibration resulting in erroneous values for barium styphnate purity.

  13. Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corry, Ben; Hool, Livia

    Ion channels underlie the electrical activity of cells. Calcium channels have a unique functional role, because not only do they participate in this activity, they form the means bywhich electrical signals are converted to responses within the cell. Calcium concentrations in the cytoplasm of cells are maintained at a low level, and calcium channels activate quickly such that the opening of ion channels can rapidly change the cytoplasmic environment. Once inside the cell, calcium acts as a "second messenger" prompting responses by binding to a variety of calcium sensitive proteins. Calcium channels are known to play an important role in stimulating muscle contraction, in neurotransmitter secretion, gene regulation, activating other ion channels, controlling the shape and duration of action potentials and many other processes. Since calcium plays an integral role in cell function, and since excessive quantities can be toxic, its movement is tightly regulated and controlled through a large variety of mechanisms.

  14. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  15. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium. (2... No. 2—Calcium Lake,” and a lake prepared by extending the barium salt prepared from Ext. D&C Red...

  16. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  17. Selectivity of calcium channels in rat uterine smooth muscle: interactions between sodium, calcium and barium ions.

    PubMed

    Jmari, K; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1987-03-01

    1. Action potentials and membrane currents were recorded by means of a double sucrose-gap technique from Cs-loaded strips from pregnant rats superfused in Ca-free EGTA-containing solutions. 2. When external Ca was reduced below 1 microM in the presence of 1 mM-EGTA, step depolarizations from a holding potential close to the normal resting potential produced tetrodotoxin-resistant inward currents. These currents were suppressed after removal of external Na and blocked by a variety of Ca-channel blockers such as Mn, Co, Ni and nifedipine. 3. Inactivation of the inward Na current was studied using a double-pulse protocol. The degree of inactivation of the Na current was almost maximal for depolarizations of +50 mV. Application of stronger depolarizations did not significantly increase it and had no effect on recovery from inactivation. Similarly, increasing the duration of the conditioning pulse from 30 to 250 ms had no further effect on both amplitude and kinetics of the Na current. These results suggest that the Na current inactivation reflects a pure voltage-dependent mechanism. 4. The effects of external Ca were studied over a 10(9)-fold range in concentration. When external Ca was gradually increased from 1 nM to 1 microM, the inward Na current was reduced and finally abolished. As the external Ca was increased over 0.5 mM, inward current reappeared and increased as Ca became the charge carrier. 5. When Na was the charge carrier, external Ca was the most effective divalent cation in blocking the Ca channel with a half-blockage concentration of 0.1 microM. Addition of millimolar concentrations of Ca and Sr also reduced the Ba current while adding Ba to Ca-containing solution produced no increase in current. 6. Membrane currents in solutions containing both Ba and Ca ions were less than in solutions containing either Ca or Ba at the same concentration, suggesting that Ca channels are single-file multi-ion pores. 7. We conclude that the selectivity of uterine Ca channels depends on the presence of external Ca. In the absence of Ca, these channels become permeable to other divalent (Ba and Sr) and monovalent (Na) cations. PMID:2443660

  18. Effect of powder synthesis procedure on calcium site occupancies in barium calcium titanate: A Rietveld analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, P. S. R.; Pandey, Dhananjai; Tiwari, V. S.; Chakravarthy, R.; Dasannacharya, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    (Ba,Ca)TiO3 samples with the ratio of (Ba+Ca) to Ti as unity but prepared by (i) a semiwet route involving (Ba,Ca)CO3 solid solution precursors and TiO2 and (ii) the conventional dry route involving BaCO3, CaCO3, and TiO2 powders, exhibit diffuse and BaTiO3-type sharp ferroelectric phase transitions, respectively. Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction data from the two types of samples shows that, whereas in the samples prepared by the semiwet route, Ca2+ exclusively occupies the Ba2+ site, nearly half of the substituted Ca2+ occupies the Ti4+ site in the case of samples prepared by the dry route. We show that Ca replacement at the Ba site leads to diffuseness whereas Ca introduction at the Ti site leads to sharpening of the transition. To our knowledge, this is the first clear demonstration of the powder synthesis procedure affecting the substitutional sites in multicomponent ceramics and this, in turn, influencing their physical behavior drastically.

  19. A barium chemobezoar in an infant.

    PubMed

    Anatol, T; Maharaj, P; Leach, J

    2007-10-01

    A case report is presented of an infant who developed a large barium concretion proximal to a jejunal anastomosis. A brief literature review outlines the issues involved in the indications for, and choice of, contrast material for use in the precise radiological diagnosis of upper intestinal obstruction in infants. PMID:18303763

  20. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Commission found that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 31757... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of Commission determination to conduct a full five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on...

  1. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... established a schedule for the conduct of this review (74 FR 62587, November 30, 2010). Subsequently, counsel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  2. Aluminum citrate inhibits cytotoxicity and aggregation of oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chungang; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2007-02-12

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), which represents a major component of kidney stones, is an end metabolite of ethylene glycol. COM accumulation has been linked with acute renal toxicity in ethylene glycol poisoning. COM injures the kidney either by directly producing cytotoxicity to the kidney cells or by aggregating in the kidney lumen leading to the blockage of urine flow. The present studies were designed to examine whether aluminum citrate could reduce the toxicity of COM. Toxicity was determined in human proximal tubule cells by leakage of lactate dehydrogenase or uptake of ethidium homodimer and in erythrocytes by degree of hemolysis. Aluminum citrate significantly inhibited the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase from human proximal tubule cells and protected against cell death from COM. The inhibitory effect of aluminum citrate was greater than that of other citrate or aluminum salts such as sodium citrate, aluminum chloride, calcium citrate, ammonium citrate or potassium citrate. Aluminum citrate significantly inhibited the aggregation of COM crystals in vitro and decreased red cell membrane damage from COM. Aluminum citrate appeared to directly interact with COM, but not with the cell membrane. As such, aluminum citrate reduced the cytotoxicity by a physico-chemical interaction with the COM surface, and not by dissolving the COM crystals. These studies suggest that aluminum citrate may protect against tissue damage that occurs with high levels of oxalate accumulation, especially in ethylene glycol poisoning and possibly in hyperoxaluric states. PMID:17161516

  3. 21 CFR 82.1051 - Lakes (D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., gloss white, clay, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or... radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium; or (ii) a salt prepared... subpart, by combining such color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium,...

  4. ARE THERE ANY STARS LACKING NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS? EVIDENCE FROM STRONTIUM AND BARIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic dispersion in the abundances of the heavy elements strontium and barium in halo stars is well known. Strontium and barium are detected in most cool, metal-poor giants, but are these elements always detectable? To identify stars that could be considered probable candidates for lacking these elements, I examine the stellar abundance data available in the literature for 1148 field stars and 226 stars in dwarf galaxies, 776 of which have metallicities lower than [Fe/H] <-2.0. Strontium or barium have been detected in all field, globular cluster, and dwarf galaxy environments studied. All upper limits are consistent with the lowest detected ratios of [Sr/H] and [Ba/H]. The frequent appearance of these elements raises the intriguing prospect that at least one kind of neutron-capture reaction operates as often as the nucleosynthesis mechanisms that produce lighter elements, such as magnesium, calcium, or iron, although the yields of heavy elements may be more variable.

  5. Hydrothermal Transformation of the Calcium Aluminum Oxide Hydrates CaAl2O4 . 10H2O and Ca2Al2O. 8H2O to Ca3Al2(OH)12 Investigated by In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen,T.; Christensen, A.; Hanson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrothermal transformation of calcium aluminate hydrates were investigated by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in the temperature range 25 to 170 C. This technique allowed the study of the detailed reaction mechanism and identification of intermediate phases. The material CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O converted to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and amorphous aluminum hydroxide. Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O transformed via the intermediate phase Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}13H{sub 2}O to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. The phase Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}19H{sub 2}O reacted via the same intermediate phase to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and mainly amorphous aluminum hydroxide. The powder pattern of the intermediate phase is reported.

  6. 21 CFR 82.2051 - Lakes (Ext. D&C).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, talc, rosin, aluminum benzoate, calcium carbonate, or on any combination of... is a salt in which is combined the basic radical sodium, potassium, barium, or calcium; or (ii) a... color with the basic radical sodium, potassium, aluminum, barium, calcium, strontium, or zirconium....

  7. Equilibrium model for speciation of aluminum in serum.

    PubMed

    Harris, W R

    1992-09-01

    An equilibrium model for the speciation of Al3+ in normal serum has been developed in which 81% of the aluminum is bound to transferrin. The remaining 19% exists primarily as Al(PO4)(OH)-, with minor amounts of citrate and hydroxide species. The model meets several key criteria. The concentration of free aluminum is below the upper limit set by the solubility product of aluminum phosphate. The fraction of low-molecular-mass aluminum species agrees with experimental studies on the fraction of ultrafiltrable aluminum in both normal and uremic serum. Lastly, the model accounts for the relative effectiveness of EDTA, citrate, and desferrioxamine B for binding aluminum in serum by including competition from zinc, magnesium, and calcium for these ligands. Uncertainties in the available thermodynamic database are discussed. PMID:1526019

  8. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  9. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution. PMID:26999358

  10. Electron microscopic study of barium hexaaluminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Takekawa, S.; Bando, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-03-01

    The crystallographic relation between phase I and phase II of barium hexaaluminates, which were conventionally considered as the single compound "barium hexaaluminate (BaAl 12O 19)," was investigated using principally the electron diffraction method. Phase I (Ba 0.79Al 10.9O 17.14) was found to have β-alumina type structure with space group {P6 3}/{mmc}. On the other hand, phase II (Ba 2.34Al 21.0O 33.84) exhibited an a√3 × a√3 superstructure, which is probably due to the ordering of excess Ba ions within BaO layers. Possible structure models of both phases are presented.

  11. Resonance-fluorescence in barium ion clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, H. G.; Whitaker, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The problem of resonant-fluorescent scattering of sunlight by a high altitude, plane-parallel, barium ion cloud is solved numerically. Line strengths and profiles are computed using a modified version of the computer program LINEAR (Auer, Heasley and Milkey, 1972). Hyperfine structure of the spectral lines becomes important for very thick layers and is taken into account. Comparisons are made between coherent and completely noncoherent scattering results, and finally the influence of collisions on the radiation field is estimated.

  12. Survey of barium in Italian drinking water supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Lanciotti, E.; Comodo, N.; Gambassini, L.; Cerbai, E. ); Vallone, G.; Griffini, E. ); Mugelli, A. )

    1989-12-01

    Trace metal contamination in public water supplies may be detrimental to human health. In recent years there has been increasing attention paid to the presence of barium in public water supplies and to its possible effects on human health. Recently the maximum allowed level for barium in drinking water in Europe has been reduced from 1 mg/L to 0.1 mg/L. The toxic effects following acute ingestion of soluble barium salts are well characterized. Elevated barium levels in drinking water have been associated with higher mortality rates due to cardiovascular or heart diseases. The present survey was undertaken to evaluate the extent of exposure of the Tuscany population to barium. Levels of barium were measured in drinking water supplies.

  13. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles for Biomarker Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, O.; Posada, O. M.; Hondow, N. S.; Wälti, C.; Saunders, M.; Murray, C. A.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    A tetragonal crystal structure is required for barium titanate nanoparticles to exhibit the nonlinear optical effect of second harmonic light generation (SHG) for use as a biomarker when illuminated by a near-infrared source. Here we use synchrotron XRD to elucidate the tetragonal phase of commercially purchased tetragonal, cubic and hydrothermally prepared barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticles by peak fitting with reference patterns. The local phase of individual nanoparticles is determined by STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), measuring the core-loss O K-edge and the Ti L3-edge energy separation of the t2g, eg peaks. The results show a change in energy separation between the t2g and eg peak from the surface and core of the particles, suggesting an intraparticle phase mixture of the barium titanate nanoparticles. HAADF-STEM and bright field TEM-EDX show cellular uptake of the hydrothermally prepared BaTiO3 nanoparticles, highlighting the potential for application as biomarkers.

  14. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related tests: Phosphorus ; Vitamin D Tests ; PTH ; Magnesium ; Albumin ; Comprehensive Metabolic Panel ; Basic Metabolic Panel ; Kidney Stone ... and people with blood protein abnormalities like low albumin . Large fluctuations in ionized calcium can cause the ...

  15. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  17. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  18. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped charges are discussed. Active experiments confirm that anomalous ionization processes may operate, but photoionization accounts for the production of the bulk of the barium ions. Pitch-angle diffusion and/or velocity-space diffusion may occur, but observations of barium ions moving upwards against gravity suggests that the ions retain a significant enough fraction of their initial perpendicular velocity to provide a mirror force. The barium ion plasmas should have a range of Alfven Mach numbers and plasma betas. Because the initial conditions can be predicted these active experiments should permit testing plasma instability hypotheses.

  19. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  20. Effect of temperature on isoprenaline- and barium-induced slow action potentials in guinea-pig ventricular strips.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Parlani, M; Martucci, E; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of variation in temperature (37-32 and 27 degrees C) on electrical and mechanical activity of depolarized and isoprenaline- or barium-reactivated guinea pig ventricular strips was studied. Lowering the temperature brings a marked prolongation of isoprenaline-induced slow action potentials. In addition the maximal rate of depolarization was strongly reduced at lower temperatures. These effects were observed at an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of either 0.9 or 2.5 mM. The accompanying mechanical activities was significantly increased by reduction in temperature. Barium-induced slow action potentials were similarly affected by temperature variations. These observations suggest that hypothermia exert a sort of calcium antagonistic action probably coupled to a reduction of repolarizing outward potassium currents. PMID:2430855

  1. Depolarization-induced contractile activity of smooth muscle in calcium-free solution.

    PubMed

    Mangel, A W; Nelson, D O; Rabovsky, J L; Prosser, C L; Connor, J A

    1982-01-01

    In calcium-free solution, strips of cat intestinal muscle developed slow, rhythmic electrical potential changes that triggered contractions. Some strips failed to develop spontaneous electrical activity in calcium-free solution but responded with contractions to depolarization by direct electrical stimulation or by treatment with barium chloride, potassium chloride, or acetylcholine. Similar results were obtained with segments of cat stomach, colon, esophagus, bladder, uterus, and vena cava, as well as with rabbit vena cava. In calcium-free saline, rat small intestinal muscle showed fast electrical activity with accompanying development of a tetanuslike contraction. After 60 min in calcium-free solution, cat small intestinal muscle retained 17.7% of its original concentration of calcium. It is concluded that in some smooth muscles, depolarization-triggered release of intracellular calcium does not require an associated influx of calcium. PMID:7058877

  2. Biocompatibility of Intracanal Medications Based on Calcium Hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Andolfatto, Carolina; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Cornélio, Ana Livia Gomes; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario; Faria, Gisele; Bonetti-Filho, Idomeo; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rat subcutaneous tissue reaction to calcium hydroxide-based intracanal medicaments, UltraCal XS (calcium hydroxide, barium sulphate, aqueous matrix), Hydropast (calcium hydroxide, barium sulphate, and propyleneglycol), and Calen (Calcium hydroxide, zinc oxide, colophony, and polyethyleneglycol), used as a control. Methods. Forty-eight rats (Rattus Norvegicus Holtzman) were distributed in three groups: Calen, UltraCal XS, and Hydropast. Polyethylene tubes filled with one of the medicaments were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous. After 7 and 30 days, the implants were removed and the specimens were fixed and embedded in paraffin. Morphological and quantitative analyses were carried out in the HE-stained sections. The numerical density of inflammatory cells in the capsule was evaluated and statistical analyses were performed (P ≤ 0.05). Results. At 7 days, all materials induced an inflammatory reaction in the subcutaneous tissue adjacent to the implants. In all groups, a significant reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and giant cells was verified in the period of 30 days. Conclusion. These results indicate that the calcium hydroxide-based medicaments evaluated present biocompatibility similar to Calen. PMID:23320187

  3. Aluminum hydroxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.S.; Weaver, M.L.

    1988-07-05

    A method is described for the production of aluminum hydroxide, comprising reacting water in the liquid phase and aluminum of surface area of at least 20 mm/sup 2/ per gram at a pH above about 12.4 for producing a reaction mixture containing aluminum hydroxide, and collecting solid aluminum hydroxide from the reaction mixture, the reaction being carried out in the presence of choline at a concentration of about 0.05 to 2 mols per liter.

  4. Cardiotoxic and bronchoconstrictor effects of industrial metal fumes containing barium.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R; Caldas, L Q; Dare, P R; Hewitt, P J

    1986-01-01

    For certain metal arc-welding and other metal processing operations, compounds of barium are used as flux components. Airborne fumes generated by welding with electrodes using barium fluoride or carbonate fluxes may contain 15-30% of barium in readily water-soluble form (Dare et al. 1984). Urine of welders inhaling such fumes was shown to contain elevated levels of barium ions (up to 234 micrograms/l). To assess the possible hazards of such exposure, the toxic potencies of fume samples, expressed in terms of their water-soluble barium ion contents, were compared with effects of solutions of barium salts in anaesthetised guinea-pigs. Dose-effect relationships were established and it was verified that acute toxic effects of inhaled aerosols or of intravenous bolus administration correlated with the barium contents of various forms of welding fumes. Bronchopulmonary reactivity to the barium was observed as marked increases in resistance to ventilatory air-flow, indicating bronchoconstriction. Simultaneously, marked pressor effects on blood pressure occurred. ECG abnormalities indicated myocardial hyperexcitability. Effects were modified by nifedipine and propranolol pretreatments. PMID:3468925

  5. BARIUM IN TEETH AS INDICATOR OF BODY BURDEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the biological availability of naturally occurring barium in a municipal drinking water by the analysis of barium in deciduous teeth of children. The grade school children of two Illinois towns were chosen for the study. The towns were chosen ba...

  6. Composition and structure measurements in an ionospheric barium cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narcisi, R.; Tracinski, E.; Federico, G.; Wlodyka, L.; Bench, P.

    1981-12-01

    A 48 kg barium payload was launched from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida on 12 December 1980 at 2311 GMT and detonated at 183.7 km. At 2342:50.25 GMT, a second rocket, instrumented with an ion mass spectrometer and pulsed plasma probes, was fired to traverse the barium cloud. Composition, ion density, and structure measurements were acquired up to 241.2 km in both the natural and disturbed ionosphere. The rocket penetrated the barium cloud between 147 and 184 km. In addition to the Ba+, Ba++ produced by H Lyman alpha ionization, and Ca+, an impurity in the barium were detected in the cloud. A peak barium ion concentration of about 6,000,000 ions cu cm was measured at 161 km where the ionospheric NO+ and O2+ ions were essentially eliminated by large recombination loss. The bottom side of the barium cloud had a relatively smooth structure while the top side showed significant density fluctuations. The first experimental evidence of a theoretically predicted E region 'image cloud' was found in the form of an enhanced NO+ layer just below the barium cloud. Unexplained wave-like density variations in O+, NO+, and O2(+) also were seen above the barium cloud to 195 km. A quantitative estimate of the outgassing water vapor concentrations near the payload's surface was made using the fast change transfer rate coefficient for O+ + H2O yields H2O+ + O that created the observed water vapor ions.

  7. Vacancy ordering in reduced barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, David I.; Reaney, Ian M.; Yang, Gaiying Y.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Randall, Clive A.

    2004-06-01

    A crystal structure is proposed for reduced barium titanate, BaTiO3-δ, δ≈0.33, formed during the degradation of Ni-BaTiO3 X7R multilayer ceramic capacitors. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction have been used in combination with computer simulations to show that oxygen vacancies accrete on every third pseudocubic {111} plane, resulting in a cell with space group P3m1. Additionally, from electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is proposed that Ti4+ is reduced to Ti3+ as a mechanism of charge compensation within oxygen-deficient octahedra.

  8. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  9. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  10. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  11. Barium cardiotoxicity: Relationship between ultrastructural damage and mechanical effects.

    PubMed

    Delfino, G; Amerini, S; Mugelli, A

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural damage in guinea-pig ventricular strips caused by barium was analysed. At a concentration of 1 mmol/litre, barium chloride caused a dramatic increase in the developed tension associated with the onset of automaticity. The ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that barium caused notable and consistent alterations which affected most myocyte components. Various degenerative aspects were observed in mitochondria and in the contractile apparatus. Glycogen deposits were completely depleted. Preparations driven at 4 Hz (i.e. the rate of spontaneous firing of barium-treated preparations) showed moderate ultrastructural alterations, thus demonstrating that the increase in the rate of beating is not the only determinant of the observed damage. These results suggest that the myocardial toxicity of barium is due not only to the well-known modifications in membrane permeability, but possibly also to alterations in cell function. PMID:20702358

  12. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  13. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  14. Relationship of aluminum to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Perl, D P

    1985-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques in the brain. Aluminum salts may be used experimentally to produce lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle. Although some studies have reported increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, these bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate and remain controversial. Using scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry, we have investigated this question on the cellular level. We have identified abnormal accumulations of aluminum within neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients containing neurofibrillary tangles. Similar accumulations have been detected in the numerous neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons seen in the brains of the indigenous native population of the island of Guam who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism with dementia. Epidemiologic evidence strongly suggests a causal role for local environmental conditions relating to availability of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. In view of the fact that a major consequence of acid rain is the liberation of large amounts of aluminum in bioavailable forms, concerns are raised about possible human health risks of this environmental phenomenon. PMID:4076080

  15. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  16. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  17. Energetic Insight into the Formation of Solids from Aluminum Polyoxocations.

    PubMed

    Reusser, Dana; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    The ε-Keggin [AlO4Al12(OH)24(H2O)12](7+) ion (AlAl12(7+)) is a metastable precursor in the formation of aluminum oxyhydroxide solids. It also serves as a useful model for the chemistry of aluminous mineral surfaces. Herein we calculate the enthalpies of formation for this aqueous ion and its heterometal-substituted forms, GaAl12(7+) and GeAl12(8+), using solution calorimetry. Rather than measuring the enthalpies of the MAl12(7/8+) ions directly from solution hydrolysis, we measured the metathesis reaction of the crystallized forms with barium chloride creating an aqueous aluminum solution monospecific in MAl12(7/8+). Then, the contributions to the heat of formation from the crystallized forms were subtracted using referenced states. When comparing the aqueous AlAl12(7+) ion to solid aluminum (oxy)-hydroxide phases, we found that this ion lies closer in energy to solid phases than to aqueous aluminum monomers, thus explaining its role as a precursor to amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases. PMID:26129924

  18. External cadmium and internal calcium block of single calcium channels in smooth muscle cells from rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Quayle, J M; Worley, J F; Standen, N B; Nelson, M T

    1989-11-01

    The patch clamp technique was used to record unitary currents through single calcium channels from smooth muscle cells of rabbit mesenteric arteries. The effects of external cadmium and cobalt and internal calcium, barium, cadmium, and magnesium on single channel currents were investigated with 80 mM barium as the charge carrier and Bay K 8644 to prolong openings. External cadmium shortened the mean open time of single Ca channels. Cadmium blocking and unblocking rate constants of 16.5 mM-1 ms-1 and 0.6 ms-1, respectively, were determined, corresponding to dissociation constant Kd of 36 microM at -20 mV. These results are very similar to those reported for cardiac muscle Ca channels (Lansman, J. B., P. Hess, and R. W. Tsien. 1986. J. Gen. Physiol. 88:321-347). In contrast, Cd2+ (01-10 mM), when applied to the internal surface of Ca channels in inside-out patches, did not affect the mean open time, mean unitary current, or the variance of the open channel current. Internal calcium induced a flickery block, with a Kd of 5.8 mM. Mean blocking and unblocking rate constants for calcium of 0.56 mM-1 ms-1 and 3.22 ms-1, respectively, were determined. Internal barium (8 mM) reduced the mean unitary current by 36%. We conclude that under our experimental conditions, the Ca channel is not symmetrical with respect to inorganic ion block and that intracellular calcium can modulate Ca channel currents via a low-affinity binding site. PMID:2481511

  19. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  20. Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.

  1. Photoluminescence of barium titanate and barium zirconate in multilayer disordered thin films at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moreira, M L; Gurgel, M F C; Mambrini, G P; Leite, E R; Pizani, P S; Varela, J A; Longo, E

    2008-09-25

    The emission of wide band photoluminescence showed a synergic effect on barium zirconate and barium titanate thin films in alternate multilayer system at room temperature by 488 nm exiting wavelength. The thin films obtained by spin-coating were annealed at 350, 450, and 550 degrees C for 2 h. The X-ray patterns revealed the complete separation among the BaTiO3 and BaZrO3 phases in the adjacent films. Visible and intense photoluminescence was governed by BaZrO3 thin films in the multilayer system. Quantum mechanics calculations were used in order to simulate ordered and disordered thin films structures. The disordered models, which were built by using the displacement of formers and modifier networks, showed a different symmetry in each system, which is in accordance with experimental photoluminescence emission, thus allowing to establish a correlation among the structural and optical properties of these multilayered systems. PMID:18593105

  2. The crystal structure of barium hexaaluminate phase I (barium β-alumina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Inoue, Z.; Takekawa, S.; Kimura, S.

    1984-03-01

    The crystal structure of barium hexaaluminate phase I (Ba 0.79Al 10.9O 17.14) was determined by single crystal X-ray reflection data. The refinements were carried out by the least-square method to give a final R-value of 0.023. The structure was revealed to be essentially of a β-alumina type and the Ba ion was detected only at the 6 h site near the Beevers-Ross site (2 d site). The charge compensation for nonstoichiometry was found to be principally effected by the interstitial oxygen due to Frenkel defects of Al ions. From the structural point of view, phase I was referred to as "barium β-alumina."

  3. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  4. Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoxiang; Tao Shanwen; Irvine, John T.S.

    2010-01-15

    Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

  5. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples. Both the strength and work of fracture were shown to be affected by the texture direction. The multilayer samples did not show significant improvements in either strength or work of fracture, but they did show much less variability than the monolithic samples.

  6. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  7. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-17

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above T(C) and up to T*≈200-225 °C. Above T*, however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization. PMID:26230825

  8. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-01

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above TC and up to T*≈2 00 - 2 2 5 °C . Above T* , however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization.

  9. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  10. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  11. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  12. Adsorption of radium and barium on goethite and ferrihydrite: A kinetic and surface complexation modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajih, M.; Bryan, N. D.; Livens, F. R.; Vaughan, D. J.; Descostes, M.; Phrommavanh, V.; Nos, J.; Morris, K.

    2014-12-01

    Radium and barium uptake onto ferrihydrite and goethite have been studied in the concentration range 1 nM to 5 mM and from pH 4 to 10, to develop a model to predict radium behaviour in legacy uranium mining wastes. For ferrihydrite, uptake of Ra2+ at nM concentrations was strong at pH >7. At higher concentrations, Ba2+ sorption to ferrihydrite was slightly weaker than that of Ra2+. Experiments with goethite showed weaker binding for both metal ions in all systems. The interactions of radium with both ferrihydrite and goethite are fully reversible. The behaviour of radium during transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite has been studied, and no evidence for irreversible incorporation within the goethite lattice was found; radium uptake to goethite was the same, whether or not it was present during its formation. Calcium competed with radium for ferrihydrite sorption only at high calcium concentrations (>10 mM). Barium is a more effective competitor, and a concentration of 1 mM reduced radium sorption. Sediment samples from a legacy uranium mining site have been analysed, and the in situ Rd values are consistent with radium uptake by surface coatings of ferrihydrite or goethite like phases. Surface complexation models have been developed for radium sorption to ferrihydrite and goethite which simulate the experimental data successfully. In both cases, approaches based on a single surface functional group and tetradentate binding sites simulated the data successfully. These data could be used in underpinning the safety case for legacy mining sites.

  13. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  14. Upper gastrointestinal barium evaluation of duodenal pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Debi, Uma; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor

    2014-01-01

    Like other parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), duodenum is subject to a variety of lesions both congenital and acquired. However, unlike other parts of the GIT viz. esophagus, rest of the small intestine and large intestine, barium evaluation of duodenal lesions is technically more challenging and hence not frequently reported. With significant advances in computed tomography technology, a thorough evaluation including intraluminal, mural and extramural is feasible in a single non-invasive examination. Notwithstanding, barium evaluation still remains the initial and sometimes the only imaging study in several parts of the world. Hence, a thorough acquaintance with the morphology of various duodenal lesions on upper gastrointestinal barium examination is essential in guiding further evaluation. We reviewed our experience with various common and uncommon barium findings in duodenal abnormalities. PMID:25170399

  15. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  16. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  17. Synthesis, photoluminescence and magnetic properties of barium vanadate nanoflowers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 ; Hu, Chenguo; Xi, Yi; Peng, Chen; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate was obtained for the first time. The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. Research highlights: {yields} In the paper, the flower-shaped barium vanadate were obtained for the first time. The CHM method used here is new and simple for preparation of barium vanadate. {yields} The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. The strong bluish-green emission was observed. {yields} The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers was found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g. {yields} The mechanisms of PL and magnetic property of barium vanadate nanoflowers have been discussed. -- Abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate has been obtained by the composite hydroxide mediated (CHM) method from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and BaCl{sub 2} at 200 {sup o}C for 13 h. XRD and XPS spectrum of the as-synthesized sample indicate it is hexagonal Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} with small amount of Ba{sub 3}VO{sub 4.8} coexistence. Scan electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display that the flower-shaped crystals are composed of nanosheets with thickness of {approx}20 nm. The UV-visible spectrum shows that the barium vanadate sample has two optical gaps (3.85 eV and 3.12 eV). Photoluminescence spectrum of the barium vanadate flowers exhibits a visible light emission centered at 492 and 525 nm which might be attributed to VO{sub 4} tetrahedron with T{sub d} symmetry in Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers has been found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, which is mainly due to the presence of a non-orthovanadate phase with spin S = 1/2.

  18. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  19. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  20. 'Skidding' of the CRRES G-9 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Mitchell, H. G.; Fedder, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation study and experimental data of the CRRES G-9 ionospheric barium release are presented. The simulation study is based on a 2D electrostatic code that incorporates time-dependent coupling to the background plasma. It is shown that the densest portion of the barium ion cloud 'skids' about 15 km within the first three seconds following the release, consistent with the optical data analyses.

  1. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  2. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium carbonate (US$6.00/d v US$0.65/d). Calcium ketoglutarate may be an effective and safe alternative to treatment with aluminum-containing phosphate binders in patients on hemodialysis who are intolerant of calcium carbonate or acetate because of hypercalcemia. However, care must be exercised when dealing with patients with pre-existing gastrointestinal discomfort. Due to the high cost of the therapy, calcium ketoglutarate should be used only for selected patients. PMID:9469496

  3. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  4. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death. PMID:23629399

  5. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  6. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  7. Aluminum composite driveshafts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article examines the development and performance of a metal matrix composite lightweight driveshaft tube of 6061 aluminum alloy with an even dispersion of 20[percent] aluminum oxide particles. The topics of the article include evolution of the lightweight design, raw material production, tubing fabrication, driveshaft performance, and modulus testing.

  8. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also

  9. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  10. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  11. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... A calcium-rich diet (including dairy, nuts, leafy greens and fish) helps to build and protect your ... yogurt and cheese are high in calcium. Certain green vegetables and other foods contain calcium in smaller ...

  12. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  13. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  14. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  15. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  16. Optimum viscosity of barium suspension for use in the double contrast barium meal.

    PubMed

    Cumberland, D C

    1977-10-25

    The effect of viscosity of barium sulphate suspensions on coating was assessed by glass slides as in vitro, and the rat as in vivo models. It was found that below a certain viscosity (as measured by a cup viscometer) coating was impaired. As increasing viscosity is associated with increasing bubble retention and, eventually, when very high viscosities are reached, poor surface flow of suspension, it is recommended that the viscosity of the medium employed should be kept within a narrow range, approximately equal to 70% w/v Baritop, 80% Micropaque, 115% E--Z-paque, 150% Barosperse, or 200% HD 200. PMID:615819

  17. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  18. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 3 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Assigned roles for plant crystal formation include functions in defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. From a human health standpoint, oxalate present in edible plant tiss...

  19. Hydrothermal transformation of the calcium aluminum oxide hydrates CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.10H{sub 2}O and Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}.8H{sub 2}O to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} investigated by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Torben R. . E-mail: trj@chem.au.dk; Christensen, Axel Norlund; Hanson, Jonathan C.

    2005-12-15

    The hydrothermal transformation of calcium aluminate hydrates were investigated by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction in the temperature range 25 to 170 deg. C. This technique allowed the study of the detailed reaction mechanism and identification of intermediate phases. The material CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.10H{sub 2}O converted to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and amorphous aluminum hydroxide. Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}.8H{sub 2}O transformed via the intermediate phase Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 7}.13H{sub 2}O to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. The phase Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 7}.19H{sub 2}O reacted via the same intermediate phase to Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and mainly amorphous aluminum hydroxide. The powder pattern of the intermediate phase is reported.

  20. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  1. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  2. Co-doped Barium Phosphate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Co-doping of a P2O5:BaO glass matrix with divalent tin and trivalent samarium ions has been realized by the melt-quenching technique with the purpose of investigating the material's luminescent properties. Photoluminescence excitation spectra obtained by monitoring Sm3+ 4G5/2 emission showed a broad excitation band around 290 nm (absent in a Sm3+-doped reference), typical of donor/acceptor energy transfer. Under such excitation, the material exhibits a reddish-white emission. Time-resolved spectra recorded under the 290-nm excitation (non-resonant with Sm3+ excitation peaks) exposed a broad blue-white band characteristic of twofold-coordinated Sn centers and orange-red emission bands of Sm3+ ions, which appeared well separated in time in accord with their emission decay dynamics. Consequently, the data indicate that light absorption occurs at Sn centers (donors) followed by energy transfer to samarium ions (acceptors) which results in populating the 4G5/2 emitting state in Sm3+. Energy transfer pathways likely resulting in the sensitization of Sm3+ photoluminescence are discussed. Results are put into context in terms of the potential of SnO and rare-earth co-doped barium phosphate glasses for use in white light-emitting devices.

  3. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  4. Theoretical isotope shifts in neutral barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, C.; Li, J. G.; Godefroid, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present work deals with a set of problems in isotope shifts of neutral barium spectral lines. Some well-known transitions (6 s2 1S0-6 s 6 p 1,3P1o and 6 s2 1S0-6 p2 3P0) are investigated. Values of the changes in the nuclear mean-square charge radius are deduced from the available experimental isotope shifts using our ab initio electronic factors. The three sets {? A ,A'} obtained from these lines are consistent with each other. The combination of the available nuclear mean-square radii with our electronic factors for the 6 s 5 d 3D1 ,2-6 s 6 p 1P1o transitions produces isotope shift values in conflict with the laser spectroscopy measurements of U. Dammalapati et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 53, 1 (2009), 10.1140/epjd/e2009-00076-x].

  5. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  6. Mononuclear barium diketonate polyamine adducts. Synthesis, structures, and use in MOCVD of barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, R.A.; Gordon, D.C.; Stauf, G.T.; Vaartstra, B.A.; Ostrander, R.L.; Rheingold, A.L.

    1994-11-01

    Mononuclear barium {beta}-diketonate Lewis base adducts have been synthesized by reaction of Ba(thd){sub 2} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) with polyamines 1,1,4,7,7-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdt) and 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (hmtt). The adducts [Ba(thd){sub 2}(pmdt)] (I) and [Ba(thd){sub 2}(hmtt)] (II) have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.577(3) {angstrom}, b = 23.547(7) {angstrom}, c = 15.963(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.21(2){degrees}, and Z = 4. Compound II crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.833(6) {angstrom}, b = 20.442(12) {angstrom}, c = 19.404(9) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.35(4){degrees}, and Z = 4. The adducts are seven- and eight-coordinate, respectively, with all nitrogen atoms of the polyamine bound to a single barium center. Compound I has been used for thin-film growth of BaTiO{sub 3} which has revealed that, compared to Ba(thd){sub 2}(tetraglyme), the polyamine adduct allows a larger temperature window for effective vapor transport. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  8. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  9. Preparation of barium hexaferrite powders using oxidized steel scales waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Ardita; Idayanti, Novrita; Kristiantoro, Tony

    2016-02-01

    Research on preparation of barium hexaferrite powders has been done using Hot Strip Mill scales as raw materials. Hot Strip Mill scales are oxidized steel scales waste from steel industrial process. The method used for preparing the barium hexaferrite powders was solid state reaction method. Oxidized steel scales were milled using ball mill for 10 hours, then screened through a 250 mesh sieve to obtain powders with maximum size of 63 µm. Powders were roasted at 600°C temperature for 4 hours to obtain hematite (Fe2O3) phase. Roasted powders were then mixed with barium carbonate, and were subsequently milled for 16 hours. After mixing, powders were calcined with an increasing rate of 10°C/min and maintained at 1100°C for 3 hours. Calcination process was performed to acquire barium hexaferrite phase. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization in conjunction with RIR analysis showed that 85 wt. % of barium hexaferrite is formed. The magnetic properties of powders were characterized using Permagraph. It is found the value of remanent induction is 1.09 kG, coercivity of 2.043 kOe, and the maximum energy product of 0.25 MGOe.

  10. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  11. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  12. Boron aluminum composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Design, analysis and fabrication techniques have been developed for boron-aluminum composite structure technology and were compared with those of conventional metal structure technology to evaluate relative performance.

  13. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  14. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  15. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  16. Selectivity in biomineralization of barium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Minna R; Wasserman, Brian; Finney, Lydia; McNulty, Ian; Legnini, Daniel; Vogt, Stefan; Joester, Derk

    2011-11-01

    The desmid green alga Closterium moniliferum belongs to a small number of organisms that form barite (BaSO(4)) or celestite (SrSO(4)) biominerals. The ability to sequester Sr in the presence of an excess of Ca is of considerable interest for the remediation of (90)Sr from the environment and nuclear waste. While most cells dynamically regulate the concentration of the second messenger Ca(2+) in the cytosol and various organelles, transport proteins rarely discriminate strongly between Ca, Sr, and Ba. Herein, we investigate how these ions are trafficked in C. moniliferum and how precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) crystals occurs in the terminal vacuoles. Towards this goal, we simultaneously visualize intracellular dynamics of multiple elements using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of cryo-fixed/freeze-dried samples. We correlate the resulting elemental maps with ultrastructural information gleaned from freeze-fracture cryo-SEM of frozen-hydrated cells and use micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) to determine sulfur speciation. We find that the kinetics of Sr uptake and efflux depend on external Ca concentrations, and Sr, Ba, and Ca show similar intracellular localization. A highly ion-selective cross-membrane transport step is not evident. Based on elevated levels of sulfate detected in the terminal vacuoles, we propose a "sulfate trap" model, where the presence of dissolved barium leads to preferential precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) due to its low solubility relative to SrSO(4) and CaSO(4). Engineering the sulfate concentration in the vacuole may thus be the most direct way to increase the Sr sequestered per cell, an important consideration in using desmids for phytoremediation of (90)Sr. PMID:21871966

  17. Calcium channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Felix, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) is highly regulated in eukaryotic cells. The free [Ca2+]i is approximately four orders of magnitude less than that in the extracellular environment. It is, therefore, an electrochemical gradient favoring Ca2+ entry, and transient cellular activation increasing Ca2+ permeability will lead to a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. These transient rises of [Ca2+]i trigger or regulate diverse intracellular events, including metabolic processes, muscle contraction, secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters, cell differentiation, and gene expression. Hence, changes in [Ca2+]i act as a second messenger system coordinating modifications in the external environment with intracellular processes. Notably, information on the molecular genetics of the membrane channels responsible for the influx of Ca2+ ions has led to the discovery that mutations in these proteins are linked to human disease. Ca2+ channel dysfunction is now known to be the basis for several neurological and muscle disorders such as migraine, ataxia, and periodic paralysis. In contrast to other types of genetic diseases, Ca2+ channelopathies can be studied with precision by electrophysiological methods, and in some cases, the results have been highly rewarding with a biophysical phenotype that correlates with the ultimate clinical phenotype. This review outlines recent advances in genetic, molecular, and pathophysiological aspects of human Ca2+ channelopathies. PMID:16775382

  18. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  19. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  20. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  1. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  2. Comparision of Uptake Models for Strontium (Sr) and Barium (Ba) in Vine (Vitis vinifera L.) in Castilla-La Mancha (spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorós, José Angel; Pérez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad; García-Navarro, Francisco J.; Bravo, Sandra; Higueras, Pablo; Moreno, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Castilla-La Mancha is the biggest vine-growing region in the world (about 500,000 ha) and one of the most important in terms of production of wine. The soils diversity should induce differences in the uptake of mineral elements by the vineyard. Of over the regional vine extension, 101 plots were selected and analyzed soil samples from each of them, following the description by FAO procedures. Samples of leaves were also taken from each soil plot. We analyzed the contents of mineral elements in both soil and leaf, using the FRX technique. This paper is focused on the elements strontium and barium because they are the trace elements having a higher concentration in the soils of the region, with values in soil range from 22.3 mg•kg-1-3602.7 mg•kg-1 in strontium and from 65.4 mg•kg-1 to 469.3 mg•kg-1 in barium. The contents of both elements in leaves have ranged from 23.3 mg•kg-1 y 1084.5 mg•kg-1 for strontium, and between 3.86 mg•kg-1 and 235.0 mg•kg-1 for barium. The aim of this work is state the behaviour in the soil-plant system for both elements. For this study, different statistical adjustment models have been tested (linear, multiplicative, exponential and logarithmic). The results show that the values of "R" for strontium are higher than barium in all models. Samples have also been studied by soil order (classified according to the FAO criteria). In this case, significant correlation from strontium have been found in all soil orders, except in calcisols. Significant correlations for barium appear only in entisols and luvisols. In conclusion it can be seen how these two elements differ in their behaviour in the soil-plant system. In general, the concentration of strontium in the soil is better correlated with leaf content than barium in the same soil. We can suggest a greater facility for the absorption of strontium by the grapevine. In calcisols, bearing in mind the interference of calcium, this uptake does not present such a high correlation. The correlation soil-leave of barium is better in poorly developed soils (entisols) and highly evolved (luvisols), although this fact may obey other edaphic parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, mineralogy, etc.).

  3. Radiation dose in mass screening for gastric cancer with high-concentration barium sulfate compared with moderate-concentration barium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Azuma, M; Kuroda, C; Kubo, T; Yabunaka, K; Yamazaki, H; Katsuda, T; Takeda, Y

    2009-06-01

    Recently, high-concentration barium sulfate has been developed and is used in many medical facilities. This study compared radiation dose using high-concentration and moderate-concentration barium sulfate. The dose was evaluated with an experimental method using a gastric phantom and with a clinical examination. In the former, the dose and X-ray tube load were measured on the phantom with two concentrations of barium sulfate. In the latter, the fluoroscopic dose-area product (DAP), the radiographic DAP and their sum, the total DAP, were investigated in 150 subjects (112 males, 38 females) treated with both concentrations of barium sulfate. The effective dose was calculated by the software of PCXMC in every case. The results of the experimental evaluation indicated that the effective dose and X-ray tube load were greater with high-concentration barium sulfate than with moderate-concentration barium sulfate (p < 0.05). The results of the clinical evaluation indicated that the fluoroscopic DAP was greater with moderate-concentration barium sulfate than with high-concentration barium sulfate (p < 0.05), but the radiographic DAP was quite the reverse, so the total DAP and effective dose were almost same with both concentrations of barium sulfate. We conclude that high-concentration barium sulfate does not increase radiation dose in mass screening for gastric cancer. PMID:19623859

  4. Aequorin response facilitation and intracellular calcium accumulation in molluscan neurones

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen J.; Zucker, Robert S.

    1980-01-01

    1. When molluscan neural somata are filled with the calcium-indicating photo-protein aequorin and subjected to a 1 Hz train of depolarizing pulses (0·3 sec duration to + 15 mV) under voltage clamp, the successive photo-emissions due to calcium influx facilitate. The origin of this phenomenon was investigated in identified neurones from the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Since outward currents inactivate cumulatively in successive pulses, the effective depolarization increases due to a series resistance error. Elimination of this error by electronic compensation or pharmacological block of outward current reduced aequorin response facilitation by only about 30%, on the average. 3. When voltage-dependent sodium and potassium currents are blocked in tetraethylammonium (TEA)-substituted zero-sodium sea water, the remaining inward calcium currents display no facilitation. On the contrary, a slow decline during a pulse and a slight progressive depression in successive pulses are observed. Barium-substitution for calcium in the same medium eliminates a small residual potassium current insensitive to external TEA. The remaining inward barium currents also display depression instead of facilitation. 4. A non-pharmacological separation of calcium current was accomplished by measuring tail currents at the potassium equilibrium potential following depolarizing pulses. Calcium tail currents activate rapidly and then decline gradually and incompletely as depolarizing pulse duration is lengthened. Tail currents also show no evidence of facilitation; there is instead a slight depression of currents after successive pulses. 5. Increments of optical absorbance in neurones filled with the calcium-sensitive dye arsenazo III show a depression rather than facilitation to successive depolarizations in a train. The time course of these absorbance signals is consistent with the time-dependent depression of calcium current. 6. Calibration of arsenazo III response amplitude indicates that the dye reports only about 1% of the calcium concentration increment expected from knowledge of cell volume and the charge carried by calcium current during a depolarizing pulse. This suggests that cytoplasmic buffering of free calcium must occur rapidly, on a time scale comparable to the response time of arsenazo III (about 1 msec) or more rapidly. 7. The slow potassium tail current following a depolarizing pulse is calcium-dependent and probably provides an approximate index of the internal sub-membrane calcium concentration. Increments in this current after repetitive pulses display a slight progressive depression rather than facilitation. 8. Since neither calcium currents nor the concentration transients show facilitation, we conclude that aequorin response facilitation is due to the non-linear dependence of aequorin photo-emissions on calcium concentration. This conclusion is supported by a finding that the very different kinetics of arsenazo III responses and aequorin responses can be reconciled by a simple model representing calcium accumulation and known response properties of the two indicator substances. 9. In a train of impulses evoked by injecting depolarizing current into a neurone, the successive action potentials grow in duration. Nevertheless, a nearly constant calcium influx signalled by arsenazo III accompanies broadening action potentials. PMID:6247486

  5. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Prabaharan, T.; Shyam, A.

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO3) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  6. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 ? load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  7. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  8. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tannic acid and barium enema preparations. 201.304... Tannic acid and barium enema preparations. (a) It has become a widespread practice for tannic acid to be added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  10. Tunable dielectric properties of lead barium zirconate niobate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ya-Ling; Wu, Jenn-Ming

    2006-09-01

    The effect of substitution of niobium for zirconium on tunable behavior of lead barium zirconate (PBZ) films was investigated. Lead barium zirconate niobate films were grown on Pt /Ti/SiO2/Si substrates using chemical solution deposition method. The substitution of Nb for Zr enhances tunable properties of PBZ films. The dielectric tunabilities are excellent, all higher than 45% with a maximum=60%. The substitution of Nb for Zr raises values of figure of merit (FOM) of films. The maximum FOM takes place at 5mol% Nb with a value of 90, which is about three times that of the corresponding PBZ film.

  11. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  12. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  13. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  14. Thermally Induced Rearrangement of Molecules in Barium Stearate Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englisch, U.; Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Oeser, R.; Oietsch, U.

    1997-05-01

    Barium stearate multilayer films have been prepared by use of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique transferring sequentially deuterated and nondeuterated bilayers on a silicon support. Combined X-ray and neutron scattering experiments show a rearrangement of the molecules when the films have been annealed at temperatures higher than 60 °C. Whereas the periodicity of the barium sheets is unchanged, the intensity of the superstructure peak decreases close to the melting point of the stearic acid component (about 70 °C) and vanishes completely above. This behaviour is explained by the vertical movements and rearrangements of stearic acid molecules without noticeable evaporation of molecules.

  15. Emission mechanism of barium-containing thermionic cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Enqui, Z.; Xeuque, L.

    1991-03-27

    Through the analysis and synthesis of data obtained from barium containing thermionic cathodes, especially those by modern surface analysis technique, the authors have come to a unified theory--the dynamical surface emission center model. Barium absorbed on the surface of alkaline earth metal oxides in case of oxide cathode or of aluminate, tungstate etc. in case of dispenser cathode may form the emission center. Its size should be large enough to screen off the attractive field produced by the substrate, but small enough to facilitate the transport of electrons from the substrate to the emitting center. The compositions and the dynamical characters of the surface emission center are also discussed.

  16. Concentrations of lead, cadmium and barium in urban garden-grown vegetables: the impact of soil variables

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Murray B.; Shayler, Hannah A.; Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G.; Ferenz, Gretchen S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M.; Casey, Linda; Bachman, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Paired vegetable/soil samples from New York City and Buffalo, NY, gardens were analyzed for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba). Vegetable aluminum (Al) was measured to assess soil adherence. Soil and vegetable metal concentrations did not correlate; vegetable concentrations varied by crop type. Pb was below health-based guidance values (EU standards) in virtually all fruits. 47% of root crops and 9% of leafy greens exceeded guidance values; over half the vegetables exceeded the 95th percentile of market-basket concentrations for Pb. Vegetable Pb correlated with Al; soil particle adherence/incorporation was more important than Pb uptake via roots. Cd was similar to market-basket concentrations and below guidance values in nearly all samples. Vegetable Ba was much higher than Pb or Cd, although soil Ba was lower than soil Pb. The poor relationship between vegetable and soil metal concentrations is attributable to particulate contamination of vegetables and soil characteristics that influence phytoavailability. PMID:25163429

  17. Determination of micro amounts of iron, aluminum, and alkaline earth metals in silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirata, H.; Arai, M.

    1978-01-01

    A colorimetric method for analysis of micro components in silicon carbide used as the raw material for varistors is described. The microcomponents analyzed included iron soluble in hydrochloric acid, iron, aluminum, calcium and magnesium. Samples were analyzed by the method, and the results for iron and aluminum agreed well with the N.B.S. standard values and the values obtained by the other company. The method can therefore be applied to the analysis of actual samples.

  18. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  19. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  20. Fabrication and Evaluation of Membranes as Specific Electrodes for Calcium ions

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, René; Shatkay, Adam; Saroff, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Membranes fabricated from an inert polyvinyl chloride matrix impregnated with tributyl phosphate and with tributyl phosphate plus thenoyl trifluoroacetone were tested as electrodes specific for calcium ions. Both types of membrane exhibited a high specificity for calcium ions in the presence of sodium, magnesium, and barium ions. In the presence of perturbing ions, the usefulness of membranes is limited by both the transport of current and development of potentials by the interfering ion. An experimental method for evaluating these interfering quantities is presented. PMID:19211002

  1. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) A, b = 17.1823(4) A, c = 23.5718(5) A, {beta} = 90{sup o}, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with vertical bar F vertical bar > 7{sigma}(F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula (Z = 4) is Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}{sup IV}Fe{sub 2}{sup (2+)IV}[Al{sub 14}{sup VI}O{sub 31}(OH)][Al{sub 2}{sup IV}O][Al{sup IV}]AL{sup IV}(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe{sup 2+} tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  2. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MAGNESIUM, CALCIUM, AND ALUMINUM ON SOYBEAN ROOT ELONGATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alleviation of Al rhizotoxicity by Ca and Mg can differ among species and genotypes. Root elongation of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] line N93-S-179 and cvs. Young and Ransom exposed to varying concentrations of Al, Ca and Mg were compared in two experiments using a vertically split root system. ...

  3. A Case of Recurrent Renal Aluminum Hydroxide Stone

    PubMed Central

    Cakıroglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  4. ALUMINUM RECLAMATION BY ACIDIC EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM-ANODIZING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of aluminum-anodizing sludges with sulfuric acid was examined to determine the potential for production of commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, that is liquid alum. The research established kinetic and stoichiometric relationships and evaluates product qu...

  5. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  6. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  7. Dielectric Behavior of Nano Barium Titanate Filled Polymeric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, A.; Joshi, N. J.; Rakshit, P. B.; Grewal, G. S.; Shrinet, V.

    Rapid growth of electronic industry requires development of new materials that combine the high dielectric constant intrinsic to ferroelectric ceramic materials with easy processing characteristics of polymers. Ceramic-polymeric composites possess interesting properties for a variety of electronic applications including passive electronic devices. In fact, polymer-ceramic materials have drawn lot attention for use in microelectronic packaging, because they can give higher performance with lower cost, size and weight. In this work, attempts are made to prepare ceramic polymer composites followed by characterization of dielectric properties. The Barium Titanate ceramic powders are synthesized using the hydrothermal process. Crystal structure and crystallite size of particles are determined using X-ray diffraction. Silane treatment is carried out on Barium Titanate powder to increase its compatibility with polymer, followed with preparation of ceramic polymer composites. Epoxy and polyvinyledene fluoride (PVDF) polymers are used as matrices for preparation of the composites. The proportion of nanopowder is varied from 60 to 90 wt%. Dielectric properties such as volume resistivity, dielectric constant, dissipation factor are evaluated. Results indicate that the dielectric constant and dissipation factor vary between 18 -140 and 0.01 to 0.09, respectively as the relative ratio of polymer and silane modified Barium Titanate is varied. Specifically, at 90 wt% of 0.1 wt% silane modified Barium Titanate, the highest dielectric constant of 140 along with dissipation factor of 0.07 is obtained in the epoxy based system.

  8. Modeling of low-pressure barium-rare-gas discharges

    PubMed

    Lister; Curry; Lawler

    2000-10-01

    The fundamental principles of low-pressure discharges containing a minority of barium (5-20 mtorr) in a rare gas at pressure 1-20 torr have been investigated, using a numerical model of the positive column, with a view to assessing the potential of these discharges as a light source. The principle resonance line of neutral barium is from the 6p(1)P1 state and has a wavelength of 553 nm, which is close to the center of the photopic eye response curve. This green line can be augmented by radiation from barium ions to produce a "white" light. Published cross-section measurements suggest that the 6p(1)P1 state is heavily quenched by collisions with rare-gas atoms, reducing the radiation efficiency. The measured quenching cross section is much smaller for neon than other rare gases. Spectral line broadening by these same collisions, on the other hand, enhances the escape of radiation from the discharge through the line wings. The present paper reports the results of detailed calculations of the influence of rare-gas quenching and line broadening on discharge parameters (power balance, electric field, electron temperature, and density) as a function of discharge current, rare-gas, and barium vapor pressure. PMID:11089116

  9. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is a database of EPA's consensus opinion of the human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. A Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary were prepared for barium and compounds in 1998 ...

  10. BARIUM AND RADIUM REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the applicability of weak acid exchange resin in the hydrogen form for removal of hardness, barium and radium from groundwater. Weak acid resin in the hydrogen form eliminates the addition of sodium to drinking water. The capac...

  11. Dynamics of a barium release in the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Haerendel, G.

    1989-01-01

    The late time behavior of the May 13, 1985 magnetotail barium cloud is examined. The bulk dynamics of the cloud are studied based on triangulated data and data from Fabry-Perot Doppler velocity measurements. The changes in cloud morphology in relation to the in situ measurements made by the Ion Release Module satellite are discussed.

  12. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  13. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases.

    PubMed

    Deehr, C; Romick, G

    1977-05-12

    An effect which appeared to be pulsating aurora was observed to be associated with explosive releases of barium vapour near 250 km altitude, but only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. PMID:16073415

  14. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting. PMID:18429501

  15. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  16. Effects of chronic ethanol on currents carried through calcium channels in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Treistman, S N; Wilson, A

    1991-06-01

    Voltage clamp techniques were used to monitor the effects of chronic exposure to ethanol (EtOH) on current carried through calcium channels in an identified neuron of cultured abdominal ganglia from Aplysia californica. Exposure to 200 mM EtOH for periods up to 3 weeks did not change the baseline characteristics of current carried through calcium channels, nor did it alter its acute sensitivity to either 100 mM or 300 mM EtOH challenge. The currents that we examined were equivalent when carried by calcium or barium, and EtOH had similar effects on currents carried by these two ions. The population of voltage-dependent calcium channels studied here does not show development of tolerance after chronic exposure to EtOH. PMID:1652219

  17. XAFS studies of the local environment of Pb impurity atoms in barium, strontium, and calcium titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. I.; Sluchinskaya, I. A.; Erko, A.; Veligzhanin, A. A.; Chernyshov, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    The local environment of Pb impurity atoms in BaTiO3, SrTiO3, and CaTiO3 crystals was studied by XAFS technique. It is shown that, in both polar and nonpolar phases of BaTiO3 and in SrTiO3, the Pb atoms are displaced from the A lattice sites by ˜0.15 Å; in CaTiO3 this displacement is absent. Large values of Debye-Waller factors (0.05-0.10 Å2) for the atoms in the first shell of Pb observed in all the three crystals indicate the distortion of the oxygen environment of Pb atoms. The appearance of these features was explained by the fact that the Pb-O chemical bond has a noticeable covalent component and a Pb atom can form strong bonds only with four of the 12 surrounding oxygen atoms. The obtained data were used to determine the main factors responsible for the occurrence of ferroelectric phase transition in SrTiO3 and CaTiO3 and for the increase of the Curie temperature of BaTiO3 when it is doped with Pb.

  18. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the early time rise and exponential fall to be due to CIV ionization, of 0.014% (CIV I) and 0.40% (CIV II) for the Ba releases. The later ions produced at a constant rate probably have origins from other such processes as stripping and associative ionization collisions with atmospheric constituents primarily O, and charge exchange with O(+), He(+), and H(+). We suggest that the much larger Ba ionization rate in CIV II than CIV I is due to the fact that the release occurred in the peak Ca density where hot electrons were already present.

  19. Straczekite, a new calcium barium potassium vanadate mineral from Wilson Springs, Arkansas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T., Jr.; Nord, G.; Marinenko, J.; Milton, C.

    1984-01-01

    Straczekite occurs as a rare secondary mineral in fibrous seams, along with other V minerals (A.M. 64-713), in ore from the vanadium mine in Wilson Springs (formerly Potash Sulfur Springs), Garland County, Arkansas. It forms soft, thin laths of dark greenish black crystals up to 0.5 mm in length. Indexed XRD data are tabulated; strongest lines 3.486(100), 10.449(50), 1.8306(50), 1.9437(15) A; a 11.679, b 3.6608, c 10.636 A, beta 100.53o; space group C2/m, C2 or Cm. Chemical analysis gave V2O5 66.4, V2O4 15.3, Fe2O3 0.9, Na2O 0.4, K2O 1.8, CaO 2.5, BaO 5.5, H2O 7.2, = 100.0, leading to the formula (Ca0.39Ba0.31K0.33Na0.11)- 196(V4+1.59V5+6.31Fe3+0.10)O20.02(H2O)2.9; Dcalc. 3.21 g/cm3. A possible layer structure is discussed. The name is for J. A. Straczek, Chief Geologist at Union Carbide Corp.-R.A.H.

  20. Barium and strontium as calcium substitutes for contractile responses in the rat tail artery.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, A B; Aloamaka, C P

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Ba2+ and Sr2+ to substitute for Ca2+ in contractile responses of the rat tail artery has been examined. Both Ba2+ and Sr2+ caused comparable contractions in Ca-depleted NA-stimulated, or K+-depolarized strips. Ba2+ and Sr2+ substitute poorly for Ca2+ at noradrenaline-sensitive membrane sites. At high concentrations, the three divalent cations stabilize the membrane in the order: Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Ba2+. The relaxation rates following high-K+ contractions were similar for all three divalent cations, suggesting a common mechanism for sequestration/extrusion. PMID:2414057

  1. Flame synthesis of calcium-, strontium-, barium fluoride nanoparticles and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2005-04-01

    Non-oxidic salts such as NaCl, CaF2, SrF2 and BaF2 were synthesised using a flame spray method; optional doping of such fluorides with rare earth elements suggests possible applications in optics. PMID:15791326

  2. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  3. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  4. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  5. Detecting the barium daughter in 136Xe 0-νββ decay using single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescent imaging may provide an avenue to efficiently detect the Ba++ daughter atom in the decay 136Xe → Ba + 2e-, and, unambiguously associate the birth point in space within the electron trajectories of the decay event. Chelation of doubly-charged alkaline earth elements such as calcium and barium by certain precursor molecules converts the resulting complex from a non-fluorescent to a fluorescent state. Repeated photo-excitation of a single fluorescent complex reveals both presence and location with high precision. This technique, widespread now in biochemistry, biophysics and biology, may permit a similar discriminating response in a large high-pressure xenon gas TPC for the Ba++ ion from xenon double-beta decay. The TPC measures the event time and energy of the two nascent electrons, as well as topology and position in 3-D from their trajectories in the gas. Measurement of the 2-D location of the molecular ion after arrival at the cathode plane permits an association of ion with the event. Demonstration of an efficient, highly specific detection of the barium daughter would provide a long-sought pathway to a background-free result in the search for this decay mode, of central importance for determining the nature of the neutrino.

  6. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... calcium, but dairy products are the best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and ... calcium that your body can easily absorb. Whole milk (4% fat) is recommended for children ages 1 ...

  7. Synthesis of nanocomposites comprising iron and barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, M.; Bid, S.; Pradhan, S. K.; Nath, B. K.; Das, D.; Chakravorty, D.

    2004-02-01

    Composites of nanometre-sized α-iron and barium hexaferrite phases, respectively, have been synthesized by the ceramic processing route. Pure barium hexaferrite (BaO·6Fe 2O 3) was first of all prepared by calcinations of the precursor oxides at a maximum temperature of 1200°C for 4 h. By subjecting the resulting powder having particle size of the order of 1 μm to a reduction treatment in the temperature range 500-650°C for a period varying from 10 to 15 min it was possible to obtain a composite consisting of nanosized barium hexaferrite and α-Fe. At reduction temperature of 650°C for a period greater than 15 min all the ferrite phase was converted to α-Fe and Ba—the particle sizes being 59.4 and 43.6 nm, respectively. These conclusions are based on X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer studies of different samples. During reduction H + ions are introduced into the hexaferrite crystallite. It is believed that due to a tensile stress the crystals are broken up into smaller dimensions and the reduction brings about the growth of nanosized α-Fe and barium, respectively, around the hexaferrite particles. Magnetic measurements show coercivity values for the reduced samples in the range 120-440 Oe and saturation magnetization varying from 158 to 53.7 emu/g. These values have been ascribed to the formation and growth of α-Fe particles as the reduction treatment is increased. By heating the nanocomposites at a temperature of 1000°C for 1 h in ordinary atmosphere it was found that they were reconverted to the barium hexaferrite phase with a particle size ˜182.3 nm. The reaction described in this study is thus reversible.

  8. Preliminary study of the CRRES magnetospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary theoretical and computational analyses of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) magnetospheric barium releases are presented. The focus of the studies is on the evolution of the diamagnetic cavity which is formed by the barium ions as they expand outward, and on the structuring of the density and magnetic field during the expansion phase of the releases. Two sets of simulation studies are discussed. The first set is based upon a 2D ideal MHD code and provides estimates of the time and length scales associated with the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity. The second set uses a nonideal MHD code; specifically, the Hall term is included. This additional term is critical to the dynamics of sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, such as the CRRES barium releases, because it leads to instability of the expanding plasma. Detailed simulations of the G4 and G10 releases were performed. In both cases the expanding plasma rapidly structured: the G4 release structured at time t less than about 3 s and developed scale sizes of about 1-2 km, while the G10 release structured at time t less than about 22 s and developed scale sizes of about 10-15 km. It is also found that the diamagnetic cavity size is reduced from those obtained from the ideal MHD results because of the structure. On the other hand, the structuring allows the formation of plasma blobs which appear to free stream across the magnetic field; thus, the barium plasma can propagate to larger distances traverse to the magnetic field than the case where no structuring occurs. Finally, a new normal mode of the system was discovered which may be excited at the leading edge of the expanding barium plasma.

  9. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehm, F.; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K.

    2015-12-01

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10-5 g(H2O)/m2/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  10. Dynamic motions of calmodulin in response to aluminum binding: An implication for aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shixing Yuan.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic motions of spinach calmodulin in the nanosecond range can be studied through a strategically anchored probe, e.g., a fluorescence probe, bimane, or, a EPR probe, proxyl, attached at cysteinyl-26 residue. With Ca{sup 2+} ions present, fluorescence studies indicated that the rotational motions of calmodulin is faster relative to those of apocalmodulin. This may result from compactness of calmodulin conformation in the presence of calcium, which implies that when Ca{sup 2+} ions bind to calmodulin, local conformational changes can trigger a largescale molecular conformational rearrangement. This explanation also matches the studies in binding of mastoparan to calmodulin molecule. Fluorescence studies showed when mastoparan binds to calmodulin, the whole mastoparan-calmodulin complex rotates slower, i.e., the rotational correlation time becomes longer because the total volume of the complex becomes larger than calmodulin molecule itself. On the other hand, mastoparan binding also triggers largescale conformational rearrangement on calmodulin molecule, which can be monitored through the microenvironmental changes around the EPR probe. When aluminum ions were added to calmodulin solution, in the presence of saturation of Ca{sup 2+}, motional changes of calmodulin different from those in the absence of aluminum ions were observed. Fluorescence energy transfer studies showed that the energy transfer efficiency from the single tryptophanyl residue on mastoparan-X to the probe attached at the cysteinyl site is different in the presence of aluminum from that in the absence of aluminum. This suggests that aluminum ions may interfere the interactions between calmodulin and mastoparan.

  11. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  12. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  13. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  14. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  15. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the roles of calcium and vitamin D in bone health. Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling and it also affects bone mass through its impact on the remodeling rate. Typically, about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and ...

  16. RECLAMATION OF ALUMINUM FINISHING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research study of the reclamation of aluminum-anodizing sludges was conducted in two sequential phases focused on enhanced dewatering of aluminum-anodizing sludges to produce commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, i.e., liquid alum. The use of high-pressure (14 to...

  17. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  18. Ca2+ released from calcium alginate gels can promote inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gail; Mooney, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In general, alginate hydrogels are considered to be biologically inert and are commonly used for biomedical purposes that require minimum inflammation. However, Ca2+, which is commonly used to crosslink alginate, is a critical second messenger in immune cell signaling, and little has been done to understand its effect on immune cell fate when delivered as a component of alginate gels. We found that dendritic cells (DCs) encapsulated in Ca2+-crosslinked alginate (calcium alginate) secreted at least fivefold more of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β when compared to DCs encapsulated in agarose and collagen gels, as well as DCs plated on tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). Plating cells on TCPS with the alginate polymer could not reproduce these results, whereas culturing DCs on TCPS with increasing concentrations of Ca2+ increased IL-1β, MHC class II and CD86 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with these findings, calcium alginate gels induced greater maturation of encapsulated DCs compared to barium alginate gels. When injected subcutaneously in mice, calcium alginate gels significantly upregulated IL-1β secretion from surrounding tissue relative to barium alginate gels, and similarly, the inflammatory effects of LPS were enhanced when it was delivered from calcium alginate gels rather than barium alginate gels. These results confirm that the Ca2+ used to crosslink alginate gels can be immunostimulatory and suggest that it is important to take into account Ca2+’s bioactive effects on all exposed cells (both immune and non-immune) when using calcium alginate gels for biomedical purposes. This work may strongly impact the way people use alginate gels in the future as well as provide insights into past work utilizing alginate gels. PMID:23938198

  19. Building an aluminum car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article examines the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles to decrease weight and consequently increase fuel economy. The topics of the article include federal fuel economy goals, the development of optimum body structure and manufacturing techniques, comparison with steel, cost of materials, weight reduction and recycling of materials.

  20. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  1. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  2. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  3. Mechanisms of aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity limits agricultural productivity over much of the world’s arable land by inhibiting root growth and development. Affected plants have difficulty in acquiring adequate water and nutrition from their soil environments and thus have stunted shoot development and diminished yield....

  4. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  5. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  6. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  7. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  8. Markets for recovered aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The study describes the operation of the markets for scrap aluminum as an example of how recycling markets are structured, what factors influence the supply of and demand for materials, what projections can be made about recycling markets, and how government policies to increase recycling may affect these markets.

  9. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  10. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  11. ALUMINUM SOLUBILITY, CALCIUM-ALUMINUM EXCHANGE, AND PH IN ACID FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Important components in several models designed to describe the effects of acid deposition on soils and surface waters are the pH-A1 and Ca-A1 exchange relationships. f A1 solubility is controlled by A1 trihydroxide minerals, the theoretical pH-A1 relationship can be described by...

  12. The effect of radiopacifiers agents on pH, calcium release, radiopacity, and antimicrobial properties of different calcium hydroxide dressings.

    PubMed

    Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; García-Godoy, Franklin; Moldauer, Bertram Ivan; Gagliardi Minotti, Paloma; Tercília Grizzo, Larissa; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, pH level, calcium ion release, and radiopacity of calcium hydroxide pastes associated with three radiopacifying agents (iodoform, zinc oxide, and barium sulfate). For the pH and calcium release tests, 45 acrylic teeth were utilized and immersed in ultrapure water. After 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days the solution was analyzed by using a pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Polyethylene tubes filled with the pastes were used to perform the radiopacity test. For the antimicrobial test, 25 dentin specimens were infected intraorally in order to induce the biofilm colonization and treated with the pastes for 7 days. The Live/Dead technique and a confocal microscope were used to obtain the ratio of live cells. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed to show differences among the groups (P < 0.05). The pH analysis at 7 days showed significant differences (P < 0.05) among the groups. No differences among the pastes were found in the calcium release test on the 7th day (P > 0.05). The calcium hydroxide/iodoform samples had the highest radiopacity and antimicrobial activity against the biofilm-infected dentin in comparison to the other pastes (P < 0.05). Calcium hydroxide mixed with 17% iodoform and 35% propylene glycol into a paste had the highest pH, calcium ion release, radiopacity, and the greatest antimicrobial action versus similar samples mixed with BaSO4 or ZnO. PMID:25990864

  13. Synchronous barium peaks in high-resolution profiles of calcite and aragonite marine bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, David Paul; Lorrain, Anne; Paulet, Yves-Marie; André, Luc; Dehairs, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Barium/calcium profiles of bivalve shells are characterized by flat background signals periodically interrupted by sharp peaks, with the background signals correlated with water Ba/Ca. To test if the peaks are an environmental signal related to productivity, we analyzed high-resolution Ba/Ca profiles in bivalve shells that grew adjacent to one another. Two aragonitic Saxidomus giganteus show remarkable similarity over a decade of growth, clearly indicating an environmental forcing. Four calcitic Pecten maximus shells also record synchronous Ba/Ca peaks, again indicating an exogenous control. The Ba/Ca peaks, however, start ~40 days after the crash of a bloom, while sedimentation takes place immediately following the bloom. Barite formation in settling phytoplankton flocs, as has been previously proposed, is clearly not the cause of these peaks. Other possible causes, such as dissolved Ba in ambient water, spawning, shell organic matter content, and kinetic growth rate effects are also discussed, but none provide satisfactory explanations. Background shell Ba partition coefficients (Ba/Cacarbonate/Ba/Cawater) for both the calcitic shells (0.18) and aragonitic shells (0.16) are similar to that previously reported for the calcitic Mytilus edulis (~0.1). We suggest that Ba/Ca peaks in bivalve shells are caused by an as yet undetermined environmental forcing, while background Ba/Ca levels are a good indication of dissolved Ba/Ca in the water; both are independent of shell mineralogy.

  14. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  15. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  16. Effect of calcium and antacids on phenytoin bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Chapron, D J; Kramer, P A; Mariano, S L; Hohnadel, D C

    1979-07-01

    The effects of bihourly administration of gluconate calcium and tow magnesium-aluminum-containing acids on the bioavailability of a single capsule dose of phenytoin sodium were determined in two normal volunteers. Neither the rate nor the extent of phenytoin absorption were altered by the treatments, in spite of indirect evidence from other studies that might suggest such an interaction. No interaction between calcium or magnesium and either unionized or anionic phenytoin could be demonstrated in vitro using solubility and spectral techniques. PMID:454247

  17. Particularities of Radiation Defect Formation in Ceramic Barium Cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khromushin, I. V.; Aksenova, T. I.; Tuseev, T.; Munasbaeva, K. K.; Ermolaev, Yu V.; Ermolaev, V. N.; Seitov, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of irradiation with electrons, ions of noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) and oxygen on the structure and properties of neodymium-doped barium cerate have been studied using the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was shown that irradiation by low-energy ions of noble gases stimulates the blistering processes on the sample surface, while the high-energy ions contribute to formation of the structures on the irradiated surface that resemble the various stages of spherulitegrowth. The similar structures were not observed in the case of irradiation with high-energy oxygen ions. According to the data on thermal desorption of water and oxygen molecules from the irradiated barium cerate it was supposed that irradiation by the noble gas ions promotes neodymium oxidation state change. It was noticed that the electron irradiation leads to the formation of the nano-sized acicular structures on the cerate surface.

  18. Photoionization and photoelectric loading of barium ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A. V.; Churchill, L. R.; Griffin, P. F.; Chapman, M. S.

    2007-05-15

    Simple and effective techniques for loading barium ions into linear Paul traps are demonstrated. Two-step photoionization of neutral barium is achieved using a weak intercombination line (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1}, {lambda}=791 nm) followed by excitation above the ionization threshold using a nitrogen gas laser ({lambda}=337 nm). Isotopic selectivity is achieved by using a near Doppler-free geometry for excitation of the triplet 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1} state. Additionally, we report a particularly simple and efficient trap loading technique that employs an inexpensive uv epoxy curing lamp to generate photoelectrons.

  19. NASA/Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brence, W. A.; Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.; Neuss, H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Munich, Germany, conducted a cooperative experiment involving the release and study of a barium cloud at 31,500 km altitude near the equatorial plane. The release was made near local magnetic midnight on Sept. 21, 1971. The MPE-built spacecraft contained a canister of 16 kg of Ba CuO mixture, a two-axis magnetometer, and other payload instrumentation. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate the interaction of the ionized barium cloud with the ambient medium and to deduce the properties of electric fields in the proximity of the release. An overview of the project is given to briefly summarize the organization, responsibilities, objectives, instrumentation, and operational aspects of the project.

  20. Relationship of pheasant occurrence to barium in Illinois soils.

    PubMed

    Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Distribution of the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is nearly co-extensive with the boundary of Wisconsinan glaciation; this is an area of base-rich soils that are mostly developed in calcareous tills. Anderson and Stewart (1973) speculated that barium in the diet might be a factor limiting the pheasant establishment in habitats adjacent to areas of long-term sustaining populations in Illinois. Total Ba was calculated for soils of 74 conterminous counties for which there were pheasant population data. Barium over the range of about 480 to 700 mg kg(-1) soil was unrelated to pheasant occurrence or to population indeces. The selective eating of iron-manganese concretions that are enriched in Ba might present a unique pathway for Ba loading. PMID:24197899

  1. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  2. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  3. Observations and theory of the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Pongratz, M. B.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The barium releases in the magnetotail during the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) operation were monitored by ground-based imagers and by instruments on the Ion Release Module. After each release, the data show the formation of a structured diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grows until the dynamic pressure of the expanding ions balances the magnetic pressure on its surface. The magnetic field inside the cavity is zero. The barium ions collect on the surface of the cavity, producing a shell. Plasma irregularities form along magnetic field lines draped over the surface of the cavity. The scale size of the irregularities is nearly equal to the thickness of the shell. The evolution and structuring of the diamagnetic cavity are modeled using magnetohydrodynamics theory.

  4. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  5. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation. PMID:27145888

  6. Synthesis and characterization of barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-González, M.A.; Mendoza-Suárez, G.; Padmasree, K.P.

    2013-10-15

    In this work, we prepared barium ferrite-silica (BaM-SiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites of different molar ratios by high-energy ball milling, followed by heat-treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure, morphology and magnetic properties were characterized for different synthesis conditions by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results indicate that 15 h of milling was enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase and to get a good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix. For milling periods beyond 15 h and heat treatment above 900 °C, the XRD patterns showed the presence of hematite phase caused by the decomposition of BaM. The agglomerate size observed through SEM analysis was around 150 nm with a good BaM dispersion into the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The highest saturation magnetization (Ms) value obtained was 43 emu/g and the corresponding coercivity (Hc) value of 3.4 kOe for the composition 60BaM-40SiO{sub 2} milled for 15 h and heat treated at 900 °C. This coercivity value is acceptable for the application in magnetic recording media. Highlights: • Barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites were prepared by high energy ball milling. • Optimal processing time is 15 h milling and heat treatment at 900 °C. • This is enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase. • Obtain good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix • Above this processing time shows the presence of increased amount of hematite.

  7. Barium hexaferrite based on the waste products from electroplating processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Stepanchikova, I.G.; Makarov, S.V.; Zaitsev, V.A.; Danilov, A.S.

    1987-11-01

    The authors assess the possibility of simultaneously treating and using waste electroplating slurries containing large amounts of iron hydroxides for obtaining barium hexaferrite ceramics. Differential thermal analysis was employed to determine the processing and recovery parameters and the resulting hexaferrites were tested, mechanically and by x-ray diffraction, for their mechanical and magnetic properties as well as for their phase composition and structure. The consequences of the process on pollution abatement are also evaluated.

  8. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  9. Calcium-bismuth electrodes for large-scale energy storage (liquid metal batteries)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Boysen, DA; Ouchi, T; Sadoway, DR

    2013-11-01

    Calcium is an attractive electrode material for use in grid-scale electrochemical energy storage due to its low electronegativity, earth abundance, and low cost. The feasibility of combining a liquid Ca-Bi positive electrode with a molten salt electrolyte for use in liquid metal batteries at 500-700 degrees C was investigated. Exhibiting excellent reversibility up to current densities of 200 mA cm(-2), the calcium bismuth liquid alloy system is a promising positive electrode candidate for liquid metal batteries. The measurement of low self-discharge current suggests that the solubility of calcium metal in molten salt electrolytes can be sufficiently suppressed to yield high coulombic efficiencies >98%. The mechanisms giving rise to Ca-Bi electrode overpotentials were investigated in terms of associated charge transfer and mass transport resistances. The formation of low density Ca11Bi10 intermetallics at the electrode electrolyte interface limited the calcium deposition rate capability of the electrodes; however, the co-deposition of barium into bismuth from barium-containing molten salts suppressed Ca-Bi intermetallic formation thereby improving the discharge capacity. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alkoxylation using modified calcium-containing bimetallic or polymetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for providing an alkoxylation catalyst. It comprises reacting or solubilizing, at least partially, calcium metal or a calcium-containing compound, by mixing with an activator or solubilizing thereby forming a calcium-containing reacting a divalent or polyvalent metal or a divalent or polyvalent metal-containing compound wherein the divalent or polyvalent metal is selected from the group consisting of beryllium, magnesium, strontium, barium, lanthanum, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, boron, gallium, silicon, germanium tin, phosphorus, antimony, sulfur, selenium, tellurium, cerium and thorium with an organic compound having at least one active hydrogen to produce a divalent or polyvalent metal-containing composition: reacting the calcium-containing composition with the divalent or polyvalent metal-containing composition under effective reaction conditions to produce a catalyst precursor composition; and reacting the catalyst precursor composition with a divalent or polyvalent oxyacid or a divalent or polyvalent metal salt of an oxyacid or mixtures thereof under effective reaction conditions to produce the alkoxylation catalyst.

  11. Vanadium doped barium germanate microrods and photocatalytic properties under solar light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L. Z.; Wang, S.; Liu, H. D.; Lin, N.; Yu, H. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vanadium doped barium germanate microrods have been prepared by a facile hydrothermal process. The obtained vanadium doped barium germanate microrods are proved to be hexagonal BaGe4O9 and orthorhombic Ba2V2O7 phases by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the vanadium doped barium germanate products consist of microrods with the diameter of microscale size. The diameter of the mirorods decreases from 800 nm to 150 nm with the vanadium doping mass percentage increasing from 1% to 10%. Solid UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra show that the band gap of the vanadium doped barium germanate is smaller than that of the undoped barium germanate. The photocatalytic activity has been greatly enhanced by the vanadium doping. The vanadium doped barium germanate microrods exhibit great application potential for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under solar light irradiation.

  12. Barium aluminosilicate reinforced in situ with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, K.K.; Freitag, D.W.; Hunn, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    Advanced ceramic composite materials that exhibit high strength and toughness with good thermal shock resistance are needed for emerging high-temperature engineering applications. A recently developed in situ reinforced barium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic shows promise of meeting many of the requirements for these types of applications with the added benefit of low-cost fabrication through densification by pressureless sintering. The material is toughened through in situ growth of rodlike {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains resulting from the {alpha}-{beta} silicon nitride phase transformation. Microstructural development and material properties for temperatures up to 1,400 C are discussed. When compared to monolithic barium aluminosilicate, barium aluminosilicate reinforced with 70% by volume of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} shows a significant increase in flexural strength (from 80 to 565 MPa) and fracture toughness (from 1.8 to 5.74 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}) with a high resistance to thermal shock.

  13. Scanning electron and tunneling microscopy of palladium barium emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, V. B.; Volkov, U. P.; Semenov, S. V.; Semenov, A. S.

    2003-06-01

    The results of study of metal-alloyed palladium-barium emitters' of modern very high frequency high-powered electronic vacuum tubes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) are presented. Since the Pd/Ba foil surface is fairly smooth and is not oxidized in air STM/STS investigations are carried out in air in normal laboratory environment. SEM and STM images show that the emitter surface has a complex porous structure. The cathode surface study by STS in tunneling gap modulation mode allowed to take a map of phase distribution with various work function values and high lateral resolution. Obtained images demonstrate the presence of three phases on the Pd/Ba emitter surface, viz. barium-oxygen compounds, intermetallic, and palladium. As it is seen from presented STS image the phase with a low work function value (barium oxides) is concentrated along boundaries of the substance inclusions with work function corresponding to the intemetallic compound Pd 5Ba. This supports the model of low work function areas obtained via Ba segregation from the intermetallic compound and oxidation. The presented methods may be used in the Pd/Ba cathode manufacturing process for increasing the yield of electronic devices in microwave tube production and optimize the emitters' characteristics.

  14. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  15. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    PubMed

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices. PMID:20356280

  16. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  17. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  18. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  19. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major accomplishments for the program include definition of the system thermo-chemistry, demonstration of reactor stage 1, development of reactor stage 2 critical components in a 500 kW module, experimental determination of the vapor recovery reactor fundamentals, detailed design and installation of an advanced stage 1/vapor recovery reactor, feasibility of efficient separation of Al-C metal alloy product, updated capital and operating cost estimates, and development of computer models for all steps of the Advanced Reactor Process.

  20. Determination of silicon, barium, and titanium in fresnoite single crystals and raw materials for them

    SciTech Connect

    Sizonenko, N.T.; Egorova, L.A.; Gaiduk, O.V.; Khukhryanskii, A.K.

    1985-09-01

    Single crystals of fresnoite show good electroptic parameters and high resistance to laser radiation, and are being examined for use in acoustoelectronics and optoelectronics. This paper investigates simple and reliable methods of determining silicon, barium, and titanium without preliminary separation. The authors examined the effects of large amounts of titanium and barium on the determination of silicon; it was found that titanium interferes. Barium does not interfere with the determination of silicon. Barium and titanium were determined by EDTA titration. The relative standard deviation in determining each of the elements did not exceed 6 x 10/sup -3/.

  1. Direct acid dissolution of aluminum and other metals from fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kelmers, A.D.; Egan, B.Z.; Seeley, F.G.; Campbell, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Fly ash could provide a significant domestic source of alumina and thus supply a large part of the US needs for aluminum and possibly also several other metals. The aluminum and other metals can be solubilized from fly ash by acid dissolution methods. The aluminum may be present in any or all of three solid phases: (1) crystalline; (2) glassy amorphous; and (3) irregular, spongy amorphous. The chemistry of these phases controls the solubilization behavior. The aluminum in high-calcium western ashes is primarily found in the amorphous phases, and much of it can be solubilized by using short-time, ambient-temperature leaching. Little of the aluminum in the low-calcium eastern ashes is solubilized under ambient-temperature conditions, and only a portion can be solubilized even at reflux temperature conditions. Some of the aluminum in these eastern ashes is present as mullite, while some is found in the amorphous material. The fraction contained in mullite is relativey acid insoluble, and only partial solubilization can be achieved even under vigorous acid leach conditions.

  2. [Calcium antagonism by papaverine in isolated rat gastric fundus strips in a model system].

    PubMed

    Simon, L; Sallai, J; Szontagh, M; Simon-Talpas, G; Müller, A

    1984-04-01

    Examining isolated strips of gastric fundus tissue of rats the authors observed that papaverin up to 7.8 X 10(-8) to 6.25 X 10(-7) mol/l increased the intensity of convulsions induced by constant amounts of barium chloride (9.5 X 10(-4); with further increase of the concentration the intensity of convulsions gradually sank under the initial value. An increased proneness to cramping was also observed when the calcium content of the Tyrode solution was reduced. In this case the proneness to cramping was highest between 1 and 1.3 mmol/l calcium content. When the calcium content was 1 mmol/l, papaverin increased the proneness to cramping only to a smaller degree, in agreement with the effect measured when the calcium content of the organ bath was reduced below 1 mmol/l. In model experiments, calcium antagonized the potential difference-increasing effect of papaverin at the ether/NaCl (0.1 mol/l) phase boundary. From this the authors infer an interaction (complex formation) between papaverin and calcium at the phase boundary, which is independent of the biological medium. Their findings and the papaverin -calcium antagonism first observed by Benigni [2] can be interpreted in this way. PMID:6739529

  3. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  4. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  5. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  6. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  7. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  8. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  9. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  10. A review of the health impacts of barium from natural and anthropogenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Darrah, Thomas H; Miller, Richard K; Lyerly, H Kim; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing public awareness of the relatively new and expanded industrial barium uses which are potential sources of human exposure (e.g., a shale gas development that causes an increased awareness of environmental exposures to barium). However, absorption of barium in exposed humans and a full spectrum of its health effects, especially among chronically exposed to moderate and low doses of barium populations, remain unclear. We suggest a systematic literature review (from 1875 to 2014) on environmental distribution of barium, its bioaccumulation, and potential and proven health impacts (in animal models and humans) to provide the information that can be used for optimization of future experimental and epidemiological studies and developing of mitigative and preventive strategies to minimize negative health effects in exposed populations. The potential health effects of barium exposure are largely based on animal studies, while epidemiological data for humans, specifically for chronic low-level exposures, are sparse. The reported health effects include cardiovascular and kidney diseases, metabolic, neurological, and mental disorders. Age, race, dietary patterns, behavioral risks (e.g., smoking), use of medications (those that interfere with absorbed barium in human organism), and specific physiological status (e.g., pregnancy) can modify barium effects on human health. Identifying, evaluating, and predicting the health effects of chronic low-level and moderate-level barium exposures in humans is challenging: Future research is needed to develop an understanding of barium bioaccumulation in order to mitigate its potential health impacts in various exposured populations. Further, while occupationally exposed at-risk populations exist, it is also important to identify potentially vulnerable subgroups among non-occupationally exposed populations (e.g., elderly, pregnant women, children) who are at higher risk of barium exposure from drinking water and food. PMID:24844320

  11. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  12. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  13. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  14. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  15. Photoemission study of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum/aluminum oxide/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Zorba, Serkan; Gao Yongli; Ma Liping; Yang Yang

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the interface electronic structure of a sandwich structure involving aluminum oxide and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq), i.e. (Alq/AlO{sub x}/Alq), has been investigated with photoemission spectroscopy. Strong chemical reactions have been observed due to aluminum deposition onto the Alq substrate. The subsequent oxygen exposure releases some of the Alq molecules from the interaction with aluminum. Finally, the deposition of the top Alq layer leads to an asymmetry in the electronic energy level alignment with respect to the AlO{sub x} interlayer.

  16. Target-Cell Contact Activates a Highly Selective Capacitative Calcium Entry Pathway in Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zweifach, Adam

    2000-01-01

    Calcium influx is critical for T cell activation. Evidence has been presented that T cell receptor–stimulated calcium influx in helper T lymphocytes occurs via channels activated as a consequence of depletion of intracellular calcium stores, a mechanism known as capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE). However, two key questions have not been addressed. First, the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells has not been examined. While the T cell receptor–mediated early signals in helper and cytotoxic T cells are similar, the physiology of the cells is strikingly different, raising the possibility that the mechanism of calcium influx is also different. Second, contact of T cells with antigen-presenting cells or targets involves a host of intercellular interactions in addition to those between antigen–MHC and the T cell receptor. The possibility that calcium influx pathways in addition to those activated via the T cell receptor may be activated by contact with relevant cells has not been addressed. We have used imaging techniques to show that target-cell–stimulated calcium influx in CTLs occurs primarily through CCE. We investigated the permeability of the CTL influx pathway for divalent cations, and compared it to the permeability of CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T cells. CCE in CTLs shows a similar ability to discriminate between calcium, barium, and strontium as CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T lymphocytes, where CCE is likely to mediated by Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ current (CRAC) channels, suggesting that CRAC channels also underlie CCE in CTLs. These results are the first determination of the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells and the first demonstration that cell contact–mediated calcium signals in T cells occur via depletion-activated channels. PMID:10662784

  17. Wideband and enhanced microwave absorption performance of doped barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Pingyuan; Xiong, Kun; Ju, Kui; Li, Shengnan; Xu, Guangliang

    2015-07-01

    To achieve stronger microwave attenuation and larger bandwidth in electromagnetic absorber, the nickel ions (Ni2+) and manganese ions (Mn2+) were employed to partially replace the cobalt ions (Co2+) in BaCoTiFe10O19, and the doped barium hexaferrite (Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19 and Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19) powders were synthesized via the sol-gel combustion method. Subsequently, the microwave absorbing composites were prepared by mixing the ferrite powders with the paraffin. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the doped ferrites confirmed the formation of the M-type barium ferrite, and no other types of barium ferrite could be found. Based on the electromagnetic parameters measured by the vector net-analyzer, it was found that the composite (Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19) possessed a minimum reflection loss of -52.8 dB at 13.4 GHz with a matching thickness of 1.8 mm and the bandwidth below -15 dB was 5.8 GHz. Moreover, the maximum attenuation of Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19 could reach -69 dB when its thickness was 1.8 mm, and also the bandwidth less than -20 dB was ranging from 13.2 GHz to 18 GHz. Thus, Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19 and Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19 could be the good microwave absorbers, which have great potentials to be applied in the high frequency fields of the microwave absorbing materials.

  18. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  19. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  20. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  1. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  2. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation--which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports--the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  3. 75 FR 36629 - Barium Chloride From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Barium Chloride From China, 75 FR 33824 (June 15, 2010), and Barium Chloride from China (Inv. No. 731-TA... Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 74 FR 31412 (July 1, 2009). As a result of its review, the Department... China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset Review of Antidumping Duty Order, 74 FR 55814 (October...

  4. LACK OF EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER BARIUM ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. he purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities alters the known risk factors for...

  5. Composition and structure measurements in an ionospheric barium cloud. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Narcisi, R.; Trzcinski, E.; Federico, G.; Wlodyka, L.; Bench, P.

    1981-12-23

    A 48 kg barium payload was launched from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida on 12 December 1980 at 2311 GMT and detonated at 183.7 km. At 2342:50.25 GMT, a second rocket, instrumented with an ion mass spectrometer and pulsed plasma probes, was fired to traverse the barium cloud. Composition, ion density, and structure measurements were acquired up to 241.2 km in both the natural and disturbed ionosphere. The rocket penetrated the barium cloud between 147 and 184 km. In addition to the Ba+, Ba++ produced by H Lyman alpha ionization, and Ca+, an impurity in the barium were detected in the cloud. A peak barium ion concentration of about 6,000,000 ions cu cm was measured at 161 km where the ionospheric NO+ and O2+ ions were essentially eliminated by large recombination loss. The bottom side of the barium cloud had a relatively smooth structure while the top side showed significant density fluctuations. The first experimental evidence of a theoretically predicted E region 'image cloud' was found in the form of an enhanced NO+ layer just below the barium cloud. Unexplained wave-like density variations in O+, NO+, and O2(+) also were seen above the barium cloud to 195 km. A quantitative estimate of the outgassing water vapor concentrations near the payload's surface was made using the fast change transfer rate coefficient for O+ + H2O yields H2O+ + O that created the observed water vapor ions.

  6. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Methods Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, non-taster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40% w/v barium: non-carbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter) and sucrose (sweet). Mixed model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Results Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than non-tasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Conclusions Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  7. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  8. Agglomeration behavior of solid nickel on polycrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K Scott; Mast, Eric S; Sprenkle, Vince

    2007-11-01

    This letter describes the phenomenon that takes place between nickel/barium titanate couples when heated under conditions employed in multilayer ceramic capacitor manufacturing practice: a 4hr, 1300°C isothermal anneal in 1% H2 – 99% N2. Dense, sputtered nickel films were observed to dewet the titanate and agglomerate into discrete or interconnected islands via a solid-state process. Up to a critical film thickness value of ~1.4 μm, the degree of agglomeration was found to display an exponential dependence on the thickness of the original nickel film.

  9. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  10. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  11. Highly efficient white light generation from barium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Rajgara, F. A.; Reddy, N. C. S.; Sandhu, A. S.; Mathur, D.

    2004-02-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient white light generation by focusing 45 fs long pulses of 800 nm laser radiation with 1 mJ energy onto a 10 cm long barium fluoride crystal. The entire wavelength band from 400-1000 nm was generated with efficiency greater than 40%. We also observe multiphoton absorption induced fluorescence in the crystal. By employing line focusing geometry at low intensity, we show that white light fringes are formed with a single laser beam, indicative of the coherent property of the white light that is produced.

  12. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-01

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1-xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba2+ ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba2+ ion in SBT lattice.

  13. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  14. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  15. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Lauren M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d33 piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m-1. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  16. CNO and F abundances in the barium star HD 123396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Yong, D.; Meléndez, J.; Vásquez, S.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Barium stars are moderately rare, chemically peculiar objects, which are believed to be the result of the pollution of an otherwise normal star by material from an evolved companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Aims: We aim to derive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine abundances for the first time from the infrared spectra of the barium red giant star HD 123396 to quantitatively test AGB nucleosynthesis models for producing barium stars via mass accretion. Methods: High-resolution and high S/N infrared spectra were obtained using the Phoenix spectrograph mounted at the Gemini South telescope. The abundances were obtained through spectrum synthesis of individual atomic and molecular lines, using the MOOG stellar line analysis program, together with Kurucz's stellar atmosphere models. The analysis was classical, using 1D stellar models and spectral synthesis under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We confirm that HD 123396 is a metal-deficient barium star ([Fe/H] = -1.05), with A(C) = 7.88, A(N) = 6.65, A(O) = 7.93, and A(Na) = 5.28 on a logarithmic scale where A(H) = 12, leading to [(C+N)/Fe] ≈ 0.5. The A(CNO) group, as well as the A(Na) abundances, is in excellent agreement with those previously derived for this star using high-resolution optical data. We also found A(F) = 4.16, which implies [F/O] = 0.39, a value that is substantially higher than the F abundances measured in globular clusters of a similar metallicity, noting that there are no F measurements in field stars of comparable metallicity. Conclusions: The observed abundance pattern of the light elements (CNO, F, and Na) recovered here as well as the heavy elements (s-process) studied elsewhere suggest that the surface composition of HD 123396 is well fitted by the predicted abundance pattern of a 1.5 M⊙ AGB model star with Z = 0.001. Thus, the AGB mass transfer hypothesis offers a quantitatively viable framework.

  17. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 C to 1400 C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  18. Evidence against Barium in the Mushroom Trogia venenata as a Cause of Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths. PMID:23042168

  19. Barium impaction therapy with balloon occlusion for deep colonic diverticular bleeding: a three-case series

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Mikinori; Kusano, Chika; Gotoda, Takuji; Suzuki, Sho; Sato, Takemasa; Fukuzawa, Masakatsu; Itoi, Takao; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: In hemostasis for colonic diverticular bleeding, the incidence of recurrent bleeding is higher in deep colonic diverticulum than in shallow. We aimed to improve and evaluate barium impaction therapy using an enteroscopic overtube with balloon. Patients and method: We performed barium impaction therapy in three patients with a diagnosis of deep colonic diverticular bleeding. The tip of the overtube was inserted to reach the cecum using the conventional method. After deflating the colon, the enteroscope was removed. The balloon in the tube was inflated, followed by barium filling via the tube. Sufficient pressure was applied by ensuring no regurgitation into the small intestine side. The entire colon was continuously filled with barium in stages. Results: Post-treatment bleeding was controllable without adverse events in all three patients. Conclusion: This novel barium impaction therapy using an enteroscopic overtube with balloon was effectively performed without adverse events. PMID:27227115

  20. Removal of carbon dioxide by reactive crystallization in a scrubber—kinetics of barium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pao-Chi; Kou, K. L.; Tai, H. K.; Jin, S. L.; Lye, C. L.; Lin, C. Y.

    2002-04-01

    A bubble column scrubber was utilized to remove simulated CO 2 waste gas under a constant pH value. Using barium chloride solution as an absorbent reacting with CO 2-gas in the scrubber under an alkaline solution condition, precipitates of barium carbonate were formed during the operation. Measured crystal size distributions at a given time were used to calculate the growth rate of barium carbonate crystals, which is proportional to a 1.49 order of relative supersaturation. This demonstrates that both mass transfer and surface integration are important to the crystal growth of barium carbonate. The classical nucleation theory can be used to describe the nucleation rate of barium carbonate. In addition, the agglomeration kernel is proportional to a 2.86 order of relative supersaturation.

  1. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute. PMID:24563566

  2. Multi-colony calibrations of coral Ba/Ca with a contemporaneous in situ seawater barium record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, Michèle; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Palardy, James E.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    The coral skeleton barium to calcium ratio (Ba/Cacoral), a proxy for seawater barium concentrations (BaSW), has been interpreted as a tracer of upwelling based on the characteristic "nutrient like" depth profile of BaSW. However, in some tropical regions, such as the Gulf of Panamá, substantial influence of terrestrial runoff inputs and differences between the vertical distribution of BaSW and that of the major nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) in the upper water column can complicate the interpretation of Ba/Cacoral as an upwelled nutrient proxy. In the Gulf of Panamá, contemporaneous Ba/Cacoral records from multiple colonies of Porites lobata, Pavona gigantea, and Pavona clavus corals record a nearly twofold change in surface water BaSW as a 20-70% increase in skeletal Ba/Ca with excellent correlation among Ba/Ca records from co-located colonies (r = 0.86-0.99). These results provide, for the first time, an absolute calibration of the coral Ba proxy with a contemporaneous BaSW record. Compiling the Ba/Cacoral records from three co-located colonies of each species into taxon-specific composite regressions reveals strong statistically significant correlations with the BaSW time-series record (p < 0.001). Differences among taxa in regression slope, y-intercept, and average distribution coefficient, as well as a demonstration of the application of the P. clavus calibration to a previously published Ba/Cacoral record, emphasize the necessity of using taxon-specific calibrations to reconstruct changes in BaSW with accuracy. These results support the application of Ba/Cacoral to reconstruct past changes in absolute BaSW concentrations, adding an important tool to the collection of geochemical proxies for reconstructing surface ocean biogeochemical processes in the past.

  3. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population. PMID:25862324

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium...

  6. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  7. Dissolution of Barium from Barite in Sewage Sludges and Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F.; Pepi, M.; Burrini, D.; Kniewald, G.; Scali, D.; Lanciotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of total barium, ranging from 0.42 to 1.58 mg(middot)g(sup-1) (dry weight) were found in sludges of two sewage treatment plants near Florence, Italy. Barium concentrations in the suspended matter decreased as redox potential values changed from negative to positive. An anoxic sewage sludge sample was aerated, and 30% of the total barium was removed in 24 h. To demonstrate that barium was solubilized from barite by sulfate-reducing bacteria, a strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to study the solubilization of barium from barite under laboratory conditions. During cell growth with different concentrations of barite from 0.01 to 0.3 g(middot)liter(sup-1) (the latter is the MIC) as the only source of sulfates in the cultures, the D. desulfuricans strain accumulated barium up to 0.58 (mu)g(middot)mg(sup-1) (dry weight). Three times the quantity of barium was dissolved by bacteria than in the uninoculated medium (control). The unexpectedly low concentration of soluble barium (1.2 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)) with respect to the quantity expected (109 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)), calculated on the basis of the free H(inf2)S evolved from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate from barite, was probably due to the formation of other barium compounds, such as witherite (BaCO(inf3)) and the transient species barium sulfide (BaS). The D. desulfuricans strain, growing on barite, formed visible aggregates. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that aggregates consisted of bacteria and barite. After 3 days of incubation, several autofluorescent crystals surrounded by a dissolution halo were observed. The crystals were identified as BaS by comparison with the commercial compound. PMID:16535353

  8. [Study on the Influence of Mineralizer on the Preparation of Calcium Aluminates Based on Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wang, Liang; Zheng, Huai-li; Chen, Wei; Tang, Xiao-min; Shang, Juan-fang; Qian, Li

    2015-05-01

    In this study, effect of mineralizer on the structure and spectraproperties of calcium aluminates formation was extensively studied. Medium or low-grade bauxite and calcium carbonate were used as raw material and mineralizer CaF2 as additive. Calcium aluminates can be obtained after mixing fully, calcination and grinding. The prepared calcium aluminates can be directly used for the production of polyaluminiumchloride (PAC), polymeric aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminate and some other water treatment agents. The calcium aluminates preparation technology was optimized by investigating the mass ratio of raw materials (bauxiteand calcium carbonate) and mineralizer CaF2 dosage. The structure and spectra properties of bauxite and calcium aluminates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis and the mineralization mechanism of the mineralizer was studied. FTIR spectra indicated that the addition of mineralizer promoted the decomposition and transformation of the diaspore, gibbsite and kaolinite, the decomposition of calcium carbonate, and more adequately reaction between bauxite and calcium carbonate. In addition, not only Ca in calcium carbonate and Si in bauxite were more readily reacted, but also Si-O, Si-O-Al and Al-Si bonds in the bauxite were more fractured which contributed to the release of Al in bauxite, and therefore, the dissolution rate of Al2O3 could be improved. The dissolution rate of Al2O3 can be promoted effectively when the mineralizer CaF2 was added in a mass ratio amount of 3%. And the mineralizer CaF2 cannot be fully functioned, when its dosage was in a mass percent of 1. 5%. Low-grade bauxite was easier to sinter for the preparation of calcium aluminates comparing with the highgrade one. The optimum material ratio for the preparation of calcium aluminates calcium at 1 250 °C was the mass ratio between bauxite and calcium carbonate of 1 : 0. 6 and mineralizer CaF2 mass ratio percent of 3%. PMID:26415430

  9. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  10. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  11. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  12. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  13. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  14. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  15. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frdric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C.; Grey, Clare P.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29?kJ?mol-1, as well as the general activation energy, 16?kJ?mol-1, to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities.

  16. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frdric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C; Grey, Clare P; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol(-1), as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol(-1), to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities. PMID:23666383

  17. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanjian; Yu, Zhong; Yang, Yan; Sun, Ke; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen

    2015-09-01

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba1-xLaxFe12-xCoxO19 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2, ωkf1, ωaf1, ωkf2, and ωbk of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f1, 4f2, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2 and ωaf1 decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ωkf1, ωkf2, and ωbk show a slight change.

  18. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  19. Results of magnetospheric barium ion cloud experiment of 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The barium ion cloud experiment involved the release of about 2 kg of barium at an altitude of 31 482 km, a latitude of 6.926 N., and a longitude of 74.395 W. Significant erosion of plasma from the main ion core occurred during the initial phase of the ion cloud expansion. From the motion of the outermost striational filaments, the electric field components were determined to be 0.19 mV/m in the westerly direction and 0.68 mV/m in the inward direction. The differences between these components and those measured from balloons flown in the proximity of the extremity of the field line through the release point implied the existence of potential gradients along the magnetic field lines. The deceleration of the main core was greater than theoretically predicted. This was attributed to the formation of a polarization wake, resulting in an increase of the area of interaction and resistive dissipation at ionospheric levels. The actual orientation of the magnetic field line through the release point differed by about 10.5 deg from that predicted by magnetic field models that did not include the effect of ring current.

  20. The crystal structure of barium lead hexaaluminate phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Inoue, Z.; Takekawa, S.; Kimura, S.

    1985-11-01

    A refinement was performed on the average crystal structure of barium lead hexaaluminate phase II ((Ba 0.8Pb 0.2) 2.34Al 21.0O 33.84) using single crystal X-ray diffraction data, giving a final R value of 0.030 with space group symmetry P overline6m2 . The structure is essentially of a β-alumina type, but contains a lot of defects and interstitials. Inside the spinel block were found Ba(Pb) ions at 12-coordinated polyhedral sites, formed by complex defects, including triple Reidinger defects, in the same unit cell. Barium lead hexaaluminate phase II was found to consist of two kinds of unit cells with formulae "(BaPb) 3.0Al 20.0O 35.0" and "Ba 2.0Al 22.0O 34.0" in a 1 : 2 ratio; these three cells combine to form an a√3 × a√3 superstructure.

  1. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  2. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  3. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements . Our system exhibits flux-film-substrate interactions that can lead to dramatic changes to the microstructure. This effect is especially pronounced onc -sapphire, with Al diffusion from the substrate leading to formation of an epitaxial BaAl2O4 second phase at the substrate-film interface. The formation of this second phase in the presence of a liquid phase seeds {111} twins that drive abnormal grain growth. The orientation of the sapphire substrate determines the BaAl2O 4 morphology, enabling control the abnormal grain growth behavior. CuO additions leads to significant grain growth at 900 °C, with average grain size approaching 500 nm. The orthorhombic-tetragonal phase transition is clearly observable in temperature dependent measurements and both linear and nonlinear dielectric properties are improved. All films containing CuO are susceptible to aging. A number of other systems were investigated for efficacy at temperatures below 900 °C. Pulsed laser deposition was used to study flux + BaTiO 3 targets, layered flux films, and in situ liquids. RF-magnetron sputtering using a dual-gun approach was used to explore integration on flexible foils with Ba1-xSrxTiO3. Many of these systems were based on the BaO-B2O3 system, which has proven effective in thin films, multilayer ceramic capacitors, and bulk ceramics. Modifiers allow tailoring of the microstructure at 900 °C, however no compositions were found, and no reports exist in the open literature, that provide significant grain growth or densification below 900 °C. Liquid phase fluxes offer a promising path forward for low temperature processing of barium titanate, with the ultimate goal of integration with metalized silicon substrates. This work demonstrates significant improvements to dielectric properties and the necessity of understanding interactions in the film-flux-substrate system.

  4. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  5. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney failure Other infrequent causes of high blood calcium include • Some medicines, such as lithium (to treat psychiatric illness) or, ...

  6. Calcium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood is attached to proteins, mainly albumin. A separate test that measures calcium that is ... their hormone) Kidney failure Low blood level of albumin Liver disease Magnesium deficiency Pancreatitis Vitamin D deficiency

  7. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  8. Calcium and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... to milk and milk products include calcium-enriched rice or soy milk (if soy is tolerated), vegan ... soy-based (again, if soy is tolerated) or rice-based frozen desserts, sorbets, puddings, and ice pops. ...

  9. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity, which gradually decreased the internal precipitation zones with increasing aluminum content. In samples containing 8 wt.% aluminum, a thick continuous oxide scale formed and prevented nitrogen and oxygen penetration into the bulk of the sample, thus preventing the formation of any internal precipitates. The effect of modifying the heating rate in pure N2 atmospheres was examined. Samples were heated over the course of 1, 10, or 100 minutes. Faster heating rates increased the aluminum content in the oxide scale on all samples. Additionally, these rapid heating rate samples had either had lower internal precipitation depths or no internal precipitates. Experiments were conducted in N2--2.5% H2/H 2O mixtures with varying dew points to lower the oxygen potential of the reaction gas and prevent the formation of external iron oxide scales. In the 3 and 5 wt.% Al alloys, this produced an internal aluminum-rich oxide band which inhibited further internal precipitation. Samples treated in atmospheres to simulate the reheat furnace combustion atmosphere experienced dramatically increased external oxidation in addition to inward growth of the oxide scale and internal precipitation of oxides and nitrides within the metal. The most important scientific findings of this dissertation are the dramatic effect of heating rate on modifying the external scale of the alloys presented and the presence of continuous internal oxide bands in several samples throughout the study. Oxidation studies typically occur for longer times and in higher oxygen contents than the present results, so the influence of heating rate is either largely unnoticed or is overcome by oxide growth at long times. Oxide bands have been observed in literature, but few aluminum oxide bands have been seen before this study. vi.

  10. Aluminum hydroxide issue closure package

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, T.B.

    1998-08-26

    Aluminum hydroxide coatings on fuel elements stored in aluminum canisters in K West Basin were measured in July and August 1998. Good quality data was produced that enabled statistical analysis to determine a bounding value for aluminum hydroxide at a 99% confidence level. The updated bounding value is 10.6 kg per Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), compared to the previously estimated bounding value of 8 kg/MCO. Thermal analysis using the updated bounding value, shows that the MCO generates oxygen concentrate that are below the lower flammability limits during the 40-year interim storage period and are, therefore, acceptable.

  11. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not significantly affected. This work demonstrated significant modification of the tribological and electrochemical properties of the aluminum surface can be accomplished using nitrogen plasma source ion implantation.

  12. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  13. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  14. High barium levels in public drinking water and its association with elevated blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Brenniman, G R; Kojola, W H; Levy, P S; Carnow, B W; Namekata, T

    1981-01-01

    A maximum contaminant level for barium in drinking water has been set at 1. mg/L. This study examines for the first time, whether there are significant differences in mean blood pressure levels between a high and a low barium community. A total of approximately 2,400 Illinois residents in West Dundee, with a mean barium drinking water level of 7.3 mmg/L, and in McHenry, with a mean barium level of 0.1 mg/L, were studied. All other drinking water constituents were nearly identical between the two communities, with the major difference being the level of barium ingested. No significant differences (P greater than .05) were found in blood pressures between the high and low barium communities. Adjustment for duration of exposure, home water softeners, and high blood pressure medication did not alter the findings. The data from this study suggest that elevated levels of barium in drinking water do not significantly elevate blood pressure levels in adult males or females. It is recommended that the drinking water standard of 1. mg/L be re-examined for other possible health effects. PMID:7469488

  15. The Evolving Mixture of Barium Isotopes in Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals in stars form through one of two types of neutron capture processes: the rapid r-process or slower s-process. The fraction of odd and even barium isotopes in stars can indicate which process predominantly contributed to a star’s heavy metals, since odd barium isotopes predominantly form through the r-process and even barium isotopes through the s-process. The “stellar model” predicts that older stars contain comparable amounts of odd and even barium isotopes, while the “classical model” states that they almost exclusively contain odd isotopes. This study investigated these competing models by analyzing high-resolution spectra of twelve Milky Way stars. These spectra were analyzed for the first time in this study. To quantify r- and s-process enrichment, we measured the odd barium isotope fraction in the stars by fitting models to the stars’ spectra. Generating models involved measuring the stars’ Doppler shift, resolution, and barium abundance. To reduce error margins we optimized resolution and barium abundance measurements by enhancing existing techniques through several rounds of revisions. Our results support the stellar model of heavy metal enrichment, and our proposed optimizations will enable future researchers to obtain a deeper understanding of chemical enrichment in the Universe. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program at the University of California Santa Cruz, Lick Observatory, and the National Science Foundation.

  16. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed. PMID:26794953

  17. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  18. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  19. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-01

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba2Co2-xNixFe12O22 (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (Ms) decreases with Ni contents. Ni2+, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co2+ having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba2Co1.5Ni0.5Fe12O22 shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature TC is increased with Ni contents, while TS is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3bVI, 6cIV*, 6cVI, 18hVI, 6cIV, and 3aIV sites at below TC. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe3+ and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (Hhf), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna applications in UHF band.

  20. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-07

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases with Ni contents. Ni{sup 2+}, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co{sup 2+} having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature T{sub C} is increased with Ni contents, while T{sub S} is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3b{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}*, 6c{sub VI}, 18h{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}, and 3a{sub IV} sites at below T{sub C}. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe{sup 3+} and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna applications in UHF band.

  1. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  2. Short-range order in barium hexaaluminate (phase I) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, A´e.; Gbehi, T´; Thery, Jeanine; Legendre, Jean-Jacques

    1988-06-01

    Single crystals of barium hexaaluminate (phase I, barium β-alumina) with the composition Ba 0.68Al 11O 17.18 have been obtained by zone melting. X-ray and electron diffuse scattering give evidence of local ordering between Ba and vacancies. This short-range order is simulated by a Monte Carlo-type routine and can be described as a two-dimensional superstructure a √3 × a√3, covering about 60A˚and limited by zones which contain vacancies or barium clusters.

  3. Using Barium Ions for Heavy-Atom Derivatization and Phasing of Xylanse ll from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseeva,N.; Allaire, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of barium chloride to produce a heavy-atom derivative of xylanase II crystals from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, which was obtained either by cocrystallization or soaking. SAD phasing led to interpretable electron-density maps that allowed unambiguous chain tracing. In the best case, with a data set collected at 9.5 keV, 88% of the residues were built, with 83% of the side chains assigned. The barium ions are found to mainly interact with main-chain carbonyl groups and water molecules. It is suggested that barium ions could also be used as a potential anomalous scatterer in the quick cryosoaking procedure for phasing.

  4. Activity and diffusion of metals in binary aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jao, C. S.

    1980-12-01

    To determine the activity of zinc in Zn-Al alloys, the electromotive force (emf) of the cell: Zn/ZnCl/sub 2/-KC1 (eut)/Zn,Al was measured at temperatures between 569.5 K (296.5C) and 649.5 K (376.5C). The applicability of a two-suffix Margules equation was demonstrated, in good agreement with theoretical expectations. The diffusion coefficient of Zn in Al determined from a planar diffusion model for the experimental data was about 3 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//sec to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//sec in the range of temperature studied. This is higher than that found in the literature. The most plausible reason appears to be the high alumina concentration in the working electrode because of partial oxidation. Oxidation of the alloying metals was the primary cause of poor alloying between calcium/or zinc and aluminum, thereby frustrating similar measurements at a Ca-Al/or Zn-Al alloy. The literature on the activity of calcium and zinc is aluminum is reviewed.

  5. CALCIUM ISOTOPE COMPOSITION OF METEORITES, EARTH, AND MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Justin I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Moynier, Frederic

    2009-09-01

    The relative abundances of calcium isotopes in the mass range 40-44 were measured in primitive and differentiated meteorites and igneous rocks from Earth and Mars in search of non-mass-dependent variations that could provide clues about early solar system processes. Most bulk samples of planetary materials have calcium isotopic compositions identical with Earth's within the current resolution of about 0.01% in {sup 40}Ca/{sup 44}Ca. Possible exceptions include carbonaceous chondrites, some ordinary chondrites, and two samples of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, which have small excesses of {sup 40}Ca. The samples with {sup 40}Ca excesses are also known to have {sup 50}Ti and {sup 135}Ba excesses and {sup 142}Nd and {sup 144}Sm deficits. Collectively these data from refractory elements suggest that the planetary embryos represented by chondrites preserve isotopic heterogeneity that reflects different nucleosynthetic sources. No late admixture from a single nucleosynthetic source can explain all observations. The results are most compatible with variable proportions of material derived from Type II supernovae. The initial calcium isotope compositions of Earth and Mars are indistinguishable and similar to the {sup 40}Ca abundance found in some chondrites and all differentiated meteorites studied. It appears that isotopic heterogeneity in calcium was still present at the completion of disk formation but was homogenized during planetary accretion.

  6. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO4, coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  7. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO(4), coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  8. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  9. Immunotoxicity of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanzhu; Li, Yanfei; Miao, Liguang; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Yanhuan; Yan, Xijun; Cui, Xuezhe; Li, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is present in the daily life of all humans. With the incidence of Al contamination increased in recent years, the toxicity of Al on the immune function has attracted more attention. Even with this increased attention, the mechanism of Al immunotoxicity still remains unclear. The mechanism of Al immunotoxicity reviewed herein focused on the effects of Al on the splenic trace elements, the status of α-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) cells, cytokines, complement and immunoglobulins, as well as macrophages. The studies in the literature showed that Al decreased splenic iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) levels, but the effects of Al on splenic copper (Cu) level was ambiguous and controversial. Al exposure inhibited levels of ANAE(+) cells, the production of interleukin (IL)-2 and the functions of macrophages. With respect to other key cytokines, studies showed that Al suppressed the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in vitro; effects of Al on TNF-α formation in vivo were less overt. Al exposure reduced complement 3 (C3) level, but effects of Al exposure on complement 4 (C4) level were not as clear-cut. Lastly, the effects of Al exposure on the IgG, IgM and IgA levels were conflicting. Taken in totality, the results of several studies in the literature demonstrated that Al could impart adverse effects on immune function. PMID:24287266

  10. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-24

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1−xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba{sup 2+} ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba{sup 2+} ion in SBT lattice.

  11. Barium titanate nanocomposite capacitor FY09 year end report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Tyler E.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William; Fellows, Benjamin D.

    2009-11-01

    This late start RTBF project started the development of barium titanate (BTO)/glass nanocomposite capacitors for future and emerging energy storage applications. The long term goal of this work is to decrease the size, weight, and cost of ceramic capacitors while increasing their reliability. Ceramic-based nanocomposites have the potential to yield materials with enhanced permittivity, breakdown strength (BDS), and reduced strain, which can increase the energy density of capacitors and increase their shot life. Composites of BTO in glass will limit grain growth during device fabrication (preserving nanoparticle grain size and enhanced properties), resulting in devices with improved density, permittivity, BDS, and shot life. BTO will eliminate the issues associated with Pb toxicity and volatility as well as the variation in energy storage vs. temperature of PZT based devices. During the last six months of FY09 this work focused on developing syntheses for BTO nanoparticles and firing profiles for sintering BTO/glass composite capacitors.

  12. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. R.; Huang, W. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Jiang, X. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications.

  13. Impact of vanadium ions in barium borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Hammad, Ahmed H.

    2015-02-01

    Combined optical and infrared spectral measurements of prepared barium borate glasses containing different concentrations of V2O5 were carried out. Vanadium containing glasses exhibit extended UV-visible (UV/Vis.) bands when compared with base binary borate glass. UV/Vis. spectrum shows the presence of an unsymmetrical strong UV broad band centered at 214 nm attributed to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glass. The calculated direct and indirect optical band gaps are found to decrease with increasing the vanadium content (2.9:137 for indirect and 3.99:2.01 for direct transition). This change was discussed in terms of structural changes in the glass network. Infrared absorption spectra of the glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular and tetrahedral borate units. Electron spin resonance analyses indicate the presence of unpaired species in sufficient quantity to be identified and to confirm the spectral data.

  14. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquais, J. M.; Poret, F.; le Doze, R.; Ricaud, J. L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-06-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK).

  15. Coralline barium records temporal variability in equatorial Pacific upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, David W.; Shen, Glen T.; Boyle, Edward A.

    1989-08-01

    LATTICE-BOUND cadmium in scleractinian corals has been shown to be a sensitive tracer of historical changes in the nutrient content of surface waters1,2. Barium also substitutes into the lattice of aragonite reef-building corals because there is solid solution between orthorhombic BaCO3 (witherite) and CaCO3(aragonite)3. It is expected that the substitution should be proportional to the Ba content of sea water, which increases from low values in warm surface waters to higher values in cold deep waters. Here we present a high-resolution coralline Ba record from the Galapagos Islands spanning the period 1965-1978. Coralline Ba/Ca tracks historical sea surface temperatures, reflecting the vertical displacement of warm nutrient-poor surface waters by cold, nutrient-rich source waters. Differences between coralline Ba and Cd records may be due to preferential uptake of Cd by phytoplankton during times of lower surface nutrients.

  16. Dynamics of the CRRES barium releases in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Mende, S. B.; Geller, S. P.; Miller, M.; Hoffman, R. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Pongratz, M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) G-2, G-3, and G-4 ionized and neutral barium cloud positions are triangulated from ground-based optical data. From the time history of the ionized cloud motion perpendicular to the magnetic field, the late time coupling of the ionized cloud with the collisionless ambient plasma in the magnetosphere is investigated for each of the releases. The coupling of the ionized clouds with the ambient medium is quantitatively consistent with predictions from theory in that the coupling time increases with increasing distance from the Earth. Quantitative comparison with simple theory for the couping time also yields reasonable agreement. Other effects not predicted by the theory are discussed in the context of the observations.

  17. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  18. Gamma radiation induced darkening in barium gallo-germanate glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Heng, Xiaobo; Tang, Guowu; Zhu, Tingting; Sun, Min; Shan, Xiujie; Wen, Xin; Guo, Jingyuan; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    Barium gallo-germanate (BGG) glass is an important glass matrix material used for mid-infrared transmission and mid-infrared fiber laser. In this study, we investigated the γ-ray irradiation induced darkening effect of BGG glass. Optical transmittance spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra were employed to investigate the γ-ray irradiation induced defects. Two kinds of Ge-related defects in the irradiated BGG glass, named Ge-related non-bridging oxygen hole center (Ge-NBOHC) and Ge-related electron centers (GEC), were verified. In addition, the absorption bands of the two defects have been separated and the peak absorptivity of Ge-NBOHC and GEC defects is at 375 nm and 315 nm, respectively. PMID:27137531

  19. Microwave absorption properties of barium titanate/epoxide resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Guiqin; Duan, Yuping; Liu, Shunhua

    2007-03-01

    Nano-barium titanate (BT) was prepared by a sol-gel method. The prepared powders were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The complex relative dielectric permittivity (? = ?' - j?'') and magnetic permeability (? = ?' - j?'') of the BT powders were measured in the frequency range 8 ~ 18 GHz. The BT/epoxide resin (EP) composite with different volume contents was investigated. The effects of thickness on the BT/EP composite were studied. It was found that an optimum thickness and contents of the absorber can yield the maximum reflection loss which could be obtained over a broad frequency region in the X and Ku bands. Our results indicate that BT could be a promising microwave absorption material.

  20. Laser irradiation in Nd3+ doped strontium barium niobate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro-González, P.; Martín, I. R.; Arbelo-Jorge, E.; González-Pérez, S.; Cáceres, J. M.; Núñez, P.

    2008-07-01

    A local nanocrystalline formation in a neodymium doped strontium barium niobate (SBN) glass has been obtained under argon laser irradiation. The intense emission around 880 nm, originated from the F43/2 (F45/2) thermalized level when the glass structure changes to a glass ceramic structure due to the irradiation of the laser beam, has been studied. The intensities and lifetimes change from this level inside and outside the irradiated area made by the laser excitation. They have been analyzed and demonstrated that the desvitrification process has been successfully achieved. These results confirm that nanocrystals of SBN have been created by the laser action confirming that the transition from glass to glass ceramic has been completed. These results are in agreement with the emission properties of nanocrystals of the bulk glass ceramic sample. The present study also suggests that the SBN nanocrystal has a potential application as temperature detector.

  1. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  2. A new type of microphone using flexoelectric barium strontium titnate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seol ryung; Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Shujun; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-03-01

    A flexoelectric bridge-structured microphone using bulk barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 or BST) ceramic was investigated in this study. The flexoelectric microphone was installed in an anechoic box and exposed to the sound pressure emitted from a loud speaker. Charge sensitivity of the flexoelectric microphone was measured and calibrated using a reference microphone. The 1.5 mm×768 μm×50 μm micro-machined bridge-structured flexoelectric microphone has a sensitivity of 0.92 pC/Pa, while its resonance frequency was calculated to be 98.67 kHz. The analytical and experimental results show that the flexoelectric microphone has both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, indicating that flexoelectric microphones are potential candidates for many applications.

  3. Parenteral drug products containing aluminum as an ingredient or a contaminant: Response to Food and Drug Administration notice of intent and request for information. ASCN/A. S. P. E. N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Aluminum remains a significant contaminant of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions and may be elevated in bone, urine, and plasma of infants receiving TPN. Aluminum accumulation in tissues of uremic patients and adult TPN patients has been associated with low-turnover bone disease. Furthermore, aluminum has also been linked with encephalopathy and anemia in uremic patients and with hepatic cholestasis in experimental animals. Because of the toxic effects of aluminum, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a notice of intent to set an upper limit of 25 micrograms/L for aluminum in large-volume parenterals and to require manufacturers of small-volume parenterals, such as calcium and phosphate salts, to measure aluminum content and note this content on the package label. The ASCN/A.S.P.E.N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions supports these intentions and further urges the FDA to require that cumulative aluminum intake in terms of safe, unsafe, and toxic quantities of aluminum per kilogram be made known to physicians and pharmacists preparing the TPN solutions, to ensure that manufacturers use appropriate control procedures in aluminum measurements, and to employ a standard unit of aluminum measurement.

  4. Detection of the White Dwarf Companions of Barium Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, C. J.; Griffin, E.; McGahee, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Barium dwarfs are chemically peculiar F- and G-type stars that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements such as strontium and barium. They are believed to have derived their chemical peculiarities via mass transfer from a former AGB companion, now a white dwarf. These WD companions should be detectable in the far-ultraviolet if their effective temperatures exceed 10,000K. However, despite dedicated IUE searches, no WD companion has been directly detected. We have observed 4 Ba dwarfs with the GALEX ultraviolet space telescope (2 newly discovered Ba dwarfs have archival observations), and report here on the first unequivocal direct detection of a WD companion of a Ba dwarf, HD 15306, the hottest Ba dwarf known (F4 V). This WD companion is detected through a clear far-ultraviolet excess. Detection of the putative WD companions of the other observed Ba dwarfs is somewhat more problematical, as those stars have cooler effective temperatures and chromospheric activity can significantly affect their FUV fluxes. The disentanglement of WD FUV fluxes from FUV emission due to chromospheric activity requires comparison of the observed Ba dwarfs with F- and G-type dwarfs with archival GALEX photometry. We have selected a set of 68 F- and G-type dwarfs from the NStars program (Gray et al. 2003, 2006) that have good quality archival GALEX photometry and show a wide range of chromospheric activity. A comparison of these stars with the 5 remaining GALEX-observed Ba dwarfs suggests that one and perhaps two of these Ba dwarfs have detectable WD companions.

  5. [Aortic calcification and calcium].

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Motoo

    2010-11-01

    Vascular calcification occurred as the last step of arteriosclerosis makes a lot of disturbances on vascular function and should influence on the worsening of the vascular diseases. Calcium is the main component of the vascular calcification like bone, and one of causes of vascular calcification should be the hypoparathyroidism due to the lowering of serum calcium and the following calcium paradox seen in osteoporosis. Bone calcium must shift to the arterial wall from the bone. Medial calcification could be formed under the molecular regulatory control like in bone by differentiated osteoblast or chondroblast from pericyte like cell origin smooth muscle cell. Many substances such as osteopontine, osteocalcine, bone morphogenetic protein 2, matrix Gla protein and alkaliphosphatase were found in calcified area. In intimal calcification, degenerated elastin and macrophage originated calcification were found. In the process of degeneration of elastin polypentapeptide structure in elastin can be easily conbined to Ca(2+), elastin-Ca(2+) complex is neutralized by PO4(2-) and calcium phosphate is accumulated in degenerated elastin. PMID:21037382

  6. Calcium orthophosphates in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, remains a major public health problem in the most communities even though the prevalence of disease has decreased since the introduction of fluorides for dental care. Therefore, biomaterials to fill dental defects appear to be necessary to fulfill customers' needs regarding the properties and the processing of the products. Bioceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used for these purposes, as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Calcium orthophosphates belong to bioceramics but they have some specific advantages over other types of bioceramics due to a chemical similarity to the inorganic part of both human and mammalian bones and teeth. Therefore, calcium orthophosphates (both alone and as components of various formulations) are used in dentistry as both dental fillers and implantable scaffolds. This review provides brief information on calcium orthophosphates and describes in details current state-of-the-art on their applications in dentistry and dentistry-related fields. Among the recognized dental specialties, calcium orthophosphates are most frequently used in periodontics; however, the majority of the publications on calcium orthophosphates in dentistry are devoted to unspecified "dental" fields. PMID:23468163

  7. Calcium and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin D

    2007-01-01

    Calcium is required for normal growth and development as well as maintenance of the skeleton. Vitamin D is also essential for intestinal calcium absorption and plays a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and skeletal integrity. In addition, both micronutrients have important roles in non-skeletal-related physiological processes. Of concern, significant proportions of some population groups fail to achieve the recommended calcium intakes in a number of western countries. Furthermore, while cutaneous biosynthesis upon exposure of skin to ultraviolet B light is the major source of vitamin D for most people, this does not occur during winter time. Thus, there is an increased reliance on dietary sources during winter months to help maintain adequate vitamin D status. Since vitamin D is found naturally only in a limited number of foods, the usual dietary vitamin D intake by many European populations is not sufficient to maintain adequate vitamin D status. This paper will briefly review these important issues together with consideration of the potential role for supplementation with calcium and vitamin D in terms of improving their intakes in the population. It will also focus on the issues of efficacy as well as safety considerations of supplements. PMID:17913228

  8. Prospective comparison of double contrast barium enema plus flexible sigmoidoscopy v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding: barium enema v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, E J; O'Connor, J; Frost, R A; Shorvon, P; Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Hunt, R H

    1988-01-01

    Rectal bleeding often heralds serious colonic disease. The literature suggests that colonoscopy is superior to barium enema plus sigmoidoscopy, although no good comparative studies exist. Seventy one patients with overt rectal bleeding had prospectively flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema and colonoscopy completed independently. Against the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy were 0.69 and 0.78 respectively for a spectrum of colonic lesions, while for combined flexible sigmoidoscopy and double contrast barium enema these values were 0.80 and 0.56, respectively. When assessing adenoma or carcinoma, colonoscopy was more sensitive at 0.82 v 0.73, while flexible sigmoidoscopy plus double contrast barium enema was superior for detecting diverticular disease. The positive predictive value for colonoscopy was 0.87 against 0.81 for flexible sigmoidoscopy and double contrast barium enema. This study confirms that colonoscopy should be a first line investigation in subjects likely to require biopsy or therapeutic intervention. PMID:3273756

  9. F + center as a paramagnetic probe in the EPR investigation of barium hexaaluminate phases I and II and barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbehi, T.; Gourier, D.; Thery, J.; Vivien, D.

    1989-12-01

    An X-ray-induced F + center is used as a paramagnetic probe to study sintered powders of barium hexaaluminates phases I and II (referred to as Ba( ΦI) and Ba( ΦII)) and mixed barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate (referred to as BLA). This F + center was previously shown to exist only in β-alumina-type mirror planes containing interstitial oxygen ions as charge-compensating defects, so that its study yields information about the local structure of this type of mirror plane. By comparison of the EPR spectra of Ba( ΦI) and Ba( ΦII) it is shown that the latter contains only one type of F + center with a reduced hf interaction. This indicates that there is only one type of mirror plane containing interstitial oxygen in Ba( ΦII) and that the separation between spinel blocks is larger in Ba( ΦII) than in Ba( ΦI). This result agrees with models proposed by other authors for barium-lead hexaaluminate and barium hexagallate. Investigation of the F + center in mixed barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate ceramics clearly supports the hypothesis of segregation of Ba 2+ ions in β-alumina-type mirror planes. It is also shown that the structure of these planes is very similar to that of Ba( ΦII) defect planes.

  10. F sup + center as a paramagnetic probe in the EPR investigation of barium hexaaluminate phases I and II and barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gbehi, T.; Gourier, D.; Thery, J.; Vivien, D. )

    1989-12-01

    An X-ray-induced F{sup +} center is used as a paramagnetic probe to study sintered powders of barium hexaaluminates phases I and II (referred to as Ba({Phi}{sub I}) and Ba({Phi}{sub II})) and mixed barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate (referred to as BLA). This F{sup +} center was previously shown to exist only in {beta}-alumina-type mirror planes containing interstitial oxygen ions as charge-compensating defects, so that its study yields information about the local structure of this type of mirror plane. By comparison of the EPR spectra of Ba({Phi}{sub I}) and Ba({Phi}{sub II}) it is shown that the latter contains only one type of F{sup +} center with a reduced hf interaction. This indicates that there is only one type of mirror plane containing interstitial oxygen in Ba({Phi}{sub II}) and that the separation between spinel blocks is larger in Ba({Phi}{sub II}) than in Ba({Phi}{sub I}). This result agrees with models proposed by other authors for barium-lead hexaaluminate and barium hexagallate. Investigation of the F{sup +} center in mixed barium-lanthanum hexaaluminate ceramics clearly supports the hypothesis of segregation of Ba{sup 2+} ions in {beta}-alumina-type mirror planes. It is also shown that the structure of these planes is very similar to that of Ba({Phi}{sub II}) defect planes.

  11. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  12. Calcium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Many channels and carriers associate with auxiliary subunits which modify their activities and facilitate biogenesis. Advances in genome sequencing as well as biochemical, molecular genetic, and physiological experimentation have allowed for the discovery of many transport auxiliary subunits. Recent interests in the pharmacology of the calcium auxiliary subunits prompted a large amount of effort in deciphering their specific role in the conductance of calcium ions. In this review, we evaluate the functions of the 'extra' subunits of the voltage-gated calcium channels in animals as an example of auxiliary subunits of transporters in general. We discuss the functional data available for each of these subunits, present phylogenetic analyses, and discuss their potential evolutionary origins. Our analyses also reveal novel homologues of these subunits which might be of interest to the community. PMID:17114897

  13. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  14. Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored for use in metal matrix composites, including Al, Be, Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, and Ag. By far, the largest usage is in aluminum matrix composites. From a reinforcement perspective, the materials used are typically ceramics since they provide a very desirable combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, there has been work on metallic materials as reinforcements, notably W and steel fibers. The morphology of the reinforcement material is another variable of importance in metal matrix composites. The three major classes of reinforcement morphology are continuous fiber, chopped fiber or whisker, and particulate. Typically, the selection of the reinforcement morphology is determined by the desired property/cost combination. Generally, continuous fiber reinforced MMCs provide the highest properties in the direction of the fiber orientation but are the most expensive. Chopped fiber and whisker reinforced materials can produce significant property improvements in the plane or direction of their orientation, at somewhat lower cost. Particulates provide a comparatively more moderate but isotropic increase in properties and are typically available at the lowest cost. By adding to the three variables of metallic matrix, reinforcement material, and reinforcement morphology the further options of reinforcement volume fraction, orientation, and matrix alloy composition and heat treatment, it is apparent that there is a very wide range of available material combinations and resultant properties. This paper will focus on how MMCs have been applied in specific application areas.

  15. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations;

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  16. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  17. Surface studies on the low work function surface complex of barium on an osmium-ruthenium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Ralph

    1987-09-01

    Barium and oxygen on an osmium-ruthenium (Os/Ru) surface is the surface complex responsible for the excellent electron emission properties of commercial M-type thermionic cathodes. A computerized Auger technique was used to study the surface properties of this surface complex and compare it with results obtained earlier for Ba-O-W surfaces, which characterize the properties of commercial barium impregnated tungsten thermionic cathodes. Barium desorption, electron emission and barium, barium oxide evaporation were measured at elevated temperatures for this experimental surface study. Desorption measurements, at 1100°C, on the barium on osmium-ruthenium substrate show that the energy for desorption was higher than that for the lowest work function Ba-O-W surface (5.4 to 4.8 eV). Oxygen was always present on the sputtered Os/Ru substrate and contributed to the strong bonding of barium to the Os/Ru surface. The barium and barium oxide evaporative products from such a surface at 1100°C were found to be mainly barium with the Ba/BaO ratio equal to approximately 100.

  18. Numberical simulation of the effects of radially injected barium plasma in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The morphology of the ion cloud in the radial shaped charge barium injection was studied. The shape of the ion cloud that remains after the explosive products and neutral barium clears away was examined. The ion cloud which has the configuration of a rimless wagon wheel is shown. The major features are the 2.5 km radius black hole in the center of the cloud, the surrounding ring of barium ion and the spokes of barium ionization radiating away from the center. The cloud shows no evolution after it emerges from the neutral debris and it is concluded that it is formed within 5 seconds of the event. A numerical model is used to calculate the motion of ions and electrons subject to the electrostatic and lorenz forces.

  19. Barium hexaaluminate nanowhiskers synthesized by novel sol-gel process in reverse micellar media.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Prashant K; Kulkarni, B D; Khomane, R B; Pardhy, S A; Phalgune, U D; Rajmohanan, P; Pasricha, Renu

    2003-08-01

    Barium hexaaluminate (BHA) synthesized by coupling of sol-gel process in reverse microemulsions shows a unique nanowhisker morphology and high surface area, which are retained after calcination at 1300 degrees C. PMID:12932011

  20. Barium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube yarns as low-work-function thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Liu, Peng; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Kaili; Feng, Xiaofeng; Wei, Yang; Qian, Li; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Taihua

    2008-04-01

    Barium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube yarns were fabricated by drawing and twisting multiwalled carbon nanotube forests through a solution containing barium nitrate. After heat activation under vacuum, the functionalized yarns were enriched in barium oxide due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanotubes. The cathodes exhibited good thermionic properties, with a work function as low as 1.73-2.06eV and thermionic current density that exceeded 185mA/cm2 in a field of 850V/5mm at 1317K. The barium-functionalized yarns had high tensile strength of up to 420MPa and retained strength of ˜250MPa after a 2h activation process.

  1. The value of the preoperative barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gedgaudas, R.K.; Kelvin, F.M.; Thompson, W.M.; Rice, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    The value of the barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses was studied in 44 patients. Findings from those barium-enema examinations and from pathological specimens from 37 patients who had malignant tumors and seven patients who had endometriosis were retrospectively analyzed to determine if the barium-enema examination is useful in differentiating extrinsic lesions with and without invasion of the colon. None of the 12 patients who had extrinsic lesions had any of the criteria that indicated bowel-wall invasion. These criteria included fixation and serrations of the bowel wall in all patients with invasion, and ulceration and fistulizaton in those patients who had complete transmural invasion. In patients with pelvic masses, the preoperative barium-enema examination may be useful to the surgeon in planning surgery and in preparing the patient for the possibility of partial colectomy or colostomy.

  2. Cement-mortar pipes as a source of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Berend, K.; Trouwborst, T.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996 in Curacao, acute aluminum (Al) intoxication sickened patients in a dialysis center that used tap water to prepare dialysate. The mortality rate was 32%. A new factory-lined cement-mortar water distribution pipe had recently been installed. It is known that substantial amounts of barium, cadmium, and chromium can leach from cement-mortar linings. This article shows that high concentrations of Al can leach from cement mortars for at least two years in soft, aggressive water. The newly installed pipe, cement containing four times as much Al as usual, corrosive water, the high pH and temperature of the water, long residence time, and perhaps the corrosion inhibitor polyphosphate may have promoted this leaching. Certification of cements used to line water pipes is warranted. Central water treatment plants must distribute noncorrosive water, especially plants that use membrane desalination or other reverse osmosis or nanofiltration processes. Dialysis units should be promptly informed of any impending change in water treatment that might increase the Al content of tap water and also of any accidental pollution of the water distributed. Dialysis centers should always practice extended purification of tap water used for dialysate. Although Al as a risk factor for Alzheimer`s disease in the general population is still debated, there is no doubt that Al causes dialysis encephalopathy.

  3. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-01

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission where we investigated the effects of high calcium intake (>1000 mg/d) and vitamin D supplementation (650 IU/d) on the calcium and bone metabolism during 21 days in microgravity. In the MIR 97 mission high calcium intake and vitamin D supplementation led to high ionized calcium levels and a marked decrease in calcitriol levels together with decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption markers. Our conclusion from the MIR 97 mission is that an adequate calcium intake and vitamin D supplementation during space missions is mandatory but, in contrast to terrestrial conditions, does not efficiently counteract the development of space osteoporosis. PMID:10477499

  4. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.; Rahman, T.S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms by their group on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  5. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  6. Role of Barium Swallow in Diagnosing Clinically Significant Anastomotic Leak following Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Simon; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Keech, John C.; Bashir, Mohammad; Gruber, Peter J.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Barium swallow is performed following esophagectomy to evaluate the anastomosis for detection of leaks and to assess the emptying of the gastric conduit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the barium swallow study in diagnosing anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy. Methods Patients who underwent esophagectomy from January 2000 to December 2013 at our institution were investigated. Barium swallow was routinely done between days 5–7 to detect a leak. These results were compared to clinically determined leaks (defined by neck wound infection requiring jejunal feeds and or parenteral nutrition) during the postoperative period. The sensitivity and specificity of barium swallow in diagnosing clinically significant anastomotic leaks was determined. Results A total of 395 esophagectomies were performed (mean age, 62.2 years). The indications for the esophagectomy were as follows: malignancy (n=320), high-grade dysplasia (n=14), perforation (n=27), benign stricture (n=7), achalasia (n=16), and other (n=11). A variety of techniques were used including transhiatal (n=351), McKeown (n=35), and Ivor Lewis (n=9) esophagectomies. Operative mortality was 2.8% (n=11). Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (93%) underwent barium swallow study after esophagectomy. Clinically significant anastomotic leak was identified in 36 patients (9.8%). Barium swallow was able to detect only 13/36 clinically significant leaks. The sensitivity of the swallow in diagnosing a leak was 36% and specificity was 97%. The positive and negative predictive values of barium swallow study in detecting leaks were 59% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion Barium swallow is an insensitive but specific test for detecting leaks at the cervical anastomotic site after esophagectomy. PMID:27066433

  7. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite: evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G.W.

    1983-12-02

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10/sup 11/ atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  8. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite - Evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10 to the 11th atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  9. Comparison of the reflectance characteristics of polytetrafluoroethylene and barium sulfate paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, C. L.; Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the directional reflectance measurements taken on two tetrafluorethylene (TFE) paints formulated with silicone binders. Both paints are found to be more Lambertian than barium sulfate paint and pressed powder, although the pigment to binder ratios for barium sulfate and TFE paints are about 133 and 3.3 to 1, respectively. The TFE paints exhibit total visible reflectances above 90 percent and offer surfaces that are not significantly affected by water.

  10. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  11. Photoemission studies with barium and LaB6 photocathodes and polarized laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M. E.; Kwon, S. I.; Young, A. T.; Leung, K. N.; Kim, K.-J.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, presented is a work on the optimization of the performance of barium photocathodes. Studies on the dependence of the quantum yield on the polarization and angle of incidence of the laser beam are conducted. Moreover, studies on single crystal LaB6 photocathodes are reported. This material possesses a lower quantum yield than barium, but chemically it is much less reactive and have a very good thermionic emission characteristics.

  12. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  13. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  14. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  15. Technical development: CT colonography without cathartic cleansing and with barium as the sole tagging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan; Baekelandt, Marc; Van Holsbeeck, Bartel

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform CT colonography (CTC) without cathartic colon cleansing. Four groups of 3 patients were prepared the day before CTC with a dedicated low residue diet, a hydration control allowing 2 liters of fluid intake and barium as tagging agent. Four different barium regimens were investigated. Groups 1 and 3 ingested barium over 1 day at different concentrations and groups 2 and 4 over 2 days. The barium volume to drink the day before CTC was 750 ml in groups 1 and 2 and 50 ml in groups 3 and 4. The fluid, density measurements of the fecal residue and tagging efficacy were evaluated. All fecal residue with densities >= 150 H.U. was electronically labeled. Per segment a visual labeling score (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%) was performed. The fluid was evaluated according to its proportion to the maximum anteroposterior diameter of the colonic segment where it was detected. No significant differences in densities of tagged residue were detected. The visual labeling scores varied between 90 and 100% in all segments. There were 6 fluid levels: 5 covering < 10% and one covering 50% of the colonic lumen. The lowest density of the fluid was 360 H.U. In this preliminary study we could conclude that CTC without cathartic cleansing and with barium produced efficient labeling of fecal residue. The barium intake could be reduced to one day and to 50 ml.

  16. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  17. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  18. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate intakes of vitamin D and calcium are essential preventative measures and essential components of any therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis. Vitamin D is also important for the prevention of falls. Current evidence suggests that a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) or higher ...

  19. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  20. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.