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Sample records for aluminum honeycomb core

  1. An examination of impact damage in glass-phenolic and aluminum honeycomb core composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.; Hodge, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of low velocity impact damage to glass-phenolic and aluminum core honeycomb sandwich panels with carbon-epoxy facesheets is presented. An instrumented drop weight impact test apparatus was utilized to inflict damage at energy ranges between 0.7 and 4.2 joules. Specimens were checked for extent of damage by cross sectional examination. The effect of core damage was assessed by subjecting impact-damaged beams to four-point bend tests. Skin-only specimens (facings not bonded to honeycomb) were also tested for comparison purposes. Results show that core buckling is the first damage mode, followed by delaminations in the facings, matrix cracking, and finally fiber breakage. The aluminum honeycomb panels exhibited a larger core damage zone and more facing delaminations than the glass-phenolic core, but could withstand more shear stress when damaged than the glass-phenolic core specimens.

  2. Buckling of Aluminum Honeycomb Core and Its Effect on Ultrasonic Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, David K.; Dayal, Vinay; Harris, Aaron L.; Peters, John J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper reports an investigation on the interior buckling morphology of impact-damaged honeycomb core and its effects on the amplitude and velocity of transmitted ultrasound. In a systematic experiment, honeycomb core specimens were compressed to various degrees of buckling and the transmitted ultrasonic amplitude and time-of-flight were measured as a function of percent deformation. The measured time-of-flight showed a dramatic increase with increasing degree of buckling. As a comparison, the time of flight was modeled in a transient finite element analysis of a buckled honeycomb cell wall. A single cycle load was applied to the top end of the simplified model and the response was recorded at the bottom end of the wall. The finite element simulation results for time-of-flight showed qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Prospects of pulse phase thermography for finding disbonds in CFRP-sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores compared to ultrasonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Stotter, B.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the prospects of pulse phase thermography (PPT) compared to ultrasonic testing when applied to carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores. Measurements were carried out on full-scale components with flaws like disbonds, septum disbonds, staggers and displaced cores, where the last two are not literally flaws, but nevertheless regions of interest. The effect of the measurement time and the feasibility of extrapolating temperature decays were evaluated. Phase images, gathered with PPT, are compared with ultrasonic Cscan images to show the capability of PPT for quality assurance purposes. Finally, the saving on inspection time when using pulse phase thermography instead of ultrasonic testing is considered.

  4. Aluminum Honeycomb Characteristics in Dynamic Crush Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Swanson, Lloyd H.

    1999-07-01

    Fifteen aluminum honeycomb cubes (3 in.) have been crushed in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory's drop table testing machines. This report summarizes shock experiments with honeycomb densities of 22.1 pcf and 38.0 pcf and with crush weights of 45 lb, 168 lb, and 268 lb. The honeycomb samples were crushed in all three orientations, W, L, and T. Most of the experiments were conducted at an impact velocity of {approx}40 fps, but higher velocities of up to 90 fps were used for selected experiments. Where possible, multiple experiments were conducted for a specific orientation and density of the honeycomb samples. All results are for Hexcel honeycomb except for one experiment with Alcore honeycomb and have been evaluated for validity. This report contains the raw acceleration data measured on the top of the drop table carriage, pictures of the crushed samples, and normalized force-displacement curves for all fifteen experiments. These data are not strictly valid for material characteristics in L and T orientations because the cross-sectional area of the honeycomb changed (split) during the crush. However, these are the best data available at this time. These dynamic crush data do suggest a significant increase in crush strength to 8000 psi ({approximately} 25-30% increase) over quasi-static values of {approximately}6000 psi for the 38.0 pcf Hexcel Honeycomb in the T-orientation. An uncertainty analysis is included and estimates the error in these data.

  5. Preelectroplating Treatment Of Titanium Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael L.; Harvey, James S.

    1992-01-01

    New technique used to treat titanium honeycomb core electrochemically by applying conversion coat to keep honeycomb active and receptive to electroplating with solution of sodium bichromate and hydrofluoric acid. Maskant permits electroplating of controlled amount of filler metal on edge of honeycomb. Eliminates excess copper filler.

  6. Aluminum core structures brazed without use of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum alloy face sheets are brazed to aluminum alloy honeycomb cores without using corrosive flux by means of one or three methods. The completed brazed structure has the high-strength characteristics of heat treated aluminum alloys.

  7. Experimental Analysis and Modeling of the Crushing of Honeycomb Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminanda, Y.; Castanié, B.; Barrau, J.-J.; Thevenet, P.

    2005-05-01

    In the aeronautical field, sandwich structures are widely used for secondary structures like flaps or landing gear doors. The modeling of low velocity/low energy impact, which can lead to a decrease of the structure strength by 50%, remains a designer’s main problem. Since this type of impact has the same effect as quasi-static indentation, the study focuses on the behavior of honeycomb cores under compression. The crushing phenomenon has been well identified for years but its mechanism is not described explicitly and the model proposed may not satisfy industrial purposes. To understand the crushing mechanism, honeycomb test specimens made of Nomex™, aluminum alloy and paper were tested. During the crushing, a CCD camera showed that the cell walls buckled very quickly. The peak load recorded during tests corresponded to the buckling of the common edge of three honeycomb cells. Further tests on corner structures to simulate only one vertical edge of a honeycomb cell show a similar behavior. The different specimens exhibited similar load/displacement curves and the differences observed were only due to the behavior of the different materials. As a conclusion of this phenomenological study, the hypothesis that loads are mainly taken by the vertical edge can be made. So, a honeycomb core subjected to compression can be modeled by a grid of nonlinear springs. A simple analytical model was then developed and validated by tests on Nomex™ honeycomb core indented by different sized spherical indenters. A good correlation between theory and experiment was found. This result can be used to satisfactorily model using finite elements the indentation on a sandwich structure with a metallic or composite skin and honeycomb core.

  8. Development of graphite/polyimide honeycomb core materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Honeycomb panel constructions consisting entirely of graphite/polyimide composites were developed and evaluated. Graphite/polyimide composites, were used in the honeycomb core webs and in pre-cured sandwich skins. Polyimide adhesives were also developed and evaluated for use in skin-core bonding. The purpose of this program was to develop light weight sandwich constructions for high temperature applications which could provide comparable shear strength and stiffness to metallic honeycomb constructions.

  9. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  10. The total hemispheric emissivity of painted aluminum honeycomb at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, J.; Canavan, E.; DiPirro, M.; Li, X.; Knollenberg, P.

    2014-01-29

    NASA uses high-emissivity surfaces on deep-space radiators and thermal radiation absorbers in test chambers. Aluminum honeycomb core material, when coated with a high-emissivity paint, provides a lightweight, mechanically robust, and relatively inexpensive black surface that retains its high emissivity down to low temperatures. At temperatures below about 100 Kelvin, this material performs much better than the paint itself. We measured the total hemispheric emissivity of various painted honeycomb configurations using an adaptation of an innovative technique developed for characterizing thin black coatings. These measurements were performed from room temperature down to 30 Kelvin. We describe the measurement technique and compare the results with predictions from a detailed thermal model of each honeycomb configuration.

  11. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  12. Characterization of Thermal and Mechanical Impact on Aluminum Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Christen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study supports NASA Kennedy Space Center's research in the area of intelligent thermal management systems and multifunctional thermal systems. This project addresses the evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of metallic cellular solid (MCS) materials; those that are lightweight; high strength, tunable, multifunctional and affordable. A portion of the work includes understanding the mechanical properties of honeycomb structured cellular solids upon impact testing under ambient, water-immersed, liquid nitrogen-cooled, and liquid nitrogen-immersed conditions. Additionally, this study will address characterization techniques of the aluminum honeycomb's ability to resist multiple high-rate loadings or impacts in varying environmental conditions, using various techniques for the quantitative and qualitative determination for commercial applicability.

  13. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  14. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  15. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  16. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  17. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  18. Double-Lap Shear Test For Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Double-lap test measures shear strength of panel made of honeycomb core with 8-ply carbon-fiber/epoxy face sheets. Developed to overcome three principal disadvantages of prior standard single-lap shear test: specimen had to be more than 17 in. long; metal face sheets had to be used; and test introduced torque, with consequent bending and peeling of face sheets and spurious tensile or compressive loading of honeycomb.

  19. Finite Element Development and Specifications of a Patched, Recessed Nomex Core Honeycomb Panel for Increased Sound Transmission Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2007-01-01

    This informal report summarizes the development and the design specifications of a recessed nomex core honeycomb panel in fulfillment of the deliverable in Task Order 13RBE, Revision 10, Subtask 17. The honeycomb panel, with 0.020-inch thick aluminum face sheets, has 0.016-inch thick aluminum patches applied to twenty-five, 6 by 6 inch, quarter inch thick recessed cores. A 10 dB higher transmission loss over the frequency range 250 - 1000 Hz was predicted by a MSC/NASTRAN finite element model when compared with the transmission loss of the base nomex core honeycomb panel. The static displacement, due to a unit force applied at either the core or recessed core area, was of the same order of magnitude as the static displacement of the base honeycomb panel when exposed to the same unit force. The mass of the new honeycomb design is 5.1% more than the base honeycomb panel. A physical model was constructed and is being tested.

  20. Crushing Strength of Aluminum Honeycomb with Thinning Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Chiba, Norimasa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kikuchi, Yuji

    To evaluate the crash safety of automobiles, various collision tests are performed by the auto industry. In the offset frontal collision test and the side collision test, the target is an aluminum honeycomb material which has thinning cell walls. In this study, based on the analyses of the shock absorption mechanism, a new crushing strength formula is proposed. First, load-displacement curves obtained from compression tests in quasi-static condition showed an almost linear relation between a thinning rate of cell walls and a crushing strength. Second, based on Wierzbicki's theory, a new formula was proposed, which can estimate a crushing strength of a honeycomb material with thinning wall. In addition, a correcting equation which considered an elastic deformation was also proposed. Third, parametric analyses were carried out with a FE model which can simulate a delamination between cell walls. The results obtained from the theory and FEM almost corresponded to each other for a wide range of the thinning rate. Fourth, impact tests were carried out, in which the weight was dropped freely at the speed used for the automobile tests. Those results almost agreed well with the sum of the theoretical crush strength and the inside air pressure.

  1. Glass polyimide honeycomb cores for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentjes, J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a glass fiber reinforced polyimide honeycomb was considered for various applications requiring lightweight stiff structures which may experience temperatures up to 600K. The experiences and results of fabricating these core types are reported. The process parameters and most desirable characteristics are noted. The differences in considering resins for making laminates versus their use in surface coatings are stressed. This comparison is made to explain the problems encountered in using the three new resin types for dipping honeycomb to the desired density. Some properties and the effect of post cure, forming and ventilating techniques for the condensation polyimide core types are presented.

  2. Apparatus measures thermal conductivity of honeycomb-core panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Overall thermal conductivity of honeycomb-core panels at elevated temperatures is measured by an apparatus with a heater assembly and a calibrated heat-rate transducer. The apparatus has space between the heater and transducer for insertion of a test panel and insulation.

  3. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  4. Probabilistic nondestructive evaluation of bonded aluminum honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.

    1995-07-01

    Aluminum honeycomb panels fabricated in accordance with spacecraft fracture control guidelines must be evaluated to a 90/95 POD/CL (probability of detection/confidence) level for detection of the critical initial flaw (CIF) size. Severe weight limitations can drive the CIF to a size of one cell diameter, or smaller. Additionally, producibility (low or no type II errors) must be maintained, and inspection costs minimized. To assure these goals, a reliability demonstration program was undertaken on thin skin panels for the Space Station Electric Power System ORU (orbital replacement unit) enclosures. This paper examines the probabilistic NDE process in detail, including: analysis of the manufacturing methodology, expected flaw types, construction of the disbond flaw data base, and the subsequent evaluations and results using laser shearography. The experimental data is then reduced utilizing the statistical methodology outlined in a proposed military standard for NDE reliability demonstrations, and contrasted against conventional through transmission ultrasonic inspection. The effort revealed that substantial gains in system reliability and flaw type discrimination are possible with laser shearography, along with a nearly order of magnitude reduction in inspection time.

  5. Heat Transfer in Adhesively Bonded Honeycomb Core Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship has been used as a standard in aerospace industry to predict the effective thermal conductivity of honeycomb core panels. Recent measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of an adhesively bonded titanium honeycomb core panel using three different techniques, two steady-state and one transient radiant step heating method, at four laboratories varied significantly from each other and from the Swann and Pittman predictions. Average differences between the measurements and the predictions varied between 17 and 61% in the temperature range of 300 to 500 K. In order to determine the correct values of the effective thermal conductivity and determine which set of the measurements or predictions were most accurate, the combined radiation and conduction heat transfer in the honeycomb core panel was modeled using a finite volume numerical formulation. The transient radiant step heating measurements provided the best agreement with the numerical results. It was found that a modification of the Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship which incorporated the facesheets and adhesive layers in the thermal model provided satisfactory results. Finally, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the influence of adhesive thickness and thermal conductivity on the overall heat transfer through the panel.

  6. Smart impact management devices: experimental validation of impact triggered rapid expansion of aluminum honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Webb, Scott R.

    2006-03-01

    A major limitation of current dedicated impact energy management structures and passive devices used in the transportation industry is that their starting volume is their maximum volume, i.e. they dissipate energy by crushing or stroking from a larger to a smaller volume. This space so occupied is not available for other uses, including such necessary/desirable functions as vehicle serviceability and repair, operational clearances, and interior spaciousness. This limitation has led to the proposal of a class of "smart" impact energy management devices, based on unexpanded aluminum honeycomb (HOBE), that initially occupy a small volume and based on sensor input are rapidly expanded to a much larger crushable volume (nominally 75 times greater) just prior to or in response to an impact. This paper documents the first portion of an experimental exploration of the viability of this technology. Specific goals of the herein documented test program were the demonstration, starting from blocks of unexpanded aluminum honeycomb, a) of the feasibility (and robustness) of sensor triggered rapid expansion both in terms of the integrity and uniformity of the resulting expanded honeycomb, and b) that expansion mechanisms that were required could be simple and have low energy/force requirements. The test program documented here was successful in both respects, demonstrating and thus validating the feasibility and robustness of low energy rapid expansion of aluminum honeycomb.

  7. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Facesheet-Core Disbonds on the Buckling Load of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance approach for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method. Facesheet and core nodes in a predetermined circular region were detached to simulate a disbond induced via low-speed impact between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. A significant change in the slope of the edge load-deflection response was used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load.

  8. A Model for Simulating the Response of Aluminum Honeycomb Structure to Transverse Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2012-01-01

    A 1-dimensional material model was developed for simulating the transverse (thickness-direction) loading and unloading response of aluminum honeycomb structure. The model was implemented as a user-defined material subroutine (UMAT) in the commercial finite element analysis code, ABAQUS(Registered TradeMark)/Standard. The UMAT has been applied to analyses for simulating quasi-static indentation tests on aluminum honeycomb-based sandwich plates. Comparison of analysis results with data from these experiments shows overall good agreement. Specifically, analyses of quasi-static indentation tests yielded accurate global specimen responses. Predicted residual indentation was also in reasonable agreement with measured values. Overall, this simple model does not involve a significant computational burden, which makes it more tractable to simulate other damage mechanisms in the same analysis.

  9. Prospects and limitations of digital Shearography and Active Thermography in finding and rating flaws in CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows the prospects and limitations of the non-destructive testing methods Digital Shearography and Active Thermography when applied to CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb cores. Two specimens with different core materials (aluminum, NOMEX) and artificial flaws such as delaminations, disbonds and inclusions of foreign material, are tested with Digital Shearography and Pulse Thermography including Pulse Phase Thermography. Both methods provide a good ability for finding and rating the flaws.

  10. Dynamic Crush Behaviors Of Aluminum Honeycomb Specimens Under Compression Dominant Inclined Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Pan, Jwo; Tyan, Tau; Prasad, Priya

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic crush behaviors of aluminum 5052-H38 honeycomb specimens under out-of-plane inclined loads are investigated by experiments. Different types of honeycomb specimens were designed for crush tests under pure compressive and inclined loads with respect to the out-of-plane direction. A test fixture was designed for both quasi-static and dynamic crush tests under inclined loads. The results of the quasi-static crush tests indicate that the normal crush and shear strengths under inclined loads are consistent with the corresponding results under combined loads. The results of the dynamic crush tests indicate that as the impact velocity increases, the normal crush strength increases and the shear strength remains nearly the same. The trends of the normalized normal crush strengths under inclined loads for specimens with different in-plane orientation angles as functions of the impact velocity are very similar to each other. Based on the experimental results, a macroscopic yield criterion as a function of the impact velocity is proposed. The experimental results suggest that as the impact velocity increases, the shape of the macroscopic yield surface changes, or more specifically, the curvature of the yield surface increases near the pure compression state. The experimental results also show similar microscopic progressive folding mechanisms in honeycomb specimens under pure compressive and inclined loads. However, honeycomb specimens under inclined loads show inclined stacking patterns of folds due to the asymmetric location of horizontal plastic hinge lines.

  11. Segmented Aluminum Honeycomb Characteristics in T-Direction, Dynamic Crush Environments

    SciTech Connect

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; SWANSON,LLOYD H.

    2000-08-23

    Thirteen segmented aluminum honeycomb samples (5 in. diameter and 1.5 in. height) have been crushed in an experimental configuration that uses a drop table impact machine. The 38.0 pcf bulk density samples are a unique segmented geometry that allows the samples to be crushed while maintaining a constant cross-sectional area. A crush weight of 175 lb was used to determine the rate sensitivity of the honeycomb's highest strength orientation, T-direction, in a dynamic environment of {approx}50 fps impact velocity. Experiments were conducted for two honeycomb manufacturers and at two temperatures, ambient and +165 F. Independent measurements of the crush force were made with a custom load cell and a force derived from acceleration measurements on the drop table using the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique with a Calibrated Force (SWAT-CAL). Normalized stress-strain curves for all thirteen experiments are included and have excellent repeatability. These data are strictly valid for material characteristics in the T orientation because the cross-sectional area of the honeycomb did not change during the crush. The dynamic crush data have a consistent increase in crush strength of {approximately}7--19% as compared to quasi-static data and suggest that dynamic performance may be inferred from static tests. An uncertainty analysis estimates the error in these data is {+-} 11%.

  12. Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring frame/stringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin veil- efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels was made -hick incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining their strength. The majority of the designs were centered around the concept of creating areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced/recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  13. Mode I Toughness Measurements of Core/Facesheet Bonds in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2006-01-01

    Composite sandwich structures will be used in many future applications in aerospace, marine and offshore industries due to the fact that the strength and stiffness to mass ratios surpass any other structural type. Sandwich structure also offers advantages over traditional stiffened panels such as ease of manufacturing and repair. During the last three decades, sandwich structure has been used extensively for secondary structure in aircraft (fuselage floors, rudders and radome structure). Sandwich structure is also used as primary structure in rotorcraft, the most common example being the trailing edge of rotor blades. As with other types of composite construction, sandwich structure exhibits several types of failure mode such as facesheet wrinkling, core crushing and sandwich buckling. Facesheet/core debonding has also been observed in the marine and aerospace industry. During this failure mode, peel stresses applied to an existing facesheet/core debond or an interface low in toughness, results in the facesheet being peeled from the core material, possibly leading to a significant loss in structural integrity of the sandwich panel. In an incident during a test on a liquid hydrogen fuel tank of the X-33 prototype vehicle, the outer graphite/epoxy facesheet and honeycomb core became debonded from the inner facesheet along significant areas, leading to failure of the tank. As a consequence of the accident; significant efforts were made to characterize the toughness of the facesheet/core bond. Currently, the only standardized method available for assessing the quality of the facesheet/core interface is the climbing drum peel test (ASTM D1781). During this test a sandwich beam is removed from a panel and the lip of one of the facesheets is attached to a drum, as shown in Fig. 1. The drum is then rotated along the sandwich beam, causing the facesheet to peel from the core. This method has two major drawbacks. First, it is not possible to obtain quantitative fracture data from the test and so the results can only be used in a qualitative manner. Second, only sandwich structure with thin facesheets can be tested (to facilitate wrapping of the facesheet around the climbing drum). In recognition of the need for a more quantitative facesheet/core fracture test, several workers have devised experimental techniques for characterizing the toughness of the facesheet/core interface. In all of these cases, the tests are designed to yield a mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface in a manner similar to that used to determine mode I fracture toughness of composite laminates. In the current work, a modified double cantilever beam is used to measure the mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the interface in a sandwich consisting of glass/phenolic honeycomb core reinforced with graphite epoxy facesheets. Two specimen configurations were tested as shown in Fig 2. The first configuration consisted of reinforcing the facesheets with aluminum blocks (Fig. 2a). In the second configuration unreinforced specimens were tested (Fig. 2b). Climbing drum peel tests were also conducted to compare the fracture behavior observed between this test and the modified double cantilever beam. This paper outlines the test procedures and data reduction strategies used to compute fracture toughness values from the tests. The effect of specimen reinforcement on fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface is discussed.

  14. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels With Thin Facesheets. Part 1; Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part one, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the experimental testing. Of interest are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of specimens, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested. Static indentation and low velocity impact using a drop tower are used to study damage formation in these materials. A series of highly instrumented CAI tests was then completed. New techniques used to observe CAI response and failure include high speed video photography, as well as digital image correlation (DIC) for full-field deformation measurement. Two CAI failure modes, indentation propagation, and crack propagation, were observed. From the results, it can be concluded that the CAI failure mode of these panels depends solely on the honeycomb core density.

  15. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  16. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  17. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets, Part 2: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part 2, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the analysis, which corresponds to the CAI testings described in Part 1. Of interest, are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of materials, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested in Part 1. The results highlighted the need for analysis methods which taken into account multiple failure modes. A finite element model (FEM) is developed here, in Part 2. A commercial implementation of the Multicontinuum Failure Theory (MCT) for progressive failure analysis (PFA) in composite laminates, Helius:MCT, is included in this model. The inclusion of PFA in the present model provided a new, unique ability to account for multiple failure modes. In addition, significant impact damage detail is included in the model. A sensitivity study, used to assess the effect of each damage parameter on overall analysis results, is included in an appendix. Analysis results are compared to the experimental results for each of the 32 CAI sandwich panel specimens tested to failure. The failure of each specimen is predicted using the high-fidelity, physicsbased analysis model developed here, and the results highlight key improvements in the understanding of honeycomb core sandwich panel CAI failure. Finally, a parametric study highlights the strength benefits compared to mass penalty for various core densities.

  18. Thermal behavior of a titanium honeycomb-core sandwich panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Finite element thermal stress analysis was performed on a rectangular titanium honecomb-core sandwich panel which is subjected to thermal load with a temperature gradient across its depth. The distributions of normal stresses in the face sheets and the face-sheet/sandwich-core interfacial shear stresses are presented. The thermal buckling of the heated face sheet was analyzed by assuming the face sheet to be resting on an elastic foundation representing the sandwich core. Thermal buckling curves and thermal buckling load surface are presented for setting the limit for temperature gradient across the panel depth.

  19. Evaluation of the Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding Process for Ti3Al-Based Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Hoffman, Eric K.

    1998-01-01

    The suitability of using transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding to fabricate honeycomb core sandwich panels with Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt%) titanium aluminide (T3Al) face sheets for high-temperature hypersonic vehicle applications was evaluated. Three titanium alloy honeycomb cores and one Ti3Al alloy honeycomb core were investigated. Edgewise compression (EWC) and flatwise tension (FWT) tests on honeycomb core sandwich specimens and tensile tests of the face sheet material were conducted at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 F. EWC tests indicated that the honeycomb cores and diffusion bonded joints were able to stabilize the face sheets up to and beyond the face sheet compressive yield strength for all temperatures investigated. The specimens with the T3Al honeycomb core produced the highest FWT strengths at temperatures above 1000 F. Tensile tests indicated that TLP processing conditions resulted in decreases in ductility of the Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets. Microstructural examination showed that the side of the face sheets to which the filler metals had been applied was transformed from equiaxed alpha2 grains to coarse plates of alpha2 with intergranular Beta. Fractographic examination of the tensile specimens showed that this transformed region was dominated by brittle fracture.

  20. Measuring Core/Facesheet Bond Toughness in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines two test methods to evaluate the peel toughness of the skin to core debond of sandwich panels. The methods tested were the climbing drum (CD) peel test and the double cantilever beam (DCB) test. While the CD peel test is only intended for qualitative measurements, it is shown in this study that qualitative measurements can be performed and compare well with DCB test data. It is also shown that artificially stiffening the facesheets of a DCB specimen can cause the test to behave more like a flatwise tensile test than a peel test.

  1. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  2. Buckling tests of three 4.6 meter diameter aluminum honeycomb sandwich conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Davis, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Three aluminum honeycomb sandwich conical shells with a 120 apex angle and a 4.6-m (15.0-ft) base diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the thickness of their respective face sheets. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions, and good agreement was obtained between test and theory. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on the three cones in the as fabricated condition.

  3. Compression After Impact Experiments and Analysis on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of the effect of impact damage on composite structures is necessary to give the engineer an ability to design safe, efficient structures. Current composite structures suffer severe strength reduction under compressive loading conditions, due to even light damage, such as from low velocity impact. A review is undertaken to access the current state-of-development in the areas of experimental testing, and analysis methods. A set of experiments on honeycomb core sandwich panels, with thin woven fiberglass cloth facesheets, is described, which includes detailed instrumentation and unique observation techniques.

  4. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  5. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  6. Analysis of an Aircraft Honeycomb Sandwich Panel with Circular Face Sheet/Core Disbond Subjected to Ground-Air Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James

    2013-01-01

    The ground-air pressurization of lightweight honeycomb sandwich structures caused by alternating pressure differences between the enclosed air within the honeycomb core and the ambient environment is a well-known and controllable loading condition of aerospace structures. However, initial face sheet/core disbonds intensify the face sheet peeling effect of the internal pressure load significantly and can decrease the reliability of the sandwich structure drastically. Within this paper, a numerical parameter study was carried out to investigate the criticality of initial disbonds in honeycomb sandwich structures under ground-air pressurization. A fracture mechanics approach was used to evaluate the loading at the disbond front. In this case, the strain energy release rate was computed via the Virtual Crack Closure Technique. Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed.

  7. Phononic band gap design in honeycomb lattice with combinations of auxetic and conventional core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel design of a honeycomb lattice geometry that uses a seamless combination of conventional and auxetic cores, i.e. elements showing positive and negative Poisson’s ratio. The design is aimed at tuning and improving the band structure of periodic cellular structures. The proposed cellular configurations show a significantly wide band gap at much lower frequencies compared to their pure counterparts, while still retaining their major dynamic features. Different topologies involving both auxetic inclusions in a conventional lattice and conversely hexagonal cellular inclusions in auxetic butterfly lattices are presented. For all these cases the impact of the varying degree of auxeticity on the band structure is evaluated. The proposed cellular designs may offer significant advantages in tuning high-frequency bandgap behaviour, which is relevant to phononics applications. The configurations shown in this paper may be made iso-volumetric and iso-weight to a given regular hexagonal topology, making possible to adapt the hybrid lattices to existing sandwich structures with fixed dimensions and weights. This work also features a comparative study of the wave speeds corresponding to different configurations vis-a vis those of a regular honeycomb to highlight the superior behaviour of the combined hybrid lattice.

  8. Electromechanical modeling of a honeycomb core integrated vibration energy converter with increased specific power for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharan, Nataraj

    Innovation in integrated circuit technology along with improved manufacturing processes has resulted in considerable reduction in power consumption of electromechanical devices. Majority of these devices are currently powered by batteries. However, the issues posed by batteries, including the need for frequent battery recharge/replacement has resulted in a compelling need for alternate energy to achieve self-sufficient device operation or to supplement battery power. Vibration based energy harvesting methods through piezoelectric transduction provides with a promising potential towards replacing or supplementing battery power source. However, current piezoelectric energy harvesters generate low specific power (power-to-weight ratio) when compared to batteries that the harvesters seek to replace or supplement. In this study, the potential of integrating lightweight cellular honeycomb structures with existing piezoelectric device configurations (bimorph) to achieve higher specific power is investigated. It is shown in this study that at low excitation frequency ranges, replacing the solid continuous substrate of a conventional piezoelectric bimorph with honeycomb structures of the same material results in a significant increase in power-to-weight ratio of the piezoelectric harvester. In order to maximize the electrical response of vibration based power harvesters, the natural frequency of these harvesters is designed to match the input driving frequency. The commonly used technique of adding a tip mass is employed to lower the natural frequency (to match driving frequency) of both, solid and honeycomb substrate bimorphs. At higher excitation frequency, the natural frequency of the traditional solid substrate bimorph can only be altered (to match driving frequency) through a change in global geometric design parameters, typically achieved by increasing the thickness of the harvester. As a result, the size of the harvester is increased and can be disadvantageous especially if the application imposes a space/size constraint. Moreover, the bimorph with increased thickness will now require a larger mechanical force to deform the structure which can fall outside the input ambient excitation amplitude range. In contrast, the honeycomb core bimorph offers an advantage in terms of preserving the global geometric dimensions. The natural frequency of the honeycomb core bimorph can be altered by manipulating honeycomb cell design parameters, such as cell angle, cell wall thickness, vertical cell height and inclined cell length. This results in a change in the mass and stiffness properties of the substrate and hence the bimorph, thereby altering the natural frequency of the harvester. Design flexibility of honeycomb core bimorphs is demonstrated by varying honeycomb cell parameters to alter mass and stiffness properties for power harvesting. The influence of honeycomb cell parameters on power generation is examined to evaluate optimum design to attain highest specific power. In addition, the more compliant nature of a honeycomb core bimorph decreases susceptibility towards fatigue and can increase the operating lifetime of the harvester. The second component of this dissertation analyses an uncoupled equivalent circuit model for piezoelectric energy harvesting. Open circuit voltage developed on the piezoelectric materials can be easily computed either through analytical or finite element models. The efficacy of a method to determine power developed across a resistive load, by representing the coupled piezoelectric electromechanical problem with an external load as an open circuit voltage driven equivalent circuit, is evaluated. The lack of backward feedback at finite resistive loads resulting from such an equivalent representation is examined by comparing the equivalent circuit model to the governing equations of a fully coupled circuit model for the electromechanical problem. It is found that the backward feedback is insignificant for weakly coupled systems typically seen in micro electromechanical systems and other energy harvesting device configurations with low coupling. For moderate to high coupling systems, a correction factor based on a calibrated resistance is presented which can be used to evaluate power generation at a specific resistive load.

  9. Buckling Analysis of a Honeycomb-Core Composite Cylinder with Initial Geometric Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Gene; Schultz, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Thin-walled cylindrical shell structures often have buckling as the critical failure mode, and the buckling of such structures can be very sensitive to small geometric imperfections. The buckling analyses of an 8-ft-diameter, 10-ft-long honeycomb-core composite cylinder loaded in pure axial compression is discussed in this document. Two loading configurations are considered configuration 1 uses simple end conditions, and configuration 2 includes additional structure that may more closely approximate experimental loading conditions. Linear eigenvalue buckling analyses and nonlinear analyses with and without initial geometric imperfections were performed on both configurations. The initial imperfections were introduced in the shell by applying a radial load at the midlength of the cylinder to form a single inward dimple. The critical bifurcation buckling loads are predicted to be 924,190 lb and 924,020 lb for configurations 1 and 2, respectively. Nonlinear critical buckling loads of 918,750 lb and 954,900 lb were predicted for geometrically perfect configurations 1 and 2, respectively. Lower-bound critical buckling loads for configurations 1 and 2 with radial perturbations were found to be 33% and 36% lower, respectively, than the unperturbed critical loads. The inclusion of the load introduction cylinders in configuration 2 increased the maximum bending-boundary-layer rotation up to 11%.

  10. Light-weight sandwich panel honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin for electric vehicle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyono, Sukmaji Indro; Widodo, Angit; Anwar, Miftahul; Diharjo, Kuncoro; Triyono, Teguh; Hapid, A.; Kaleg, S.

    2016-03-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite is relative high cost material in current manufacturing process of electric vehicle body structure. Sandwich panels consisting polypropylene (PP) honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin were investigated. The aim of present paper was evaluate the flexural properties and bending rigidity of various volume fraction carbon-glass fiber composite skins with the honeycomb core. The flexural properties and cost of panels were compared to the reported values of solid hybrid Carbon/Glass FRP used for the frame body structure of electric vehicle. The finite element model of represented sandwich panel was established to characterize the flexural properties of material using homogenization technique. Finally, simplified model was employed to crashworthiness analysis for engine hood of the body electric vehicle structure. The good cost-electiveness of honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber skin has the potential to be used as a light-weight alternative material in body electric vehicle fabricated.

  11. Fabrication and evaluation of enhanced diffusion bonded titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels with titanium aluminide face sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, E. K.; Bird, R. K.; Bales, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    A joining process was developed for fabricating lightweight, high temperature sandwich panels for aerospace applications using Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets and Ti-3Al-2.5V honeycomb core. The process, termed Enhanced Diffusion Bonding (EDB), relies on the formation of a eutectic liquid through solid-state diffusion at elevated temperatures and isothermal solidification to produce joints in thin-gage titanium and titanium aluminide structural components. A technique employing a maskant on the honeycomb core was developed which permitted electroplating a controlled amount of EDB material only on the edges of the honeycomb core in order to minimize the structural weight and metallurgical interaction effects. Metallurgical analyses were conducted to determine the interaction effects between the EDB materials and the constituents of the sandwich structure following EDB processing. The initial mechanical evaluation was conducted with butt joint specimens tested at temperatures from 1400 - 1700 F. Further mechanical evaluation was conducted with EDB sandwich specimens using flatwise tension tests at temperatures from 70 - 1100 F and edgewise compression tests at ambient temperature.

  12. Microsandwich honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, T. Balakrishna; Wang, Taylor G.; Gibson, Lorna J.

    1989-01-01

    Microsandwich honeycombs are honeycombs in which the cell walls are themselves sandwich structures. This article develops the idea of microsandwich honeycombs, outlining their design principles, fabrication techniques and properties.

  13. Wax Reinforces Honeycomb During Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towell, Timothy W.; Fahringer, David T.; Vasquez, Peter; Scheidegger, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    Method of machining on conventional metal lathe devised for precise cutting of axisymmetric contours on honeycomb cores made of composite (matrix/fiber) materials. Wax filling reinforces honeycomb walls against bending and tearing while honeycomb being contoured on lathe. Innovative method of machining on lathe involves preparation in which honeycomb is placed in appropriate fixture and the fixture is then filled with molten water-soluble wax. Number of different commercial waxes have been tried.

  14. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  15. Debris Impact on CFRP-AL Honeycomb Sandwich Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashide, Masumi; Nagao, Yosuke; Kibe, Seishiro; Francesconi, Alessandro; Paverin, Daniele

    In order to do risk assessments of debris impacts on unmanned spacecraft, it is necessary to investigate damage of honeycomb sandwich structures caused by debris impacts. However, the study of the honeycomb sandwich panel with CFRP face sheets has not been sufficiently performed. The purpose of this study is to investigate hypervelocity impact phenomena of CFRP-AL honeycomb sandwich structure. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed with a two-stage light gas gun at University of Padova. Three kinds of CFRP-AL honeycomb sandwich panels which are frequently used as a material of a spacecraft structure were tested. The cell size and the core thickness were varied. Aluminum spheres, 0.8 mm in diameter, were used as projectiles. The tests were performed at a velocity range between 2 and 5 km/sec. After the tests, the projectiles perforated all targets. The perforation holes on the panels were measured, and ultrasonic inspection was performed. The area of the perforation holes of the panel were increased with the impact velocity. The core size of the honeycomb core did not influence the relationship between the hole and the impact velocity. Impacts of the projectile on the foil of honeycomb cell caused heavy damage to a face sheet of the opposite side of the impact surface.

  16. Brazed Borsic/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Wiant, H. R.; Royster, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A fluxless brazing process has been developed that minimizes degradation of the mechanical properties of Borsic/aluminum composites. The process, which employs 718 aluminum alloy braze, is being used to fabricate full scale Borsic/aluminum-titanium honeycomb-core panels for Mach 3 flight testing on the YF-12 aircraft and ground testing in support of the Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program. The manufacturing development and results of shear tests on full scale panels are presented.

  17. Analytical structural efficiency studies of borsic/aluminum compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    Analytically determined mass-strength curves, strain-strength curves, and dimensions are presented for structurally efficient hat-stiffened panels, corrugation-stiffened panels, hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panels, open-section corrugation panels, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels. The panels were assumed to be fabricated from either titanium, borsic/aluminum, or a combination of these materials. Borsic/aluminum panels and titanium panels reinforced with borsic/aluminum were lighter and stiffer than comparably designed titanium panels. Reinforced titanium panels had the same extensional stiffness as comparably designed Borsic/aluminum panels. For a given load, the structural efficiency of the hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panel was higher than the structural efficiency of the other stiffened panels.

  18. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  19. Aerodynamic effect of a honeycomb rotor tip shroud on a 50.8-centimeter-tip-diameter core turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Whitney, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 50.8-cm-tip-diameter turbine equipped with a rotor tip shroud of hexagonal cell (or honeycomb) cross section has been tested in warm air (416 K) for a range of shroud coolant to primary flow rates. Test results were also obtained for the same turbine operated with a solid shroud for comparison. The results showed that the combined effect of the honeycomb shroud and the coolant flow was to cause a reduction of 2.8 points in efficiency at design speed, pressure ratio, and coolant flow rate. With the coolant system inactivated, the honeycomb shroud caused a decrease in efficiency of 2.3 points. These results and those obtained from a small reference turbine indicate that the dominant factor governing honeycomb tip shroud loss is the ratio of honeycomb depth to blade span. The loss results of the two shrouds could be correlated on this basis. The same honeycomb and coolant effects are expected to occur for the hot (2200 K) version of this turbine.

  20. Honeycomb pattern array of vertically standing core-shell nanorods: Its application to Li energy electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youn-Su; Nam, Sang Hoon; Lee, Sang Ho; Shim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Won Bae; Ahn, Hyo-Jin

    2008-09-08

    An energy storage electrode system is fabricated via a template method with one-dimensional nanostructures that are hexagonally patterned in a honeycomblike fashion and vertically standing nanorods made of a gold-coated carbon nanotube core and a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} shell layer. The performance of this system for Li insertion and extraction shows an increased capacity along with an enhanced rate performance, which could be attributed to the aligned nanostructures having increased reaction sites, facilitated charge transport, and improved stability in the face of mechanical stress.

  1. Design manufacture and test of a cryo-stable Offner relay using aluminum foam core optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Content, David A.

    2001-12-01

    Aluminum foam core optics have the desirable characteristics of being lightweight, cryo-stable, and low cost. The availability of high quality aluminum foam and a bare aluminum super-polishing process have allowed high performance foam core optics made entirely of aluminum to be produced. Mirrors with integral mounts were designed for minimum surface error induced by self-weight deflection, thermal gradients, and mounting stresses. The design of the optics was extensively optimized using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Geometric Element Analysis (GEA) to determine the effects of design parameters on mirror performance under the anticipated operating environments. A unique manufacturing process was developed to accommodate the aluminum brazing process used to install the aluminum foam while maintaining dimensional stability. Aluminum foam core optics have the additional advantage of being fabricated from a common aerospace structural material. An Offner relay using all aluminum optics and structure will be manufactured and tested with the goal of demonstrating that an all aluminum optical system can be aligned at room temperature and maintain alignment at cryogenic temperatures due to near zero CTE mismatch between all system components. If successful, an all aluminum Offner relay has potential uses for NGST, specifically in the testing of micro-mirror arrays.

  2. Honeycomb vs. Foam: Evaluating Potential Upgrades to ISS Module Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon J.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of honeycomb cells in a dual-wall structure is advantageous for mechanical performance and low weight in spacecraft primary structures but detrimental for shielding against impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris particles (MMOD). The presence of honeycomb cell walls acts to restrict the expansion of projectile and bumper fragments, resulting in the impact of a more concentrated (and thus lethal) fragment cloud upon the shield rear wall. The Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) is a Russian research module scheduled for launch and ISS assembly in 2011 (currently under review). Baseline shielding of the MLM is expected to be predominantly similar to that of the existing Functional Energy Block (FGB), utilizing a baseline triple wall configuration with honeycomb sandwich panels for the dual bumpers and a thick monolithic aluminum pressure wall. The MLM module is to be docked to the nadir port of the Zvezda service module and, as such, is subject to higher debris flux than the FGB module (which is aligned along the ISS flight vector). Without upgrades to inherited shielding, the MLM penetration risk is expected to be significantly higher than that of the FGB module. Open-cell foam represents a promising alternative to honeycomb as a sandwich panel core material in spacecraft primary structures as it provides comparable mechanical performance with a minimal increase in weight while avoiding structural features (i.e. channeling cells) detrimental to MMOD shielding performance. In this study, the effect of replacing honeycomb sandwich panel structures with metallic open-cell foam structures on MMOD shielding performance is assessed for an MLM-representative configuration. A number of hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on both the baseline honeycomb configuration and upgraded foam configuration, and differences in target damage, failure limits, and derived ballistic limit equations are discussed.

  3. The structural behavior of a graphite-polymide honeycomb sandwich panel with quasi-isotropic face sheets and an orthotropic core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Hagaman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a series of tests of graphite-polyimide honeycomb sandwich panels are presented. The panels were 1.22 m long, 0.508 m wide, and approximately 13.3 m thick. The face sheets were a T-300/PMR-15 fabric in a quasi-isotropic layup and were 0.279 mm thick. The core was Hexcel HRH 327-3/16 - 4.0 glass reinforced polyimide honeycomb, 12.7 mm thick. Three panels were used in the test: one was cut into smaller pieces for testing as beam, compression, and shear specimens; a second panel was used for plate bending tests; the third panel was used for in-plane stability tests. Presented are the experimental results of four point bending tests, short block compression tests, core transverse shear modulus, three point bending tests, vibration tests, plate bending tests, and panel stability tests. The results of the first three tests are used to predict the results of some of the other tests. The predictions and experimental results are compared, and the agreement is quite good.

  4. Processing and characterization of honeycomb composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Jahan Emir

    Honeycomb composite structures are widely used in the aerospace and sporting goods industries because of the superior performance and weight saving advantages they offer over traditional metal structures. However, in order to maximize the mechanical and chemical properties of honeycomb composites, the structures must be specially designed to take advantage of their inherent anisotropic, viscoelastic and heterogeneous qualities. In the open literature little work has been done to understand these relationships. Most research efforts have been focused towards studying and modeling the effects of environmental exposure, impact damage and energy absorption. The objectives of this work was to use a systemic engineering approach to explore the fundamental material relationships of honeycomb composites with an emphasis towards the industrial manufacturing, design and performance characteristics of these materials. To reach this goal, a methodology was created to develop model honeycomb systems that were characteristically similar to their commercial counterparts. From the model systems, some of the important chemical and mechanical properties that controlled the behavior of honeycomb core were identified. With the knowledge gained from the model system, studies were carried out to correlate the compressive properties of honeycomb rings to honeycomb core. This type of correlation gives paper, resin, and adhesive manufactures the ability to develop new honeycomb materials without requiring specific honeycomb manufacturers to divulge their trade secrets. After characterizing the honeycomb core, efforts were made to understand the manufacturing and in-service responses of honeycomb materials. Using three Design of Experiments, investigations were performed to measure the mechanisms of composite structures to propagate damage and water over a fourteen month service period. Collectively, this research represents a fundamental starting point for understanding the processing-structure-property relationships of honeycomb core.

  5. Ballistic Resistance of Honeycomb Sandwich Panels under In-Plane High-Velocity Impact

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu; Wang, Dong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic responses of honeycomb sandwich panels (HSPs) subjected to in-plane projectile impact were studied by means of explicit nonlinear finite element simulations using LS-DYNA. The HSPs consisted of two identical aluminum alloy face-sheets and an aluminum honeycomb core featuring three types of unit cell configurations (regular, rectangular-shaped, and reentrant hexagons). The ballistic resistances of HSPs with the three core configurations were first analyzed. It was found that the HSP with the reentrant auxetic honeycomb core has the best ballistic resistance, due to the negative Poisson's ratio effect of the core. Parametric studies were then carried out to clarify the influences of both macroscopic (face-sheet and core thicknesses, core relative density) and mesoscopic (unit cell angle and size) parameters on the ballistic responses of the auxetic HSPs. Numerical results show that the perforation resistant capabilities of the auxetic HSPs increase as the values of the macroscopic parameters increase. However, the mesoscopic parameters show nonmonotonic effects on the panels' ballistic capacities. The empirical equations for projectile residual velocities were formulated in terms of impact velocity and the structural parameters. It was also found that the blunter projectiles result in higher ballistic limits of the auxetic HSPs. PMID:24187526

  6. Ballistic resistance of honeycomb sandwich panels under in-plane high-velocity impact.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Yang, Shu; Wang, Dong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic responses of honeycomb sandwich panels (HSPs) subjected to in-plane projectile impact were studied by means of explicit nonlinear finite element simulations using LS-DYNA. The HSPs consisted of two identical aluminum alloy face-sheets and an aluminum honeycomb core featuring three types of unit cell configurations (regular, rectangular-shaped, and reentrant hexagons). The ballistic resistances of HSPs with the three core configurations were first analyzed. It was found that the HSP with the reentrant auxetic honeycomb core has the best ballistic resistance, due to the negative Poisson's ratio effect of the core. Parametric studies were then carried out to clarify the influences of both macroscopic (face-sheet and core thicknesses, core relative density) and mesoscopic (unit cell angle and size) parameters on the ballistic responses of the auxetic HSPs. Numerical results show that the perforation resistant capabilities of the auxetic HSPs increase as the values of the macroscopic parameters increase. However, the mesoscopic parameters show nonmonotonic effects on the panels' ballistic capacities. The empirical equations for projectile residual velocities were formulated in terms of impact velocity and the structural parameters. It was also found that the blunter projectiles result in higher ballistic limits of the auxetic HSPs. PMID:24187526

  7. Piezoelectrically-induced guided wave propagation for health monitoring of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fei

    Honeycomb sandwich structures have been widely used in marine and aerospace applications due to their high strength/stiffness-to-weight ratio. However, an excessive load or repeated loading in the core tends to induce debonding along the skin-core interface, threatening the integrity and safety of the whole structure. This dissertation focuses on development of guided wave strategies for health monitoring of honeycomb sandwich structures, based on a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network. The honeycomb sandwich panels, which are composed of aluminum alloy (T6061) skins and hexagonal-celled Nomex core, are specifically considered in the study. First, elastic wave propagation mechanism in honeycomb sandwich structures is numerically and experimentally investigated, based on a piezoelectric actuator/sensor system. Influences of cell geometry parameters upon wave propagation are also discussed. Some wave propagation characteristics, such as wave group velocity dispersion relation and mode tuning capabilities, in the honeycomb composite panels are experimentally characterized. Secondly, effects of skin-core debonding upon the leaky guided wave propagation in honeycomb sandwich structures are studied by the finite element simulation. An appropriate signal difference coefficient is defined to represent the differential features caused by debonding. By means of probability analysis of differential features of transmitted guided waves and the image fusion, the final image of the structure is constructed with improved detection precision. A multilevel sensor network strategy is proposed to detect multiple debondings in the honeycomb sandwich structure. Thirdly, an analytical model considering coupled piezo-elastodynamics is developed to quantitatively describe dynamic load transfer between a surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer actuator and a prestressed plate. The finite element method is used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical prediction. Effects of prestresses on the characteristics of guided wave generation and propagation, such as time-of-flight, amplitude and wave tuning properties of guided wave modes, are analyzed, based on the developed model. Finally, to overcome the limitations of conventional guided wave methods, a baseline-free detection technique by using nonlinear acoustics is developed for debonding identification in honeycomb sandwich structures. The finite element analysis is performed to understand effects of the interaction of two debonded interfaces upon dynamic behavior of the sandwich structure. Specific experimental study is also conducted on the honeycomb sandwich panel to validate the concept. This dissertation study aims to broaden the scope of existing guided wave methods for debonding detection in honeycomb sandwich structures, and provide some insights for health monitoring of in-service structures.

  8. Probability of Detection Study on Impact Damage to Honeycomb Composite Structure using Thermographic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Walker, James L., II

    2008-01-01

    A probability of detection study was performed for the detection of impact damage using flash heating infrared thermography on a full scale honeycomb composite structure. The honeycomb structure was an intertank structure from a previous NASA technology demonstration program. The intertank was fabricated from IM7/8552 carbon fiber/epoxy facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The intertank was impacted in multiple locations with a range of impact energies utilizing a spherical indenter. In a single blind study, the intertank was inspected with thermography before and after impact damage was incurred. Following thermographic inspection several impact sites were sectioned from the intertank and cross-sectioned for microscopic comparisons of NDE detection and actual damage incurred. The study concluded that thermographic inspection was a good method of detecting delamination damage incurred by impact. The 90/95 confidence level on the probability of detection was close to the impact energy that delaminations were first observed through cross-sectional analysis.

  9. SPERT Destructive Test - I on Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-07

    SPERT - Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests Destructive Test number 1 On Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core. A test studying the behavior of the reactor under destructive conditions on a light water moderated pool-type reactor with a plate-type core.

  10. SPERT Destructive Test - I on Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-05

    SPERT - Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests Destructive Test number 1 On Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core. A test studying the behavior of the reactor under destructive conditions on a light water moderated pool-type reactor with a plate-type core.

  11. Face Sheet/Core Disbond Growth in Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Subjected to Ground-Air-Ground Pressurization and In-Plane Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhi M.; Krueger, Ronald; Rinker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Typical damage modes in light honeycomb sandwich structures include face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture, both of which can pose a threat to the structural integrity of a component. These damage modes are of particular interest to aviation certification authorities since several in-service occurrences, such as rudder structural failure and other control surface malfunctions, have been attributed to face sheet/core disbonding. Extensive studies have shown that face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture can lead to damage propagation caused by internal pressure changes in the core. The increasing use of composite sandwich construction in aircraft applications makes it vitally important to understand the effect of ground-air-ground (GAG) cycles and conditions such as maneuver and gust loads on face sheet/core disbonding. The objective of the present study was to use a fracture mechanics based approach developed earlier to evaluate the loading at the disbond front caused by ground-air-ground pressurization and in-plane loading. A honeycomb sandwich panel containing a circular disbond at one face sheet/core interface was modeled with three-dimensional (3D) solid finite elements. The disbond was modeled as a discrete discontinuity and the strain energy release rate along the disbond front was computed using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed. The commercial finite element analysis software, Abaqus/Standard, was used for the analyses. The recursive pressure-deformation coupling problem was solved by representing the entrapped air in the honeycomb cells as filled cavities in Abaqus/Standard. The results show that disbond size, face sheet thickness and core thickness are important parameters that determine crack tip loading at the disbond front. Further, the pressure-deformation coupling was found to have an important load decreasing effect [6]. In this paper, a detailed problem description is provided first. Second, the analysis methodology is presented. The fracture mechanics approach used is described and the specifics of the finite element model, including the fluid-filled cavities, are introduced. Third, the initial model verification and validation are discussed. Fourth, the findings from a closely related earlier study [6] are summarized. These findings provided the basis for the current investigation. Fifth, an aircraft ascent scenario from 0 to 12192 m (0 to 40000 ft) is considered and the resulting crack tip loading at the disbond front is determined. In-plane loading to simulate maneuvers and gust conditions are also considered. Sixth, the results are shown for a curved panel, which was used to simulate potential fuselage applications. Finally, a brief summary of observations is presented and recommendations for improvement are provided.

  12. Lightweight Aluminum Mirrors Using Foam Core Sandwich Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Lyons, J., III; Budinoff, J.

    1999-01-01

    The possible use of all aluminum mirrors made from thin faceplates supported by aluminum foam is explored from an optomechanical design and fabrication perspective. Foam mirrors can be relatively cheaply and easily made using conventional foam fabrication and diamond turning; such a mirror recently flew for the first time on the Stardust mission. The proposed structural concept is highly weight efficient and should not be prone to quilting. The weight and structural stability of such mirrors is presented, along with plans underway at GSFC for developing this concept.

  13. Honeycomb-Fin Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Improved finned heat sink for electronic components more lightweight, inexpensive, and efficient. Designed for use with forced air, easily scaled up to dissipate power up to few hundred watts. Fins are internal walls of aluminum honeycomb structure. Cell structure gives strength to thin aluminum foil. Length of channels chosen for thermodynamic efficency; columns of cells combined in any reasonable number because flowing air distributed to all. Heat sink cools nearly as effectively at ends as near its center, no matter how many columns of cells combined.

  14. Nonlinear acoustics and honeycomb materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. O.

    2012-05-01

    The scope of research activity that Bruce Thompson embraced was very large. In this talk three different research topics that the author shared with Bruce are reviewed. They represent Bruce's introduction to NDE and include nonlinear acoustics, nondestructive measurements of adhesive bond strengths in honeycomb panels, and studies of flexural wave dispersion in honeycomb materials. In the first of these, four harmonics of a 30 Mhz finite amplitude wave were measured for both fused silica and aluminum single crystals with varying lengths and amounts of cold work using a capacity microphone with heterodyne receiver with a flat frequency response from 30 to 250 Mhz. The results for fused silica with no dislocation structure could be described by a model due to Fubini, originally developed for gases, that depends upon only the second and third order elastic constants and not the fourth and higher order constants. The same was not true for the aluminum with dislocation structures. These results raised some questions about models for harmonic generation in materials with dislocations. In the second topic, experiments were made to determine the adhesive bond strengths of honeycomb panels using the vibrational response of the panels (Chladni figures). The results showed that both the damping characteristics of panel vibrations as a whole and velocity of propagation of elastic waves that travel along the surface and sample the bondline can be correlated with destructively determined bond strengths. Finally, the phase velocity of flexural waves traveling along a 1-inch honeycomb sandwich panel was determined from 170 Hz to 50 Khz, ranging from 2.2×104 cm/sec at the low end to 1.18×105 cm/sec at 40 Khz. The dispersion arises from the finite thickness of the panel and agreed with the results of continuum models for the honeycomb. Above 40 Khz, this was not the case. The paper concludes with a tribute to Bruce for his many wonderful contributions and lessons beyond his technical legacy for all of us.

  15. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  16. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Peck, S. J.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1987-10-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range vapor chamber type heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for potential use on the space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include type of material, material and panel thickness, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. A thin-wall all-welded stainless steel design with methanol as the working fluid was the initial prototype unit. It was found that an aluminum panel could not be fabricated in the same manner as a stainless steel panel due to diffusion bonding and resistance welding considerations. Therefore, a formed and welded design was developed. The prototype consists of ten panels welded together into a large panel 122 by 24 by 0.15 in., with a heat rejection capability of 1000 watts and a fin efficiency of essentially 1.0.

  17. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Peck, S. J.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range vapor chamber type heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for potential use on the space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include type of material, material and panel thickness, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. A thin-wall all-welded stainless steel design with methanol as the working fluid was the initial prototype unit. It was found that an aluminum panel could not be fabricated in the same manner as a stainless steel panel due to diffusion bonding and resistance welding considerations. Therefore, a formed and welded design was developed. The prototype consists of ten panels welded together into a large panel 122 by 24 by 0.15 in., with a heat rejection capability of 1000 watts and a fin efficiency of essentially 1.0.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact Evaluation of Metal Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, John; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) [1], building 267 (Houston, Texas) between January 2003 and December 2005 to test the HVI performance of metal foams, as compared to the metal honeycomb panels currently in service. The HITF testing was conducted at the NASA JSC White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Eric L. Christiansen, Ph.D., and NASA Lead for Micro-Meteoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection requested these hypervelocity impact tests as part of shielding research conducted for the JSC Center Director Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project. The structure tested is a metal foam sandwich structure; a metal foam core between two metal facesheets. Aluminum and Titanium metals were tested for foam sandwich and honeycomb sandwich structures. Aluminum honeycomb core material is currently used in Orbiter Vehicle (OV) radiator panels and in other places in space structures. It has many desirable characteristics and performs well by many measures, especially when normalized by density. Aluminum honeycomb does not perform well in Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) Testing. This is a concern, as honeycomb panels are often exposed to space environments, and take on the role of Micrometeoroid / Orbital Debris (MMOD) shielding. Therefore, information on possible replacement core materials which perform adequately in all necessary functions of the material would be useful. In this report, HVI data is gathered for these two core materials in certain configurations and compared to gain understanding of the metal foam HVI performance.

  19. Numerical simulation of temperature field in horizontal core-filling continuous casting for copper cladding aluminum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-jun; Liu, Xin-hua; Wu, Yong-fu; Huang, Hai-you; Xie, Jian-xin

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state temperature field of horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) for producing copper cladding aluminum rods was simulated by finite element method to investigate the effects of key processing parameters on the positions of solid-liquid interfaces (SLIs) of copper and aluminum. It is found that mandrel tube length and mean withdrawing speed have significant effects on the SLI positions of both copper and aluminum. Aluminum casting temperature ( T Al) (1003-1123 K) and secondary cooling water flux (600-900 L·h-1) have little effect on the SLI of copper but cause the SLI of aluminum to move 2-4 mm. When T Al is in a range of 1043-1123 K, the liquid aluminum can fill continuously into the pre-solidified copper tube. Based on the numerical simulation, reasonable processing parameters were determined.

  20. Ceramic Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E.; Riccitiello, Salvatore R.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic honeycomb panels serve as lightweight, heat-resistant structural members. Depending on choice of ceramic materials, panels expected to withstand temperatures as high as 1,800 degree C. Honeycomb structure made by vapor-depositing ceramic on fabric substrate woven in honeycomb pattern, then eliminating substrate by oxidizing it. Fabric made of loosely woven polymer such as polyacrylonitrile. Impregnated with organic binder such as phenolic resin for stiffness.

  1. A novel method of testing the shear strength of thick honeycomb composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, A. J.; Nettles, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    Sandwich composites of aluminum and glass/phenolic honeycomb core were tested for shear strength before and after impact damage. The assessment of shear strength was performed in two ways; by four point bend testing of sandwich beams and by a novel double lap shear (DLS) test. This testing technique was developed so smaller specimens could be used, thus making the use of common lab scale fabrication and testing possible. The two techniques yielded similar data. The DLS test gave slightly lower shear strength values of the two methods but were closer to the supplier's values for shear strength.

  2. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes (stainless steel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for the NASA space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include: type of material, material and panel thicknesses, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. In addition, the overall performance of the honeycomb panel heat pipe was evaluated analytically.

  3. Nde of Bonded Aluminum Components on Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.; Foreman, Cory; Wendt, Scott; Kreitinger, Nicholas A.; Steffes, Gary J.

    2008-02-01

    Bonded aluminum structures have been commonly used on aircraft for many years, and many of these applications include flight control surfaces. These bonded structures can be made up of aluminum face sheets adhesively bonded to a central honeycomb core, or they could also be composed of machined components that are bonded in a tongue-in-groove type manner called Grid-Lock. Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) methods of bonded aluminum structures usually involve the detection of skin-to-core disbonds, core buckling and damage caused by impacts. In the case of Grid-Lock, NDI techniques are focused on the detection of failures in the tongue-in-groove adhesive joint. Three nondestructive inspection methods were applied to honeycomb sandwich structures and Grid-Lock panels. The three methods were computer aided tap test (CATT), air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT), and mechanical impedance analysis (MIA). The honeycomb structures tested consisted of structural panels and flight control surfaces from various aircraft. The Grid-Lock samples tested are laboratory specimens that simulate various defects. Experimental results and comparisons from each of these methods and samples will be presented.

  4. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; Xu, Huifang; Rathod, Shailendra; Shah, Pratik; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  5. Pre-stressing micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles to improve reactivity.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Valery I; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  6. General Method for the Synthesis of Ultrastable Core/Shell Quantum Dots by Aluminum Doping.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhichun; Yao, Wei; Kong, Long; Zhao, Yixin; Li, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have attracted extensive attention in various applications because of their unique optical and electronic properties. However, long-term photostability remains a challenge for their practical application. Here, we present a simple method to enhance the photostability of QDs against oxidation by doping aluminum into the shell of core/shell QDs. We demonstrate that Al in the coating shell can be oxidized to Al2O3, which can serve as a self-passivation layer on the surface of the core/shell QDs and effectively stop further photodegradation during long-term light irradiation. The prepared CdSe/CdS:Al QDs survived 24 h without significant degradation when they were subjected to intense illumination under LED light (450 nm, 0.35 W/cm(2)), whereas conventional CdSe/CdS QDs were bleached within 3 h. PMID:26389704

  7. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  8. Mechanical impedance inspection of aluminium honeycomb structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, B.S.; Guo, N.; Tui, C.G.; Teng, K.H.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of the capability of a mechanical impedance instrument, the MIA 3000, for detecting discontinuities in aluminum honeycomb structures. Good repeatability has been found. The system damping was measured using the half power method and discontinuities were found to produce an increase in damping due to their presence. This technique can aid the detection of discontinuities in aluminum honeycomb structures. The resonant frequency was found to decrease while system damping increased as the center of a discontinuity was approached. Discontinuity sizing using the single frequency test was investigated and some difficulties involved in this procedure are presented. The discontinuities were found to be reasonably accurately represented by a model for a vibrating plate which is rigidly clamped at its edges. It was also possible to use resonant frequency to determine the size of discontinuities in the range 40 mm (1.6 in.) to 90 mm (3.6 in.) in diameter.

  9. Acoustic performance of reiterated hierarchical honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainar, Naveen

    Sandwich panels constructed from honeycomb structures have been found to reduce sound transmission and improve vibration isolation. In this work, reiterated hierarchical honeycomb structures have been modeled for the core in sandwich panels and studied for sound transmission properties using finite element analysis. Several honeycomb unit cell geometries are considered, including, regular hexagonal, auxetic with properties of negative Poisson's ratio, and different reiterated hierarchical structures. Previous studies have shown that auxetic honeycomb structures exhibit improved sound transmission loss compared to regular honeycomb sandwich panels. Two different orientations of the honeycomb unit cell geometry have been studied, namely, the zigzag and armchair configurations, which are, rotated 90 degrees. Both regular and auxetic honeycombs have been used in both these configurations. The finite element model of the panels are used to extract natural frequencies and mode shapes and to perform steady state frequency response dynamic analysis up to 1000 Hz. The transmitted sound pressure levels on the surface of each structure is extracted and compared to study the influence of the reiterated hierarchy on sound transmission characteristics. The influence of corner reinforcement constructed by subtracting interior high-level hierarchical structure except at the vertices of the underlying lower-level honeycomb unit cell was also studied. Furthermore, a study was conducted to quantify the effect of changing the ratio of cell-wall thickness between various levels of hierarchy. Special focus on the limiting case of level-1 hierarchy with zero level-0 thickness is also studied. In all cases, the total mass was kept constant in order to isolate only stiffness and mass distribution effects. The results show that introduction of reiterated hierarchy in level-1 structures reduced the sound transmission of honeycomb sandwich panels compared to parent level-0 geometry. Results also showed that the corner reinforcement does not influence the sound transmission characteristics significantly, but does change the stiffness of the structure. For regular hexagonal honeycombs, changing the ratio of thickness between various levels of hierarchy did not affect the sound transmission significantly but made the structure stiffer when the ratio was increased, and reduced the stiffness when the ratio was decreased. For auxetic honeycomb structure, increasing the ratio made the structure less stiff, but reducing the ratio did not change the stiffness significantly.

  10. Characterization of the effects of water and disbond on ultrasonic signals in honeycomb composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. K.

    The flight control surfaces of the CF188 Hornet are composed of carbon/epoxy skin and aluminum honeycomb core composite material, which has a known susceptibility to water ingress. The rudder is most commonly affected and it is suspected that past in-flight failures have occurred due to the amount of bond degradation between the skin and core. Current inspection techniques involve the use of through-transmission ultrasonic testing. The presence of water within the core, however, provides coupling for the transmission of sound, which can result in the masking of certain disbonded areas. In this study, neutron radiography was used to detect the precise location of water within a test rudder. Through-transmission C-Scan ultrasonic testing was also carried out. Examination of the individual A-Scans revealed that two time-separated signals occurred where water was present. The signal from the sound that travelled down the aluminum core cell walls occurred earlier in time due to the higher velocity of sound in aluminum. The signal from the sound that travelled through the water occurred later as the velocity in water is approximately one quarter of the velocity in aluminum. Analysis of time-gated aluminum signals in the form of C-Scan amplitude or energy plots strongly suggested that the identification of areas of disbond, when water was present, is possible. This identification was achievable since the ultrasound transmission intensity for aluminum bonded to epoxy is three times that in the case of disbond, when water is present between the epoxy and aluminum.

  11. Honeycomb vs. Foam: Evaluating a Potential Upgrade to ISS Module Shielding for Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Hedman, Troy; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a honeycomb core in a multi-wall shielding configuration for protection against micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacts at hypervelocity is generally considered to be detrimental as the cell walls act to restrict fragment cloud expansion, creating a more concentrated load on the shield rear wall. However, mission requirements often prevent the inclusion of a dedicated MMOD shield, and as such, structural honeycomb sandwich panels are amongst the most prevalent shield types. Open cell metallic foams are a relatively new material with novel mechanical and thermal properties that have shown promising results in preliminary hypervelocity impact shielding evaluations. In this study, an ISS-representative MMOD shielding configuration has been modified to evaluate the potential performance enhancement gained through the substitution of honeycomb for open cell foam. The baseline shielding configuration consists of a double mesh outer layer, two honeycomb sandwich panels, and an aluminum rear wall. In the modified configuration the two honeycomb cores are replaced by open-cell foam. To compensate for the heavier core material, facesheets have been removed from the second sandwich panel in the modified configuration. A total of 19 tests on the double layer honeycomb and double layer foam configurations are reported. For comparable mechanical and thermal performance, the foam modifications were shown to provide a 15% improvement in critical projectile diameter at low velocities (i.e. 3 km/s) and a 3% increase at high velocities (i.e. 7 km/s) for normal impact. With increasing obliquity, the performance enhancement was predicted to increase, up to a 29% improvement at 60 (low velocity). Ballistic limit equations have been developed for the new configuration, and consider the mass of each individual shield component in order to maintain validity in the event of minor configuration modifications. Previously identified weaknesses of open cell foams for hypervelocity impact shielding such as large projectile diameters, low velocities, and high degrees of impact obliquity have all been investigated, and found to be negligible for the double-layer configuration.

  12. Extruded ceramic honeycomb and method

    DOEpatents

    Day, J. Paul

    1995-04-04

    Extruded low-expansion ceramic honeycombs comprising beta-spodumene solid solution as the principal crystal phase and with less than 7 weight percent of included mullite are produced by compounding an extrusion batch comprising a lithium aluminosilicate glass powder and a clay additive, extruding a green honeycomb body from the batch, and drying and firing the green extruded cellular honeycomb to crystallize the glass and clay into a low-expansion spodumene ceramic honeycomb body.

  13. Deformed Honeycomb Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yuan-Kang; Kao, Shin-Shin; Hsu, Lih-Hsing

    2008-11-01

    Assume that m, n and s are integers with m⩾2, n⩾4, 0honeycomb tori GHT (m,n,s) have been recognized as an attractive architecture to existing torus interconnection networks in parallel and distributed applications. Among the various families of graphs of GHT (m,n,s) numerous studies are devoted to honeycomb hexagonal torus HT (n) due to its nice symmetrical structure. Although each vertex of HT (n) is described by a three-dimensional coordinate (x,y,z), the graph grows uniformly in the three directions. In this article, we propose a new class of graphs extended from HT (n), namely, deformed honeycomb torus DHT (h,l,r). DHT (h,l,r) is defined to allow the graph to grow in the three independent dimensions. We prove that this more general class of graphs still remains a subset of the generalized honeycomb torus. Furthermore, we have a concrete correspondence between any DHT (h,l,r) and the associated GHT (m,n,s).

  14. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  15. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  16. Titanium Honeycomb Panel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical tests were performed on a titanium honeycomb sandwich panel to experimentally validate the hypersonic wing panel concept and compare test data with analysis. Details of the test article, test fixture development, instrumentation, and test results are presented. After extensive testing to 900 deg. F, non-destructive evaluation of the panel has not detected any significant structural degradation caused by the applied thermal-mechanical loads.

  17. Flight service evaluation of two aluminum-brazed titanium spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The long-term service evaluation of two aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi) honeycomb flight spoilers was concluded. The two spoilers had about 7.5 years of commercial flight experience on All Nippon Airways Model 737 aircraft. All Nippon Airways was selected because Japan has one of the most severe marine-industrial environments in the world. The results indicated that both flight spoilers still had the same load-carrying capability as when they were originally installed. No direct evidence of any corrosion was observed on either spoiler. Another significant accomplishment of this effort was the development of a braze design for efficiently distributing point loads from the fittings and skin into the honeycomb core.

  18. Experimental study of acoustical characteristics of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Portia Renee

    Loss factor measurements were performed on sandwich panels to determine the effects of different skin and core materials on the acoustical properties. Results revealed inserting a viscoelastic material in the core's mid-plane resulted in the highest loss factor. Panels constructed with carbon-fiber skins exhibited larger loss factors than glass-fiber skins. Panels designed to achieve subsonic wave speed did not show a significant increase in loss factor above the coincidence frequency. The para-aramid core had a larger loss factor value than the meta-aramid core. Acoustic absorption coefficients were measured for honeycomb sandwiches designed to incorporate multiple sound-absorbing devices, including Helmholtz resonators and porous absorbers. The structures consisted of conventional honeycomb cores filled with closed-cell polyurethane foams of various densities and covered with perforated composite facesheets. Honeycomb cores filled with higher density foam resulted in higher absorption coefficients over the frequency range of 50 -- 1250 Hz. However, this trend was not observed at frequencies greater than 1250 Hz, where the honeycomb filled with the highest density foam yielded the lowest absorption coefficient among samples with foam-filled cores. The energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression method (ERSA) was employed to determine the relationship between vibration suppression and acoustic damping for a honeycomb sandwich panel. Results indicated the ERSA method simultaneously reduced the sound transmitted through the panel and the panel vibration. The largest reduction in sound transmitted through the panel was 14.3% when the vibrations of the panel were reduced by 7.3%. The influence of different design parameters, such as core density, core material, and cell size on wave speeds of honeycomb sandwich structures was experimentally analyzed. Bending and shear wave speeds were measured and related to the transmission loss performance for various material configurations. The shear modulus of the core showed maximum influence on the wave speeds of the samples, while cell size did not have a significant influence on wave speeds or on transmission loss. Skin material affected wave speeds only in the pure bending regime. Honeycomb sandwich structures with a subsonic core and thus reduced wave speed showed increased transmission loss compared to samples without a subsonic core.

  19. Heat Shielding Characteristics and Thermostructural Performance of a Superalloy Honeycomb Sandwich Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2004-01-01

    Heat-transfer, thermal bending, and mechanical buckling analyses have been performed on a superalloy "honeycomb" thermal protection system (TPS) for future hypersonic flight vehicles. The studies focus on the effect of honeycomb cell geometry on the TPS heat-shielding performance, honeycomb cell wall buckling characteristics, and the effect of boundary conditions on the TPS thermal bending behavior. The results of the study show that the heat-shielding performance of a TPS panel is very sensitive to change in honeycomb core depth, but insensitive to change in honeycomb cell cross-sectional shape. The thermal deformations and thermal stresses in the TPS panel are found to be very sensitive to the edge support conditions. Slight corrugation of the honeycomb cell walls can greatly increase their buckling strength.

  20. Honeycomb chassis for electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, W. S.; Stebbins, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    In new electronic chassis support, machined honeycomb members are used to change basic relationship between chassis and support structure. Improved chassis combines internal and external support and heat dissipation by altering chassis internal geometry. Honeycomb materials allow mechanical support and thermal load sharing to be combined at lower weight and lower cost than previous equipment.

  1. Design Optimization and Analysis of a Composite Honeycomb Intertank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Jeff; Spurrier, Mile

    1999-01-01

    Intertanks, the structure between tanks of launch vehicles, are prime candidates for weight reduction of rockets. This paper discusses the optimization and detailed follow up analysis and testing of a 96 in. diameter, 77 in. tall intertank. The structure has composite face sheets with an aluminum honeycomb core. The ends taper to a thick built up laminate for a double lap bolted splice joint interface. It is made in 8 full length panels joined with bonded double lap joints. The nominal load is 4000 lb/in. Optimization is by Genetic Algorithm and minimizes weight by varying core thickness, number and orientation of acreage and buildup plies, and the size, number and spacing of bolts. A variety of design cases were run with populations up to 2000 and chromosomes as long as 150 bits. Constraints were buckling; face stresses (normal, shear, wrinkling and dimpling); bolt stress; and bolt hole stresses (bearing, net tension, wedge splitting, shear out and tension/shear out). Analysis is by a combination of elasticity solutions and empirical data. After optimization, a series of coupon tests were performed in conjunction with a rigorous analysis involving a variety of finite element models. This analysis and testing resulted in several small changes to the optimized design. The equation used for hole bearing strength was found to be inadequate, resulting in thicker ends. The core thickness increased 0.05", and potting compound was added in the taper to strengthen the facesheet bond. The intertank has undergone a 250,000 lb limit load test and been mated with a composite liquid hydrogen tank. The tank/intertank unit is being installed in a test stand where it will see 200 thermal/load cycles. Afterwards the intertank will be demated and loaded in compression to failure.

  2. Optimized Non-Obstructive Particle Damping (NOPD) Treatment for Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panossian, H.

    2008-01-01

    Non-Obstructive Particle Damping (NOPD) technology is a passive vibration damping approach whereby metallic or non-metallic particles in spherical or irregular shapes, of heavy or light consistency, and even liquid particles are placed inside cavities or attached to structures by an appropriate means at strategic locations, to absorb vibration energy. The objective of the work described herein is the development of a design optimization procedure and discussion of test results for such a NOPD treatment on honeycomb (HC) composite structures, based on finite element modeling (FEM) analyses, optimization and tests. Modeling and predictions were performed and tests were carried out to correlate the test data with the FEM. The optimization procedure consisted of defining a global objective function, using finite difference methods, to determine the optimal values of the design variables through quadratic linear programming. The optimization process was carried out by targeting the highest dynamic displacements of several vibration modes of the structure and finding an optimal treatment configuration that will minimize them. An optimal design was thus derived and laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate its performance under different vibration environments. Three honeycomb composite beams, with Nomex core and aluminum face sheets, empty (untreated), uniformly treated with NOPD, and optimally treated with NOPD, according to the analytically predicted optimal design configuration, were tested in the laboratory. It is shown that the beam with optimal treatment has the lowest response amplitude. Described below are results of modal vibration tests and FEM analyses from predictions of the modal characteristics of honeycomb beams under zero, 50% uniform treatment and an optimal NOPD treatment design configuration and verification with test data.

  3. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  4. Effect of geometric parameters on the in-plane crushing behavior of honeycombs and honeycombs with facesheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atli-Veltin, Bilim

    In aerospace field, use of honeycombs in energy absorbing applications is a very attractive concept since they are relatively low weight structures and their crushing behavior satisfies the requirements of ideal energy absorbing applications. This dissertation is about the utilization of honeycomb crushing in energy absorbing applications and maximizing their specific energy absorption (SEA) capacity by modifying their geometry. In-plane direction crushing of honeycombs is investigated with the help of simulations conducted with ABAQUS. Due to the nonlinearity of the problem an optimization technique could not be implemented; however, the results of the trend studies lead to geometries with improved SEA. This study has two objectives; the first is to obtain modified cell geometry for a hexagonal honeycomb cell in order to provide higher energy absorption for minimum weight relative to the regular hexagonal cell geometry which has 30° cell angle and walls at equal length. The results of the first objective show that by increasing the cell angle, increasing wall thickness and reducing vertical wall length it is possible to increase the SEA 4.8 times; where the honeycomb with modified geometry provided 3.3 kJ/kg SEA and with regular geometry 0.68 kJ/kg SEA. The second objective considers integration of the energy absorbing honeycombs into the helicopter subfloor, possibly as the web section of a keel beam. In-plane direction crushing of a honeycomb core sandwiched between two facesheets is simulated. Effects of core and facesheet geometric parameters on the energy absorption are investigated, and modified geometries are suggested. For the sandwich structure with thin facesheets increasing cell angle, increasing wall thicknesses and decreasing the cell depth increase the SEA. For the ones with thick facesheet reducing vertical wall length, increasing wall thicknesses and reducing the cell depth increase the SEA. The results show that regular honeycomb geometry with thin facesheets has SEA of 7.24 kJ/kg and with thick facesheets 13.16 kJ/kg. When the geometries are modified the SEA increases to 20.5 kJ/kg for the core with thin facesheets and 53.47 kJ/kg for the core with thick facesheets. The key finding of the dissertation is that the in-plane direction crushing of the honeycombs with facesheets has great potential to be used for the energy absorbing applications since their SEA levels are high enough to make them attractive for applications where high crash loads need to be absorbed such as helicopter crash.

  5. A comparative investigation for the nondestructive testing of honeycomb structures by holographic interferometry and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Genest, M.; Bouchagier, L.; Kourousis, D.; Tsimogiannis, A.; Anastassopoulous, A.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.

    2010-03-01

    The nondestructive testing (NDT) of honeycomb sandwich structures has been the subject of several studies. Classical techniques such as ultrasound testing and x-rays are commonly used to inspect these structures. Holographic interferometry (HI) and infrared thermography (IT) have shown to be interesting alternatives. Holography has been successfully used to detect debonding between the skin and the honeycomb core on honeycomb panels under a controlled environment. Active thermography has proven to effectively identify the most common types of defects (water ingress, debonding, crushed core, surface impacts) normally present in aeronautical honeycomb parts while inspecting large surfaces in a fast manner. This is very attractive for both the inspection during the manufacturing process and for in situ regular NDT assessment. A comparative experimental investigation is discussed herein to evaluate the performance of HI and IT for the NDT on a honeycomb panel with fabricated defects. The main advantages and limitations of both techniques are enumerated and discussed.

  6. Honeycomb lattices with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Meryl A.; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a variant of the honeycomb lattice in which we create defects by randomly exchanging adjacent bonds, producing a random tiling with a distribution of polygon edges. We study the percolation properties on these lattices as a function of the number of exchanged bonds using an alternative computational method. We find the site and bond percolation thresholds are consistent with other three-coordinated lattices with the same standard deviation in the degree distribution of the dual; here we can produce a continuum of lattices with a range of standard deviations in the distribution. These lattices should be useful for modeling other properties of random systems as well as percolation.

  7. Design Optimization and Analysis of a Composite Honeycomb Intertank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Jeffrey; Spurrier, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Intertanks, the structure between tanks of launch vehicles, are prime candidates for weight reduction of rockets. This paper discusses the optimization and detailed analysis of a 96 in (2.44 m) diameter, 77 in (1.85 m) tall intertank. The structure has composite face sheets and an aluminum honeycomb core. The ends taper to a thick built up laminate for a double lap bolted shear joint. It is made in 8 full length panels joined with bonded double lap joints. The nominal load is 4000 lb/in (7 x 10(exp 5) N/m). Optimization is by Genetic Algorithm and minimizes weight by varying C, core thickness, number and orientation of acreage and buildup plies, and the size, number and spacing of bolts. A variety of cases were run with populations up to 2000 and chromosomes as long as 150 bits. Constraints were buckling, face stresses (normal, shear, wrinkling and dimpling, bolt stress, and bolt hole stresses (bearing, net tension, wedge splitting, shear out and tension/shear out). Analysis is by a combination of theoretical solutions and empirical data. After optimization, a series of coupon tests were performed in conjunction with a rigorous analysis involving a variety of finite element models. The analysis and test resulted in several small changes to the optimized design. The intertank has undergone a 250,000 lb (1.1 x 10(exp 6) N) limit load test and been mated with a composite liquid hydrogen tank. The tank/intertank unit is being installed in a test stand where it will see 200 thermal/load cycles. Afterwards the intertank will be demated and loaded in compression to failure.

  8. Finite Element Development of Honeycomb Panel Configurations with Improved Transmission Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob; Castle, William D.

    2006-01-01

    The higher stiffness-to-mass ratio of a honeycomb panel compared to a homogeneous panel results in a lower acoustic critical frequency. Above the critical frequency the panel flexural wave speed is acoustically fast and the structure becomes a more efficient radiator with associated lower sound transmission loss. Finite element models of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented featuring areas where the core is removed from the radiating face sheet disrupting the supersonic flexural and shear wave speeds that exist in the baseline honeycomb panel. These modified honeycomb panel structures exhibit improved transmission loss for a pre-defined diffuse field sound excitation. The models were validated by the sound transmission loss of honeycomb panels measured in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. A honeycomb core panel configuration is presented exhibiting a transmission loss improvement of 3-11 dB compared to a honeycomb baseline panel over a frequency range from 170 Hz to 1000 Hz. The improved transmission loss panel configuration had a 5.1% increase in mass over the baseline honeycomb panel, and approximately twice the deflection when excited by a static force.

  9. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  10. Honeycomb Weathering of Limestone Formations

    Honeycomb weathering of sandstone located on the shores of Puget Sound occurs when expanding salt crystals break fragments of rock, creating a small hole that becomes larger as the process repeats itself over time....

  11. Versatile honeycomb matrix heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal protection system for atmospheric entry of a vehicle, the system including a honeycomb structure with selected cross sectional shapes that receives and holds thermally cured thermal protection (TP) blocks that have corresponding cross sectional shapes. Material composition for TP blocks in different locations can be varied to account for different atmospheric heating characteristics at the different locations. TP block side walls may be attached to all, or to less than all, the corresponding honeycomb structure side walls.

  12. Investigation of honeycomb structure using pulse infrared thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2010-11-01

    To reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, composite structure has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures, such as adhesive bonding and honeycomb structure. Honeycomb structures composed by a honeycomb core between two facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. With the large increase in the use of composite materials and honeycomb structures, the need for high speed, large area inspection for fracture critical, sub-surface defects in aircraft, missiles and marine composites led to broad acceptance of infrared based NDT methods. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, analyze the thermal sequence and intensity graph got by this methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting disbonding defect, can distinguish the location and the dimension of the defect exactly.

  13. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOEpatents

    Holleran, Louis M.; Lipp, G. Daniel

    1999-01-01

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb.

  14. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOEpatents

    Holleran, L.M.; Lipp, G.D.

    1999-08-03

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb. 7 figs.

  15. Aluminum/uranium fuel foaming/recriticality considerations for production reactor core-melt accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Ellison, P.G. ); Cronenberg, A.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Severe accident studies for the Savannah River production reactors indicate that if coherent fuel melting and relocation occur in the absence of target melting, in-vessel recriticality may be achieved. In this paper, fuel-melt/target interaction potential is assessed where fission gas-induced fuel foaming and melt attack on target material are evaluated and compared with available data. Models are developed to characterize foams for irradiated aluminum-based fuel. Predictions indicate transient foaming, the extent of which is governed by fission gas inventory, heating transient conditions, and bubble coalescence behavior. The model also indicates that metallic foams are basically unstable and will collapse, which largely depends on film tenacity and melt viscosity considerations. For high-burnup fuel, extensive foaming lasting tens of seconds is predicted, allowing molten fuel to contact and cause melt ablation of concentric targets. For low-burnup fuel, contact can not be assured. 9 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Polymer optical waveguide composed of europium-aluminum-acrylate composite core for compact optical amplifier and laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Marina; Yamashita, Kenichi; Fukui, Toshimi; Ishigure, Takaaki

    2015-02-01

    We successfully fabricate polymer waveguides with Europium-Aluminum (Eu-Al) polymer composite core using the Mosquito method that utilizes a microdispenser for realizing a compact waveguide optical amplifiers and lasers. Rareearth (RE) ions are widely used as the gain medium for fiber lasers and optical fiber amplifiers. However, high concentration doping of rare-earth-ion leads to the concentration quenching resulting in observing less gain in optical amplification. For addressing the concentration quenching problem, a rare-earth metal (RE-M) polymer composite has been proposed by KRI, Inc. to be a waveguide core material. Actually, 10-wt% RE doping into organic polymer materials was already achieved. Hence, realization of compact and high-efficiency waveguide amplifiers and lasers have been anticipated using the RE-M polymer composite. In this paper, a microdispenser is adopted to fabricate a Eu-doped polymer waveguide. Then, it is experimentally confirmed that the low-loss waveguides are fabricated with a high reproducibility. Optical gain is estimated by measuring the amplified spontaneous emission using the variable stripe length method. The fabricated waveguide exhibits an optical gain as high as 7.1 dB/cm at 616-nm wavelength.

  17. Liquid ingress recognition in honeycomb structure by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Zheng

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed thermography has been proven to be a fast and effective method to detect fluid ingress in aircraft honeycomb structure; however, water and hydraulic oil may have similar appearance in the thermal image sequence. It is meaningful to identify what kind of liquid ingress it is for aircraft maintenance. In this study, honeycomb specimens with glass fiber and aluminum skin are injected different kinds of liquids: water and oil. Pulsed thermography is adopted; a recognition method is proposed to first get the reference curve by linear fitting the beginning of the logarithmic curve, and then an algorithm based on the thermal contrast between liquid and reference is used to recognize what kind of fluid it is by calculating their thermal properties. It is verified with the results of theory and the finite element simulation.

  18. Method of fabricating lightweight honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Pickering, Michael (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for fabricating lightweight honeycomb type structures out of material such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon (S). The lightweight structure consists of a core to define the shape and size of the structure. The core is coated with an appropriate deposit such as SiC or Si to give the lightweight structure strength and stiffness and for bonding the lightweight structure to another surface. The core is fabricated from extremely thin ribs of appropriately stiff and strong material such as graphite. First, a graphite core consisting of an outer hexagonal cell with six inner triangular cells is constructed from the graphite ribs. The graphite core may be placed on the back-up side of a SiC faceplate and then coated with SiC to produce a monolithic structure without the use of any bonding agent. Cores and methods for the fabrication thereof in which the six inner triangular cells are further divided into a plurality of cells are also disclosed.

  19. An Al@Al2O3@SiO2/polyimide composite with multilayer coating structure fillers based on self-passivated aluminum cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Wang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a capability in combining two kinds of nanosize and microsize particles of core-shell Al@Al2O3@SiO2 with aluminum cores to form multilayer coating structures as fillers in polyimide matrix for electronic applications. The core-shell Al@Al2O3@SiO2 structure can effectively adjust the relative permittivity (about 12 @1 MHz) of the composite while keeping lower dielectric loss (0.015 @1 MHz) compared to that uncoated aluminum particles. The combination of "macro" and "micro" coating can significantly improve the dielectric properties of the composites. This work provides a useful method to modify the fillers for polymer matrix nanocomposite materials.

  20. Honeycomb mirrors of borosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of different types of honeycomb mirrors with various kinds of borosilicate glass is discussed. Borosilicate glass is much less expensive to make than zero expansion glass, and can be used for ground-based applications. A mirror 60 cm in diameter made with a slotted strut or egg-crate honeycomb of 6 mm polished Pyrex plate is shown. The faceplates are 12 mm thick, laminated from the same 6 mm sheet. The result of an interferometric test is shown, with residual errors of about wavelength/8 RMS. An alternative fabrication technique for very large mirrors which require high quality bonds between separate sheets of thick Pyrex is described. The result of a recent test casting of a 60 cm honeycomb structure made in a mold with towers 14 cm square and 6 mm gaps between is shown, and methods to cast an entire mirror in one operation are discussed.

  1. Millimeter Wave Holographical Inspection of Honeycomb Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Stefes, G.; Hepburn, Frank L.; Hepburn, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-layered composite structures manufactured with honeycomb, foam or balsa wood cores are finding increasing utility in a variety of aerospace, transportation, and infrastructure applications. Due to the low conductivity and inhomogeneity associated with these composites standard nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are not always capable of inspecting their interior for various defects caused during the manufacturing process or as a result of in-service loading. On the contrary, microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods are well-suited for inspecting these structures since signals at these frequencies readily penetrate through these structures and reflect from different interior boundaries revealing the presence of a wide range of defects such as disbond, delamination, moisture and oil intrusion, impact damage, etc. Millimeter wave frequency spectrum spans 30 GHz - 300 GHz with corresponding wavelengths of 10 - 1 mm. Due to the inherent short wavelengths at these frequencies, one can produce high spatial resolution images of these composites either using real-antenna focused or synthetic-aperture focused methods. In addition, incorporation of swept-frequency in the latter method (i.e., holography) results in high-resolution three-dimensional images. This paper presents the basic steps behind producing such images at millimeter wave frequencies and the results of two honeycomb composite panels are demonstrated at Q-band (33-50 GHz). In addition, these results are compared to previous results using X-ray computed tomography.

  2. Quasi-static and impact tests of honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, G.; Klepaczko, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper the quasi-static and instrumented compression impact testing of two kinds of aluminum-alloy honeycomb are reported. Those two types of honeycomb called Hard (H) and Soft (S) were tested. The specimens in cubical form of dimensions 60 mm × 60 mm × 120 mm were made with and without the front aluminum alloy plates (thickness 1.0 mm) cemented to the specimen two faces. The tests have been performed along the largest dimension that is 120 mm, which is parallel to the aluminum sheet profiles forming the honeycomb. A wide range of compression velocities from the quasi-static rate (V0 = 10 mm/min) to the highest impact velocity V6 = 120 m/s were applied. The total number of velocities applied, including the quasi-static loading, was six. Several series of tests were performed. The first two were carried out with the flat-ended strikers of specific masses, which were adequate to each impact velocity. In order to obtain an adequate displacement of crushing the condition of constant kinetic energy of a striker was assumed. In addition, conical strikers were applied with the cone angle 120circ. Application of the direct impact arrangement along with properly instrumented 9m long Hopkinson bar of Nylon with diameter 80 mm enabled for a wave dispersion analysis to be applied. The crushing force versus time could be exactly determined at the specimen-bar interface by application of an inverse technique along with the theory of visco-elastic wave propagation.

  3. A study of PV/T collector with honeycomb heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, F.; Othman, M. Y. H.; Yatim, B.; Ruslan, H.; Sopian, K.; Ibarahim, Z.

    2013-11-01

    This paper present a study of a single pass photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar collector combined with honeycomb heat exchanger. A PV/T system is a combination of photovoltaic panel and solar thermal components in one integrated system. In order to enhance the performance of the system, a honeycomb heat exchanger is installed horizontally into the channel located under the PV module. Air is used as the heat remover medium. The system is tested with and without the honeycomb at irradiance of 828 W/m2 and mass flow rate spanning from 0.02 kg/s to 0.13 kg/s. It is observed that the aluminum honeycomb is capable of enhancing the thermal efficiency of the system efficiently. At mass flow rate of 0.11 kg/s, the thermal efficiency of the system without honeycomb is 27% and with honeycomb is 87 %. Throughout the range of the mass flow rate, the electrical efficiency of the PV module improved by 0.1 %. The improved design is suitable to be further investigated as solar drying system and space heating.

  4. Elastic wave propagation in hexagonal honeycomb sandwich composite by using piezoelectric actuators/sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G. L.; Song, F.; Kim, J.

    2009-03-01

    Honeycomb composite structures have been widely used in aerospace and aeronautic industries due to their unique characteristics. Due to the complex nature of honeycomb composite with the celled core, structural health monitoring (SHM) of honeycomb composite panels inherently imposes many challenges, which requires a detailed knowledge of dynamic elastic responses of such complex structures in a broad frequency domain. This paper gives numerical and experimental analyses of elastic wave propagation phenomena in sandwich panels with a honeycomb core, especially when the frequency domain of interest is relative high. Numerical simulation based on the Finite Element (FE) method is first performed to investigate wave generation and reception using piezoelectric actuators/sensors. The effectiveness of homogenized core model is discussed, compared with the dynamic responses based on honeycomb celled core model. The reliability of the simulated wave will be verified with the experimental results. Specific attention will be paid on core effects on group wave velocity. This research will establish a solid theoretical foundation for the future study of the structural health monitoring in the composites.

  5. Impact-limiting materials characterization. [Structural and thermal testing of Al honeycombs and polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R. E.; Duffey, T. A.; McConnell, P.

    1991-01-01

    Goal in the design of an impact limiter (foams or honeycombs) for packaging of radioactive materials is to minimize the deceleration loads during a drop onto an unyielding target, and to reduce the effects of a fire. Methods are being developed for selecting impact-limiting materials. Figures of merit have been developed for screening both structural and thermal response; they have been applied to aluminum honeycombs and polyurethane foams. Three figures of merit are presented for the structural response, one figure for the thermal response (minimize the heat flux into the containment boundary). 11 figs., 6 refs. (DLC)

  6. Development of NDE to monitor bond degradation in aircraft honeycomb components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Susan J.; Scala, Christine M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents results of recent research at DSTO Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory to develop NDE techniques to assess bond degradation in metal-skin honeycomb and composite skin honeycomb control surfaces. In particular, it covers the detection of fillet bond failure where the honeycomb core and adhesive separate. Realistic fillet bond failure specimens, one of which had only 20% of the good bond strength, were generated by the application of spray-release agent to the honeycomb. 20MHz ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging was successfully used to detect fillet bond failure in these specimens. This technique was successful in detecting defined areas of fillet bond failure for a range of skin type and thickness Promising results were also obtained for the application to actual components, whilst also highlighting effects due to the presence of repairs. Further work will involve the evaluation of a range of other NDE methods to the detection and sizing of fillet bond failure.

  7. Structural Physics of Bee Honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-03-01

    Honeybee combs have aroused interest in the ability of honeybees to form regular hexagonal geometric constructs since ancient times. Here we use a real space technique based on the pair distribution function (PDF) and radial distribution function (RDF), and a reciprocal space method utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) to quantify the order for a range of honeycombs made by Apis mellifera. The PDFs and RDFs are fit with a series of Gaussian curves. We characterize the order in the honeycomb using a real space order parameter, OP3, to describe the order in the combs and a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller order parameter, u, is derived. Both OP3 and u take values from [0, 1] where the value one represents perfect order. The analyzed combs have values of OP3 from 0.33 to 0.60 and values of u from 0.83 to 0.98. RDF fits of honeycomb histograms show that naturally made comb can be crystalline in a 2D ordered structural sense, yet is more `liquid-like' than cells made on `foundation' wax. We show that with the assistance of man-made foundation wax, honeybees can manufacture highly ordered arrays of hexagonal cells.

  8. Bosonic edge states in gapped honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaiming; Niu, Yuekun; Chen, Shu; Feng, Shiping

    2016-03-01

    By quantum Monte Carlo simulations of bosons in gapped honeycomb lattices, we show the existence of bosonic edge states. For a single layer honeycomb lattice, bosonic edge states can be controlled to appear, cross the gap, and merge into bulk states by an on-site potential applied on the outermost sites of the boundary. On a bilayer honeycomb lattice, A bosonic edge state traversing the gap at half filling is demonstrated. The topological origin of the bosonic edge states is discussed with pseudo Berry curvature. The results will simulate experimental studies of these exotic bosonic edge states with ultracold bosons trapped in honeycomb optical lattices.

  9. Berry curvature of interacting bosons in a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Sengupta, Pinaki; Batrouni, George G.; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider soft-core bosons with on-site interaction loaded in the honeycomb lattice with different site energies for the two sublattices. Using both a mean-field approach and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the topology of the honeycomb lattice results in a nonvanishing Berry curvature for the band structure of the single-particle excitations of the system. This Berry curvature induces an anomalous Hall effect when driving the system out of equilibrium. It is seen by studying the time evolution of a wave packet, namely, a superfluid ground state in a harmonic trap, subjected either to a constant force (Bloch oscillations) or to a sudden shift of the trap center.

  10. Development of Pyrrone structural forms for honeycomb filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The development of techniques for the preparation of Pyrrone structural foams for use as honeycomb filler is described. The feasibility of preparing foams from polymers formed by the condensation of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB), or 3,3',4,4'-tetraaminobenzophenone (TABP), with 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) was investigated. Initially, most of the effort was devoted to preparing Pyrrone prepolymers with improved and more reproducible foaming properties for making chemically blown foams. When it became apparent that very high curing shrinkages would not allow the use of unfilled Pyrrone prepolymers in a foam-in-place process, emphasis was shifted from chemically blown foams to syntactic foams. Syntactic foam formulations containing hollow carbon microspheres were developed. Syntactic foams made from selected formulations were found to have very low coefficients of thermal expansion. A technique was developed for the emplacement of Pyrrone syntactic foam formulations in honeycomb core structures.

  11. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks. Each cell is completely uniform, maintaining the shape of the inserted mandrel. Furthermore, the layup creates pressure that insures node bond strength. Each node is a composite laminate using only the inherent resin system to form the bond. This contrasts starkly with the other known method of producing composite honeycomb, in which individual corrugations are formed, cured, and then bonded together in a secondary process. By varying the size of the mandrels within the layup, varying degrees of density can be achieved. Typical sizes are 3/8 and 3/16 in. (approximately 10 and 5 millimeters). Cell sizes up to 1 in. (approximately 25 millimeters) have been manufactured. Similarly, the shape of the core can be altered for a flexible honeycomb structure.

  12. Increased power to weight ratio of piezoelectric energy harvesters through integration of cellular honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharan, N.; Thompson, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    The limitations posed by batteries have compelled the need to investigate energy harvesting methods to power small electronic devices that require very low operational power. Vibration based energy harvesting methods with piezoelectric transduction in particular has been shown to possess potential towards energy harvesters replacing batteries. Current piezoelectric energy harvesters exhibit considerably lower power to weight ratio or specific power when compared to batteries the harvesters seek to replace. To attain the goal of battery-less self-sustainable device operation the power to weight ratio gap between piezoelectric energy harvesters and batteries need to be bridged. In this paper the potential of integrating lightweight honeycomb structures with existing piezoelectric device configurations (bimorph) towards achieving higher specific power is investigated. It is shown in this study that at low excitation frequency ranges, replacing the solid continuous substrate of conventional bimorph with honeycomb structures of the same material results in a significant increase in power to weight ratio of the piezoelectric harvester. At higher driving frequency ranges it is shown that unlike the traditional piezoelectric bimorph with solid continuous substrate, the honeycomb substrate bimorph can preserve optimum global design parameters through manipulation of honeycomb unit cell parameters. Increased operating lifetime and design flexibility of the honeycomb core piezoelectric bimorph is demonstrated as unit cell parameters of the honeycomb structures can be manipulated to alter mass and stiffness properties of the substrate, resulting in unit cell parameter significantly influencing power generation.

  13. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in risk analysis software, and includes the effect of panel thickness, core density, and facesheet material properties. A comparison between the shielding performance of foam core sandwich panel structures and common MMOD shielding configurations is made for both conservative (additional 35% non-ballistic mass) and optimistic (additional mass equal to 30% of bumper mass) considerations. Suggestions to improve the shielding performance of foam core sandwich panels are made, including the use of outer mesh layers, intermediate fabric/composite layers, and varying pore density.

  14. Constraints on formation processes of two coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions: a study of mantles, islands and cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Many coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) contain features that are inconsistent with equilibrium liquid crystallization models of origin. Spinel-free islands (SFIs) in spinel-rich cores of Type B CAIs are examples of such features. One model previously proposed for the origin of Allende 5241, a Type B1 CAI containing SFIs, involves the capture and assimilation of xenoliths by a liquid droplet in the solar nebula (El Goresy et al, 1985; MacPherson et al 1989). This study reports new textural and chemical zoning data from 5241 and identifies previously unrecognized chemical zoning patterns in the melilite mantle and in a SFI. -from Author

  15. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  16. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. [airframe integrated scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  17. Detection of Skin Disbond in Honeycombs and Coating Detachment by a Laser Acoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, A.; Campagne, B.; Néron, C.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2007-03-01

    Many engineering structures are composite and include for example a protective coating or a bonded layer. A novel technique, close to laser-ultrasonics but significantly different, has been developed for the detection of disbonds between the coating or the bonded layer and the substrate. It is also applicable to the detection of core unbonds in honeycomb structures. The technique is based on the thermoelastic excitation by a pulsed laser of the top layer or top skin which is driven into vibration if it is detached from the substrate underneath. This vibration is then detected by a second laser coupled to a photorefractive interferometer. The technique can be made very flexible by using optical fiber coupling. One foresees its application to the in-service inspection of aerospace structures for the detection of core unbonds in honeycombs or near surface delaminations. Examples of application to honeycombs and to various coatings are presented.

  18. Ceramic Honeycomb Structures and Method Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E.; Riccitiello, Salvatore R.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing ceramic articles and the articles, the process comprising the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and/or chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of a honeycomb structure. Specifically the present invention relates to a method for the production of a ceramic honeycomb structure, including: (a) obtaining a loosely woven fabric/binder wherein the fabric consists essentially of metallic, ceramic or organic fiber and the binder consists essentially of an organic or inorganic material wherein the fabric/binder has and retains a honeycomb shape, with the proviso that when the fabric is metallic or ceramic the binder is organic only; (b) substantially evenly depositing at least one layer of a ceramic on the fabric/binder of step (a); and (c) recovering the ceramic coated fiber honeycomb structure. In another aspect, the present invention relates to a method for the manufacture of a lightweight ceramic-ceramic composite honeycomb structure, which process comprises: (d) pyrolyzing a loosely woven fabric a honeycomb shaped and having a high char yield and geometric integrity after pyrolysis at between about 700 degrees and 1,100 degrees Centigrade; (e) substantially evenly depositing at least one layer of ceramic material on the pyrolyzed fabric of step (a); and (f) recovering the coated ceramic honeycomb structure. The ceramic articles produced have enhanced physical properties and are useful in aircraft and aerospace uses.

  19. Square lattice honeycomb reactor for space power and propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    2000-01-01

    The most recent nuclear design study at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) is the Moderated Square-Lattice Honeycomb (M-SLHC) reactor design utilizing the solid solution of ternary carbide fuels. The reactor is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U,Zr,Nb)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. The M-SLHC design is based on a cylindrical core that has critical radius and length of 37 cm and 50 cm, respectively. This design utilized zirconium hydrate to act as moderator. The fuel sub-assemblies are designed as cylindrical tubes with 12 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Five fuel subassemblies are stacked up axially to form one complete fuel assembly. These fuel assemblies are then arranged in the circular arrangement to form two fuel regions. The first fuel region consists of six fuel assemblies, and 18 fuel assemblies for the second fuel region. A 10-cm radial beryllium reflector in addition to 10-cm top axial beryllium reflector is used to reduce neutron leakage from the system. To perform nuclear design analysis of the M-SLHC design, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. To optimize the system design, five axial regions are specified. In each axial region, temperature and fuel density are varied. The axial and radial power distributions for the system are calculated, as well as the axial and radial flux distributions. Temperature coefficients of the system are also calculated. A water submersion accident scenario is also analyzed for these systems. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel, which provides a relatively high thrust to weight ratio. .

  20. Study of the core-corona structure formed during the explosion of an aluminum wire in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachenko, S. I.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Khattatov, T. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Ol'khovskaya, O. G.; Gasilov, V. A.; Kalinin, Yu. G.

    2012-01-15

    The time evolution of the matter parameters and current distribution in the discharge channel formed during a nanosecond explosion of a 25-{mu}m-diameter 12-mm-long aluminum wire was studied in a series of experiments with the following parameters: the discharge voltage was U{sub 0} = 20 kV, the current amplitude was I{sub max} {approx} 8 kA, and the current rise rate was dI/dt {approx} 40 A/ns. Optical shadow and schlieren images of the discharge channel were obtained using the second harmonic of a YAG: Nd{sup +3} laser, and UV images of the discharge channel self-radiation were recorded using a four-frame camera with a microchannel plate. The process of aluminum wire explosion was simulated numerically (including simulations performed from the 'cold start'). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data.

  1. Honeycomb Mirrors for Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John; Martin, Hubert; Angel, Roger

    This chapter deals with the design, fabrication, and use of the borosilicateglass honeycomb mirrors which are being produced at the University ofArizona's Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory. These mirrors are a coretechnology for the whole telescope, and a number of telescopes are nowoperational using these primary mirrors. The mirrors contribute to the telescopedesign because of their light weight, their high stiffness, and their shortthermal time constant. The light weight of the primary mirrors helps to keepthe weight of the entire telescope low and to maximize the structuralperformance. The ability to circulate air through the glass honeycombstructure allows control of local seeing in the telescope environment. Thehoneycomb sandwich is formed by spin casting borosilicate glass into aceramic fiber mold. The Mirror Lab has previously produced three 3.5-mmirrors, three 6.5-m mirrors, and two 8.4-m mirrors which are now operatingsuccessfully in telescopes. Results are highlighted from these telescopes withemphasis on the Large Binocular Telescope with two 8.4 m primaries.Excellent results have been obtained with adaptive secondary mirrorsin combination with the honeycomb primary mirrors. Two additional6.5-m mirrors and two additional 8.4-m mirrors have also been cast andare in various stages of production for other projects including the firstoff-axis segment for the future Giant Magellan Telescope. An additional keytechnology for large telescopes is the ability to fabricate high-precision primaryoptics with short focal lengths in order to keep the telescope structure andenclosure compact. The stressed lap allows efficient polishing of thesefast conic surfaces by actively adjusting its shape as it strokes across themirror.

  2. Vibration and acoustic properties of honeycomb sandwich structures subject to variable incident plane-wave angle pressure loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaxue

    Honeycomb structures are widely used in many areas for their material characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight, sound transmission, and other properties. Honeycomb structures are generally constructed from periodically spaced tessellations of unit cells. It can be shown that the effective stiffness and mass properties of honeycomb are controlled by the local geometry and wall thickness of the particular unit cells used. Of particular interest are regular hexagonal (6-sided) honeycomb unit cell geometries which exhibit positive effective Poisson's ratio, and modified 6-sided auxetic honeycomb unit cells with Poisson's ratio which is effectively negative; a property not found in natural materials. One important honeycomb meta-structure is sandwich composites designed with a honeycomb core bonded between two panel layers. By changing the geometry of the repetitive unit cell, and overall depth and material properties of the honeycomb core, sandwich panels with different vibration and acoustic properties can be designed to shift resonant frequencies and improve intensity and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). In the present work, a honeycomb finite element model based on beam elements is programmed in MATLAB and verified with the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for frequency extraction and direct frequency response analysis. The MATLAB program was used to study the vibration and acoustic properties of different kinds of honeycomb sandwich panels undergoing in-plane loading with different incident pressure wave angles and frequency. Results for the root mean square intensity IRMS based on normal velocity on the transmitted side of the panel measure vibration magnitude are reported for frequencies between 0 and 1000 Hz. The relationship between the sound transmission loss computed with ABAQUS and the inverse of the intensity of surface velocity is established. In the present work it is demonstrated that the general trend between the STL pressure response and the inverted intensity metric have similar response characteristics over both the stiffness frequency region and the resonance frequency region, showing that an increase in IRMS corresponds to a decrease in STL. The ABAQUS model was used to verify the MATLAB program for natural frequencies and mode shapes, and to compute the STL on the top surface of the honeycomb sandwich structure. Resonant peaks in the frequency response of intensity and STL are identified with natural frequencies and mode shapes of the honeycomb sandwich structure. A unique feature of this research is the ability to apply the time-harmonic acoustic pressure as a load on the transmitting surface of the honeycomb sandwich panel with variable incident angle ranging between 0° to 90°. When the incident angle is nonzero, the pressure load is complex valued, with sinusoidal distribution, and frequency dependent. The finite element implementation of the complex-valued variable incident pressure distribution is programmed in MATLAB to give complete control of the angle, frequency and distribution. Commercial finite element software such as ABAQUS has limited ability to directly apply frequency dependent and distributed real and imaginary pressure distributions in a direct steady state frequency analysis over a large number of frequency evaluations. In the present work, IRMS results for a family of honeycomb sandwich panels with systematic increment in internal cell wall angle, subject to incremental changes in incident angle pressure loads are studied and compared. Results show that for honeycomb sandwich panels with both positive and negative internal cell wall angle, on average, intensity for the nonzero incident angles is higher than the 0° normal incident angle. For the honeycomb sandwich panels with positive internal angle, the intensity consistently increases with larger nonzero incident angles. Furthermore, under the same incident angle pressure load, the intensity of honeycomb panel with positive internal angle is consistently larger than honeycomb panels with negative internal angles.

  3. Ceramic honeycomb structures and the method thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The subject invention pertains to a method of producing an improved composite-composite honeycomb structure for aircraft or aerospace use. Specifically, the subject invention relates to a method for the production of a lightweight ceramic-ceramic composite honeycomb structure, which method comprises: (1) pyrolyzing a loosely woven fabric/binder having a honeycomb shape and having a high char yield and geometric integrity after pyrolysis at between about 700 and 1,100 C; (2) substantially evenly depositing at least one layer of ceramic material on the pyrolyzed fabric/binder of step (1); (3) recovering the coated ceramic honeycomb structure; (4) removing the pyrolyzed fabric/binder of the structure of step (3) by slow pyrolysis at between 700 and 1000 C in between about a 2 to 5% by volume oxygen atmosphere for between about 0.5 and 5 hr.; and (5) substantially evenly depositing on and within the rigid hollow honeycomb structure at least one additional layer of the same or a different ceramic material by chemical vapor deposition and chemical vapor infiltration. The honeycomb shaped ceramic articles have enhanced physical properties and are useful in aircraft and aerospace uses.

  4. Design and fabrication of a radiative actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. A.; Pagel, L. L.; Schaeffer, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The panel assembly consisted of an external thermal protection system (metallic heat shields and insulation blankets) and an aluminum honeycomb structure. The structure was cooled to temperature 442K (300 F) by circulating a 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol and water through dee shaped coolant tubes nested in the honeycomb and adhesively bonded to the outer skin. Rene'41 heat shields were designed to sustain 5000 cycles of a uniform pressure of + or - 6.89kPa (+ or - 1.0 psi) and aerodynamic heating conditions equivalent to 136 kW sq m (12 Btu sq ft sec) to a 422K (300 F) surface temperature. High temperature flexible insulation blankets were encased in stainless steel foil to protect them from moisture and other potential contaminates. The aluminum actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel was designed to sustain 5000 cycles of cyclic in-plane loading of + or - 210 kN/m (+ or - 1200 lbf/in.) combined with a uniform panel pressure of + or - 6.89 kPa (?1.0 psi).

  5. Dispersion of Lamb waves in a honeycomb composite sandwich panel.

    PubMed

    Baid, Harsh; Schaal, Christoph; Samajder, Himadri; Mal, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being used in advanced aircraft and aerospace structures. Despite their many advantages, composites are often susceptible to hidden damages that may occur during manufacturing and/or service of the structure. Therefore, safe operation of composite structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost effective method for defects monitoring in advanced structures due to their long propagation range and their sensitivity to defects in their propagation path. In this paper, some of the useful properties of guided Lamb type waves are investigated, using analytical, numerical and experimental methods, in an effort to provide the knowledge base required for the development of viable structural health monitoring systems for composite structures. The laboratory experiments involve a pitch-catch method in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on the outside surface of the structure for generating and recording the wave signals. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate, a woven composite laminate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The agreement between experimental, numerical and theoretical results are shown to be excellent in certain frequency ranges, providing a guidance for the design of effective inspection systems. PMID:25287973

  6. Designing with advanced composites; Report on the European Core Conference, 1st, Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 20, 21, 1988, Conference Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development history of sandwich panel construction, production methods and quality assurance for Nomex sandwich panel core papers, the manufacture of honeycomb cores, state-of-the-art design methods for honeycomb-core panels, the Airbus A320 airliner's CFRP rudder structure, and the design tradeoffs encountered in honeycomb-core structures' design. Also discussed are sandwich-construction aircraft cabin interiors meeting new FAA regulations, the use of Nomex honeycomb cores in composite structures, a low-cost manufacturing technique for sandwich structures, and the Starship sandwich panel-incorporating airframe primary structure.

  7. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  8. Sensing and actuation of smart chiral honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovitch, H.; Burgard, M.; Edery-Azulay, Lucy; Evans, K. E.; Hoffmeister, M.; Miller, W.; Scarpa, F.; Smith, C. W.; Tee, K. F.; Schönecker, A.; Seffner, L.

    2008-03-01

    A chiral honeycomb configuration is developed with embedded piezosensors and actuators for smart sandwich panel applications. The chiral honeycomb concept is made of repeating units of cylinders and plates (ligaments), featuring an in-plane negative Poisson's ratio. Rapid Prototyping vacuum-cast and FDM (Fusion Deposition Moulding) techniques are developed to embed micro fibres composites to be used for potential structural health monitoring (SHM) applications, and microwave absorption screens for electromagnetic compatibility. Finite Element models are also developed to prototype and simulate the response, sensing and actuation capability of the honeycombs for design purposes. Dynamic tests using scanning laser vibrometers and acoustic wave propagation are carried out to assess the feasibility of the concept.

  9. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecka, Agnieszka; Grémaud, Benoît; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-01

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter’s butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  10. Detecting water in aviation honeycomb structures by using transient infrared thermographic NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Klimov, Alexey G.; Nesteruk, Dmitry; Shiryaev, Vladimir V.

    2003-04-01

    A lot of structural key elements of many modern civilian and military airplanes, such as flaps, keel, etc., are made of honeycomb structures. Honeycombs involve a combination of some materials including aluminum, Nomex, glass and graphite epoxy composites. During exploitation, atmosphere water could penetrate these structures due to possible imperfections in various junctions, and, thus, deteriorate airplane durability. In Russia, water in honeycombs is typically detected by using the X ray and ultrasonic technique. However, the X ray equipment is hardly accepted by commercial airlines because of the safety reason, and the point-by-point ultrasonic inspection is low-productive. Since 2002, we develop the IR thermographic method of detecting water by thermally stimulating aviation panels under test. Unlike the technique accepted by Airbus Industry, Inc., that uses 'a warm blanket', we use a powerful optical heater assembled with an IR camera into a single set. The first stage of research included modeling the detection process and optimizing the experimental procedure. As a result, we have demonstrated that, due to the high heat capacity of water, a temperature signal over moist areas evolves in time during a relatively long period that relaxes the requirements to the test protocol. Thus, even aluminum panels can be thermally stimulated during few seconds with a delay time being also in a few second range. A similar protocol can be applied to the inspection of composite honeycombs where the image quality resembles that obtained by X rays. The paper will describe all stages of the research starting from modeling and finishing with the preliminary experimental results obtained in situ on civilian airplanes.

  11. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  12. Method and apparatus for extruding large honeycombs

    DOEpatents

    Kragle, Harry A.; Lambert, David W.; Lipp, G. Daniel

    1996-09-03

    Extrusion die apparatus and an extrusion method for extruding large-cross-section honeycomb structures from plasticized ceramic batch materials are described, the apparatus comprising a die having a support rod connected to its central portion, the support rod being anchored to support means upstream of the die. The support rod and support means act to limit die distortion during extrusion, reducing die strain and stress to levels permitting large honeycomb extrusion without die failure. Dies of optimal thickness are disclosed which reduce the maximum stresses exerted on the die during extrusion.

  13. Vibroacoustic Model Validation for a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Robinson, Jay H.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element and boundary element models are developed to investigate the vibroacoustic response of a curved honeycomb composite sidewall panel. Results from vibroacoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility are used to validate the numerical predictions. The sidewall panel is constructed from a flexible honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate face sheets. This type of construction is being used in the development of an all-composite aircraft fuselage. In contrast to conventional rib-stiffened aircraft fuselage structures, the composite panel has nominally uniform thickness resulting in a uniform distribution of mass and stiffness. Due to differences in the mass and stiffness distribution, the noise transmission mechanisms for the composite panel are expected to be substantially different from those of a conventional rib-stiffened structure. The development of accurate vibroacoustic models will aide in the understanding of the dominant noise transmission mechanisms and enable optimization studies to be performed that will determine the most beneficial noise control treatments. Finite element and boundary element models of the sidewall panel are described. Vibroacoustic response predictions are presented for forced vibration input and the results are compared with experimental data.

  14. Breath Figure Method for Construction of Honeycomb Films

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Yingying; Jin, Mingliang; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Honeycomb films with various building units, showing potential applications in biological, medical, physicochemical, photoelectric, and many other areas, could be prepared by the breath figure method. The ordered hexagonal structures formed by the breath figure process are related to the building units, solvents, substrates, temperature, humidity, air flow, and other factors. Therefore, by adjusting these factors, the honeycomb structures could be tuned properly. In this review, we summarized the development of the breath figure method of fabricating honeycomb films and the factors of adjusting honeycomb structures. The organic-inorganic hybrid was taken as the example building unit to discuss the preparation, mechanism, properties, and applications of the honeycomb films. PMID:26343734

  15. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  16. Honeycomb Geometry: Applied Mathematics in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William J.

    1984-01-01

    Study and exploration of the hexagonal shapes found in honeycombs is suggested as an interesting topic for geometry classes. Students learn that the hexagonal pattern maximizes the enclosed region and minimizes the wax needed for construction, while satisfying the bees' cell-size constraint. (MNS)

  17. Fiberglass honeycomb elements formed quickly and cheaply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    Cookie cutter device initiates production of identical, double-contoured fiber glass elements used as shock absorbers. Three-bladed edges convert triangular honeycomb elements into hexagonal shapes which are then stamped to desired length by concave and convex dies. Sandpaper smoothing completes the process.

  18. PT-symmetry in honeycomb photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Szameit, Alexander; Rechtsman, Mikael C.; Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-15

    We apply gain and loss to honeycomb photonic lattices and show that the dispersion relation is identical to tachyons--particles with imaginary mass that travel faster than the speed of light. This is accompanied by -symmetry breaking in this structure. We further show that the -symmetry can be restored by deforming the lattice.

  19. High heat flux actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. C.; Pagel, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program to design and fabricate an unshielded actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft are presented. The design is an all-aluminum honeycomb sandwich with embedded cooling passages soldered to the inside of the outer moldline skin. The overall finding is that an actively cooled structure appears feasible for application on a hypersonic aircraft, but the fabrication process is complex and some material and manufacturing technology developments are required. Results from the program are summarized and supporting details are presented.

  20. Acoustic scattering response of hierarchic honeycomb structures for cylindrical and spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Arun

    Sandwich panels with honeycomb core are often employed in structures for improved mechanical properties with lightweight. Honeycombs are defined by non-overlapping and periodic unit cells. Most research conducted on these sandwich panels focuses on stiffness and strength properties. The acoustic aspect of these panels has been focused on sound transmission loss. For acoustics, previous studies used effective honeycomb orthotropic elastic moduli based on Cartesian unit cell geometry to model the core as a homogeneous structure. While efficient, this modeling approach loses accuracy at higher frequencies. Furthermore, when used for curved panels, the effective moduli are only approximate. In this work, mechanical and acoustic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical honeycomb panels are studied using finite element analysis. The unit cell geometry core is oriented both radially and in the transverse direction. The models are analyzed for sound scattering measured by target strength with interactions between structure and the acoustic medium through coupling between the domains. Both air and water are compared for the acoustic region. Different honeycomb core geometries varying in the hexagon arrangement, number of unit cells and level of hierarchy are studied. The structures developed are constrained to have the same total mass allowing for comparisons based on only changes in stiffness properties. The effect of face sheet thickness on the mechanical and acoustic properties of the curved sandwich structures is also studied. The vibration and acoustic scattering behavior of these structures have been investigated for natural frequencies between 1-1000 Hz to predict and understand the different responses near and at resonances. The target strength response of the structures has been studied in the near field at both front and back of the structures. The effect of acoustic coupling is observed clearly on varying the outer domains properties between air and water. It is noted that the acoustic scattering characteristics of the structures depend on the frequency of the incident wave and acoustic domain properties interacting with structures. When comparing honeycomb structures to a homogeneous structure with the same mass, for cylindrical structures the first few natural frequencies are lower compared to the reference homogeneous structure, and then increases for higher modes. In the case of the spherical structure, this behavior was reversed indicating the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness of the 3-D sphere compared to the 2-D cylinder modes.

  1. Engineering polar discontinuities in honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Marco; Pizzi, Giovanni; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented and fascinating phenomena have been recently observed at oxide interfaces between centrosymmetric cubic materials, where polar discontinuities can give rise to polarization charges and electric fields that drive a metal-insulator transition and the appearance of a two-dimensional electron gas. Lower-dimensional analogues are possible, and honeycomb lattices offer a fertile playground, thanks to their versatility and the extensive ongoing experimental efforts in graphene and related materials. Here we suggest different realistic pathways to engineer polar discontinuities in honeycomb lattices and support these suggestions with extensive first-principles calculations. Several approaches are discussed, based on (i) nanoribbons, where a polar discontinuity against the vacuum emerges, and (ii) functionalizations, where covalent ligands are used to engineer polar discontinuities by selective or total functionalization of the parent systems. All the cases considered have the potential to deliver innovative applications in ultra-thin and flexible solar-energy devices and in micro- and nano-electronics. PMID:25300521

  2. Hybrid honeycomb panel heat rejection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.; Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of a hybrid honeycomb panel heat rejection system concept for future high-power spacecraft is described. Performance evaluation of this heat pipe-based hybrid radiator is based on data and prediction models from a developmental component hardware testing program. The concept integrates three high-performance components into an optimized radiator system. These components are the sideflow heat pipe transport leg, honeycomb panel evaporator, and light-weight high-efficiency heat pipe fins. A 3.05 m (10 ft.) long hybrid radiator was designed considering remnant hardware available from other Hughes programs. The key performance objective for the hybrid radiator was to demonstrate high thermal transport capacity, increased radiating fin lengths, improved thermal efficiency across structural boundaries, and reduced weight. Analysis showed that 9000 W can be transported over a 3.05 m radiator and that finlengths of up to 1 m are possible.

  3. Engineering polar discontinuities in honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibertini, Marco; Pizzi, Giovanni; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    Unprecedented and fascinating phenomena have been recently observed at oxide interfaces between centrosymmetric cubic materials, where polar discontinuities can give rise to polarization charges and electric fields that drive a metal-insulator transition and the appearance of a two-dimensional electron gas. Lower-dimensional analogues are possible, and honeycomb lattices offer a fertile playground, thanks to their versatility and the extensive ongoing experimental efforts in graphene and related materials. Here we suggest different realistic pathways to engineer polar discontinuities in honeycomb lattices and support these suggestions with extensive first-principles calculations. Several approaches are discussed, based on (i) nanoribbons, where a polar discontinuity against the vacuum emerges, and (ii) functionalizations, where covalent ligands are used to engineer polar discontinuities by selective or total functionalization of the parent systems. All the cases considered have the potential to deliver innovative applications in ultra-thin and flexible solar-energy devices and in micro- and nano-electronics.

  4. Thermographic Inspection of Metallic Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John O.; Dupont, H. M.

    1998-01-01

    The X-33/VentureStar has a Thermal Protection System (TPS) consisting mainly of brazed metallic honeycomb sandwich structures. Inspection of these structures is changing as a result of the extremely thin (less than 200 microns) skins, the small critical defect size (less than 2 mm long by 100 microns wide) and the large number (more than 1000) of parts to be inspected. Pulsed Infrared Thermography has been determined to be the most appropriate inspection method for manufacturing inspection based on performance comparison with other methods, cost, schedule and other factors. The results of the assessment of the different methods will be summarized and data on the performance of the final production inspection system will be given. Finite difference thermal methods have been used to model the whole inspection process. Details of correlation between the models and experimental data will be given and data on the use of pulsed infrared thermography on other metallic honeycomb sandwich structures will be given.

  5. Kitaev physics in three dimensional honeycomb iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Baek

    It has been realized that Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling may allow strongly bond-dependent exchange interactions between local moments. Such interactions may lead to magnetic frustration and possible quantum spin liquid phases. This is in contrast to usual frustrated magnets, where the magnetic frustration comes from the geometry of the underlying lattice structure. Hence, it offers a new avenue to generate exotic phases of matter. Recently, both two-dimensional (α-Li2IrO3) and three-dimensional honeycomb iridates (β-Li2IrO3 and γ-Li2IrO3) have been discovered and it has been suggested that the magnetic exchange interactions contain the so-called Kitaev interaction, which depends on bond directions. In particular, the local moments of Ir ions in β-Li2IrO3 and γ-Li2IrO3 reside on the three-dimensional hyper-honeycomb and stripy-honeycomb lattices. The Kitaev model is exactly solvable on these lattices as well as the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice and the ground state is a quantum spin liquid with gapless excitations. We discuss recent progress in theoretical understanding of magnetic exchange interactions, possible presence of quantum spin liquid phases, and unusual magnetic order in β-Li2IrO3 and γ-Li2IrO3. These theoretical results are used to make connections to recent experimental data. This work is supported by the NSERC and CIFAR.

  6. Radiated Sound Power from a Curved Honeycomb Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jay H.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2003-01-01

    The validation of finite element and boundary element model for the vibro-acoustic response of a curved honeycomb core composite aircraft panel is completed. The finite element and boundary element models were previously validated separately. This validation process was hampered significantly by the method in which the panel was installed in the test facility. The fixture used was made primarily of fiberboard and the panel was held in a groove in the fiberboard by a compression fitting made of plastic tubing. The validated model is intended to be used to evaluate noise reduction concepts from both an experimental and analytic basis simultaneously. An initial parametric study of the influence of core thickness on the radiated sound power from this panel, using this numerical model was subsequently conducted. This study was significantly influenced by the presence of strong boundary condition effects but indicated that the radiated sound power from this panel was insensitive to core thickness primarily due to the offsetting effects of added mass and added stiffness in the frequency range investigated.

  7. Titanium honeycomb acoustic lining structural and thermal test report. [for acoustic tailpipe for JT8D engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joynes, D.; Balut, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of static, fatigue and thermal testing of titanium honeycomb acoustic panels representing the acoustic tailpipe for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D Refan engine which is being studied for use on the Boeing 727-200 airplane. Test specimens represented the engine and tailpipe flange joints, the rail to which the thrust reverser is attached and shear specimens of the tailpipe honeycomb. Specimens were made in four different batches with variations in configuration, materials and processes in each. Static strength of all test specimens exceeded the design ultimate load requirements. Fatigue test results confirmed that aluminum brazed titanium, as used in the Refan tailpipe design, meets the fatigue durability objectives. Quality of welding was found to be critical to life, with substandard welding failing prematurely, whereas welding within the process specification exceeded the panel skin life. Initial fatigue testing used short grip length bolts which failed prematurely. These were replaced with longer bolts and subsequent testing demonstrated the required life. Thermal tests indicate that perforated skin acoustic honeycomb has approximately twice the heat transfer of solid skin honeycomb.

  8. Microdischarges in ceramic foams and honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, K.

    2009-08-01

    Microdischarges in spatially confined geometries, such as microcavities and micropores of various materials, present a promising method for the generation and maintenance of stable discharges at atmospheric pressure. They have been successfully used in many biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. The paper presents two relatively new types of discharges in confined volumes - a capillary microdischarge in ceramic foams and a sliding discharge inside the capillaries of ceramic honeycombs - and describes their basic physical properties and mechanisms. Microdischarges inside the microporous ceramic foams develop from the surface barrier discharge if the amplitude of the applied voltage reaches given threshold, but only for a specific pore size. Sliding discharge inside the honeycomb capillaries is produced by a combination of AC barrier discharge inside catalytic pellet bed coupled in series with DC powered honeycomb monolith. Both discharges produce relatively cold microplasmas with high level of non-equilibrium. The basic characteristics of the microdischarges, addressing the effects of the applied voltage, discharge power, pore size, length and diameter of the capillaries are discussed.

  9. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  10. High-Fidelity Modeling for Health Monitoring in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dimitry G.; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Tyson, Richard W.; Walker, James L.; Miller, Jimmy L.

    2011-01-01

    High-Fidelity Model of the sandwich composite structure with real geometry is reported. The model includes two composite facesheets, honeycomb core, piezoelectric actuator/sensors, adhesive layers, and the impactor. The novel feature of the model is that it includes modeling of the impact and wave propagation in the structure before and after the impact. Results of modeling of the wave propagation, impact, and damage detection in sandwich honeycomb plates using piezoelectric actuator/sensor scheme are reported. The results of the simulations are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the model is suitable for analysis of the physics of failure due to the impact and for testing structural health monitoring schemes based on guided wave propagation.

  11. Mechanics and applications of pressure adaptive honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof

    A novel adaptive aerostructure is presented that relies on certified aerospace materials and can therefore be applied in conventional passenger aircraft. This structure consists of a honeycomb material which' cells extend over a significant length perpendicular to the plane of the cells. Each of the cells contains an inelastic pouch (or bladder) that forms a circular tube when the cell forms a perfect hexagon. By changing the cell differential pressure (CDP) the stiffness of the honeycomb can be altered. Using an external force or the elastic force within the honeycomb material, the honeycomb can be deformed such that the cells deviate from their perfect-hexagonal shape. It can be shown that by increasing the CDP, the structure eventually returns to a perfect hexagon. By doing so, a fully embedded pneumatic actuator is created that can perform work and substitute conventional low-bandwidth flight control actuators. It is shown that two approaches can be taken to regulate the stiffness of this embedded actuator: (1) The first approach relies on the pouches having a fixed amount of air in them and stiffness is altered by a change in ambient pressure. Coupled to the ambient pressure-altitude cycle that aircraft encounter during each flight, this approach yields a true adaptive aerostructure that operates independently of pilot input and is controlled solely by the altitude the aircraft is flying at. (2) The second approach relies on a controlled constant CDP. This CDP could be supplied from one of the compressor stages of the engine as a form of bleed air. Because of the air-tight pouches there would essentially be no mass flow, meaning engine efficiency would not be significantly affected due to this application. By means of a valve system the pilot could have direct control over the pressure and, consequently, the stiffness of the structure. This allows for much higher CDPs (on the order of 1MPa) than could physically be achieved by relying on the ambient pressure decrease with altitude. This option does require more infrastructure like tubing, valves, and supporting electronics from the cockpit. Applications of pressure adaptive honeycomb are tailored primarily towards low-bandwidth applications like secondary flight control. The most profound application is the morphing of an entire wing section, from leading to trailing edge, due to the adaptive honeycomb. On a smaller scale, other examples include a solid state pressure adaptive flap, a pressure adaptive droop nose, a pressure adaptive Gurney flap and a pressure adaptive engine inlet. Each of these applications is based on the same principle of stiffness alteration with pressure and can be used with either actuation option (constant mass or constant pressure). A model that relates the volumetric change of the honeycomb cells to the external blocked stress was shown to correlate well to experiments that were carried out on several test articles. Based on this model it was estimated that pressure adaptive honeycomb has a maximum mass-specific energy density of 12.4J/g, for the case of an externally applied CDP of 0.9MPa (can be supplied from a high-pressure compressor stage of a gas turbine). In addition, it was shown that a maximum strain of 76% can be achieved and that the maximum blocked stress amounts to 0.82MPa. In the case of a 40kPa drop in atmospheric pressure and constant mass of air in the pouches, the maximum mass specific energy amounts to 1.1J/g and a maximum blocked force of 70kPa can be attained. Pressure adaptive honeycomb was embedded into a 25%c adaptive flap on a NACA2412 wing section with a chord of 1.08m. Wind tunnel tests at Reynolds number of 1 million demonstrated a shift in the cl -- alpha curve upwards by an average of 0.3, thereby increasing the maximum lift coefficient from 1.27 to 1.52. This successfully demonstrated the application of pressure adaptive honeycomb embedded in a morphing aircraft structure.

  12. Nonlinear wave dynamics in honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in honeycomb lattices and show that, in quasi-one-dimensional configurations, the waves propagating in the lattice can be separated into left-moving and right-moving waves, and any wave packet composed of only left (or only right) movers does not change its intensity structure in spite of the nonlinear evolution of its phase. We show that the propagation of a general wave packet can be described, within a good approximation, as a superposition of left- and right-moving self-similar (nonlinear) wave packets. Finally, we find that Klein tunneling is not suppressed by nonlinearity.

  13. Clean Electrical-Discharge Machining Of Delicate Honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Clarence S.

    1993-01-01

    Precise recesses in fragile metal honeycomb blocks formed in special electrical-discharge machining process. Special tooling used, and recesses bored with workpiece in nonstandard alignment. Cutting electrode advances into workpiece along x axis to form pocket of rectangular cross section. Deionized water flows from fitting, along honeycomb tubes of workpiece, to electrode/workpiece interface.

  14. Lattice Defects in the Kitaev Honeycomb Model.

    PubMed

    Brennan, John; Vala, Jiří

    2016-05-19

    The Kitaev honeycomb lattice system is an important model of topological materials whose phase diagram exhibits both abelian and non-abelian topological phases. The latter, a so-called Ising phase, is related to topological superconductors. Its quasiparticle excitations, which are formed by Majorana fermions attached to vortices, show non-abelian fractional statistics and are known as Ising anyons. We investigate dislocation defects in the Ising phase of the Kitaev honeycomb model. After introducing them to the system, we accordingly generalize our solution of this model to the situation with the defects. The important part of this effort is developing an appropriate Jordan-Wigner fermionization procedure. It is expected that the presence of defects manifests itself by the formation of fermionic zero-energy modes around the defect end points. We numerically confirm this expectation and further investigate properties of these modes. The computational potential of our technique is demonstrated for both diagonalization and dynamical simulations. The latter focuses on the process of fusion of the vortex zero-energy modes with the Majorana fermions attached to the defect. This process simulates fusion of non-abelian Ising anyons. PMID:26886150

  15. A non-asymptotic model of dynamics of honeycomb lattice-type plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cielecka, Iwona; J?drysiak, Jaros?aw

    2006-09-01

    Lightweight structures, consisted of special composite material systems like sandwich plates, are often used in aerospace or naval engineering. In composite sandwich plates, the intermediate core is usually made of cellular structures, e.g. honeycomb micro-frames, reinforcing static and dynamic properties of these plates. Here, a new non-asymptotic continuum model of honeycomb lattice-type plates is shown and applied to the analysis of dynamic problems. The general formulation of the model for periodic lattice-type plates of an arbitrary lay-out was presented by Cielecka and J?drysiak [Journal of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 40 (2002) 23-46]. This model, partly based on the tolerance averaging method developed for periodic composite solids by Wo?niak and Wierzbicki [Averaging techniques in thermomechanics of composite solids, Wydawnictwo Politechniki Cz?stochowskiej, Cz?stochowa, 2000], takes into account the effect of the length microstructure size on the dynamic plate behaviour. The shown method leads to the model equations describing the above effect for honeycomb lattice-type plates. These equations have the form similar to equations for isotropic cases. The dynamic analysis of such plates exemplifies this effect, which is significant and cannot be neglected. The physical correctness of the obtained results is also discussed.

  16. Cryogenic performance of slotted brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels that would incorporate a frame element were designed, fabricated and tested. The panels were representative of the lower surface of an advanced space transportation vehicle. The first panel was a two span panel supported by a center frame and on edges parallel to it. The second panel was a two span panel supported by a center frame and on edges parallel to it. The second panel was a three span panel supported on two frames and on edges parallel to the frames. Each panel had its outer skin slotted to reduce the thermal stresses of the panel skins. The first panel was tested under simulated boost conditions that included liquid hydrogen exposure of the frame and inner skin and radiant heat to 478K on the outer skins. The first panel was tested to investigate the effect of thermal stresses in skins and core caused by the panel being restrained by a cold integral frame and to observe the effects of frost formation and possible liquid air development in and around outer skin slots.

  17. Self-sustained Trojan Wave Packets on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinski, Matt

    2014-05-01

    We have recently showed that counterintuitively to Earnshaw's theorem of electrostatics the stable configurations of quantum charges may exist in rotating frame forming so called Rutherford atom without any external field support when the single localized semi-classical electron is orbiting tiny core consisting of the nucleus and the second electron which is in elliptical charge state. Here we show the existence of dynamic ferroelectric Rydberg matter when all hydrogen atoms are placed symmetrically on the honeycomb lattice and because of the nonvanishing local field from the nearest neighbors they sustain each other without the external field. This is in the analogy to ferromagnetic phase transition within Bethe-Peierls-Weiss theory. Because the local field due to the nearest dipole rotation is none stationary also in strength in the selected lattice center the whole structure is shape-breathing around the static dipole average. We present both the time-averaged mean-field theory as well as we conduct the numerical simulations using the time-dependent Hartree equation with the effective self interaction.

  18. Application of Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) for Inspection of Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Pergantis, Charles; Flanagan, David; Deschepper, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The application of a noncontact air coupled acoustic heating technique is investigated for the inspection of advanced honeycomb composite structures. A weakness in the out of plane stiffness of the structure, caused by a delamination or core damage, allows for the coupling of acoustic energy and thus this area will have a higher temperature than the surrounding area. Air coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) measurements were made on composite sandwich structures with damage and were compared to conventional flash thermography. A vibrating plate model is presented to predict the optimal acoustic source frequency. Improvements to the measurement technique are also discussed.

  19. Crystallography of rare galactic honeycomb structure near supernova 1987a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Near supernova 1987a, the rare honeycomb structure of 20-30 galactic bubbles measures 30 x 90 light years. Its remarkable regularity in bubble size suggests a single-event origin which may correlate with the nearby supernova. To test the honeycomb's regularity in shape and size, the formalism of statistical crystallography is developed here for bubble sideness. The standard size-shape relations (Lewis's law, Desch's law, and Aboav-Weaire's law) govern area, perimeter and nearest neighbor shapes. Taken together, they predict a highly non-equilibrium structure for the galactic honeycomb which evolves as a bimodal shape distribution without dominant bubble perimeter energy.

  20. Simulation of the honeycomb construction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanzhang, Zhang

    2010-06-01

    The construction process of the honeycomb by bees is an astonishing process. The original structure which the bees built is nothing more than a lot of rough cylinders. But keeping the beeswax semi-flow for a certain time, those rough structures become perfect hexahedral columns. A modified, simplified particle method was used here to simulate the semi-flow state of the material. Although the parameters used here were still rather subjective, the simulation still could demonstrate some behavior of that sort of material like beeswax. And the method that the bees used to build their honey comb, could be an efficient method to imitate when we are trying to manufacture cellular materials.

  1. Honeycomb Betavoltaic Battery for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin R.; Ulmen, Ben; Miley, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Radioisotopic batteries offer advantages relative to conventional chemical batteries for applications requiring a long lifetime with minimum maintenance. Thus, thermoelectric type cells fueled with Pu have been used extensively on NASA space missions. The design for a small beta battery using nickel-63 (Ni-63) and a vacuum direct collection method is described here. A honeycomb nickel wire structure is employed to achieve bi-directional direct collection by seeding Ni-63 onto honeycomb shaped wires that will provide structural support as well. The battery design is intended to power low power electronics and distribute power needs in space probes as well as space colonies. Ni-63 is chosen as the source emitter because it has a long half-life and ease of manufacturing. The use of vacuum is especially well mated to space use; hence, vacuum insulation is employed to gain a higher efficiency than prior beta batteries with a dielectric insulator. A unique voltage down-converter is incorporated to efficiently reduce the inherent output voltage from 17.4 kV to ~17.4 V. This converter operates like a ``reverse'' Marx circuit where capacitor charging occurs in series but the discharge is in parallel. The reference battery module described here is about 100 cm×100 cm×218 cm and has a power of ~10 W with a conversion efficiency of ~15.8%. These modules can be stacked for higher powers and are very attractive for various applications in space colonization due to their long life (half-life for Ni-63~100 yrs) and low maintenance.

  2. Modeling the Axial Mechanical Response of Amorphous Fe45Ni45Mo7B3 Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, Balaji; Hanan, Jay C.

    2012-08-01

    The high yield strength and elastic modulus of metallic glasses suggests they could perform an important role in structural applications. To produce materials with a high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent mechanical energy absorption, it is advantageous to form amorphous alloys as cellular solids. Using the elastic properties of slip cast amorphous Fe45Ni45Mo7B3 ribbons, a metallic glass honeycomb was manufactured with a unique manufacturing approach. First, prototypes were manufactured with a porosity of 97 pct, a cell wall thickness of 0.03 mm, and a cell size of 3 mm. Experimentally measured mechanical properties were reasonably similar to analytical models. This suggests that a three-times improvement in the yield strength along the out-of-plane direction is achievable when compared with crystalline aluminum honeycombs. An analytical model was developed to predict the relative density and the compressive stress ( σ {3/ * }) in the out-of-plane ( X 3) direction of the "teardrop" cellular structure. The predictions are validated by initial experimental results and compare well with existing analytical models for hexagonal cellular materials.

  3. Optimum Running Condition of Honeycomb Type Rotation Desiccant Device Composed of Polymer Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Takahisa; Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko

    This paper deals with the optimum running conditions of honeycomb rotor composed of new polymer sorbent which was composed of the cross-linked polymer of sodium acrylate. At first, overall mass transfer coefficient of the honeycomb rotor for numerical computation was derived by the experimental results from the model experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations could predict the optimum running conditions of the honeycomb rotor such as the revolution number of the honeycomb rotor against the inflow air velocity and honeycomb length etc.

  4. Test results for electron beam charging of flexible insulators and composites. [solar array substrates, honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staskus, J. V.; Berkopec, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Flexible solar-array substrates, graphite-fiber/epoxy - aluminum honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films were exposed to monoenergetic electron beams ranging in energy from 2 to 20 keV in the Lewis Research Center's geomagnetic-substorm-environment simulation facility to determine surface potentials, dc currents, and surface discharges. The four solar-array substrate samples consisted of Kapton sheet reinforced with fabrics of woven glass or carbon fibers. They represented different construction techniques that might be used to reduce the charge accumulation on the array back surface. Five honeycomb-panel samples were tested, two of which were representative of Voyager antenna materials and had either conductive or nonconductive painted surfaces. A third sample was of Navstar solar-array substrate material. The other two samples were of materials proposed for use on Intelsat V. All the honeycomb-panel samples had graphite-fiber/epoxy composite face sheets. The thin dielectric films were 2.54-micrometer-thick Mylar and 7.62-micrometer-thick Kapton.

  5. Propogation loss with frequency of ultrasound guided waves in a composite metal-honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Baid, Harsh K.; Guzman, Narciso; Kempen, Lothar U.; Mal, Ajit

    2009-05-01

    Non-destructive testing of critical structural components is time consuming, while necessary for maintaining safe operation. Large aerospace structures, such as the vertical stabilizers of aircraft undergo inspection at regular intervals for damage diagnostics. However, conventional techniques for damage detection and identification before repair can be scheduled are conducted off-line and therefore can take weeks. The use of guided ultrasound waves is being investigated to expedite damage detection in composites. We measure the frequency dependent loss of ultrasonic guided waves for a structure comprising a boron-nitride composite skin sandwiching an aluminum honeycomb. A wide range of ultrasound frequencies propagate as measured using PZTs, with the lowest attenuation observed about 200-250 kHz. These measurements are confirmed using optical fiber Bragg grating arrays used as ultrasound transducers.

  6. Nuclear design analysis of square-lattice honeycomb space nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widargo, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    The square-lattice honeycomb reactor is designed based on a cylindrical core that is determined to have critical diameter and length of 0.50 m and 0.50 c, respectively. A 0.10-cm thick radial graphite reflector, in addition to a 0.20-m thick axial graphite reflector are used to reduce neutron leakage from the reactor. The core is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U, Zr, Nb)C, which is one of several ternary uranium carbides that are considered for this concept. The fuel is to be fabricated as 2 mm grooved (U, Zr, Nb)C wafers. The fuel wafers are used to form square-lattice honeycomb fuel assemblies, 0.10 m in length with 30% cross-sectional flow area. Five fuel assemblies are stacked up axially to form the reactor core. Based on the 30% void fraction, the width of the square flow channel is about 1.3 mm. The hydrogen propellant is passed through these flow channels and removes the heat from the reactor core. To perform nuclear design analysis, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. The preliminary results are obtained using a simple four-group cross-section model. To optimize the nuclear design, the fuel densities are varied for each assembly. Tantalum, hafnium and tungsten are considered and used as a replacement for niobium in fuel material to provide water submersion sub-criticality for the reactor. Axial and radial neutron flux and power density distributions are calculated for the core. Results of the neutronic analysis indicate that the core has a relatively fast spectrum. From the results of the thermal hydraulic analyses, eight axial temperature zones are chosen for the calculation of group average cross-sections. An iterative process is conducted to couple the neutronic calculations with the thermal hydraulics calculations. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel. This design provides a relatively high thrust to weight ratio.

  7. Assessment of Bulk Absorber Properties for Multi-Layer Perforates in Porous Honeycomb Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2006-01-01

    CONTINUING progress in materials technology provides potential for improved acoustic liners for attenuating broadband fan noise emissions from aircraft engine nacelles. Conventional liners (local-reacting perforate-over-honeycomb structures) provide significant narrow-band attenuation, but limited attenuation over wide bandwidths. Two approaches for increasing attenuation bandwidth are to (1) replace the honeycomb structure with bulk material, or (2) cascade multiple layers of perforate/honeycomb structures. Usage of the first approach is limited because of mechanical and maintenance reasons, while multi-layer liners are limited to about three layers because of their additional mechanical complexity, depth and weight. The current research concerns a novel approach reported by the University of Cincinnati, in which a single-layer conventional liner is converted into an extended-reaction, broadband absorber by making the honeycomb core structure porous. This modified single-layer liner requires no increase in depth and weight, and minimal increase in mechanical complexity. Langley has initiated research to identify potential benefits of liner structures with porous cell walls. This research has two complementary goals: (1) develop and validate experimental techniques for treating multi-layer perforates (representative of the internal cells of a liner with porous cell walls) as 1-D bulk materials, and (2) develop analytical approaches to validate this bulk material assumption. If successful, the resultant model can then be used to design optimized porous honeycomb liners. The feasibility of treating an N-layer perforate system (N porous plates separated by uniform air gaps) as a one-dimensional bulk absorber is assessed using the Two-Thickness Method (TTM), which is commonly used to educe bulk material intrinsic acoustic parameters. Tests are conducted with discrete tone and random noise sources, over an SPL range sufficient to determine the nonlinearity of the test specimens, for test specimens consisting of 5, 10 and 15% porous plates. Measured impedances for two liner thicknesses (e.g., 12 and 24 layers) are used as input to the TTM to determine the characteristic impedance and propagation constant that characterize these liners as bulk absorbers. These parameters are then used to calculate the predicted impedance of liners with different thicknesses (e.g., 36 layers), and a comparison of predicted and measured impedances for these other thicknesses is used to determine the efficacy of this approach. Finally, an independent method is used to educe the propagation constant for a single representative sample, and excellent comparison between the results for this method and those for the TTM provides increased confidence in the results achieved with the TTM. In general, the results demonstrate these multi-layer perforates can be acceptably treated as bulk absorbers.

  8. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt & Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  9. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-22

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt and Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  10. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  11. Effective Dirac Hamiltonian for anisotropic honeycomb lattices: Optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Leyva, M.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-01-01

    We derive the low-energy Hamiltonian for a honeycomb lattice with anisotropy in the hopping parameters. Taking the reported Dirac Hamiltonian for the anisotropic honeycomb lattice, we obtain its optical conductivity tensor and its transmittance for normal incidence of linearly polarized light. Also, we characterize its dichroic character due to the anisotropic optical absorption. As an application of our general findings, which reproduce the previous case of uniformly strained graphene, we study the optical properties of graphene under a nonmechanical distortion.

  12. Dirac-like plasmons in Ag nanopillar honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Siying; Brenny, Benjamin; Hellstrom, Sondra; Coenen, Toon; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmons in honeycomb lattices of Ag nanoparticles exhibit Dirac-like band structures, similar to the electronic band structure of graphene. Full wave simulations for an infinite honeycomb lattice of silver nano-pillars reveal hybridization of localized plasmonic modes between two neighboring pillars and the consequent formation of bonding and anti-bonding modes that are energetically degenerate at Dirac points. Electromagnetic simulations reveal the existence of plasmonic edge states in finite width nanoribbons of the honeycomb nanoparticle lattice. Nanoscale architecture of the honeycomb lattice may provide a new way to control plasmon propagation by selective excitation of directional surface plasmon edge states without backscattering. Experimentally, we have utilized cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy to study angular emission patterns and construct band structures of the silver pillars in honeycomb lattices. In our initial CL measurement, silver pillars in honeycomb lattices, we have observed strong radiation patterns near the Brillouin zone edge, integrated over an interval of wavelength centered on the wavelength of the Dirac points.

  13. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded corrugated sandwich core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formulas and associated graphs for evaluating the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core, are presented. A comparison of structural stiffnesses of the sandwich core and a honeycomb core under conditions of equal sandwich core density was made. The stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (that is, triangular truss core) is lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former has higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  14. New concept in brazing metallic honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, P. D.; Layton, R. E.; Stratton, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    Aluminum oxide coating provides surface which will not be wetted by brazing alloy and which stops metallic diffusion welding of tooling materials to part being produced. This method eliminates loss of tooling materials and parts from braze wetting and allows fall-apart disassembly of tooling after brazing.

  15. Development of Rene' 41 honeycomb structure as an integral cryogenic tankage/fuselage concept for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. J.; Swegle, A. R.; Fields, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The status of the structural development of an integral cryogenic-tankage/hot-fuselage concept for future space transportation systems (STS) is discussed. The concept consists of a honeycomb sandwich structure which serves the combined functions of containment of cryogenic fuel, support of vehicle loads, and thermal protection from an entry heating environment. The inner face sheet is exposed to a cryogenic (LH2) temperature of -423 F during boost; and the outer face sheet, which is slotted to reduce thermal stress, is exposed to a maximum temperature of 1400 F during a high altitude, gliding entry. A fabrication process for a Rene' 41 honeycomb sandwich panel with a core density less than 1 percent was developed which is consistent with desirable heat treatment processes for high strength.

  16. Development of Rene 41 honeycomb structure as an integral cryogenic tankage/fuselage concept for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. L.; Swegle, A. R.; Fields, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The status of the structural development of an integral cryogenic-tankage/hot-fuselage concept for future space transportation systems is reviewed. The concept comprises a honeycomb sandwich structure that serves the combined functions of containing the cryogenic fuel, supporting the vehicle loads, and protecting the spacecraft from entry heating. The inner face sheet is exposed to cryogenic temperature of -423 F during boost; the outer face sheet, which is slotted to reduce thermal stress, is exposed to a maximum temperature of 1400 F during a high-altitude gliding entry. Attention is given to the development of a fabrication process for a Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich panel with a core density of less than 1 percent that is consistent with desirable heat treatment processes for high strength.

  17. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  18. Effects of thickness and delamination on the damping in honeycomb foam sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuang; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    2006-06-01

    In engineering applications where the use of lightweight structures is important, the introduction of a viscoelastic core layer, which has high inherent damping, between two face sheets, can produce a sandwich structure with high damping. Sandwich structures have the additional advantage that their strength to weight ratios are generally superior to those of solid metals. So, sandwich structures are being used increasingly in transportation vehicles. Knowledge of the passive damping of sandwich structures and attempts to improve their damping at the design stage thus are important. Some theoretical models for passive damping in composite sandwich structures are reviewed in this paper. The effects of the thickness of the core and face sheets, and delamination on damping are analyzed. Measurements on honeycomb-foam sandwich beams with different configurations and thicknesses have been performed and the results compared with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Analysis of propagation characteristics of flexural wave in honeycomb sandwich panel and design of loudspeaker for radiating inclined sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    A loudspeaker for an auditory guiding system is proposed. This loudspeaker utilizes inclined sound transformed from a flexural wave in a honeycomb sandwich panel. We focused on the fact that the inclined sound propagates extensively with uniform level and direction. Furthermore, sound can be generated without group delay dispersion because the phase velocity of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel becomes constant with increasing frequency. These characteristics can be useful for an auditory guiding system in public spaces since voice-guiding navigation indicates the right direction regardless of position on a pathway. To design the proposed loudspeaker, the behavior of the sandwich panel is predicted using a theoretical equation in which the honeycomb core is assumed as an orthotropic continuum. We calculated the phase velocity dispersion of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel and compared the results obtained using the equation with those of a simulation based on the finite element method and an experiment in order to confirm the applicability of the theoretical equation. It was confirmed that the phase velocities obtained using the theoretical equation and by the simulation were in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. The obtained results suggest that the behavior of the sandwich panel can be predicted using the parameters of the panel. In addition, we designed an optimized honeycomb sandwich panel for radiating inclined sound by calculating the phase velocity characteristics of various panels that have different parameters of core height and cell size using the theoretical equation. Sound radiation from the optimized panel was simulated and compared with that of a homogeneous plate. It was clear that the variance of the radiation angle with varying frequency of the optimized panel was smaller than that of the homogeneous plate. This characteristic of sound radiation with a uniform angle is useful for indicating the destination direction. On the basis of this fact, we established a design method of the flat-panel loudspeaker for generating inclined sound using a honeycomb sandwich panel.

  20. Optimal Design of Honeycomb Material Used to Mitigate Head Impact

    PubMed Central

    Caccese, Vincent; Ferguson, James R.; Edgecomb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the impact resistance of honeycomb structure with the purpose to mitigate impact forces. The objective is to aid in the choice of optimal parameters to minimize the thickness of the honeycomb structure while providing adequate protection to prevent injury due to head impact. Studies are presented using explicit finite element analysis representing the case of an unprotected drop of a rigid impactor onto a simulated floor consisting of vinyl composition tile and concrete. Analysis of honeycomb material to reduce resulting accelerations is also presented where parameters such as honeycomb material modulus, wall thickness, cell geometry and structure depth are compared to the unprotected case. A simplified analysis technique using a genetic algorithm is presented to demonstrate the use of this method to select a minimum honeycomb depth to achieve a desired acceleration level at a given level of input energy. It is important to select a minimum material depth in that smaller dimensions lead toward more aesthetic design that increase the likelihood of that the device is used. PMID:23976812

  1. Aluminum Pannier

    This aluminum pannier was made for the storage of meat, vegetables and other food products. The pannier could be buried in the ground or placed in water in order to keep the contents cool. It was designed by Dr. J. D. Love and made for him in 1945. For transportation, this pannier, along with two re...

  2. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  3. Modeling and structural analysis of honeycomb structure mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yeping

    2012-09-01

    In development of large-scale astronomical telescopes, some promising new technology and method such as honeycomb structure mirrors and silicon carbide mirrors are applied for primary mirrors. Especially in space telescopes, the mirror lightweight design is becoming the key technology and honeycomb structure mirrors are normally required more and more to reduce the cost and increase the feasibility of the telescopes system. In this paper, a parameter FEA model of a two meters honeycomb structure mirror has been built, by using the engineering analysis software ANSYS. Through this model, the structural analysis, thermal deformation analysis and the simulation active correction of low-order frequency aberration by the finite element method have been presented.

  4. Topology optimization of pressure adaptive honeycomb for a morphing flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof; Scheepstra, Jan; Barrett, Ron

    2011-03-01

    The paper begins with a brief historical overview of pressure adaptive materials and structures. By examining avian anatomy, it is seen that pressure-adaptive structures have been used successfully in the Natural world to hold structural positions for extended periods of time and yet allow for dynamic shape changes from one flight state to the next. More modern pneumatic actuators, including FAA certified autopilot servoactuators are frequently used by aircraft around the world. Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAM) show good promise as aircraft actuators, but follow the traditional model of load concentration and distribution commonly found in aircraft. A new system is proposed which leaves distributed loads distributed and manipulates structures through a distributed actuator. By using Pressure Adaptive Honeycomb (PAH), it is shown that large structural deformations in excess of 50% strains can be achieved while maintaining full structural integrity and enabling secondary flight control mechanisms like flaps. The successful implementation of pressure-adaptive honeycomb in the trailing edge of a wing section sparked the motivation for subsequent research into the optimal topology of the pressure adaptive honeycomb within the trailing edge of a morphing flap. As an input for the optimization two known shapes are required: a desired shape in cruise configuration and a desired shape in landing configuration. In addition, the boundary conditions and load cases (including aerodynamic loads and internal pressure loads) should be specified for each condition. Finally, a set of six design variables is specified relating to the honeycomb and upper skin topology of the morphing flap. A finite-element model of the pressure-adaptive honeycomb structure is developed specifically tailored to generate fast but reliable results for a given combination of external loading, input variables, and boundary conditions. Based on two bench tests it is shown that this model correlates well to experimental results. The optimization process finds the skin and honeycomb topology that minimizes the error between the acquired shape and the desired shape in each configuration.

  5. Aluminum-Induced photoluminescence red shifts in core-shell GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dhaka, Veer; Oksanen, Jani; Jiang, Hua; Haggren, Tuomas; Nykänen, Antti; Sanatinia, Reza; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Huhtio, Teppo; Mattila, Marco; Ruokolainen, Janne; Anand, Srinivasan; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-08-14

    We report a new phenomenon related to Al-induced carrier confinement at the interface in core-shell GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires grown using metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy with Au as catalyst. All Al(x)Ga(1-x)As shells strongly passivated the GaAs nanowires, but surprisingly the peak photoluminescence (PL) position and the intensity from the core were found to be a strong function of Al composition in the shell at low temperatures. Large and systematic red shifts of up to ~66 nm and broadening in the PL emission from the GaAs core were observed when the Al composition in the shell exceeded 3%. On the contrary, the phenomenon was observed to be considerably weaker at the room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals Al segregation in the shell along six Al-rich radial bands displaying a 3-fold symmetry. Time-resolved PL measurements suggest the presence of indirect electron-hole transitions at the interface at higher Al composition. We discuss all possibilities including a simple shell-core-shell model using simulations where the density of interface traps increases with the Al content, thus creating a strong local electron confinement. The carrier confinement at the interface is most likely related to Al inhomogeneity and/or Al-induced traps. Our results suggest that a low Al composition in the shell is desirable in order to achieve ideal passivation in GaAs nanowires. PMID:23898926

  6. Mechanical analysis of confectioning flaw of refractory alloy honeycomb sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaodong; Kong, Xianghao; Shi, Liping; Li, Mingwei

    2009-03-01

    Thermal protection system is one of the key technology of reusable launch vehicle (RLV). After C/C and ceramic-matrix composite used in space orbiter, one new-typed thermal protection systems (TPS)-ARMOR TPS is coming forth. ARMOR TPS is means adaptable, robust, metallic, operable, reusable TPS. The ARMOR TPS has many advantages, for example: fixing easily, longer life, good properties, short time of maintenance and service. The ARMOR TPS is one of important candidate structure of RLV. ARMOR thermal protection system in foreign countries for reusable launch vehicle is used instead of the traditional ceramic-matrix composite thermal protection system and C/C thermal protection system. Also the constituent feature of ARMOR thermal protection system is much better than the traditional TPS. In comparison with traditional TPS, the ARMOR TPS will be the best selection for all kinds of RLV. So the ARMOR thermal protection system will be used in aviation and spaceflight field more and more widely because of its much better performance. ARMOR TPS panel is above the whole ARMOR TPS, and the metal honeycomb sandwich structure is the surface of the ARMOR TPS panel. So the metal honeycomb sandwich structure plays an important role in the ARMOR TPS, while it bears the flight dynamic pressure and stands against the flight dynamic calefaction. The metal honeycomb sandwich structure is made using the technique of the whole braze welding. In the course of the vacuum high temperature braze welding, its surface will appear concave. The reasons which lead to the shortage are summarized and discussed. The difference of thermal expansion coefficient and pressure between the core and the panels may be the chief reasons. This paper will analyze the mechanics behavior of metal honeycomb sandwich structure in the course of the vacuum high temperature braze welding, then make sure the reasons and get a way to solve it. Haynes214 is a good material of face sheet at present. γ - TiAl and microlaminate materials are the candidate materials in the future.

  7. Electrical transport measurements on honeycomb artificial spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will; Functional Magnetism Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. We have previously shown that in a cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice composed of 1 micron long nanowires there are unusual features in the magnetotransport below 50K. Here we explore the low temperature transport of equivalent artificial spin ice structures fabricated from permalloy. We discuss the extent to which the phenomenon is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and the effect of changing the constituent material on the onset temperature and the magnitude of the magnetotransport effect.

  8. Carbon Honeycomb High Capacity Storage for Gaseous and Liquid Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.; Zubarev, Evgeniy N.

    2016-02-01

    We report an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. The allotrope structures are derived from our low temperature electron diffraction and electron microscopy data. These structures can be both periodic and random and are built exclusively from s p2 -bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. They demonstrate high levels of physical absorption of various gases unattainable in other carbon forms such as fullerites or nanotubes. These honeycomb structures can be used not only for storage of various gases and liquids but also as a matrix for new composites.

  9. Chaos in the honeycomb optical-lattice unit cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Max D.; Reichl, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Natural and artificial honeycomb lattices are of great interest because the band structure of these lattices, if properly constructed, contains a Dirac point. Such lattices occur naturally in the form of graphene and carbon nanotubes. They have been created in the laboratory in the form of semiconductor 2DEGs, optical lattices, and photonic crystals. We show that, over a wide energy range, gases (of electrons, atoms, or photons) that propagate through these lattices are Lorentz gases and the corresponding classical dynamics is chaotic. Thus honeycomb lattices are also of interest for understanding eigenstate thermalization and the conductor-insulator transition due to dynamic Anderson localization.

  10. Adhesion characterization and defect sizing of sandwich honeycomb composites.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Elhadji Barra; Maréchal, Pierre; Duflo, Hugues

    2015-09-01

    Defects may appear in composite structures during their life cycle. A 10MHz 128 elements phased array transducer was investigated to characterize join bonds and defects in sandwich honeycomb composite structures. An adequate focal law throughout the composite skin gives the ultrasonic dispersive properties of the composite skin and glue layer behind. The resulting B-scan cartographies allow characterizing locally the honeycomb adhesion. Experimental measurements are compared in good agreement with the Debye Series Method (DSM). In the processed C-scan image, flaws are detectable and measurable, localized both in the scanning plane and in the thickness of the composite skin. PMID:26138595

  11. Condensed solute droplets templated honeycomb pattern on polymer films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenghui; Cheng, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Panpan

    2014-12-15

    A method to generate honeycomb pattern on polymer films is demonstrated. Briefly, a polymer solution in a volatile solvent containing a nonvolatile liquid solute is cast into a thin layer, with the fast evaporation of the volatile solvent, the liquid solute is enriched at the top surface of the layer. The enriched liquid solute condenses into uniform droplets after reaching its saturation state, meanwhile, the polymer precipitates at the interface of the droplets. With this method, we prepared the honeycomb-patterned polysulfone, polystyrene, and polyvinylidene fluoride films. This method provides a new approach to manipulate the surface geometry of polymer films. PMID:25259756

  12. Effects of service environments on aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Aluminum brazed titanium (ABTi) structures were evaluated during prolonged exposure to extreme environments: elevated temperature exposure to airline service fluids, hydraulic fluid, and seawater, followed by laboratory corrosion tests. Solid-face and perforated face honeycomb sandwich panel specimens, stressed panel assemblies, and faying surface brazed joints were tested. The corrosion resistance of ABTi is satisfactory for commercial airline service. Unprotected ABTi proved inherently resistant to attack by all of the extreme service aircraft environments except: seawater at 700 K (800 F) and above, dripping phosphate ester hydraulic fluid at 505 K (450 F), and a marine environment at ambient temperature. The natural oxides and deposits present on titanium surfaces in airline service provide protection against hot salt corrosion pitting. Coatings are required to protect titanium dripping phosphate ester fluid at elevated temperatures and to protect exposed acoustic honeycomb parts against corrosion in a marine environment.

  13. Honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Yang, Jing; Gao, Yenan; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Ben

    2015-02-01

    We report on a honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air for the first time. It consists of hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework and bifurcates from a hexagon pattern as the applied voltage increases. A phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas component and gas pressure is presented. The instantaneous images show that the hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework are ignited in turn in each half voltage cycle. The honeycomb framework is composed of filaments ignited randomly. The spatiotemporal dynamics of honeycomb superlattice pattern is discussed by wall charges.

  14. Honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ping; Dong, Lifang Yang, Jing; Gao, Yenan; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Ben

    2015-02-15

    We report on a honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air for the first time. It consists of hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework and bifurcates from a hexagon pattern as the applied voltage increases. A phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas component and gas pressure is presented. The instantaneous images show that the hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework are ignited in turn in each half voltage cycle. The honeycomb framework is composed of filaments ignited randomly. The spatiotemporal dynamics of honeycomb superlattice pattern is discussed by wall charges.

  15. Some considerations of the performance of two honeycomb gas path seal material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Shiembob, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A standard Hastelloy-X honeycomb material and a pack aluminide coated honeycomb material were evaluated as to their performance as labyrinth seal materials for aircraft gas turbine engines. Consideration from published literature was given to the fluid sealing characteristics of two honeycomb materials in labyrinth seal applications, and their rub characteristics, erosion resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated. The increased temperature potential of the coated honeycomb material compared to the uncoated standard could be achieved without compromising the honeycomb material's rub tolerance, although there was some penalty in terms of reduced erosion resistance.

  16. Detection of entrapped moisture in honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallmark, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal neutron moisture detection system detects entrapped moisture in intercellular areas of bonded honeycomb sandwich structures. A radium/beryllium fast neutron source bombards a specimen. The emitted thermal neutrons from the target nucleus are detected and counted by a boron trifluoride thermal neutron detector.

  17. Honeycomb and triangular domain wall networks in heteroepitaxial systems.

    PubMed

    Elder, K R; Chen, Z; Elder, K L M; Hirvonen, P; Mkhonta, S K; Ying, S-C; Granato, E; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for the influence of misfit strain, adhesion strength, and lattice symmetry on the complex Moiré patterns that form in ultrathin films of honeycomb symmetry adsorbed on compact triangular or honeycomb substrates. The method used is based on a complex Ginzburg-Landau model of the film that incorporates elastic strain energy and dislocations. The results indicate that different symmetries of the heteroepitaxial systems lead to distinct types of domain wall networks and phase transitions among various surface Moiré patterns and superstructures. More specifically, the results show a dramatic difference between the phase diagrams that emerge when a honeycomb film is adsorbed on substrates of honeycomb versus triangular symmetry. It is also shown that in the small deformation limit, the complex Ginzburg-Landau model reduces to a two-dimensional sine-Gordon free energy form. This free energy can be solved exactly for one dimensional patterns and reveals the role of domains walls and their crossings in determining the nature of the phase diagrams. PMID:27155643

  18. Honeycomb and triangular domain wall networks in heteroepitaxial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, K. R.; Chen, Z.; Elder, K. L. M.; Hirvonen, P.; Mkhonta, S. K.; Ying, S.-C.; Granato, E.; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for the influence of misfit strain, adhesion strength, and lattice symmetry on the complex Moiré patterns that form in ultrathin films of honeycomb symmetry adsorbed on compact triangular or honeycomb substrates. The method used is based on a complex Ginzburg-Landau model of the film that incorporates elastic strain energy and dislocations. The results indicate that different symmetries of the heteroepitaxial systems lead to distinct types of domain wall networks and phase transitions among various surface Moiré patterns and superstructures. More specifically, the results show a dramatic difference between the phase diagrams that emerge when a honeycomb film is adsorbed on substrates of honeycomb versus triangular symmetry. It is also shown that in the small deformation limit, the complex Ginzburg-Landau model reduces to a two-dimensional sine-Gordon free energy form. This free energy can be solved exactly for one dimensional patterns and reveals the role of domains walls and their crossings in determining the nature of the phase diagrams.

  19. Repair of honeycomb panels with welded breakaway studs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, D. F.

    1969-01-01

    Damaged metallic honeycomb panels can be repaired by drilling holes and welding breakaway studs to both facing sheets. Minimal heat required for welding reduces distortion of highly stressed panels. Repairs can be made without the use of doublers and with greater strength when doublers are used.

  20. Metal honeycomb to porous wireform substrate diffusion bond evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Moorhead, P. E.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two nondestructive techniques were used to evaluate diffusion bond quality between a metal foil honeycomb and porous wireform substrate. The two techniques, cryographics and acousto-ultrasonics, are complementary in revealing variations of bond integrity and quality in shroud segments from an experimental aircraft turbine engine.

  1. Hollow needle used to cut metal honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, E. A.

    1966-01-01

    Hollow needle tool cuts metal honeycomb structures without damaging adjacent material. The hollow needle combines an electrostatic discharge and a stream of oxygen at a common point to effect rapid, accurate metal cutting. The tool design can be varied to use the hollow needle principle for cutting a variety of shapes.

  2. d + i d superconductivity on the honeycomb bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Milica; Vucicevic, Jaksa; Tanaskovic, Darko

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate that for interlayer attractive interactions on bilayer honeycomb lattice with large interlayer hopping, a time reversal symmetry breaking d-wave topological superconductor is a dominant phase. We find that small momentum order parameter expansion has dx^2-y^2+ i dxy symmetry around both Dirac points and discuss a possible relevance of this state for experiments on graphene bilayer.

  3. Lightweight Composite Core For Curved Composite Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Christopher C.; Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.

    1991-01-01

    New type of composite core material for curved composite mirrors proposed. Strips cut from corrugated sheets of graphite/epoxy bonded together at crests and valleys. In comparison with honeycomb and other lightweight core materials, structure less mechanically anisotropic, tailored to have less distortion due to temperature changes, naturally vented, and easily fabricated. Conforms readily to spherical and paraboloidal curvatures and fabricated in large sizes.

  4. Bio-inspired low frictional surfaces having micro-dimple arrays prepared with honeycomb patterned porous films as wet etching masks.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Yabu, H

    2015-01-27

    Some kinds of snakes have micro-dimple arrays on their skins and show low frictional properties. Cost-effective and simple preparation methods of surfaces having micro-dimple arrays without burrs have been required. In this study, micro-dimple arrays were successfully prepared on aluminum plates and pipes by using honeycomb patterned porous films as wet etching masks. Resulting surfaces having 5 and 8 μm dimple diameters show low frictional coefficients compared with polished surfaces at a fluid lubrication regime. PMID:25547931

  5. Identification of honeycomb sandwich properties by high-resolution modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebillat, M.; Boutillon, X.

    2010-06-01

    A method is proposed to identify the mechanical properties of the skin and core materials of honeycomb sandwich. All the elastic coefficients and loss-factors that matter in the dynamics of a panel in the thick-plate approximation are identified. To this end, experimental natural modes (i.e. eigenmodes of the damped system) are compared to the numerical modes of a large sandwich panel (lx,y/h ≃ 80). The chosen generic model for the visco-elastic behaviour of the materials is E (1 + jη). The numerical modes are computed by means of a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure and their dampings are predicted according to the visco-elastic model. The frequencies and dampings of the natural modes of the panel are estimated experimentally by means of a high-resolution modal analysis technique. An optimisation procedure yields the desired coefficients. A sensitivity analysis assess the reliability of the method.

  6. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  7. Aluminum plasmonics for enhanced visible light absorption and high efficiency water splitting in core-multishell nanowire photoelectrodes with ultrathin hematite shells.

    PubMed

    Ramadurgam, Sarath; Lin, Tzu-Ging; Yang, Chen

    2014-08-13

    The poor internal quantum efficiency (IQE) arising from high recombination and insufficient absorption is one of the critical challenges toward achieving high efficiency water splitting in hematite (α-Fe2O3) photoelectrodes. By combining the nanowire (NW) geometry with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor-metal-metal oxide core-multishell (CMS) NWs, we theoretically demonstrate an effective route to strongly improve absorption within ultrathin (sub-50 nm) hematite layers. We show that Si-Al-Fe2O3 CMS NWs exhibit photocurrent densities comparable to Si-Ag-Fe2O3 CMS and outperform Fe2O3, Si-Fe2O3 CS and Si-Au-Fe2O3 CMS NWs. Specifically; Si-Al-Fe2O3 CMS NWs reach photocurrent densities of ∼ 11.81 mA/cm(2) within a 40 nm thick hematite shell which corresponding to a solar to hydrogen (STH) efficiency of 14.5%. This corresponds to about 93% of the theoretical maximum for bulk hematite. Therefore, we establish Al as an excellent alternative plasmonic material compared to precious metals in CMS structures. Further, the absorbed photon flux is close to the NW surface in the CMS NWs, which ensures the charges generated can reach the reaction site with minimal recombining. Although the NW geometry is anisotropic, the CMS NWs exhibit polarization independent absorption over a large range of incidence angles. Finally, we show that Si-Al-Fe2O3 CMS NWs demonstrate photocurrent densities greater than ∼ 8.2 mA/cm(2) (STH efficiency of 10%) for incidence angles as large as 45°. These theoretical results strongly establish the effectiveness of the Al-based CMS NWs for achieving scalable and cost-effective photoelectrodes with improved IQE, enabling a novel route toward high efficiency water splitting. PMID:24971707

  8. Service evaluation of Aluminum-Brazed Titanium (ABTi) jet engine tailpipe extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    Aluminum-brazed titanium (ABTi) jet engine tailpipe extensions were evaluated in commercial service over a 3-year period. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the corrosion resistance of ABTi in acoustic applications (i.e., honeycomb sandwich incorporating a perforated inner skin). The results showed that ABTi does not have acceptable corrosion resistance in acoustic applications under severe operating conditions, but may be acceptable for acoustic applications in less severe environments.

  9. Superelastic NiTi honeycombs: fabrication and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John A.; Grummon, David S.; Foltz, John

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new class of superelastic NiTi honeycomb structures. We have developed a novel brazing technique that has allowed us to fabricate Nitinol-based cellular structures with relative densities near 5%. Commercially available nickel-rich Nitinol strips were shape-set into corrugated form, stacked, and bonded at high temperature by exploiting a contact eutectic melting reaction involving pure niobium. After heat treatment to restore transformational superelastic response, prototype honeycomb structures were subjected to severe in-plane compression loading at room temperature. The specimens exhibited good specific strength, high specific stiffness, and enhanced shape recovery compared to monolithic shape memory alloys (SMAs). Compressive strains of over 50% could be recovered upon unloading. The demonstrated architectures are simple examples of a wide variety of possible built-up topologies, enabled by the bonding method, that can be engineered for customizable net section properties, arbitrary shape, and kinematically enhanced thermomechanical shape-memory and superelastic response.

  10. Charge dynamics in doped Mott insulators on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Feng, Shiping

    2016-03-01

    Within the framework of the fermion-spin theory, the charge transport in the doped Mott insulators on a honeycomb lattice is studied by taking into account the pseudogap effect. It is shown that the conductivity spectrum in the low-doped regime is separated by the pseudogap into a low-energy non-Drude peak followed by a broad mid-infrared band. However, the decrease of the pseudogap with the increase of doping leads to a shift of the position of the mid-infrared band towards the low-energy non-Drude peak, and then the low-energy Drude behavior recovers in the high-doped regime. The combined results of both the doped honeycomb-lattice and square-lattice Mott insulators indicate that the two-component conductivity induced by the pseudogap is a universal feature in the doped Mott insulators.

  11. Heterojunction Photodiodes Based on Honeycomb Structures for Ultraviolet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shu-Yi; Lee, Jian-Hong; Hon, Min-Hsiung

    2012-06-01

    The p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device based on honeycomb structures was fabricated by RF sputtering method. The structural and optical properties of the p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and current-voltage (I-V) photocurrent measurements. The XRD spectra indicate that ZnO films were of hexagonal wurtzite structures, preferentially (002) oriented. SEM show that the spherical polystyrene stacking on hexagonal close-packing lattice structure. Optical measurements showed that the honeycomb structures exhibited the maximum haze values up to 50% at wavelength range 380-800 nm. The I-V curve of the heterojunction demonstrates obvious rectifying diode behavior in a dark environment. The lowest of leakage current is 8.23×10-9 A/cm2 for p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device.

  12. Mechanical-Acoustic Multi-Objective Optimization of Honeycomb Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wang-Ying; Yang, Xiong-Wei; Li, Yue-Ming

    At present, optimal design against noise caused by vibrating structures is often formulated with the objective of minimizing sound power or sound pressure. In this paper, a mechanical and acoustic multi-objective optimization method is proposed aimed at minimizing static, dynamic and acoustic response of a honeycomb sandwich panel under given mass constraint. The multi-objective is defined as a weighted sum of static deflection, vibration response and sound power from the norm method. The static and dynamic responses are calculated using FEM and sound power radiated by structures is calculated using discrete Rayleigh integral. The sensitivities of static, dynamic and acoustic response are formulated to improve efficiency by the adjoint method. Numerical examples on the honeycomb plate are considered, which indicate that the proposed method can improve acoustical property without weakening mechanical property.

  13. Ultrasonic waveguide transducer for high temperature testing of ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; An, C. P.; Nickerson, S. T.; Gunasekaran, N.; Shi, Z.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical ultrasonic waveguide transducer designed for in situ material property characterization of ceramic honeycomb at high temperatures (>1200°C) and under fast thermal cycles (>1000°C/min). The low thermal conductivity MACOR waveguide allows the use of conventional transducer (max temp. 50°C) at one end and guides ultrasonic waves into the high temperature region where the characterization is carried out. The impact of time, temperature, and heating/cooling rates on the material behavior was studied. It was demonstrated that the same transducer could also be used for in-situ crack detection during the thermal shock testing of ceramic honeycomb.

  14. Localization in quantum walks on a honeycomb network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Changyuan; Yu, Luyan; Wu, Shengjun

    2015-11-01

    We systematically study the localization effect in discrete-time quantum walks on a honeycomb network and establish the mathematical framework. We focus on the Grover walk first and rigorously derive the limit form of the walker's state, showing it has a certain probability to be localized at the starting position. The relationship between localization and the initial coin state is concisely represented by a linear map. We also define and calculate the average probability of localization by generating random initial states. Further, coin operators varying with positions are considered and the sufficient condition for localization is discussed. We also similarly analyze another four-state Grover walk. Theoretical predictions are all in accord with numerical simulation results. Finally, our results are compared with previous works to demonstrate the unusual trapping effect of quantum walks on a honeycomb network, as well as the advantages of our method.

  15. The CHORUS honeycomb tracker and its bitstream electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uiterwijk, J. W. E.; van Beuzekom, M. G.; van Dantzig, R.; van der Graaf, H.; de Jong, M.; Kok, J. W.; Konijn, J.; Litmaath, M. F.; Metselaar, J. P. M.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Panman, J.; van der Poel, C. J. A. F.; Visschers, J. L.

    1998-02-01

    The CHORUS experiment searches for ν μ↔ν τ oscillation. To aid in the momentum reconstruction of charged hadrons, a honeycomb tracker was built with three orientations of six planes each. The planes are manufactured by point-welding together two precision folded conductive polycarbonate foils, forming hexagonal tubes with 30 μm thick anode wires in the center. The honeycomb tracker in CHORUS is read out using a bitstream principle. The amplified signal of each wire is binary sampled every 5 ns and stored in a 256 bit circular buffer, implemented in dual-port memories. This technique allows a full reconstruction of a 1.28 μs history of each wire. Eighteen cards, each handling 72 wires, are read out over a single flat cable using a card-to-card pipeline.

  16. Layer Anti-Ferromagnetism on Bilayer Honeycomb Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hong-Shuai; Chen, Yao-Hua; Lin, Heng-Fu; Liu, Hai-Di; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bilayer honeycomb lattice, with inter-layer tunneling energy, has a parabolic dispersion relation, and the inter-layer hopping can cause the charge imbalance between two sublattices. Here, we investigate the metal-insulator and magnetic phase transitions on the strongly correlated bilayer honeycomb lattice by cellular dynamical mean-field theory combined with continuous time quantum Monte Carlo method. The procedures of magnetic spontaneous symmetry breaking on dimer and non-dimer sites are different, causing a novel phase transition between normal anti-ferromagnet and layer anti-ferromagnet. The whole phase diagrams about the magnetism, temperature, interaction and inter-layer hopping are obtained. Finally, we propose an experimental protocol to observe these phenomena in future optical lattice experiments. PMID:24947369

  17. Quantum Hall effects in a non-Abelian honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Hao, Ningning; Liu, Guocai; Bai, Zhiming; Li, Zai-Dong; Chen, Shu; Liu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the tunable quantum Hall effects in a non-Abelian honeycomb optical lattice which is a multi-Dirac-point system. We find that the quantum Hall effects present different features with the change in relative strengths of several perturbations. Namely, the quantum spin Hall effect can be induced by gauge-field-dressed next-nearest-neighbor hopping, which, together with a Zeeman field, can induce the quantum anomalous Hall effect characterized by different Chern numbers. Furthermore, we find that the edge states of the multi-Dirac-point system represent very different features for different boundary geometries, in contrast with the generic two-Dirac-point system. Our study extends the borders of the field of quantum Hall effects in a honeycomb optical lattice with multivalley degrees of freedom.

  18. d-wave superconductivity on the honeycomb bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučičević, J.; Goerbig, M. O.; Milovanović, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a microscopic model on the honeycomb bilayer, which in the small-momentum limit captures the usual (quadratic dispersion in the kinetic term) description of bilayer graphene. In the limit of strong interlayer hopping it reduces to an effective honeycomb monolayer model with also third-neighbor hopping. We study interaction effects in this effective model, focusing on possible superconducting instabilities. We find dx2-y2 superconductivity in the strong-coupling limit of an effective tJ-model-like description that gradually transforms into d+id time-reversal symmetry-breaking superconductivity at weak couplings. In this limit the small-momentum order-parameter expansion is (kx+iky)2 [or (kx-iky)2] in both valleys of the effective low-energy description. The relevance of our model and investigation for the physics of bilayer graphene is also discussed.

  19. Order parameters from image analysis: a honeycomb example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest H.; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-11-01

    Honeybee combs have aroused interest in the ability of honeybees to form regular hexagonal geometric constructs since ancient times. Here we use a real space technique based on the pair distribution function (PDF) and radial distribution function (RDF), and a reciprocal space method utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) to quantify the order for a range of honeycombs made by Apis mellifera ligustica. The PDFs and RDFs are fit with a series of Gaussian curves. We characterize the order in the honeycomb using a real space order parameter, OP 3 , to describe the order in the combs and a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller order parameter, u, is derived. Both OP 3 and u take values from [0, 1] where the value one represents perfect order. The analyzed combs have values of OP 3 from 0.33 to 0.60 and values of u from 0.59 to 0.69. RDF fits of honeycomb histograms show that naturally made comb can be crystalline in a 2D ordered structural sense, yet is more ‘liquid-like’ than cells made on ‘foundation’ wax. We show that with the assistance of man-made foundation wax, honeybees can manufacture highly ordered arrays of hexagonal cells. This is the first description of honeycomb utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor, and provides a complete analysis of the order in comb from a real-space order parameter and a reciprocal space order parameter. It is noted that the techniques used are general in nature and could be applied to any digital photograph of an ordered array.

  20. Pressurized honeycombs as soft-actuators: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Lorenzo; Fratzl, Peter; Bréchet, Yves J. M.; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2014-01-01

    The seed capsule of Delosperma nakurense is a remarkable example of a natural hygromorph, which unfolds its protecting valves upon wetting to expose its seeds. The beautiful mechanism responsible for this motion is generated by a specialized organ based on an anisotropic cellular tissue filled with a highly swelling material. Inspired by this system, we study the mechanics of a diamond honeycomb internally pressurized by a fluid phase. Numerical homogenization by means of iterative finite-element (FE) simulations is adapted to the case of cellular materials filled with a variable pressure fluid phase. Like its biological counterpart, it is shown that the material architecture controls and guides the otherwise unspecific isotropic expansion of the fluid. Deformations up to twice the original dimensions can be achieved by simply setting the value of input pressure. In turn, these deformations cause a marked change of the honeycomb geometry and hence promote a stiffening of the material along the weak direction. To understand the mechanism further, we also developed a micromechanical model based on the Born model for crystal elasticity to find an explicit relation between honeycomb geometry, swelling eigenstrains and elastic properties. The micromechanical model is in good qualitative agreement with the FE simulations. Moreover, we also provide the force-stroke characteristics of a soft actuator based on the pressurized anisotropic honeycomb and show how the internal pressure has a nonlinear effect which can result in negative values of the in-plane Poisson's ratio. As nature shows in the case of the D. nakurense seed capsule, cellular materials can be used not only as low-weight structural materials, but also as simple but convenient actuating materials. PMID:24966238

  1. Fabrication of prepackaged superalloy honeycomb Thermal Protection System (TPS) panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W.; Meaney, J. E.; Rosenthal, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature materials were surveyed, and Inconel 617 and titanium were selected for application to a honeycomb TPS configuration designed to withstand 2000 F. The configuration was analyzed both thermally and structurally. Component and full-sized panels were fabricated and tested to obtain data for comparison with analysis. Results verified the panel design. Twenty five panels were delivered to NASA Langley Research Center for additional evaluation.

  2. Spin-orbital quantum liquid on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    The symmetric Kugel-Khomskii can be seen as a minimal model describing the interactions between spin and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxides with orbital degeneracy, and it is equivalent to the SU(4) Heisenberg model of four-color fermionic atoms. We present simulation results for this model on various two-dimensional lattices obtained with infinite projected-entangled pair states (iPEPS), an efficient variational tensor-network ansatz for two dimensional wave functions in the thermodynamic limit. This approach can be seen as a two-dimensional generalization of matrix product states - the underlying ansatz of the density matrix renormalization group method. We find a rich variety of exotic phases: while on the square and checkerboard lattices the ground state exhibits dimer-Néel order and plaquette order, respectively, quantum fluctuations on the honeycomb lattice destroy any order, giving rise to a spin-orbital liquid. Our results are supported from flavor-wave theory and exact diagonalization. Furthermore, the properties of the spin-orbital liquid state on the honeycomb lattice are accurately accounted for by a projected variational wave-function based on the pi-flux state of fermions on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4-filling. In that state, correlations are algebraic because of the presence of a Dirac point at the Fermi level, suggesting that the ground state is an algebraic spin-orbital liquid. This model provides a good starting point to understand the recently discovered spin-orbital liquid behavior of Ba3CuSb2O9. The present results also suggest to choose optical lattices with honeycomb geometry in the search for quantum liquids in ultra-cold four-color fermionic atoms. We acknowledge the financial support from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  3. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering. PMID:26700239

  4. Accordion-Like Honeycombs for Tissue Engineering of Cardiac Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Engelmayr, George C.; Cheng, Mingyu; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineered grafts may be useful in myocardial repair, however previous scaffolds have been structurally incompatible with recapitulating cardiac anisotropy. Utilizing microfabrication techniques, a novel accordion-like honeycomb microstructure was rendered in poly(glycerol sebacate) to yield porous, elastomeric 3-D scaffolds with controllable stiffness and anisotropy. Accordion-like honeycomb scaffolds with cultured neonatal rat heart cells demonstrated utility via: (1) closely matched mechanical properties compared to native adult rat right ventricular myocardium, with stiffnesses controlled by polymer curing time; (2) heart cell contractility inducible by electric field stimulation with directionally-dependent electrical excitation thresholds (p<0.05); and (3) greater heart cell alignment (p<0.0001) than isotropic control scaffolds. Prototype bilaminar scaffolds with 3-D interconnected pore networks yielded electrically excitable grafts with multi-layered neonatal rat heart cells. Accordion-like honeycombs can thus overcome principal structural-mechanical limitations of previous scaffolds, promoting the formation of grafts with aligned heart cells and mechanical properties more closely resembling native myocardium. PMID:18978786

  5. Accordion-like honeycombs for tissue engineering of cardiac anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Engelmayr, George C; Cheng, Mingyu; Bettinger, Christopher J; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E

    2008-12-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts may be useful in myocardial repair; however, previous scaffolds have been structurally incompatible with recapitulating cardiac anisotropy. Here, we use microfabrication techniques to create an accordion-like honeycomb microstructure in poly(glycerol sebacate), which yields porous, elastomeric three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with controllable stiffness and anisotropy. Accordion-like honeycomb scaffolds with cultured neonatal rat heart cells demonstrated utility through: (1) closely matched mechanical properties compared to native adult rat right ventricular myocardium, with stiffnesses controlled by polymer curing time; (2) heart cell contractility inducible by electric field stimulation with directionally dependent electrical excitation thresholds (p<0.05); and (3) greater heart cell alignment (p<0.0001) than isotropic control scaffolds. Prototype bilaminar scaffolds with 3D interconnected pore networks yielded electrically excitable grafts with multi-layered neonatal rat heart cells. Accordion-like honeycombs can thus overcome principal structural-mechanical limitations of previous scaffolds, promoting the formation of grafts with aligned heart cells and mechanical properties more closely resembling native myocardium. PMID:18978786

  6. Accordion-like honeycombs for tissue engineering of cardiac anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmayr, George C.; Cheng, Mingyu; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E.

    2008-12-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts may be useful in myocardial repair; however, previous scaffolds have been structurally incompatible with recapitulating cardiac anisotropy. Here, we use microfabrication techniques to create an accordion-like honeycomb microstructure in poly(glycerol sebacate), which yields porous, elastomeric three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with controllable stiffness and anisotropy. Accordion-like honeycomb scaffolds with cultured neonatal rat heart cells demonstrated utility through: (1) closely matched mechanical properties compared to native adult rat right ventricular myocardium, with stiffnesses controlled by polymer curing time; (2) heart cell contractility inducible by electric field stimulation with directionally dependent electrical excitation thresholds (p<0.05) and (3) greater heart cell alignment (p<0.0001) than isotropic control scaffolds. Prototype bilaminar scaffolds with 3D interconnected pore networks yielded electrically excitable grafts with multi-layered neonatal rat heart cells. Accordion-like honeycombs can thus overcome principal structural-mechanical limitations of previous scaffolds, promoting the formation of grafts with aligned heart cells and mechanical properties more closely resembling native myocardium.

  7. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  8. Vibroacoustic flexural properties of symmetric honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaumie, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The vibroacoustic bending properties of honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces are studied from the wavenumber modulus to the mechanical impedance, passing through the modal density. Numerical results extracted from finite element software computations are compared with analytical results. In both cases, the homogenization method is used to calculate the global properties of the sandwich panel. Since faces are made of composite material, the classical laminate theory serves as reference. With particular conditions used in the application for symmetric panels, the original orthotropic mechanical properties can be reduced simply to three parameters commonly used in vibroacoustic characterizations. These three parameters are the mass per unit area, the bending rigidity and the out-of-plane shear rigidity. They simultaneously govern the wavenumber modulus, the modal frequencies, the modal density and the mechanical impedance. For all of these vibroacoustic characterizations, a special frequency called the transition frequency separates two domains. In the first domain, below the transition frequency or for low frequencies, the orthotropic sandwich panel has a classical isotropic plate behavior. In the second domain, above the transition frequency or for high frequencies, the out-of-plane shear rigidity is very significant and changes the behavior. However, the results discussed are only valid up to a certain frequency which is determined by the thickness and out-of-plane shear stiffness of the honeycomb core, the thickness and the bending stiffness of the laminated face sheets and then the mass per unit area and bending stiffness of the total sandwich structure. All these parameters influence the final choice of model and simplifications presented. Experimental measurements of the bending wavenumber modulus and modal frequencies for our own application were carried out. In the vibroacoustic domain, the critical frequency is also an important frequency. It again depends on the mass per unit area, the bending rigidity and the out-of-plane shear rigidity. The experimental and numerical results of the article are reasonably in agreement with the analytical formula. They all confirm the changes in frequency through different boundary conditions around the panel. The analytical modal frequencies of rectangular sandwich panels with transverse shear, under simply supported boundary conditions are well known, but under free boundary conditions it is more difficult to predict them. For experiments, however, these latter conditions are the most common. We present, in this paper, an analytical formula that we have developed for the modal frequencies of such a panel under free boundary conditions. All parameters being controlled, it is possible from dynamic measurements and with a special process to identify some honeycomb and composite mechanical properties.

  9. Water ingress detection in honeycomb sandwich panels by passive infrared thermography using a high-resolution thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Brault, L.; Marcotte, F.; Genest, M.; Farley, V.; Maldague, X.

    2012-06-01

    Water ingress in honeycomb structures is of great concern for the civil and military aerospace industries. Pressure and temperature variations during take-off and landing produce considerable stress on aircraft structures, promoting moisture ingress (by diffusion through fibers or by direct ingress through voids, cracks or unsealed joints) into the core. The presence of water (or other fluids such as kerosene, hydraulic fluid and de-icing agents) in any of its forms (gas vapor, liquid or ice) promotes corrosion, cell breakage, and induce composite layer delaminations and skin disbonds. In this study, testing specimens were produced from unserviceable parts from military aircraft. In order to simulate atmospheric conditions during landing, selected core areas were filled with measured quantities of water and then frozen in a cold chamber. The specimens were then removed from the chamber and monitored for over 20 minutes as they warm up using a cooled high-resolution infrared camera. Results have shown that detection and quantification of water ingress on honeycomb sandwich structures by passive infrared thermography is possible using a HD mid-wave infrared cameras for volumes of water as low as 0.2 ml and from a distance as far as 20 m from the target.

  10. Effective electromagnetic properties of honeycomb substrate coated with dielectric or magnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Fan, C. Z.; Zhu, N. B.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Liu, R. P.

    2014-09-01

    Effective electromagnetic properties of aramid honeycomb board coated with a layer of multi-wall carbon nanotube or iron flakes composites were measured with waveguide method from 4 to 12 GHz. It was proved that homogenization theory could predict the effective permittivity or permeability of the honeycomb composites with good accuracy. The coated honeycomb composites of relatively high permittivity and permeability could potentially be used to develop dielectric or magnetic substrate for shielding layer or absorbing structures working at microwave frequencies.

  11. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 3; 8-ply Out-of-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10 m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800B/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of the 3- by 5-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, T40-800B/5320-1 facesheets (referred to as Panel C). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D), models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength.

  12. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel: Comparison of In- and Out-of-Autoclave Facesheet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kellas, Sotiris; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle, were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration and the NASA Constellation Ares V programs. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.0 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3 ft. by 5 ft. panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections and tested under compressive loading. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3 ft. by 5 ft. panel. To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yielded good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  13. Water Vapor Desorption Characteristics of Honeycomb Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto; Okamoto, Tamio; Seo, Jeong-Kyun

    This paper describes the water vapor desorption characteristics of honeycomb shape type sorbent element containing new organic sorbent of the bridged complex of sodium polyacrylate. The transient experiments in which the dry air was passed into the honeycomb type sorbent element sorbed water vapor were carried out under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. The obtained data for desorption process were compared with those for sorption process. Finally, Sherwood number of mass transfer of the organic sorbent for desorption process was derived in terms of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  14. Sorption Characteristics of Honeycomb-Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto

    This study deals with the sorption characteristics of a honeycomb-type sorption element composed of a new organic sorbent that was composed of the cross-linked polymer of sodium acrylate. Transient experiments in which moist air was passed into the honeycomb-type sorption element were conducted under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. As a result, the effective mass transfer coefficient of the organic sorbent adsorbing the water vapor was non-dimensionalized as a function of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  15. Hidden symmetry and protection of Dirac points on the honeycomb lattice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice possesses a novel energy band structure, which is characterized by two distinct Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, dominating most of the physical properties of the honeycomb structure materials. However, up till now, the origin of the Dirac points is unclear yet. Here, we discover a hidden symmetry on the honeycomb lattice and prove that the existence of Dirac points is exactly protected by such hidden symmetry. Furthermore, the moving and merging of the Dirac points and a quantum phase transition, which have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed on the honeycomb lattice, can also be perfectly explained by the parameter dependent evolution of the hidden symmetry. PMID:26639178

  16. Hidden symmetry and protection of Dirac points on the honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice possesses a novel energy band structure, which is characterized by two distinct Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, dominating most of the physical properties of the honeycomb structure materials. However, up till now, the origin of the Dirac points is unclear yet. Here, we discover a hidden symmetry on the honeycomb lattice and prove that the existence of Dirac points is exactly protected by such hidden symmetry. Furthermore, the moving and merging of the Dirac points and a quantum phase transition, which have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed on the honeycomb lattice, can also be perfectly explained by the parameter dependent evolution of the hidden symmetry. PMID:26639178

  17. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  18. Characterizatin of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, M. M.; Jorgensen, B. S.; Mang, J. T.; Smith, B. L.; Son, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from {approx}25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  19. Repair of boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. L.; Miller, M. F.; Doyal, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    A program was performed to determine the repairability of boron/aluminum aerospace structural components. During the program, a list of repair guidelines was prepared to aid in determining the proper repair techniques for a given structure. These guidelines included specifying types of repair material and their applicability, corrosion prevention procedures, design criteria, and inspection criteria. Six sets of boron/aluminum structural components were repaired and tested to compare as-fabricated and repaired performance. The specimens included a honeycomb-stiffened panel, elastically buckled tubes, a skin-stringer panel, a tube combining bending and tension, a splice joint specimen, and a tension field panel. All but one set of specimens, when repaired, exceeded the strength of the original specimens. The repairs resulted in an average weight increase per structure of 9% and an average performance increase of 27%. It is concluded that metal-matrix composite material, damaged in service, can be repaired by techniques not very different from those currently in use for conventional materials.

  20. Spring back of infinite honeycomb sheets beyond plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, A.; Bhaskar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Cellular structures are promising for applications where high stiffness and strength are required with the minimal use of material. They are often used in applications where the plastic deformation plays an important role, such as those involving crashworthiness, energy absorption, and stents. The elastic analysis of a honeycomb sheet has been carried out in the past [1]. The present analysis extends this classical work in the elasto-plastic regime. Recoil analysis due to elastic recovery is absent from the published literature. This work aims to develop an analytical model to calculate the spring back for a simplified case, that of an infinite honeycomb sheet. An elastic-perfectly plastic material model is assumed. The recoil for a clamped beam with a load and moment applied at the free edge is analytically calculated first. This is carried out by relating the stress distribution of the cross section to the final deformed shape. The part corresponding to the elastic contribution is subsequently subtracted in order to obtain the final configuration after the external load is removed. This simple elasto-plastic analysis is then incorporated into the analysis of an infinite sheet made of uniform hexagonal cells. The translational symmetry of the lattice is exploited along with the analysis of a beam under tip loading through to plastic stage and recoil. The final shape of the struts upon the removal of the remote stress is completely determined by the plastic deformation which cannot be recovered. The expression for the beam thus obtained is then used to build an analytical model for an infinite honeycomb sheet loaded in both directions.

  1. Bandwidth-resonant Floquet states in honeycomb optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quelle, A.; Goerbig, M. O.; Morais Smith, C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate, within Floquet theory, topological phases in the out-of-equilibrium system that consists of fermions in a circularly shaken honeycomb optical lattice. We concentrate on the intermediate regime, in which the shaking frequency is of the same order of magnitude as the band width, such that adjacent Floquet bands start to overlap, creating a hierarchy of band inversions. It is shown that two-phonon resonances provide a topological phase that can be described within the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model of HgTe quantum wells. This allows for an understanding of out-of-equilibrium topological phases in terms of simple band inversions, similar to equilibrium systems.

  2. Adhesives and the ATS satellite. [construction of honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Adhesives in the ATS satellite allow the designers to save weight, simplify design and fabrication and provide thermal and electrical conductivity or resistivity as required. The selections of adhesives are restricted to those few which can pass rigorous outgassing tests in order to avoid contaminating lenses and thermal control surfaces in space. An epoxy adhesive is used to construct the honeycomb panels which constitute most of the satellite's structure. General purpose epoxy adhesives hold doublers and standoffs in place and bond the truss to its fittings. Specialized adhesives include a high temperature resistant polyamide, a flexible polyurethane and filled epoxies which conduct heat or electricity.

  3. Antiferromagnetic majority voter model on square and honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Francisco; Henkel, Malte

    2016-02-01

    An antiferromagnetic version of the well-known majority voter model on square and honeycomb lattices is proposed. Monte Carlo simulations give evidence for a continuous order-disorder phase transition in the stationary state in both cases. Precise estimates of the critical point are found from the combination of three cumulants, and our results are in good agreement with the reported values of the equivalent ferromagnetic systems. The critical exponents 1 / ν, γ / ν and β / ν were found. Their values indicate that the stationary state of the antiferromagnetic majority voter model belongs to the Ising model universality class.

  4. Emission of an intense electron beam from a ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Myers, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Sethian, J. D.; Ludeking, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inserting a slab of honeycomb ceramic in front of the emitting surface of a large-area cathode improves the electron beam emission uniformity, decreases the beam current rise and fall times, and maintains a more constant diode impedance. Moreover, changing the cathode material from velvet to carbon fiber achieved a more robust cathode that starts to emit at a higher electric field without a degradation in beam uniformity. In addition, an 80% reduction in the postshot diode pressure was also observed when gamma alumina was deposited on the ceramic. A possible explanation is that reabsorption and recycling of adsorbed gases takes place.

  5. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-22

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima. PMID:26849619

  6. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima.

  7. Nondestructive testing techniques used in analysis of honeycomb structure bond strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, D. C.; Martin, G.; Moore, J. F.; Thomas, G.; Varney, H. S.

    1967-01-01

    DOT /Driver-Displacement Oriented Transducer/, applicable to both lap shear type application and honeycomb sandwich structures, measures the displacement of the honeycomb composite face sheet. It incorporates an electromagnetic driver and a displacement measuring system into a single unit to provide noncontact bond strength measurements.

  8. Assessment of a novel neutron tomography instrument and other nondestructive technologies for the characterization of degradation in honeycomb composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungler, P. C.

    The feasibility of developing a nondestructive evaluation technique (NDE) or combination of techniques capable of characterizing degradation in honeycomb composites was investigated. To enable the determination of the exact location of water ingress inside a honeycomb composite structure, a novel neutron tomography instrument (NTI) was designed and developed at RMC. The system represents the only NTI available in Canada and allows a range of objects to be investigated including honeycomb coupons and complete CF 188 rudders. In order to produce 3D volumetric reconstructions of sufficient quality to assess the location of water, the system was optimized in terms of optics, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An imaging test object was designed to enable the quantitative measurement of the spatial resolution in 2D images and 3D reconstructions, filling a gap in the current neutron imaging standards. Several noise reduction filters were applied to 2D and 3D images produced by the NTI, which improved the spatial resolution and SNR. Appropriate coupons that were purposely degraded to represent honeycomb composites subjected to water ingress were designed, constructed and tested. To produce coupons with different degrees of degradation in the skin to core bond, varying numbers of freeze-thaw cycles were used. Destructive flat-wise tension tests were then performed to evaluate the coupons and the results showed a strong first-order linear decay relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the filet bond strength. The method developed to reliably degrade the filet bond, provides a more appropriate degradation mechanism compared to other available methods for producing degraded coupons. The degraded coupons were subsequently inspected using several adapted NDE techniques: neutron tomography, infrared thermography, through-transmission ultrasonics and acoustic bond testing. Neutron tomography was capable of detailing the exact location of water in the composite using 3D volumetric reconstructions and individual axial slices. Both through-transmission ultrasonics and acoustic bond testing were shown to be capable of detecting degradation in the test coupons. Finally, development of NDE techniques towards the reliable quantification of varying degrees of adhesive degradation was recommended.

  9. Aluminum hydroxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.S.; Weaver, M.L.

    1988-07-05

    A method is described for the production of aluminum hydroxide, comprising reacting water in the liquid phase and aluminum of surface area of at least 20 mm/sup 2/ per gram at a pH above about 12.4 for producing a reaction mixture containing aluminum hydroxide, and collecting solid aluminum hydroxide from the reaction mixture, the reaction being carried out in the presence of choline at a concentration of about 0.05 to 2 mols per liter.

  10. Considerations for the installation of honeycomb and screens to reduce wind-tunnel turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, J.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a half-scale model representing a 0.914-m (3.0-ft) square stream tube of the flow through the fourth corner and settling chamber of the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The model included the tube cooler 45 degree turning vanes, and the turbulence reduction screens and honeycomb, which were the subject of the tests. Hot-wire measurements of the turbulence reduction for various combinations of screens and honeycomb were made at various duct speeds. Of the four sizes of honeycomb cells tested, none were found to have a superior performance advantage. The effectiveness of screens and honeycomb in reducing turbulence is greatly affected by relatively minor physical damage; therefore, extreme care must be exercised in installing and maintaining honeycomb or screens if the turbulence reduction performance is to be maintained.

  11. NiO nanostructured honeycomb realized by annealing Ni film deposited on silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaili; Rossi, Carole; Alphonse, Pierre; Tenailleau, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    Two-dimensional nanostructures have various interesting applications due to their large surface areas. In this study, we propose a simple approach to synthesize two-dimensional NiO nano honeycomb by thermal annealing of Ni thin film deposited onto silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. The effects on the nano honeycomb morphology of the annealing temperature and time are investigated. Because the NiO nano honeycomb is realized onto silicon substrate, a basic material for microelectronics and micro-system, this will probably open the door to integrate the nano honeycomb into micro-system, thus leading to nano based functional devices. The as-synthesized NiO nano honeycomb is characterized by SEM, XRD, and surface area measurement. PMID:19198324

  12. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates. PMID:25746272

  13. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients - Comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals shows the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluids entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  14. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients; comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.; Elrod, David; Hale, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals show the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluid entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  15. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  16. Biodegradable honeycomb-patterned film composed of poly(lactic acid) and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Fukuhira, Yukako; Kitazono, Eiichi; Hayashi, Takami; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Masaru; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Sumi, Yoshihiko

    2006-03-01

    Honeycomb-patterned films have been reported to be useful for scaffolds of cell culture in tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated a new compound, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), a naturally derived phospholipid having unsaturated fatty acid moieties, as a surfactant for fabricating honeycomb-patterned poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) film. Only DOPE among commercially available phospholipids was useful as a surfactant, and it showed good solubility in PLA/chloroform solution and an excellent property for fabricating honeycomb-patterned film (the concentration of DOPE was from 0.2% to 20% by weight based on the weight of PLA). The pore size of the honeycomb was uniform, and all pores were interconnected with each other. The contact angle of water on the honeycomb-patterned film was affected by the amount of DOPE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) data suggested that DOPE was concentrated on the surface of the honeycomb-patterned film. To investigate cell proliferation and adhesion on the honeycomb-patterned film, NIH3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured on the film. The NIH3T3 cells adhered well on the honeycomb-patterned PLA film with DOPE (PLA-DOPE) and showed good cell proliferation compared to that on honeycomb-patterned PLA film fabricated with a copolymer (CAP) of dodecylacrylamide and omega-carboxyhexylacrylamide (PLA-CAP). These results suggest that the honeycomb-patterned PLA-DOPE can be applicable as a scaffold for cells with better profiles in comparison with PLA-CAP. PMID:16293301

  17. Computer simulation of screw dislocation in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure in a 110 screw dislocation core for aluminum is obtained by computer simulation. The lattice statics technique is employed since it entails no artificially imposed elastic boundary around the defect. The interatomic potential has no adjustable parameters and was derived from pseudopotential theory. The resulting atomic displacements were allowed to relax in all three dimensions.

  18. Deconfined Criticality in a J - Q model on Honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, Sumiran; Alet, Fabien; Damle, Kedar

    2013-03-01

    The Deconfined Criticality scenario[1] describes in the context of quantum magnets a generic non-Landau second-order transition between two orders that break different symmetries - antiferromagnetic order that breaks SU (2) symmetry and Valence bond (VB) order breaking lattice translational symmetry. We investigate this physics in the context of a J - Q model[2] on the honeycomb lattice using both T = 0 Projector Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and finite- T Stochastic Series Expansion QMC techniques. We find evidence for a continuous transition from different measurements including scaling of Nel and VB order parameters, Binder ratios of staggered magnetization, stiffness and uniform susceptibility. We have indications that this critical point belongs to the same universality class as the one observed on square lattice J - Q model. Our results also suggest that this critical fixed point controlling deconfined critical behaviour remains essentially unchanged even on the honeycomb lattice which allows three-fold hedgehog defects in the Nel order to be present in the continuum description of the critical point.

  19. Iridium containing honeycomb Delafossites by topotactic cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Roudebush, John H; Ross, K A; Cava, R J

    2016-06-01

    We report the structure and magnetic properties of two new iridium-based honeycomb Delafossite compounds, Cu3NaIr2O6 and Cu3LiIr2O6, formed by a topotactic cation exchange reaction. The starting materials Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3, which are based on layers of IrO6 octahedra in a honeycomb lattice separated by layers of alkali ions, are transformed to the title compounds by a topotactic exchange reaction through heating with CuCl below 450 °C; higher temperature reactions cause decomposition. The new compounds display dramatically different magnetic behavior from their parent compounds - Cu3NaIr2O6 has a ferromagnetic like magnetic transition at 10 K, while Cu3LiIr2O6 retains the antiferromagnetic transition temperature of its parent compound but displays significantly stronger dominance of antiferromagnetic coupling between spins. These results reveal that a surprising difference in the magnetic interactions between the magnetic Ir ions has been induced by a change in the non-magnetic interlayer species. A combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction is used for the structure refinement of Cu3NaIr2O6 and both compounds are compared to their parent materials. PMID:27147423

  20. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  1. Triangular and honeycomb lattices of cold atoms in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Shabnam; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional homogeneous ensemble of cold bosonic atoms loaded inside two optical cavities and pumped by a far-detuned external laser field. We examine the conditions for these atoms to self-organize into triangular and honeycomb lattices as a result of superradiance. By collectively scattering the pump photons, the atoms feed the initially empty cavity modes. As a result, the superposition of the pump and cavity fields creates a space-periodic light-shift external potential and atoms self-organize into the potential wells of this optical lattice. Depending on the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser, these minima can either form a triangular or a hexagonal lattice. By numerically solving the dynamical equations of the coupled atom-cavity system, we have shown that the two stable atomic structures at long times are the triangular lattice and the honeycomb lattice with equally populated sites. We have also studied how to drive atoms from one lattice structure to another by dynamically changing the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser.

  2. The Hamiltonian Laceability of some Generalized Honeycomb Tori

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu Liyen; Lin Tungyi; Kao Shinshin

    2008-11-06

    Assume that m, n and s are integers with m{>=}2, n{>=}4, 0{<=}s{<=}n and s is of the same parity of m. The generalized honeycomb torus GHT (m,n,s) is recognized as another attractive alternative to existing torus interconnection networks in parallel and distributed applications. It is known that any GHT (m,n,s) is 3-regular, hamiltonian, bipartite graph. We are interested in two special types of the generalized honeycomb torus, GHT (m,n,(n/2)) and GHT (m,n,0). Let G = GHT(m,n,s), where s(set-membership sign){l_brace}(n/2),0{r_brace}. We prove that any G is hamiltonian laceable. More precisely, given a pair of vertices P = {l_brace}u,v|u(set-membership sign)B,v(set-membership sign)W{r_brace} where B and W are the bipartition of V(G), there exists a path Q between u and v such that Q contains all vertices of G.

  3. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  4. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  5. Controllable growth of aluminum nanorods using physical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Stagon, Stephen P; Huang, Hanchen

    2014-01-01

    This letter proposes and experimentally demonstrates that oxygen, through action as a surfactant, enables the growth of aluminum nanorods using physical vapor deposition. Based on the mechanism through which oxygen acts, the authors show that the diameter of aluminum nanorods can be controlled from 50 to 500nm by varying the amount of oxygen present, through modulating the vacuum level, and by varying the substrate temperature. When grown under medium vacuum, the nanorods are in the form of an aluminum metal - aluminum oxide core-shell. The thickness of the oxide shell is ~2nm as grown and is stable when maintained in ambient for 30days or annealed in air at 475K for 1day. As annealing temperature is increased, the nanorod morphology remains stable while the ratio of oxide shell to metallic core increases, resulting in a fully aluminum oxide nanorod at 1,475K. PMID:25170334

  6. Directed Self-Assembly of Large Scaffold-free Multicellular Honeycomb Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micromold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess, were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multicellular honeycomb within 24 hours. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies. PMID:21828905

  7. Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.

  8. Polar molecules with three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnes, Lars; Büchler, Hanspeter; Wessel, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    We study the phase diagram of ultra-cold bosonic polar molecules loaded on a two-dimensional optical lattice of hexagonal symmetry controlled by external electric and microwave fields. Following a recent proposal in (Büchler et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 726), such a system is described by an extended Bose-Hubbard model of hard-core bosons that includes both extended two- and three-body repulsions. Using quantum Monte-Carlo simulations, exact finite cluster calculations and the tensor network renormalization group, we explore the rich phase diagram of this system, resulting from the strongly competing nature of the three-body repulsions on the honeycomb lattice. Already in the classical limit, they induce complex solid states with large unit cells and macroscopic ground-state degeneracies at different fractional lattice fillings. For the quantum regime, we obtain effective descriptions of the various phases in terms of emerging valence bond crystal states and quantum dimer models. Furthermore, we access the experimentally relevant parameter regime and determine the stability of the crystalline phases towards strong two-body interactions.

  9. Evaluation of Composite Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Under Compressive Loads at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen composite honeycomb sandwich panels were tested to failure under compressive loading. The test specimens included panels with both 8 and 24-ply graphite-bismaleimide composite facesheets and both titanium and graphite-polyimide core materials. The panels were designed to have the load introduced through fasteners attached to pairs of steel angles on the ends of the panels to simulate double shear splice joints. The unloaded edges were unconstrained. Test temperatures included room temperature, 250F, and 300F. For the room and 250F temperature tests, the 24-ply specimen failure strains were close to the unnotched allowable strain values and failure loads were well above the design loads. However, failure strains much lower than the unnotched allowable strain values, and failure loads below the design loads were observed with several of the 8-ply specimens. For each individual test temperature, large variations in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 8-ply specimens. Dramatic decreases in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 24-ply specimens as the test temperature was increased from 250F to 300F. All 8-ply specimens appeared to have failed in a facesheet strength failure mode for all test temperatures. The 24-ply specimens displayed appreciably greater amounts of bending prior to failure than the 8-ply specimens, and panel buckling occurred prior to facesheet strength failure for the 24-ply room and 250F temperature tests.

  10. Chiral spin liquid in the frustrated XY model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran

    2015-03-01

    A honeycomb lattice allowing hops between nearest- and next-nearest neighbors hosts ``moat'' bands with degenerate energy minima attained along closed lines in Brillouin zone. If populated with hard-core bosons, a variety of unconventional ground states stabilizes. We argue that the degeneracy prevents Bose condensation, stabilizing novel spin liquid phases including composite fermion state and a chiral spin liquid. The latter stabilizes at half-filling, when the system is equivalent to s = 1 / 2 XY model at zero magnetic field. Absence of condensation means no spontaneous polarization in XY plane, however our consideration indicates formation of a state spontaneously breaking the time-reversal symmetry. This state has a bulk gap and chiral gapless edge excitations, and is similar to the one in Haldane's ``quantum Hall effect without Landau levels'' in its topologically nontrivial sector with Chen number C = +/- 1 . The applications of the developed analytical theory include an explanation of recent unexpected numerical findings and a suggestion of a chiral spin liquid realization in experiments with cold atoms in optical lattices.

  11. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  12. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO4, coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  13. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO(4), coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  14. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-01

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  15. Correlated spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Daniel D.; Scherer, Michael M.; Honerkamp, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the quantum many-body instabilities of the extended Hubbard model for spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice with repulsive nearest-neighbor and second-nearest-neighbor density-density interactions. Recent exact diagonalization and infinite density matrix renormalization group results suggest that a putative topological Mott insulator phase driven by the second-nearest-neighbor repulsion is suppressed, while other numerically exact approaches support the topological Mott insulator scenario. In the present work, we employ the functional renormalization group (fRG) for correlated fermionic systems. Our fRG results hint at a strong suppression of the scattering processes stabilizing the topological Mott insulator. From analyzing the effects of fermionic fluctuations, we obtain a phase diagram, which is the result of the competition of various charge ordering instabilities.

  16. A honeycomb collimator for the neutron Brillouin scattering spectrometer BRISP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, C.; Guarini, E.; Formisano, F.; Sacchetti, F.; Babucci, E.; Campeggi, C.

    2002-08-01

    A new collimator for thermal neutrons, based on the honeycomb design, has been produced in a few prototype versions. The method of construction is simple and the overall cost of the device is rather low. Development of this collimator has been stimulated by the technical specifications of the spectrometer BRISP for thermal neutron Brillouin scattering, presently under construction. The performances of the prototypes have been measured on the monochromatic beam of a steady source and exploiting the time-of-flight technique at a pulsed neutron source. The expected response of the device has been calculated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation of the experiments. This paper describes the method of construction and reports on the results of the neutron test measurements in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Superconductivity in intercalated group-IV honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Sanna, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the electron-phonon superconductivity of honeycomb M X2 layered structures where X is one element of group IV (C, Si, or Ge) and M is an alkali or an alkaline-earth metal. Among the studied compositions we predict a TC of 7 K in RbGe2, 9 K in RbSi2, and 11 K in SrC2. All these compounds feature a strongly anisotropic superconducting gap. Our results show that despite the different doping levels and structural properties, the three families of materials fall into a similar description of their superconducting behavior. This allows us to estimate an upper critical temperature of about 20 K for the class of intercalated group-IV structures, including intercalated graphite and doped graphene.

  18. Friction-factor characteristics for narrow channels with honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Morrison, G. L.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental determination of friction-factors for the flow of air in a narrow channel lined with various honeycomb geometries has been carried out. Test results show that, generally, the friction-factor is nearly constant or slightly decreases as the Reynolds number increases, a characteristic common to turbulent flow in pipes. However, in some test geometries this trend is remarkably different. The friction factor dramatically drops and then rises as the Reynolds number increases. This phenomenon can be characterized as a 'friction-factor jump'. Further investigations of the acoustic spectrum and friction-factor measurements for a broad range of Reynolds numbers indicate that the 'friction-factor jump' phenomenon is accompanied by an onset of a normal mode resonance excited coherent flow fluctuation structure, which occurs at Reynolds number of the order of 10,000. The purpose of this paper is to explain the friction-factor-jump phenomenon and friction-factor characteristics.

  19. Sound Transmission Through a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Robinson, Jay H.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2003-01-01

    Composite structures are often used in aircraft because of the advantages offered by a high strength to weight ratio. However, the acoustical properties of these light and stiff structures can often be less than desirable resulting in high aircraft interior noise levels. In this paper, measurements and predictions of the transmission loss of a curved honeycomb composite panel are presented. The transmission loss predictions are validated by comparisons to measurements. An assessment of the behavior of the panel is made from the dispersion characteristics of transverse waves propagating in the panel. The speed of transverse waves propagating in the panel is found to be sonic or supersonic over the frequency range from 100 to 5000 Hz. The acoustical benefit of reducing the wave speed for transverse vibration is demonstrated.

  20. Phosphorenes with Non-Honeycomb Structures: A Much Extended Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Huazhong University of Science; Technology Team; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Team

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorous allotropes, namely, ɛ-P, ζ-P, η-P and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 176802 (2014)), γ-P and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 046804 (2014)) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four phases, together with 5 hybrid phases, are confirmed stable by first-principles calculations. In particularly, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene allotropes. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different phases under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. MHW was supported by start-up fund from Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

  1. Discrete solitons and vortices in anisotropic hexagonal and honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoq, Q. E.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, we consider the self-focusing discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation on hexagonal and honeycomb lattice geometries. Our emphasis is on the study of the effects of anisotropy, motivated by the tunability afforded in recent optical and atomic physics experiments. We find that multi-soliton and discrete vortex states undergo destabilizing bifurcations as the relevant anisotropy control parameter is varied. We quantify these bifurcations by means of explicit analytical calculations of the solutions, as well as of their spectral linearization eigenvalues. Finally, we corroborate the relevant stability picture through direct numerical computations. In the latter, we observe the prototypical manifestation of these instabilities to be the spontaneous rearrangement of the solution, for larger values of the coupling, into localized waveforms typically centered over fewer sites than the original unstable structure. For weak coupling, the instability appears to result in a robust breathing of the relevant waveforms.

  2. Chiral Bosonic Phases on the Haldane Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter; Collaboration Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by its recent realization in an ultracold atom experiment, we investigate the honeycomb lattice tight-binding model introduced by Haldane, for bosons with local interactions at the average filling of one boson per site. We uncover in the ground state phase diagram three phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), a chiral superfluid (CSF) and a plaquette Mott insulator with local current loops (PMI). Nearest-neighbor and next-nearest neighbor currents distinguish CSF from SF, and the phase transition between them is first order. We apply bosonic dynamical mean field theory and exact diagonalization to obtain the zero temperature phase diagram, complementing numerics with calculations of excitation spectra in strong and weak coupling perturbation theory. Furthermore, we explore the possibility of chiral Mott insulating phases at the average filling of one boson every two sites. The characteristic density fluctuations, current correlation functions, and excitation spectra are measurable in ultracold atom experiments.

  3. Chiral bosonic phases on the Haldane honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments in ultracold atoms and photonic analogs have reported the implementation of artificial gauge fields in lattice systems, facilitating the realization of topological phases. Motivated by such advances, we investigate the Haldane honeycomb lattice tight-binding model, for bosons with local interactions at the average filling of one boson per site. We analyze the ground-state phase diagram and uncover three distinct phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), a chiral superfluid (CSF), and a plaquette Mott insulator with local current loops (PMI). Nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor currents distinguish CSF from SF, and the phase transition between them is first order. We apply bosonic dynamical mean-field theory and exact diagonalization to obtain the phase diagram, complementing numerics with calculations of excitation spectra in strong and weak coupling perturbation theory. The characteristic density fluctuations, current correlation functions, and excitation spectra are measurable in ultracold atom experiments.

  4. Theoretical Predictions of Freestanding Honeycomb Sheets of Cadmium Chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kent, Paul R; Xie, Yu; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Smith, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanocrystals of CdX (X = S, Se, Te) typically grown by colloidal synthesis are coated with organic ligands. Recent experimental work on ZnSe showed that the organic ligands can be removed at elevated temperature, giving a freestanding 2D sheet of ZnSe. In this theoretical work, freestanding single- to few-layer sheets of CdX, each possessing a pseudo honeycomb lattice, are considered by cutting along all possible lattice planes of the bulk zinc blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases. Using density functional theory, we have systematically studied their geometric structures, energetics, and electronic properties. A strong surface distortion is found to occur for all of the layered sheets, and yet all of the pseudo honeycomb lattices are preserved, giving unique types of surface corrugations and different electronic properties. The energetics, in combination with phonon mode calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the syntheses of these freestanding 2D sheets could be selective, with the single- to few-layer WZ110, WZ100, and ZB110 sheets being favored. Through the GW approximation, it is found that all single-layer sheets have large band gaps falling into the ultraviolet range, while thicker sheets in general have reduced band gaps in the visible and ultraviolet range. On the basis of the present work and the experimental studies on freestanding double-layer sheets of ZnSe, we envision that the freestanding 2D layered sheets of CdX predicted herein are potential synthesis targets, which may offer tunable band gaps depending on their structural features including surface corrugations, stacking motifs, and number of layers.

  5. Antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Hong-Shuai, Tao; Guo, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic adatoms in the honeycomb lattice have received tremendous attention due to the interplay between Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction and Kondo coupling leading to very rich physics. Here we study the competition between the antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening of local moments by the conduction electrons on the honeycomb lattice using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method. While changing the interband hybridization V, we systematically investigate the antiferromagnetic-order state and the Kondo singlet state transition, which is characterized by the behavior of the local moment, antiferromagnetic structure factor, and the short range spin-spin correlation. The evolution of the single particle spectrum are also calculated as a function of hybridization V, we find that the system presents a small gap in the antiferromagnetic-order region and a large gap in the Kondo singlet region in the Fermi level. We also find that the localized and itinerant electrons coupling leads to the midgap states in the conduction band in the Fermi level at very small V. Moreover, the formation of antiferromagnetic order and Kondo singlet are studied as on-site interaction U or temperature T increasing, we have derived the phase diagrams at on-site interaction U (or temperature T) and hybridization V plane. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 2011CB921502 and 2012CB821305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61227902, 61378017, and 11434015), the State Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics and Quantum Optical Devices, China (Grant No. KF201403).

  6. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  7. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  8. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  9. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  10. Mechanical properties of the hierarchical honeycombs with stochastic Voronoi sub-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yinghong; Pugno, Nicola; Gong, Baoming; Wang, Dongpo; Sun, Yongtao; Ding, Qian

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of hierarchy into structures has been credited with changing mechanical properties. In this study, periodically hierarchical honeycomb with irregular sub-structure cells has been designed based on the Voronoi tessellation algorithm. Numerical investigation has been performed to determine the influence of structural hierarchy and irregularity on the in-plane elastic properties. Irregular hierarchical honeycombs can be up to 3 times stiffer than regular hexagonal honeycombs on an equal density basis. Both the stiffness and Poisson's ratio of the hierarchical honeycomb are insensitive to the degree of regularity, and depend on the cell-wall thickness-to-length ratio of the super-structure. Increasing the relative lengths of the super- and sub-structures results in the increment of Young's modulus, whereas Poisson's ratio almost remains constant varying from 1.0 to 0.7.

  11. Two-dimensional transition metal honeycomb realized: Hf on Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Li, Linfei; Wang, Yeliang; Xie, Shengyi; Li, Xian-Bin; Wang, Yu-Qi; Wu, Rongting; Sun, Hongbo; Zhang, Shengbai; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb systems made of elements with d electrons are rare. Here, we report the fabrication of a transition metal (TM) 2D layer, namely, hafnium crystalline layers on Ir(111). Experimental characterization reveals that the Hf layer has its own honeycomb lattice, morphologically identical to graphene. First-principles calculations provide evidence for directional bonding between adjacent Hf atoms, analogous to carbon atoms in graphene. Calculations further suggest that the freestanding Hf honeycomb could be ferromagnetic with magnetic moment μ/Hf = 1.46 μ(B). The realization and investigation of TM honeycomb layers extend the scope of 2D structures and could bring about novel properties for technological applications. PMID:24016148

  12. Study on moisture absorption and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Aifen; Zhang, Yongjiu

    2015-07-01

    The moisture absorption and liberation properties of honeycomb polyester fiber were studied in order to understand its moisture absorption and sweat discharge. Through testing moisture absorption and liberation regains of honeycomb polyester fiber and normal polyester fiber in standard atmospheric conditions, their moisture absorption and liberation curves were depicted, and the regression equations of moisture regains to time during their reaching the balance of moisture absorption and moisture liberation were obtained according to the curves. Their moisture absorption and liberation rate curves were analyzed and the regression equations of the rates to time were obtained. The results shows that the moisture regain of honeycomb polyester fiber is much bigger than the normal polyester fiber's, and the initial moisture absorption and moisture liberation rates of the former are much higher than the latter's, so that the moisture absorbance and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber are excellent.

  13. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  14. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 2; 6-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Meyers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Dixon, Genevieve D.

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panel types, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3- by 5-ft panel. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panels composed of 6-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to as Panels B-1 and B-2). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional (3-D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  15. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  16. Loop-Nodal and Point-Nodal Semimetals in Three-Dimensional Honeycomb Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb structure has a natural extension to three dimensions. Simple examples are hyperhoneycomb and stripy-honeycomb lattices, which are realized in β -Li2IrO3 and γ -Li2IrO3 , respectively. We propose a wide class of three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb lattices which are loop-nodal semimetals. Their edge states have intriguing properties similar to the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice in spite of a dimensional difference. Partial flat bands emerge at the zigzag or bearded edge of the 3D honeycomb lattice, whose boundary is given by the Fermi loop in the bulk spectrum. On the other hand, perfect flat bands emerge in the zigzag-bearded edge or when the anisotropy is large. The loop-nodal structure is destroyed once staggered potential or antiferromagnetic order is introduced. All these 3D honeycomb lattices become strong topological insulators with the inclusion of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI). Furthermore, point-nodal semimetals may be realized in the presence of both antiferromagnetic order and the SOI. We construct the effective four-band theory with the SOI to understand the physics near the Fermi level, based upon which the density of states and the dc conductivity are calculated.

  17. Self-organized honeycomb structures of Mn(12) single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hang; Li, Wen; Wollenberg, Lance; Li, Bao; Wu, Lixin; Li, Fengyan; Xu, Lin

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, Mn(12)-based ordered honeycomb structures were successfully constructed from a simple solution casting process at high relative humidity through the modification of fatty acids to Mn(12) clusters. Mn(12)-fatty acid complexes maintain typical features of a single-molecule magnet as confirmed by IR spectra and magnetization hysteresis studies. Investigation of the effects of concentration, velocity of humid airflow, solvent, substrate, and alkyl chain length of the Mn(12) complex on the morphology of the honeycomb structures demonstrated wide generality and high reproducibility of the formation of Mn(12)-based self-organized honeycomb-patterned films. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional honeycomb structures were obtained by adjusting the concentration of the complex solution. Mn(12)-based, honeycomb-patterned films maintain a paramagnetic response at room temperature, and thus give rise to a spatially distributed magnetic pattern on the substrate, which can be imaged by magnetic force microscopy. Importantly, the single-molecule magnetic property of the Mn(12) complex at low temperature is well maintained in the honeycomb-patterned film, which represents a promising outlook for high-density information storage and quantum computing applications. PMID:19824615

  18. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  19. Aluminum composite driveshafts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article examines the development and performance of a metal matrix composite lightweight driveshaft tube of 6061 aluminum alloy with an even dispersion of 20[percent] aluminum oxide particles. The topics of the article include evolution of the lightweight design, raw material production, tubing fabrication, driveshaft performance, and modulus testing.

  20. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also

  1. Diffusion bonded boron/aluminum spar-shell fan blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. E. K.; Cutler, J. L.; Fisher, W. J.; Memmott, J. V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Design and process development tasks intended to demonstrate composite blade application in large high by-pass ratio turbofan engines are described. Studies on a 3.0 aspect radio space and shell construction fan blade indicate a potential weight savings for a first stage fan rotor of 39% when a hollow titanium spar is employed. An alternate design which featured substantial blade internal volume filled with titanium honeycomb inserts achieved a 14% potential weight savings over the B/M rotor system. This second configuration requires a smaller development effort and entails less risk to translate a design into a successful product. The feasibility of metal joining large subsonic spar and shell fan blades was demonstrated. Initial aluminum alloy screening indicates a distinct preference for AA6061 aluminum alloy for use as a joint material. The simulated airfoil pressings established the necessity of rigid air surfaces when joining materials of different compressive rigidities. The two aluminum alloy matrix choices both were successfully formed into blade shells.

  2. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  3. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  4. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  5. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  6. Aspects of interacting electrons on graphene honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bitan

    In this thesis, we study the electron-electron interaction on the graphene honeycomb lattice theoretically. Even though pristine graphene behaves like a semimetal, sufficiently strong interactions can place the system in ordered phases. First, we derive a general Lagrangian for repulsive, short-ranged quartic interactions. The number of parameters in the Lagrangian is restricted by the symmetries present in the lattice, and the emergent ones. Then, we study the interacting theory in the framework of the renormalization group. All the critical points describing the transitions from the semimetallic phase to insulating phases reside in a Lorentz symmetric subspace. All the transitions are continuous and weak Lorentz symmetry breaking is irrelevant near the critical points. We also study the behaviour of various physical observables near the criticality. In the presence of an attractive interaction, we study the superconducting ground state, when fermions living on the nearest-neighbour sites of the honeycomb lattice attract each other strongly. A spatially inhomogeneous, spin-triplet, odd under sublattice exchange, Kekule superconductor turns out to be the variational ground state. Within the mean field approximation, the Kekule superconductor is energetically the best solution at and close to filling one-half. Even though all the transitions in neutral graphene can only take place at strong couplings, penetration of either real or pseudo magnetic field lowers the critical strength for insulation to zero. We study the problem of interacting fermions in the presence of the two magnetic fields, as well as when both of them are present. Moreover, our analysis includes the formation of insulators in the presence of inhomogeneous fields. We take analytical and numerical approaches to convey the central message: irrespective of the form of the fields, as long as there exists a finite density of states near zero energy, graphene finds itself in an ordered phase even at infinitesimal interactions. However, in the presence of real (pseudo) magnetic field the order parameter breaks the chiral (time reversal) symmetry. We present a thorough study of the scaling of the interaction induced gap, universal amplitudes and finite size effects. Keywords: Graphene; Interactions; Insulators; Superconductors; Renormalization group; Magnetic catalysis.

  7. Interpretation of Cp(*) - protected Aluminum Clusters as Superatom Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayborne, P. Andre; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Whetten, Robert; Grönbeck, Henrik; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2011-03-01

    Metal clusters stabilized by a surface ligand shell represent an interesting intermediate state of matter between molecular metal-ligand complexes and bulk metal. Such ``metalloid'' particles are characterized by the balance between metal-metal bonds in the core and metal-ligand bonds at the exterior of the cluster. In previous studies, the electronic stability observed for selected ligand-protected aluminum clusters is not fully understood. By density functional theory calculations, we illustrate here that the electronic stability of various experimentally isolated Cp(*) -- protected aluminum clusters can be explained using the electron shell model for the aluminum core, coupled with an ionic Al-Cp(*) interaction at the surface. Thus, one may classify ligand-protected aluminum clusters as ``superatom complexes'' similar to the ligand-protected gold clusters. Financial support by the Academy of Finland. The computational resources were provided by the CSC - the Finnish IT Center for Science in Espoo.

  8. Bloch-Zener oscillations in a tunable optical honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehlinger, Thomas; Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Tarruell, Leticia; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-12-01

    Ultracold gases in optical lattices have proved to be a flexible tool to simulate many different phenomena of solid state physics [1, 2]. Recently, optical lattices with complex geometries have been realized [3, 4, 5, 6, 7], paving the way to simulating more realistic systems. The honeycomb structure has recently become accessible in an optical lattice composed of mutually perpendicular laser beams. This lattice structure exhibits topological features in its band structure - the Dirac points. At these points, two energy bands intersect linearly and the particles behave as relativistic Dirac fermions. In optical lattices, Bloch oscillations [8] resolved both in time and in quasi-momentum space can be directly observed. We make use of such Bloch-Zener oscillations to probe the vanishing energy gap at the Dirac points as well as their position in the band structure. In small band gap regions, we observe Landau-Zener tunneling [7, 9] to the second band and the regions of maximum transfer can be identified with the position of the Dirac points.

  9. Bloch-Zener oscillations in a tunable optical honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehlinger, Thomas; Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Esslinger, Tilman; Tarruell, Leticia

    2013-12-04

    Ultracold gases in optical lattices have proved to be a flexible tool to simulate many different phenomena of solid state physics [1, 2]. Recently, optical lattices with complex geometries have been realized [3, 4, 5, 6, 7], paving the way to simulating more realistic systems. The honeycomb structure has recently become accessible in an optical lattice composed of mutually perpendicular laser beams. This lattice structure exhibits topological features in its band structure – the Dirac points. At these points, two energy bands intersect linearly and the particles behave as relativistic Dirac fermions. In optical lattices, Bloch oscillations [8] resolved both in time and in quasi-momentum space can be directly observed. We make use of such Bloch-Zener oscillations to probe the vanishing energy gap at the Dirac points as well as their position in the band structure. In small band gap regions, we observe Landau-Zener tunneling [7, 9] to the second band and the regions of maximum transfer can be identified with the position of the Dirac points.

  10. Monomer-dimer problem on random planar honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haizhen; Department of Mathematics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810008, Qinghai ; Zhang, Fuji; Qian, Jianguo

    2014-02-15

    We consider the monomer-dimer (MD) problem on a random planar honeycomb lattice model, namely, the random multiple chain. This is a lattice system with non-periodic boundary condition, whose generating process is inspired by the growth of single walled zigzag carbon nanotubes. By applying algebraic and combinatorial techniques we establish a calculating expression of the MD partition function for bipartite graphs, which corresponds to the permanent of a matrix. Further, by using the transfer matrix argument we show that the computing problem of the permanent of high order matrix can be converted into some lower order matrices for this family of lattices, based on which we derive an explicit recurrence formula for evaluating the MD partition function of multiple chains and random multiple chains. Finally, we analyze the expectation of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements on a random multiple chain and the asymptotic behavior of the annealed MD entropy when the multiple chain becomes infinite in width and length, respectively.

  11. Magnetic Susceptibility and Quantum Oscillations in a Buckled Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, Calvin; Carbotte, Jules; Nicol, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the magnetic response of a low-buckled honeycomb lattice with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling which is described by the Kane-Mele Hamiltonian (a model which would describe the low-energy physics of a material like silicene). Included in the Hamiltonian, is a sublattice potential difference term which may be induced by a perpendicular electric field; this field can tune the system from a topological insulator (TI), through a valley-spin polarized metal, to a trivial band insulator (BI). In an external magnetic field, a distinct signature of the phase transition is seen in the derivative of the magnetization with respect to chemical potential; this gives the quantization of the Hall plateaus through the Streda relation. The results are compared with the zero-frequency conductivity obtained from the Kubo formula. The magnetic susceptibility also displays signatures of the different topological phases. We also explore the de-Haas van-Alphen effect. At the transition point between the TI and BI, magnetic oscillations exist for any value of chemical potential. Away from the critical point, the chemical potential must be larger than the minimum gap. For large chemical potential (or small but finite sublattice potential difference), there is a strong beating pattern.

  12. Proximate Kitaev quantum spin liquid behaviour in a honeycomb magnet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banerjee, A.; Bridges, C. A.; Yan, J. -Q.; Aczel, A. A.; Li, L.; Stone, M. B.; Granroth, G. E.; Lumsden, M. D.; Yiu, Y.; Knolle, J.; et al

    2016-04-04

    Quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are topological states of matter exhibiting remarkable properties such as the capacity to protect quantum information from decoherence. While their featureless ground states have precluded their straightforward experimental identification, excited states are more revealing and particularly interesting due to the emergence of fundamentally new excitations such as Majorana Fermions. Ideal probes of these excitations are inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We report these here for a ruthenium-based material α-RuCl3, continuing a major search (so far concentrated on iridium materials inimical to neutron probes) for realizations of the celebrated Kitaev honeycomb topological QSL. Our measurements confirm the requisitemore » strong spin-orbit coupling and low-temperature magnetic order matching predictions proximate to the QSL. We find stacking faults, inherent to the highly 2D nature of the material, resolve an outstanding puzzle. Crucially, dynamical response measurements above interlayer energy scales are naturally accounted for in terms of deconfinement physics expected for QSLs. Comparing these with recent dynamical calculations involving gauge flux excitations and Majorana fermions of the pure Kitaev model, we propose the excitation spectrum of α-RuCl3 as prime candidate for realization of fractionalized Kitaev physics.« less

  13. Thermal analysis of a 4m honeycomb telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Xian, Hao

    2012-09-01

    Thermal characteristics of a 4m class honeycomb telescope primary mirror are presented. A 3 dimensional finite elements model of the primary mirror with the varying ambient air temperature as the boundary conditions is used for the numerical simulations. Every night's air temperature profile has been detected in 2009 in Gaomeigu observatory site. Four typical nights' air temperature profiles in different seasons are chose as the boundary conditions in finite element simulation. Temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and ambient air is studied, as well as the axial temperature difference inner the mirror blank and radial temperature difference on the optical surface. Primary mirror seeing phenomenon results from the temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and the ambient air is discussed. Thermal deformations due to temperature gradient of the primary mirror are analyzed by the finite element model. Axial thermal deformations on the optical surface are discussed in detail. Thermal deformation would induce the optical surface of primary mirror to distort from the normal shape, and lead to large observation image quality degradation. Primary mirror seeing with the turbulence near the optical surface would introduce wavefront aberration and deteriorate the final observation image. In order to reduce mirror seeing and thermal deformation, it is necessary to design a thermal control system for primary mirror. The thermal and structural analysis result will be valuable in designing primary mirror's thermal control system.

  14. Majorana edge modes in Kitaev model on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurathi, Manisha; Sengupta, Krishnendu; Sen, Diptiman

    2015-03-01

    We study the Majorana modes, both equilibrium and Floquet, which can appear at the edges of the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. We first present the analytical solutions known for the equilibrium Majorana edge modes for both zigzag and armchair edges of a semi-infinite Kitaev model and chart the parameter regimes of the model in which they appear. We then examine how edge modes can be generated if the Kitaev coupling on the bonds perpendicular to the edge is varied periodically in time as periodic δ-function kicks. We derive a general condition for the appearance and disappearance of the Floquet edge modes as a function of the drive frequency for a generic d-dimensional integrable system. We confirm this general condition for the Kitaev model with a finite width by mapping it to a one-dimensional model. Our numerical and analytical study of this problem shows that Floquet Majorana modes can appear on some edges in the kicked system even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no Majorana mode solutions on those edges. We support our analytical studies by numerics for finite sized system which show that periodic kicks can generate modes at the edges and the corners of the lattice. We thank CSIR, India and DST, India for financial support.

  15. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  16. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  17. Monitoring of non-uniform strains and progressive damage in honeycomb skin by complex Bragg reflection spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiyun; Bian, Kan; Liang, Dakai; Liu, Shulin

    2015-07-01

    An analysis method of spectrum was proposed to assess the damage of honeycomb structures. The non-homogeneous strain fields of honeycomb cell walls were obtained by finite element analysis when tension was applied on the honeycomb structures. Spectrum changes of FBG sensors stuck on the cell walls were monitored and analyzed. Our analysis revealed that spectral bandwidth was broadened from 1nm to 3.5nm and spectrum was split to 12 peaks. The changes of light intensity of secondary peak corresponded to inflection points of load-displacement curves. The regular variations of spectrum were able to indicate progressive damage of honeycomb structures.

  18. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  19. The honeycomb terrain on the Hellas basin floor, Mars: A case for salt or ice diapirism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, H.; Reiss, D.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present quantitative plausibility studies of potential formation mechanisms for the "honeycomb" terrain on the northwestern Hellas basin floor. The honeycomb terrain is a unique landscape of ~10.5 × 5 km wide, mostly cell-shaped depressions that are arranged in a regular, dense pattern covering ~36,000 km2. We argue against the honeycombs being (peri)glacial landforms (till rings, iceberg imprints, and thermokarst) or the result of igneous diapirism, as terrestrial analogs do not reproduce their key characteristics. Fossilized impact melt convection cells also appear to be an unsuitable interpretation, as melt solidification should not permit such structures to be retained. We present arguments in favor of salt or ice diapirism as honeycomb formation models. Honeycomb-sized diapirs could be formed by a ~2 km thick salt layer (~72,000 km3 for the entire honeycomb terrain), which might have been derived from the highlands north of Hellas Planitia—an area of abundant chloride signatures and intense snowfall according to ancient Mars climate models. Nearby volcanic activity ~3.8 Ga ago potentially enabled recurring phases of (probably salty) meltwater runoff (as indicated by meandering channels) and might therefore have enabled evaporite deposition in the Hellas basin. Being twice as buoyant as salt, water ice would require an only ~1 km thick layer (i.e., ~36,000 km3) to form honeycomb-sized diapirs, which would be in agreement with a likely ~2 km thick ice stability zone beneath the Hellas basin floor. However, it would remain an open question as to why we find only one such ice diapir landscape on Mars.

  20. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  1. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-02-23

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation.

  2. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a "nanoreactor" for oxidation.

  3. Boron aluminum composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Design, analysis and fabrication techniques have been developed for boron-aluminum composite structure technology and were compared with those of conventional metal structure technology to evaluate relative performance.

  4. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  5. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  6. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  7. A damage tolerance comparison of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy and IM7/977-2 carbon/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Lance, David G.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of low velocity impact damage between one of the strongest aluminum alloys, to a new, damage tolerant resin system as a matrix for high strength carbon fibers was examined in this study. The aluminum and composite materials were used as face sheets on a 0.13 g/cu cm aluminum honeycomb. Four levels of impact energy were used; 2.6 J, 5.3 J, 7.8 J and 9.9 J. The beams were compared for static strength and fatique life by use of the four-point bend flexure test. It was found that in the undamaged state the specific strength of the composite face sheets was about twice that of the aluminum face sheets. A sharp drop in strength was observed for the composite specimens impacted at the lowest (2.6J) energy level, but the overall specific strength was still higher than for the aluminum specimens. At all impact energy levels tested, the static specific strength of the composite face sheets were significantly higher than the aluminum face sheets. The fatigue life of the most severely damaged composite specimen was about 17 times greater than the undamaged aluminum specimens when cycled at 1 Hz between 20 percent and 85 percent of ultimate breaking load.

  8. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  9. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  10. Topological states in multi-orbital HgTe honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Beugeling, W; Kalesaki, E; Delerue, C; Niquet, Y-M; Vanmaekelbergh, D; Morais Smith, C

    2015-01-01

    Research on graphene has revealed remarkable phenomena arising in the honeycomb lattice. However, the quantum spin Hall effect predicted at the K point could not be observed in graphene and other honeycomb structures of light elements due to an insufficiently strong spin-orbit coupling. Here we show theoretically that 2D honeycomb lattices of HgTe can combine the effects of the honeycomb geometry and strong spin-orbit coupling. The conduction bands, experimentally accessible via doping, can be described by a tight-binding lattice model as in graphene, but including multi-orbital degrees of freedom and spin-orbit coupling. This results in very large topological gaps (up to 35 meV) and a flattened band detached from the others. Owing to this flat band and the sizable Coulomb interaction, honeycomb structures of HgTe constitute a promising platform for the observation of a fractional Chern insulator or a fractional quantum spin Hall phase. PMID:25754462

  11. Development of a Computer simulation approach for honeycomb constructions for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarnikov, O. V.; Karpenkov, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    An approach to definition of a homogeneous simulation model for honeycomb structures has been developed and verified for specimens containing a finite number of cells. The elastic characteristics of the model were evaluated basing on the results of tensile and shear numerical tests of honeycomb specimen. This is an extension of earlier work related with spatially reinforced composites. The simulation model was validated for specimens comprised of different numbers of cells in the specimen to expose the scale effect influence. As the number of cells was increased, the calculated values of the moduli Ex and Ey converged, confirming the theoretical result that the appropriate model is transversely isotropic rather than orthotropic for the honeycomb specimen investigated. Elastic properties obtained from the numerical test of the honeycomb structure were then applied in the characterization of continuous medium. The examination was carried out using criteria expressing basic features of homogeneous body. The case of a honeycomb integrated with composite plates as a sandwich structure was analysed for a complex loading case as well as buckling and eigen- frequency analysis.

  12. Topological states in multi-orbital HgTe honeycomb lattices

    PubMed Central

    Beugeling, W.; Kalesaki, E.; Delerue, C.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Smith, C. Morais

    2015-01-01

    Research on graphene has revealed remarkable phenomena arising in the honeycomb lattice. However, the quantum spin Hall effect predicted at the K point could not be observed in graphene and other honeycomb structures of light elements due to an insufficiently strong spin–orbit coupling. Here we show theoretically that 2D honeycomb lattices of HgTe can combine the effects of the honeycomb geometry and strong spin–orbit coupling. The conduction bands, experimentally accessible via doping, can be described by a tight-binding lattice model as in graphene, but including multi-orbital degrees of freedom and spin–orbit coupling. This results in very large topological gaps (up to 35 meV) and a flattened band detached from the others. Owing to this flat band and the sizable Coulomb interaction, honeycomb structures of HgTe constitute a promising platform for the observation of a fractional Chern insulator or a fractional quantum spin Hall phase. PMID:25754462

  13. Design optimization of sinusoidal glass honeycomb for flat plate solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurrin, J. C.; Buchberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    The design of honeycomb made of sinusoidally corrugated glass strips was optimized for use in water-cooled, single-glazed flat plate solar collectors with non-selective black absorbers. Cell diameter (d), cell height (L), and pitch/diameter ratio (P/d) maximizing solar collector performance and cost effectiveness for given cell wall thickness (t sub w) and optical properties of glass were determined from radiative and convective honeycomb characteristics and collector performance all calculated with experimentally validated algorithms. Relative lifetime values were estimated from present materials costs and postulated production methods for corrugated glass honeycomb cover assemblies. A honeycomb with P/d = 1.05, d = 17.4 mm, L = 146 mm and t sub w = 0.15 mm would provide near-optimal performance over the range delta T sub C greater than or equal to 0 C and less than or equal to 80 C and be superior in performance and cost effectiveness to a non-honeycomb collector with a 0.92/0.12 selective black absorber.

  14. Detection of disbonds in a honeycomb composite structure using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baid, Harsh; Banerjee, Sauvik; Joshi, Shiv; Mal, Siddhartha

    2008-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. An example of such a defects critical structural component is the "honeycomb composite" in which thin composite skins are bonded with adhesives to the two faces of extremely lightweight and relatively thick metallic honeycombs. These components are often used in aircraft and aerospace structures due to their high strength to weight ratio. Unfortunately, the bond between the honeycomb and the skin may degrade with age and service loads leading to separation of the load-bearing skin from the honeycomb (called "disbonds") and compromising the safety of the structure. This paper is concerned with the noninvasive detection of disbonds using ultrasonic guided waves. Laboratory experiments are carried out on a composite honeycomb specimen containing localized disbonded regions. Ultrasonic waves are launched into the specimen using a broadband PZT transducer and are detected by a distributed array of identical transducers located on the surface of the specimen. The guided wave components of the signals are shown to be very strongly influenced by the presence of a disbond. The experimentally observed results are being used to develop an autonomous scheme to locate the disbonds and to estimate their size.

  15. Porous and Microporous Honeycomb Composites as Potential Boundary-Layer Bleed Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Willis, B. P.; Schoenenberger, M.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation are presented in which the use of porous and microporous honeycomb composite materials is evaluated as an alternate to perforated solid plates for boundary-layer bleed in supersonic aircraft inlets. The terms "porous" and "microporous," respectively, refer to bleed orifice diameters roughly equal to and much less than the displacement thickness of the approach boundary-layer. A Baseline porous solid plate, two porous honeycomb, and three microporous honeycomb configurations are evaluated. The performance of the plates is characterized by the flow coefficient and relative change in boundary-layer profile parameters across the bleed region. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 1.27 and 1.98. The results show the porous honeycomb is not as efficient at removing mass compared to the baseline. The microporous plates were about equal to the baseline with one plate demonstrating a significantly higher efficiency. The microporous plates produced significantly fuller boundary-layer profiles downstream of the bleed region for a given mass flow removal rate than either the baseline or the porous honeycomb plates.

  16. Magnetic properties of Dirac fermions in a buckled honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, C. J.; Carbotte, J. P.; Nicol, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic response of a buckled honeycomb lattice with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (such as silicene) which supports valley-spin polarized energy bands when subjected to a perpendicular electric field Ez. By changing the magnitude of the external electric field, the size of the two band gaps involved can be tuned, and a transition from a topological insulator (TI) to a trivial band insulator (BI) is induced as one of the gaps becomes zero, and the system enters a valley-spin polarized metallic state (VSPM). In an external magnetic field (B ), a distinct signature of the transition is seen in the derivative of the magnetization with respect to chemical potential μ , which gives the quantization of the Hall plateaus through the Streda relation. When plotted as a function of the external electric field, the magnetization has an abrupt change in slope at its minimum, which signals the VSPM state. The magnetic susceptibility χ shows jumps as a function of μ when a band gap is crossed, which provides a measure of the gaps' variation as a function of external electric field. Alternatively, at fixed μ , the susceptibility displays an increasingly large diamagnetic response as the electric field approaches the critical value of the VSPM phase. In the VSPM state, magnetic oscillations exist for any value of chemical potential while for the TI and BI states, μ must be larger than the minimum gap in the system. When μ is larger than both gaps, there are two fundamental cyclotron frequencies (which can also be tuned by Ez) involved in the de-Haas van-Alphen oscillations that are close in magnitude. This causes a prominent beating pattern to emerge.

  17. Development of beryllium honeycomb sandwich composite for structural and other related applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Grant, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating large beryllium honeycomb panels was demonstrated. Both flat and curved sandwich structures were manufactured using practical, braze bonding techniques. The processes developed prove that metallurgically assembled beryllium honeycomb panels show decided potential where rigid, lightweight structures are required. Three panels, each 10 square feet in surface area, were fabricated, and radiographically inspected to determine integrity. This examination revealed a 97 percent braze in the final panel. It is believed that ceramic dies for forming and brazing would facilitate the fabrication techniques for higher production rates. Ceramic dies would yield a lower thermal gradient in the panel during the braze cycle. This would eliminate the small amount of face sheet wrinkling present in the panels. Hot forming the various panel components demonstrated efficient manufacturing techniques for scaling up and producing large numbers of hot formed beryllium components and panels. The beryllium honeycomb panel demonstrated very good vibrational loading characteristics under test with desirable damping characteristics.

  18. Breaking inversion symmetry in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: artificial graphene with tunable band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Staarmann, C.; Ölschläger, C.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present the application of a novel method for controlling the geometry of a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: the energy offset between the two sublattices of the honeycomb structure can be adjusted by rotating the atomic quantization axis. This enables us to continuously tune between a homogeneous graphene-like honeycomb lattice and a triangular lattice and to open an energy gap at the characteristic Dirac points. We probe the symmetry of the lattice with microwave spectroscopy techniques and investigate the behavior of atoms excited to the second energy band. We find a striking influence of the energy gap at the Dirac cones onto the lifetimes of bosonic atoms in the excited band.

  19. Existence of featureless paramagnets on the square and the honeycomb lattices in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Chao-Ming; Zaletel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar features of quantum magnetism sometimes forbid the existence of gapped "featureless" paramagnets which are fully symmetric and unfractionalized. The Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem is an example of such a constraint, but it is not known what the most general restriction might be. We focus on the existence of featureless paramagnets on the spin-1 square lattice and the spin-1 and spin-1/2 honeycomb lattice with spin rotation and space group symmetries in 2+1 dimensions. Although featureless paramagnet phases are not ruled out by any existing theorem, field theoretic arguments disfavor their existence. Nevertheless, by generalizing the construction of Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki to a class we call "slave-spin" states, we propose featureless wave functions for these models. The featurelessness of the spin-1 slave-spin states on the square and honeycomb lattice are verified both analytically and numerically, but the status of the spin-1/2 honeycomb state remains unclear.

  20. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  1. Development and utilization of composite honeycomb and solid laminate reference standards for aircraft inspections.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2004-06-01

    The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center, in conjunction with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee, developed a set of composite reference standards to be used in NDT equipment calibration for accomplishment of damage assessment and post-repair inspection of all commercial aircraft composites. In this program, a series of NDI tests on a matrix of composite aircraft structures and prototype reference standards were completed in order to minimize the number of standards needed to carry out composite inspections on aircraft. Two tasks, related to composite laminates and non-metallic composite honeycomb configurations, were addressed. A suite of 64 honeycomb panels, representing the bounding conditions of honeycomb construction on aircraft, was inspected using a wide array of NDI techniques. An analysis of the resulting data determined the variables that play a key role in setting up NDT equipment. This has resulted in a set of minimum honeycomb NDI reference standards that include these key variables. A sequence of subsequent tests determined that this minimum honeycomb reference standard set is able to fully support inspections over the full range of honeycomb construction scenarios found on commercial aircraft. In the solid composite laminate arena, G11 Phenolic was identified as a good generic solid laminate reference standard material. Testing determined matches in key velocity and acoustic impedance properties, as well as, low attenuation relative to carbon laminates. Furthermore, comparisons of resonance testing response curves from the G11 Phenolic NDI reference standard was very similar to the resonance response curves measured on the existing carbon and fiberglass laminates. NDI data shows that this material should work for both pulse-echo (velocity-based) and resonance (acoustic impedance-based) inspections.

  2. Oxidation and ignition of aluminum nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Noor, Fahad; Zhang, Hua; Korakianitis, Theodosios; Wen, Dongsheng

    2013-12-14

    The oxidation and ignition of aluminum nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 150 nm are investigated with the help of simultaneous thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectra analysis (EDS) and scanning and transmission electron microscopy at heating rates of 2-30 K min(-1). A unique early ignition reaction is observed when the heating rate is ≥8 K min(-1) and there is a co-existence of various polymorphs of alumina (γ-, δ-, θ-, and α-Al2O3) below the melting temperature of aluminum nanoparticles. It is proposed that such an early ignition reaction is due to a combined effect of solid phase transformation of the alumina shell and the early melting of the aluminum core, and is responsible for the co-existence of various polymorphs of alumina at the low temperature. The ignition temperature increases approximately with the increase of the heating rate. Regardless of the heating rate, the oxidation scenario can be described by a three-stage reaction with the main reaction occurring before the melting of aluminum nanoparticles. PMID:24162275

  3. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  4. Mineral resources of the Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area, Washakie County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Peper, J.D.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; Almquist, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area in Washakie County, Wyo., has no identified mineral or energy resources. A moderate resource potential exists for oil and gas, for undiscovered subsurface coal in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the study area, and for industrial commodities, sand and gravel, mudstone, and sandstone along the western and northern edges of this study area. The Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area has a low resource potential for uranium and no resource potential for metals other than subsurface titanium or for geothermal resources. The potential for subsurface titanium in placer deposits is unknown in this study area.

  5. Nonlinear excitations in the honeycomb lattice: Beyond the high-symmetry points of the band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, Edward; Morales-Molina, Luis

    2016-05-01

    The interplay between nonlinearity and the band structure of pristine honeycomb lattices is systematically explored. For that purpose, a theory of collective excitations valid for the first Brillouin zone of the lattice is developed. Closed-form expressions of two-dimensional excitations are derived for Bloch wave numbers beyond the high-symmetry points of the band structure. A description of the regions of validity of different nonlinear excitations in the first-Brillouin zone is given. We find that the unbounded nature of these excitations in nonlinear honeycomb latices is a signature of the strong influence of the Dirac cones in other parts of the band structure.

  6. Flow past an array of catalyst blocks with a honeycomb structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalov, A.V.

    1992-07-10

    There is interest in an organized stationary catalyst beds consisting of block catalysts with a honeycomb structure: The flow is directed between vertically positioned blocks, in which the through channels are oriented perpendicularly to the direction of the incident flow ({alpha} = 90{degrees}). Calculations of the flow past a single block of honey comb structure were performed for this case, and it has been shown that the surface of the through channel is accessible to the reaction flow. The authors continued this effort to quantitate the flow with honeycomb catalysts. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  7. ALUMINUM RECLAMATION BY ACIDIC EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM-ANODIZING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of aluminum-anodizing sludges with sulfuric acid was examined to determine the potential for production of commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, that is liquid alum. The research established kinetic and stoichiometric relationships and evaluates product qu...

  8. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  9. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  10. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  11. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  12. Evaluation of the in-service performance behavior of honeycomb composite sandwich structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shafizadeh, J.E.; Seferis, J.C.; Chesmar, E.F.; Geyer, R.

    1999-12-01

    When honeycomb composite structures are fabricated for the aerospace industry, they are designed to be closed to their operating environment for the life of the composite structure. However, once in service, this design can break down. Damage can set in motion a chain reaction of events that will ultimately degrade the mechanical integrity of the composite structure. Through thermographic analysis, the tendency of honeycomb composite structures to absorb and retain water was investigated, and an attempt was made to quantify the extent of water ingression in the Boeing 767 aircraft. Through thermographic analysis, the exterior honeycomb composite structures were found to contain less than 50 kg of water per plane. On average, over 90% of the water found on an aircraft was contained in five problematic parts, which included the outboard flap wedge, the nose landing gear doors, the main landing gear doors, the fixed upper wing panels, and the escape slide door. Kevlar lamina induced microcracking, skin porosity problems, and cracked potting compound were the root causes of water ingression and migration in these structures. Ultimately, this research will aid in the fundamental understanding and design of future honeycomb composite sandwich structures.

  13. Macroscopic Artificial Magnetic Honeycomb Lattice of Thermally Controlled Ultra-Small Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Brock; Dahal, Ashutosh; Debeer-Schitt, Lisa; Gunasekera, Jagath; Singh, Deepak

    The two-dimensional artificial magnetic honeycomb lattice system is evolving into a new research arena to explore a plethora of novel magnetism that are predicted to occur as functions of temperature and magnetic field: a long-range spin ice, spin liquid, an entropy-driven magnetic charge-ordered state involving topological vortex pairs and a spin-order due to the spin chirality. We have created macroscopic samples of artificial magnetic honeycomb lattices of Cobalt and Permalloy having connected ultra-small elements (bonds), with length scales of sub-10 nm to 30 nm, which have never before been possible. The equivalent energy of the resulting systems is 10-100 K and is thus amenable to both temperature- and field-dependent exploration of novel magnetic phenomena. We have performed detailed magnetic and small angle neutron scattering measurements (SANS) on the newly fabricated honeycomb lattice of Permalloy that show the thermal character of the system. Furthermore, the experimental data reveals the onset of magnetic ordered regimes in temperature that are consistent with the predicted novel phase diagram in artificial honeycomb lattice. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  14. Numerical calculations for Heisenberg ferromagnet on honeycomb lattice using Oguchi’s method

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Gülistan; Mert, H. Şevki

    2015-03-10

    Magnetic properties such as the magnetization, internal energy and specific heat for Heisenberg ferromagnet with spin - 1/2 on honeycomb lattice are have been calculated using Oguchi’s method. We have found that the magnetic specific heat exhibits two peaks.

  15. Study made to control depth of potting compound for honeycomb sandwich fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J.

    1966-01-01

    Study determines optimum fastener insert size and shape, type of embedding cement, diameter, undercut and depth control by fiber glass plug in a honeycomb structure for maximum tensile strength The best potting compound is 5-5-1 weight mixture of epoxy resin, curing agent, and milled glass fibers.

  16. Aircraft Metal Skin Repair and Honeycomb Structure Repair; Sheet Metal Work 3: 9857.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course helps students determine types of repairs, compute repair sizes, and complete the repair through surface protection. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, protection of metals, repairs to metal skin, and honeycomb structure repair. A bibliography and post-test are appended. A prerequisite for this course is mastery of the…

  17. Laser-induced agitation and cavitation from proprietary honeycomb tips for endodontic applications.

    PubMed

    George, Roy; Chan, Keith; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation and agitation generated by lasers in fluid-filled root canals create fluid movement and shear stresses along the root canals walls, enhancing removal of the smear layer and biofilm. When used with sodium hypochlorite and EDTA, laser activation of aqueous fluids can increase the efficiency of debridement and disinfection of root canals. However, the use of forward-firing laser fibers with such solutions poses a risk of driving fluid past the root apex, which could cause postoperative complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of fluid agitation caused by a novel honeycomb tip. Glass capillary tubes filled with distilled water were used to replicate single-tooth root canals. A 980 nm pulsed diode laser was used with 200 μm diameter plain tips, tube-etched conical tips, and honeycomb tips. To record fluid movements, the tubes were backlit and imaged using a digital camera attached to a microscope. The honeycomb tips generated agitation with fluid movement directed onto the walls, while both the conventional plain fibers and the conical tips created fluid movement largely in a forward direction. The use of honeycomb tips alters the pattern of fluid agitation, and this laterally directed effect might lower the risk of fluid extrusion beyond the apex. PMID:24647465

  18. Non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2012-11-01

    The aerospace industry is in constant need of ever-more efficient inspection methods for quality control. Product inspection is also essential to maintain the safe operation of aircraft components designed to perform for decades. This paper proposes a method for non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels. Honeycomb sandwich panels are extensively employed in the aerospace industry due to their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios. In order to attach additional structures to them, panels are reinforced by filling honeycomb cells and drilling holes into the reinforced areas. The proposed procedure is designed to detect the position of the holes within the reinforced area and to provide a robust measurement of the distance between each hole and the boundary of the reinforced area. The result is a fast, safe and clean inspection method for drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels that can be used to robustly assess a possible displacement of the hole from the center of the reinforced area, which could have serious consequences. The proposed method is based on active infrared thermography, and uses state of the art methods for infrared image processing, including signal-to-nose ratio enhancement, hole detection and segmentation. Tests and comparison with X-ray inspections indicate that the proposed system meets production needs.

  19. Rapid synthesis of porous honeycomb Cu/Pd through a hydrogen-bubble templating method.

    PubMed

    Najdovski, Ilija; Selvakannan, P R; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2011-08-29

    A rapid electrochemical method based on using a clean hydrogen-bubble template to form a bimetallic porous honeycomb Cu/Pd structure has been investigated. The addition of palladium salt to a copper-plating bath under conditions of vigorous hydrogen evolution was found to influence the pore size and bulk concentration of copper and palladium in the honeycomb bimetallic structure. The surface was characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which revealed that the surface of honeycomb Cu/Pd was found to be rich with a Cu/Pd alloy. The inclusion of palladium in the bimetallic structure not only influenced the pore size, but also modified the dendritic nature of the internal wall structure of the parent copper material into small nanometre-sized crystallites. The chemical composition of the bimetallic structure and substantial morphology changes were found to significantly influence the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic response for immobilised rhodamine B and the hydrogen-evolution reaction. The ability to create free-standing films of this honeycomb material may also have many advantages in the areas of gas- and liquid-phase heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:21769955

  20. RECLAMATION OF ALUMINUM FINISHING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research study of the reclamation of aluminum-anodizing sludges was conducted in two sequential phases focused on enhanced dewatering of aluminum-anodizing sludges to produce commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, i.e., liquid alum. The use of high-pressure (14 to...

  1. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  2. On the Fabrication, Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Melt-Stretched Stochastic Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, Megan

    This thesis presents a new type of polypropylene (PP) cellular material fabricated through a simple melt-stretching process. Stochastic honeycombs have an open cell, random honeycomb structure, with webs oriented perpendicular to built-in skins. This process has the advantage that, for example, PP pellets can be turned into a sandwich panel in one step. It was demonstrated that despite the randomness in the web structure, the out-of-plane compressive strength of stochastic honeycombs was repeatable, and exceeded that of commercial PP foams and was comparable to commercial PP honeycombs. The key material properties required to produce an this architecture were shown to be a high melt strength and a high viscosity, branched polymer. The viscosity was shown to affect the total length of the webs in cross-section and the relative partitioning of material through the skin, transition region and webs. Web thickness was affected by the areal density of the polymer during fabrication. Mechanical testing methods were adapted from ASTM standards for honeycombs, and the fabrication method was advanced from a manual to a machine controlled process. Stochastic honeycombs were shown to buckle elastically, plastically, and fracture after the peak strength. Elastic and plastic buckling were dominant at lower densities, and plastic buckling and fracture at higher densities. A thin-plate buckling model for the strength of stochastic honeycombs was developed and verified experimentally. The crystallinity of the polymer affected the tensile strength and stiffness, having a linear effect on the buckling strength. The architecture was composed of webs bound on both sides and webs bound on one side and free on the other. A greater fraction of bound webs increased the strength of the structure in the buckling model. A fabrication study showed that melt-stretching the polymer at higher strain rates increased the connectivity and fraction of bound webs. Additionally, higher density led to a less connected structure. Energy absorption could be improved if the drop in stress from the peak to valley strength was minimized. Higher melt-stretching rates during fabrication increased the energy absorbed, and higher viscosity polymers minimized the drop from peak to valley, also increasing the absorbed energy.

  3. Building an aluminum car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article examines the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles to decrease weight and consequently increase fuel economy. The topics of the article include federal fuel economy goals, the development of optimum body structure and manufacturing techniques, comparison with steel, cost of materials, weight reduction and recycling of materials.

  4. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  5. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  6. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  7. Mechanisms of aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity limits agricultural productivity over much of the world’s arable land by inhibiting root growth and development. Affected plants have difficulty in acquiring adequate water and nutrition from their soil environments and thus have stunted shoot development and diminished yield....

  8. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  9. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  10. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  11. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  12. Markets for recovered aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The study describes the operation of the markets for scrap aluminum as an example of how recycling markets are structured, what factors influence the supply of and demand for materials, what projections can be made about recycling markets, and how government policies to increase recycling may affect these markets.

  13. Shearography for Non-destructive Inspection with applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of shearography techniques for non-destructive evaluation in two unique application areas is examined. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the B.4T gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. Using a vibration excitation, the more poorly bonded tiles are readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach.

  14. Nanostructured 2D Diporphyrin Honeycomb Film: Photoelectrochemistry, Photodegradation, and Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewu; Shang, Qiuwei; Yu, Jiachao; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2015-06-10

    Surface patterns of well-defined nanostructures play important roles in fabrication of optoelectronic devices and applications in catalysis and biology. In this paper, the diporphyrin honeycomb film, composed of titanium dioxide, protoporphyrin IX, and hemin (TiO2/PPIX/Hem), was synthesized using a dewetting technique with the well-defined polystyrene (PS) monolayer as a template. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film exhibited a higher photoelectrochemical response than that of TiO2 or TiO2/PPIX, which implied a high photoelectric conversion efficiency and a synergistic effect between the two kinds of porphyrins. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film was also a good photosensitizer due to its ability to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) under irradiation by visible light. This led to the use of diporphyrin TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film for the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria. In addition, the photocatalytic activities of other metal-diporphyrin-based honeycomb films, such as TiO2/MnPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CoPPIX/Hem, TiO2/NiPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CuPPIX/Hem, and TiO2/ZnPPIX/Hem, were investigated. The result demonstrated that the photoelectric properties of diporphyrin-based film could be effectively enhanced by further coupling of porphyrin with metal ions. Such enhanced performance of diporphyrin compounds opened a new way for potential applications in various photoelectrochemical devices and medical fields. PMID:25992484

  15. Vortex molecular crystal and vortex plastic crystal states in honeycomb and kagomé pinning arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2007-08-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate vortex configurations and pinning in superconductors with honeycomb and kagomé pinning arrays. We find that a variety of vortex crystal states can be stabilized at integer and fractional matching field densities. The honeycomb and kagomé pinning arrays produce considerably more pronounced commensuration peaks in the critical depinning force than triangular pinning arrays, and also cause additional peaks at noninteger matching fields where a portion of the vortices are located in the large interstitial regions of the pinning lattices. For the honeycomb pinning array, we find matching effects of equal strength at most fillings B/Bϕ=n/2 for n>2 , where n is an integer, in agreement with recent experiments. For kagomé pinning arrays, pronounced matching effects generally occur at B/Bϕ=n/3 for n>3 , while for triangular pinning arrays pronounced matching effects are observed only at integer fillings B/Bϕ=n . At the noninteger matching field peaks in the honeycomb and kagomé pinning arrays, the interstitial vortices are arranged in dimer, trimer, and higher order n -mer states that have an overall orientational order. We call these n -mer states “vortex molecular crystals” and “vortex plastic crystals” since they are similar to the states recently observed in colloidal molecular crystal systems. We argue that the vortex molecular crystals have properties in common with certain spin systems such as Ising and n -state Potts models. We show that kagomé and honeycomb pinning arrays can be useful for increasing the critical current above that of purely triangular pinning arrays.

  16. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of the oxidation of aluminum-cyclopentadienyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2014-05-01

    We report Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of the oxidation of aluminum-cyclopentadienyl clusters currently being considered as novel fuels or energetic materials. These clusters contain a small aluminum core surrounded by a single organic ligand layer. The aromatic cyclopentadienyl ligands form a very strong bond with surface Al atoms, giving rise to a stable organometallic cluster which crystallizes into a low-symmetry solid-state material. Our calculations of an isolated cluster in oxygen show minimal reaction between the ligand and oxygen molecules at simulation temperatures of 300 and 1000 K. Rather, in all cases O2 diffuses through the ligand barrier, splits into atomic oxygen upon contact with the aluminum, and forms an amorphous aluminum oxide core. Loss of aluminum-ligand units, as expected from bond strength calculations, is not observed except following significant oxidation. We present simple metrics to quantitatively compare the steric barrier of the outer ligands that limits the oxidation process.

  18. Shearography for Non-Destructive Evaluation with Applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    In this report we examine the applicability of shearography techniques for nondestructive inspection and evaluation in two unique application areas. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the BAT gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. By exciting the mask with a vibration, the more poorly bonded tiles can be distinguished by their greater displacement response, which is readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. Generally speaking, the results show good agreement. Further investigation would be useful to optimize certain test parameters such as vibration frequency and amplitude. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach. For the particular panel examined here, some scaling issues should be examined further to resolve the measurement scale down to the very small size of the core cells. In addition, further development should be undertaken to determine the general applicability of the new approach and to establish a firm quantitative foundation.

  19. Development of Composite Honeycomb and Solid Laminate Reference Standards to Aid Aircraft Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Roach, D.

    1999-03-04

    The rapidly increasing use of composites on commercial airplanes coupled with the potential for economic savings associated with their use in aircraft structures means that the demand for composite materials technology will continue to increase. Inspecting these composite structures is a critical element in assuring their continued airworthiness. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center, in conjunction with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee (CACRC), is developing a set of composite reference standards to be used in NDT equipment calibration for accomplishment of damage assessment and post-repair inspection of all commercial aircraft composites. In this program, a series of NDI tests on a matrix of composite aircraft structures and prototype reference standards were completed in order to minimize the number of standards needed to carry out composite inspections on aircraft. Two tasks, related to composite laminates and non-metallic composite honeycomb configurations, were addressed. A suite of 64 honeycomb panels, representing the bounding conditions of honeycomb construction on aircraft, were inspected using a wide array of NDI techniques. An analysis of the resulting data determined the variables that play a key role in setting up NDT equipment. This has resulted in a prototype set of minimum honeycomb reference standards that include these key variables. A sequence of subsequent tests determined that this minimum honeycomb reference standard set is able to fully support inspections over the fill range of honeycomb construction scenarios. Current tasks are aimed at optimizing the methods used to engineer realistic flaws into the specimens. In the solid composite laminate arena, we have identified what appears to be an excellent candidate, G11 Phenolic, as a generic solid laminate reference standard material. Testing to date has determined matches in key velocity and acoustic impedance properties, as well as, low attenuation relative to carbon laminates. Furthermore, comparisons of resonance testing response curves from the G11 Phenolic prototype standard was very similar to the resonance response curves measured on the existing carbon and fiberglass laminates. NDI data shows that this material should work for both pulse-echo (velocity-based) and resonance (acoustic impedance-based) inspections. Additional testing and industry review activities are underway to complete the validation of this material.

  20. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    PubMed

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices. PMID:20356280

  1. Honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator using self-assembled electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shin; Kim, Hyounjin; Kim, Yeongjun; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator (HN-TENG) is presented. In order to fabricate the honeycomb-like nanofiber, we utilized self-assembly of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) nanofibers. The honeycomb-like P(VDF-TrFE) nanofiber network was directly produced via electrospinning without any additional processing. The HN-TENG showed a maximum voltage, current, and power density of 160 V, 17 μA, and 1.6 W/m2, respectively. The power density was enhanced more than twofold as compared with a typical flat nanofiber network based TENG due to the large surface area and high surface roughness of the honeycomb structure. Finally, we verified that HN-TENG has the potential to be used for practical applications by driving 100 light emitting diodes and charging capacitors.

  2. Evidence for coexisting magnetic order in frustrated three-dimensional honeycomb iridates Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breznay, Nicholas; Ruiz, Alejandro; Frano, Alex; Analytis, James

    The search for unconventional magnetism has found a fertile hunting ground in 5d iridium oxide (iridate) materials. The competition between coulomb, spin-orbit, and crystal field energy scales in honeycomb iridates leads to a quantum magnetic system with localized spin-1/2 moments communicating through spin-anisotropic Kitaev exchange interactions. Although early and ongoing work has focused on layered two-dimensional honeycomb compounds such as Na2IrO3 and a 4d analog, RuCl3, recently discovered polytypes of Li2IrO3 take on three-dimensional honeycomb structures. Bulk thermodynamic studies, as well as recent resonant x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy experiments, have uncovered a rich phase diagram for these three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. Low temperature incommensurate and commensurate magnetic orders can be stabilized by tuning the applied magnetic field, displaying a delicate coexistence that signals highly frustrated magnetism.

  3. Viscoelastic lithography for fabricating self-organizing soft micro-honeycomb structures with ultra-high aspect ratios

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Gi Seok; No, Da Yoon; Lee, JaeSeo; Yoon, Junghyo; Chung, Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    High-aspect ratio micro- and nano-structures have been used for the production of a variety of applications. In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an arrayed microarchitecture with an ultra-high aspect ratio using soft materials. The shapes and sizes of the honeycomb structure can be easily modulated by changing the dimensions and position of the base mould pattern and the pressure. The honeycomb structure is used to prepare a drug delivery patch and a microwell array to form cell spheroids without cell loss. The honeycomb structures prepared using natural ECM (collagen–Matrigel) materials are successfully fabricated. The hepatocytes and endothelial cells are seeded and co-cultured in the ECM-based micro-honeycomb to prepare a 3D liver model successfully mimicking an ultrastructure of liver and providing enhanced liver function. PMID:27157977

  4. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major accomplishments for the program include definition of the system thermo-chemistry, demonstration of reactor stage 1, development of reactor stage 2 critical components in a 500 kW module, experimental determination of the vapor recovery reactor fundamentals, detailed design and installation of an advanced stage 1/vapor recovery reactor, feasibility of efficient separation of Al-C metal alloy product, updated capital and operating cost estimates, and development of computer models for all steps of the Advanced Reactor Process.

  5. Choice of optimal properties of molding compounds for extrusion of block supports and catalysts with the honeycomb structure

    SciTech Connect

    Prokof`ev, V.Yu.; Il`in, A.P.; Shirokov, Yu.G.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1995-09-20

    Properties of compounds for molding of block supports and catalysts with the honeycomb structure have been studied. The examples studied include ultraporcelain, alumina, titanium dioxide, clays, and graphite. The molding properties of these compounds are characterized by such parameters as the relationship between deformations, relaxation time, power for destruction of the coagulation structure, and flow index. For molding of blocks with the honeycomb structure compounds with enhanced plastic properties and a stable coagulation structure are suggested.

  6. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel Part 1: 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets. Part 1; 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Pineda, Evan J.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Space Launch Systems program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to predict the compressive response of the 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to Panel A). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber misalignments, and three-dimensional (3 D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  7. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part I: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, Angel; Kircheva, Nina; Perrin, Marion

    2011-10-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid is proposed as innovative solution for high energy density lead acid battery. The proof of concept is demonstrated, developing grids suitable for the small capacity, scale of valve-regulated lead acid batteries with 2.5-3 Ah plates. The manufacturing of the grids, includes fast, known and simple processes which can be rescaled for mass production with a minimum, investment costs. The most critical process of green composite carbonisation by heating in inert, atmosphere from 200 to 1000 °C takes about 5 h, guaranteeing the low cost of the grids. An AGM-VRLA, cell with prototype positive plate based on the lead-2% tin electroplated carbon honeycomb grid and, conventional negative plates is cycled demonstrating 191 deep cycles. The impedance spectroscopy, measurements indicate the grid performance remains acceptable despite the evolution of the corrosion, processes during the cycling.

  8. An alternative order-parameter for non-equilibrium generalized spin models on honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Francisco; Henkel, Malte

    2016-04-01

    An alternative definition for the order-parameter is proposed, for a family of non-equilibrium spin models with up-down symmetry on honeycomb lattices, and which depends on two parameters. In contrast to the usual definition, our proposal takes into account that each site of the lattice can be associated with a local temperature which depends on the local environment of each site. Using the generalised voter motel as a test case, we analyse the phase diagram and the critical exponents in the stationary state and compare the results of the standard order-parameter with the ones following from our new proposal, on the honeycomb lattice. The stationary phase transition is in the Ising universality class. Finite-size corrections are also studied and the Wegner exponent is estimated as ω =1.06(9).

  9. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures.

  10. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal "artificial atoms" behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures. PMID:27076196

  11. Friction-factor data for flat-plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Childs, Dara W.

    1992-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  12. Steps toward 8m honeycomb mirrors. VIII - Design and demonstration of a system of thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. Y. S.; Angel, J. R. P.

    1986-01-01

    Directed jets of ambient temperature air are proposed for the maintenance of low internal temperature gradients and conformity with ambient temperatures in honeycomb-structure borosilicate glass telescope mirrors. The use of greater airflow on thicker sections, to match cooling rates, and the cooling or heating of the internal, back, and edge surfaces of the mirror at the same rate established by convection on the front surface, have been tested on a full scale glass thermal model of a single honeycomb cell from an 8-m diameter mirror. The internal thermal gradient (less than 0.1 C) and ambient-temperature-change lag (less than 0.24 C) ensure minimum image degradation.

  13. Friction factor data for flat plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Tae Woong

    1989-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  14. Kitaev magnetism in honeycomb RuCl3 with intermediate spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heung-Sik; Vijay Shankar, V.; Catuneanu, Andrei; Kee, Hae-Young

    2015-06-01

    Intensive studies of the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and electronic correlations in transition-metal compounds have recently been undertaken. In particular, jeff=1 /2 bands on a honeycomb lattice provide a pathway to realize Kitaev's exactly solvable spin model. However, since current wisdom requires strong atomic SOC to make jeff=1 /2 bands, studies have been limited to iridium oxides. Contrary to this expectation, we demonstrate how Kitaev interactions arise in 4 d -orbital honeycomb α -RuCl3 , despite having significantly weaker SOC than the iridium oxides, via assistance from electron correlations. A strong-coupling spin model for these correlation-assisted jeff=1 /2 bands is derived, in which large antiferromagnetic Kitaev interactions emerge along with ferromagnetic Heisenberg interactions. Our analyses suggest that the ground state is a zigzag-ordered phase lying close to the antiferromagnetic Kitaev spin liquid. Experimental implications for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, neutron scattering, and optical conductivities are discussed.

  15. Absorption efficiency enhancement in inorganic and organic thin film solar cells via plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Tok, Rüştü Umut; Sendur, Kürşat

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate theoretically that by embedding plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays into the active layers of inorganic (c-Si) and organic (P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS) thin film solar cells, absorption efficiency can be improved. To obtain the solar cell absorption spectrum that conforms to the solar radiation, spectral broadening is achieved by breaking the symmetry within the Wigner-Seitz unit cell on a uniform hexagonal grid. For optimized honeycomb designs, absorption efficiency enhancements of 106.2% and 20.8% are achieved for c-Si and P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS thin film solar cells, respectively. We have demonstrated that the transverse modes are responsible for the enhancement in c-Si solar cells, whereas both the longitudinal and transverse modes, albeit weaker, are the main enhancement mechanisms for P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. For both inorganic and organic solar cells, the absorption enhancement is independent of polarization. PMID:24104664

  16. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures. PMID:27076196

  17. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  18. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  19. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  20. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  1. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  2. Study of Band Structure of Two-Dimensional Anisotropic Honeycomb Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedghi, A.; Soufiani, A. Rounaghi

    2013-10-01

    Using the plane wave expansion method, we have calculated, for both E and H polarizations, the band structure of 2D anisotropic photonic crystals with honeycomb lattice composed of anisotropic tellurium (Te) rods embedded in air background. The two rods in the unit cell are chosen square and circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have also studied the band structure as a function of size of rods.

  3. Effects of interaction in the Hofstadter regime of the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Archana; Hassan, S. R.; Shankar, R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate phases of spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice with nearest-neighbor interaction in the Hofstadter regime. The interaction induces incompressible nematic and ferrielectric phases with broken translation symmetry. Some of the transitions are accompanied by changes in the Hall conductivity. We study pair correlations and show that the quantum metric, averaged over the Brillouin zone, characterizes the shape of the pair correlation function.

  4. Insert facing tool. [manually operated cutting tool for forming studs in honeycomb material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, W. J.; Snoddy, L. G. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A manually actuated tool for facing the exposed end of an insert installed in a honeycomb panel is described. Several cutting bits are held in a round body portion that is rotated around the end of a stud to provide the cutting action. Pressure is adjusted through a spring against the body portion and the surface of the stud by a pressure nut threaded on the stud. A diagram of the components of the device is provided.

  5. Honeycomb-like graphitic ordered macroporous carbon prepared by pyrolysis of ammonium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liancheng; Zhang, Junhao; School of Biology and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212003 ; Xu, Liqiang; Qian, Yitai

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Honeycomb-like graphitic macroporous carbon (HGMC) with big pores centered at 1-3 {mu}m, has been prepared by controlling the reaction temperature and amount of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} at 550 {sup o}C in a sealed reaction system. Possible formation processes of HGMC are discussed on the experimental results. It is believed that the in situ formed MgO microparticles play a template role during the preparation of HGMC. Highlights: {yields} Honeycomb-like graphitic carbon was synthesized at 550 {sup o}C. {yields} The honeycomb-like graphitic carbon is macroposous structures. {yields} The formed MgO microparticles play a template role during the HGMC formation. {yields} The method can be expended to synthesize other porous or hollow carbon material. -- Abstract: Honeycomb-like graphitic macroporous carbon (HGMC) was synthesized by means of pyrolysis of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} using Mg powder as reductant in an autoclave at 550 {sup o}C. The characterization of structure and morphology was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and (High-resolution) transmission electron microscope [(HR)TEM]. The results of nitrogen adsorption-desorption indicate that the products are macropore materials with the pore size of 1-3 {mu}m, and the Brunauer-Emett-Teller (BET) surface area was 14 m{sup 2}/g. As a typical morphology, the possible growth process of HGMC was also investigated and discussed. The experimental results show that the in situ formed MgO microparticles play a template role during the HGMC formation.

  6. Preparation of Honeycomb SnO₂ Foams and Configuration-Dependent Microwave Absorption Features.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Fan, Bingbing; Xu, Yawei; Shao, Gang; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Wanyu; Zhang, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams were successfully synthesized by means of a template method. The honeycomb SnO2 foams were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), laser Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). It can be found that the SnO2 foam configurations were determined by the size of polystyrene templates. The electromagnetic properties of ordered SnO2 foams were also investigated by a network analyzer. The results reveal that the microwave absorption properties of SnO2 foams were dependent on their configuration. The microwave absorption capabilities of SnO2 foams were increased by increasing the size of pores in the foam configuration. Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave absorption was also correlated with the pore contents in SnO2 foams. The large and high amounts pores can bring about more interfacial polarization and corresponding relaxation. Thus, the perfect ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams obtained in the existence of large amounts of 322 nm polystyrene spheres showed the outstanding electromagnetic wave absorption properties. The minimal reflection loss (RL) is -37.6 dB at 17.1 GHz, and RL less than -10 dB reaches 5.6 GHz (12.4-18.0 GHz) with thin thickness of 2.0 mm. The bandwidth (<-10 dB, 90% microwave dissipation) can be monitored in the frequency regime of 4.0-18.0 GHz with absorber thickness of 2.0-5.0 mm. The results indicate that these ordered honeycomb SnO2 foams show the superiorities of wide-band, high-efficiency absorption, multiple reflection and scatting, high antioxidation, lightweight, and thin thickness. PMID:26552325

  7. Buckling of regular, chiral and hierarchical honeycombs under a general macroscopic stress state.

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Babak; Papadopoulos, Jim; Mousanezhad, Davood; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-07-01

    An approach to obtain analytical closed-form expressions for the macroscopic 'buckling strength' of various two-dimensional cellular structures is presented. The method is based on classical beam-column end-moment behaviour expressed in a matrix form. It is applied to sample honeycombs with square, triangular and hexagonal unit cells to determine their buckling strength under a general macroscopic in-plane stress state. The results were verified using finite-element Eigenvalue analysis. PMID:25002823

  8. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  9. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  10. Two-Dimensional Iron Tungstate: A Ternary Oxide Layer With Honeycomb Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional physical properties of graphene have sparked tremendous interests toward two-dimensional (2D) materials with honeycomb structure. We report here the successful fabrication of 2D iron tungstate (FeWOx) layers with honeycomb geometry on a Pt(111) surface, using the solid-state reaction of (WO3)3 clusters with a FeO(111) monolayer on Pt(111). The formation process and the atomic structure of two commensurate FeWOx phases, with (2 × 2) and (6 × 6) periodicities, have been characterized experimentally by combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and understood theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. The thermodynamically most stable (2 × 2) phase has a formal FeWO3 stoichiometry and corresponds to a buckled Fe2+/W4+ layer arranged in a honeycomb lattice, terminated by oxygen atoms in Fe–W bridging positions. This 2D FeWO3 layer has a novel structure and stoichiometry and has no analogues to known bulk iron tungstate phases. It is theoretically predicted to exhibit a ferromagnetic electronic ground state with a Curie temperature of 95 K, as opposed to the antiferromagnetic behavior of bulk FeWO4 materials. PMID:27110319

  11. Theory of Magnetic Phases in Hyperhoneycomb and Harmonic-honeycomb Iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric Kin Ho; Kim, Yong Baek

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider a generic spin model in the jeff = 1 / 2 basis for the hyperhoneycomb and harmonic-honeycomb iridates. Based on microscopic considerations, the effect of an additional bond-dependent anisotropic spin exchange interaction (?) beyond the Heisenberg-Kitaev model is investigated. We obtain the magnetic phase diagrams of the hyperhoneycomb and harmonic-honeycomb (H-1) lattices via a combination of the Luttinger-Tisza approximation, single-Q variational ansatz, and classical Monte Carlo simulated annealing. The resulting phase diagrams on both systems show the existence of incommensurate, non-coplanar spiral magnetic orders as well as other commensurate magnetic orders. The spiral orders show counter-propagating spiral patterns, which may be favorably compared to recent experimental results on both iridates. The parameter regime of various magnetic orders and ordering wavevectors are quite similar in both systems. We discuss the implications of our work to recent experiments and also compare our results to those of the two dimensional honeycomb iridate systems. Computations were performed on the GPC supercomputer at the SciNet HPC Consortium. This research was supported by the NSERC, CIFAR, and Centre for Quantum Materials at the University of Toronto.

  12. Mechanical Hysteresis as AN Nde Tool for Evaluating Composite Honeycomb Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Cory D.; Dayal, Vinay; Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.

    2009-03-01

    Honeycomb composites are finding ever increasing use on aircraft structures, making nondestructive detection of defects contained within honeycomb structures all the more important. This paper focuses on a new detection technique which makes use of the mechanical hysteresis seen as loops in the force-displacement curves. It was observed from load test data that internal damage in honeycomb sandwiches causes the average slope of the force-displacement curves to decrease and the area contained within the hysteresis loop to increase. To satisfy the inspection speed and one-sided access requirements of NDE techniques, a dynamic loading approach was pursued where an accelerometer was used to tap the surface of the test sample. Much of the research focused on the deduction of the force-displacement curves from an acceleration curve. This greatly increased the speed of the technique as well as reduced it to a one-sided test, where only access to the outer surface of the structure is needed.

  13. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part II: Operation of the negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Dumenil, S.; Alias, M.; Christin, R.; de Mascarel, A.; Perrin, M.

    2015-04-01

    The article presents the recent progress in the carbon honeycomb grid technology for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries with absorptive glass-mat separators (AGM-VRLAB). The work is focused on the development of negative current collectors using industrial grade composite honeycomb precursors. The developed model AGM-VRLA cells comprised of one prototype honeycomb negative electrode and two conventional traction positive counter-electrodes show high utilisation of the negative active material and long cycle life both in high-rate partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling mode and in deep cycling mode. The analysis of the results from the cycle-life tests and the tear-down analysis indicate that the benefits delivered by the novel grids can be related to the low mesh size of the grid, low γ-coefficient, as well as the use of milled carbon fibre additive. The combination of the three, results in the reversibility of the negative active material sulfation process when the electrolyte concentration in the cells is lower than the one traditionally used in the AGM-VRLAB technology. The negative plates show no signs of irreversible degradation after more than 900 cycles in deep cycling mode and more than 2000 capacity turnovers (equivalent cycles) in HRPSoC cycling mode.

  14. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  15. When block copolymer self-assembly in hierarchically ordered honeycomb films depicts the breath figure process.

    PubMed

    Escalé, Pierre; Save, Maud; Billon, Laurent; Ruokolainen, Janne; Rubatat, Laurent

    2016-01-21

    Nowadays, a challenge in the preparation of hierarchically ordered materials is the control of concomitant and interacting self-organization processes occurring in time at different length scales. In the present paper, the breath figure process is combined with block copolymer nano-phase segregation to elaborate hierarchically structured honeycomb porous films. Copolymer ordering, at the nanometer length scale, is observed and described in detail with respect to the array of pores of micrometer dimension, hence pointing out the structural interplays between both length-scales. The study is focused on two diblock copolymers made of polystyrene and poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PS-b-PtBA) with compositions producing lamellae or hexagonal packing of cylinders at thermodynamical equilibrium. Transmission Electron Microscopy completed with Small and Ultra-Small Angle Scattering are performed to evidence the inner morphologies of the honeycomb. The structural data are discussed in the light of the honeycomb film formation process establishing the interest in using kinetically trapped block copolymer self-organization as an imprint to elucidate the complex breath figure process. PMID:26528753

  16. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program sponsored the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, which is designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar honeycomb structure to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed flat until needed for deployment. A variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid methods can be used. Experimental evaluation of the DEA utilized a building block approach that included material characterization testing of its constituent, Kevlar -129 fabric/epoxy, and flexural testing of single hexagonal cells. In addition, the energy attenuation capabilities of the DEA were demonstrated through multi-cell component dynamic crush tests, and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto concrete, water, and soft soil. During each stage of the DEA evaluation process, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. This report documents the results of the experimental evaluation that was conducted to assess the energy absorption capabilities of the DEA.

  17. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  18. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  19. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  20. Photoemission study of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum/aluminum oxide/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Zorba, Serkan; Gao Yongli; Ma Liping; Yang Yang

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the interface electronic structure of a sandwich structure involving aluminum oxide and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq), i.e. (Alq/AlO{sub x}/Alq), has been investigated with photoemission spectroscopy. Strong chemical reactions have been observed due to aluminum deposition onto the Alq substrate. The subsequent oxygen exposure releases some of the Alq molecules from the interaction with aluminum. Finally, the deposition of the top Alq layer leads to an asymmetry in the electronic energy level alignment with respect to the AlO{sub x} interlayer.

  1. Mechanics of pressure-adaptive honeycomb and its application to wing morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof; Barrett, Ron

    2011-09-01

    Current, highly active classes of adaptive materials have been considered for use in many different aerospace applications. From adaptive flight control surfaces to wing surfaces, shape-memory alloy (SMA), piezoelectric and electrorheological fluids are making their way into wings, stabilizers and rotor blades. Despite the benefits which can be seen in many classes of aircraft, some profound challenges are ever present, including low power and energy density, high power consumption, high development and installation costs and outright programmatic blockages due to a lack of a materials certification database on FAR 23/25 and 27/29 certified aircraft. Three years ago, a class of adaptive structure was developed to skirt these daunting challenges. This pressure-adaptive honeycomb (PAH) is capable of extremely high performance and is FAA/EASA certifiable because it employs well characterized materials arranged in ways that lend a high level of adaptivity to the structure. This study is centered on laying out the mechanics, analytical models and experimental test data describing this new form of adaptive material. A directionally biased PAH system using an external (spring) force acting on the PAH bending structure was examined. The paper discusses the mechanics of pressure adaptive honeycomb and describes a simple reduced order model that can be used to simplify the geometric model in a finite element environment. The model assumes that a variable stiffness honeycomb results in an overall deformation of the honeycomb. Strains in excess of 50% can be generated through this mechanism without encountering local material (yield) limits. It was also shown that the energy density of pressure-adaptive honeycomb is akin to that of shape-memory alloy, while exhibiting strains that are an order of magnitude greater with an energy efficiency close to 100%. Excellent correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated in a number of tests. A proof-of-concept wing section test was conducted on a 12% thick wing section representative of a modern commercial aircraft winglet or flight control surface with a 35% PAH trailing edge. It was shown that camber variations in excess of 5% can be generated by a pressure differential of 40 kPa. Results of subsequent wind tunnel test show an increase in lift coefficient of 0.3 at 23 m s - 1 through an angle of attack from - 6° to + 20°. This paper was originally presented at the 2010 ASME SMASIS conference, as paper 'SMASIS 2010-3634'. Despite the substantial changes that have been made to the paper, there are still various figures and text stemming from the original.

  2. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  3. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  4. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  5. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  6. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  7. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation--which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports--the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  8. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  9. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 C to 1400 C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  10. The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won

    2012-07-01

    The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) fabricated on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template is investigated. The full structure consists of the following layers: AAO membrane (600 nm)/Pt anode/YSZ electrolyte (900 nm)/porous Pt cathode. The utilization of a 600-nm-thick AAO membrane significantly improves the thermomechanical stability due to its well-known honeycomb-shaped nanopore structure. Moreover, the Pt anode layer deposited in between the AAO membrane and the YSZ electrolyte preserves its integrity in terms of maintaining the triple-phase boundary (TPB) and electrical conductivity during high-temperature operation. Both of these results guarantee thermomechanical stability of the micro-SOFC and extend the cell lifetime, which is one of the most critical issues in the fabrication of freestanding membrane-type micro-SOFCs.

  11. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  12. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  13. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  14. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  15. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  16. Synthesis of honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yachao; Zhou, Min; Chen, Hao; Feng, Lei; Wang, Zhao; Yan, Xinzhu; Guan, Shiyou

    2015-12-01

    Improving the electrochemical performance of manganese dioxide (MnO2) electrodes is of great significance for supercapacitors. In this study, a novel honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites has been fabricated through freeze-drying method. The honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres are well inserted and dispersed on the graphene. Carbon nanoparticles in the composites act as spacers to effectively prevent graphene from restacking and agglomeration, construct efficient 3D conducting architecture with graphene for honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres, and alleviate the aggregation of honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres by separating them from each other. As a result, such honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres/carbon nanoparticles/graphene composites display much improved electrochemical capacitive performance of 255 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1, outstanding rate capability (150 F g-1 remained at a current density of 20 A g-1) and good cycling stability (83% of the initial capacitance retained after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). The strategy for the synthesis of these composites is very effective.

  17. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  18. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  19. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity, which gradually decreased the internal precipitation zones with increasing aluminum content. In samples containing 8 wt.% aluminum, a thick continuous oxide scale formed and prevented nitrogen and oxygen penetration into the bulk of the sample, thus preventing the formation of any internal precipitates. The effect of modifying the heating rate in pure N2 atmospheres was examined. Samples were heated over the course of 1, 10, or 100 minutes. Faster heating rates increased the aluminum content in the oxide scale on all samples. Additionally, these rapid heating rate samples had either had lower internal precipitation depths or no internal precipitates. Experiments were conducted in N2--2.5% H2/H 2O mixtures with varying dew points to lower the oxygen potential of the reaction gas and prevent the formation of external iron oxide scales. In the 3 and 5 wt.% Al alloys, this produced an internal aluminum-rich oxide band which inhibited further internal precipitation. Samples treated in atmospheres to simulate the reheat furnace combustion atmosphere experienced dramatically increased external oxidation in addition to inward growth of the oxide scale and internal precipitation of oxides and nitrides within the metal. The most important scientific findings of this dissertation are the dramatic effect of heating rate on modifying the external scale of the alloys presented and the presence of continuous internal oxide bands in several samples throughout the study. Oxidation studies typically occur for longer times and in higher oxygen contents than the present results, so the influence of heating rate is either largely unnoticed or is overcome by oxide growth at long times. Oxide bands have been observed in literature, but few aluminum oxide bands have been seen before this study. vi.

  20. Aluminum hydroxide issue closure package

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, T.B.

    1998-08-26

    Aluminum hydroxide coatings on fuel elements stored in aluminum canisters in K West Basin were measured in July and August 1998. Good quality data was produced that enabled statistical analysis to determine a bounding value for aluminum hydroxide at a 99% confidence level. The updated bounding value is 10.6 kg per Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), compared to the previously estimated bounding value of 8 kg/MCO. Thermal analysis using the updated bounding value, shows that the MCO generates oxygen concentrate that are below the lower flammability limits during the 40-year interim storage period and are, therefore, acceptable.

  1. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  2. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not significantly affected. This work demonstrated significant modification of the tribological and electrochemical properties of the aluminum surface can be accomplished using nitrogen plasma source ion implantation.

  3. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  4. Low-energy impact resistance of graphite-epoxy plates and ALS honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, David

    1989-01-01

    Low energy impact may be potentially dangerous for many highly optimized stiff structures. Impact by foreign objects such as birds, ice, and runways stones or dropping of tools occur frequently and the resulting damage and stress concentrations may be unacceptable from a designer's standpoint. The barely visible, yet potentially dangerous dents due to impact of foreign objects on the Advanced Launch System (ALS) structure are studied. Of particular interest is the computation of the maximum peak impact force for a given impactor mass and initial velocity. The theoretical impact forces will be compared with the experimental dropweight results for the ALS face sheets alone as well as the ALS honeycomb sandwich panels.

  5. Two- and one-dimensional honeycomb structures of silicon and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahangirov, Seymur; Topsakal, Mehmet; Aktrk, Ethem; ?ahin, Hasan; Ciraci, Salim

    2010-03-01

    First-principles calculations of structure optimization, phonon modes and finite temperature molecular dynamics predict that silicon and germanium can have stable, two-dimensional, low -buckled, honeycomb structures. Similar to graphene, these puckered structures are ambipolar and their charge carriers can behave like a massless Dirac fermions due to their ?- and &*circ;-bands which are crossed linearly at the Fermi level. In addition to these fundamental properties, bare and hydrogen passivated nanoribbons of Si and Ge show remarkable electronic and magnetic properties, which are size and orientation dependent. These properties offer interesting alternatives for the engineering of diverse nanodevices.

  6. ESCA studies of yttrium aluminum garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, D.A.; Wozniak, K.; Frukacz, Z.; Barr, T.L.; Fiorentino, D.; Seal, S.

    1999-03-04

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/ESCA) has been employed to investigate pure single crystals and powdered samples of yttrium aluminum garnet, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), and YAG crystals doped with several rare earth elements (Ln = Pr, Er, Ho, Tm) and a transition metal (Cr). Core level XPS peak shapes of the main elements forming the garnet structure can be rationalized due to different structural environments of particular ions modified by doping. The change of dopant oxidation state also results in variation of XPS peaks and helps to identify the sites in which it takes place. Single-crystal and powder samples give different XPS spectra. Possible sources of these differences are discussed. Similarities and differences between simple and mixed oxides are shown. The structure of YAG suggests the presence of only one independent oxygen ion; however the O(1s) spectra of all YAG systems exhibit two readily discerned peaks. An explanation for this dichotomy is discussed, involving the possible polarization of the oxygen valence electron density between the aluminum and yttrium. Alternative explanations are also considered.

  7. Assembly of acid and sintering resistant honeycomb washcoat and catalytically active phase using sols of silica, zirconia, and platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Felthouse, T.R.; Berkel, D.A.; Jost, S.R.

    1995-12-01

    Development of high performance honeycomb catalysts containing platinum active phase for gas phase air oxidation of sulfur dioxide is described. Stepwise assembly of these washcoated honeycombs consists of: (1) selection of honeycomb composition (mullite substrate) and cell density based on pressure drop requirements; (2) identification of washcoat slurry composition (silica-precursor sol, silica powder, and surfactants if needed); (3) processing of the washcoat-substrate by dip coating, drying, and calcining; (4) loading of the platinum active phase through a facilitated adsorption technique followed by drying and activation steps; and (5) reactor loading and evaluation. Details of these steps will be presented that include thermal and chemical stability tests. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy of the final Pt/(ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}) composite attached to the mullite substrate will be reported.

  8. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for labyrinth gas seals with honeycomb stators. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Lawrence Allen

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results for the rotordynamic stiffness and damping coefficients of a labyrinth -rotor honeycomb-stator seal are presented. The coefficients are compared to the coefficients of a labyrinth-rotor smooth-stator seal having the same geometry. The coefficients are compared to analytical results from a two-control-volume compressible flow model. The experimental results show that the honeycomb stator configuration is more stable than the smooth stator configuration at low rotor speeds. At high rotor speeds and low clearance, the smooth stator seal is more stable. The theoretical model predicts the cross-coupled stiffness of the honeycomb stator seal correctly within 25 percent of measured values. The model provides accurate predictions of direct damping for large clearance seals. Overall, the model does not perform as well for low clearance seals as for high clearance seals.

  9. Experimental results for labyrinth gas seals with honeycomb stators - Comparisons to smooth-stator seals and theoretical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Larry; Childs, Dara; Hale, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Experimental measurements are presented for the rotordynamic stiffness and damping coefficients of a teeth-on-rotor labyrinth seal with a honeycomb stator. Inlet circumferential velocity, inlet pressure, rotor speed, and seal clearance are primary variables. Results are compared to data for teeth-on-rotor labyrinth seals with smooth stators and to analytical predictions from a two-control-volume compressible flow model. The experimental results show that the honeycomb-stator configuration is more stable than the smooth-stator configuration at low rator speeds. At high rotor speeds, the stator surface does not affect stability. The theoretical model predicts the cross-coupled stiffness of the honeycomb-stator seal correctly within 25 percent of measured values. The model provides accurate predictions of direct damping for large clearance seals; however, the model predictions and test results diverge with increasing running speed. Overall, the model does not perform as well for low clearance seals as for high clearance seals.

  10. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  11. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  12. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  13. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the nanometer scale. This special section contains interesting papers on graphene, h-BN and related 'honeycomb' compounds on solid surfaces, which are currently in development. Interfacial interaction strongly modifies the electronic and atomic structures of these overlayer systems and substrate surfaces. In addition, one can recognize a variety of growth phenomena by changing the surface and growth conditions, which are promising as regards fabricating those noble nanosystems. We have great pleasure in acknowledging the enthusiastic response and participation of our invited authors and their diligent preparation of the manuscripts. Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures contents Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structuresThomas Geber and Chuhei Oshima Templating of arrays of Ru nanoclusters by monolayer graphene/Ru Moirés with different periodicitiesEli Sutter, Bin Wang, Peter Albrecht, Jayeeta Lahiri, Marie-Laure Bocquet and Peter Sutter Controllable p-doping of graphene on Ir(111) by chlorination with FeCl3N A Vinogradov, K A Simonov, A V Generalov, A S Vinogradov, D V Vyalikh, C Laubschat, N Mårtensson and A B Preobrajenski Optimizing long-range order, band gap, and group velocities for graphene on close-packed metal surfacesF D Natterer, S Rusponi, M Papagno, C Carbone and H Brune Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal surfaces: chemical vapor deposition versus liquid phase depositionSamuel Grandthyll, Stefan Gsell, Michael Weinl, Matthias Schreck, Stefan Hüfner and Frank Müller High-yield boron nitride nanosheets from 'chemical blowing': towards practical applications in polymer compositesXuebin Wang, Amir Pakdel, Chunyi Zhi, Kentaro Watanabe, Takashi Sekiguchi, Dmitri Golberg and Yoshio Bando BCx layers with honeycomb lattices on an NbB2(0001) surfaceChuhei Oshima Epitaxial growth of boron-doped graphene by thermal decomposition of B4CWataru Norimatsu, Koichiro Hirata, Yuta Yamamoto, Shigeo Arai and Michiko Kusunoki Mechanical exfoliation of epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) enabled by Br2 intercalationCharlotte Herbig, Markus Kaiser, Nedjma Bendiab, Stefan Schumacher, Daniel F Förster, Johann Coraux, Klaus Meerholz, Thomas Michely and Carsten Busse Low energy electron microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy investigation of grapheneK L Man and M S Altman Periodic overlayers and moiré patterns: theoretical studies of geometric propertiesKlaus Hermann Silicene structures on silver surfacesHanna Enriquez, Sébastien Vizzini, Abdelkader Kara, Boubekeur Lalmi and Hamid Oughaddou Contrast inversion of the h-BN nanomesh investigated by nc-AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopyS Koch, M Langer, S Kawai, E Meyer and Th Glatzel Probing the electronic structure and optical response of a graphene quantum disk supported on monolayer grapheneWu Zhou, Stephen J Pennycook and Juan-Carlos Idrobo Multi-oriented moiré superstructures of graphene on Ir(111): experimental observations and theoretical modelsLei Meng, Rongting Wu, Lizhi Zhang, Linfei Li, Shixuan Du, Yeliang Wang and H-J Gao The physics of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001)H Kageshima, H Hibino and S Tanabe

  14. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  15. Immunotoxicity of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanzhu; Li, Yanfei; Miao, Liguang; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Yanhuan; Yan, Xijun; Cui, Xuezhe; Li, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is present in the daily life of all humans. With the incidence of Al contamination increased in recent years, the toxicity of Al on the immune function has attracted more attention. Even with this increased attention, the mechanism of Al immunotoxicity still remains unclear. The mechanism of Al immunotoxicity reviewed herein focused on the effects of Al on the splenic trace elements, the status of α-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) cells, cytokines, complement and immunoglobulins, as well as macrophages. The studies in the literature showed that Al decreased splenic iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) levels, but the effects of Al on splenic copper (Cu) level was ambiguous and controversial. Al exposure inhibited levels of ANAE(+) cells, the production of interleukin (IL)-2 and the functions of macrophages. With respect to other key cytokines, studies showed that Al suppressed the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in vitro; effects of Al on TNF-α formation in vivo were less overt. Al exposure reduced complement 3 (C3) level, but effects of Al exposure on complement 4 (C4) level were not as clear-cut. Lastly, the effects of Al exposure on the IgG, IgM and IgA levels were conflicting. Taken in totality, the results of several studies in the literature demonstrated that Al could impart adverse effects on immune function. PMID:24287266

  16. Preparation and characterization of energetic materials coated superfine aluminum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songsong; Ye, Mingquan; Han, Aijun; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to protect the activity of aluminum in solid rocket propellants by means of solvent/non-solvent method in which nitrocellulose (NC) and Double-11 (shortened form of double-base gun propellant, model 11) have been used as coating materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to characterize the morphology of coated Al particles. Other characterization data of coated and uncoated Al particles, such as infrared absorption spectrum, laser particle size analysis and the active aluminum content were also studied. The thermal behavior of pure and coated aluminum samples have also been studied by simultaneous thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that: superfine aluminum particles could be effectively coated with nitrocellulose and Double-11 through a solvent/non-solvent method. The energetic composite particles have core-shell structures and the thickness of the coating film is about 20-50 nm. The active aluminum content of different coated samples was measured by means of oxidation-reduction titration method. The results showed that after being stored in room temperature and under 50% humidity condition for about 4months the active aluminum content of coated Al particles decreased from 99.8 to 95.8% (NC coating) and 99.2% (Double-11 coating) respectively. Double-11 coating layer had a much better protective effect. The TG-DTA and DSC results showed that the energy amount and energy release rate of NC coated and Double-11 coated Al particles were larger than those of the raw Al particles. Double-11 coated Al particles have more significant catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition characters of AP than that of NC coated Al particles. These features accorded with the energy release characteristics of solid propellant.

  17. Candidate Quantum Spin Liquid due to Dimensional Reduction of a Two-Dimensional Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Dongwei; Baker, Peter J.; Pratt, Francis L.; Zhu, Daoben

    2014-09-01

    As with quantum spin liquids based on two-dimensional triangular and kagome lattices, the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice with either a strong spin-orbital coupling or a frustrating second-nearest-neighbor coupling is expected to be a source of candidate quantum spin liquids. An ammonium salt [(C3H7)3NH]2[Cu2(C2O4)3](H2O)2.2 containing hexagonal layers of Cu2+ was obtained from solution. No structural transition or long-range magnetic ordering was observed from 290 K to 2 K from single crystal X-ray diffraction, specific heat and susceptibility measurements. The anionic layers are separated by sheets of ammonium and H2O with distance of 3.5 Å and no significant interaction between anionic layers. The two-dimensional honeycomb lattice is constructed from Jahn-Teller distorted Cu2+ and oxalate anions, showing a strong antiferromagnetic interaction between S = 1/2 metal atoms with θ = -120 (1) K. Orbital analysis of the Cu2+ interactions through the oxalate-bridges suggests a stripe mode pattern of coupling with weak ferromagnetic interaction along the b axis, and strong antiferromagnetic interaction along the a axis. Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility shows that it is dominated by a quasi-one-dimensional contribution with spin chains that are at least as well isolated as those of well-known quasi-one-dimensional spin liquids.

  18. Band gap analysis of star-shaped honeycombs with varied Poisson’s ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Deng, Z.; Zhang, K.; Xu, X.; Wen, F.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, star-shaped honeycombs are analyzed in terms of their equivalent mechanical behaviors and band gap properties. Firstly, by applying Castigliano’s second theorem, the effective Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio are derived by an analytical method used in structural mechanics. On the basis of Bloch’s theorem, the dispersion characteristics are then analyzed by the dynamic matrix in conjunction with the Wittrick-Williams (W-W) algorithm. It should be noted that the presented method can form a more simple stiffness and mass matrices of the proposed structures, compared with the traditional finite element (FE) method. Thereafter, the effects of the geometrical parameters on the effective constants and band gaps are investigated and discussed. Numerical results demonstrate that the negative Poisson’s ratio provides an enhanced effective Young’s modulus of the considered honeycombs. Furthermore, the band gap exists in a much lower frequency region with an unchanged summing band gap width when the Poisson’s ratio is in negative values. In general, the work can serve as a guide for the optimal design of cellular structures.

  19. Anomalous refractive effects in honeycomb lattice photonic crystals formed by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Dong, G Y; Yang, X L; Cai, L Z

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated for the first time the anomalous refractive effects of a photonic crystal (PhC) formed by holographic lithography (HL) with triangular rods arranged in a honeycomb lattice in air. Possibilities of left-handed negative refraction and superlens are discussed for the case of TM2 band with the index contrast n = 3.4:1. In contrast to the conventional honeycomb PhC made of regular rods in air, the HL PhCs show left-handed negative refraction over a wider and higher frequency range with high transmissivity (>90%), and the effective indices quite close to -1 for a wide range of incident angles with a larger all-angle left-handed negative refraction (AALNR) frequency range (Deltaomega/omega approximately 14.8%). Calculations and FDTD simulations demonstrate the high-performance negative refraction properties can happen in the holographic structures for a wide filling ratio and can be modulated by changing the filling ratio easily. PMID:20721016

  20. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. PMID:26302067

  1. High-fluorine rhyolite: An eruptive pegmatite magma at the Honeycomb Hills, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, Roger D.; Nash, W. P.

    1988-11-01

    The Honeycomb Hills rhyolite dome in western Utah displays chemical and mineralogical features characteristic of a rare-element pegmatite magma. The lavas show extreme enrichments in such trace elements as Rb (≤1960 ppm), Cs (≤78), Li (≤344), Sn (≤33), Be (≤270), and Y (≤156). Phenocrysts (10%-50% by volume) include sanidine (Or66-70), plagioclase (Ab83-92), quartz, biotite approaching fluorsiderophyllite, and fluortopaz, as well as accessory phases common to highly differentiated granites and pegmatites, including zircon, thorite, fluocerite, columbite, fergusonite, and samarskite. Low temperatures (600 to 640 °C), coupled with high phenocryst and silica content, might normally preclude eruption due to the extremely high viscosity of the melt. However, high concentrations of fluorine (2%-3%) could domal lavas significantly reduce viscosity and allow eruption of domal lavas even after dewatering of the mama during the initial pyroclastic phase of the eruptive cycle. Fractionation of phenocrysts and accessory phases, for which partition coefficients have been measured, is sufficient to account for most compositional gradients inferred in the preeruptive magma body, although transport by a fluid phase formed a may have caused upward enrichments in Li, Be, and Cs. If the Honeycomb Hills magma had crystallized at depth, it would have formed a rare-element pegmatite.

  2. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to themore » mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.« less

  3. Room-temperature quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe honeycomb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane; Beugeling, Wouter; Kalesaki, Efterpi; Niquet, Y.-M.; Delerue, Christophe; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The recent experimental realization of self-assembled honeycomb superlattices of truncated semiconducting nanocrystals has opened a new path to engineer graphene-like structures. Atomistic band-structure calculations for honeycomb lattices of PbSe and CdSe have shown a rich band structure, with Dirac cones at the s- as well as at the p-bands, in addition to a flat p-band. By controlling the chemical composition of the nanocrystals, lattices with strong spin-orbit coupling can be artificially designed. We show that for HgTe a huge non-trivial gap, of order of 50 meV, opens at the K-points. We calculate the edge states using both, an atomistic calculation that takes into account 106 atomic orbitals per unit cell, as well as an effective 16-bands tight-binding model, and find that the quantum spin Hall effect should be observable in this material at temperatures of the order of room temperature. Financial support from ANR, NWO and FOM is acknowledged.

  4. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  5. Strong-coupling approach to Mott transition of massless and massive Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibi, Elaheh; Jafari, S. Akbar

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions in the Hubbard model and ionic Hubbard model at half-filling on the honeycomb lattice are investigated in the strong-coupling perturbation theory which corresponds to an expansion in powers of the hopping t around the atomic limit. Within this formulation we find analytic expressions for the single-particle spectrum, whereby the calculation of the insulating gap is reduced to a simple root finding problem. This enables high-precision determination of the insulating gap that does not require any extrapolation procedure. The critical value of Mott transition on the honeycomb lattice is obtained to be Uc≈2.38 t . Studying the ionic Hubbard model at the lowest order, we find two insulating states, one with Mott character at large U and another with single-particle gap character at large ionic potential Δ . The present approach gives a critical gapless state at U =2 Δ at lowest order. By systematically improving on the perturbation expansion, the density of states around this critical gapless phase reduces.

  6. Intermediate honeycomb ordering to trigger oxygen redox chemistry in layered battery electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortemard de Boisse, Benoit; Liu, Guandong; Ma, Jiangtao; Nishimura, Shin-Ichi; Chung, Sai-Cheong; Kiuchi, Hisao; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kikkawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okubo, Masashi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-04-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are attractive energy storage media owing to the abundance of sodium, but the low capacities of available cathode materials make them impractical. Sodium-excess metal oxides Na2MO3 (M: transition metal) are appealing cathode materials that may realize large capacities through additional oxygen redox reaction. However, the general strategies for enhancing the capacity of Na2MO3 are poorly established. Here using two polymorphs of Na2RuO3, we demonstrate the critical role of honeycomb-type cation ordering in Na2MO3. Ordered Na2RuO3 with honeycomb-ordered [Na1/3Ru2/3]O2 slabs delivers a capacity of 180 mAh g-1 (1.3-electron reaction), whereas disordered Na2RuO3 only delivers 135 mAh g-1 (1.0-electron reaction). We clarify that the large extra capacity of ordered Na2RuO3 is enabled by a spontaneously ordered intermediate Na1RuO3 phase with ilmenite O1 structure, which induces frontier orbital reorganization to trigger the oxygen redox reaction, unveiling a general requisite for the stable oxygen redox reaction in high-capacity Na2MO3 cathodes.

  7. Photoexcited states of the harmonic honeycomb iridate γ -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, J. P.; Patankar, S.; Thewalt, E.; Ruiz, A.; Lopez, G.; Breznay, N.; Vishwanath, A.; Analytis, J.; Orenstein, J.; Koralek, J. D.; Kimchi, I.

    2015-09-01

    We report equilibrium and nonequilibrium optical measurements on the recently synthesized "harmonic" honeycomb iridate γ -Li2IrO3 (LIO), as well as the layered honeycomb iridate Na2IrO3 (NIO). Using Fourier transform infrared microscopy we performed reflectance measurements on LIO, from which we obtained the optical conductivity below 2 eV. In addition, we measured the photoinduced changed in reflectance Δ R , as a function of time t , temperature T , and probe field polarization in both LIO and NIO. In LIO, Δ R (t ,T ) is anisotropic and comprises three T -dependent components. Two of these components are related to the onset of magnetic order and the third is related to a photoinduced population of metastable electronic excited states. In NIO, Δ R (t ,T ) has a single T -dependent component that is strikingly similar to the electronic excitation component of Δ R in LIO. Through analysis and comparison of Δ R (t ,T ) for two compounds, we extract information on the onset of magnetic correlations at and above the transition temperature in LIO, the bare spin-flip scattering rate in equilibrium, the lifetime of low-lying quasiparticle excitations, and the polarization dependence of optical transitions that are sensitive to magnetic order.

  8. CaMn2Sb2 : Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2 , which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first- and second-neighbor exchange interactions J1 and J2 in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1≈1 /6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2 is an example of a compound that lies very close to the mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the Néel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveals a mean field ordering temperature ≈4 times larger than the reported Néel temperature TN=85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.

  9. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Low-buckled Honeycomb Lattice with In-plane Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Pan, Hui; Yang, Fei; Li, Xin; Qiao, Zhenhua; Zhenhua Qiao's group Team; Hui Pan's group Team

    With out-of-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has been extensively studied in quantum wells and two-dimensional atomic crystal layers. Here, we investigate the possibility of realizing quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in honeycomb lattices with in-plane magnetization. We show that the QAHE can only occur in low-buckled honeycomb lattice where both intrinsic and intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling appear spontaneously. The extrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling is detrimental to this phase. In contrast to the out-of-plane magnetization induced QAHE, the QAHE from in-plane magnetization is achieved in the vicinity of the time reversal symmetric momenta at M points rather than Dirac points. In monolayer case, the QAHE can be characterized by Chern number  = +/- 1 whereas additional phases with Chern number  = +/- 2 appear in chiral stacked bilayer system. The Chern number strongly depends on the orientation of the magnetization. The bilayer system also provides additional tunability via out-of-plane electric field, which can reduce the critical magnetization strength required to induce QAHE. It can also lead to topological phase transitions from  = +/- 2 to +/- 1 and finally to 0 Equal contribution from Yafei Ren and Hui Pan.

  10. Featureless and nonfractionalized Mott insulators on the honeycomb lattice at 1/2 site filling

    PubMed Central

    Kimchi, Itamar; Parameswaran, S. A.; Turner, Ari M.; Wang, Fa; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2013-01-01

    Within the Landau paradigm, phases of matter are distinguished by spontaneous symmetry breaking. Implicit here is the assumption that a completely symmetric state exists: a paramagnet. At zero temperature such quantum featureless insulators may be forbidden, triggering either conventional order or topological order with fractionalized excitations. Such is the case for interacting particles when the particle number per unit cell, f, is not an integer. However, can lattice symmetries forbid featureless insulators even at integer f? An especially relevant case is the honeycomb (graphene) latticewhere free spinless fermions at (the two sites per unit cell mean is half-filling per site) are always metallic. Here we present wave functions for bosons, and a related spin-singlet wave function for spinful electrons, on the honeycomb lattice and demonstrate via quantum to classical mappings that they do form featureless Mott insulators. The construction generalizes to symmorphic lattices at integer f in any dimension. Our results explicitly demonstrate that in this case, despite the absence of a noninteracting insulator at the same filling, lack of order at zero temperature does not imply fractionalization.

  11. Design of Mott and topological phases on buckled 3d-oxide honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentcheva, Rossitza

    The honeycomb lattice, as realized e.g. in graphene, has rendered a robust platform for innovative science and potential applications. A much richer generalization of this lattice arises in (111)-oriented bilayers of perovskites, adding the complexity of the strongly correlated, multiorbital nature of electrons in transition metal oxides. Based on first principles calculations with an on-site Coulomb repulsion, here we provide trends in the evolution of ground states versus band filling in (111)-oriented (La XO3)2 /(LaAlO3)4 superlattices, with X spanning the entire 3d transition metal series. The competition between local quasi-cubic and global triangular symmetry triggers unanticipated broken symmetry phases, with mechanisms ranging from Jahn-Teller distortion, to charge-, spin-, and orbital-ordering. LaMnO3 and LaCoO3 bilayers, where spin-orbit coupling opens a sizable gap in the Dirac-point Fermi surface, emerge as much desired oxide-based Chern insulators, the latter displaying a gap capable of supporting room-temperature applications Further realizations of the honeycomb lattice and geometry patterns beyond the perovskite structure will be addressed. Research supported by the DFG, SFB/TR80.

  12. Mott-Hubbard Physics in a Patterned GaAs Heterostructure with Honeycomb Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-03-01

    This talk considers efforts directed towards the design and exploration of novel collective electron states in artificial lattice structures that are realized in semiconductor heterostructures by nanofabrication methods. These studies reveal striking interplays between electron interactions and geometrical constraints (topology). We focus on the honeycomb topology, or ``artificial graphene'' (AG), that supports Dirac fermions. Dirac fermions and the emergence of quantum phases, such as spin liquids and topologically protected states, can be studied by highly demanding inelastic light scattering methods and by electrical transport at low temperatures. In particular, we probed the excitation spectrum of electrons in the honeycomb lattice in a magnetic field identifying collective modes that emerged from the Coulomb interaction, as predicted by the Mott-Hubbard model. These observations allow us to determine the Hubbard gap and suggest the existence of a Coulomb-driven ground state. Studies of electrons confined to artificial lattices should provide key perspectives on strong electron correlation in condensed matter science. Work done in collaboration with A. Singha, M. Gibertini, M. Polini, B. Karmakar, M. Katsnelson, S. Yuan, A. Pinczuk, G. Vignale, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West

  13. Effects of porosity on shock-induced melting of honeycomb-shaped Cu nanofoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengpeng

    Metallic foams are of fundamental and applied interests in various areas, including structure engineering (e.g., lightweight structural members and energy absorbers), and shock physics (e.g., as laser ablators involving shock-induced melting and vaporization).Honeycomb-shaped metallic foams consist of regular array of hexagonal cells in two dimensions and have extensive applications and represent a unique, simple yet useful model structure for exploring mechanisms and making quantitative assessment. We investigate shock-induced melting in honeycomb-shaped Cu nanofoams with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A total of ten porosities (phi) are explored, ranging from 0 to 0.9 at an increment of 0.1. Upon shock compression, void collapse induces local melting followed by supercooling for sufficiently high porosity at low shock strengths. While superheating of solid remnants occurs for sufficiently strong shocks at phi<0.1. Both supercooling of melts and superheating of solid remnants are transient, and the equilibrated shock states eventually fall on the equilibrium melting curve for partial melting. However, phase equilibrium has not been achieved on the time scale of simulations in supercooled Cu liquid (from completely melted nanofoams). The temperatures for incipient and complete melting are related to porosity via a power law and approach the melting temperature at zero pressure as phi tends to 1.

  14. Cluster dynamic mean-field study on the superconductivity in doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao Yan; Dang, Hung T.; Wessel, Stefen; Meng, Zi Yang

    The issue of superconductivities emerging from doped honeycomb lattice Mott insulator remains inconclusive. Existing proposals, such as p+ip triplet pairing driven by ferromagnetic fluctuations, d+id singlet pairing driven by antiferromagnetic fluctuations or van Hove singularities in the band structure, are not compatible. This is mainly due to the limitation of various approximated techniques employed in addressing such question with inherent strongly correlated nature. Trying to clarify the situation, we perform large-scale cluster dynamic mean-field simulations to explore the superconductivity instabilities in the doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model, from medium to strong coupling. To benchmark, we make use of both interaction- and hybridization-expansion continuous time quantum Monte Carlo methods to exactly solve the quantum cluster embedded in self-consistently determined mean-field bath. Temperature dependence of various superconducting susceptibilities are calculated, hence, we provide the least biased results of the competition of the superconductivity in different channels in the phase diagram spanned by doping and electronic interaction.

  15. Novel electronic degrees of freedom emerging from symmetry breaking of honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ji

    2013-03-01

    Electrons are central to the society-transforming information technologies. The intrinsic degrees of freedom of an electron, namely, its charge and spin, have been extensively explored in electronic and spintronic devices. As we are approaching the limit of device miniaturization, the exploration of novel electronic degrees of freedom, in terms of theoretical development and materials discovery, is of current interest. In this talk, we will focus on two strategies to break the symmetry of a Fermionic honeycomb lattice that lead to novel degrees of freedom of Bloch electrons. The essential idea in these approaches is to lift the isospin degeneracy a honeycomb lattice by introducing contrasting identities (chemical or magnetic) to the two sublattices. The new indices of Bloch electrons will then arise, corresponding to contrasting responses to external fields, such as in optical selectivity and anomalous electronic transport. Using combined computational, theoretical and experimental approaches, we go on to demonstrate that the proposed physics can be realized in real material systems. In particular, our results indicate that monolayer transition metal chalcogenides, such as non-magnetic MoX2 and antiferromagnetic MnPX3 (X = S, Se), can indeed exhibit selective circular dichroism. The associated Berry curvature-supported quantum transport will also be discussed.

  16. Moving vortex phases, dynamical symmetry breaking, and jamming for vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We show using numerical simulations that vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays can exhibit a remarkable variety of dynamical phases that are distinct from those found for triangular and square pinning arrays. In the honeycomb arrays, it is possible for the interstitial vortices to form dimer or higher n-mer states which have an additional orientational degree of freedom that can lead to the formation of vortex molecular crystals. For filling fractions where dimer states appear, a dynamical symmetry breaking can occur when the dimers flow in one of two possible alignment directions. This leads to transport in the direction transverse to the applied drive. We show that dimerization produces distinct types of moving phases which depend on the direction of the driving force with respect to the pinning lattice symmetry. When the dimers are driven along certain directions, a reorientation of the dimers can produce a jamming phenomenon which results in a strong enhancement in the critical depinning force. The jamming can also cause unusual effects such as an increase in the critical depinning force when the size of the pinning sites is reduced.

  17. Metastable honeycomb SrTiO3/SrIrO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. J.; Ryu, S.; Zhou, H.; Xie, L.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Ma, Y.; Irwin, J.; Pan, X. Q.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-04-01

    Recent theory predictions of exotic band topologies in (111) honeycomb perovskite SrIrO3 layers sandwiched between SrTiO3 have garnered much attention in the condensed matter physics and materials communities. However, perovskite SrIrO3 film growth in the (111) direction remains unreported, as efforts to synthesize pure SrIrO3 on (111) perovskite substrates have yielded films with monoclinic symmetry rather than the perovskite structure required by theory predictions. In this study, we report the synthesis of ultra-thin metastable perovskite SrIrO3 films capped with SrTiO3 grown on (111) SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The atomic structure of the ultra-thin films was examined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which suggests a perovskite layering distinct from the bulk SrIrO3 monoclinic phase. In-plane 3-fold symmetry for the entire heterostructure was confirmed using synchrotron surface X-ray diffraction to measure symmetry equivalent crystal truncation rods. Our findings demonstrate the ability to stabilize (111) honeycomb perovskite SrIrO3, which provides an experimental avenue to probe the phenomena predicted for this material system.

  18. Removal of alachlor from water by catalyzed ozonation on Cu/Al2O3 honeycomb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-2′6′-diethyl-N-methoxymethylacetanilide) has been known as a probable human carcinogen, and the MCL (minimum contamination level) for drinking water has been set at 2 μg L-1. Therefore, the advanced methods for effectively removing it from water are a matter of interest. Catalyzed ozonation is a promising method for refractory organics degradation. Cu/Al2O3 catalyzed ozonation for degrading an endocrine disruptor (alachlor) in water was investigated. Results Experimental results showed that the ozonation of alachlor can be effectively catalyzed and enhanced by Cu/Al2O3-honeycomb. The main intermediate products formed (aliphatic carboxylic acids) were mineralized to a large extent in the catalytic process. Conclusions This study has shown that Cu/Al2O3-honeycomb is a feasible and efficient catalyst in the ozonation of alachlor in water. Less intermediate oxidation product was produced in the catalytic process than in the uncatalytic one. Furthermore, the mineralization of alachlor could be enhanced by increasing the pH of the reaction solution. PMID:23977841

  19. Magnetic ordering of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Shinichiro; Soda, Minoru; Kasatani, Kazuhiro; Ono, Toshio; Avdeev, Maxim; Masuda, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic order of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6 and its related antiferromagnet Ba3NiTa2O9 by neutron diffraction measurements. We observe magnetic Bragg peaks below the transition temperatures, and identify propagation vectors for these oxides. A combination of representation analysis and Rietveld refinement leads to a collinear magnetic order for Ba2NiTeO6 and a 120∘ structure for Ba3NiTa2O9 . We find that the spin model of the bilayer triangular lattice is equivalent to that of the two-dimensional buckled honeycomb lattice having magnetic frustration. We discuss the magnetic interactions and single-ion anisotropy of Ni+2 ions for Ba2NiTeO6 in order to clarify the origin of the collinear magnetic structures. Our calculation suggests that the collinear magnetic order of Ba2NiTeO6 is induced by the magnetic frustration and easy-axis anisotropy.

  20. Symplectic analysis of dynamic properties of hexagonal honeycomb sandwich tubes with plateau borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Deng, Zichen; Meng, Junmiao; Xu, Xiaojian; Wang, Yan

    2015-09-01

    A new type of hexagonal honeycomb sandwich tube with plateau borders are introduced in this work and the Symplectic analysis with its high computational efficiency and high accuracy is applied to obtain the structural dynamic properties. The effects of material distribution (β) and relative density (ρbar) on the dynamic properties of the structure are also studied. Based on the definition of the elastic constants and the homogenization method, the independent elastic constants are obtained. By introducing dual variables and applying the variational principle, the canonical equations of Hamiltonian system are constructed. The precise integration method and extended Wittrick-Williams algorithm are adopted to solve the canonical equations. The dispersion relations of sandwich tubes are obtained, and the effects of material distribution and relative density on the normalized frequencies of the sandwich tubes are investigated. The proposed homogenization method is verified by comparing with other researchers' works. Dispersion relations of the sandwich tubes are obtained. The material distribution parameter and the relative density have significant effects on the dynamic properties of the structures. This work expects to offer new opportunities for the optimal design of metallic honeycomb sandwich tubes and future applications in the engineering sector.