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Sample records for alvaro alberto cnaaa

  1. Polyglot of the Everyday: Alberto Aguilar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucero, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Chicago-born artist Alberto Aguilar enacts his artworks through video, performance, sound recordings, cooking, photographs, participatory events, drawings, installations, interior design, writing, collage, singing, teaching, conducting interviews, curating, mail-art, being on the Internet, writing, and personal social exchanges (e.g.…

  2. Seismology in South America; an interview with Alberto Giesecke

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    Dr. Alberto A. Giesecke is head of the Instituto Geofisico del Peru, in Lima, Peru, and Director of Centro Regional de Sismologia para America del Sur (CERESIS). The center is dedicated to the coordination and promotion of earthquake hazard mitigation. Dr. Giesecke was President of the National Research Council of Peru and currently is a member of the Board of Directors of the National Institute for Industrial Technological Research and Standards and of the National Institute for Research and Training in Telecommunications. He presided over the Organizing Committee for the General Assemblies of the International Association for Seismology and Physics of the Earth's interor and the International Union for Radio Science held in Lima, Peru, in 1973 and 1975, respectively. 

  3. Flooding in southeastern United States from tropical storm Alberto, July 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hale, Timothy W.; Stamey, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, parts of Georgia, Alabama and Florida were devastated by floods resulting from rainfall produced by Tropical Storm Alberto. The flooding resulted in 33 human deaths in towns and small communities or near swollen streams. Total damages to public and private property were estimated at nearly $1 billion dollars. This article highlights severe stream flooding resulting from Alberto and describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) efforts to document this event and provide information to those who need it.

  4. From "Sanhattan" to "Nashvegas": The Aesthetics of Detachment in Alberto Fuguet's Filmmaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraza, Vania

    2015-01-01

    This current study focuses on the effects of neoliberalism on the Chilean sociopolitical period of postdictatorship (1990-2010) by studying a new generation of filmmakers in the work of Alberto Fuguet. In the trilogy of "Se arrienda" (2005), "Velódrom" (2010), and "Música campesin"a (2011), Fuguet reviews the…

  5. Flooding in southeastern United States from tropical storm Alberto, July 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamey, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    In July 1994, parts of central and southwestern Georgia, southeastern Albama, and the western panhandle of Florida were devastated by floods resulting from rainfall produced by Tropical Storm Alberto. Entire communities were inundated by flood waters as numerous streams reached peak stages and discharges far greater than previous floods in the Flint, Ocmulgee, and Choctawhatchee River basins. The flooding resulted in 33 deaths in towns and small communities along or near the overflowing streams. President Clinton declared 78 counties as Federal disaster areas; 55 in Georgia, 10 in Alabama, and 13 in Florida. The Flint River and Ocmulgee River basins in Georgi experienced floods that exceeded the 100-year recurrence interval discharge along almost their entire lengths. Travel was disrupted as railroad and highway bridges and culverts were overtopped and, in many cases, washed out. Total food damages to public and private property were estimated at near $1 billion dollars. The destruction caused by this storm serves to emphasize the high cost imposed upon life and property by flood disasters; and thus, highlight the importance of preparing for, monitoring, and documenting such occurrences.In July 1994, parts of central and southwestern Georgia, southeastern Alabama, and the western panhandle of Florida were devastated by floods resulting from rainfall produced by Tropical Storm Alberto. Entire communities were inundated by flood waters as numerous streams reached peak stages and discharges far greater than previous floods in the Flint, Ocmulgee, and Choctawhatchee River basins. The flooding resulted in 33 deaths in towns and small communities along or near the overflowing streams. President Clinton declared 78 counties as Federal disaster areas: 55 in Georgia, 10 in Alabama, and 13 in Florida. The Flint River and Ocmulgee River basins in Georgia experienced floods that exceeded the 100-year recurrence interval discharge along almost their entire lengths. Travel was

  6. [The life story of Joaquim Alberto Cardoso de Melo: Quincas, Um berro à vida].

    PubMed

    Zancan, Lenira; Matida, Álvaro Hideyoshi

    2015-10-01

    The article seeks to reflect on the contribution of Joaquim Alberto Cardoso de Melo (1936-1993) to the field of public health relating his life story and his scientific production with core issues of education and health, present in his time and which remain in debate to this day. His contribution resulted in the production of new meanings for health practices, with the understanding as social and transdisciplinary phenomena. Based on conversations with co-authors and friends and rereading of his texts, it was decided to approach his biography from: (i) his skills and participation in initiatives and practices of preventive medicine and popular education, which fomented the critical analysis of health education; (ii) his presence as an educator in public health courses throughout the country, eliciting the deconstruction of the theories and practices of education and health with managers, students, professionals and teachers; (iii) his availability for transdisciplinary dialogue with the humanities and social sciences in the search for "epistemological sutures" between reason and passion, capable of responding to the dilemmas and challenges of healthcare work. These three trajectories indicate that the performance of "Quincas" must be understood from his restlessness as a health professional and educator, engaged in the production of knowledge and practices related to the complexity of the phenomenon of life. PMID:26465867

  7. The power of visual memory: the earliest remembered drawing of Alberto Giacometti, Snow White in Her Coffin.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laurie

    2008-04-01

    Since the time of Freud, many psychoanalysts have seen screen memories and earliest memories as reflecting underlying dynamics. I propose that an earliest remembered artwork is a highly condensed construction similar to a screen memory. Alberto Giacometti's earliest remembered drawing, of Snow White in Her Coffin, contains clues to the artist's personality and references to childhood experience. Giacometti's memory of the drawing done in childhood is a striking condensation of significant biographical events and psychodynamic conflicts, as well as a marker of important unconscious fantasies. The artist's postwar sculptural style, utilizing gaunt figures, epitomizes the final transformation of the psychological meaning of his earliest remembered drawing. PMID:18512362

  8. A McOndo Writer's Take on Literature in the Era of Audiovisual and Digital Communication: The Case of Alberto Fuguet's "Las Peliculas de mi vida"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Alberto Fuguet, one of the leaders of the McOndo writers who seek cultural direction from the United States and exploit mass-media formulas, is a polarizing figure in contemporary Latin American culture. His most recent full-length novel, the semi-autobiographical "Las peliculas de mi vida" (2003), has led many to conclude that Fuguet is simply a…

  9. Transborder Library Forum Proceedings = Memorias del Foro Binacional de Bibliotecas (1st, Nogales, Arizona, February 1-2, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Charlene M., Comp.

    At the first Transborder Library Forum in 1991, 132 librarians from the United States and Mexico gathered to get to know one another, discuss issues of common interest, and begin to build an international network. Conference materials are provided in both English and Spanish. Keynote addresses were delivered by Alberto Alvaro Rios and Jesus Lau.…

  10. Water quality of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Ocmulgee river basins related to flooding from Tropical Storm Alberto; pesticides in urban and agricultural watersheds, and nitrate and pesticides in ground water, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hippe, D.J.; Wangsness, D.J.; Frick, E.A.; Garrett, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents preliminary water-quality information from three studies that are part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River basin and the adjacent Ocmulgee River basin. During the period July 3-7, 1994, heavy rainfall from tropical storm Alberto caused record flooding on the Ocmulgee and Flint Rivers and several of their tributaries. Much of the nitrogen load transported during the flooding was as organic nitrogen generally derived from organic detritus, rather than nitrate derived from other sources, such as fertilizer. More than half the mean annual loads of total phosphorus and organic nitrogen were trans- ported in the Flint and Ocmulgee Rivers during the flood. Fourteen herbicides, five insecticides, and one fungicide were detected in floodwaters of the Ocmulgee, Flint, and Apalachicola Rivers. In a second study, water samples were collected at nearly weekly intervals from March 1993 through April 1994 from one urban and two agricultural watersheds in the ACF River basin, and analyzed for 84 commonly used pesticides. More pesticides were detected and at generally higher concentrations in water from the urban watershed than the agricultural water- sheds, and a greater number of pesticides were persistent throughout much of the year in the urban watershed. Simazine exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking-water standards in one of 57 samples from the urban watershed. In a third study, 38 wells were installed in surficial aquifers adjacent to and downgradient of farm fields within agricultural areas in the southern ACF River basin. Even though regional aquifers are generally used for irrigation and domestic- and public-water supplies, degradation of water quality in the surficial aquifers serves as an early warning of potential contamination of regional aquifers. Nitrate concentrations were less than 3 mg/L as N (indicating minimal effect of human activities) in water

  11. A bill for the relief of Jose Alberto Martinez Moreno, Micaela Lopez Martinez, and Adilene Martinez.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-03-18

    03/18/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1895) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. A bill for the relief of Jose Alberto Martinez Moreno, Micaela Lopez Martinez, and Adilene Martinez.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-02

    03/02/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1136) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. [Chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis in the Hospital Alberto Sabogal Sologuren, Lima, Peru: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ormeño J, Alexis; García D, Cesar; Sumire U, Julia; Asato H, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent recessive genetic disorder in the caucasian population and is produced by the alteration of electrolyte and water transport in the epithelial cell membrane. Liver disease is a frequent complication towards the end of the first decade of life, being weird its onset, except in patients with a history of meconium ileus. The characteristic liver injury in CF is focal biliary cirrhosis, but fatty infiltration can also be found. The diagnosis is made considering the clinical, laboratory and imaging results having in consideration that the normal liver function tests do not rule out the disease. Ultrasound is the most widely used and can detect the presence of steatosis, stones, fibrosis, cirrhosis, portal hypertension or abnormalities of the biliary tree. There is an also available technique such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, which allows a morphological study. Important aspects in the treatment are nutritional management, administration of soluble vitamins and the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). In cases of advanced cirrhosis, transplantation, isolated or combined with the lung, is an option to consider, with acceptable survival rates. We report the case of an 11 year old patient with a diagnosis of chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:24108378

  14. Scaling and Exponent Equalities in Island Nucleation: Novel Results and Application to Organic Films Alberto Pimpinelli, Levent Tumbek, and Adolf Winkler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimpinelli, Alberto; Tumbek, Levent; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-03-01

    As discussed in the first talk, the scaling of the island density with the flux F and/or the capture zone distribution (CZD) can be used to determine the size of the critical nucleus i, but so far an analytic function for CZD exists only for diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). For CZD the scaling function is Pβ (s) =aβsβ exp (-bβs2) , with β = i + 2 . We have extended the analytic description of the CZD in terms of Pβ also to attachment-limited aggregation (ALA); in this case we obtain β = (i + 3) / 2 . Furthermore, we could demonstrate that the general relationship αβ = i holds, independent of the aggregation mechanism. This important exponent equality should help to better characterize nucleation and growth of thin films. Work at Graz supported by Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Project No. P 23530.

  15. "I Don't Find Any Privacy around Here": Ethnographic Encounters with Local Practices of Literacy in the State Prison of Oaxaca

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, Angeles; Higgins, Michael James; Sughrua, William Michael

    2011-01-01

    In his poem entitled "Privacy", Alberto, an inmate in the state prison of Oaxaca, Mexico, vividly evokes the conflictive dynamics of space and time within his living quarters. This is his way of dealing with the sadness, trauma, and mundanity of his incarceration. Alberto's poem has emerged from our ongoing ethnographic project based on a creative…

  16. The Self Inside and Out: Authenticity and Disability in "Mar adentro" and "Yo, tambien"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Cordero, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Spanish filmmakers Alejandro Amenabar, Antonio Naharro, and Alvaro Pastor have recently focused on disability and personal identity by presenting the disabled subject in the foreground and by posing an array of ethical questions. This essay explores representations of disability as they appear in "Mar adentro" and "Yo, tambien"…

  17. Expresiones locativas modificadoras de sustantivo (Locative Expressions Modifying Nouns).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonder, John P.

    1979-01-01

    Elaborates on and updates the article "Derived Noun Phrases in Spanish Containing Locatives" by John P. Wonder and Alberto Eraso Guerrero (1976). Gives a detailed description of the uses of "ser" and "haber" in the locative expression. (NCR)

  18. Desert Voices: Southwestern Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polette, Keith

    1997-01-01

    Examines three books with different ways of writing about the desert. Discusses: "Here Is the Southwestern Desert" by Madeline Dunphy, "The Desert Is My Mother" by Pat Mora, and "The Desert Mermaid" by Alberto Blanco. (PA)

  19. Weighing Evidence from Mendelian Randomization-Early-Life Obesity as a Causal Factor in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2016-06-01

    In this Perspective, Alberto Ascherio and Kassandra Munger discuss the implications of Richards and colleagues' study exploring the role of early-life obesity in risk of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27351631

  20. On the Grammar of Silence: The Structure of My Undocumented Immigrant Writer's Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In this reflective essay, Alberto Ledesma explores how being undocumented can produce a particular form of writer's block. He argues that there is a pattern of predictable silences and obfuscations inherent in all undocumented immigrant autobiographies that cannot be easily negotiated when undocumented students are asked to write about "their…

  1. What's Black and White and Re-Tweeted All Over? Teaching News Literacy in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loth, Renee

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation placed a major bet on State University of New York at Stony Brook: $1.7-million to enroll 10,000 students in its news-literacy curriculum over five years. Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the foundation, expected the course to foster "a group of students who would simply graduate…

  2. IRT Model Fit Evaluation from Theory to Practice: Progress and Some Unanswered Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Monroe, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, the authors congratulate Professor Alberto Maydeu-Olivares on his article [EJ1023617: "Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models, Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives," this issue] as it provides a much needed overview on the mathematical underpinnings of the theory behind the…

  3. People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    INTERVIEW Interview: How Google conquered the sky Carol Christian and Alberto Conti work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (the home of Hubble) in Baltimore and co-created Sky in Google Earth. David Smith spoke to them between stage appearances at Astrofest

  4. Science, Science Education and Their Discontents: A Response to Commentaries on the Paper, "Portrait of a Science Teacher as a Bricoleur--A Case Study from India"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    In this response to commentaries by Ali Sammel, Jhumki Basu and Alberto Rodriguez, I present my perspective on three important issues raised by the commentators. These issues relate to the role of a researcher in her field settings and society, the critique of science and science education as oppressive dominant discourses, and co-opting…

  5. "Tango Feroz": Teaching a History of Politics and Economics of Argentina through Sex, Drugs, and Rock and Roll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Eva Karene

    2015-01-01

    This article directly resulted from the teacher/researcher experience, describing new analyses resulting from subtitling a film for curriculum incorporation: "Tango feroz, la leyenda de Tanguito" (1993). Set in Argentina in the sixties and loosely based on the life of José Alberto Iglesias Correa, also known as Tanguito, this film…

  6. Nonfiction Film Theory and Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsam, Richard Meran, Ed.

    This anthology offers significant writings on the subject of nonfiction film, with emphasis primarily on British and American films and film makers (although the work of Alberto Cavalcanti, Leni Riefenstahl, and Joris Ivens is also represented). The first section of the book offers essays that examine and define the essential nature and idea of…

  7. Effects of Text-to-Speech Software on the Reading Rate and Comprehension Skills of High School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Amanda; Boon, Richard T.; Keller-Bell, Yolanda; Stagliano, Christina; Jeffs, Tara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a text-to-speech software program known as "Read Please" on the reading rate and reading comprehension accuracy of two high school students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) in reading. A single-subject A-B-A-B "withdrawal" research design (Alberto & Troutman, 2009) was used to…

  8. Comparative Perspectives on the Academic Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.

    Essays include: gentlemen and players, the changing British professoriate (Gareth Williams); the robed baron, the academic profession in the Italian university (Guido Martinotti, Alberto Giasanti); the changing role of the Japanese professor (William K. Cummings, Ikuo Amano); academic staff and academic drift in Australian colleges of advanced…

  9. Proceedings of the First Inter-American Conference on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troike, Rudolph C., Ed.; Modiano, Nancy, Ed.

    The conference papers presented here are grouped under the six topics around which the conference was organized. The section on program goals and models for bilingual education contains papers by Joshua Fishman, Salomon Nahmad, John C. Molina, Alberto Escobar, G. Kent Gooderham, and Dillon Platero. The section on teaching the second language…

  10. 78 FR 68151 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... BAUREITHEL KARL HERBERT BEECHING SUSAN MARIE BENNETT SUSAN JANE BERAHA ALBERTO BERAHA BELLA CAROLINA BERAHA... KRASTEL-NICHOLS HELGA IRMA KREISELMEYER MARTHA MARIA KRUSELL PETER KARL KUBLIN JOYCE ARLENE KUSTER JANINE... TAN YANQIANG TANAKA RYO TANG MARX THERN EDINA RITTER THERN JR ROBERT WILLIAM TIEN LAUREN TSAK...

  11. Globalizations and Education: Collected Essays on Class, Race, Gender, and the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Spanning an extraordinary 30-year career, this book collects seminal essays by critical theorist Carlos Alberto Torres. Torres is among the foremost scholars devoted to interpreting the work of Paulo Freire and has done much over the years to raise the visibility of Freire's contribution to educational theory. In addition, he has helped to…

  12. 76 FR 28080 - United States v. Unilever N.V., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... research, development, production, marketing, servicing, distribution, or sale of the Alberto VO5 and Rave... firm's value shampoo and conditioner as their next best choice. Consequently, a significant fraction of... firm's brands of hairspray as their next best choice. Consequently, a significant fraction of the...

  13. Report on Virginia Tech Shootings Urges Clarification of Privacy Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Educators, mental-health officials, and law-enforcement officers often do not share information about troubled students because they are confused by what they can disclose under complex and overlapping privacy laws, according to a report on the Virginia Tech shootings. Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales and two other Bush cabinet secretaries…

  14. What exactly did you claim?

    PubMed

    Häyry, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Philosophers should express their ideas clearly. They should do this in any field of specialization, but especially when they address issues of practical consequence, as they do in bioethics. This article dissects a recent and much-debated contribution to philosophical bioethics by Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva, examines how exactly it fails to meet the requirement of clarity, and maps a way forward by outlining the ways in which philosophical argumentation could validly and soundly proceed in bioethics. PMID:25473863

  15. Division III: Commission 15: Physical Studies of Comets and Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Gil-Hutton, Ricardo; Cellino, Alberto; Hestroffer, Daniel; Belskaya, Irina N.; Davidsson, Björn J. R.; Dotto, Elisabetta; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Hestroffer, Daniel; Kawakita, Hideyo; Mothe-Diniz, Thais; Licandro, Javier; Wooden, Diane H.; Yano, Hajime

    2015-08-01

    The business meeting of IAU Commission 15 (C15) took place in Beijing on 29 August 2012, from 14:00 to 18:00, in room 405 of the China National Convention Center. This report of the business meeting of Commission 15 at the 2012 IAU GA is based on the report provided by Alberto Cellino, past president, and on the minutes taken by Daniel Hestroffer, secretary of Commission 15 in the triennium 2009 to 2012, and current secretary.

  16. The moral status of babies.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    In their controversial paper 'After-birth abortion', Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva argue that there is no rational basis for allowing abortion but prohibiting infanticide ('after-birth abortion'). We ought in all consistency either to allow both or prohibit both. This paper rejects their claim, arguing that much-neglected considerations in philosophical discussions of this issue are capable of explaining why we currently permit abortion in some circumstances, while prohibiting infanticide. PMID:23637450

  17. Prospecting with neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    One of the latest attempts to explore the interface between physics and geophysics is the extravagant scheme of Alvaro De Rújula, Sheldon Glashow, Robert Wilson, and Georges Charpak, to be published in Physics Reports. In what these theoretical and experimental physicists described recently as “our mad project” (Physics Today, August 1983), a high-energy neutrino beam is to be used as a geophysical prospecting tool.The beam would be able to look for oil, natural gas, and high-atomic-number metal ores, and it would be able to profile the vertical density distribution of the earth. De Rújula et al. come to this project from the world of big physics machines, so it is natural to expect that the “Geotron,” the field instrument to supply and focus the neutrino beam, is to be big also.

  18. Some Thoughts About Thinking.

    PubMed

    Manguel, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    In this first-person case history, the writer Alberto Manguel chronicles the experience of losing his ability to write and speak during a stroke. He was reassured somewhat by his continued ability to read and to quote mentally from literature that he had memorized. Within hours after the stroke, he regained the ability to write. He remained unable to speak for a month. In this essay he ponders eloquently the relationship between thought and language, and describes how it felt not to be able to bridge the gap between thought and speech during his period of aphasia. PMID:26102993

  19. Peru privatizes

    SciTech Connect

    Suttil, K.R.

    1993-02-01

    Peru has been undergoing a revolution since the election of Alberto Fujimori as president in 1990. A revolution that is reversing many of the policies of the past 25 years and one which aims to bring Peru back into the mainstream of the world economy. All the enterprises nationalized in the heady days of the early 1970s are set up for privatization. The most important are the three mining companies: Hierro-Peru, Centromin, and Mineroo-Peru. It will not be easy to attract foreign investment after such a long period of political and economic instability but the rewards are there for the intrepid.

  20. The place of the unknown in the Medical Humanities.

    PubMed

    Lambrichs, Louise L; Marazia, Chantal; Montiel, Luis

    2012-12-31

    In the birth and development of the Medical Humanities, literature has played a crucial role, both as an educational resource and as an analytical device. This article proposes an appraisal of this approach by focussing on a model literary situation. Taking the move from Alberto Barrera Tyszka's novel La enfermedad [The illness], the authors identify and explore some of the "places of ignorance" that can emerge in the doctor-patient relationship, as potentially in any form of intersubjective encounter. The analysis aims at highlighting the constructive potential of such spaces of not knowing as a positive element to deal with, rather than a mere limitation of our power of intervention. PMID:23347415

  1. Self-assembly of nanoparticles on the surface of ionic crystals: Structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, K.; Murugesan, M.; Forshaw, M.; Cunningham, D.; Martinez-Albertos, J.-L.; Moore, B. D.

    2007-07-01

    With a suitable combination of ligand-stabilised nanoparticle suspension and ionic salt solutions, it is possible to produce microcrystals that are coated with nanoparticles. The self-assembly process of coating microcrystals by gold nanoparticles (NP) is mediated by the crystal lattice. This is the so-called CLAMS process - a generic process for self-organisation of nanoparticles on the surface of crystals [M. Murugeshan, D. Cunningham, J.-L. Martnez-Albertos, R. Vrcelj, B.D. Moore, Chem. Commun. (2005) 2677]. We are exploring here the structural properties of these self-assembled structures by using different imaging techniques.

  2. Elastic geobarometry and the role of brittle failure on pressure release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Rustioni, Greta; Milani, Sula; Nimis, Paolo; Chiara Domeneghetti, Maria; Marone, Federica; Harris, Jeff W.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    results show that crack intensity increases with increase in inclusion size. In addition, the residual pressure decreases with increasing inclusion volume (i.e. with increasing brittle deformation). However, the actual release in pressure can only be estimated knowing the composition and thus the exact equation of state of the infillings of the cracks. This work is supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to Fabrizio Nestola and by the MIUR-SIR grant "MILE DEEp" (RBSI140351) to M. Alvaro. References Angel, R.J., Mazzucchelli, M.L., Alvaro, M., Nimis, P., and Nestola, F. (2014) Am Mineral, 99, 2146-2149 Angel R.J., Nimis P., Mazzucchelli M. L., Alvaro M., Nestola F., (2015) J. Metamorph. Geol. 33, 801-813.

  3. Single inclusion piezobarometry confirms high-temperature decompression path for Variscan granulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Ross; Alvaro, Matteo; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nimis, Paolo; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    temperatures. The extension of single inclusion piezobarometry to elastically anisotropic minerals will allow quantitative analysis of diamonds trapped in other minerals such as kyanite. This work was supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to Fabrizio Nestola and by the MIUR-SIR grant "MILE DEEp" (RBSI140351) to M. Alvaro. Angel R.J., Mazzucchelli M.L., Alvaro M., Nimis P. & Nestola F. (2014) Geobarometry from host-inclusion systems: the role of elastic relaxation. Am. Mineral., 99, 2146-2149. Angel R.J., Nimis P., Mazzucchelli M.L., Alvaro M. & Nestola F. (2015) How large are departures from lithostatic pressure? Constraints from host-inclusion elasticity. J. Metamorphic Geol., 33, 801-813. Kotková J, O'Brien P.J & Ziemann M.A. (2011)Diamond and coesite discovered in Saxony-type granulite: Solution to the Variscan garnet peridotite enigma. Geology, 39, 667-670.

  4. Into the Eye of the Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    MISR acquired this stereoimage of Hurricane Alberto on August 19, 2000 during Terra orbit 3571. At this time, the storm was located in the North Atlantic Ocean, about 1700 kilometers west of the Azores. According to the National Weather Service, Alberto was increasing in intensity and exhibiting maximum sustained winds of about 165 kilometers per hour.

    This stereo 'anaglyph' image was generated using MISR's vertical (nadir)camera plus the 26-degree forward-viewing camera. It is oriented so that the spacecraft's flight path is from left to right. North is at the left. To view the image in 3-D, use red/blue glasses with the red filter over your left eye.

    Near the center of the storm, the 'eye' measures about 60 kilometers in diameter. The steep eye wall, where surface winds reach their peak intensity, is very apparent. Convective thunderclouds are present in the storm's spiral arms, and their three-dimensional structure is visible in this stereo view.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

    For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  5. One Typhoon and Two Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The powerful super Typhoon Bilis hit Taiwan with 161 mph (260 kmh) winds on August 22, 2000. At times, the winds were strong enough to shake concrete buildings. In addition to the wind, heavy rains may bring flooding and mudslides to the island. Mudslides particularly threaten areas hit by 1999's powerful earthquake. This image (above) shows Bilis as the outer arms of the storm swept over Taiwan near noon local time on August 22, 2000. The true color image was captured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Meanwhile, in the Atlantic ... On the other side of the globe there were two relatively small hurricanes. Hurricane Alberto sat in the center of the North Atlantic, hanging on in its third week of life. Hurricane Debby was approaching Puerto Rico with sustained winds of only 75 mph (120 kph). NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) acquired this image (below) of the Western Hemisphere, showing both Alberto and Debby, at 2:30 PM EDT August 22, 2000. Typhoon Bilis provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. GOES imagery courtesy GOES Project Science Office, NASA GSFC.

  6. Adolescents’ Attitudes toward Anti-marijuana Ads, Usage Intentions, and Actual Marijuana Usage

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Eusebio M.; Crano, William D.; Siegel, Jason T.; Hohman, Zachary; Johnson, Ian; Nakawaki, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The association of adolescents’ appraisals of the anti-marijuana television ads used in the National Youth Anti-drug Media Campaign with future marijuana use was investigated. The 12 to 18 year old respondents (N = 2993) were first classified as users, resolute nonusers, or vulnerable nonusers (Crano, Siegel, Alvaro, Lac, & Hemovich, 2008). Usage status and the covariates of gender, age, and attitudes toward marijuana were used to predict attitudes toward the ads (Aad) in the first phase of a multi-level linear analysis. All covariates were significantly associated with Aad, as was usage status: resolute nonusers evaluated the ads significantly more positively than vulnerable nonusers and users (all p < .001), who did not differ. In the second phase, the covariates along with Aad and respondents’ usage status predicted intentions and actual usage one year after initial measurement. The lagged analysis disclosed negative associations between Aad and usage intentions, and between Aad and actual marijuana use (both p < .05); however, this association held only for users (p < .01), not vulnerable or resolute nonusers. Users reporting more positive attitudes towards the ads were less likely to report intention to use marijuana and to continue marijuana use at 1-year follow-up. These findings may inform designers of persuasion-based prevention campaigns, guiding pre-implementation efforts in the design of ads that targeted groups find appealing and thus, influential. PMID:23528197

  7. Security for whom? Stabilisation and civilian protection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Elhawary, Samir

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on three periods of stabilisation in Colombia: the Alliance for Progress (1961-73) that sought to stem the threat of communist revolution in Latin America; Plan Colombia and President Alvaro Uribe's 'democratic security' policy (2000-07) aimed at defeating the guerrillas and negotiating a settlement with the paramilitaries; and the current 'integrated approach', adopted from 2007, to consolidate more effectively the state's control of its territory.(1) The paper assesses the extent to which these stabilisation efforts have enhanced the protection of civilians and ultimately finds that in all three periods there has been a disconnect between the discourse and the practice of stabilisation. While they have all sought to enhance security, in actual fact, they have privileged the security of the state and its allies at the expense of the effective protection of the civilian population. This has not only led to widespread human rights abuses but also has undermined the long-term stability being pursued. PMID:20846351

  8. [History of Instituto Nacional de Salud Ocupacional del Peru].

    PubMed

    Cossio-Brazzan, Juan M

    2012-06-01

    In Peru, the industry's development has made economic improvements but at the same time, it has had a major impact on the health of the workers; for that reason, it was necessary to generate control mechanisms. So, in 1940 it was created the Departmento de Higiene Industrial, which in 1956 was changed to Instituto de Salud Ocupacional, but it was deactivated in 1994. However, in 2001 it reappeared into the Ministerio de Salud organizational structure with the name of Instituto de Salud Ocupacional "Alberto Hurtado Abadía". Actually, it is the Centro Nacional de Salud Ocupacional y Protección del Ambiente para la Salud (CENSOPAS), organ of the Instituto Nacional de Salud which continues working in synergy with other institutions and sectors, making research to protect the health of exposed persons (workers and community) to contamination and risks associated with economic activities. PMID:22858781

  9. Peru action simmering despite privatization delays

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-07

    After months of delays, the sale of Petroleos del Peru SA (Petroperu) was postponed earlier this year until after the elections, which saw Peru`s incumbent President Alberto Fujimori reelected. In June, Fujimori appointed Amado Yataco Minister of Energy and Mines. Yataco, also serving as president of the privatization commission Copri, said a decision on the sale of Petroperu would be made quickly, perhaps by July 28, ahead of this report`s presstime. The uncertain status of Petroperu has not, however, slowed activity in Peru`s petroleum sector. The paper first discusses privatization plans and Petroperu`s budget, then describes exploration and development activities in the supergiant Camisea gas/condensate fields in the central southern jungle. Activities in several smaller fields are briefly described.

  10. COMMITTEES: Proceedings of the 13th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW13), San Juan, Puerto Rico, 19-22 January 2009 Proceedings of the 13th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW13), San Juan, Puerto Rico, 19-22 January 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Bruce Allen, AEI, Germany Patrick Brady, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA Deepto Chakrabarty, MIT, USA Eugenio Coccia, INFN, Gran Sasso, Italy James Cordes, Cornell University, USA Mario Díaz (Chair), University of Texas Brownsville, USA Sam Finn, Penn State, USA Neil Gehrels, NASA GSFC, USA Fredrick A Jenet, University of Texas Brownsville, USA Nobuyuki Kanda, Osaka City University, Japan Erik Katsavounides, MIT, USA Dick Manchester, ATNF, Australia Soumya Mohanty, University of Texas Brownsville, USA Benoit Mours, LAPP-Annecy, France Maria Alessandra Papa, AEI, Germany Kate Scholberg, Duke University, USA Susan Scott, The Australian National University Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham, UK Andrea Vicere, INFN - Sezione di Firenze, Italy Stan Whitcomb, LIGO CALTECH, USA Local Organising Committee (LOC) Paulo Freire (Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico) Murray Lewis (Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico) Wanda Wiley (University of Texas Brownsville, USA)

  11. Peru struggles to maintain crude production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Revival of Peru's moribund oil and gas industry in the 1990s hinges on whether the new administration of President Alberto Fujimori is successful in attracting foreign investment in Peru. Fujimori's success would mean Peru pushing ahead into stepped up exploration and major development projects, such as the huge Camisea gas/condensate field discovered 2 years ago. His failure could mean Peru continuing to fall further behind in its already lagging low oil production. Huge sums of money will be needed. Peru also needs to succeed in its efforts to become creditworthy again for international agencies, foreign governments, and commercial banks. Meanwhile, Petroleos del Peru SA (Petroperu), the state oil company, will have to transfer an increasing share of its operations to private investors. But the company is likely to try to hold onto producing fields, even though it is unable to maintain full output.

  12. Reduced food intake after exposure to subtle weight-related cues.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas A; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This research investigated the influence of weight-related cues on food intake. The first study used a screensaver showing three of the famous skinny human-like sculptures by Alberto Giacometti and found that participants in this condition consumed less chocolate than when they were exposed to a more neutral work of art. In the second study, participants had to indicate their body weight either before or after the tasting. Reporting their weight before the tasting resulted in reduced food intake. A gender effect was found for the second but not the first study. We suggest that the cues in the two studies might have been processed with different levels of awareness, which might explain the gender effect found in the second study. PMID:22425649

  13. Disembodiment and Identity in Literary Depictions of Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaccarella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the often perplexing experience of being an epilepsy surgery candidate, as portrayed in four book-length accounts: Laura Doermer's Moritz mein Sohn (Moritz my son, 1990), David B.'s L'ascension du haut mal (The ascent of the high evil, 1996; published in English as Epileptic, 2003), Ray Robinson's Electricity (2006), and Alberto Capitta's Il giardino non esiste (The garden doesn't exist, 2009). Building upon critical disability studies and the work of French poststructuralists Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, I analyze issues of embodiment, identity and narrative (re)construction in the postsurgical alleviation of chronic illness. I argue that these texts highlight the inevitable disruption of self that brain surgery entails and ultimately resist biomedical normativization. They also call for a narratological reconsideration of current illness narrative typologies, among which Arthur Frank's "chaos narrative" emerges as the best suited to accommodate the chronic fragmentation of consciousness and voice in epilepsy. PMID:26095838

  14. Effects of the Georgia flood of `94 on Lake Blackshear Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, R.C.; Northrop, J.H.; Crisp, R.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Tropical Storm Alberto produced record rainfall in central Georgia in early July, 1994. The area drains into Lake Blackshear, formed in the Flint River by Lake Blackshear Dam. The level of the lake rose 3.5 m (11.5 ft) above normal and caused the worst flooding of the area in recorded history. The north embankment of the dam was overtopped, causing a 215 m (700 ft) breach. Prior to the breach, a few concentrated boils were observed in the tailwater downstream of the non-breached portion of the dam. This portion remained intact through the flood, but the presence of the boils raised questions regarding its integrity. The effects of the flood on the north embankment are discussed, as well as the geotechnical investigation conducted to assess subsurface conditions at the breach and intact portions and the plan for remediation.

  15. Lessons from the Georgia floods.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, J J; Hagebak, B R; Sirmons, J G; Brennan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, tropical storm Alberto brought heavy rains to parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. In South Georgia, rivers rose 44 feet above flood stage, muddy water covered 10,000 square miles, and 31 lives were lost. In implementing the Health and Medical Services portion of the FEMA Federal Response Plan, the Public Health Service learned lessons from this experience that can be applied to planning for other natural disasters. Continuous reassessment to assure the best utilization of resources in rapidly changing conditions, cross-training in the content of emergency plans at all levels, and on-going face-to-face liaison among response managers will improve response efforts. Populations with special medical needs must become part of any response design. The effects that any response activity may have on the community as a whole should be carefully considered before action is taken. Images p685-a p687-a PMID:8570818

  16. Unlike Thailand, RP can't adopt local condom use policy.

    PubMed

    Department of Health Secretary Alberto Romualdez has declared that the Philippines would not be able to adopt a local condom use policy similar to that of Thailand. The policy has greatly reduced the number of STD cases in Thailand from 6.5/1000 in 1989 to 0.49/1000 in 1996 and has imposed a 95% rate of condom use in sex establishments. Secretary Romualdez said that the condom policy could not be applied in the Philippines because, unlike Thailand, the sex trade is illegal in the Philippines; thus its government would not be able to impose the condom use policy on its sex workers. He announced that the DOH, however, continued to support programs to protect persons engaged in unprotected sex and that he believed that condoms were still the best STD prevention devices. PMID:12349214

  17. Worldwide Assessment of the Status of Seismic Zonation, Fourth International Forum on Seismic Zonation, Proceedings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, W.W.

    1994-01-01

    Italy/Appendix D). 2. United States Geological Survey, 1992, The Worldwide Earthquake Risk Management (WWERM) Program, Reston, Virginia, 19 p (Paul Thenhaus or S.T. Algermissen - USA/ Appendix D). 3. Instituto Panamericano de Geografia Historia, 1992, Revista Geofisica, Lima, Peru, No. 37, July-December, 234 p (Alberto Giesecke- Peru/Appendix D). 4. Annali di Geofisica, 1992, Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP) (Special Issue), International Lithosphere Program, Publication 209, Bologna, Italy, 257 p (Domenico Giardini-Italy/Appendix F). 5. International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior and European Seismological Commission, 1993, The Practice of Hazard Assessment, Golden, Colorado, 284 p (Write Bob Engdahl, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Mail Stop 967, Denver, Colorado 80225, USA).

  18. ['Negative' eugenics, psychiatry, and Catholicism: clashes over eugenic sterilization in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Wegner, Robert; Souza, Vanderlei Sebastião de

    2013-03-01

    The article analyzes the dialogue between eugenicist Renato Kehl and a group of Brazilian psychiatrists who turned their interest to so-called negative eugenics in the early 1930s. Enthused about research into eugenics and the application of eugenic methods in countries such as the United States and Germany, authors like Ernani Lopes, Ignácio da Cunha Lopes, Alberto Farani, and Antonio Carlos Pacheco e Silva blamed Catholicism for impeding Brazil from moving in a similar direction, especially the church's resistance to the sterilization of 'degenerates', which entered into effect in Germany in 1934. The article charts the various strategies these authors proposed for engaging in dialogue with the Catholic Church. PMID:23429742

  19. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  20. LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Tom Abel, Stanford University Odylio Aguiar, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Tal Alexander, Wizemann Institute Peter Bender, University of Colorado Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Robert Byer, Stanford University Manuela Campanelli, University of Texas Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Neil Cornish, Montana State University Michael Cruise, University of Birmingham Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Karsten Danzmann, University of Hannover Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Gerhard Heinzel, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik Craig Hogan, University of Washington Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Scott Hughes, MIT Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Alberto Lobo, ICE-CSIC and IEEC Avi Loeb, Harvard University Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Peter Michelson, Stanford University Guido Mueller, University of Florida Sterl Phinney, Caltech Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Ke-Xun Sun, Stanford University Kip Thorne, Caltech Michele Vallisneri, NASA/JPL Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Rai Weiss, MIT Nick White, NASA/Goddard Local Organising Committee (LOC) Sasha Buchman (Stanford University) Robert Byer (Stanford University) Sara Charbonneau-Lefort (Stanford University) Nancy Christianson (Stanford University) John Conklin (Stanford University) Dan DeBra (Stanford University) Jan Goebel (Stanford University) Vivian Drew (Stanford University) Ke-Xun Sun (Stanford University) Lucy Zhou (Stanford University) Andrea Zoellner (Stanford University)

  1. 3D Immersive Visualization: An Educational Tool in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Campos, N.; Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Juárez-Casas, M.; Castrejón-Pineda, R.

    2007-05-01

    3D immersive visualization is an innovative tool currently used in various disciplines, such as medicine, architecture, engineering, video games, etc. Recently, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) mounted a visualization theater (Ixtli) with leading edge technology, for academic and research purposes that require immersive 3D tools for a better understanding of the concepts involved. The Division of Engineering in Earth Sciences of the School of Engineering, UNAM, is running a project focused on visualization of geoscience data. Its objective is to incoporate educational material in geoscience courses in order to support and to improve the teaching-learning process, especially in well-known difficult topics for students. As part of the project, proffessors and students are trained in visualization techniques, then their data are adapted and visualized in Ixtli as part of a class or a seminar, where all the attendants can interact, not only among each other but also with the object under study. As part of our results, we present specific examples used in basic geophysics courses, such as interpreted seismic cubes, seismic-wave propagation models, and structural models from bathymetric, gravimetric and seismological data; as well as examples from ongoing applied projects, such as a modeled SH upward wave, the occurrence of an earthquake cluster in 1999 in the Popocatepetl volcano, and a risk atlas from Delegación Alvaro Obregón in Mexico City. All these examples, plus those to come, constitute a library for students and professors willing to explore another dimension of the teaching-learning process. Furthermore, this experience can be enhaced by rich discussions and interactions by videoconferences with other universities and researchers.

  2. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1930, Alberto Sirlin studied at the University of Buenos Aires from 1948-52, where he carried out research work in classical nonlinear physics, under the guidance of Richard Gans, and in 1953 received the degree of doctor in Physical-Mathematical Sciences. In 1953 he held a fellowship at the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he did research work and attended some graduate courses, including a memorable and highly influential one taught by Richard Feynman. He spent the academic year 1954-55 at UCLA, where he initiated his work on electroweak physics in collaboration with Robert Finkelstein and Ralph Behrends. His next move was to Cornell University in 1955, earning his PhD there in 1958 for research in electroweak physics in collaboration with Toichiro Kinoshita. Sirlin spent 1957-59 as a research associate at Columbia University, becoming an Assistant Professor of Physics at New York University in 1959, an Associate Professor in 1961, and a full Professor in 1968. It is a remarkable coincidence that one of his fellow post-docs, Steven Weinberg, was to become one of the founders of the Standard Model, which in turn has provided the natural setting for Sirlin's work. During his formative years, he was extremely fortunate to receive guidance and advice from an extraordinary group of distinguished scientists, including R Gans, R P Feynman, R J Finkelstein, H A Bethe and E E Salpeter. He also enjoyed close and fruitful long-term collaborations with a number of brilliant theorists, including R E Behrends, T Kinoshita, T D Lee, M A B Beg, W J Marciano, P Langacker, G Degrassi, P Gambino and B A Kniehl, and has had fourteen excellent, interesting, and highly enterprising graduate students, who have remained close friends. Sirlin's main research interests have been in precision electroweak physics, other topics in weak interaction theory, the search for higher symmetries of the strong interactions

  3. Formation of African Easterly Waves and Mesoscale Convective Systems over Eastern Africa and its Implication to Tropical Cyclogenesis over Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang

    2009-07-01

    The formation of African easterly waves and mesoscale convective systems in eastern North Africa and its impacts on the tropical cyclogenesis over the eastern Atlantic Ocean is studied. Based on numerical simulations, AEWs can be produced by vortex shedding from the EH. The lee vortex is generated mainly by the blocking of the EH and helped by the horizontal shear associated with the northeasterly wind and the jet passing through the Turkana channel. The MCS was originated from the moist convection over the EH triggered by diurnal sensible heating. When the MCS moved to the lee of the mountain, it merged with the lee vortex of the AEW train and formed the coupled AEW-MCS system. Numerical simulations of a regional climate model indicate that the simulated fields do possess the AEW characteristics and the convection was generated over the EH, and the pre-Alberto AEW-MCS system was generated near the lee of the EH. Finer-resolution numerical simulations demonstrate that the vortex generated on the lee and MCS over the mountain eventually merge and become an AEW-MCS system which might serve as a precursor of tropical cyclone.

  4. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Josefa Ros

    2015-11-01

    Alberto Fragio is currently one of the major experts on Hans Blumenberg's work and thought. In recent years he has become a great interpreter of Blumenberg's posthumous publications and his Nachlaβ at the Deutsche Literatur-Archiv Marbach (DLA Marbach). Since he acquired his doctoral degree in 2007, Fragio has devoted much of his efforts to clarifying Blumenberg's convoluted philosophical corpus, whose understanding - as is known - is really demanding for anyone who ventures into its disclosure, and it requires a monumental exercise of patience. Fragio has published far more than a dozen academic articles and three monographs, all of them generally pointing to the existence of a holistic nature in the philosophical work to which Blumenberg devoted a lifetime. Although his research project was on Blumenberg's History and Philosophy of Science, his joint publication with Giordano Bruno, Hans Blumenberg, Nuovi paradigmi d'analisi(2010), and the publication of what is the first enquiry into Blumenberg's History of Astronomy, Destrucción, cosmos, metáfora. Ensayos sobre HansBlumenberg (2010),

  5. The earliest mollusc dominated seep fauna from the Early Jurassic of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaim, Andrzej; Jenkins, Robert; Parent, Horacio; Garrido, Alberto; Moriya, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-01

    The earliest mollusc dominated seep fauna from the Early Jurassic of Argentina Andrzej Kaim, Robert G. Jenkins, Horacio Parent, Alberto C. Garrido The hydrocarbon seep deposits are known from Early Jurassic of Argentina since the report of Gomez-Perez (2003). The latter author identified very negative δ13C values (down to -33) and several fabrics typical for seep carbonates. Nevertheless she identified no macrofaunal assemblages apart from worm tubes. We re-visited the locality of Gomez-Perez (named here La Elina) and we were able to collect several molluscs associated with the seep carbonate. The most common and diversified are molluscs and worm tubes. We identified at least three species of gastropods, including the oldest-known species of neomphalids, lucinid and protobranch bivalves and numerous ammonoids. Unlike another known Early Jurassic seep from Oregon and the only Late Triassic seep (also from Oregon) there are no brachiopods associated with this seep. Therefore we consider the seep at La Elina as the oldest seep of modern aspect where the fauna is dominated by molluscs and not brachiopods.

  6. Spotlight on Peru.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Lima's population grew from 1 million to 7 million during 1969-89, almost entirely due to rural-urban immigration. Other urban areas such as Iquitos experienced similar growth over the period. National, regional, and municipal governments have been working to restore civil order in the country and to bring basic health, sanitation, and education programs to the population. However, language, attitudinal, and cultural differences impede progress in this diverse and changing country. Peru's young population of median age 21 years presents a challenge to the development and implementation of effective reproductive health care programs for the country. Pathfinder's work in Peru is helped by current President Alberto Fujimori's strong and active support for family planning. In the face of strong opposition from the Roman Catholic Church, President Fujimori has held onto his conviction and commitment to reduce levels of maternal morbidity and mortality in Peru by increasing the accessibility of family planning programs. Pathfinder's work in Peru with the US Agency for International Development (USAID) includes the 5-year program Project 2000 designed to improve maternal and child health in 12 priority regions of the country. Pathfinder is also working with USAID to link family planning to postpartum services in 30 public hospitals throughout the country. New programs will be launched with contributions from individuals and foundations. PMID:12179686

  7. Identification of rain-freshened plumes in the coastal ocean using Ra isotopes and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Willard S.; Kjerfve, BjöRn; Todd, James F.

    1998-04-01

    Two transient plumes of freshened water in the South Atlantic Bight off the coast of South Carolina were measured and mapped during a continental shelf cruise in July 1994. Salinity in the plumes was depressed 1-2 parts per thousand compared to surrounding shelf waters. One plume was at least 160 km long, 20 km wide, and 5-7 m deep. The other was 75 km long, 25 km wide and 5-7 m deep. Both plumes disintegrated almost completely in 6 days due to mixing or advection away from the sampling area. Measurement and analysis of short-lived Ra isotopes and Si indicated that the plumes were not caused by river discharge but were rather due to an intense rain event a few days prior to the sampling cruise. With only salinity measurements we would have incorrectly concluded that the freshened water was a result of river plumes having entered the shelf. The rain was associated with the system that spawned tropical storm Alberto. We estimate that 220-330 mm of rain fell on the coastal ocean immediately before the cruise. Accompanying the rain were pesticides and nutrients. We estimate that the flux of nitrate from the rain was twice the riverine flux of nitrate to the study area in the month preceding the cruise.

  8. High Sensitivity Gravity Measurements in the Adverse Environment of Oil Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfutzner, Harold

    2014-03-01

    Bulk density is a primary measurement within oil and gas reservoirs and is the basis of most reserves calculations by oil companies. The measurement is performed with a gamma-ray source and two scintillation gamma-ray detectors from within newly drilled exploration and production wells. This nuclear density measurement, while very precise is also very shallow and is therefore susceptible to errors due to any alteration of the formation and fluids in the vicinity of the borehole caused by the drilling process. Measuring acceleration due to gravity along a well provides a direct measure of bulk density with a very large depth of investigation that makes it practically immune to errors from near-borehole effects. Advances in gravity sensors and associated mechanics and electronics provide an opportunity for routine borehole gravity measurements with comparable density precision to the nuclear density measurement and with sufficient ruggedness to survive the rough handling and high temperatures experienced in oil well logging. We will describe a borehole gravity meter and its use under very realistic conditions in an oil well in Saudi Arabia. The density measurements will be presented. Alberto Marsala (2), Paul Wanjau (1), Olivier Moyal (1), and Justin Mlcak (1); (1) Schlumberger, (2) Saudi Aramco.

  9. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  10. Science education as a pathway to teaching language literacy: a critical book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Sara

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, I present a critical review of the recent book, Science Education as a Pathway to Teaching Language Literacy, edited by Alberto J. Rodriguez. This volume is a timely collection of essays in which the authors bring to attention both the successes and challenges of integrating science instruction with literacy instruction (and vice versa). Although several themes in the book merit further attention, a central unifying issue throughout all of the chapters is the task of designing instruction which (1) gives students access to the dominant Discourses in science and literacy, (2) builds on students' lived experiences, and (3) connects new material to socially and culturally relevant contexts in both science and literacy instruction— all within the high stakes testing realities of teachers and students in public schools. In this review, I illustrate how the authors of these essays effectively address this formidable challenge through research that `ascends to the concrete'. I also discuss where we could build on the work of the authors to integrate literacy and science instruction with the purpose of `humanizing and democratizing' science education in K-12 classrooms.

  11. KSC-05PD-0123

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott (upper right), with United Space Alliance, fits the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel on orbiter Discoverys left wing. Helping to support the panel underneath is Alberto DeLoucas, also with United Space Alliance. The leading edges of each of an orbiters wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.

  12. KSC-05PD-0122

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott (upper right), with United Space Alliance, fits the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel on orbiter Discoverys left wing. Helping to support the panel underneath are Alberto DeLoucas (left) and Mel Romans, with United Space Alliance. The leading edges of each of an orbiters wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.

  13. Short History of Malaria and Its Eradication in Italy With Short Notes on the Fight Against the Infection in the Mediterranean Basin

    PubMed Central

    Majori, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    In Italy at the end of 19th Century, malaria cases amounted to 2 million with 15,000–20,000 deaths per year. Malignant tertian malaria was present in Central-Southern areas and in the islands. Early in the 20th Century, the most important act of the Italian Parliament was the approval of laws regulating the production and free distribution of quinine and the promotion of measures aiming at the reduction of the larval breeding places of Anopheline vectors. The contribution from the Italian School of Malariology (Camillo Golgi, Ettore Marchiafava, Angelo Celli, Giovanni Battista Grassi, Amico Bignami, Giuseppe Bastianelli) to the discovery of the transmission’s mechanism of malaria was fundamental in fostering the initiatives of the Parliament of the Italian Kingdom. A program of cooperation for malaria control in Italy, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation started in 1924, with the establishment of the Experimental Station in Rome, transformed in 1934 into the National Institute of Public Health. Alberto Missiroli, Director of the Laboratory of Malariology, conducted laboratory and field research, that with the advent of DDT brought to Italy by the Allies at the end of the World War II, allowed him to plan a national campaign victorious against the secular scourge. PMID:22550561

  14. GOssTo: a stand-alone application and a web tool for calculating semantic similarities on the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Caniza, Horacio; Romero, Alfonso E.; Heron, Samuel; Yang, Haixuan; Devoto, Alessandra; Frasca, Marco; Mesiti, Marco; Valentini, Giorgio; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We present GOssTo, the Gene Ontology semantic similarity Tool, a user-friendly software system for calculating semantic similarities between gene products according to the Gene Ontology. GOssTo is bundled with six semantic similarity measures, including both term- and graph-based measures, and has extension capabilities to allow the user to add new similarities. Importantly, for any measure, GOssTo can also calculate the Random Walk Contribution that has been shown to greatly improve the accuracy of similarity measures. GOssTo is very fast, easy to use, and it allows the calculation of similarities on a genomic scale in a few minutes on a regular desktop machine. Contact: alberto@cs.rhul.ac.uk Availability: GOssTo is available both as a stand-alone application running on GNU/Linux, Windows and MacOS from www.paccanarolab.org/gossto and as a web application from www.paccanarolab.org/gosstoweb. The stand-alone application features a simple and concise command line interface for easy integration into high-throughput data processing pipelines. PMID:24659104

  15. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    Abigail Alvarez OlarteCINVESTAV Alba Leticia Carrillo MonteverdeDCI-UG Alberto CarramiñanaINAOE Aldo MorselliFERMI Alejandro CastillaDCI-UG Alejandro IbarraTechnical University of Munich Alma D Rojas PachecoFCFM-BUAP Alma Xochitl Gonzalez MoralesInstituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM Andrew Walcott BeckwithAmerican Institute of Beam Energy Physics Ariadna Montiel ArenasDepartamento de Física, CINVESTAV Arnulfo ZepedaCinvestav Arturo Alvarez CruzInstituto de Fisica, UNAM Axel de la MacorraUNAM, IAC Azar MustafayevUniversity of Minnesota Benjamin JaramilloDCI-UG Vincent BertinCPPM-Marseille Carlos Alberto Vaquera-AraujoDCI-UG Carlos MuñozMadrid Autonoma U. & Madrid, IFT Carmine PagliaroneINFN, FNAL Carolina Lujan PeschardDCI-UG Christiane Frigerio MartinsUniversidade Federal do ABC-São Paulo Csaba BalazsMonash University David DelepineDCI-UG David G CerdenoUniversidad Autonoma de Madrid & Instituto de Fisica Teorica Debasish MajumdarSaha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India Dibyendu PanigrahiKandi Raj College, Kandi, Murshidabad, INDIA-742137 Dupret Alberto Santana BejaranoUniversidad de Sonora Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica Ernest MaRiverside U.C. Esteban Alejandro Reyes Pírez MontañezInstituto de Física, UNAM Federico Ortiz TrejoINSTITUTO DE ASTRONOMÍA - UNAM Francisco José de Anda NavarroUniversidad de Guadalajara González Alvarez Francisco JavierCINVESTAV-Depto. Física Gustavo Medina TancoICN-UNAM Hernando Efrain Caicedo OrtizInstituto Politecnico Nacional - IPN J D VergadosCERN & Ioannina U. James R BoyceJefferson Lab Jason SteffenFERMILAB Javier Montaño DomínguezDCI-UG Jeevan SolankiMandsaur Institue of Technology MP India Joe SatoSaitama University Jorge Luis Navarro EstradaUNAM-ICN and Universidad del Atlantico (B/quilla-Col.) Jose A R CembranosUniversity of Minnesota José DíazIFIC Jose Didino Garcia AguilarDepto. de Fisica. Cinvestav Keith OliveUniversity of Minnesota Konstantia BalasiUniversity of Ioannina, Greece Lilian Prado

  16. El Salvador.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Background notes on El Salvador capsulizes specific statistical and descriptive information on geography, demography, government. and economic conditions. The man text describes the people, their history and the nature of the peace process, principal government officials, political conditions, human rights, the state of the economy, foreign relations, and relations with the US. In 1992, the estimated population was about 5 million of which 89% are mestizo (Spanish-Indian), 10% Indian, and 1% Caucasian. 58% live in rural areas. It is largely Roman Catholic. Literacy is about 65% among adults. 6 years of education are compulsory. 40% are engaged in agriculture, 27% in services, and 16% in industry. The gross domestic product was $5.1 billion; per capita income was $1160. El Salvador's history has been marked by frequent revolutions. Almost every present since 1932 has been a military officer. In the more recent past (1969-80), Honduras and El Salvador fought over borders; a peace treaty was signed in 1980, but it was not until 1992 that the land in dispute was awarded by the International Court of Justice to Honduras. During the 1970, efforts by Duarte were made toward democratic reform, but fraud and corruption contributed to the rise of armed guerrilla warfare as a means to bring about change. There were rightist and leftists groups accelerating violence; event he Salvadoran armed forces engaged in lawlessness. The judicial system failed. Nicaragua after 1979 supplied arms and munitions to 5 guerrilla groups. Duarte returned to power and his junta initiated land reform and nationalized banks and marketing of coffee and sugar. The elections in 1982 led to the transfer of power to Alvaro Magana. The new constitution in 1983 appeased some, but land reforms still did not satisfy guerrillas. Duarte was elected again in 1984 and Alfredo Christiani in 1989 in a peaceful transfer of power. In 1991 and 1992 peace accords were signed with the guerrillas. During this 12-year

  17. SUPPORT FOR THE CONFERENCE ''WOCE & BEYOND'' TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlin, Worth, D., Jr., Distinguished Professor, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University

    2003-02-05

    OAK B188 We are proud to report that the WOCE and Beyond meeting was a tremendous success, garnering praise for its content and execution from federal agency representatives, international sponsors, the speakers, and the audience. The conference attracted 379 registered participants (total attendance was 401) from 22 countries; 319 posters were presented; and 30 oral presentations by distinguished researchers touched on all aspects of WOCE science.Particularly gratifying to the organizers was the active participation of 43 students from around the world. In addition to helping underwrite infrastructure costs related to the poster sessions, DOE's grant supported the travel and subsistence of 12 students and funded the awards for outstanding student posters (31 student posters were judged for three prizes of $500 each). Thus a strategic goal of the meeting-entraining young scientists into the WOCE research stream-was achieved with the help of DOE funding.Post-conference, the meeting' s website (http://www.woce2002.tamu.edu) was revamped to link to the plenary session presentations and poster abstracts. This website will be maintained until June of 2003. A copy of the meeting document, combining the program and poster abstracts will be sent to Dr. Anna Palmisano, DOE Scientific Officer.Recipients of travel support were: Mr Marcelo Barreiro, Texas A&M University Ms Elena Brambilla, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Ms Shuimin Chen, University of Hawaii Ms Meyre da Silva, Texas A&M University Ms Elizabeth Douglass, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Mr Shane Elipot, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Mr Joong-Tae Kim, Texas A&M University Mr Yueng-Djern Lenn, Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Nadja Lonnroth, Texas A&M University Mr Alvaro Montenegro, Florida State University Ms Sarah Zedler, Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Li Zhang, Texas A&M University Recipients of $500 Prizes for Outstanding Student Posters: Mr Geoffrey Gebbie, Massachusetts Institute

  18. The pressure-volume equation of state of a synthetic grossular Ca3Al2Si3O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Sula; Boffa Ballaran, Tiziana; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of a wide research project focused on mineral inclusions in diamonds we have investigated the compressibility of a synthetic grossular garnet (Ca3Al2Si3O12) with the purpose of providing new constraints on the diamond geobarometry. In fact, not only garnets are among the important phases of the Earth upper mantle but at the same time are one of the main phases found as inclusion in diamonds. Garnets are a crucial marker in determining the origin source of diamonds, which can be eclogitic and/or peridotitic. In particular, peridotitic diamonds include garnets characterized by about 90-92% of pyrope-almandine with the grossular component reaching about 6-8%, whereas eclogitic diamonds have garnets with the grossular component increased up to about 20-22%. In order to obtain information about the depth of formation of the diamond-garnet pair, beyond the classical chemical method, we propose the so called "elastic method", which is based on the knowledge of precise and accurate thermoelastic parameters for both diamond and inclusion (e.g. Nestola et al. 2011 and references therein). We have determined the pressure - volume equation of state of a pure synthetic grossular garnet by single-crystal X-ray diffraction up to about 8 GPa. The resulting equation of state coefficients, together with those previously determined for pyrope and almandine end-members and their intermediate compositions (see Milani et al. 2013) will cover the compositional range of garnets found as inclusions in diamonds, allowing to construct a robust model to predict the elastic parameters for any garnet composition typical of eclogitic and/or peridotitic diamond. The research was funded by the ERC Starting Grant to FN (grant agreement n° 307322). References Milani S., Mazzucchelli M., Nestola F., Alvaro M., Angel R.J., Geiger C.A., Domeneghetti M.C. (2013) The P-T conditions of garnet inclusion formation in diamond: thermal expansion of synthetic end-member pyrope. EGU General

  19. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  20. Infanticide: a reply to Giubilini and Minerva

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Alberto Giubilini and Francesco Minerva's recent infanticide proposal is predicated on their personism and actualism. According to these related ideas, human beings achieve their moral status in virtue of the degree to which they are capable of laying value upon their lives or exhibiting certain qualities or being desirable to third-party family members. This article challenges these criteria, suggesting that these and related ideas are rely on arbitrary and discriminatory notions of human moral status. Our propensity to sleep, fall unconscious, pass out and so on, demonstrates that we often exhibit our status as ‘potential persons’ who are not in the condition of attributing any value to their own existence. Our abilities, age and desirability can and do fluctuate. The equal dignity principle, distinguished in turn from both the excesses of vitalism and consequentialism, is analysed and defended in the context of human rights logic and law. The normalisation of non- and involuntary euthanasia, via such emerging practices as the self-styled Groningen Protocol, is considered. Substituted consent to the euthanasia of babies and others is scrutinised and the implications of institutionalising non-voluntary euthanasia in the context of financial, research and political interests are considered. The impact on the medical and legal professions, carers, families and societies, as well as public attitudes more generally, is discussed. It is suggested that eroding the value of human life carries with it significant destructive long-term implications. To elevate some, often short-term, implications while ignoring others demonstrates the irrational nature of the effort to institutionalise euthanasia. PMID:23637448

  1. Space-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Precipitation Processes, Microphysics, and Microwave Radiative Properties of flood Producing Storms in Mediterranean & Adriatic Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the meteorological and microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms requires a combination of in situ data analysis, radar data analysis, and satellite data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales. An important aspect of understanding microphysical controls of severe storms, is first understanding the meteorological controls under which a storm has evolved, and then using that information to help characterize the dominant microphysical processes. For hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted by the October 5-6, 1998 Friuli flood event in northern Italy, a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution. This involves intense convective development, Sratiform decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes, as well as the associated vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that effect details of the size distributions and fall rates of the various types of hydrometeors found within the storm environment. This talk overviews the microphysical elements of a severe Mediterranean storm in such a context, investigated with the aid of TRMM satellite and other remote sensing measurements, but guided by a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model simulation of the Friuli flood event. The data analysis for this paper was conducted by my research groups at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, AL and Florida State University in Tallahassee, and in collaboration with Dr. Alberto Mugnai's research group at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Rome. The numerical modeling was conducted by Professor Oreg Tripoli and Ms. Giulia Panegrossi at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, using Professor Tripoli's nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). This is a scalable, fully nested mesoscale model capable of resolving nonhydrostatic circulations from regional scale down to cloud scale

  3. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  4. Report on the Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Imode-CKD and Bcmolmed Marie Curie Training and Research Programs.

    PubMed

    Krochmal, Magdalena; Cisek, Katryna; Markoska, Katerina; Spasovski, Goce; Vlahou, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    A Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Marie Curie Training and Research Programs iMODECKD (Identification of the Molecular Determinants of established Chronic Kidney Disease) and BCMolMed (Molecular Medicine for Bladder Cancer) was held from 20-22 March at the Macedonian Academy of Science and Arts (MASA). The meeting was hosted by the participating center University of Skopje (SKO) - Goce Spasovski and MASA - Momir Polenakovic (R. Macedonia). The representative from MASA proteomic research center - Katerina Davalieva (R. Macedonia) had presentation on proteomic research in prostate cancer (PCa). 40 researchers from 13 different countries participated at the meeting. The Workshop was devoted on "Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Management issues", and consisted of 15 oral presentations given by nephrologists and experts in the field of CKD. Raymond Vanholder (Belgium) - past president of ERA-EDTA had a keynote lecture on "CKD: Questions that need to be answered and are not (or at least not entirely)". The workshop continued in four sessions with lectures from Alberto Ortiz (Spain), Olivera Stojceva-Taneva (R. Macedonia), Dimitrios Goumenos (Greece), Joachim Beige (Germany), Marian Klinger (Poland), Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia), Joachim Jankowski (Germany), Adalbert Schiller (Romania), Robert Johnson (USA), Franco Ferrario (Italy), Ivan Rychlik (Czech Republic), Fulvio Magni (Italy) and Giovambattista Capasso (Italy), all covering a training theme. Within the meeting there were two lectures on complimentary skills for ethics in science and career advancement from two principal investigators - Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia) and Joost Schanstra (France). During the Regular Meeting, 13 PhD students i.e. Early Stage Researchers and one Experienced Researcher from both Programs presented their work and progress within iMODE-CKD and BCMolMed projects. This meeting was a great opportunity to exchange experience and ideas in the field of systems biology approaches and

  5. Infanticide: a reply to Giubilini and Minerva.

    PubMed

    Laing, Jacqueline A

    2013-05-01

    Alberto Giubilini and Francesco Minerva's recent infanticide proposal is predicated on their personism and actualism. According to these related ideas, human beings achieve their moral status in virtue of the degree to which they are capable of laying value upon their lives or exhibiting certain qualities or being desirable to third-party family members. This article challenges these criteria, suggesting that these and related ideas are rely on arbitrary and discriminatory notions of human moral status. Our propensity to sleep, fall unconscious, pass out and so on, demonstrates that we often exhibit our status as 'potential persons' who are not in the condition of attributing any value to their own existence. Our abilities, age and desirability can and do fluctuate. The equal dignity principle, distinguished in turn from both the excesses of vitalism and consequentialism, is analysed and defended in the context of human rights logic and law. The normalisation of non- and involuntary euthanasia, via such emerging practices as the self-styled Groningen Protocol, is considered. Substituted consent to the euthanasia of babies and others is scrutinised and the implications of institutionalising non-voluntary euthanasia in the context of financial, research and political interests are considered. The impact on the medical and legal professions, carers, families and societies, as well as public attitudes more generally, is discussed. It is suggested that eroding the value of human life carries with it significant destructive long-term implications. To elevate some, often short-term, implications while ignoring others demonstrates the irrational nature of the effort to institutionalise euthanasia. PMID:23637448

  6. Infrared Sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. D.; Bolatto, A. D.; Stanimirovic, S.; Shah, R. Y.; Leroy, A.; Sandstrom, K.

    2008-03-01

    We have imaged the entire Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), one of the two nearest star-forming dwarf galaxies, in all seven IRAC and MIPS bands. The low mass and low metallicity (1/6 solar) of the SMC make it the best local analog for primitive galaxies at high redshift. By studying the properties of dust and star formation in the SMC at high resolution, we can gain understanding of similar distant galaxies that can only be observed in much less detail. In this contribution, we present a preliminary analysis of the properties of point sources detected in the Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (S^{3}MC). We find ˜400,000 unresolved or marginally resolved sources in our IRAC images, and our MIPS 24 μm mosaic contains ˜17,000 point sources. Source counts decline rapidly at the longer MIPS wavelengths. We use color-color and color-magnitude diagrams to investigate the nature of these objects, cross-correlate their positions with those of known sources at other wavelengths, and show examples of how these data can be used to identify interesting classes of objects such as carbon stars and young stellar objects. For additional examples of some of the questions that can be studied with these data, please see the accompanying contributions by Alberto Bolatto (survey information and images), Adam Leroy (dust and gas in a low-metallicity environment), Karin Sandstrom (far infrared-radio continuum correlation), and Snežana Stanimirović (on a young supernova remnant in the SMC). The mosaic images and point source catalogs we have made have been released to the public on our website (http://celestial.berkeley.edu/spitzer).

  7. EDITORIAL: The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2012-02-01

    to the proceedings of the 15th CEWQO (Physica Scripta 2009 T135 011005). The 18th edition of CEWQO (CEWQO11) was held in Madrid in 2011. There were about 250 participants, from practically every European country. Many colleagues from other continents also joined the event, including well-established researchers in the field. This is a clear demonstration that these meetings provide an excellent chance to hear about the latest results and new directions of research. The organization of CEWQO11 was carried out by a committee consisting of members active in this topic in Madrid. From Universidad Complutense, Alberto Galindo and Luis L Sánchez-Soto from Universidad Autónoma, Jose Calleja and Carlos Tejedor; from Universidad Politécnica, Enrique Calleja; from Universidad Carlos III, Alberto Ibort; and from the National Research Council (CSIC), Juan León and Juan J García-Ripoll. Special thanks go to the Spanish Ministry for Science and Innovation, Universidad Complutense and the Quitemad Consortium for financial support. The proceedings of the 16th CEWQO held at the University of Turku, Finland and the 17th CEWQO held at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK are also available (Physica Scripta 2010 T140 and Physica Scripta 2011 T143). The present Topical Issue is a collection of papers presented in Madrid; they represent an illustrative sample of the major achievements and trends in this area. In turn, they reflect the wide range of interests in this rapidly evolving field. Some collaborators from different scientific centres who could not, due to different reasons, come to Madrid, but participated in previous CEWQOs and plan to participate in future CEWQOs, also contributed to this issue. The papers are arranged alphabetically by the name of the first author. Special thanks goes to Roger Wäppling, the Managing Editor of Physica Scripta, and Graeme Watt, the Publisher, for the opportunity to publish CEWQO11. From a Physica Scripta Editorial Board meeting it was

  8. ESO's Hidden Treasures Brought to Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Telescope in Paranal, Chile, with guided tours and the opportunity to participate in a night's observations. Runner-up prizes included an iPod, books and DVDs. Furthermore, the highest ranked images will be released for the world to see on www.eso.org as Photo Releases or Pictures of the Week, co-crediting the winners. The jury evaluated the entries based on the quality of the data processing, the originality of the image and the overall aesthetic feel. As several of the highest ranked images were submitted by the same people, the jury decided to make awards to the ten most talented participants, so as to give more people the opportunity to win a prize and reward their hard work and talent. The ten winners of the competition are: * First prize, a trip to Paranal + goodies: Igor Chekalin (Russia). * Second prize, an iPod Touch + goodies: Sergey Stepanenko (Ukraine). * Third Prize, VLT laser cube model + goodies: Andy Strappazzon (Belgium). * Fourth to tenth prizes, Eyes on the Skies Book + DVD + goodies: Joseph (Joe) DePasquale (USA), Manuel (Manu) Mejias (Argentina), Alberto Milani (Italy), Joshua (Josh) Barrington (USA), Oleg Maliy (Ukraine), Adam Kiil (United Kingdom), Javier Fuentes (Chile). The ten winners submitted the twenty highest ranked images: 1. M78 by Igor Chekalin. 2. NGC3169 & NGC3166 and SN 2003cg by Igor Chekalin. 3. NGC6729 by Sergey Stepanenko. 4. The Moon by Andy Strappazzon. 5. NGC 3621 by Joseph (Joe) DePasquale. 6. NGC 371 by Manuel (Manu) Mejias. 7. Dust of Orion Nebula (ESO 2.2m telescope) by Igor Chekalin. 8. NGC1850 EMMI by Sergey Stepanenko. 9. Abell 1060 by Manuel (Manu) Mejias. 10. Celestial Prominences NGC3582 by Joseph DePasquale. 11. Globular Cluster NGC288 by Alberto Milani. 12. Antennae Galaxies by Alberto Milani. 13. Sakurai's Object by Joshua (Josh) Barrington. 14. NGC 1929, N44 Superbubble by Manuel (Manu) Mejias. 15. NGC 3521 by Oleg Maliy. 16. NGC 6744 by Andy Strappazzon. 17. NGC 2217 by Oleg Maliy. 18. VIMOS.2008-01-31T07_16_47j by

  9. CaSiO3-walstromite inclusions in super-deep diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzolini, Chiara; Nestola, Fabrizio; Milani, Sula; Brenker, Frank E.

    2015-04-01

    , and it is possible that the entrapment pressure falls at least into the stability field of Ca2SiO4-larnite + CaSi2O5-titanite. In support of this hypothesis we secondly compared our Raman spectra with reference spectra of the same phases obtained from an experimental product of Gasparik et al. (1994). Our preliminary results indicate in at least one inclusion the coexistence of CaSiO3-walstromite + Ca2SiO4-larnite, suggesting that CaSiO3-walstromite forms in sub-lithospheric conditions from the back transformation from CaSiO3-perovskite. Further investigations are in progress in order to find evidence of CaSi2O5-titanite in these inclusions. References Angel R.J., Alvaro M., Nestola F., Mazzucchelli M.L. (2014) Diamond thermoelastic properties and implications for determining the pressure of formation of diamond-inclusion systems. Russ Geol Geophys, in press; Gasparik, T., Wolf, K. and Smith, C.M. (1994) Am Mineral, 79,1219-1222; Joswig, W., Paulus, E.F., Winkler, B. and Milman, V. (2003) Z Kristallogr, 218,811-818; Kaminsky, F. (2008) Earth Sc Rev, 110,127-147; Liu, X., Wang, S., He, Q., Chen, J., Wang, H., Li, S., Peng, F., Zhang, L. and Fei, Y. (2012) Am Mineral 97,262-267; Swamy, V. and Dubrovinsky, L.S. (1997) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 61,1181-1191; Tamai, H. and Yagi, T. (1989) Phys Earth Planet Inter, 54,370-377.

  10. Elastic geobarometry for ultra high pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Alvaro, Matteo; Nimis, Paolo; Domeneghetti, Chiara Maria; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    solution to be used in combination with any form of equation of state and/or thermal expansion, and is not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. Calculations can be performed with Eosfit7c (Angel et al. 2014b). A key result is that non-uniform stress fields are developed within the constrained two-phase system. Such stress fields can give rise to either over- or under-pressure with respect to external lithostatic pressure. This is true for all combinations of host and inclusion minerals and examination of simplified systems can provide some constraints to this problem. Thus, for example, quartz inclusions trapped in the cores of garnet during the prograde path of the Kulet whiteschist (e.g. Parkinson, 2000) experience pressures lower than the external pressure. By peak conditions of ~3.5 GPa and ~780°C, the quartz inclusions are calculated as experiencing a peak pressure of only 1.9 GPa, sufficient to prevent them entering the stability field of coesite. This work was supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to Fabrizio Nestola. Angel R.J., et al. (2014a) Am Mineral, 99(10), 2146-2149. Angel RJ, Gonzalez-Platas J, Alvaro M (2014b) Z Kristallogr, 229, 405-419. Parkinson, CD (2000) Lithos, 52:215-233. Zhang, Y (1998) EPSL, 157:209-222

  11. Isomekes: A fundamental tool to determine the formation pressure for diamond-inclusion pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nestola, Fabrizio; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    for experimental data of higher accuracy. For example, for the case of garnet in diamond the uncertainties in published thermal expansion coefficients of garnets (from 2.0 to 2.6*10-5 K-1) and in the bulk modulus of diamond (442 to 446 GPa) lead to uncertainties in calculated depths of inclusion entrapment of the order of 30km. Larger errors arise from the use of incorrect forms of EoS. This work was supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to Fabrizio Nestola. Adams HG, Cohen LH, Rosenfeld JL (1975) Am Mineral 60:574-583 Angel RJ, Gonzalez-Platas J, Alvaro M (2014) Z Kristallogr, submitted. Howell, D, Wood, IG, Nestola, F, Nimis, P, and Nasdala, L (2012) Eur J Mineral, 24(4): 563-573. Nestola, F., Nimis, P., Ziberna, L., Longo, M., Marzoli, A., Harris, J.W., Manghnani, M.H., and Fedortchouk, Y. (2011) EPSL, 305(1-2):249-255.

  12. PREFACE: X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division, Mexican Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    Avanzados (CINVESTAV), Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (UAM-I), Universidad de Guanajuato (UG), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). We especially acknowledge the support and the kind hospitality of our host, the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo. Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas, Héctor H. Hernández Hernández, Miguel Sabido, Carlos A. Soto, Luis Alberto López, Omar Pedraza, Victoria E. Cerón. Editors

  13. The Hibernating Stellar Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  14. The Wild, Hidden Cousin of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  15. Reconstruction of seawater chemistry from deeply subducted oceanic crust; hydrogen and oxygen isotope of lawsonite eclogites preserving pillow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabata, D., VI; Masuyama, Y.; Tomiyasu, F.; Ueno, Y.; Yui, T. F.; Okamoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand evolution of life, change of seawater chemistry from Hadean, Archean to present is significant. Pillow structure is well-preserved in the Archean greenstone belt (e.g. Komiya et al., 1999). Oxygen and hydrogen isotope of rims in the pillow is useful conventional tool to decipher chemistry of Paleao-seawater from Archean to Present. However, Archean greenstone belt suffered regional metamorphism from greenschist to Amphibolite facies conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to testify the validity of pillow chemistry from recent (Phanerozoic) metamorphosed greenstone. We have systematically collected pillowed greenstone from blueschist and eclogites. Two eclogite exhibiting pillow structures were chosen for oxygen and hydrogen isotope analysis. One is from Corsica (lawsonite eclogite collected with Dr. Alberto Vidale Barbarone) and another is from Cazadero, Franciscan belt (collected by Dr. Tatsuki Tsujimori). The both are ascribed as MORB from major and trace bulk chemistry and Ca is rich in the core and Na is poor in the rims. The former exhibits garnet, omphacite, lawsonite, and glacophane. Phengite is in core of the pillow and chlorite is in the rims. In the latter, besides garnet, omphacite, epdiote and glaucophane, chlorite is recognized with phengite in the core. Glaucophane is richer in the rims from the both samples, therefore istope analysis of glaucophane was done. Mineral separation was carefully done using micro-mill, heavy liquid and isodynamic separator. 20 mg specimens were used for oxygen isotope analysis and 2mg were for hydrogen analysis. δ18O of the all analysis (7.7 to 8.3) is within the range of unaltered igneous oceanic crust and high temperature hydrothermal alteration although rims (8.3 for Franciscan and 8.0 for Corsica) are higher than cores (7.7 for Franciscan and Corsica). δD data is also consistent with hydrothermal alteration. It is relative higher in core from the Corsica and Franciscan (-45 and -56) than of the

  16. Historical Glacier Variations in Southern South America since the Little Ice Age: Examples from Lago Viedma (Southern Patagonia) and Mendoza (Central Andes), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, S. U.; Masiokas, M.; Pitte, P.; Berthier, E.; Guerrido, C.; Luckman, B. H.; Villalba, R.

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of historical information can give valuable insight into past glacier dynamics, especially before the onset of modern measurements. Early photographs and maps depict changes for selected glaciers in southern South America. Within this study, written documents and pictorial historical records (drawings, sketches, engravings, photographs, chronicles, topographic maps) are analysed critically, with a particular focus on two regions: Lago Viedma (El Chaltén, southern Patagonia, 49.5°S, 73.0°W) and the Río Mendoza basin (Mendoza, central Andes, 33.1°S, 69.9°W). For the Lago Viedma area, early historical data for the end of the 19th century stem from the expedition of the Chilean-Argentinean border commission. In addition, the expedition by the German Scientific Society, conducted between 1910 and 1916, and the later photographs by Alberto M. de Agostini give an excellent depiction of the glaciers. Glaciar Viedma is a calving glacier which shows distinct retreat from 1896 until the present (though with a stationary or possibly advancing glacier front between 1930/31 and 1951/52), similar to the neighbouring glaciers. On the contrary, nearby Glaciar Perito Moreno shows an exceptional behaviour: the glacier front has been advancing during the first half of the 20th century, staying in an advanced position until the present. At the beginning of the 20th century, Robert Helbling explored the Argentinean-Chilean Andes together with his friend Friedrich Reichert. In the summer of 1909/10, they started a detailed survey of the highly glacierized Juncal-Tupungato mountains (Río Mendoza basin), leading to the first accurate topographic map of the area published in 1914. Its outstanding quality allows a comparison with contemporary satellite imagery. The area received attention in 1934, when the sudden drainage of a glacier-dammed lake in the upper Río del Plomo valley caused fatalities and considerable damage to constructions and the Transandine Railway. A

  17. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  18. Stability Analysis for Cellinoid Shape Model in Inverse Process from Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Ip, Wing-Huen; Song, Yun-Lin; Zhao, Hai-Bin

    2016-04-01

    Based on the special shape first introduced by Alberto Cellino, which consists of eight ellipsoidal octants with the constraint that adjacent octants must have two identical semi-axes, an efficient algorithm to derive the physical parameters, such as the rotational period, spin axis, and overall shape from either lightcurves or sparse photometric data of asteroids, is developed by Lu et al.[1]. They call this model 'Cellinoid' shape model. Numerical applications confirm that the cellinoid shape model could derive the best-fit rotational period for the asteroid from several lightcurves observed in one apparition. Furthermore by exploiting more lightcurves observed in various viewing circumstances, the derived spin axis could be refined [2]. Additionally the cellinoid shape model is applied to the sparse Hipparcos data with the average number of measurements being of the order of 70 per object, similar to the future catalog of the ongoing space project, Gaia [3]. The derived rotational periods from 70 sparse measurements are accurate and the spin axes are close to the known results, derived from lightcurves by other methods. With only 3 more parameters than the traditional triaxial ellipsoid, the cellinoid shape model of having the asymmetric morphology could perform efficiently and simulate the real asteroids better. That could be employed for the huge number of photometric sparse data observed by Gaia in the coming future. For thoroughly investigating the relationship between the morphology of the synthetic lightcurves generated by the cellinoid shape model and its six semi-axes, the numerical tests are implemented to compare the synthetic lightcurves generated by various cellinoid models. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the stable spin axis of cellinoid shape model with respect to its semi-axes is analyzed, too. These numerical tests provide important information for optimizing the aforementioned algorithm to search the physical parameters for asteroids based on

  19. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsø (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee (The Netherlands, ref. Jens Greinert).

  20. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsø (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Zeeonderzoek (The Netherlands, ref. Tjeerd C.E. van Weering).

  1. Matching Lithosphere velocity changes to the GOCE gravity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Authors: Carla Braitenberg, Patrizia Mariani, Alberto Pastorutti Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste Via Weiss 1, 34100 Trieste Seismic tomography models result in 3D velocity models of lithosphere and sublithospheric mantle, which are due to mineralogic compositional changes and variations in the thermal gradient. The assignment of density is non-univocal and can lead to inverted density changes with respect to velocity changes, depending on composition and temperature. Velocity changes due to temperature result in a proportional density change, whereas changes due to compositional changes and age of the lithosphere can lead to density changes of inverted sign. The relation between velocity and density implies changes in the lithosphere rigidity. We analyze the GOCE gradient fields and the velocity models jointly, making simulations on thermal and compositional density changes, using the velocity models as constraint on lithosphere geometry. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. We find that the lithosphere geometry is a controlling factor on the overlying geologic elements, defining the regions where rifting and collision alternate and repeat through time. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the conjugate margins of the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105---- Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th

  2. [[Anti-leishmanial activity in plants from a Biological Reserve of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Chinchilla-Carmona, Misael; Valerio-Campos, Idalia; Sánchez-Porras, Ronald; Bagnarello-Madrigal, Vanessa; Martínez-Esquivel, Laura; González-Paniagua, Antonieta; Alpizar-Cordero, Javier; Cordero-Villalobos, Maribel; Rodríguez-Chaves, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Leishmaniosis is an important human disease very difficult to treat. For this reason, many researchers in the world have been look- ing for anti-leishmanial chemical components present in several plant species. In Costa Rica, since no studies have been done in this field, this work aimed at the search of active chemical components in local plants that may have an activity against Leishmania sp. A total of 67 plants were selected from the Alberto Manuel Brenes Biological Reserve (REBAMB). For these collected plants, fresh or dried hidroalcoholic extracts of root, stem, mature or young leaves, flowers, and immature or mature fruits, were prepared under conventional methods. All extracts were tested for their effect against a strain of Leishmania (OCR with known characteristics). Firstly, by presumptive tests, we selected only those with some activity, and then, more specific studies were done to determine the IC50 in μg/mL; a promising plant was considered only if at least one of its parts presented an IC50 < 100 μg/mL. Under this parameter, the following active plants were obtained and their lowest and highest IC50 obtained values presented (μg/mL): Bocconia frutescens (0.6 and 66.7), Clematis dioica (27.5 and 44.4), Cordia megalantha (80.0), Eugenia austin-smithi (90.6), Guarea bullata (98.8), Guateria tonduzii (44.4 and 66.3), Mikania holwayana (45.0 and 95.6), Nectandra membranacea (44.5 and 58.6), Neurolaena lobata (25.0 and 100.0), Persea povedae (76.9), Piper auritum (60.0), Rollinia pittieri (43.1), Solanum arboreum (25.8 and 72.5), Tetrorchidiumn eurphyllum (53.8 and 95.0), Witheringia solanacea (15.9 and 98.1) and Zanthoxylum juniperinum (23.4 and 97.5). Although the parasitic effect of fresh or dried extracts were almost similar, the fresh material slightly showed better results. That anti-parasitic effect occurred in one or more than four parts of the plant. Most of the active extracts did not produce lysis and aglutination which indicates a low

  3. PREFACE: Brazil MRS Meeting 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    The annual meetings, organized by the Brazilian materials research society - B-MRS, are amongst the most import discussion forums in the area of materials science and engineering in Brazil, with a growing interest from the national and international scientific society. In the last 4 years, more than 1,500 participants have attended the B-MRS meetings, promoting an auspicious environment for presentation and discussion of scientific and technological works in the materials science area. The XIII Brazilian Materials Research Society Meeting was held from 28 September to 02 October, 2014, in João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. The Meeting congregated more than 1650 participants from the whole of Brazil and from 28 other countries. More than 2100 abstracts were accepted for presentation, distributed along 19 Symposia following the format used in traditional meetings of Materials Research Societies. These involved topics such as: synthesis of new materials, computer simulations, optical, magnetic and electronic properties, traditional materials as clays and cements, advanced metals, carbon and graphene nanostructures, nanomaterials for nanostructures, energy storage systems, composites, surface engineering and others. A novelty was a symposium dedicated to innovation and technology transfer in materials research. The program also included 7 Plenary Lectures presented by internationally renowned researchers: Alberto Salleo from Stanford University, United States of America; Roberto Dovesi from Universita' degli Studi di Torino, Italy; Luís Antonio F. M. Dias Carlos from Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal; Jean Marie Dubois from Institut Jean-Lamour, France; Sir Colin Humphreys from University of Cambridge, England; Karl Leo from Technische Universität Dresden, Germany; Robert Chang from Northwestern University, Evanston, United States of America. The numbers of participants in the B-MRS meetings have been growing continuously, and in this meeting we had almost 2200 presentations

  4. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von

  5. Coseismic ground deformations related to the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Working Group, E.

    2009-12-01

    and to many individual throws observed along the long-term Paganica fault, raise questions on the maximum expected Magnitude and the seismic hazard estimate of this area. Thus, although the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake and associated faulting caused major damage and loss of life, it does not fully characterize the seismic hazard associated to this area. Emergeo working group: Giuliana Alessio, Laura Alfonsi, Carlo Alberto Brunori, Francesca R. Cinti, Riccardo Civico, Luigi Cucci, Paolo Marco De Martini, Sofia Mariano, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Paola Montone, Rosa Nappi, Daniela Pantosti, Antonio Patera, Simona Pierdominici and Stefano Pucci.

  6. The Lithological Constraint To Gas Hydrate Formation: Evidence OF Grain Size Of Sediments From IODP 311 On CASCADIA Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2006-12-01

    A total of 614 sediment samples at intervals of about 1.5 m from all 5 sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on Cascadia Margin were analyzed using a Beckman Coulter LS-230 Particle Analyzer. The grain-size data were then plotted in depth and compared with other proxies of gas hydrate- occurrence such as soupy/mousse-like structures in sediments, gas hydrate concentration (Sh) derived from LWD data using Archie's relation, IR core images (infrared image) and the recovered samples of gas hydrate¨Cbearing sediments. A good relationship between the distribution of coarse grains in size of 31-63¦Ìm and 63-125¦Ìm sediments and the potential occurrence of gas hydrate was found across the entire gas hydrate stability zone. The depth distribution of grain size from the Site U1326 shows clear excursions at depths of 5-8, 21-26, 50- 123, 132-140, 167-180, 195-206 and 220-240 mbsf, which coincide with the potential occurrence of gas hydrate suggested by soupy/mousse-like structures, logging-derived gas hydrate concentrations (Sh) and the recovered samples of the gas hydrate¨Cbearing sand layers. The lithology of sediments significantly affects the formation of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate forms preferentially within relatively coarse grain-size sediments above 31 ¦Ìm. Key words: grain size of sediments, constraint, occurrence of gas hydrate, IODP 311 IODP Expedition 311 Scientists: Michael Riedel (Co-chief Scientist), Timothy S. Collett (Co-chief Scientist), Mitchell Malone (Expedition Project Manager/Staff Scientist), Gilles Gu¨¨rin, Fumio Akiba, Marie-Madeleine Blanc-Valleron, Michelle Ellis, Yoshitaka Hashimoto, Verena Heuer, Yosuke Higashi, Melanie Holland, Peter D. Jackson, Masanori Kaneko, Miriam Kastner, Ji-Hoon Kim, Hiroko Kitajima, Philip E. Long, Alberto Malinverno, Greg Myers, Leena D. Palekar, John Pohlman, Peter Schultheiss, Barbara Teichert, Marta E. Torres, Anne M. Tr¨¦hu, Jiasheng Wang, Ulrich G. Wortmann, Hideyoshi

  7. HUBBLE HERITAGE PROJECT'S FIRST ANNIVERSARY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    HH 32 is an excellent example of a 'Herbig-Haro object,' which is formed when young stars eject jets of material back into interstellar space. This object, about 1,000 light-years from Earth, is somewhat older than Hubble's variable nebula, and the wind from the bright central star has already cleared much of the dust out of the central region, thus exposing the star to direct view. Many young stars, like the central object in HH 32, are surrounded by disks of gas and dust that form as additional material is attracted gravitationally from the surrounding nebula. Material in the disk gradually spirals in toward the star and eventually some of it accretes onto the star, increasing its mass. A fraction of the gas, however, is ejected perpendicularly to the disk at speeds near 200 miles per second, and forms two oppositely directed jets. These jets plow into the surrounding nebula, producing strong shock waves that heat the gas and cause it to glow in the light of hydrogen atoms (green) and sulfur ions (blue), several other atoms and ions, and sometimes radiation from the exciting star that is reflected by the surrounding gas (red). This glow is called a Herbig-Haro object, in honor of astronomers George Herbig and Guillermo Haro, who did much of the early work in this area in the 1950's. The jet on the top side, whose furthest extent is about 0.2 light-year from the star, is pointed more nearly in our direction, while the opposite jet on the bottom lies on the far side of the star and is fainter either because it is partially obscured by dust surrounding the star or because there is much less material in front of the star. The Hubble Heritage team (NASA/AURA/STScI) made this image from observations of Herbig-Haro 32 acquired by Salvador Curiel, Jorge Canto, Alejandro Raga, (UNAM), Alberto Noriega-Crespo (IPAC), and collaborators. Image Credit: NASA/The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI).

  8. Erratum: "Meeting the Cool Neighbors. X. Ultracool Dwarfs from the 2MASS All-Sky Data Release" (2008, AJ, 136, 1290)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. Neill; Cruz, Kelle L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Allen, Peter R.; Mungall, F.; Liebert, James; Lowrance, Patrick; Sweet, Anne

    2008-11-01

    Alberto Alvarez, Angel Guerra, and Patricio Ugarte at CTIO. We apologize to the authors of the article and to readers of the journal for this unfortunate error.

  9. "The role of redundant information in cultural transmission and cultural stabilization": Correction to Acerbi and Tennie (2016).

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Reports an error in "The role of redundant information in cultural transmission and cultural stabilization" by Alberto Acerbi and Claudio Tennie (Journal of Comparative Psychology, 2016[Feb], Vol 130[1], 62-70). In the article the copyright should have been "© 2016 The Author(s)". The author note also should have included the following license statement "This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Copyright for this article is retained by the author(s). Author(s) grant(s) the American Psychological Association the exclusive right to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher." The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-07004-005.) Redundant copying has been proposed as a manner to achieve the high-fidelity necessary to pass on and preserve complex traits in human cultural transmission. There are at least 2 ways to define redundant copying. One refers to the possibility of copying repeatedly the same trait over time, and another to the ability to exploit multiple layers of information pointing to the same trait during a single copying event. Using an individual-based model, we explore how redundant copying (defined as in the latter way) helps to achieve successful transmission. The authors show that increasing redundant copying increases the likelihood of accurately transmitting a behavior more than either augmenting the number of copying occasions across time or boosting the general accuracy of social learning. They also investigate how different cost functions, deriving, for example, from the need to invest more energy in cognitive processing, impact the evolution of redundant copying. The authors show that populations converge either

  10. PREFACE: Workshop Photograph and Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Workshop photograph Workshop Program Sunday 28 March 201019:00-21:00 Reception at Okura Frontier Hotel Tsukuba(Buffet style dinner with drink) Monday 29 March 2010Introduction (Chair: André Rubbia (ETH Zurich))09:00 Welcome address (05') Atsuto Suzuki (KEK)09:05 Message from CERN on neutrino physics (10') Sergio Bertolucci (CERN)09:15 Message from FNAL on neutrino physics (10') Young Kee Kim (FNAL)09:25 Message from KEK on neutrino physics (10') Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK)09:35 Introductory remark on GLA2010 (10') Takuya Hasegawa (KEK) Special session (Chair: Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK))09:45 The ICARUS Liquid Argon TPC (45') Carlo Rubbia (CERN)10:30-11:00 Coffee break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments I (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))11:00 Results from massive underground detectors (non accelerator) (30') Takaaki Kajita (ICRR, U. of Tokyo)11:30 Present long baseline neutrino experiments (30') Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook)12:00-12:10 Workshop picture12:10-14:00 Lunch break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments II (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))14:00 Physics goals of the next generation massive underground experiments (30') David Wark (Imperial College London)14:30 Near detectors for long baseline neutrino experiments (20') Tsuyoshi Nakaya (Kyoto U.) Lessons on Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology from ongoing developments (Chair: Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook))14:50 WARP (30') Claudio Montanari (U. of Pavia)15:20 ArDM (30') Alberto Marchionni (ETH Zurich)15:50 From ArgoNeuT to MicroBooNE (30') Bonnie Fleming (Yale U.)16:20 250L (30') Takasumi Maruyama (KEK)16:50 The DEAP/CLEAN project (20') Mark Boulay (Queen's U.)17:10-17:40 Coffee break Lessons from Xe based Liquids Imaging detectors (Chair: Flavio Cavanna (U. of L'Aquilla))17:30 MEG (20') Satoshi Mihara (KEK)17:50 The XENON project (20') Elena Aprile (Columbia U.)18:10 XMASS (20') Hiroyuki Sekiya (ICRR, U. of Tokyo) Studies on physics performance (Chair

  11. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    , as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN

  12. PREFACE: Workshop Photograph and Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Workshop photograph Workshop Program Sunday 28 March 201019:00-21:00 Reception at Okura Frontier Hotel Tsukuba(Buffet style dinner with drink) Monday 29 March 2010Introduction (Chair: André Rubbia (ETH Zurich))09:00 Welcome address (05') Atsuto Suzuki (KEK)09:05 Message from CERN on neutrino physics (10') Sergio Bertolucci (CERN)09:15 Message from FNAL on neutrino physics (10') Young Kee Kim (FNAL)09:25 Message from KEK on neutrino physics (10') Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK)09:35 Introductory remark on GLA2010 (10') Takuya Hasegawa (KEK) Special session (Chair: Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK))09:45 The ICARUS Liquid Argon TPC (45') Carlo Rubbia (CERN)10:30-11:00 Coffee break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments I (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))11:00 Results from massive underground detectors (non accelerator) (30') Takaaki Kajita (ICRR, U. of Tokyo)11:30 Present long baseline neutrino experiments (30') Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook)12:00-12:10 Workshop picture12:10-14:00 Lunch break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments II (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))14:00 Physics goals of the next generation massive underground experiments (30') David Wark (Imperial College London)14:30 Near detectors for long baseline neutrino experiments (20') Tsuyoshi Nakaya (Kyoto U.) Lessons on Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology from ongoing developments (Chair: Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook))14:50 WARP (30') Claudio Montanari (U. of Pavia)15:20 ArDM (30') Alberto Marchionni (ETH Zurich)15:50 From ArgoNeuT to MicroBooNE (30') Bonnie Fleming (Yale U.)16:20 250L (30') Takasumi Maruyama (KEK)16:50 The DEAP/CLEAN project (20') Mark Boulay (Queen's U.)17:10-17:40 Coffee break Lessons from Xe based Liquids Imaging detectors (Chair: Flavio Cavanna (U. of L'Aquilla))17:30 MEG (20') Satoshi Mihara (KEK)17:50 The XENON project (20') Elena Aprile (Columbia U.)18:10 XMASS (20') Hiroyuki Sekiya (ICRR, U. of Tokyo) Studies on physics performance (Chair

  13. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Heller Jagiellonian University, Krakow Samuli Hemming University of Iceland Yasuaki Hikida DESY, Hamburg Christian Hillmann Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Potsdam Stephan Hoehne Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Carlos Hoyos University of Wales, Swansea Mechthild Huebscher Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid Matthias Ihl University of Texas at Austin Emiliano Imeroni University of Wales, Swansea Nikos Irges University of Crete Negru Iulian University of Craiova Matthias Kaminski Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Stefanos Katmadas Universiteit Utrecht Shoichi Kawamoto Oxford University Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Arjan Keurentjes Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Sadi Khodaee Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, Iran Michael Kiermaier Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Ingo KirschEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Johanna Knapp CERN, Geneva Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Anatoly Konechny Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Daniel KreflLudwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Chethan KrishnanUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Stanislav Kuperstein Université Libre de Bruxelles Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Roman Linares Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, México Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Joseph Lykken Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, IL Carlo Maccaferri Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Oscar Macia Universidad de Valencia Tristan Maillard Centre de

  14. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    To assess the impact of climate change on soil organic C (SOC) stocks in agro-silvo-pastoral environments, different models have been applied worldwide at local or regional scales, such as as RothC (Francaviglia et al., 2012) or CENTURY (Alvaro-Fuentes et al., 2012). However, some of these models may require a high number of input parameters or can underestimate the effect of soil depth. CarboSOIL (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013) is an empirical model based on regression techniques and developed to predict SOC contents at standard soil depths (0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm) under a range of climate and/or land use change scenarios. CarboSOIL has been successfully applied in different Mediterranean areas ,e.g. Southern Spain (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013; Abd-Elmabod et al., 2014), Northern Egypt (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014) and Italy (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). In this study, CarboSOIL was applied in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park. This area covers 385 km2 and is located within Sierra Morena (Córdoba, South Spain) and has a semiarid Mediterranean climate. It is characterized by agro-silvo-pastoral systems. The Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland (MEOW-dehesa) is savanna-like open woodland ecosystem characterized by silvopastoral uses, being an ancient human modified Mediterranean landscape (Corral-Fernández et al., 2013; Lozano-García and Parras-Alcántara 2013). The most representative soils in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park are Cambisols, Regosols, Leptosols and Fluvisols. These soils are characterized by low fertility, poor physical conditions and marginal capacity for agricultural use, together with low organic matter (OM) content due to climate conditions (semiarid Mediterranean climate) and soil texture (sandy). The model was applied at different soil depths: 0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm (Parras-Alcántara et al., 2015) considering land use and climate changes scenarios based on available global climate models (IPPC, 2007). A

  15. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    To assess the impact of climate change on soil organic C (SOC) stocks in agro-silvo-pastoral environments, different models have been applied worldwide at local or regional scales, such as as RothC (Francaviglia et al., 2012) or CENTURY (Alvaro-Fuentes et al., 2012). However, some of these models may require a high number of input parameters or can underestimate the effect of soil depth. CarboSOIL (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013) is an empirical model based on regression techniques and developed to predict SOC contents at standard soil depths (0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm) under a range of climate and/or land use change scenarios. CarboSOIL has been successfully applied in different Mediterranean areas ,e.g. Southern Spain (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013; Abd-Elmabod et al., 2014), Northern Egypt (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014) and Italy (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). In this study, CarboSOIL was applied in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park. This area covers 385 km2 and is located within Sierra Morena (Córdoba, South Spain) and has a semiarid Mediterranean climate. It is characterized by agro-silvo-pastoral systems. The Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland (MEOW-dehesa) is savanna-like open woodland ecosystem characterized by silvopastoral uses, being an ancient human modified Mediterranean landscape (Corral-Fernández et al., 2013; Lozano-García and Parras-Alcántara 2013). The most representative soils in the Cardeña and Montoro mountain range Natural Park are Cambisols, Regosols, Leptosols and Fluvisols. These soils are characterized by low fertility, poor physical conditions and marginal capacity for agricultural use, together with low organic matter (OM) content due to climate conditions (semiarid Mediterranean climate) and soil texture (sandy). The model was applied at different soil depths: 0-25, 25-50 and 50-75 cm (Parras-Alcántara et al., 2015) considering land use and climate changes scenarios based on available global climate models (IPPC, 2007). A

  16. ESA presents INTEGRAL, its space observatory for Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    Baikonur is actually scheduled for 2001. ESA pioneered gamma-ray astronomy in space with its COS-B satellite (1975). Russia's Granat (1989) and NASA's Compton GRO (1991) followed. But INTEGRAL will be better still. With this mission ESA will further strengthen its lead in gamma-astronomy. Principal Investigators : Imager : Pietro Ubertini (IAS, Frascati, Italy) Spectrometer : Gilbert Vedrenne (CESR, Toulouse/France) Volker Schoenfelder (MPE, Garching/.Germany) X-Ray monitor : Niels Lund (DSRI, Copenhagen/Denmark) Optical Monitoring Camera : Alvaro Gimenez (INTA, Madrid/Spain) Integral Science Data Center : Thierry Courvoisier (Genova Observatory, Switzerland) For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel: +33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.76.90 INTEGRAL MEDIA DAY Tuesday 22 September 1998 Newton Conference Centre ESTEC, Noordwijk, Keplerlaan 1 (The Netherlands) Programme 10:30 . Arrival and Registration in the Newton Conference Centre 10:45. Welcome and introduction by David Dale, Director of ESTEC 10:50 The Scientific Challenge : the mission of INTEGRAL, by Chistoph Winkler, INTEGRAL Project Scientist 11:10 The Technical Challenge : the INTEGRAL spacecraft, by Kai Clausen, INTEGRAL Project Manager 11:30 The Industrial Challenge by A. Simeone, Programme Director at Aleniaspazio 11:45 Question/Answer session 12:00 Visit to INTEGRAL spacecraft ; photo and film opportunities, incl. Interview opportunities with speakers 13:00 Informal buffet lunch in Foyer of Conference Centre Newton 14:30 End of event

  17. The Role of Energy Dispersion in the Genesis and Life Cycle of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Michael

    This dissertation uses energy dispersion and wave packet concepts to provide a better conceptual model of the genesis and life cycle of African Easterly Waves and to better understand the instability of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The existence of an upstream (eastward) group velocity for AEWs is shown based on single-point lag regressions using gridded reanalysis data from 1990 to 2010. The eastward energy dispersion is consistent with the direction of ageostrophic geopotential flux vectors. A local eddy kinetic energy (EKE) budget reveals that, early in the life cycle of AEWs, growth rate due to geopotential flux convergence exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth rates. Later in the life cycle, EKE decay due to geopotential flux divergence cancels or exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth. A potential vorticity (PV) budget is used to diagnose tendencies related to group propagation. Although both upstream and downstream group speeds are possible because of the reversal in the mean meridional PV gradient, upstream propagation associated with the positive poleward PV gradient dominates wave packet evolution. Analogous to the concept of downstream development of midlatitude baroclinic waves, new AEWs develop preferentially upstream of the older ones, thus providing a mechanism for seeding new waves. The usefulness of upstream development as a genesis mechanism for AEWs is demonstrated by performing a case study of the AEW which ultimately produced hurricane Alberto (2000). The case study uses the ERA-interim reanalysis combined with surface observations and TRMM data. Using a local EKE budget, we attribute its genesis to energy dispersion from a preceding AEW. After genesis, baroclinic and barotropic conversion dominated the energetics of this AEW. Some strengths and weaknesses of upstream development as a paradigm for AEW genesis are discussed with respect to other potential mechanisms. The stability of the AEJ is examined applying the concept of absolute

  18. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  19. Effects of climate change on three flow regime-related ecosystem services in a highly-regulated Alpine river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolli, Mauro; Zolezzi, Guido; Geneletti, Davide; Majone, Bruno; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    for small hydropower production. Furthermore, we evaluated in detail the local effects of licensing new withdrawals in the river system under climate change scenarios by simulating three new water withdrawals for small hydropower production. The additional withdrawals have a major effect in comparison with climate change especially on rafting suitability, which will largely decrease with the increase of withdrawal capacity. Minor effects were detected on the quality of trout habitat. Our analysis showed as climate change could influence the suitability of the services and it showed as withdrawal licensing policy has to be taken into account to predict the future suitability of river ecosystem services. Bruno Majone, Francesca Villa, Roberto Deidda, Alberto Bellin, 2016. Impact of climate change and water use policies on hydropower potential in the south-eastern Alpine region, Science of The Total Environment, Volume 543, Pages 965-980, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.009.

  20. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  1. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    , as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN

  2. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    cole Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Denis KleversPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Karl KollerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow and Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Alexey KoshelevVrije Universiteit, Brussel Costas KounnasÉcole Normale Supérieure, Paris Daniel KreflCERN, Geneva Charlotte KristjansenNiels Bohr Institute, København Finn LarsenCERN, Geneva and University of Michigan Arnaud Le DiffonÉcole Normale Supérieure, Lyon Michael LennekCentre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Andreas LiberisUniversity of Patras Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Oscar Loaiza-Brito CINVESTAV, Mexico Florian Loebbert Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Yolanda Lozano University of Oviedo Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Tomasz Łukowski Jagiellonian University, Krakow Diego Mansi University of Crete Alberto Mariotti Università di Milano-Bicocca Raffaele Marotta Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Alessio Marrani Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and LNF, Firenze Andrea Mauri University of Crete Liuba Mazzanti École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Sean McReynoldsUniversità di Milano-Bicocca AKM Moinul Haque Meaze Chittagong University Patrick Meessen Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Carlo MeneghelliUniversità di Parma and Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Lotta Mether University of Helsinki and CERN, Geneva René Meyer Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Georgios MichalogiorgakisCenter de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Giuseppe Milanesi Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Samuel Monnier Université de Genève Wolfgang Mueck

  4. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    participants at the Group30 colloquium from 46 different countries. This high number of participants makes the 30th edition of ICGTMP one of the most successful meetings of the series. We were particularly happy with the attendance of 32 students and many young postdocs: this is promising for the future of the research field and of the colloquium series. The attraction of young scientists was promoted by a reduced participation fee, the availability of cheap accommodation in the University Student Guest House, grants from a US-NSF project and grants from the Organising Committee supporting participants from countries with limited financial resources. The colloquium brought together international top researchers, with a variety of different backgrounds but with "group theoretical or algebraic methods" as common ground. The selection of plenary speakers and topics was made by the Organizing Committee, following the suggestions of the International Advisory Committee (consisting of prominent scientists in their domain), and ensuring the diversity of the subjects treated. There were 11 plenary talks, given as well by distinguished world experts as by young rising stars: Matthias Christandl, Alberto De Sole, Rui Loja Fernandes, François Gay-Balmaz, Gitta Kutyniok, Amiram Leviatan, Karl-Hermann Neeb, Christoph Schweigert, Yuji Tachikawa, Luc Vinet and Joshua Zak. Next to the plenary talks, there were 170 talks in six parallel sessions and 10 poster presentations. All scientific activities took place in the Joseph Plateau Building of the Faculty of Engineering and Architecture of Ghent University, a historical building conveniently located in the city centre of Ghent. In this building we could make use of the main lecture hall (400 seats) for the plenary lectures, six lecture rooms for parallel sessions, two offices for organizational activities and registrations, two PC-rooms and a large foyer for coffee breaks, book exhibitions and the poster session. As part of the colloquium, a

  5. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    and numerical techniques which enable efficient quantitative study of peeling-ballooning modes. More broadly, I would like to thank the full DIII-D, C-Mod and JET teams, the LLNL and General Atomics Theory groups, and the York Plasma Institute. In addition, I would like to thank the US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, EURATOM, and the UK EPSRC for supporting this research. On a more personal note, I would like to thank my mentors over the years, including Nat Fisch, Greg Hammett, Ron Waltz, Vincent Chan, and Tony Taylor, and numerous colleagues who provided insight related to this work, including Lang Lao, Alan Turnbull, Ming Chu, Bob Miller, Rip Perkins, John Greene, Keith Burrell, John Ferron, Mickey Wade, Wayne Solomon, George McKee, Zheng Yan, Andrea Garofalo, Raffi Nazikian, Jack Connor, Jim Hastie, Chris Hegna, Samuli Saarelma, Guido Huijsmans, Alberto Loarte, Yutaka Kamada, Naoyuki Oyama, Hajime Urano, Nobuyuki Aiba, Andrew Kirk, David Dickinson, Lorne Horton, Costanza Maggi, Wolfgang Suttrop, P.A. Schneider, Rajesh Maingi, Amanda Hubbard, Ahmed Diallo, John Walk, and Matthew Leyland. Recently, the model developed in this paper has been used to discover a new regime of operation, the Super H-Mode, and to shed light on mechanisms for suppressing Edge Localized Modes. I hope that the model will continue to be useful, both as a tool for predicting and optimizing pedestal and fusion performance, and as a platform on which the fusion community continues to build our understanding of the complex physics of the edge barrier region, which plays such an important role in overall confinement and stability.

  6. Preface: The Evolving ISM in the Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, K.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Ingalls, J.; Paladini, R.

    2009-01-01

    "greening" the conference, from transportation options to elimination of paper. These proceedings are all electronic. We greatly appreciate the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), whose abstract service makes it easy to disseminate a paperless proceedings. The conference was extremely smooth and did not run over time on any day - this would not have been possible without the help and experience of the local organizing committee. In particular, we want to acknowledge the help of the Spitzer conference experts: Mary Ellen Barba, Roseanne Scholey, Helga Mycroft, Eloise Kennedy and the ISG team. We thank Megan Crane for designing and maintaining the abstract and registration submission pages. We also thank Seppo Laine, Tim Pyle and Robert Hurt for their help with designing the conference poster and the conference mascot (Dusty Starr!). Members of the SSC science staff (Sean Carey, Deborah Padgett, Caroline Bot, Sachin Shenoy and Roberta Paladini) served on the LOC and were ready to help as needed. A particular shout out goes to Jim Ingalls, web designer extra-ordinaire for a beautiful and easy to navigate website. And kudos to Roberta Paladini and Jim Ingalls for their work with the ADS in putting together these electronic proceedings. The conference would not have been as successful without the scientific program which was put together with the help of an incredible scientific organizing committee (Lia Athanassoula, Francois Boulanger, Pauline Barmby, Francoise Combes, Ed Churchwell, Debra Elmegreen, Neal Evans, George Helou, Robert Kennicutt, Jin Koda, Peter Martin, Paul Martini, Eva Schinnerer, Alberto Noriega-Crespo and Kartik Sheth). And finally a heartfelt thank you to all the participants for their contributions. We hope to see all of you in Pasadena again.

  7. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on Thin Films (ICTF-15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Osamu; Saito, Nagahiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Terashima, Chiaki; Ueno, Tomonaga; Sakai, Osamu; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Ito, Takahiro; Yogo, Toshinobu; Inoue, Yasushi; Ohtake, Naoto; Yoshida, Tsukasa; Tosa, Masahiro; Takai, Madoka; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Matsuda, Naoki; Teshima, Katsuya; Seki, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2013-03-01

    in the ancient temples and shrines, as well as private houses, which are built in styles unique to Kyoto. Furthermore, many festivals, ceremonies and traditional activities reveal the will of this city to convey and develop its 1200-year-old culture. Participants of the conference will also be able to see many world heritage sites in the city. Moreover, November is the best time of year to visit Kyoto. We hope you will enjoy Kyoto very much. We would like to offer our thanks for all the contributions from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, Symposium Chairs, the Secretary General, the Thin Film Division of IUVSTA (chair: Professor Dr Alberto Tagliaferro), IUVSTA, VSJ and other cooperating societies, and to all of the supporting organizations and enterprises. We would also like to express our thanks to all of the participants, secretariat members and members of the supporting staff. I am very pleased to welcome you to ICTF-15 and Kyoto! Director Professor Dr Osamu Takai Chairperson of ICTF-15 EcoTopia Science Institute, and Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering Graduate School of Engineering Nagoya University Japan

  8. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Midgley, P. A.

    2011-11-01

    where necessary. In the end, 61 manuscripts were accepted for publication. The Editors are very grateful to the following colleagues for their rapid and careful reviewing of manuscripts: M Albrecht, J S Barnard, R Beanland, G A Botton, D Cooper, L Clement, A J Craven, A G Cullis, N Daneu, V Grillo, E Grünbaum, A Gustafsson, P-H Jouneau, O L Krivanek, D Larson, M Luysberg, S I Molina, F A Ponce, A Rosenauer, F M Ross, I M Ross, J-L Rouviere, and Z L Wang. Prizes for student presentations at the conference were awarded to Mr Alberto Eljarrat, Universitat de Barcelona, and Mr Thibaud Denneulin, CEA-LETI Grenoble, both of whom are presenting their results also as contributions to this proceedings volume. Entertainment during the conference dinner was provided by the college's string quartet, and after the meal we held the now traditional friendly competition between teams of microscopists; this year teams were asked to construct models of scientific instruments using only cardboard, paper, sticky tape and glue. By unanimous vote, the team who presented the 'Atomic Food Microscope (AFM)' prototype won first prize - the deft 'dipping mode' of the cardboard cantilever (see photo) was a highlight! Figure 2 Figure 2. The prize winning 'Atomic Food Microscope (AFM)' in action! The organisers are very grateful to the following companies who contributed to the success of the meeting by presenting trade stands during an exhibition on the evening of 5 April: Agar Scientific, Bruker, CamScan, FEI, Gatan, Hitachi High Technologies, HREM Research, IOP Publishing, JEOL, Leica Microsystems and MICOS. Finally, we would like to thank the staff of the Institute of Physics for their expert assistance in planning and organising this conference and in particular Claire Garland for her dedicated professional support and her always joyful approach to any issues that arose. October 2011 T Walther P A Midgley

  9. East Meets West on "Double Star", a Joint Mission to Explore Earth's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    Cluster instruments has a number of advantages for both European and Chinese scientists. "By flying experiments identical to those on Cluster, we can reduce costs and development time," explained Alberto Gianolio, ESA Project Manager for Double Star. "This will minimise risk and help us to ensure that we are able to meet the spacecraft development schedule." ESA has agreed to contribute 8 million euros to the Double Star programme. This funding will be used for refurbishment and pre-integration of the European instruments, acquisition of data for 4 hours per day and coordination of scientific operations. Notes for Editors: Double Star will be the first mission launched by China to explore the Earth's magnetosphere - the magnetic bubble that surrounds our planet. As its name suggests, Double Star will involve two satellites - each designed, developed, launched and operated by the CNSA - flying in complementary orbits around the Earth. This orbital configuration will enable scientists to obtain simultaneous data on the changing magnetic field and population of electrified particles in different regions of the magnetosphere. The duo is expected to be launched by Chinese Long March 2C rockets in December 2002 and March 2003. This schedule may enable them to operate alongside ESA's Cluster mission - a mini-flotilla of four identical spacecraft launched into elliptical orbits around the Earth last summer. The "equatorial" spacecraft (DSP-1) will be launched into an elliptical orbit of 550 x 60,000 km, inclined at 28.5 degrees to the equator. This will enable it to investigate the Earth's huge magnetic tail, the region where particles are accelerated towards the planet's magnetic poles by a process known as reconnection. The "polar" satellite (DSP-2) will concentrate on physical processes taking place over the magnetic poles and the development of aurorae. It will have a 350 x 25,000 km orbit taking it round the Earth once every 7.3 hours.

  10. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Quintana, Jacqueline

    2002-03-01

    -of-equilibrium dynamics, non-linear dynamics, chaos, turbulence and chaotic dynamics. The present issue contains a substantial number of the invited and contributed talks presented at the meeting. We made an effort to arrange these papers with an order similar to that of presentation during the meeting. It is our pleasure to thank the scientific committee, all the speakers, the session chairs and all participants who contributed to the success of the conference. We are grateful to the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation (Messina-Italy), and to the President On. Nino Calarco, for the Patronage and the enthusiastic support. Our thanks goes also for the Messina University, the INFM (Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Italy), the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT, Mexico) and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). The Conference was sponsored by the INFM-Sec.C, CONACyT, UNAM, the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation which contributed financial support to participants and to the publication of the present issue. We are grateful to them for the support. Last, but not the least, we express our warmest gratitude to all the members of the local organizing committee for their assistance and for the work spent in organizing this meeting and especially to Professor~Alberto Robledo for his valuable advice.

  11. Surgical pathology in the 20th century at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

    PubMed

    Geller, Stephen A

    2008-08-01

    How did the education of surgical pathology, and pathology in general, differ at Mount Sinai? Passing the examination of the American Board of Pathology was never the focus of the department. Learning criteria or quoting references was de-emphasized, but mastery of macroscopic pathology was required, supported in both word and action by two brilliant surgical pathologists, Otani and Kaneko, and by two extraordinary medical pathologists, Klemperer and Popper. Meticulous microscopy emphasized pattern rather than reliance on lists of discrete features. Otani developed a regular "problem case" meeting for a community of pathologists, made up of alumni and other interested pathologists, as well as active department members. These monthly sessions provided the highest level of "continuing medical education." Otani and Kaneko unequivocally believed in learning from cases, and Mount Sinai residents were fortunate both in the one-to-one teaching and in the wealth of material, in all systems, that came to surgical pathology. Outstanding pathologists who came from Mount Sinai settled throughout the country and provided the highest level of diagnoses, but, with the exception of Bernard Wagner, Emanuel Rubin, Fiorenzo Paronetto, Richard Horowitz, Michael Gerber, Marc Rosenblum, Bruce Wenig, Jaishree Jagirdar, Swan Thung, Cesar Moran, Hideko Kamino, Philip LeBoit, Alberto Marchevsky, and others, there were relatively few academic leaders. Otani and Kaneko did not have national reputations. Klemperer, although world renowned, was relatively unassuming, and his disciples numbered almost as many nonpathologists as pathologists. Popper did establish a major center for liver pathology, with students coming from around the world, but did not particularly promote general surgical pathology. Can the Mount Sinai approach still be applied? The decline in the numbers of autopsies performed, the demands for rapid turnaround time, the de-emphasis of gross pathology as newer technologies (eg

  12. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    Bohemian (Jesuit) provinces, mainly in Vienna and Neisse (the present Nysa in Silesia, Poland), but no traces of further astronomical activity have survived, if they ever existed. The fourth article, by Hans Gaab, is a very thoroughly researched biography of Johann Philipp von Wurzelbau (1651-1725), an merchant turned astronomer from Nuremberg. Wurzelbau started his activities at Christoph Eimmart's (the director of the painters' academy in Nuremberg) private observatory, and his first published work deals with observations of the great comet of 1680. Furthermore, he observed solar eclipses, Mercury transits, and determined the geographical latitude of Nuremberg. The article also contains a detailed description of Wurzelbau's observatory and its instruments. The fifth paper, by Klaus-Dieter Herbst, deals with Gottfried Kirch's idea of founding an astronomical society - being a vehicle to publishing astronomical observations. Kirch (1639-1710) was a well-known astronomer and calendar manufacturer. Around 1700, Kirch was appointed first astronomer at the Brandenburg society of sciences, and director of the observatory that was to be established with the new Berlin Academy. Herbst shows that Kirch's religious attitude that converged on pietism was a driving force to establish a scientific society. However, the final failure of such a project is due to the emergence of the scientific journal Acta Eruditorum, issued since 1682 in Leipzig, which could serve as an outlet for the publication of astronomical data by Kirch and others, thus fulfilling an essential task of the projected academy. Kirch's occupation with the composition of calendars, which took most of his time, was another reason. The following three shorter articles deal with 19th century astronomy. Peter Brosche describes an early visual photometer employed by Johann Gottfried Koehler (1745-1801) in Dresden, Alberto Meschiari edits and comments letters by Franz Xaver von Zach (1754-1832) to the physicist Gerbi in

  13. Contribution of seismic processing to put up the scaffolding for the 3-dimensional study of deep sedimentary basins: the fundaments of trans-national 3D modelling in the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capar, Laure

    2013-04-01

    European Territorial Cooperation 2007-2013. The project integrates partners from Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia and Switzerland and runs from September 2012 to June 2015. Further information on www.geomol.eu The GeoMol seismic interpretation team: Roland Baumberger (swisstopo), Agnès BRENOT (BRGM), Alessandro CAGNONI (RLB), Renaud COUËFFE (BRGM), Gabriel COURRIOUX (BRGM), Chiara D'Ambrogi (ISPRA), Chrystel Dezayes (BRGM), Charlotte Fehn (LGRB), Sunseare GABALDA (BRGM), Gregor Götzl (GBA), Andrej Lapanje (GeoZS), Stéphane MARC (BRGM), Alberto MARTINI (RER-SGSS), Fabio Carlo Molinari (RER-SGSS), Edgar Nitsch (LGRB), Robert Pamer (LfU BY), Marco PANTALONI (ISPRA), Sebastian Pfleiderer (GBA), Andrea PICCIN (RLB), (Nils Oesterling (swisstopo), Isabel Rupf (LGRB), Uta Schulz (LfU BY), Yves SIMEON (BRGM), Günter SÖKOL (LGRB), Heiko Zumsprekel (LGRB)

  14. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    thank the following outgoing Board Members whose term of service was reached at the end of 2012: Keith Burrell, Atsushi Fukuyama, Guenter Janeschitz, Myeun Kwon, Alberto Loarte, Derek Stork, Tony Taylor and Kazuo Toi. We welcome the new Board Members who have joined the Board from the start of 2013: Pietro Barabaschi, Riccardo Betti, Rich Callis, Wonho Choi, Yasuaki Kishimoto, Joaquin Sánchez, Paul Thomas, Mickey Wade, Howard Wilson, Hiroshi Yamada and Steve Zinkle. We look forward to working with the Board to maintain the high standing of Nuclear Fusion . The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors, referees, and Board of Editors, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the IAEA Nuclear Fusion office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to the team for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees, Board of Editors, and Vienna and Bristol office staff season's greetings and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2013. References [1] Whyte D.G. et al 2010 I-mode: an H-mode energy confinement regime with L-mode particle transport in Alcator C-Mod Nucl. Fusion 50 105005 [2] Bosch H.-S. et al 2013 Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X Nucl. Fusion 53 126001 [3] Chapman I.T. et al 2013 Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER Nucl. Fusion 53 066001 [4] Knaster J. et al 2013 IFMIF: overview of the validation activities Nucl. Fusion 53 116001

  15. The crystalline revolution :ISO's finding opens a new research field, "astro-mineralogy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    bodies. Models predict that in about ten to one hundred million years they will make planets", Waters says. "In fact, crystalline silicates are very common in our own Solar System. You also have them in the comet Hale Bopp!". The reason why crystalline silicates had not been detected before in stars has to do with their low temperatures. Cold material emits mostly infrared light, which means an infrared space telescope like ESA's ISO was needed. The two high-resolution spectrometers on-board the satellite, able to detect the 'chemical fingerprint' of the crystals, did the rest. Astronomers are sure about the discovery because those chemical fingerprints, the spectra, can be compared in laboratories with spectra from crystalline silicates found on Earth. This method has demonstrated the crystalline structure and has even already allowed the identification of some of the crystals, such as forsterite and enstatite. However, crystalline silicates are a large family and their chemical signatures can be very similar; to enlarge the list of precise crystals more work will be needed, say experts in space chemistry. That is just one of the open questions requiring lab work. There's at least another one: crystalline silicates are found around old stars, in protoplanetary disks and in our own Solar System, but not in the space among the stars; astronomers can't explain it yet. "Crystalline silicates are synthesised around the stars; then that dust goes into the interstellar space, and enriches the raw material out of which more stars and planets will form. So you would expect crystals also to be in the interstellar medium! Crystals will certainly make us learn a lot...", says Waters. "This finding shows that ISO is really unveiling the chemistry of the Universe", says ESA astronomer Alberto Salama, chairman of the workshop about ISO results in spectroscopy held this week at ESA's Villafranca station in Madrid where the results were presented to the scientific community. "This is

  16. PREFACE: The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N.

    2012-07-01

    Daoulas, Victor Rühle and Kurt Kremer Smectic shellsTeresa Lopez-Leon, Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, Mauri

  17. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  18. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    The present issue of SERBIAN ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL is the last one edited by the two of us. We resigned not because we were tired of our service to the astronomical community but due to the old tradition of the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory that its Director is automatically the Editor-in-Chief of its publications. We therefore gladly give the opportunity to the new Director, in charge since July 1st. 2002, to organize the publishing activity according to his conceptions. One of us (M.S.D.) was appointed Editor on January 1st. 1984 (from No. 135), becoming the Editor-in-Chief in 1987 (from No. 137). The other one (L.C.P.) is the Editor since 1994 (from No. 150). During this period the Bulletin de l'Observatoire Astronomique de Belgrade merged with the Publications of the Department of Astronomy, changing its name into Bulletin Astronomique de Belgrade from No. 145 in 1992, to finally become Serbian Astronomical Journal in 1998, from No. 157. Accordingly, of a "Bulletin" we made a "Journal". For example, in the period 1971-1984 (Nos. 125-134) in Bull. Obs. Astron. Belgrade, practically only the associates of the Belgade Observatory published their papers, save for a few individuals from the Belgrade University. We found within this period the name of one sole foreign astronomer - from the USSR - namely V. A. Fomin, among the authors. In the period 1985-2002 in the Serbian Astronomical Journal published their communications not only astronomers from Yugoslavia but also from Belgium, China, France, Italy, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Spain, Ukraine, USA. Our authors from outside of Yugoslavia are: J. P. Anosova C. Beuyninx Cristina Blaga Paul A. Blaga Veronique Bommier N. M. Bronnikov Alberto Celino Pierre Cugnon D. R. Davis Henry Debehogne Veronique Dehant P. Farinella Alex Gaina R. I. Gumerov R. S. Izmailov V. B. Kapkov F. F. Khalikhevich S. A. Kilioner Tatiana R. Kirian N. G. Litkevich Evencio G. Mediavilla O. Mihai Andrea Milani Vasile Mioc Jose A. Munoz Viktor V

  19. Golden legacy from ESA's observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    ISO was the first space observatory able to see the sky in infrared light. Using its eyes, we have discovered many new phenomena that have radically changed our view of the Universe. Everybody knows that when something is heated it glows. However, things also glow with a light our eyes cannot detect at room temperature: infrared light. Infrared telescopes do not work well on the Earth’s surface because such light is absorbed by the atmosphere. ISO looked at the cold parts of the universe, usually the 'cold and dusty' parts. It peered into clouds of dust and gas where stars were being born, observing for the first time the earliest stages of star formation. It discovered, for example, that stars begin to form at temperatures as low as -250°C or less. Scientists were able to follow the evolution of dust from where it is produced (that is, old stars - the massive 'dust factories') to the regions where it forms new planetary systems. ISO found that most young stars are surrounded by discs of dust that could harbour planets. The observatory also analysed the chemical composition of cosmic dust, thereby opening up a new field of research, ‘astromineralogy’. With ISO we have been able to discover the presence of water in many different regions in space. Another new discipline, 'astrochemistry', was boosted when ISO discovered that the water molecule is common in the Universe, even in distant galaxies, and complex organic molecules like benzene readily form in the surroundings of some stars. "ISO results are impacting most fields of astronomical research, almost literally from comets to cosmology," explains Alberto Salama, ISO Project Scientist. "Some results answer questions. Others open new fields. Some are already being followed up by existing telescopes; others have to await future facilities." When ISO's operational life ended, in 1998, its observations became freely available to the world scientific community via ISO’s data archive. In May 2003 the

  20. PREFACE: International Symposium on Ultrasound in the Control of Industrial Processes (UCIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Luis Elvira; Resa López, Pablo; Salazar, Jordi; Benedito Fort, José Javier; Martínez Graullera, Óscar

    2012-12-01

    Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Pedro Castro Blazquez, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain David Romero Laorden, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Javier Rodrigo Villazón Terrazas, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Patricia Nevado, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Sofia Aparicio, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Montserrat Parrilla Romero, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Luis Gómez-Ullate Alvear, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Dr Alberto Ibáñez Rodríguez, Centro de Acústica Aplicada y Evaluación No Destructiva (CAEND), UPM-CSIC, Spain Sponsors Sponsors

  1. Introduction to the 30th volume of Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2014-01-01

    The field of inverse problems is a fast-developing domain of research originating from the practical demands of finding the cause when a result is observed. The woodpecker, searching for insects, is probing a tree using sound waves: the information searched for is whether there is an insect or not, hence a 0-1 decision. When the result has to contain more information, ad hoc solutions are not at hand and more sophisticated methods have to be developed. Right from its first appearance, the field of inverse problems has been characterized by an interdisciplinary nature: the interpretation of measured data, reinforced by mathematical models serving the analyzing questions of observability, stability and resolution, developing efficient, stable and accurate algorithms to gain as much information as possible from the input and to feedback to the questions of optimal measurement configuration. As is typical for a new area of research, facets of it are separated and studied independently. Hence, fields such as the theory of inverse scattering, tomography in general and regularization methods have developed. However, all aspects have to be reassembled to arrive at the best possible solution to the problem at hand. This development is reflected by the first and still leading journal in the field, Inverse Problems. Founded by pioneers Roy Pike from London and Pierre Sabatier from Montpellier, who enjoyably describes the journal's nascence in his book Rêves et Combats d'un Enseignant-Chercheur, Retour Inverse [1], the journal has developed successfully over the last few decades. Neither the Editors-in-Chief, formerly called Honorary Editors, nor the board or authors could have set the path to success alone. Their fruitful interplay, complemented by the efficient and highly competent publishing team at IOP Publishing, has been fundamental. As such it is my honor and pleasure to follow my renowned colleagues Pierre Sabatier, Mario Bertero, Frank Natterer, Alberto Grünbaum and

  2. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can

  3. Introduction to the 30th volume of Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2014-01-01

    The field of inverse problems is a fast-developing domain of research originating from the practical demands of finding the cause when a result is observed. The woodpecker, searching for insects, is probing a tree using sound waves: the information searched for is whether there is an insect or not, hence a 0-1 decision. When the result has to contain more information, ad hoc solutions are not at hand and more sophisticated methods have to be developed. Right from its first appearance, the field of inverse problems has been characterized by an interdisciplinary nature: the interpretation of measured data, reinforced by mathematical models serving the analyzing questions of observability, stability and resolution, developing efficient, stable and accurate algorithms to gain as much information as possible from the input and to feedback to the questions of optimal measurement configuration. As is typical for a new area of research, facets of it are separated and studied independently. Hence, fields such as the theory of inverse scattering, tomography in general and regularization methods have developed. However, all aspects have to be reassembled to arrive at the best possible solution to the problem at hand. This development is reflected by the first and still leading journal in the field, Inverse Problems. Founded by pioneers Roy Pike from London and Pierre Sabatier from Montpellier, who enjoyably describes the journal's nascence in his book Rêves et Combats d'un Enseignant-Chercheur, Retour Inverse [1], the journal has developed successfully over the last few decades. Neither the Editors-in-Chief, formerly called Honorary Editors, nor the board or authors could have set the path to success alone. Their fruitful interplay, complemented by the efficient and highly competent publishing team at IOP Publishing, has been fundamental. As such it is my honor and pleasure to follow my renowned colleagues Pierre Sabatier, Mario Bertero, Frank Natterer, Alberto Grünbaum and

  4. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    enjoyed during the Symposium. Finally, the Local Organising Committee and the IEEC staff have given their enthusiastic support to the organisation in every detail, and have efficiently worked for months to make the Symposium happen. Many thanks to all of them, and congratulations. Alberto Lobo and Carlos F Sopuerta Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Guest Editors

  5. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008 Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-05-01

    model whose primer display we enjoyed during the symposium. Finally, the local organising committee (LOC) and the IEEC staff have given their enthusiastic support to the organization in every detail, and have worked efficiently for months to make the symposium happen. Many thanks to all of them, and congratulations. This is a co-publication with Journal of Physics Conference Series. A selection of papers are published in this issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity with the bulk of the papers, after peer review, published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Alberto Lobo and Carlos F Sopuerta Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Guest Editors

  6. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    -review, with the aim to raise the quality of our content, three years later the number of published articles has remained stable at around 220 per year, whilst the number of downloads and citations to the journal has grown. In 2011, three topical issues have been published, on: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Guest Editor: Alberta Bonanni, University of Linz, Austria) Flexible OLEDs and organic electronics (Guest Editors: Jang-Joo Kim, Min-Koo Han, Cambridge University, UK, and Yong-Young Noh, Seoul National University, Korea) From heterostructures to nanostructures: an 80th birthday tribute to Zhores Alferov (Guest Editor: Dieter Bimberg, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) For the coming years, I will strongly support that the number of published topical issues will continue on the same level or slightly rise. SST has planned the publication of the following topical issues for 2012: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors (Guest Editors: Jung Han, Yale University, USA, and Michael Kneissl, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) Topological insulators (Guest Editors: Alberto Morpurgo, Université de Genève, Switzerland and Björn Trauzettel, Universität Basel, Switzerland) Atomic layer deposition (Guest Editor: Marek Godlewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) 50th Anniversary of the laser diode (Guest Editors: Mike Adams, Univeristy of Essex, UK and Stephane Calvez, University of Strathclyde, UK) In addition to the traditional topics of SST, I as Editor-in-chief, strongly support and welcome the submission of manuscripts on organic semiconductors, topological insulators, semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic, solid-state lighting and energy harvesting, IC application beyond Moore's law and fundamental works on semiconductors based on abundant materials. I am extremely optimistic about the future of SST. I believe that we will raise the standards of acceptance while maintaining the short time from submission to

  7. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    . Döbele (1993 - 1999) K. Muraoka (1999 - 2003) A. J. H. Donné (2003 - ) LOCAL ORGANIZERS: Leonardo Giudicotti, Consorzio RFX and Padova University (Chairman) Roberto Pasqualotto, Consorzio RFX Margherita Basso, Consorzio RFX Santolo De Benedictis, Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, CNR Paolo Innocente, Consorzio RFX Alberto Alfier, Consorzio RFX Enrico Scek Osman, Consorzio RFX PREVIOUS LAPD MEETINGS 1983- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1985- Oxford, U.K.: D. Evans (Organizer) 1987- Lake Arrowhead, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 1989- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1991- Bad Honnef, Germany: F. Döbele (Organizer) 1993- Bar Harbor, USA: P. Woskov (Organizer) 1995- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1997- Doorwerth, Netherlands: A. J. H. Donné (Organizer) 1999- Lake Tahoe, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 2001- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 2003- Les Houches, France: N. Sadeghi (Organizer) 2005- Snowbird, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 2007- Takayama, Japan: K. Kawahata (Organizer) 2009- Castelbrando, Italy: L. Giudicotti (Organizer)

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    The present issue of SERBIAN ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL is the last one edited by the two of us. We resigned not because we were tired of our service to the astronomical community but due to the old tradition of the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory that its Director is automatically the Editor-in-Chief of its publications. We therefore gladly give the opportunity to the new Director, in charge since July 1st. 2002, to organize the publishing activity according to his conceptions. One of us (M.S.D.) was appointed Editor on January 1st. 1984 (from No. 135), becoming the Editor-in-Chief in 1987 (from No. 137). The other one (L.C.P.) is the Editor since 1994 (from No. 150). During this period the Bulletin de l'Observatoire Astronomique de Belgrade merged with the Publications of the Department of Astronomy, changing its name into Bulletin Astronomique de Belgrade from No. 145 in 1992, to finally become Serbian Astronomical Journal in 1998, from No. 157. Accordingly, of a "Bulletin" we made a "Journal". For example, in the period 1971-1984 (Nos. 125-134) in Bull. Obs. Astron. Belgrade, practically only the associates of the Belgade Observatory published their papers, save for a few individuals from the Belgrade University. We found within this period the name of one sole foreign astronomer - from the USSR - namely V. A. Fomin, among the authors. In the period 1985-2002 in the Serbian Astronomical Journal published their communications not only astronomers from Yugoslavia but also from Belgium, China, France, Italy, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Spain, Ukraine, USA. Our authors from outside of Yugoslavia are: J. P. Anosova C. Beuyninx Cristina Blaga Paul A. Blaga Veronique Bommier N. M. Bronnikov Alberto Celino Pierre Cugnon D. R. Davis Henry Debehogne Veronique Dehant P. Farinella Alex Gaina R. I. Gumerov R. S. Izmailov V. B. Kapkov F. F. Khalikhevich S. A. Kilioner Tatiana R. Kirian N. G. Litkevich Evencio G. Mediavilla O. Mihai Andrea Milani Vasile Mioc Jose A. Munoz Viktor V

  9. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  10. Adaptation response surfaces from an ensemble of wheat projections under climate change in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Ferrise, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    (14), Petr Hlavinka(7,8), Frantisek Jurecka(7,8), Jaromir Krzyszczak(10), Marcos Lana(6), Julien Minet(15), Manuel Montesino(16), Claas Nendel(6), John Porter(16), Jaime Recio(1), Françoise Ruget(11), Alberto Sanz(1), Zacharias Steinmetz(17,18), Pierre Stratonovitch(19), Iwan Supit(20), Domenico Ventrella(21), Allard de Wit(20) and Reimund P. Rötter(4). 1 Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSIAgrónomos,28040 Madrid, Spain, margarita.ruiz.ramos@upm.es 2 University of Florence, 50144 Florence, Italy 3 IFAPA Junta de Andalucia, 14004 Córdoba, Spain 4 Natural Resources Institute (LUKE), 01370 Vantaa, Finland 5 Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), 00250 Helsinki, Finland 6 Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), 15374 Müncheberg, Germany 7 Institute of Agrosystems and Bioclimatology, Mendel University in Brno, Brno 613 00, Czech Republic 8 Global Change Research Institute CAS, 603 00 Brno, Czech Republic 9 INRES, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany 10 Institute of Agrophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Lublin, Poland 11 INRA, UMR 1114 EMMAH, F-84914 Avignon, France 12 James Hutton Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, DD2 5DA, Scotland 13 State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency Management, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China 14 University of Sassari, 07100 Sassari, Italy 15 Université de Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium 16 University of Copenhagen, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 17 RIFCON GmbH, 69493 Hirschberg, Germany 18 Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, 76829 Landau, Germany 19 Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK 20 Wageningen University, 6700AA Wageningen, The Netherlands 21 Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria. CRA-SCA

  11. Evolution of the late Paleozoic accretionary complex and overlying forearc-magmatic arc, south central Chile (38°-41°S): Constraints for the tectonic setting along the southwestern margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Mark W.; Kato, Terence T.; Rodriguez, Carolina; Godoy, Estanislao; Duhart, Paul; McDonough, Michael; Campos, Alberto

    1999-08-01

    lithologies from Late Triassic shallow marine to continental deposits suggests that substantial uplift also affected the inner forearc and magmatic arc region during the D2 event. We propose that dextral-oblique convergence, initiated during the middle Permian along this segment of the Gondwana margin, resulted in the transpressional uplift and juxtaposition of high pressure/temperature (P/T) Western Series against low P/T Eastern Series lithologies and culminated with deposition of Late Triassic, continental to shallow marine, coarse clastic sedimentary rocks in fault-bounded strike-slip basins adjacent to the exhumed Western Series. Large-scale dextral transpression and northward displacement of the accretionary complex during Late Permian to Late Triassic time along the Chilean margin of Gondwana are synchronous and kinematically compatible with widespread regional transpression, extension, and silicic magmatism inboard of the southern Gondwana margin at this time. We thank C. Mpodozis, M. Gardeweg, and J. Muñoz of the Servicio de Geología y Minería de Chile (SERNAGEOMIN) for their support of this work. Fruitful discussions with N. Blanco, F. Hervé, H. Moreno, C. Mpodozis, and F. Munizaga have aided in our understanding of the geology of the region. The hard work by the staff of SERNAGEOMIN's Puerto Varas office is graciously appreciated. We thank J.D. Walker and W.R. Van Schmus at the University of Kansas for allowing MWM use of their U-Pb and mass spectrometer facilities and J. Vargas and the staff of SERNAGEOMIN's geochemistry laboratory for their assistance in this project. F. Munizaga allowed us to cite an unpublished 40Ar-39Ar date. We thank G. Ya˜nez for access to aeromagnetic data. T. Kato wishes to thank W. G. Ernst. Comments by I. Dalziel, S. Kay, and V. Ramos helped clarify ideas presented in this paper and are greatly appreciated. This work is dedicated to our friend and colleague Alberto Campos C., who died in a climbing accident on Calbuco Volcano, 1996.

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    Wisconsin-Madison, United States Günter Duckeck, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Richard Dubois, SLAC, United States Michael Ernst, BNL, United States Ian Fisk, Fermilab, United States Gonzalo Merino, PIC, Spain John Gordon, STFC-RAL, United Kingdom Volker Gülzow, DESY, Germany Frederic Hemmer, CERN, Switzerland Viatcheslav Ilyin, Moscow State University, Russia Nobuhiko Katayama, KEK, Japan Alexei Klimentov, BNL, United States Simon C. Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Milos Lokajícek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic David Malon, ANL, United States Pere Mato Vila, CERN, Switzerland Mauro Morandin, INFN CNAF, Italy Harvey Newman, Caltech, United States Farid Ould-Saada, University of Oslo, Norway Ruth Pordes, Fermilab, United States Hiroshi Sakamoto, University of Tokyo, Japan Alberto Santoro, UERJ, Brazil Jim Shank, Boston University, United States Dongchul Son, Kyungpook National University, South Korea Reda Tafirout, TRIUMF, Canada Stephen Wolbers, Fermilab, United States Frank Wuerthwein, UCSD, United States

  13. VLBA Changes Picture of Famous Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    Using the supersharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have made the most precise measurement ever of the distance to a famous star-forming region. The measurement -- to the heavily studied Orion Nebula -- changes scientists' understanding of the characteristics of the young stars in the region. Parallax Diagram Trigonometric Parallax method determines distance to star by measuring its slight shift in apparent position as seen from opposite ends of Earth's orbit. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Star Track Apparent track of star GMR A in the Orion Nebula Cluster, showing shift caused by Earth's orbital motion and star's movement in space. CREDIT: Sandstrom et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on Images for Larger Files "This measurement is four times more precise than previous distance estimates. Because our measurement reduces the distance to this region, it tells us that the stars there are less bright than thought before, and changes the estimates of their ages," said Geoff Bower, an astronomer at the University of California at Berkeley. Bower, along with Karin Sandstrom, J.E.G. Peek, Alberto Bolatto and Richard Plambeck, all of Berkeley, published their findings in the October 10 edition of the Astrophysical Journal. The scientists determined the distance to a star called GMR A, one of a cluster of stars in the Orion Nebula, by measuring the slight shift in the star's apparent position in the sky caused by the Earth's motion around the Sun. Observing the star when the Earth is on opposite sides of its annual orbit allows astronomers to measure the angle of this small shift and thus provides a direct trigonometric calculation of its distance. "By using this technique, called parallax, we get a direct measurement that does not depend on various assumptions that are required to use less-direct methods," Bower said. "Only a telescope with the remarkable ability to see fine detail that is provided by the VLBA is

  14. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    -review, with the aim to raise the quality of our content, three years later the number of published articles has remained stable at around 220 per year, whilst the number of downloads and citations to the journal has grown. In 2011, three topical issues have been published, on: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Guest Editor: Alberta Bonanni, University of Linz, Austria) Flexible OLEDs and organic electronics (Guest Editors: Jang-Joo Kim, Min-Koo Han, Cambridge University, UK, and Yong-Young Noh, Seoul National University, Korea) From heterostructures to nanostructures: an 80th birthday tribute to Zhores Alferov (Guest Editor: Dieter Bimberg, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) For the coming years, I will strongly support that the number of published topical issues will continue on the same level or slightly rise. SST has planned the publication of the following topical issues for 2012: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors (Guest Editors: Jung Han, Yale University, USA, and Michael Kneissl, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) Topological insulators (Guest Editors: Alberto Morpurgo, Université de Genève, Switzerland and Björn Trauzettel, Universität Basel, Switzerland) Atomic layer deposition (Guest Editor: Marek Godlewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) 50th Anniversary of the laser diode (Guest Editors: Mike Adams, Univeristy of Essex, UK and Stephane Calvez, University of Strathclyde, UK) In addition to the traditional topics of SST, I as Editor-in-chief, strongly support and welcome the submission of manuscripts on organic semiconductors, topological insulators, semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic, solid-state lighting and energy harvesting, IC application beyond Moore's law and fundamental works on semiconductors based on abundant materials. I am extremely optimistic about the future of SST. I believe that we will raise the standards of acceptance while maintaining the short time from submission to

  15. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-07-01

    : Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain SHAPIRO, Ilya: Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brasil SIMONI, Alberto: Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy SOLOMON, Allan: Open University/ University of Paris VI, UK/France SUDARSHAN, Ashok: SUDARSHAN, George: University of Texas at Austin, USA TULCZYJEW, Wlodzimierz: Universitá di Camerino, Italy UCHIYAMA, Chikako: University of Yamanashi, Japan VENTRIGLIA, Franco: Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy VILASI, Gaetano: Universitá di Salerno, Italy ZACCARIA, Francesco: Universitá di Napoli Federico II, Italy

  16. New study reveals twice as many asteroids as previously believed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    sky corresponding to that covered by four full moons as seen from Earth. Then, a model developed by Tedesco and the astronomers Alberto Cellino and Vincenzo Zappala (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Italy), allowed them to estimate the whole asteroid population in the main belt: between 1.1 million and 1.9 million asteroids with a diameter larger than 1 kilometre. "If you consider the average value of 1.5 million asteroids, the ISO result is about twice as high as estimated by two other recent studies in visible light," Tedesco says. The study by Durda et al., published in 1998, gave an estimate of about 860 000 asteroids larger than 1 kilometre in the main belt. In 2001, Ivezic et al. obtained an even lower figure of 740 000 asteroids based on preliminary data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Why the discrepancy? The fact that visually dark objects - such as asteroids - are better detected in the infrared might explain the discrepancy between visible and infrared results. For an optical telescope, the brightness of an asteroid depends on the visible light it reflects from the Sun. Observations with infrared telescopes, on the other hand, detect the 'heat' of the asteroid, which does not depend that much on the reflected sunlight, but on the absorbed sunlight. As an example, let’s consider two spheres of the same size, and located close to each other in the asteroid belt, one of which reflects ten times as much of the visible light striking it as the other. As seen by an optical telescope, the sphere which reflects more appears ten times brighter than the other sphere which might be even invisible. However, for ISO both spheres would be visible. Actually, the 'dark' sphere would appear brighter in the infrared because it would have a higher temperature (as it has absorbed more sunlight). Expert’s ‘best estimate’ Tedesco assumes that both visible and infrared searches might have their own biases, which is the reason why the given results have an error

  17. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    participants at the Group30 colloquium from 46 different countries. This high number of participants makes the 30th edition of ICGTMP one of the most successful meetings of the series. We were particularly happy with the attendance of 32 students and many young postdocs: this is promising for the future of the research field and of the colloquium series. The attraction of young scientists was promoted by a reduced participation fee, the availability of cheap accommodation in the University Student Guest House, grants from a US-NSF project and grants from the Organising Committee supporting participants from countries with limited financial resources. The colloquium brought together international top researchers, with a variety of different backgrounds but with "group theoretical or algebraic methods" as common ground. The selection of plenary speakers and topics was made by the Organizing Committee, following the suggestions of the International Advisory Committee (consisting of prominent scientists in their domain), and ensuring the diversity of the subjects treated. There were 11 plenary talks, given as well by distinguished world experts as by young rising stars: Matthias Christandl, Alberto De Sole, Rui Loja Fernandes, François Gay-Balmaz, Gitta Kutyniok, Amiram Leviatan, Karl-Hermann Neeb, Christoph Schweigert, Yuji Tachikawa, Luc Vinet and Joshua Zak. Next to the plenary talks, there were 170 talks in six parallel sessions and 10 poster presentations. All scientific activities took place in the Joseph Plateau Building of the Faculty of Engineering and Architecture of Ghent University, a historical building conveniently located in the city centre of Ghent. In this building we could make use of the main lecture hall (400 seats) for the plenary lectures, six lecture rooms for parallel sessions, two offices for organizational activities and registrations, two PC-rooms and a large foyer for coffee breaks, book exhibitions and the poster session. As part of the colloquium, a

  18. EDITORIAL: XIII Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Contreras, Guillermo; Delepine, David; Napsuciale, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    is just a set of foundations and a portal, considered national monuments. There, we enjoyed a delicious meal in the cellars of the Corralejo Hacienda before returning to Leon. The XIII MWPF was sponsored by several institutions: Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT) through the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías and individual research projects, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnológico del Estado de Guanajuato (CONCyTEG), Universidad de Guanajuato, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Guanajuato, Centro de Investigaciones de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla and Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí. Also, we wish to thak to those who helped in the process of getting financial support for the meeting, specially Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo, President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías and Dr José Luis Lucio Martínez, Rector of Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus León. These proceedings have been published thanks to the support of PIFI 2011. This meeting was possible due to the commitment of the working groups and we wish to thank to their members for the decisive collaboration with the organizing committee. At the local level, we thank our graduate students: Carolina Luján, Vannia González, Selim Gomez and Carlos Alberto Vaquera for their invaluable contribution in the organization of the large amount of small but important things around the meeting. Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers for delivering excellent talks which contributed to the success of the event. We are also grateful to all the participants for the nice academic and social atmosphere during the meeting and for providing their write-ups on time. The National organizing committee was formed by Arnulfo Zepeda (CINVESTAV-DF) Guillermo Contreras (CINVESTAV-Mérida) David Delepine (DF-UG) Axel de la Macorra (IAC/IF-UNAM) Lorenzo Díaz (BUAP

  19. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    Bohemian (Jesuit) provinces, mainly in Vienna and Neisse (the present Nysa in Silesia, Poland), but no traces of further astronomical activity have survived, if they ever existed. The fourth article, by Hans Gaab, is a very thoroughly researched biography of Johann Philipp von Wurzelbau (1651-1725), an merchant turned astronomer from Nuremberg. Wurzelbau started his activities at Christoph Eimmart's (the director of the painters' academy in Nuremberg) private observatory, and his first published work deals with observations of the great comet of 1680. Furthermore, he observed solar eclipses, Mercury transits, and determined the geographical latitude of Nuremberg. The article also contains a detailed description of Wurzelbau's observatory and its instruments. The fifth paper, by Klaus-Dieter Herbst, deals with Gottfried Kirch's idea of founding an astronomical society - being a vehicle to publishing astronomical observations. Kirch (1639-1710) was a well-known astronomer and calendar manufacturer. Around 1700, Kirch was appointed first astronomer at the Brandenburg society of sciences, and director of the observatory that was to be established with the new Berlin Academy. Herbst shows that Kirch's religious attitude that converged on pietism was a driving force to establish a scientific society. However, the final failure of such a project is due to the emergence of the scientific journal Acta Eruditorum, issued since 1682 in Leipzig, which could serve as an outlet for the publication of astronomical data by Kirch and others, thus fulfilling an essential task of the projected academy. Kirch's occupation with the composition of calendars, which took most of his time, was another reason. The following three shorter articles deal with 19th century astronomy. Peter Brosche describes an early visual photometer employed by Johann Gottfried Koehler (1745-1801) in Dresden, Alberto Meschiari edits and comments letters by Franz Xaver von Zach (1754-1832) to the physicist Gerbi in

  20. Obituary: Philip Morrison, 1915-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2005-12-01

    2002. Emily had been a collaborator on a few magazine articles and so forth. Phylis became a full partner on several of his books and television programs, and, most charmingly, on an annual set of Christmas reviews of books for children. Morrison the educator appears first as co-author with Hans Bethe of the text Elementary Nuclear Physics in 1952. A subset of other achievements in this territory include: (a) co-authorship of the Physical Sciences Study Committee text for high school physics in 1962 (prepublication versions existed in 1960); (b) the film, Powers of Ten, produced by Charles and Ray Eames in 1979, narrated by Phil, and seen by a large fraction of all the students in "astronomy for poets" classes since; (c) television programs including Whisper from Space (Nova, 1977, on the microwave background) and the six-part series Ring of Truth (PBS, 1987, on scientific method); and (d) literally hundreds of book reviews written for Scientific American from 1965 into the late 1990s, in every one of which you can hear his voice, in contrast to frequent Scientific American editorial practice. He produced a few late reviews and commentaries for American Scientist, but was not entirely pleased with the relationship. Among his graduate students who remained in cosmic-ray and astrophysics were Howard Laster, Kenneth Brecher, James Felten, Robert Gould, Leo Sartori, Alberto Sadun, and Minas Kafatos. Several of them describe Phil as a very "hands off" advisor, who would suggest a project and leave them to get on with it, which was rather different from the Oppenheimer style. A 1959 paper by Guiseppe Cocconi and Morrison was the first suggestion that one might communicate with extraterrestrial civilizations using radio waves close to the 1421 GHz (21 cm) frequency of neutral hydrogen, though he had thought even earlier about gamma rays for this purpose. Phil was a SETI optimist from the beginning, writing and participating in conferences on the subject for many years

  1. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can

  2. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Colloid-polymer mixtures and depletion interactions Phase stability of a reversible supramolecular polymer solution mixed with nanospheres Remco Tuinier When depletion goes critical Roberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro, Alberto Parola and Jader Colombo Tuning the demixing of colloid-polymer systems through the dispersing solvent E A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures S M Liddle, T Narayanan and W C K Poon Colloidal dynamics and crystallization Crystallization and aging in hard-sphere glasses C Valeriani, E Sanz, E Zaccarelli, W C K Poon, M E Cates and P N Pusey Real-time monitoring of complex moduli from micro-rheology Taiki Yanagishima, Daan Frenkel, Jurij Kotar and Erika Eiser Brownian motion of a self-propelled particle B ten Hagen, S van Teeffelen and H Löwen Crystallization in suspensions of hard spheres: a Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation study T Schilling, S Dorosz, H J Schöpe and G Opletal Structural signature of slow dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in two-dimensional colloidal liquids: glassy structural order Takeshi Kawasaki and Hajime Tanaka

  3. Most Massive Spiral Galaxy Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    collaboration led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) in Garching (Germany) and the Padova University (Italy). Besides Dimitra Rigopoulou and Alberto Franceschini , the team includes Herve Aussel (Padova), Catherine Cesarsky (ESO), Reinhard Genzel (MPE), David Elbaz (Saclay, France), Michael Rowan-Robinson (IC, UK), Niranjan Thatte (MPE), and Paul van der Werf (Leiden, The Netherlands). [2]: 1 billion = 1,000 million = 10 9. [3]: Some other distant spiral galaxies have been found with masses in the range of 1 - 5 x 10 11 solar masses. The heaviest spiral galaxy known until now is UGC 12591 , with a measured mass of 6 x10 11 solar masses. Technical information about the photos PR Photo 33a/00 covers an area of approx. 7 x 8 arcsec 2 ; North is up, East is to the left. The present results, including the spectrum shown in PR Photo 33b/00 , are based on observations that were collected in visitor mode during August 18-20, 2000. For these observations, ISAAC was used in medium resolution mode (R ~ 5000) with a slit of 0.6 arcsec x 2 arcmin. The pixel scale is 0.146 arcsec/pix. The wavelength for the H-alpha is 1.0370 µm and the SZ band was used for the observations. The seeing was very good throughout the run (from 0.2 - 0.9 arcsec). The spectrum shown in PR Photo 33b/00 was acquired under 0.2 arcsec seeing.