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Sample records for alveolar epithelial repair

  1. TRIM72 is required for effective repair of alveolar epithelial cell wounding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Chul; Kellett, Thomas; Wang, Shaohua; Nishi, Miyuki; Nagre, Nagaraja; Zhou, Beiyun; Flodby, Per; Shilo, Konstantin; Ghadiali, Samir N.; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hubmayr, Rolf D.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for lung cell repair are largely unknown. Previous studies identified tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) from striated muscle and linked its function to tissue repair. In this study, we characterized TRIM72 expression in lung tissues and investigated the role of TRIM72 in repair of alveolar epithelial cells. In vivo injury of lung cells was introduced by high tidal volume ventilation, and repair-defective cells were labeled with postinjury administration of propidium iodide. Primary alveolar epithelial cells were isolated and membrane wounding and repair were labeled separately. Our results show that absence of TRIM72 increases susceptibility to deformation-induced lung injury whereas TRIM72 overexpression is protective. In vitro cell wounding assay revealed that TRIM72 protects alveolar epithelial cells through promoting repair rather than increasing resistance to injury. The repair function of TRIM72 in lung cells is further linked to caveolin 1. These data suggest an essential role for TRIM72 in repair of alveolar epithelial cells under plasma membrane stress failure. PMID:25106429

  2. The role of purinergic signaling on deformation induced injury and repair responses of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Belete, Hewan A; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman-Deep

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is an important driver of the innate immune response of ventilator-injured lungs. We had previously shown that the majority of wounded alveolus resident cells repair and survive deformation induced insults. This is important insofar as wounded and repaired cells may contribute to injurious deformation responses commonly referred to as biotrauma. The central hypothesis of this communication states that extracellular adenosine-5' triphosphate (ATP) promotes the repair of wounded alveolus resident cells by a P2Y2-Receptor dependent mechanism. Using primary type 1 alveolar epithelial rat cell models subjected to micropuncture injury and/or deforming stress we show that 1) stretch causes a dose dependent increase in cell injury and ATP media concentrations; 2) enzymatic depletion of extracellular ATP reduces the probability of stretch induced wound repair; 3) enriching extracellular ATP concentrations facilitates wound repair; 4) purinergic effects on cell repair are mediated by ATP and not by one of its metabolites; and 5) ATP mediated cell salvage depends at least in part on P2Y2-R activation. While rescuing cells from wounding induced death may seem appealing, it is possible that survivors of membrane wounding become governors of a sustained pro-inflammatory state and thereby perpetuate and worsen organ function in the early stages of lung injury syndromes. Means to uncouple P2Y2-R mediated cytoprotection from P2Y2-R mediated inflammation and to test the preclinical efficacy of such an undertaking deserve to be explored. PMID:22087324

  3. Surface expression of CD74 by type II alveolar epithelial cells: a potential mechanism for macrophage migration inhibitory factor-induced epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Leigh M; Cakarova, Lidija; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; von Wulffen, Werner; Herold, Susanne; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine involved in acute lung injury and other processes such as wound repair and tumor growth. MIF exerts pro-proliferative effects on a variety of cell types including monocytes/macrophages, B cells, and gastric epithelial cell lines through binding to the major histocompatibility complex type II-associated invariant chain, CD74. In acute lung injury, inflammatory damage of the alveolar epithelium leads to loss of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-I), which are replaced by proliferation and differentiation of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-II). In this study we have investigated the potential of MIF to contribute to alveolar repair by stimulating alveolar epithelial cell proliferation. We show that murine AEC-II, but not AEC-I, express high surface levels of CD74 in vivo. Culture of AEC-II in vitro resulted in decreased mRNA levels for CD74 and loss of surface CD74 expression, which correlated with a transition of AEC-II to an AEC-I-like phenotype. MIF stimulation of AEC-II induced rapid and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, increased expression of cyclins D1 and E, as well as AEC-II proliferation. Corresponding MIF signaling and enhanced thymidine incorporation was observed after MIF stimulation of MLE-12 cells transfected to overexpress CD74. In contrast, MIF did not induce MAPK activation, gene transcription, or increased proliferation in differentiated AEC-I-like cells that lack CD74. These data suggest a previously unidentified role of MIF-CD74 interaction by inducing proliferation of AEC-II, which may contribute to alveolar repair. PMID:19136583

  4. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  5. Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Po-Nien; Matsuoka, Chisa; Wei, Shu-Chen; Sato, Atsuyasu; Sato, Susumu; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chen, Hung-Kuan; Ling, Thai-Yen; Mori, Munemasa; Cardoso, Wellington V; Morimoto, Mitsuru

    2016-07-19

    Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2(cNull)) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27364009

  6. Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cell Dysfunction in Rat Experimental Hepatopulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Fallon, Michael B.; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25419825

  7. Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Po-Nien; Matsuoka, Chisa; Wei, Shu-Chen; Sato, Atsuyasu; Sato, Susumu; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chen, Hung-kuan; Ling, Thai-Yen; Mori, Munemasa; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Morimoto, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2cNull) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27364009

  8. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today. PMID:11686863

  9. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The alveolar cleft is a bony defect that is present in 75% of the patients with cleft lip and palate. Although secondary alveolar cleft repair is commonly accepted for these patients, nowadays, controversy still remains regarding the surgical technique, the timing of the surgery, the donor site, and whether the use of allogenic materials improve the outcomes. The purpose of the present review was to evaluate the protocol, the surgical technique and the outcomes in a large population of patients with alveolar clefts that underwent secondary alveolar cleft repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 109 procedures in 90 patients with alveolar cleft were identified retrospectively after institutional review board approval was obtained. The patients were treated at a single institution during a period of 10 years (2001-2011). Data were collected regarding demographics, type of cleft, success parameters of the procedure (oronasal fistulae closure, unification of the maxillary segments, eruption and support of anterior teeth, support to the base of the nose, normal ridge form for prosthetic rehabilitation), donor site morbidity, and complications. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination was performed by means of orthopantomogram and computed tomography (CT) scan. Results: The average patient age was 14.2 years (range 4–21.3 years). There were 4 right alveolar-lip clefts, 9 left alveolar-lip clefts, 3 bilateral alveolar-lip clefts, 18 right palate-lip clefts, 40 left palate-lip clefts and 16 bilateral palate-lip clefts. All the success parameters were favorable in 87 patients. Iliac crest bone grafts were employed in all cases. There were three bone graft losses. In three cases, allogenic materials used in a first surgery performed in other centers, underwent infection and lacked consolidation. They were removed and substituted by autogenous iliac crest bone graft. Conclusions: The use of autogenous iliac crest for secondary alveolar bone grafting

  10. Alveolar epithelial disintegrity in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; de Andrade, Joao; Zhou, Yong; Luckhardt, Tracy; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of IPF primarily center on dysregulated epithelial cell repair and altered epithelial-mesenchymal communication and extracellular matrix deposition following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or environmental toxins. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed toward the role of the intercellular junctional complex in determining the specific properties of epithelia in pulmonary diseases. Additionally, recent genomewide association studies suggest that specific genetic variants predictive of epithelial cell dysfunction may confer susceptibility to the development of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A number of genetic disorders linked to pulmonary fibrosis and familial interstitial pneumonias are associated with loss of epithelial integrity. However, the potential links between extrapulmonary clinical syndromes associated with defects in epithelial cells and the development of pulmonary fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we report a case of hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia that presented with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. This case illustrates a more generalizable concept of epithelial disintegrity in the development of fibrotic lung diseases, which is explored in greater detail in this review article. PMID:27233996

  11. Lung epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Gershnabel, Shoham; Kalina, Moshe

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of alveolar epithelial cells on inflammatory responses in macrophages. Lung epithelial cells (either rat RLE-6TN or human A549 cells) reduced LPS-induced NO production in alveolar macrophages (AM) in a contact-independent mechanism. The inhibitory effect of the epithelial cells was present already at the transcriptional level: LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was significantly smaller. Surfactant protein A (SP-A)-induced NO production by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of A549 cells, though, by a different kinetics. LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production (another inflammatory pathway) by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of RLE-6TN cells. These data suggest a role for lung epithelial cells in the complicated modulation of inflammatory processes, and provide an insight into the mechanism underlying. PMID:17851743

  12. Alveolar Epithelial Dynamics in Post-pneumonectomy Lung Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chamoto, Kenji; Gibney, Barry C.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Lee, Grace S.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The intimate anatomic and functional relationship between epithelial cells and endothelial cells within the alveolus suggests the likelihood of a coordinated response during post-pneumonectomy lung growth. To define the population dynamics and potential contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to alveolar angiogenesis, we studied alveolar Type II and Type I cells during the 21 days after pneumonectomy. Alveolar Type II cells were defined and isolated by flow cytometry using a CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ phenotype. These phenotypically defined alveolar Type II cells demonstrated an increase in cell number after pneumonectomy; the increase in cell number preceded the increase in Type I (T1α+) cells. Using a parabiotic wild type/GFP pneumonectomy model, less than 3% of the Type II cells and 1% of the Type I cells were positive for GFP—a finding consistent with the absence of a blood-borne contribution to alveolar epithelial cells. The CD45−, MHC class II+, phosphine+ Type II cells demonstrated the active transcription of angiogenesis-related genes both before and after pneumonectomy. When the Type II cells on day 7 after pneumonectomy were compared to non-surgical controls, 10 genes demonstrated significantly increased expression (p<.05). In contrast to the normal adult Type II cells, there was notable expression of inflammation-associated genes (Ccl2, Cxcl2, Ifng) as well as genes associated with epithelial growth (Ereg, Lep). Together, the data suggest an active contribution of local alveolar Type II cells to alveolar growth. PMID:23408540

  13. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  14. Regulation and repair of the alveolar-capillary barrier in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the basic mechanisms that regulate fluid and protein exchange across the endothelial and epithelial barriers of the lung under both normal and pathological conditions. Clinically relevant lung injury occurs most commonly from severe viral and bacterial infections, aspiration syndromes, and severe shock. The mechanisms of lung injury have been identified in both experimental and clinical studies. Recovery from lung injury requires the reestablishment of an intact endothelial barrier and a functional alveolar epithelial barrier capable of secreting surfactant and removing alveolar edema fluid. Repair mechanisms include the participation of endogenous progenitor cells in strategically located niches in the lung. Novel treatment strategies include the possibility of cell-based therapy that may reduce the severity of lung injury and enhance lung repair. PMID:23398155

  15. N-acetylcysteine inhibits alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Felton, V. M.; Borok, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in vitro and in vivo, together with the demonstration of EMT in biopsies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, suggests a role for TGF-β1-induced EMT in disease pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on TGF-β1-induced EMT in a rat epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) and in primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). RLE-6TN cells exposed to TGF-β1 for 5 days underwent EMT as evidenced by acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology, downregulation of the epithelial-specific protein zonula occludens-1, and induction of the mesenchymal-specific proteins α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin. These changes were inhibited by NAC, which also prevented Smad3 phosphorylation. Similarly, primary alveolar epithelial type II cells exposed to TGF-β1 also underwent EMT that was prevented by NAC. TGF-β1 decreased cellular GSH levels by 50–80%, whereas NAC restored them to ∼150% of those found in TGF-β1-treated cells. Treatment with glutathione monoethyl ester similarly prevented an increase in mesenchymal marker expression. Consistent with its role as an antioxidant and cellular redox stabilizer, NAC dramatically reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in the presence of TGF-β1. Finally, inhibition of intracellular ROS generation during TGF-β1 treatment prevented alveolar EMT, but treatment with H2O2 alone did not induce EMT. We conclude that NAC prevents EMT in AEC in vitro, at least in part through replenishment of intracellular GSH stores and limitation of TGF-β1-induced intracellular ROS generation. We speculate that beneficial effects of NAC on pulmonary function in IPF may be mediated by inhibitory effects on alveolar EMT. PMID:19648289

  16. N-acetylcysteine inhibits alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Felton, V M; Borok, Z; Willis, B C

    2009-11-01

    The ability of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in vitro and in vivo, together with the demonstration of EMT in biopsies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, suggests a role for TGF-beta1-induced EMT in disease pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on TGF-beta1-induced EMT in a rat epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) and in primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). RLE-6TN cells exposed to TGF-beta1 for 5 days underwent EMT as evidenced by acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology, downregulation of the epithelial-specific protein zonula occludens-1, and induction of the mesenchymal-specific proteins alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and vimentin. These changes were inhibited by NAC, which also prevented Smad3 phosphorylation. Similarly, primary alveolar epithelial type II cells exposed to TGF-beta1 also underwent EMT that was prevented by NAC. TGF-beta1 decreased cellular GSH levels by 50-80%, whereas NAC restored them to approximately 150% of those found in TGF-beta1-treated cells. Treatment with glutathione monoethyl ester similarly prevented an increase in mesenchymal marker expression. Consistent with its role as an antioxidant and cellular redox stabilizer, NAC dramatically reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in the presence of TGF-beta1. Finally, inhibition of intracellular ROS generation during TGF-beta1 treatment prevented alveolar EMT, but treatment with H2O2 alone did not induce EMT. We conclude that NAC prevents EMT in AEC in vitro, at least in part through replenishment of intracellular GSH stores and limitation of TGF-beta1-induced intracellular ROS generation. We speculate that beneficial effects of NAC on pulmonary function in IPF may be mediated by inhibitory effects on alveolar EMT. PMID:19648289

  17. Alveolar epithelial stem and progenitor cells: emerging evidence for their role in lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A M; Ingenito, E P

    2012-01-01

    Lung injuries that impact the alveolus, such as emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and acute lung injury, are costly and prevalent problems. Moreover, the extent of alveolar injury and impairment of gas exchange is strongly associated with prognosis and survival. Thus, mechanisms of repair and regeneration of the lung alveolar compartment have received mounting attention as newer approaches to the study of stem and progenitor cells in this region unfold. The role of type II alveolar epithelial as the sole source of type I (AECI) and II (AECII) alveolar epithelial cells following lung injury has been recently challenged; recently, investigators have described stemprogenitor cells that function like precursors to AECII either in vitro or in vivo, both in mice and humans. Techniques to explore selfrenewal and multipotency have been rigorously applied to these putative stem-progenitor cell populations and the data thus far is compelling. This review provides background to the study of alveolar regeneration with the aim to provide context to the recent discoveries of putative stem-progenitor cells that may contribute to this process. PMID:23016551

  18. Hyperoxia stimulates the transdifferentiation of type II alveolar epithelial cells in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ana; Fu, Jianhua; Yang, Haiping; Zhu, Yuting; Pan, Yuqing; Xu, Shuyan; Xue, Xindong

    2015-05-01

    Supplemental oxygen treatment in preterm infants may cause bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is characterized by alveolar simplification and vascular disorganization. Despite type II alveolar epithelial cell (AEC II) damage being reported previously, we found no decrease in the AEC II-specific marker, surfactant protein C (SP-C), in the BPD model in our previous study. We thus speculated that AEC II injury is not a unique mechanism of BPD-related pulmonary epithelial repair dysfunction and that abnormal transdifferentiation can exist. Newborn rats were randomly assigned to model (85% oxygen inhalation) and control groups (room air inhalation). Expressions of AEC I (aquaporin 5, T1α) and AEC II markers (SP-C, SP-B) were detected at three levels: 1) in intact lung tissue, 2) in AEC II isolated from rats in the two groups, and 3) in AEC II isolated from newborn rats, which were further cultured under either hyperoxic or normoxic conditions. In the model group, increased AEC I was observed at both the tissue and cell level, and markedly increased transdifferentiation was observed by immunofluorescent double staining. Transmission electron microscopy revealed morphological changes in alveolar epithelium such as damaged AECs, a fused air-blood barrier structure, and opened tight junctions in the model group. These findings indicate that transdifferentiation of AECs is not suppressed but rather is increased under hyperoxic treatment by compensation; however, such repair during injury cannot offset pulmonary epithelial air exchange and barrier dysfunction caused by structural damage to AECs. PMID:25681436

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  20. Cigarette smoke extract affects mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ballweg, Korbinian; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exposure of cells to cigarette smoke induces an initial adaptive cellular stress response involving increased oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory signaling pathways. Exposure of mitochondria to cellular stress alters their fusion/fission dynamics. Whereas mild stress induces a prosurvival response termed stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, severe stress results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondrial response to mild and nontoxic doses of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in alveolar epithelial cells. We characterized mitochondrial morphology, expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission genes, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis, as well as mitochondrial functions such as membrane potential and oxygen consumption. Murine lung epithelial (MLE)12 and primary mouse alveolar epithelial cells revealed pronounced mitochondrial hyperfusion upon treatment with CSE, accompanied by increased expression of the mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 2 and increased metabolic activity. We did not observe any alterations in mitochondrial proteostasis, i.e., induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response or mitophagy. Therefore, our data indicate an adaptive prosurvival response of mitochondria of alveolar epithelial cells to nontoxic concentrations of CSE. A hyperfused mitochondrial network, however, renders the cell more vulnerable to additional stress, such as sustained cigarette smoke exposure. As such, cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, although part of a beneficial adaptive stress response in the first place, may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25326581

  1. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L; Burns, Alan R; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A

    2007-03-13

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute approximately 60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the differentiation of hES cells into an essentially pure (>99%) population of ATII cells (hES-ATII). Purity, as well as biological features and morphological characteristics of normal ATII cells, was demonstrated for the hES-ATII cells, including lamellar body formation, expression of surfactant proteins A, B, and C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor, as well as the synthesis and secretion of complement proteins C3 and C5. Collectively, these data document the successful generation of a pure population of ATII cells derived from hES cells, providing a practical source of ATII cells to explore in disease models their potential in the regeneration and repair of the injured alveolus and in the therapeutic treatment of genetic diseases affecting the lung. PMID:17360544

  2. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  3. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin-dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladapted hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis. PMID:26779814

  4. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin–dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladaptbed hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis. PMID:26779814

  5. Hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyi; Kato, Satomi; Colvocoresses-Dodds, Jennifer; Fifadara, Nimita H.; Gauthier, Theresa W.; Helms, My N.; Carlton, David P.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation is a pathological feature of lung diseases requiring oxygen therapy. One possible source for myofibroblasts is through the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To study the effects of oxygen on alveolar EMT, we used RLE-6TN and ex vivo lung slices and found that hyperoxia (85% O2, H85) decreased epithelial proteins, presurfactant protein B (pre-SpB), pro-SpC, and lamellar protein by 50% and increased myofibroblast proteins, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and vimentin by over 200% (P < 0.05). In AEC freshly isolated from H85-treated rats, mRNA for pre-SpB and pro-SpC was diminished by ∼50% and α-SMA was increased by 100% (P < 0.05). Additionally, H85 increased H2O2 content, and H2O2 (25–50 μM) activated endogenous transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), as evident by H2DCFDA immunofluorescence and ELISA (P < 0.05). Both hyperoxia and H2O2 increased SMAD3 phosphorylation (260% of control, P < 0.05). Treating cultured cells with TGF-β1 inhibitors did not prevent H85-induced H2O2 production but did prevent H85-mediated α-SMA increases and E-cadherin downregulation. Finally, to determine the role of TGF-β1 in hyperoxia-induced EMT in vivo, we evaluated AEC from H85-treated rats and found that vimentin increased ∼10-fold (P < 0.05) and that this effect was prevented by intraperitoneal TGF-β1 inhibitor SB-431542. Additionally, SB-431542 treatment attenuated changes in alveolar histology caused by hyperoxia. Our studies indicate that hyperoxia promotes alveolar EMT through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:24375795

  6. Hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition.

    PubMed

    Vyas-Read, Shilpa; Wang, Wenyi; Kato, Satomi; Colvocoresses-Dodds, Jennifer; Fifadara, Nimita H; Gauthier, Theresa W; Helms, My N; Carlton, David P; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2014-02-15

    Myofibroblast accumulation is a pathological feature of lung diseases requiring oxygen therapy. One possible source for myofibroblasts is through the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To study the effects of oxygen on alveolar EMT, we used RLE-6TN and ex vivo lung slices and found that hyperoxia (85% O2, H85) decreased epithelial proteins, presurfactant protein B (pre-SpB), pro-SpC, and lamellar protein by 50% and increased myofibroblast proteins, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and vimentin by over 200% (P < 0.05). In AEC freshly isolated from H85-treated rats, mRNA for pre-SpB and pro-SpC was diminished by ∼50% and α-SMA was increased by 100% (P < 0.05). Additionally, H85 increased H2O2 content, and H2O2 (25-50 μM) activated endogenous transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), as evident by H2DCFDA immunofluorescence and ELISA (P < 0.05). Both hyperoxia and H2O2 increased SMAD3 phosphorylation (260% of control, P < 0.05). Treating cultured cells with TGF-β1 inhibitors did not prevent H85-induced H2O2 production but did prevent H85-mediated α-SMA increases and E-cadherin downregulation. Finally, to determine the role of TGF-β1 in hyperoxia-induced EMT in vivo, we evaluated AEC from H85-treated rats and found that vimentin increased ∼10-fold (P < 0.05) and that this effect was prevented by intraperitoneal TGF-β1 inhibitor SB-431542. Additionally, SB-431542 treatment attenuated changes in alveolar histology caused by hyperoxia. Our studies indicate that hyperoxia promotes alveolar EMT through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:24375795

  7. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A.; Finigan, Jay H.; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:24748602

  8. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury. PMID:26203800

  9. Epithelial repair mechanisms in the lung.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Lynn M; Waters, Christopher M

    2010-06-01

    The recovery of an intact epithelium following lung injury is critical for restoration of lung homeostasis. The initial processes following injury include an acute inflammatory response, recruitment of immune cells, and epithelial cell spreading and migration upon an autologously secreted provisional matrix. Injury causes the release of factors that contribute to repair mechanisms including members of the epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor families (TGF-alpha, KGF, HGF), chemokines (MCP-1), interleukins (IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13), and prostaglandins (PGE(2)), for example. These factors coordinate processes involving integrins, matrix materials (fibronectin, collagen, laminin), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-9), focal adhesions, and cytoskeletal structures to promote cell spreading and migration. Several key signaling pathways are important in regulating these processes, including sonic hedgehog, Rho GTPases, MAP kinase pathways, STAT3, and Wnt. Changes in mechanical forces may also affect these pathways. Both localized and distal progenitor stem cells are recruited into the injured area, and proliferation and phenotypic differentiation of these cells leads to recovery of epithelial function. Persistent injury may contribute to the pathology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. For example, dysregulated repair processes involving TGF-beta and epithelial-mesenchymal transition may lead to fibrosis. This review focuses on the processes of epithelial restitution, the localization and role of epithelial progenitor stem cells, the initiating factors involved in repair, and the signaling pathways involved in these processes. PMID:20363851

  10. Retinoic acid promotes primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cell proliferation and differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui-wei; Kong, Xiang-yong; Zhu, Xiao-xi; Zhu, Guo-qing; Ma, Jin-shuai; Liu, Xiu-xiang

    2015-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in lung development and maturation. Many stimuli can induce alveolar epithelial cell damage which will result in the injury of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of RA on the proliferation and differentiation of primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells (fAECIIs). Primary fAECIIs were isolated from fetal rats at 19 d of gestation and purified by a differential centrifugation and adhesion method. The cells were randomly divided into control (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and RA groups. Cell proliferation, viability, apoptosis, cycle, and expression of target protein were examined at 24, 48, and 72 h. We found that the proliferation and viability of cells in the RA-exposed group significantly increased compared with the DMSO control group. The proportion (%) of cells in the G2 and S phases in the RA group was significantly higher than that in control group cells. The proportion (%) of both early apoptotic cells and late apoptotic cells decreased significantly in cells exposed to RA compared with cells exposed to DMSO. RA significantly enhanced the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5). The expression level of pulmonary surfactant C (SPC) was elevated after cells were exposed to RA for 24 and 72 h but was inhibited when cells were exposed to RA for 48 h. These results suggest that RA promotes fAECII proliferation by improving cell viability, promoting S phase entry and inhibiting apoptosis and RA promotes fAECIIs differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells (AECIs). PMID:25515249

  11. Francisella tularensis replicates within alveolar type II epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo following inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joshua D; Craven, Robin R; Fuller, James R; Pickles, Raymond J; Kawula, Thomas H

    2007-02-01

    Francisella tularensis replicates in macrophages and dendritic cells, but interactions with other cell types have not been well described. F. tularensis LVS invaded and replicated within alveolar epithelial cell lines. Following intranasal inoculation of C57BL/6 mice, Francisella localized to the alveolus and replicated within alveolar type II epithelial cells. PMID:17088343

  12. Epithelial β1 integrin is required for lung branching morphogenesis and alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Plosa, Erin J; Young, Lisa R; Gulleman, Peter M; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Benjamin, John T; Im, Amanda M; van der Meer, Riet; Gleaves, Linda A; Bulus, Nada; Han, Wei; Prince, Lawrence S; Blackwell, Timothy S; Zent, Roy

    2014-12-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between cells and extracellular matrix regulate lung development; however, specific roles for β1-containing integrins in individual cell types, including epithelial cells, remain incompletely understood. In this study, the functional importance of β1 integrin in lung epithelium during mouse lung development was investigated by deleting the integrin from E10.5 onwards using surfactant protein C promoter-driven Cre. These mutant mice appeared normal at birth but failed to gain weight appropriately and died by 4 months of age with severe hypoxemia. Defects in airway branching morphogenesis in association with impaired epithelial cell adhesion and migration, as well as alveolarization defects and persistent macrophage-mediated inflammation were identified. Using an inducible system to delete β1 integrin after completion of airway branching, we showed that alveolarization defects, characterized by disrupted secondary septation, abnormal alveolar epithelial cell differentiation, excessive collagen I and elastin deposition, and hypercellularity of the mesenchyme occurred independently of airway branching defects. By depleting macrophages using liposomal clodronate, we found that alveolarization defects were secondary to persistent alveolar inflammation. β1 integrin-deficient alveolar epithelial cells produced excessive monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and reactive oxygen species, suggesting a direct role for β1 integrin in regulating alveolar homeostasis. Taken together, these studies define distinct functions of epithelial β1 integrin during both early and late lung development that affect airway branching morphogenesis, epithelial cell differentiation, alveolar septation and regulation of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25395457

  13. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization

    SciTech Connect

    Willems, Coen H.M.P.; Zimmermann, Luc J.I.; Sanders, Patricia J.L.T.; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Duimel, Hans J.Q.; Verheyen, Fons K.C.P.; Iwaarden, J. Freek van

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process. -- Highlights: ► Model system for vital imaging and high throughput screening. ► Microvascular endothelium influences re-epithelialization. ► A549 cells form protrusions through membrane to contact HPMEC. ► A549 cells and HPMECs form heterocellular tight-, gap- and adherens-junctions.

  14. Protein Expression Profile of Rat Type Two Alveolar Epithelial Cells During Hyperoxic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Maneesh

    Rationale: In rodent model systems, the sequential changes in lung morphology resulting from hyperoxic injury are well characterized, and are similar to changes in human acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the injured lung, alveolar type two (AT2) epithelial cells play a critical role restoring the normal alveolar structure. Thus characterizing the changes in AT2 cells will provide insights into the mechanisms underpinning the recovery from lung injury. Methods: We applied an unbiased systems level proteomics approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms contributing to lung repair in a rat hyperoxic lung injury model. AT2 cells were isolated from rat lungs at predetermined intervals during hyperoxic injury and recovery. Protein expression profiles were determined by using iTRAQRTM with tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Of 959 distinct proteins identified, 183 significantly changed in abundance during the injury-recovery cycle. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified cell cycle, cell differentiation, cell metabolism, ion homeostasis, programmed cell death, ubiquitination, and cell migration to be significantly enriched by these proteins. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of data acquired during lung repair revealed differential expression of gene sets that control multicellular organismal development, systems development, organ development, and chemical homeostasis. More detailed analysis identified activity in two regulatory pathways, JNK and miR 374. A Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM) algorithm identified protein clusters with coherent changes during injury and repair. Conclusion: Coherent changes occur in the AT2 cell proteome in response to hyperoxic stress. These findings offer guidance regarding the specific molecular mechanisms governing repair of the injured lung.

  15. Alveolar Epithelial Cells Undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Degryse, Amber L.; Zoz, Donald F.; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of mutant surfactant protein C (SFTPC) results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). AECs have been implicated as a source of lung fibroblasts via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT); therefore, we investigated whether ER stress contributes to EMT as a possible mechanism for fibrotic remodeling. ER stress was induced by tunicamyin administration or stable expression of mutant (L188Q) SFTPC in type II AEC lines. Both tunicamycin treatment and mutant SFTPC expression induced ER stress and the unfolded protein response. With tunicamycin or mutant SFTPC expression, phase contrast imaging revealed a change to a fibroblast-like appearance. During ER stress, expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Zonula occludens-1 decreased while expression of mesenchymal markers S100A4 and α-smooth muscle actin increased. Following induction of ER stress, we found activation of a number of pathways, including MAPK, Smad, β-catenin, and Src kinase. Using specific inhibitors, the combination of a Smad2/3 inhibitor (SB431542) and a Src kinase inhibitor (PP2) blocked EMT with maintenance of epithelial appearance and epithelial marker expression. Similar results were noted with siRNA targeting Smad2 and Src kinase. Together, these studies reveal that induction of ER stress leads to EMT in lung epithelial cells, suggesting possible cross-talk between Smad and Src kinase pathways. Dissecting pathways involved in ER stress-induced EMT may lead to new treatment strategies to limit fibrosis. PMID:21757695

  16. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  17. Hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roan, Esra; Wilhelm, Kristina; Bada, Alex; Makena, Patrudu S; Gorantla, Vijay K; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2012-06-15

    Patients with severe acute lung injury are frequently administered high concentrations of oxygen (>50%) during mechanical ventilation. Long-term exposure to high levels of oxygen can cause lung injury in the absence of mechanical ventilation, but the combination of the two accelerates and increases injury. Hyperoxia causes injury to cells through the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species. However, the precise mechanisms that lead to epithelial injury and the reasons for increased injury caused by mechanical ventilation are not well understood. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may be more susceptible to injury caused by mechanical ventilation if hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of the cells causing them to resist deformation. To test this hypothesis, we used atomic force microscopy in the indentation mode to measure the mechanical properties of cultured AECs. Exposure of AECs to hyperoxia for 24 to 48 h caused a significant increase in the elastic modulus (a measure of resistance to deformation) of both primary rat type II AECs and a cell line of mouse AECs (MLE-12). Hyperoxia also caused remodeling of both actin and microtubules. The increase in elastic modulus was blocked by treatment with cytochalasin D. Using finite element analysis, we showed that the increase in elastic modulus can lead to increased stress near the cell perimeter in the presence of stretch. We then demonstrated that cyclic stretch of hyperoxia-treated cells caused significant cell detachment. Our results suggest that exposure to hyperoxia causes structural remodeling of AECs that leads to decreased cell deformability. PMID:22467640

  18. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  19. Potential Contribution of Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells to Chronic Neonatal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar surface is covered by large flat Type I cells (alveolar epithelial cells 1, AEC1). The normal physiological function of AEC1s involves gas exchange, based on their location in approximation to the capillary endothelium and their thinness, and in ion and water flux, as shown by the presence of solute active transport proteins, water channels, and impermeable tight junctions between cells. With the recent ability to produce relatively pure cultures of AEC1 cells, new functions have been described. These may be relevant to lung injury, repair, and the abnormal development that characterizes bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). To hypothesize a potential role for AEC1 in the development of lung injury and abnormal repair/development in premature lungs, evidence is presented for their presence in the developing lung, how their source may not be the Type II cell (AEC2) as has been assumed for 40 years, and how the cell can be damaged by same type of stressors as those which lead to BPD. Recent work shows that the cells are part of the innate immune response, capable of producing pro-inflammatory mediators, which could contribute to the increase in inflammation seen in early BPD. One of the receptors found exclusively on AEC1 cells in the lung, called RAGE, may also have a role in increased inflammation and alveolar simplification. While the current evidence for AEC1 involvement in BPD is circumstantial and limited at present, the accumulating data supports several hypotheses and questions regarding potential differences in the behavior of AEC1 cells from newborn and premature lung compared with the adult lung. PMID:24904906

  20. CXCR4 regulates migration of lung alveolar epithelial cells through activation of Rac1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Manik C.; Makena, Patrudu S.; Gorantla, Vijay; Sinclair, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of the epithelial barrier following acute lung injury is critical for recovery of lung homeostasis. After injury, alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cells spread and migrate to cover the denuded surface and, eventually, proliferate and differentiate into type I cells. The chemokine CXCL12, also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1α, has well-recognized roles in organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and immune responses through its binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR4. While CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling is known to be important in immune cell migration, the role of this chemokine-receptor interaction has not been studied in alveolar epithelial repair mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrated that secretion of CXCL12 was increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage of rats ventilated with an injurious tidal volume (25 ml/kg). We also found that CXCL12 secretion was increased by primary rat ATII cells and a mouse alveolar epithelial (MLE12) cell line following scratch wounding and that both types of cells express CXCR4. CXCL12 significantly increased ATII cell migration in a scratch-wound assay. When we treated cells with a specific antagonist for CXCR4, AMD-3100, cell migration was significantly inhibited. Knockdown of CXCR4 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) caused decreased cell migration compared with cells expressing a nonspecific shRNA. Treatment with AMD-3100 decreased matrix metalloproteinase-14 expression, increased tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity, and prevented CXCL12-induced Rac1 activation. Similar results were obtained with shRNA knockdown of CXCR4. These findings may help identify a therapeutic target for augmenting epithelial repair following acute lung injury. PMID:22345572

  1. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  2. Isolation and Culture of Alveolar Epithelial Type I and Type II Cells from Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Robert F.; Dobbs, Leland G.

    2014-01-01

    The pulmonary alveolar epithelium, comprised of alveolar Type I (TI) and Type II (TII) cells, covers more than 99% of the internal surface area of the lungs. The study of isolated and cultured alveolar epithelial TI and TII cells has provided a large amount of information about the functions of both cell types. This chapter provides information about methods for isolating and culturing both of these cell types from rat lungs. PMID:23097106

  3. Association of ICAM-1 with the cytoskeleton in rat alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Barton, W W; Wilcoxen, S E; Christensen, P J; Paine, R

    1996-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ICAM-1) is a transmembrane adhesion protein that is expressed constitutively on the apical surface of type I cells in vivo and on type II cells in vitro as they spread in culture, assuming type I cell-like characteristics. To investigate the possible interaction of ICAM-1 with the alveolar epithelial cell cytoskeleton, rat type II cells in primary culture were extracted with nonionic detergent, and residual ICAM-1 associated with the cytoskeletal remnants was determined using immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A large fraction of alveolar epithelial cell ICAM-1 remained associated with the cytoskeleton after detergent extraction, whereas two other transmembrane molecules, transferrin receptor and class II major histocompatibility complex, were completely removed. ICAM-1 was redistributed on the cell surface after the disruption of actin filaments with cytochalasin B, suggesting interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, ICAM-1 was completely detergent soluble in rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and rat alveolar macrophages. The association of ICAM-1 with the alveolar epithelial cell cytoskeleton was not altered after stimulation with inflammatory cytokines. However, detergent resistant ICAM-1 was significantly increased after crosslinking of ICAM-1 on the cell surface, suggesting that this cytoskeletal association may be modulated by interactions of alveolar epithelial cells with inflammatory cells. The association of ICAM-1 with the cytoskeleton in alveolar epithelial cells may provide a fixed intermediary between mobile inflammatory cells and the alveolar surface. PMID:8944713

  4. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  5. Thrombin-induced contraction in alveolar epithelial cells probed by traction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Sunyer, Raimon; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Farré, Ramon; Rotger, Mar; Navajas, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Contractile tension of alveolar epithelial cells plays a major role in the force balance that regulates the structural integrity of the alveolar barrier. The aim of this work was to study thrombin-induced contractile forces of alveolar epithelial cells. A549 alveolar epithelial cells were challenged with thrombin, and time course of contractile forces was measured by traction microscopy. The cells exhibited basal contraction with total force magnitude 55.0 +/- 12.0 nN (mean +/- SE, n = 12). Traction forces were exerted predominantly at the cell periphery and pointed to the cell center. Thrombin (1 U/ml) induced a fast and sustained 2.5-fold increase in traction forces, which maintained peripheral and centripetal distribution. Actin fluorescent staining revealed F-actin polymerization and enhancement of peripheral actin rim. Disruption of actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D (5 microM, 30 min) and inhibition of myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 (10 microM, 30 min) and Rho kinase with Y-27632 (10 microM, 30 min) markedly depressed basal contractile tone and abolished thrombin-induced cell contraction. Therefore, the contractile response of alveolar epithelial cells to the inflammatory agonist thrombin was mediated by actin cytoskeleton remodeling and actomyosin activation through myosin light chain kinase and Rho kinase signaling pathways. Thrombin-induced contractile tension might further impair alveolar epithelial barrier integrity in the injured lung. PMID:16675616

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide protects alveolar epithelial cells against hyperoxia via promoting the activation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Ao, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Fang; Xu, Feng

    2011-06-01

    Oxidative stress injury and death in alveolar epithelial cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of prolonged hyperoxia-induced lung impairment. A reduced survival of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECIIs) may lead to abnormal repair, resulting in acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Hyperoxia lung injury is associated with the secretion of various bioactive substances and the activation of multiple transcription factors. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), as a pulmonary sensory neuropeptide, performs a vital function in regulating cell proliferation and cell death through signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). In the present study, we investigated the effects of VIP and STAT3 on AECIIs upon the exposure of hyperoxia. MLE-12 cells were random to air (21% oxygen), hyperoxia (95% oxygen) and VIP treatment with or without STAT3 siRNA transfection. The proliferation of AECIIs was detected by MTT cell proliferation assay. The apoptosis rate was measured by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated by fluorescent dye JC-1 to understand mitochondrial and cell damage. The activation of STAT3 was assessed by western blot detection of phosphorylated STAT3. Compared with hyperoxia exposure alone, additional VIP treatment promoted cell proliferation, maintained the mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced the apoptosis and necrosis of AECIIs. The protective effects aforesaid were weakened after STAT3 expression was down regulated by siRNA. Cells with STAT3 siRNA transfection had a higher mortality and a sharper decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as a lower proliferation compared with wild-type cells after hyperoxia exposure with VIP administration. VIP interference, a protective management, could decrease hyperoxia-induced cell injury and death and improve the survival of AECIIs exposed to hyperoxia, which might be associated with the activation of STAT3. PMID:21334383

  7. Ozone Exposure of Macrophages Induces an Alveolar Epithelial Chemokine Response through IL-1α

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Rizwan; Dinarello, Charles A.; McConville, Glen; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone is known to produce an acute influx of neutrophils, and alveolar epithelial cells can secrete chemokines and modulate inflammatory processes. However, direct exposure of alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages to ozone (O3) produces little chemokine response. To determine if cell–cell interactions might be responsible, we investigated the effect of alveolar macrophage–conditioned media after ozone exposure (MO3CM) on alveolar epithelial cell chemokine production. Serum-free media were conditioned by exposing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 to ozone for 1 hour. Ozone stimulated secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 from NR8383 cells, but there was no secretion of chemokines or TNF-α. Freshly isolated type II cells were cultured, so as to express the biological markers of type I cells, and these cells are referred to as type I–like cells. Type I–like cells were exposed to diluted MO3CM for 24 hours, and this conditioned medium stimulated secretion of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemattractant-1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2). Secretion of these chemokines was inhibited by the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Although both recombinant IL-1α and IL-1β stimulated alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines, recombinant IL-1α was 100-fold more potent than IL-1β. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-rat IL-1α antibodies inhibited the secretion of chemokines by alveolar epithelial cells, whereas neutralizing anti-rat IL-1β antibodies had no effect. These observations indicate that secretion of IL-1α from macrophages stimulates alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines that can elicit an inflammatory response. PMID:17901407

  8. Effect of alveolar epithelial cell plasticity on the regulation of GM-CSF expression.

    PubMed

    Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Sturrock, Anne; McManus, Michael; Paine, Robert

    2012-03-15

    Local pulmonary expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for defense of the pulmonary alveolar space. It is required for surfactant homeostasis and pulmonary innate immune responses and is protective against lung injury and aberrant repair. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF; however, the control of homeostatic expression of GM-CSF is incompletely characterized. Increasing evidence suggests considerable plasticity of expression of AEC phenotypic characteristics. We tested the hypothesis that this plasticity extends to regulation of expression of GM-CSF using 1) MLE-12 cells (a commonly used murine cell line expressing some features of normal type II AEC, 2) primary murine AEC incubated under standard conditions [resulting in rapid spreading and loss of surfactant protein C (SP-C) expression with induction of the putative type I cell marker (T1α)], or 3) primary murine AEC on a hyaluronic acid/collagen matrix in defined medium, resulting in preservation of SP-C expression. AEC in standard cultures constitutively express abundant GM-CSF, with further induction in response to IL-1β but little response to TNF-α. In contrast, primary cells cultured to preserve SP-C expression and MLE-12 cells both express little GM-CSF constitutively, with significant induction in response to TNF-α and limited response to IL-1β. We conclude that constitutive and cytokine-induced expression of GM-CSF by AEC varies in concert with other cellular phenotypic characteristics. These changes may have important implications both for the maintenance of normal pulmonary homeostasis and for the process of repair following lung injury. PMID:22227205

  9. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  10. Endocytic response of type I alveolar epithelial cells to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman Deep; Godin, Lindsay; Pagano, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    We present plasma membrane (PM) internalization responses of type I alveolar epithelial cells to a 50 mosmol/l increase in tonicity. Our research is motivated by interest in ATI repair, for which endocytic retrieval of PM appears to be critical. We validated pharmacological and molecular tools to dissect the endocytic machinery of these cells and used these tools to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress triggers a pathway-specific internalization of PM domains. Validation experiments confirmed the fluorescent analogs of lactosyl-ceramide, transferrin, and dextran as pathway-specific cargo of caveolar, clathrin, and fluid-phase uptake, respectively. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that hypertonic exposure causes a downregulation of clathrin and fluid-phase endocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. The tonicity-mediated increase in caveolar endocytosis was associated with the translocation of caveolin-1 from the PM and was absent in cells that had been transfected with dominant-negative dynamin constructs. In separate experiments we show that hypertonic exposure increases the probability of PM wound repair following micropuncture from 82 ± 4 to 94 ± 2% (P < 0.01) and that this effect depends on Src pathway activation-mediated caveolar endocytosis. The therapeutic and biological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:21257731

  11. Potassium currents in rat type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, T E; Jacobs, E R; Silver, M R

    1988-01-01

    1. Type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from adult rats and grown in primary culture were studied using the whole-cell configuration of the gigohm-seal voltage clamp technique. 2. The average specific capacitance of type II cells was 2.5 microF/cm2, suggesting that type II cell membranes in vitro are irregular, with an actual area more than twice the apparent area. 3. Most type II cells have time- and voltage-dependent outward currents carried by potassium ions. Potassium currents activate with a sigmoid time course upon membrane depolarization, and inactivate during maintained depolarization. The average maximum whole-cell K+ conductance was 1.6 nS. 4. Two distinct types of K+-selective channels underlie outward currents in type II cells. Most cells have currents resembling delayed rectifier K+ currents in skeletal muscle, nerve and immune cells. A few cells had a different type of K+ conductance which is more sensitive to block by tetraethylammonium ions, has faster 'tail currents', and activates at more positive potentials. 5. In some experiments, individual type II cells were identified by staining with phosphine, a fluorescent dye which is concentrated in lamellar bodies. Both types of K+ channels were seen in type II cells identified with this dye. 6. Phosphine added to the bathing solution reversibly reduced K+ currents and shifted K+ channel activation to more positive potentials. Excitation of phosphine to fluoresce reduced irreversibly K+ currents in type II cells. The usefulness of phosphine as a means of identifying cells for study is discussed. PMID:2457683

  12. Characterizing mutagenesis in the hprt gene of rat alveolar epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Deyo, L.C.; Howard, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    A clonal selection assay was developed for mutation in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene of rat alveolar epithelial cells. Studies were conducted to establish methods for isolation and long-term culture of rat alveolar epithelial cells. When isolated by pronase digestion purified on a Nycodenz gradient and cultured in media containing 7.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS), pituitary extract, EGF, insulin, and IGF-1, rat alveolar epithelial cells could be maintained in culture for several weeks with cell doubling times of 2-4 days. The rat alveolar epithelial cell cultures were exposed in vitro to the mutagens ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and mutation in the hprt gene was selected for by culture in the presence of the toxic purine analog, 6-thioguanine (6TG). In vitro exposure to ENU or H{sub 2}O produced a dose-dependent increase in hprt mutation frequency in the alveolar epithelial cells. To determine if the assay system could be used to evaluate mutagenesis in alveolar type II cells after in vivo mutagen or carcinogen exposure, cells were isolated from rats treated previously with ENU or {alpha}-quartz. A significant increase in hprt mutation frequency was detected in alveolar epithelial cells obtained from rats exposed to ENU or {alpha}-quartz; the latter observation is the first demonstration that crystalline silica exposure is mutagenic in vivo. In summary, these studies show that rat alveolar epithelial cells isolated by pronase digestion and Nycodenz separation techniques and cultured in a defined media can be used in a clonal selection assay for mutation in the hprt gene. This assay demonstrates that ENU and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in vitro and ENU and {alpha}-quartz in vivo are mutagenic for rat alveolar epithelial cells. This model should be useful for investigating the genotoxic effects of chemical and physical agents on an important lung cell target for neoplastic transformation. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mutze, Kathrin; Vierkotten, Sarah; Milosevic, Jadranka; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2) and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker), exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC), whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair. PMID:26035385

  14. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  15. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Lung Alveolar Epithelial Cell Death In Vitro and In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Hailin; Yi, Bin; Zeng, Jing; Lu, Kaizhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate bilirubin-induced lung alveolar epithelial cell injury together with the protection afforded by dexmedetomidine. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting: Research laboratory. Subjects: Sprague Dawley rats. Interventions: Alveolar epithelial A549 cell lines were cultured and received bilirubin (from 0 to 160 μM) to explore the protective pathway of dexmedetomidine on bilirubin-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury assessed by immunochemistry and flow cytometry. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to common bile duct ligation surgery to explore the protective effect of dexmedetomidine on hyperbilirubinemia-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury and respiratory failure in comparison with the Sham (subjected to the surgery procedure but without bile duct ligation) or dexmedetomidine control (only received intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine). Measurements and Main Results: In vitro, dexmedetomidine reversed the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), upregulation of cytochrome C, B cell leukemia 2 associated X protein, and cleaved-caspase 3 and 9 in A549 epithelial cells with bilirubin challenge. Furthermore, dexmedetomidine reversed the arrest of cell cycle and the downregulation of the transforming growth factorβ, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase induced by bilirubin. In vivo, pulmonary edema and inflammation were found after common bile duct ligation. Bilirubin and Paco2 were significantly increased, and oxygen (Pao2) was significantly decreased in the blood of common bile duct ligation rats from the postsurgery day 7 to day 21 when compared with those in the sham controls, respectively (p < 0.01). Daily intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine significantly alleviated the lung edema and injury and prevented respiratory failure. Conclusion: Our data both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that dexmedetomidine protected alveolar

  16. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  17. Evidence that exogenous substances can be phagocytized by alveolar epithelial cells and transported into blood capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomoko; Yashiro, Takashi; Murata, Yoshio; Herbert, Damon C; Oshikawa, Katsuhisa; Bando, Masashi; Ohno, Shoji; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2003-01-01

    Since the ability of alveolar epithelial cells to ingest inhaled fine particles has not been characterized in detail, the present study seeks to evaluate this physiological activity. We used a 0.2% suspension of intact or lecithin-coated polystyrene latex beads (240 nm in diameter). A 5-ml suspension of intact or lecithin-coated latex beads was intratracheally administered to rats using a compressor nebulizer. Thereafter, the lungs were perfused intratracheally with glutaraldehyde solution and cut into small pieces. The samples were postfixed with osmium tetroxide, embedded in epoxy resin and examined under an electron microscope. Both lecithin-coated and uncoated beads were incorporated into alveolar macrophages. Some of the ingested beads in the alveolar macrophages were sequestered within lysosomes. Types I and II alveolar epithelial cells selectively incorporated only lecithin-coated beads, which were also observed within the cytoplasm of monocytes in the capillary lumen. These findings suggest that alveolar epithelial cells can incorporate exogenous particles, which are then transferred from the alveoli to intravascular spaces by transcytosis. PMID:12483283

  18. Influenza virus damages the alveolar barrier by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Kasper, Jennifer; van der Aa, Stijn; Andeweg, Arno C; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; Goeijenbier, Marco; Richard, Mathilde; Herold, Susanne; Becker, Christin; Scott, Dana P; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Koster, Abraham J; Bárcena, Montserrat; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Kuiken, Thijs

    2016-03-01

    A major cause of respiratory failure during influenza A virus (IAV) infection is damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the pulmonary alveolus. Damage to this barrier results in flooding of the alveolar lumen with proteinaceous oedema fluid, erythrocytes and inflammatory cells. To date, the exact roles of pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells in this process remain unclear.Here, we used an in vitro co-culture model to understand how IAV damages the pulmonary epithelial-endothelial barrier. Human epithelial cells were seeded on the upper half of a transwell membrane while human endothelial cells were seeded on the lower half. These cells were then grown in co-culture and IAV was added to the upper chamber.We showed that the addition of IAV (H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes) resulted in significant barrier damage. Interestingly, we found that, while endothelial cells mounted a pro-inflammatory/pro-coagulant response to a viral infection in the adjacent epithelial cells, damage to the alveolar epithelial-endothelial barrier occurred independently of endothelial cells. Rather, barrier damage was associated with disruption of tight junctions amongst epithelial cells, and specifically with loss of tight junction protein claudin-4.Taken together, these data suggest that maintaining epithelial cell integrity is key in reducing pulmonary oedema during IAV infection. PMID:26743480

  19. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  20. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  1. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials. PMID:26985677

  2. Alveolar epithelial cells express mesenchymal proteins in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marmai, Cecilia; Sutherland, Rachel E; Kim, Kevin K; Dolganov, Gregory M; Fang, Xiaohui; Kim, Sophia S; Jiang, Shuwei; Golden, Jeffery A; Hoopes, Charles W; Matthay, Michael A; Chapman, Harold A; Wolters, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Prior work has shown that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) can mediate transition of alveolar type II cells into mesenchymal cells in mice. Evidence this occurs in humans is limited to immunohistochemical studies colocalizing epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in sections of fibrotic lungs. To acquire further evidence that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurs in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), we studied alveolar type II cells isolated from fibrotic and normal human lung. Unlike normal type II cells, type II cells isolated from the lungs of patients with IPF express higher levels of mRNA for the mesenchymal proteins type I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and calponin. When cultured on Matrigel/collagen, human alveolar type II cells maintain a cellular morphology consistent with epithelial cells and expression of surfactant protein C (SPC) and E-cadherin. In contrast, when cultured on fibronectin, the human type II cells flatten, spread, lose expression of pro- SPC, and increase expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and α-SMA; markers of mesenchymal cells. Addition of a TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor (SB431542) to cells cultured on fibronectin inhibited vimentin expression and maintained pro-SPC expression, indicating persistence of an epithelial phenotype. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells can acquire features of mesenchymal cells in IPF lungs and that TGF-β can mediate this process. PMID:21498628

  3. Alveolar epithelial cells express mesenchymal proteins in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Marmai, Cecilia; Sutherland, Rachel E.; Kim, Kevin K.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Fang, Xiaohui; Kim, Sophia S.; Jiang, Shuwei; Golden, Jeffery A.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Matthay, Michael A.; Chapman, Harold A.

    2011-01-01

    Prior work has shown that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) can mediate transition of alveolar type II cells into mesenchymal cells in mice. Evidence this occurs in humans is limited to immunohistochemical studies colocalizing epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in sections of fibrotic lungs. To acquire further evidence that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurs in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), we studied alveolar type II cells isolated from fibrotic and normal human lung. Unlike normal type II cells, type II cells isolated from the lungs of patients with IPF express higher levels of mRNA for the mesenchymal proteins type I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and calponin. When cultured on Matrigel/collagen, human alveolar type II cells maintain a cellular morphology consistent with epithelial cells and expression of surfactant protein C (SPC) and E-cadherin. In contrast, when cultured on fibronectin, the human type II cells flatten, spread, lose expression of pro- SPC, and increase expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and α-SMA; markers of mesenchymal cells. Addition of a TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor (SB431542) to cells cultured on fibronectin inhibited vimentin expression and maintained pro-SPC expression, indicating persistence of an epithelial phenotype. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells can acquire features of mesenchymal cells in IPF lungs and that TGF-β can mediate this process. PMID:21498628

  4. Sirtuin 1 Activator SRT1720 Protects Against Lung Injury via Reduction of Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells Apoptosis in Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Li, Yaqing; Xu, Wu-Lin; Yan, Jian-Ping; Xia, Ying-jie; Ma, Ying-Yu; Chen, Chun; Wang, Hui-Ju; Tao, Hou-quan

    2015-08-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), two major pathological changes that occur are the loss of alveolar structure and airspace enlargement. Type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII) play a vital role in maintaining alveolar homeostasis and lung tissue repair. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates many pathophysiological processes including inflammation, apoptosis, cellular senescence and stress resistance. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether SRT1720, a pharmacological SIRT1 activator, could protect against AECII apoptosis in rats with emphysema caused by cigarette smoke exposure and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide instillation in vivo. During the induction of emphysema in rats, administration of SRT1720 improved lung function including airway resistance and pulmonary dynamic compliance. SRT1720 treatment up-regulated the levels of surfactant protein (SP)A, SPC, SIRT1 and forkhead box O 3, increased SIRT1 activity, down-regulated the level of p53 and inhibited AECII apoptosis. Lung injury caused by emphysema was alleviated after SRT1720 treatment. SRT1720 could protect against AECII apoptosis in rats with emphysema and thus could be used in COPD treatment. PMID:25415045

  5. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  6. Intrinsic epithelial cells repair the kidney after injury.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Benjamin D; Valerius, M Todd; Kobayashi, Akio; Mugford, Joshua W; Soeung, Savuth; Duffield, Jeremy S; McMahon, Andrew P; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of nephron repair is critical for the design of new therapeutic approaches to treat kidney disease. The kidney can repair after even a severe insult, but whether adult stem or progenitor cells contribute to epithelial renewal after injury and the cellular origin of regenerating cells remain controversial. Using genetic fate-mapping techniques, we generated transgenic mice in which 94%-95% of tubular epithelial cells, but no interstitial cells, were labeled with either beta-galactosidase (lacZ) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Two days after ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), 50.5% of outer medullary epithelial cells coexpress Ki67 and RFP, indicating that differentiated epithelial cells that survived injury undergo proliferative expansion. After repair was complete, 66.9% of epithelial cells had incorporated BrdU, compared to only 3.5% of cells in the uninjured kidney. Despite this extensive cell proliferation, no dilution of either cell-fate marker was observed after repair. These results indicate that regeneration by surviving tubular epithelial cells is the predominant mechanism of repair after ischemic tubular injury in the adult mammalian kidney. PMID:18371453

  7. Cigarette Smoke Enhances the Expression of Profibrotic Molecules in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Marco; Hagood, James S.; Velazquez-Cruz, Rafael; Ruiz, Victor; García-De-Alba, Carolina; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Urrea, Francisco; Becerril, Carina; Montaño, Martha; García-Trejo, Semiramis; Cisneros Lira, José; Aquino-Gálvez, Arnoldo; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and lethal disease of unknown etiology. A growing body of evidence indicates that it may result from an aberrant activation of alveolar epithelium, which induces the expansion of the fibroblast population, their differentiation to myofibroblasts and the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that activate the alveolar epithelium are unknown, but several studies indicate that smoking is the main environmental risk factor for the development of IPF. In this study we explored the effect of cigarette smoke on the gene expression profile and signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cell line from human (A549), was exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 1, 3, and 5 weeks at 1, 5 and 10% and gene expression was evaluated by complete transcriptome microarrays. Signaling networks were analyzed with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. At 5 weeks of exposure, alveolar epithelial cells acquired a fibroblast-like phenotype. At this time, gene expression profile revealed a significant increase of more than 1000 genes and deregulation of canonical signaling pathways such as TGF-β and Wnt. Several profibrotic genes involved in EMT were over-expressed, and incomplete EMT was observed in these cells, and corroborated in mouse (MLE-12) and rat (RLE-6TN) epithelial cells. The secretion of activated TGF-β1 increased in cells exposed to cigarette smoke, which decreased when the integrin alpha v gene was silenced. These findings suggest that the exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to CSE induces the expression and release of a variety of profibrotic genes, and the activation of TGF-β1, which may explain at least partially, the increased risk of developing IPF in smokers. PMID:26934369

  8. Cigarette Smoke Enhances the Expression of Profibrotic Molecules in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Checa, Marco; Hagood, James S; Velazquez-Cruz, Rafael; Ruiz, Victor; García-De-Alba, Carolina; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Urrea, Francisco; Becerril, Carina; Montaño, Martha; García-Trejo, Semiramis; Cisneros Lira, José; Aquino-Gálvez, Arnoldo; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and lethal disease of unknown etiology. A growing body of evidence indicates that it may result from an aberrant activation of alveolar epithelium, which induces the expansion of the fibroblast population, their differentiation to myofibroblasts and the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that activate the alveolar epithelium are unknown, but several studies indicate that smoking is the main environmental risk factor for the development of IPF. In this study we explored the effect of cigarette smoke on the gene expression profile and signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cell line from human (A549), was exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 1, 3, and 5 weeks at 1, 5 and 10% and gene expression was evaluated by complete transcriptome microarrays. Signaling networks were analyzed with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. At 5 weeks of exposure, alveolar epithelial cells acquired a fibroblast-like phenotype. At this time, gene expression profile revealed a significant increase of more than 1000 genes and deregulation of canonical signaling pathways such as TGF-β and Wnt. Several profibrotic genes involved in EMT were over-expressed, and incomplete EMT was observed in these cells, and corroborated in mouse (MLE-12) and rat (RLE-6TN) epithelial cells. The secretion of activated TGF-β1 increased in cells exposed to cigarette smoke, which decreased when the integrin alpha v gene was silenced. These findings suggest that the exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to CSE induces the expression and release of a variety of profibrotic genes, and the activation of TGF-β1, which may explain at least partially, the increased risk of developing IPF in smokers. PMID:26934369

  9. Proinflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced by alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha during pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Fernandez, Lucas G; Awad, Alaa S; Kron, Irving L; Laubach, Victor E

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury entails acute activation of alveolar macrophages followed by neutrophil sequestration. Although proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from macrophages are known to modulate acute IR injury, the contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to IR injury and their intercellular interactions with other cell types such as alveolar macrophages and neutrophils remain unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that following IR, alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha further induces alveolar epithelial cells to produce key chemokines that could then contribute to subsequent lung injury through the recruitment of neutrophils. Cultured RAW264.7 macrophages and MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to acute hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) as an in vitro model of pulmonary IR. H/R (3 h/1 h) significantly induced KC, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), RANTES, and IL-6 (but not TNF-alpha) by MLE-12 cells, whereas H/R induced TNF-alpha, MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-2 (but not KC) by RAW264.7 cells. These results were confirmed using primary murine alveolar macrophages and primary alveolar type II cells. Importantly, using macrophage and epithelial coculture methods, the specific production of TNF-alpha by H/R-exposed RAW264.7 cells significantly induced proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression (KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-6) by MLE-12 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alveolar type II cells, in conjunction with alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha, contribute to the initiation of acute pulmonary IR injury via a proinflammatory cascade. The release of key chemokines, such as KC and MIP-2, by activated type II cells may thus significantly contribute to neutrophil sequestration during IR injury. PMID:17416740

  10. Plexins function in epithelial repair in both Drosophila and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Pascoe, Heath G.; Pereira, Telmo; Kondo, Shu; Jacinto, Antonio; Zhang, Xuewu; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2016-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, homeostasis is contingent upon maintaining epithelial integrity. When unanticipated insults breach epithelial barriers, dormant programmes of tissue repair are immediately activated. However, many of the mechanisms that repair damaged epithelia remain poorly characterized. Here we describe a role for Plexin A (PlexA), a protein with particularly well-characterized roles in axonal pathfinding, in the healing of damaged epithelia in Drosophila. Semaphorins, which are PlexA ligands, also regulate tissue repair. We show that Drosophila PlexA has GAP activity for the Rap1 GTPase, which is known to regulate the stability of adherens junctions. Our observations suggest that the inhibition of Rap1 activity by PlexA in damaged Drosophila epithelia allows epithelial remodelling, thus facilitating wound repair. We also demonstrate a role for Plexin A1, a zebrafish orthologue of Drosophila PlexA, in epithelial repair in zebrafish tail fins. Thus, plexins function in epithelial wound healing in diverse taxa. PMID:27452696

  11. Methemoglobin-induced signaling and chemokine responses in human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Sharon; Ramakrishnan, Latha; Evans, Timothy W.; Griffiths, Mark J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is characterized by the presence of red blood cells and free hemoglobin in the alveoli and complicates a number of serious medical and surgical lung conditions including the pulmonary vasculitides and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this study we investigated the hypothesis that exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells to hemoglobin and its breakdown products regulates chemokine release via iron- and oxidant-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Methemoglobin alone stimulated the release of IL-8 and MCP-1 from A549 cells via activation of the NF-κB pathway; additionally, IL-8 required ERK activation and MCP-1 required JNK activation. Neither antioxidants nor iron chelators and knockdown of ferritin heavy and light chains affected these responses, indicating that iron and reactive oxygen species are not involved in the response of alveolar epithelial cells to methemoglobin. Incubation of primary cultures of human alveolar type 2 cells with methemoglobin resulted in a similar pattern of chemokine release and signaling pathway activation. In summary, we have shown for the first time that methemoglobin induced chemokine release from human lung epithelial cells independent of iron- and redox-mediated signaling involving the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Decompartmentalization of hemoglobin may be a significant proinflammatory stimulus in a variety of lung diseases. PMID:24142518

  12. Regulation of epithelial sodium channel expression by oestradiol and progestogen in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Deng, Jia; Wang, Dao-xin; He, Jing; Deng, Wang

    2015-09-15

    Oestrogen (E) and progestogen (P) exert regulatory effects on the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) in the kidneys and the colon. However, the effects of E and P on the ENaC and on alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) remain unclear, and the mechanisms of action of these hormones are unknown. In this study, we showed that E and/or P administration increased AFC by more than 25% and increased the expression of the α and γ subunits of ENaC by approximately 35% in rats subjected to oleic acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI). A similar effect was observed in the dexamethasone-treated group. Furthermore, E and/or P treatment inhibited 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 2 (11β-HSD2) activity, increased corticosterone expression and decreased the serum adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) levels. These effects were similar to those observed following treatment with carbenoxolone (CBX), a nonspecific HSD inhibitor. Further investigation showed that CBX further significantly increased AFC and α-ENaC expression after treatment with a low dose of E and/or P. In vitro, E or P alone inhibited 11β-HSD2 activity in a dose-dependent manner and increased α-ENaC expression by at least 50%, and E combined with P increased α-ENaC expression by more than 80%. Thus, E and P may augment the expression of α-ENaC, enhance AFC, attenuate pulmonary oedema by inhibiting 11β-HSD2 activity, and increase the active glucocorticoid levels in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26051998

  13. Ultrastructural evidence of alveolar epithelial injury in idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. L.; Katzenstein, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia (BOOP) were studied in 9 patients. As expected, the characteristic air space fibrosis was composed of spindled fibroblasts and myofibroblasts arranged concentrically within an electron-lucent stroma. In 6 patients there was evidence of incorporation of air space fibrosis into the interstitium. A surprising finding in all patients was the presence of extensive epithelial damage involving peribronchiolar alveolar septa. Necrosis and sloughing of alveolar lining cells resulted in denuding of epithelial basal laminae. Complex infoldings and deep invaginations of the denuded basal laminae into alveolar septa were common. These ultrastructural changes involving the interstitium are similar to those occurring in the interstitial pneumonias, and suggest that BOOP also results from acute epithelial injury. The different clinical manifestations and prognosis of these entities may relate to the peribronchiolar localization of the epithelial damage in BOOP compared with more diffuse involvement of distal lung in the interstitial pneumonias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3394793

  14. The vitronectin RGD motif regulates TGF-β-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Amanda K; Velikoff, Miranda; Agarwal, Manisha; Loo, Tiffany T; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Sisson, Thomas H; Kim, Kevin K

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a critical driver of acute lung injury and fibrosis. Injury leads to activation of TGF-β, which regulates changes in the cellular and matrix makeup of the lung during the repair and fibrosis phase. TGF-β can also initiate alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis. Injury leads to destruction of the laminin-rich basement membrane, which is replaced by a provisional matrix composed of arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif-containing plasma matrix proteins, including vitronectin and fibronectin. To determine the role of specific matrix proteins on TGF-β-induced apoptosis, we studied primary AECs cultured on different matrix conditions and utilized mice with deletion of vitronectin (Vtn(-/-)) or mice in which the vitronectin RGD motif is mutated to nonintegrin-binding arginine-glycine-glutamate (RGE) (Vtn(RGE/RGE)). We found that AECs cultured on fibronectin and vitronectin or in wild-type mouse serum are resistant to TGF-β-induced apoptosis. In contrast, AECs cultured on laminin or in serum from Vtn(-/-) or Vtn(RGE/RGE) mice undergo robust TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) sensitizes AECs to greater apoptosis by disrupting AEC engagement to vitronectin. Inhibition of integrin-associated signaling proteins augments AEC apoptosis. Mice with transgenic deletion of PAI-1 have less apoptosis after bleomycin, but deletion of vitronectin or disruption of the vitronectin RGD motif reverses this protection, suggesting that the proapoptotic function of PAI-1 is mediated through vitronectin inhibition. Collectively, these data suggest that integrin-matrix signaling is an important regulator of TGF-β-mediated AEC apoptosis and that PAI-1 functions as a natural regulator of this interaction. PMID:27106291

  15. CXCL9 Regulates TGF-β1 induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Beirne, Sarah L; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurélie; Reviriego, Carlota; Worrell, Julie C; Counihan, Ian P; Lumsden, Robert V; Cramton-Barnes, Jennifer; Belperio, John A.; Donnelly, Seamas C; Boylan, Denise; Marchal-Somme, Joëlle; Kane, Rosemary; Keane, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), whereby fully differentiated epithelial cells transition to a mesenchymal phenotype has been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). CXCR3 and its ligands are recognized to play a protective role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the presence and extent of EMT and CXCR3 expression in human IPF surgical lung biopsies and assessed whether CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL9 modulate EMT in alveolar epithelial cells. Coexpression of the epithelial maker thyroid transcription factor-1, and mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin and CXCR3 expression was examined by immunohistochemical staining of IPF surgical lung biopsies. Epithelial and mesenchymal marker expression was examined by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence in human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells treated with TGF-β1 and CXCL9, whilst Smad2, Smad3, and Smad7 expression and cellular localization examined by Western blotting. We found that significantly more cells were undergoing EMT in fibrotic versus normal areas of lung in IPF surgical lung biopsy samples. CXCR3 was expressed by type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts in fibrotic areas in close proximity to cells undergoing EMT. In vitro, CXCL9 abrogated TGF-β1 induced EMT. A decrease in TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 occurred with CXCL9 treatment. This was associated with increased shuttling of Smad7 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it inhibits Smad phosphorylation. This suggests a role for EMT in the pathogenesis of IPF and provides a novel mechanism for the inhibitory effects of CXCL9 on TGF-β1 induced EMT. PMID:26268659

  16. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs. PMID:27182651

  17. DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)—a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway—in alveolar formation. DA-Raf–deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf–dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14–MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14–MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development. PMID:24843139

  18. Anoctamin 1 dysregulation alters bronchial epithelial repair in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Voland, Mélanie; Marie, Solenne; Bonora, Monique; Blanchard, Elise; Blouquit-Laye, Sabine; Naline, Emmanuel; Puyo, Philippe; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Guillot, Loic; Corvol, Harriet; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium is constantly subjected to injury events due to chronic infection and inflammation. Moreover, abnormalities in CF airway epithelium repair have been described and contribute to the lung function decline seen in CF patients. In the last past years, it has been proposed that anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel, might offset the CFTR deficiency but this protein has not been characterized in CF airways. Interestingly, recent evidence indicates a role for ANO1 in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Our aims were to study non-CF and CF bronchial epithelial repair and to determine whether ANO1 is involved in airway epithelial repair. Here, we showed, with human bronchial epithelial cell lines and primary cells, that both cell proliferation and migration during epithelial repair are delayed in CF compared to non-CF cells. We then demonstrated that ANO1 Cl(-) channel activity was significantly decreased in CF versus non-CF cells. To explain this decreased Cl(-) channel activity in CF context, we compared ANO1 expression in non-CF vs. CF bronchial epithelial cell lines and primary cells, in lung explants from wild-type vs. F508del mice and non-CF vs. CF patients. In all these models, ANO1 expression was markedly lower in CF compared to non-CF. Finally, we established that ANO1 inhibition or overexpression was associated respectively with decreases and increases in cell proliferation and migration. In summary, our study demonstrates involvement of ANO1 decreased activity and expression in abnormal CF airway epithelial repair and suggests that ANO1 correction may improve this process. PMID:24080196

  19. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and "collapse" of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with plasma membrane wounds in ex vivo mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Plasma membrane integrity was assessed by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion in confocal images of subpleural alveoli. Cyclic inflations of normal lungs from zero end-expiratory pressure to 40 cmH2O produced VT values of 56.9 ± 3.1 ml/kg and were associated with 0.12 ± 0.12 PI-positive cells/alveolus. A preceding tracheal instillation of normal saline (3 ml) reduced VT to 49.1 ± 6 ml/kg but was associated with a significantly greater number of wounded alveolar epithelial cells (0.52 ± 0.16 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). Mechanical ventilation of completely saline-filled lungs with saline (VT = 52 ml/kg) to pressures between 10 and 15 cmH2O was associated with the least number of wounded epithelial cells (0.02 ± 0.02 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). In mechanically ventilated, partially saline-filled lungs, the number of wounded cells increased substantially with VT, but, once VT was accounted for, wounding was independent of maximal PTP. We found that interfacial stress associated with the generation and destruction of liquid bridges in airspaces is the primary biophysical cell injury mechanism in mechanically ventilated lungs. PMID:23997173

  20. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and “collapse” of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with plasma membrane wounds in ex vivo mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Plasma membrane integrity was assessed by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion in confocal images of subpleural alveoli. Cyclic inflations of normal lungs from zero end-expiratory pressure to 40 cmH2O produced VT values of 56.9 ± 3.1 ml/kg and were associated with 0.12 ± 0.12 PI-positive cells/alveolus. A preceding tracheal instillation of normal saline (3 ml) reduced VT to 49.1 ± 6 ml/kg but was associated with a significantly greater number of wounded alveolar epithelial cells (0.52 ± 0.16 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). Mechanical ventilation of completely saline-filled lungs with saline (VT = 52 ml/kg) to pressures between 10 and 15 cmH2O was associated with the least number of wounded epithelial cells (0.02 ± 0.02 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). In mechanically ventilated, partially saline-filled lungs, the number of wounded cells increased substantially with VT, but, once VT was accounted for, wounding was independent of maximal PTP. We found that interfacial stress associated with the generation and destruction of liquid bridges in airspaces is the primary biophysical cell injury mechanism in mechanically ventilated lungs. PMID:23997173

  1. Generation of alveolar epithelial spheroids via isolated progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Shimpei; Ito, Isao; Nagasaki, Tadao; Yamamoto, Yuki; Konishi, Satoshi; Korogi, Yohei; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Funato, Michinori; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Toyoda, Taro; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Osafune, Kenji; Mishima, Michiaki

    2014-09-01

    No methods for isolating induced alveolar epithelial progenitor cells (AEPCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been reported. Based on a study of the stepwise induction of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), we identified carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1(+) "ventralized" anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs) in vitro and in fetal human and murine lungs. Using SFTPC-GFP reporter hPSCs and a 3D coculture system with fetal human lung fibroblasts, we showed that CPM(+) cells isolated from VAFECs differentiate into AECs, demonstrating that CPM is a marker of AEPCs. Moreover, 3D coculture differentiation of CPM(+) cells formed spheroids with lamellar-body-like structures and an increased expression of surfactant proteins compared with 2D differentiation. Methods to induce and isolate AEPCs using CPM and consequently generate alveolar epithelial spheroids would aid human pulmonary disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:25241738

  2. Pulmonary contusion induces alveolar type 2 epithelial cell apoptosis: role of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Perl, Mario; Mangold, Stefanie; Neddermann, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoixa; Bachem, Max G; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Knöferl, Markus W

    2008-11-01

    Alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cell apoptosis is an important mechanism during lung inflammation, lung injury, and regeneration. Blunt chest trauma has been shown to activate inflammatory cells such as alveolar macrophages (AMs) or neutrophils (polymorphonuclear granulocytes [PMNs]), resulting in an inflammatory response. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of different components/cells of the alveolar compartment (AMs, PMNs, or bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluids) to induce apoptosis in AT-2 cells following blunt chest trauma. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham procedure or blunt chest trauma induced by a single blast wave. Various time points after injury (6 h to 7 d), the lungs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, for AT-2 cells, or with antibodies directed against caspase 3, caspase 8, Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), BAX, and BCL-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and soluble FasL were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, cultures of AT-2 cells isolated from healthy rats were incubated with supernatants of AMs, PMNs, or BAL fluids obtained from either trauma or sham-operated animals in the presence or absence of oxidative stress. Annexin V staining or TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase) assay was used to detect apoptotic AT-2 cells. Histological evaluation revealed that the total number of AT-2 cells was significantly reduced at 48 h following trauma. Fas, FasL, active caspase 8, and active caspase 3 were markedly up-regulated in AT-2 cells after chest trauma. BAX and BCL-2 did not show any significant changes between sham and trauma. IL-1beta, but not TNF-alpha, levels were markedly increased at 24 h after the injury, and soluble FasL concentrations were significantly enhanced at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the insult. Apoptosis of AT-2 cells incubated with supernatants from cultured AMs, isolated at 48 h following chest trauma was markedly increased when

  3. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of alveolar epithelial cells: effects of misfolded surfactant protein.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Zhou, Beiyun; Ann, David K; Minoo, Parviz; Liu, Yixin; Banfalvi, Agnes; Krishnaveni, Manda S; Dubourd, Mickael; Demaio, Lucas; Willis, Brigham C; Kim, Kwang-Jin; duBois, Roland M; Crandall, Edward D; Beers, Michael F; Borok, Zea

    2011-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell apoptosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that ER stress (either chemically induced or due to accumulation of misfolded proteins) is also associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). ER stress inducers, thapsigargin (TG) or tunicamycin (TN), increased expression of ER chaperone, Grp78, and spliced X-box binding protein 1, decreased epithelial markers, E-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), increased the myofibroblast marker, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and induced fibroblast-like morphology in both primary AECs and the AT2 cell line, RLE-6TN, consistent with EMT. Overexpression of the surfactant protein (SP)-C BRICHOS mutant SP-C(ΔExon4) in A549 cells increased Grp78 and α-SMA and disrupted ZO-1 distribution, and, in primary AECs, SP-C(ΔExon4) induced fibroblastic-like morphology, decreased ZO-1 and E-cadherin and increased α-SMA, mechanistically linking ER stress associated with mutant SP to fibrosis through EMT. Whereas EMT was evident at lower concentrations of TG or TN, higher concentrations caused apoptosis. The Src inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4]pyramidine) (PP2), abrogated EMT associated with TN or TG in primary AECs, whereas overexpression of SP-C(ΔExon4) increased Src phosphorylation, suggesting a common mechanism. Furthermore, increased Grp78 immunoreactivity was observed in AT2 cells of mice after bleomycin injury, supporting a role for ER stress in epithelial abnormalities in fibrosis in vivo. These results demonstrate that ER stress induces EMT in AECs, at least in part through Src-dependent pathways, suggesting a novel role for ER stress in fibroblast accumulation in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21169555

  4. Wound repair: role of immune–epithelial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Neumann, P-A; Sumagin, R; Denning, TL; Nusrat, A

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium serves as a highly selective barrier at mucosal surfaces. Upon injury, epithelial wound closure is orchestrated by a series of events that emanate from the epithelium itself as well as by the temporal recruitment of immune cells into the wound bed. Epithelial cells adjoining the wound flatten out, migrate, and proliferate to rapidly cover denuded surfaces and re-establish mucosal homeostasis. This process is highly regulated by proteins and lipids, proresolving mediators such as Annexin A1 protein and resolvins released into the epithelial milieu by the epithelium itself and infiltrating innate immune cells including neutrophils and macrophages. Failure to achieve these finely tuned processes is observed in chronic inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-healing wounds. An improved understanding of mechanisms that mediate repair is important in the development of therapeutics aimed to promote mucosal wound repair. PMID:26174765

  5. Cyclic stretch induces alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction via calpain-mediated degradation of p120-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuelan; Minshall, Richard D; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2011-08-01

    Lung hyperinflation is known to be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical stretch causes epithelial barrier dysfunction and an increase in alveolar permeability, although the precise mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. p120-catenin is an adherens junction-associated protein that regulates cell-cell adhesion. In this study, we determined the role of p120-catenin in cyclic stretch-induced alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction. Cultured alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12) were subjected to uniform cyclic (0.5 Hz) biaxial stretch from 0 to 8 or 20% change in surface area for 0, 1, 2, or 4 h. At the end of the experiments, cells were lysed to determine p120-catenin expression by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence staining of p120-catenin and F-actin was performed to assess the integrity of monolayers and interepithelial gap formation. Compared with unstretched control cells, 20% stretch caused a significant loss in p120-catenin expression, which was coupled to interepithelial gap formation. p120-Catenin knockdown with small interfering RNA (siRNA) dose dependently increased stretch-induced gap formation, whereas overexpression of p120-catenin abolished stretch-induced gap formation. Furthermore, pharmacological calpain inhibition or depletion of calpain-1 with a specific siRNA prevented p120-catenin loss and subsequent stretch-induced gap formation. Our findings demonstrate that p120-catenin plays a critical protective role in cyclic stretch-induced alveolar barrier dysfunction, and, thus, maintenance of p120-catenin expression may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:21571907

  6. Correlation of vermilion symmetry to alveolar cleft defect in unilateral cleft lip repair.

    PubMed

    Bonanthaya, K; Rao, D D; Shetty, P; Uguru, C

    2016-06-01

    Asymmetry is a major problem in repaired unilateral cleft lip (UCL). One of the important manifestations of this is the asymmetry of the vermilion. The aim of this study was to correlate the severity of the asymmetry in the vermilion to the size of the alveolar defect. Twenty patients aged between 6 and 18 months with complete unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate were included. An impression of each patient's alveolus at the time of cheiloplasty was taken using silicon rubber base material, and a study cast was prepared. The width of the cleft alveolus was measured on these casts using a transparent grid. Frontal photographs were taken at 6 months postoperative and vermilion symmetry was measured as the ratio between the cleft and non-cleft sides. The results obtained in this study showed a direct correlation between the size of the alveolar defect and the vermilion symmetry in repaired UCL. The wider the cleft alveolus and greater the antero-posterior discrepancy, the greater is the vermilion asymmetry. The asymmetry of the vermilion in UCL after repair is directly dependent on the size of the alveolar defect. The alveolar discrepancy causes 'in-rolling' of the vermilion on the cleft side and affects the vermilion symmetry. PMID:26754270

  7. Differentiated kidney epithelial cells repair injured proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Kusaba, Tetsuro; Lalli, Matthew; Kramann, Rafael; Kobayashi, Akio; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2014-01-28

    Whether kidney proximal tubule harbors a scattered population of epithelial stem cells is a major unsolved question. Lineage-tracing studies, histologic characterization, and ex vivo functional analysis results conflict. To address this controversy, we analyzed the lineage and clonal behavior of fully differentiated proximal tubule epithelial cells after injury. A CreER(T2) cassette was knocked into the sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate transporter SLC34a1 locus, which is expressed only in differentiated proximal tubule. Tamoxifen-dependent recombination was absolutely specific to proximal tubule. Clonal analysis after injury and repair showed that the bulk of labeled cells proliferate after injury with increased clone size after severe compared with mild injury. Injury to labeled proximal tubule epithelia induced expression of CD24, CD133, vimentin, and kidney-injury molecule-1, markers of putative epithelial stem cells in the human kidney. Similar results were observed in cultured proximal tubules, in which labeled clones proliferated and expressed dedifferentiation and injury markers. When mice with completely labeled kidneys were subject to injury and repair there was no dilution of fate marker despite substantial proliferation, indicating that unlabeled progenitors do not contribute to kidney repair. During nephrogenesis and early kidney growth, single proximal tubule clones expanded, suggesting that differentiated cells also contribute to tubule elongation. These findings provide no evidence for an intratubular stem-cell population, but rather indicate that terminally differentiated epithelia reexpress apparent stem-cell markers during injury-induced dedifferentiation and repair. PMID:24127583

  8. [Binase penetration into alveolar epithelial cells does not induce cell death].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fuentes, H A; Kalacheva, N V; Mukhametshina, R T; Zelenichin, P V; Kolpakov, A I; Barreto, G; Praĭssner, K T; Il'inskaia, O N

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ribonucleases possess a broad spectra of biological activities, demonstrating stimulating properties at low concentrations and cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at high concentrations. The mechanisms of their penetration into the cells are not clear so far. This research is aimed to the study of Bacillus intermedius RNase (binase) penetration in alveolar lung epithelial cells--pneumocytes of type II. Using immunofluorescence we have shown for the first time have internalization of binase by primary non-differentiated pneumocytes ATII. The enzyme did not penetrate in pneumocytes MLE-12, which also derived from type II cells. However, binase was cytotoxic towards tumor MLE-12 cells, but not ATII cells. The obtained results testified the higher sensitivity of tumor cells towards binase compared with normal cells, and also showed that penetration of the enzyme into alveolar cells did not directly correlated with the cell death. PMID:22856132

  9. Establishment and Evaluation of a Stable Cattle Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feng; Liu, Xin; Liu, Guanghui; Yu, Yuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Jin, Yaping; Hu, Guangdong; Hua, Song; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells) by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II) that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24086682

  10. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S P; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-06-21

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  11. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  12. Establishment of immortalized alveolar type II epithelial cell lines from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, K E; Carter, J M; Iype, P T; Kumari, H L; Crosby, L L; Aardema, M J; Isfort, R J; Cody, D; Chestnut, M H; Burns, J L

    1995-01-01

    We developed methodology to isolate and culture rat alveolar Type II cells under conditions that preserved their proliferative capacity, and applied lipofection to introduce an immortalizing gene into the cells. Briefly, the alveolar Type II cells were isolated from male F344 rats using airway perfusion with a pronase solution followed by incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Cells obtained by pronase digestion were predominantly epithelial in morphology and were positive for Papanicolaou and alkaline phosphatase staining. These cells could be maintained on an extracellular matrix of fibronectin and Type IV collagen in a low serum, insulin-supplemented Ham's F12 growth medium for four to five passages. Rat alveolar epithelial cells obtained by this method were transformed with the SV40-T antigen gene and two immortalized cell lines (RLE-6T and RLE-6TN) were obtained. The RLE-6T line exhibits positive nuclear immunostaining for the SV40-T antigen and the RLE-6TN line does not. PCR analysis of genomic DNA from the RLE-6T and RLE-6TN cells demonstrated the T-antigen gene was present only in the RLE-6T line indicating the RLE-6TN line is likely derived from a spontaneous transformant. After more than 50 population doublings, the RLE-6T cells stained positive for cytokeratin, possessed alkaline phosphatase activity, and contained lipid-containing inclusion bodies (phosphine 3R staining); all characteristics of alveolar Type II cells. The RLE-6TN cells exhibited similar characteristics except they did not express alkaline phosphatase activity. Early passage RLE-6T and 6TN cells showed a near diploid chromosome number.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8528500

  13. Emodin enhances alveolar epithelial barrier function in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Wang, Fang-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Kai; Wan, Hai-Jun; Xu, Wen-An; Lu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on expression of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin, as well as the alveolar epithelial barrier in rats with pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate. METHODS: Experimental pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Emodin was injected via the external jugular vein 3 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Rats from sham operation group and acute pancreatitis group were injected with normal saline (an equivalent volume as emodin) at the same time point. Samples of lung and serum were obtained 6 h after drug administration. Pulmonary morphology was examined with HE staining. Pulmonary edema was estimated by measuring water content in lung tissue samples. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level were measured by enzyme-linked immunospecific assay. Serum amylase and pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were detected by spectrophotometry. Alveolar epithelial barrier was assessed by pulmonary dye extravasation. Expression of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin in lung tissue samples was examined by immunohistology, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Pancreatitis-associated lung injury was characterized by pulmonary edema, leukocyte infiltration, alveolar collapse, and elevated serum amylase level. The pulmonary damage, pulmonary pathological scores, serum amylase and MPO activity, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and wet/dry ratio were decreased in rats after treatment with emodin. Immunostaining of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin was detected in lung tissue samples from rats in sham operation group, which was distributed in alveolar epithelium, vascular endothelium, and bronchial epithelium, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-4, claudin-5 and occludin in lung tissue samples were markedly decreased, the expression level of

  14. TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells mediate bleomycin-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Takenaka, Miki; Kage, Yukiko; Negoro, Takaharu; Toda, Takahiro; Ohbayashi, Masayuki; Numata, Tomohiro; Nakano, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Mori, Yasuo; Ishii, Masakazu; Shimizu, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Lung inflammation is a major adverse effect of therapy with the antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM). Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel that is activated by oxidative stress through the production of ADP-ribose. We herein investigated whether TRPM2 channels contributed to BLM-induced lung inflammation. The intratracheal instillation of BLM into wild-type (WT) mice increased the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and inflammatory cytokine levels in the lung. Increases in inflammatory markers in WT mice were markedly reduced in trpm2 knockout (KO) mice, which demonstrated that the activation of TRPM2 channels was involved in BLM-induced lung inflammation. The expression of TRPM2 mRNA was observed in alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells, and lung fibroblasts. Actually, TRPM2 protein was expressed in lung tissues. Of these, TRPM2 channels in epithelial cells were activated by the addition of H2O2 following a BLM pretreatment, resulting in the secretion of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The H2O2-induced activation of TRPM2 by the BLM pretreatment was blocked by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors PJ34 and 3-aminobenzamide. The accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the nucleus, a marker for ADP-ribose production, was strongly induced by H2O2 following the BLM pretreatment. Furthermore, administration of PRAP inhibitors into WT mice markedly reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells and MIP-2 secretion induced by BLM instillation. These results suggest that the induction of MIP-2 secretion through the activation of TRPM2 channels in alveolar epithelial cells is an important mechanism in BLM-induced lung inflammation, and the TRPM2 activation is likely to be mediated by ADP-ribose production via PARP pathway. TRPM2 channels may be new therapeutic target for BLM-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26600069

  15. Role of stretch on tight junction structure in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, K J; Oswari, J; Margulies, S S

    2001-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high tidal volumes can cause interstitial and alveolar edema, with degradation of pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity. Separate studies have shown that F-actin disruption and decreased intracellular ATP (ATP(i)) levels in the nonpulmonary epithelium can increase tight junction (TJ) permeability. We hypothesized that large epithelial stretch perturbs ATP(i) and actin architecture, each of which adversely affects TJ structure, and thus increases TJ permeability. Primary alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to a uniform 25% or 37% change in surface area (DeltaSA), cyclic biaxial stretch (15 cycles/min) for 1 h, or treated with either glycolytic metabolic inhibitors or cytoskeletal disrupting agents. Unstretched, untreated cells served as controls. Changes in the TJ proteins occludin and ZO-1 were determined by immunocytochemical evaluation. A stretch amplitude of 25% DeltaSA did not produce any significant cytologic changes compared with controls, but an amplitude of 37% DeltaSA stretch resulted in significant decreases in the intensity of the peripheral occludin band, the degree of cell-cell attachment (CCA), and total cellular occludin content. ATP depletion significantly diminished the occludin band intensity and decreased CCA. Actin disruption did not affect TJ protein band intensities (although the occludin distribution became punctate) but altered CCA. Untreated cells stretched cyclically at 25% or 50% DeltaSA for 1 h had significantly decreased ATP(i) compared with unstretched controls. These results suggest that stretch-induced ATP(i) reduction and actin perturbation disrupt TJ structure and CCA, which may lead to the alveolar flooding associated with high tidal volumes. PMID:11713100

  16. Epithelial injury and repair in airways diseases.

    PubMed

    Grainge, Christopher L; Davies, Donna E

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by variable respiratory distress with underlying airway inflammation and airflow obstruction. The incidence of asthma has risen inexorably over the past 50 years, suggesting that environmental factors are important in its etiology. All inhaled environmental stimuli interact with the lung at the respiratory epithelium, and it is a testament to the effectiveness of the airway innate defenses that the majority of inhaled substances are cleared without the need to elicit an inflammatory response. However, once this barrier is breached, effective communication with immune and inflammatory cells is required to protect the internal milieu of the lung. In asthma, the respiratory epithelium is known to be structurally and functionally abnormal. Structurally, the epithelium shows evidence of damage and has more mucus-producing cells than normal airways. Functionally, the airway epithelial barrier can be more permeable and more sensitive to oxidants and show a deficient innate immune response to respiratory virus infection compared with that in normal individuals. The potential of a susceptible epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to create a microenvironment that enables deviation of immune and inflammatory responses to external stimuli may be crucial in the development and progression of asthma. In this review, we consider three important groups of environmental stimuli on the epithelium in asthma: oxidants, such as environmental pollution and acetaminophen; viruses, including rhinovirus; and agents that cause barrier disruption, such as house dust mite allergens. The pathology associated with each stimulus is considered, and potential future treatments arising from research on their effects are presented. PMID:24297122

  17. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  18. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition of Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qian; Zhou, Beiyun; Ann, David K.; Minoo, Parviz; Liu, Yixin; Banfalvi, Agnes; Krishnaveni, Manda S.; Dubourd, Mickael; Demaio, Lucas; Willis, Brigham C.; Kim, Kwang-Jin; duBois, Roland M.; Crandall, Edward D.; Beers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell apoptosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that ER stress (either chemically induced or due to accumulation of misfolded proteins) is also associated with epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). ER stress inducers, thapsigargin (TG) or tunicamycin (TN), increased expression of ER chaperone, Grp78, and spliced X-box binding protein 1, decreased epithelial markers, E-cadherin and zonula occludens–1 (ZO-1), increased the myofibroblast marker, α–smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and induced fibroblast-like morphology in both primary AECs and the AT2 cell line, RLE-6TN, consistent with EMT. Overexpression of the surfactant protein (SP)–C BRICHOS mutant SP-CΔExon4 in A549 cells increased Grp78 and α-SMA and disrupted ZO-1 distribution, and, in primary AECs, SP-CΔExon4 induced fibroblastic-like morphology, decreased ZO-1 and E-cadherin and increased α-SMA, mechanistically linking ER stress associated with mutant SP to fibrosis through EMT. Whereas EMT was evident at lower concentrations of TG or TN, higher concentrations caused apoptosis. The Src inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4]pyramidine) (PP2), abrogated EMT associated with TN or TG in primary AECs, whereas overexpression of SP-CΔExon4 increased Src phosphorylation, suggesting a common mechanism. Furthermore, increased Grp78 immunoreactivity was observed in AT2 cells of mice after bleomycin injury, supporting a role for ER stress in epithelial abnormalities in fibrosis in vivo. These results demonstrate that ER stress induces EMT in AECs, at least in part through Src-dependent pathways, suggesting a novel role for ER stress in fibroblast accumulation in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21169555

  19. FXYD1 negatively regulates Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wujak, Łukasz A; Blume, Anna; Baloğlu, Emel; Wygrecka, Małgorzata; Wygowski, Jegor; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Vadász, István; Besuch, Petra; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Seeger, Werner; Morty, Rory E

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is clinical syndrome characterized by decreased lung fluid reabsorption, causing alveolar edema. Defective alveolar ion transport undertaken in part by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase underlies this compromised fluid balance, although the molecular mechanisms at play are not understood. We describe here increased expression of FXYD1, FXYD3 and FXYD5, three regulatory subunits of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, in the lungs of ARDS patients. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a pathogenic mediator of ARDS, drove increased FXYD1 expression in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells, suggesting that pathogenic TGF-β signaling altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in affected lungs. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of FXYD1 and FXYD3 allowed for overexpression of both regulatory subunits in polarized H441 cell monolayers on an air/liquid interface. FXYD1 but not FXYD3 overexpression inhibited amphotericin B-sensitive equivalent short-circuit current in Ussing chamber studies. Thus, we speculate that FXYD1 overexpression in ARDS patient lungs may limit Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, and contribute to edema persistence. PMID:26410457

  20. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells and Its Application in Alveolar Defect Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Jiawen, Si; Jianjun, Zhang; Jiewen, Dai; Dedong, Yu; Hongbo, Yu; Jun, Shi; Xudong, Wang; Shen, Steve G.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the detailed in vitro osteogenic differentiation process and in vivo bone regenerative property of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs). The in vitro osteogenic differentiation process of hAECs was evaluated by biochemical staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Next, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds alone or loaded with hAECs were implanted into the alveolar defects of rats. Micro-computed tomography evaluation and histologic studies were conducted. Our results validated the in vitro osteogenic capacity of hAECs by upregulation of Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, and osteopontin, with positive biochemical staining for osteoblasts. An epithelial-mesenchymal transformation process might be involved in the osteogenic differentiation of hAECs by increased expression of transforming growth factor-β1. Our data also demonstrated that in vivo implantation of hAECs loaded on β-TCP scaffolds, not only improved bone regeneration by direct participation, but also reduced the early host immune response to the scaffolds. The presented data indicate that hAECs possess proper osteogenic differentiation potential and a modulatory influence on the early tissue remodeling process, making these cells a potential source of progenitor cells for clinical restoration of the alveolar defect. PMID:25368378

  1. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Deng, Yubin; Zeng, Mian

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. PMID:27103436

  2. Enhancement effect of poly(amino acid)s on insulin uptake in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oda, Keisuke; Yumoto, Ryoko; Nagai, Junya; Katayama, Hirokazu; Takano, Mikihisa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we elucidated the effect of poly(amino acid)s such as poly-L-ornithine (PLO) on FITC-insulin uptake in cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN. FITC-insulin uptake by RLE-6TN cells as well as its cell surface binding was markedly increased by PLO without cytotoxicity. The uptake of FITC-insulin in the presence of PLO was shown to be mediated by endocytosis, but in contrast to the uptake in the absence of PLO, the contribution of macropinocytosis emerged. Colocalization of FITC-insulin and LysoTracker Red was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy both in the absence and presence of PLO, indicating that FITC-insulin was partly targeted to lysosomes in the cells and degraded. The half-life of the intracellular degradation of FITC-insulin was, however, prolonged by the presence of PLO. PLO also stimulated the uptake of other FITC-labeled compounds. Among them, the enhancement effects of PLO on FITC-albumin and FITC-insulin uptake were prominent. The effect of PLO on insulin absorption was also examined in in-vivo pulmonary administration in rats, and co-administration of PLO enhanced the hypoglycemic action of insulin. These findings suggest that co-administration of poly(amino acid)s such as PLO is a useful strategy for enhancing insulin uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent absorption from the lung. PMID:22510869

  3. Efficient and rapid isolation and purification of mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Messier, Elise M; Mason, Robert J; Kosmider, Beata

    2012-09-01

    The alveolar surface is covered by an epithelium composed of 2 main cell types: type I and type II cells. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells have a distinct morphology with apical microvilli and characteristic lamellar bodies, which are the intracellular storage form of pulmonary surfactant. ATII cells play an important role in innate immunity and produce and secrete pulmonary surfactant. They proliferate to restore the epithelium after damage to the more sensitive type I cells. We developed an efficient and rapid method to isolate and purify ATII cells from mice. Alveolar epithelial cells were dissociated in the murine lung with dispase and lung tissue was gently minced with a GentleMACS Dissociator. ATII cell purification was performed using negative depletion with CD45 MicroBeads and positive selection for the epithelial-cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) by magnetic labeling with Streptavidin MicroBeads in MACS LS columns. The purity of these cells as measured by flow cytometry was up to 92.1% and 91.1% for co-staining with Ep-CAM and cytokeratin and co-staining with Ep-CAM and SP-A, respectively. The resulting ATII cell population has a high purity, viability, and yield. The phenotype of isolated and cultured ATII cells was confirmed by electron micrographs, expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, proSP-B, mature SP-B, proSP-C, SP-D), and lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) by western blotting and immunocytofluorescence. This protocol is based on surface antigens and our data demonstrated that murine ATII cells can be rapidly isolated, efficiently purified, and effectively cultured. PMID:22888851

  4. Comparative effects of cocaine and cocaethylene on alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Bazuaye-Ekwuyasi, Eseosa A; Ogunbileje, John O; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Eltorky, Mahmoud A; Okorodudu, Anthony O

    2015-01-01

    Abuse of cocaine (COC) and alcohol have been among the leading causes of non-prescription drug-related deaths in the USA and are known to cause acute and chronic lung diseases. The co-abuse of COC and alcohol results in the production of an active metabolite, cocaethylene (CE). The effects of COC and its metabolites on the respiratory system have been scarcely studied. This study was aimed at comparing the toxic effects of eqimolar concentration (1 mM) of COC and CE on alveolar epithelial type II cells. This was performed by measuring cell growth, viability, clonogenic activity, cell cycle and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The treatment of CE and COC resulted in a significant inhibition of cell proliferation with the formation of an average of three colonies which measured about 1.74×10(-15) m each and 25 colonies each of about 5.73×10(-15) m, respectively, while untreated cells yielded 31 colonies of 8.75×10(-15) m (p<0.05). The treatments of CE and COC resulted in the reduction of the growth fraction of alveolar epithelial type II cells without significant decrease in viability. In addition, there was an approximately twofold increase in ROS generation as compared to the controls (p<0.05). Therefore, CE-induced inhibition of cellular proliferation may contribute to the pathogenesis of diffuse alveolar damage in co-abusers of COC and alcohol. PMID:26364649

  5. Influenza Virus Infects Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells of the Distal Lung: Impact on Fgfr2b-Driven Epithelial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Quantius, Jennifer; Schmoldt, Carole; Vazquez-Armendariz, Ana I.; Becker, Christin; El Agha, Elie; Wilhelm, Jochen; Morty, Rory E.; Vadász, István; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Bellusci, Saverio; Herold, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Influenza Virus (IV) pneumonia is associated with severe damage of the lung epithelium and respiratory failure. Apart from efficient host defense, structural repair of the injured epithelium is crucial for survival of severe pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell mediated regenerative responses are not well characterized. In particular, the impact of IV infection on lung stem cells and their regenerative responses remains elusive. Our study demonstrates that a highly pathogenic IV infects various cell populations in the murine lung, but displays a strong tropism to an epithelial cell subset with high proliferative capacity, defined by the signature EpCamhighCD24lowintegrin(α6)high. This cell fraction expressed the stem cell antigen-1, highly enriched lung stem/progenitor cells previously characterized by the signature integrin(β4)+CD200+, and upregulated the p63/krt5 regeneration program after IV-induced injury. Using 3-dimensional organoid cultures derived from these epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC), and in vivo infection models including transgenic mice, we reveal that their expansion, barrier renewal and outcome after IV-induced injury critically depended on Fgfr2b signaling. Importantly, IV infected EpiSPC exhibited severely impaired renewal capacity due to IV-induced blockade of β-catenin-dependent Fgfr2b signaling, evidenced by loss of alveolar tissue repair capacity after intrapulmonary EpiSPC transplantation in vivo. Intratracheal application of exogenous Fgf10, however, resulted in increased engagement of non-infected EpiSPC for tissue regeneration, demonstrated by improved proliferative potential, restoration of alveolar barrier function and increased survival following IV pneumonia. Together, these data suggest that tropism of IV to distal lung stem cell niches represents an important factor of pathogenicity and highlight impaired Fgfr2b signaling as underlying mechanism. Furthermore, increase of alveolar Fgf10

  6. Influenza Virus Infects Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells of the Distal Lung: Impact on Fgfr2b-Driven Epithelial Repair.

    PubMed

    Quantius, Jennifer; Schmoldt, Carole; Vazquez-Armendariz, Ana I; Becker, Christin; El Agha, Elie; Wilhelm, Jochen; Morty, Rory E; Vadász, István; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Bellusci, Saverio; Herold, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    Influenza Virus (IV) pneumonia is associated with severe damage of the lung epithelium and respiratory failure. Apart from efficient host defense, structural repair of the injured epithelium is crucial for survival of severe pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell mediated regenerative responses are not well characterized. In particular, the impact of IV infection on lung stem cells and their regenerative responses remains elusive. Our study demonstrates that a highly pathogenic IV infects various cell populations in the murine lung, but displays a strong tropism to an epithelial cell subset with high proliferative capacity, defined by the signature EpCamhighCD24lowintegrin(α6)high. This cell fraction expressed the stem cell antigen-1, highly enriched lung stem/progenitor cells previously characterized by the signature integrin(β4)+CD200+, and upregulated the p63/krt5 regeneration program after IV-induced injury. Using 3-dimensional organoid cultures derived from these epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC), and in vivo infection models including transgenic mice, we reveal that their expansion, barrier renewal and outcome after IV-induced injury critically depended on Fgfr2b signaling. Importantly, IV infected EpiSPC exhibited severely impaired renewal capacity due to IV-induced blockade of β-catenin-dependent Fgfr2b signaling, evidenced by loss of alveolar tissue repair capacity after intrapulmonary EpiSPC transplantation in vivo. Intratracheal application of exogenous Fgf10, however, resulted in increased engagement of non-infected EpiSPC for tissue regeneration, demonstrated by improved proliferative potential, restoration of alveolar barrier function and increased survival following IV pneumonia. Together, these data suggest that tropism of IV to distal lung stem cell niches represents an important factor of pathogenicity and highlight impaired Fgfr2b signaling as underlying mechanism. Furthermore, increase of alveolar Fgf10

  7. Mechanism underlying insulin uptake in alveolar epithelial cell line RLE-6TN.

    PubMed

    Oda, Keisuke; Yumoto, Ryoko; Nagai, Junya; Katayama, Hirokazu; Takano, Mikihisa

    2011-12-15

    For the development of efficient pulmonary delivery systems for protein and peptide drugs, it is important to understand their transport mechanisms in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, the uptake mechanism for FITC-insulin in cultured alveolar epithelial cell line RLE-6TN was elucidated. FITC-insulin uptake by RLE-6TN cells was time-dependent, temperature-sensitive, and concentration-dependent. The uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors, cytochalasin D, clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitors, and dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin GTPase. On the other hand, no inhibitory effect was observed with caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitors and a macropinocytosis inhibitor. Intracellular FITC-insulin was found to be partly transported to the basal side of the epithelial cell monolayers. In addition, colocalization of FITC-insulin and LysoTracker Red was observed on confocal laser scanning microscopy, indicating that FITC-insulin was partly targeted to lysosomes. In accordance with these findings, SDS-PAGE/fluoroimage analysis showed that intact FITC-insulin in the cells was eliminated with time. The possible receptor involved in FITC-insulin uptake by RLE-6TN cells was examined by using siRNA. Transfection of the cells with megalin or insulin receptor siRNA successfully reduced the corresponding mRNA expression. FITC-insulin uptake decreased on the transfection with insulin receptor siRNA, but not that with megalin siRNA. These results suggest that insulin is taken up through endocytosis in RLE-6TN cells, and after the endocytosis, the intracellular insulin is partly degraded in lysosomes and partly transported to the basal side. Insulin receptor, but not megalin, may be involved at least partly in insulin endocytosis in RLE-6TN cells. PMID:22004610

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells protect from hypoxia-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Bernard, Olivier; Marchant, Dominique; Dard, Nicolas; Vanneaux, Valérie; Larghero, Jérôme; Gille, Thomas; Clerici, Christine; Valeyre, Dominique; Nunes, Hilario; Boncoeur, Emilie; Planès, Carole

    2016-03-01

    Administration of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) reduces lung inflammation, fibrosis, and mortality in animal models of lung injury, by a mechanism not completely understood. We investigated whether hMSC would prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by hypoxia in primary rat alveolar epithelial cell (AEC). In AEC cultured on semipermeable filters, prolonged hypoxic exposure (1.5% O2 for up to 12 days) induced phenotypic changes consistent with EMT, i.e., a change in cell morphology, a decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rte) and in the expression of epithelial markers [zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, AQP-5, TTF-1], together with an increase in mesenchymal markers [vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)]. Expression of transcription factors driving EMT such as SNAIL1, ZEB1, and TWIST1 increased after 2, 24, and 48 h of hypoxia, respectively. Hypoxia also induced TGF-β1 mRNA expression and the secretion of active TGF-β1 in apical medium, and the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), two inducers of EMT. Coculture of AEC with hMSC partially prevented the decrease in Rte and in ZO-1, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 expression, and the increase in vimentin expression induced by hypoxia. It also abolished the increase in TGF-β1 expression and in TGF-β1-induced genes ZEB1, TWIST1, and CTGF. Finally, incubation with human recombinant KGF at a concentration similar to what was measured in hMSC-conditioned media restored the expression of TTF-1 and prevented the increase in TWIST1, TGF-β1, and CTGF in hypoxic AEC. Our results indicate that hMSC prevent hypoxia-induced alveolar EMT through the paracrine modulation of EMT signaling pathways and suggest that this effect is partly mediated by KGF. PMID:26702148

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epithelial monoamine oxidase mediates alveolar bone loss in a rat chronic wound model.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Firth, James D; Nayer, Tarun; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Sanbe, Toshihiro; Irie, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Oka, Takashi; Liu, Zhenzi; Vielkind, Juergen; Putnins, Edward E

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is an antimicrobial response to pathogenic challenge that may, in the case of persistent infection, have deleterious effects on the tissue of origin. A rat periodontal disease model was used to study ROS-induced chronic epithelial inflammation and bone loss. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was applied for 8 weeks into the gingival sulcus, and histological analysis confirmed the onset of chronic disease. Junctional epithelium was collected from healthy and diseased animals using laser-capture microdissection, and expression microarray analysis was performed. Of 19,730 genes changed in disease, 42 were up-regulated >/=4-fold. Three of the top 10 LPS-induced genes, monoamine oxidase B (MAO/B) and flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 and 2, are implicated in ROS signaling. LPS-associated induction of the ROS mediator H(2)O(2), as well as MAO/B and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were validated in the rat histological sections and a porcine junctional epithelial cell culture model. Topical MAO inhibitors significantly counteracted LPS-associated elevation of H(2)O(2) production and TNF-alpha expression in vivo and in vitro, inhibited disease-associated apical migration and proliferation of junctional epithelium and inhibited induced systemic H(2)O(2) levels and alveolar bone loss in vivo. These results suggest that LPS induces chronic wounds via elevated MAO/B-mediated increases in H(2)O(2) and TNF-alpha activity by epithelial cells and is further associated with more distant effects on systemic oxidative stress and alveolar bone loss. PMID:19779138

  10. Effect of mycobacterial secretory proteins on the cellular integrity and cytokine profile of type II alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Nidhi; Vir, Pooja; Verma, Indu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In lungs, alveolar macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells serve as a replicative niche for this pathogen. Secretory proteins released by actively replicating tubercle bacilli are known to interact with host cells at the initial stages of infection. To understand the role of these cells in TB pathogenesis, it is important to identify the mycobacterial components involved in interaction with alveolar epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: We fractionated the whole secretory proteome of M. tb H37Rv into 10 narrow molecular mass fractions (A1-A10; <20 kDa to >90 kDa) that were studied for their binding potential with A549; type II alveolar epithelial cell line. We also studied the consequences of this interaction in terms of change in epithelial cell viability by MTT assay and cytokine release by ELISA. Results: Our results show that several mycobacterial proteins bind and confer cytolysis in epithelial cells. Amongst all the fractions, proteins ranging from 35-45 kDa (A5) exhibited highest binding to A549 cells with a consequence of cytolysis of these cells. This fraction (A5) also led to release of various cytokines important in anti-mycobacterial immunity. Conclusion: Fraction A5 (35-45 kDa) of mycobacterial secretory proteome play an important role in mediating M. tb interaction with type II alveolar epithelial cells with the consequences detrimental for the TB pathogenesis. Further studies are being carried out to identify the candidate proteins from this region. PMID:23243342

  11. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort <3 patients. Of 366 retrieved papers, 27 were suitable for final analysis. Treatment type for injured IANs/LNs depended on injury type, injury timing, neurosensory disturbances and intra-operative findings. Best functional nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were <10 mm; larger gaps required nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. PMID:26059454

  12. Environmental Particulate (PM2.5) Augments Stiffness-Induced Alveolar Epithelial Cell Mechanoactivation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Dysart, Marilyn M.; Galvis, Boris R.; Russell, Armistead G.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional pulmonary homeostasis and repair, including diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tumorigenesis have been increasing over the past decade, a fact that heavily implicates environmental influences. Several investigations have suggested that in response to increased transforming growth factor - beta (TGFβ) signaling, the alveolar type II (ATII) epithelial cell undergoes phenotypic changes that may contribute to the complex pathobiology of PF. We have previously demonstrated that increased tissue stiffness associated with PF is a potent extracellular matrix (ECM) signal for epithelial cell activation of TGFβ. The work reported here explores the relationship between tissue stiffness and exposure to environmental stimuli in the activation of TGFβ. We hypothesized that exposure of ATII cells to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) will result in enhanced cell contractility, TGFβ activation, and subsequent changes to ATII cell phenotype. ATII cells were cultured on increasingly stiff substrates with or without addition of PM2.5. Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in increased activation of TGFβ, increased cell contractility, and elongation of ATII cells. Most notably, on 8 kPa substrates, a stiffness greater than normal but less than established fibrotic lung, addition of PM2.5 resulted in increased cortical cell stiffness, enhanced actin staining and cell elongation; a result not seen in the absence of PM2.5. Our work suggests that PM2.5 exposure additionally enhances the existing interaction between ECM stiffness and TGFβ that has been previously reported. Furthermore, we show that this additional enhancement is likely a consequence of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to increased TGFβ signaling events. These results highlight the importance of both the micromechanical and biochemical environment in lung disease initiation and suggest that individuals in early stages of lung remodeling

  13. Hypoxia-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition requires mitochondrial ROS and hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guofei; Dada, Laura A.; Wu, Minghua; Kelly, Aileen; Trejo, Humberto; Zhou, Qiyuan; Varga, John

    2009-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury develop hypoxia, which may lead to lung dysfunction and aberrant tissue repair. Recent studies have suggested that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to determine whether hypoxia induces EMT in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). We found that hypoxia induced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin and decreased the expression of E-cadherin in transformed and primary human, rat, and mouse AEC, suggesting that hypoxia induces EMT in AEC. Both severe hypoxia and moderate hypoxia induced EMT. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger Euk-134 prevented hypoxia-induced EMT. Moreover, hypoxia-induced expression of α-SMA and vimentin was prevented in mitochondria-deficient ρ0 cells, which are incapable of ROS production during hypoxia. CoCl2 and dimethyloxaloylglycine, two compounds that stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α under normoxia, failed to induce α-SMA expression in AEC. Furthermore, overexpression of constitutively active HIF-1α did not induce α-SMA. However, loss of HIF-1α or HIF-2α abolished induction of α-SMA mRNA during hypoxia. Hypoxia increased the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and preincubation of AEC with SB431542, an inhibitor of the TGF-β1 type I receptor kinase, prevented the hypoxia-induced EMT, suggesting that the process was TGF-β1 dependent. Furthermore, both ROS and HIF-α were necessary for hypoxia-induced TGF-β1 upregulation. Accordingly, we have provided evidence that hypoxia induces EMT of AEC through mitochondrial ROS, HIF, and endogenous TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:19801454

  14. Stanniocalcin-1 is induced by hypoxia inducible factor in rat alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Zemans, Rachel; Correll, Kelly; Yang, Ivana V; Ahmad, Aftab; Gao, Bifeng; Mason, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    Alveolar type II (ATII) cells remain differentiated and express surfactant proteins when cultured at an air-liquid (A/L) interface. When cultured under submerged conditions, ATII cells dedifferentiate and change their gene expression profile. We have previously shown that gene expression under submerged conditions is regulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling due to focal hypoxia resulting from ATII cell metabolism. Herein, we sought to further define gene expression changes in ATII cells cultured under submerged conditions. We performed a genome wide microarray on RNA extracted from rat ATII cells cultured under submerged conditions for 24-48h after switching from an A/L interface. We found significant alterations in gene expression, including upregulation of the HIF target genes stanniocalcin-1 (STC1), tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), enolase (Eno) 2, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13, and we verified upregulation of these genes by RT-PCR. Because STC1, a highly evolutionarily conserved glycoprotein with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, and wound healing properties, is widely expressed in the lung, we further explored the potential functions of STC1 in the alveolar epithelium. We found that STC1 was induced by hypoxia and HIF in rat ATII cells, and this induction occurred rapidly and reversibly. We also showed that recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) enhanced cell motility with extended lamellipodia formation in alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) monolayers but did not inhibit the oxidative damage induced by LPS. We also confirmed that STC1 was upregulated by hypoxia and HIF in human lung epithelial cells. In this study, we have found that several HIF target genes including STC1 are upregulated in AECs by a submerged condition, that STC1 is regulated by hypoxia and HIF, that this regulation is rapidly and reversibly, and that STC1 enhances wound healing moderately in AEC monolayers. However, STC1 did not inhibit oxidative damage in rat AECs

  15. [Inhibitory effect of Panax notoginseng saponins on alveolar epithelial to mesenchymal transition].

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhou-xin; Yu, Hai-bin; Li, Jian-sheng; Shen, Jun-ling; Li, Jun-kai; Luo, Shan

    2015-12-01

    In the study, the effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) on alveolar epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and extracellular matrix degradation were observed in a type of human alveolar epithelial cell, A549 cells, stimulated by TGF-beta1. Firstly, MTT method was applied to evaluation of cellular proliferation and found that PNS from 12.5 mg x L(-1) to 200 mg x L(-1) dosage could not inhibit significantly cellular proliferation. Then, cells were divided into five groups, normal group, TGF-beta1 group, TGF-beta1 + 50 mg x L(-1) PNS group, TGF-beta1 + 100 mg x L(-1) PNS group and TGF-beta1 + 200 mg x L(-1) PNS group. Normal cells were not stimulatec by TGF-beta1; TGF-beta1 cells were only stimulated by TGF-beta1 and the other cells were stimulated by TGF-beta1 with different doses of PNS, respectively. After stimulation, cells and supernatants were collected for assays. Cellular roundness was applied to quantitative evaluation of morphological change. Immunocytochemistry was applied to examine E-cadherion, a-SMA and FN proteins expression in the cells. Enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay was applied to MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels. The results showed that EMT of A549 cells was induced by TGF-beta1, showing significant change of roundness, E-cadherion, alpha-SMA and FN (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared to TGF-beta1, PNS significantly inhibited the changes of roundness (P < 0.05), FN and alpha-SMA (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and not significantly inhibited the change of E-cadherion. Furthermore, MMP-9 levels were significantly increased by TGFbeta1 stimulation (P < 0.05), without significant change of TIMP-1. Compared with TGF-beta1, PNS could significantly increase MMP-9 level (P < 0.05) and decrease TIMP-1 levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). In conclusion, PNS could inhibit alveolar epithelial cell EMT induced by TGF-beta1, with increase of extracellular matrix degradation ability, which showed anti-fibrosis of lung ability. PMID:27141681

  16. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L.; Leslie, Christina C.; Murphy, Robert C.; Mason, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections. PMID:26033355

  17. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L; Leslie, Christina C; Murphy, Robert C; Mason, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections. PMID:26033355

  18. Bim mediates mitochondria-regulated particulate matter-induced apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Ghio, A.J.; Chang, W.; Kamdar, O.; Rosen, G.D.; Upadhyay, D.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the role of Bim, a pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member in Airborne particulate matter (PM 2.5 μm)-induced apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). PM induced AEC apoptosis by causing significant reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1 activation. PM upregulated pro-apoptotic protein Bim and enhanced translocation of Bim to the mitochondria. ShRNABim blocked PM-induced apoptosis by preventing activation of the mitochondrial death pathway suggesting a role of Bim in the regulation of mitochondrial pathway in AEC. Accordingly, we provide the evidence that Bim mediates PM-induced apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. PMID:17716672

  19. Apocynin increases glutathione synthesis and activates AP-1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lapperre, T S; Jimenez, L A; Antonicelli, F; Drost, E M; Hiemstra, P S; Stolk, J; MacNee, W; Rahman, I

    1999-01-25

    Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone) is a potent intracellular inhibitor of superoxide anion production in neutrophils. In this study, we studied the effect of apocynin on the regulation of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and activation of the transcription factor AP-I in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Apocynin enhanced intracellular GSH by increasing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity in A549 cells. Apocynin also increased the expression of gamma-GCS heavy subunit mRNA. This was associated with increased AP-1 DNA binding as measured by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These data indicate that apocynin displays antioxidant properties, in part, by increasing glutathione synthesis through activation of AP-1. PMID:9989612

  20. Combinations of differentiation markers distinguish subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells in adult lung.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Janice M; Marconett, Crystal N; Juul, Nicholas; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Yixin; Flodby, Per; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Minoo, Parviz; Zhou, Beiyun

    2016-01-15

    Distal lung epithelium is maintained by proliferation of alveolar type II (AT2) cells and, for some daughter AT2 cells, transdifferentiation into alveolar type I (AT1) cells. We investigated if subpopulations of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) exist that represent various stages in transdifferentiation from AT2 to AT1 cell phenotypes in normal adult lung and if they can be identified using combinations of cell-specific markers. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that, in distal rat and mouse lungs, ∼ 20-30% of NKX2.1(+) (or thyroid transcription factor 1(+)) cells did not colocalize with pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SP-C), a highly specific AT2 cell marker. In distal rat lung, NKX2.1(+) cells coexpressed either pro-SP-C or the AT1 cell marker homeodomain only protein x (HOPX). Not all HOPX(+) cells colocalize with the AT1 cell marker aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and some AQP5(+) cells were NKX2.1(+). HOPX was expressed earlier than AQP5 during transdifferentiation in rat AEC primary culture, with robust expression of both by day 7. We speculate that NKX2.1 and pro-SP-C colocalize in AT2 cells, NKX2.1 and HOPX or AQP5 colocalize in intermediate or transitional cells, and HOPX and AQP5 are expressed without NKX2.1 in AT1 cells. These findings suggest marked heterogeneity among cells previously identified as exclusively AT1 or AT2 cells, implying the presence of subpopulations of intermediate or transitional AEC in normal adult lung. PMID:26545903

  1. Lung epithelial GM-CSF improves host defense function and epithelial repair in influenza virus pneumonia-a new therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed

    Rösler, Barbara; Herold, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viruses (IVs) circulate seasonally and are a common cause of respiratory infections in pediatric and adult patients. Additionally, recurrent pandemics cause massive morbidity and mortality worldwide. Infection may result in rapid progressive viral pneumonia with fatal outcome. Since accurate treatment strategies are still missing, research refocuses attention to lung pathology and cellular crosstalk to develop new therapeutic options.Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) play an important role in orchestrating the pulmonary antiviral host response. After IV infection they release a cascade of immune mediators, one of which is granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF is known to promote differentiation, activation and mobilization of myeloid cells. In the lung, GM-CSF drives immune functions of alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) and also improves epithelial repair processes through direct interaction with AECs. During IV infection, AEC-derived GM-CSF shows a lung-protective effect that is also present after local GM-CSF application. This mini-review provides an overview on GM-CSF-modulated immune responses to IV pneumonia and its therapeutic potential in severe IV pneumonia. PMID:27480877

  2. Isolation and characterization of alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanhuan; Quan, Yuan; Yan, Qing; Peng, Xinmiao; Mao, Zhengmei; Wetsel, Rick A; Wang, Dachun

    2014-06-01

    The use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to regenerate distal lung epithelia damaged by injuries or diseases requires development of safe and efficient methodologies that direct ESC differentiation into transplantable distal lung epithelial progenitors. Time-consuming culture procedure and low differentiation efficiency are major problems that are associated with conventional differentiation approaches via embryoid body formation. The use of a growth factor cocktail or a lung-specific cell-conditioned medium to enrich definitive endoderm for efficient differentiation of mouse ESCs (mESC) into alveolar epithelial progenitor type II cells (ATIICs) has been reported, but not yet successful for generating a homogenous population of ATIICs for tissue regeneration purpose, and it remains unclear whether or not those mESC-derived ATIICs possess normal biological functions. Here, we report a novel method using a genetically modified mESC line harboring an ATIIC-specific neomycin(R) transgene in Rosa 26 locus. We showed that ATIICs can be efficiently differentiated from mESCs as early as day 7 by culturing them directly on Matrigel-coated plates in DMEM containing 15% knockout serum replacement. With this culture condition, the genetically modified mESCs can be selectively differentiated into a homogenous population (>99%) of ATIICs. Importantly, the mESC-derived ATIICs (mESC-ATIICs) exhibited typical lamellar bodies and expressed surfactant protein A, B, and C as normal control ATIICs. When cultured with an air-liquid-interface culture system in Small Airway Epithelial Cell Growth Medium, the mESC-ATIICs can be induced to secrete surfactant proteins after being treated with dibutyryl cAMP+dexamethasone. These mESC-ATIICs can synthesize and secrete surfactant lipid in response to secretagogue, demonstrating active surfactant metabolism in mESC-ATIICs as that seen in normal control ATIICs. In addition, we demonstrated that the selected mESC-ATIICs can be maintained on Matrigel

  3. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:27334278

  4. Alveolar macrophages modulate the epithelial cell response to coal dust in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Rannels, D E

    1996-01-01

    The response of the alveolar epithelium to coal dust exposure is poorly understood. Coal or other dusts may act on the epithelium directly or indirectly through nearby alveolar macrophages (AM) that produce cytokines and other soluble products. AM and type II pneumocytes (T2P) were thus exposed to dust in coculture to evaluate their possible interactions. Anthracite coal dust PSOC 867 increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by T2P. AM alone did not produce ECM. Similarly, coculture of T2P with AM (3.75:1) had little effect on epithelial ECM synthesis. In contrast, coculture of T2P with AM significantly increased PSOC 867 effects on T2P rates of ECM synthesis, ECM fibronectin content, and T2P levels of fibronectin mRNA. AM-conditioned medium did not change the PSOC 867 effect on T2P. Neither control nor PSOC 867-treated AM on Falcon culture inserts (0.45-micron pore size) over T2P stimulated ECM synthesis by either untreated or dust-exposed epithelium. Thus AM-mediated changes in ECM synthesis by PSOC 867-treated T2P require close cell-cell interactions, suggesting a role for cell-cell contact or for short-lived soluble mediators of the AM effects. PMID:8772535

  5. Role of primary human alveolar epithelial cells in host defense against Francisella tularensis infection.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-08-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-kappaB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-kappaB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  6. Role of Primary Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Host Defense against Francisella tularensis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B.; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-κB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-κB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  7. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kaltofen, Till; Haase, Melanie; Thome, Ulrich H.; Laube, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC) and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome. PMID:26291531

  8. Shape matters: effects of silver nanospheres and wires on human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In nanotoxicology, the exact role of particle shape, in relation to the composition, on the capacity to induce toxicity is largely unknown. We investigated the toxic and immunotoxic effects of silver wires (length: 1.5 - 25 μm; diameter 100 - 160 nm), spherical silver nanoparticles (30 nm) and silver microparticles (<45 μm) on alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Methods Wires and nanoparticles were synthesized by wet-chemistry methods and extensively characterized. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed and potential immunotoxic effects were investigated. To compare the effects on an activated and a resting immune system, cells were stimulated with rhTNF-α or left untreated. Changes in intracellular free calcium levels were determined using calcium imaging. Finally, ion release from the particles was assessed by ICP-MS and the effects of released ions on cell viability and cytotoxicity were tested. Results No effects were observed for the spherical particles, whereas the silver wires significantly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release from A549 cells. Cytokine promoter induction and NF-κB activation decreased in a concentration dependent manner similar to the decrease seen in cell viability. In addition, a strong increase of intracellular calcium levels within minutes after addition of wires was observed. This toxicity was not due to free silver ions, since the samples with the highest ion release did not induce toxicity and ion release control experiments with cells treated with pre-incubated medium did not show any effects either. Conclusions These data showed that silver wires strongly affect the alveolar epithelial cells, whereas spherical silver particles had no effect. This supports the hypothesis that shape is one of the important factors that determine particle toxicity. PMID:22208550

  9. Hyperoxia increases the elastic modulus of alveolar epithelial cells through Rho kinase.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Kristina R; Roan, Esra; Ghosh, Manik C; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with acute lung injury are administered high concentrations of oxygen during mechanical ventilation, and while both hyperoxia and mechanical ventilation are necessary, each can independently cause additional injury. However, the precise mechanisms that lead to injury are not well understood. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells may be more susceptible to injury caused by mechanical ventilation because hyperoxia causes cells to be stiffer due to increased filamentous actin (f-actin) formation via the GTPase RhoA and its effecter Rho kinase (ROCK). We examined cytoskeletal structures in cultured murine lung alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12) under normoxic and hyperoxic (48 h) conditions. We also measured cell elasticity (E) using an atomic force microscope in the indenter mode. Hyperoxia caused increased f-actin stress fibers and bundle formation, an increase in g- and f-actin, an increase in nuclear area and a decrease in nuclear height, and cells became stiffer (higher E). Treatment with an inhibitor (Y-27632) of ROCK significantly decreased E and prevented the cytoskeletal changes, while it did not influence the nuclear height and area. Pre-exposure of cells to hyperoxia promoted detachment when cells were subsequently stretched cyclically, but the ROCK inhibitor prevented this effect. Hyperoxia caused thickening of vinculin focal adhesion plaques, and inhibition of ROCK reduced the formation of distinct focal adhesion plaques. Phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase was significantly reduced by both hyperoxia and treatment with Y-27632. Hyperoxia caused increased cell stiffness and promoted cell detachment during stretch. These effects were ameliorated by inhibition of ROCK. PMID:24289040

  10. Effects of PPARγ ligands on TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) may contribute to lung fibrosis. Since PPARγ ligands have been shown to inhibit fibroblast activation by TGF-β1, we assessed the ability of the thiazolidinediones rosiglitazone (RGZ) and ciglitazone (CGZ) to regulate TGF-β1-mediated EMT of A549 cells, assessing changes in cell morphology, and expression of cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin (epithelial cell marker) and N-cadherin (mesenchymal cell marker), and collagen 1α1 (COL1A1), CTGF and MMP-2 mRNA. Methods Serum-deprived A549 cells (human AEC cell line) were pre-incubated with RGZ and CGZ (1 - 30 μM) in the absence or presence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (10 μM) before TGFβ-1 (0.075-7.5 ng/ml) treatment for up to 72 hrs. Changes in E-cadherin, N-cadherin and phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3 levels were analysed by Western blot, and changes in mRNA levels including COL1A1 assessed by RT-PCR. Results TGFβ-1 (2.5 ng/ml)-induced reductions in E-cadherin expression were associated with a loss of epithelial morphology and cell-cell contact. Concomitant increases in N-cadherin, MMP-2, CTGF and COL1A1 were evident in predominantly elongated fibroblast-like cells. Neither RGZ nor CGZ prevented TGFβ1-induced changes in cell morphology, and PPARγ-dependent inhibitory effects of both ligands on changes in E-cadherin were only evident at submaximal TGF-β1 (0.25 ng/ml). However, both RGZ and CGZ inhibited the marked elevation of N-cadherin and COL1A1 induced by TGF-β1 (2.5 ng/ml), with effects on COL1A1 prevented by GW9662. Phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 by TGF-β1 was not inhibited by RGZ or CGZ. Conclusions RGZ and CGZ inhibited profibrotic changes in TGF-β1-stimulated A549 cells independently of inhibition of Smad phosphorylation. Their inhibitory effects on changes in collagen I and E-cadherin, but not N-cadherin or CTGF, appeared to be PPARγ-dependent. Further

  11. Apolipoprotein A1 Inhibits TGF-β1–Induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ae Rin; Lee, Ji Min; Seo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jong Sook; Lee, June Hyuk; Jang, An Soo; Kim, Do Jin; Koh, Eun Suk; Uh, Soo Taek; Kim, Yong Hoon; Park, Choon Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and lethal lung disease characterized by the accumulation of excessive fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the extracellular matrix. The transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)–induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to be a possible source of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts in IPF lungs. We have previously reported that apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) has anti-fibrotic activity in experimental lung fibrosis. In this study, we determine whether ApoA1 modulates TGF-β1–induced EMT in experimental lung fibrosis and clarify its mechanism of action. Methods The A549 alveolar epithelial cell line was treated with TGF-β1 with or without ApoA1. Morphological changes and expression of EMT-related markers, including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and α-smooth muscle actin were evaluated. Expressions of Smad and non-Smad mediators and TGF-β1 receptor type 1 (TβRI) and type 2 (TβRII) were measured. The silica-induced lung fibrosis model was established using ApoA1 overexpressing transgenic mice. Results TGF-β1–treated A549 cells were changed to the mesenchymal morphology with less E-cadherin and more N-cadherin expression. The addition of ApoA1 inhibited the TGF-β1–induced change of the EMT phenotype. ApoA1 inhibited the TGF-β1–induced increase in the phosphorylation of Smad2 and 3 as well as that of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediators. In addition, ApoA1 reduced the TGF-β1–induced increase in TβRI and TβRII expression. In a mouse model of silica-induced lung fibrosis, ApoA1 overexpression reduced the silica-mediated effects, which were increased N-cadherin and decreased E-cadherin expression in the alveolar epithelium. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that ApoA1 inhibits TGF-β1–induced EMT in experimental lung fibrosis. PMID:27433174

  12. Nanomaterial interactions with and trafficking across the lung alveolar epithelial barrier: implications for health effects of air-pollution particles

    PubMed Central

    Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Fazllolahi, Farnoosh; Kim, Yong Ho; Sipos, Arnold; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the health effects of air-pollution particles suggest that injury may result from inhalation of airborne ultrafine particles (<100 nm in diameter). Engineered nanomaterials (<100 nm in at least one dimension) may also be harmful if inhaled. Nanomaterials deposited on the respiratory epithelial tract are thought to cross the air-blood barrier, especially via the expansive alveolar region, into the systemic circulation to reach end organs (e.g., myocardium, liver, pancreas, kidney, and spleen). Since ambient ultrafine particles are difficult to track, studies of defined engineered nanomaterials have been used to obtain valuable information on how nanomaterials interact with and traffic across the air-blood barrier of mammalian lungs. Since specific mechanistic information on how nanomaterials interact with the lung is difficult to obtain using in vivo or ex vivo lungs due to their complex anatomy, in vitro alveolar epithelial models have been of considerable value in determining nanomaterial-lung interactions. In this review, we provide information on mechanisms underlying lung alveolar epithelial injury caused by various nanomaterials and on nanomaterial trafficking across alveolar epithelium that may lead to end-organ injury. PMID:25568662

  13. Azithromycin increases phagocytosis of apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hodge, S; Hodge, G; Brozyna, S; Jersmann, H; Holmes, M; Reynolds, P N

    2006-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased apoptosis and defective phagocytosis in the airway. As uncleared cells can undergo secondary necrosis and perpetuate inflammation, strategies to improve clearance would have therapeutic significance. There is evidence that the 15-member macrolide antibiotic azithromycin has anti-inflammatory properties. Its effects may be increased in the lung due to its ability to reach high concentrations in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The present study investigated the effects of low-dose (500 ng x mL(-1)) azithromycin on the phagocytosis of apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells and neutrophils by AMs. Flow cytometry was applied to measure phagocytosis and receptors involved in AM recognition of apoptotic cells. Cytokines were investigated using cytometric bead array. Baseline phagocytosis was reduced in COPD subjects compared with controls. Azithromycin significantly improved the phagocytosis of epithelial cells or neutrophils by AMs from COPD subjects by 68 and 38%, respectively, often up to levels comparable with controls. The increase in phagocytosis was partially inhibited by phosphatidylserine, implicating the phosphatidylserine pathway in the pro-phagocytic effects of azithromycin. Azithromycin had no effect on other recognition molecules (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CD44, CD31, CD36, CD91, alphavbeta3 integrin). At higher doses, azithromycin decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, low-dose azithromycin therapy could provide an adjunct therapeutic option in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:16737992

  14. Physiological and biochemical markers of alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction in perfused human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Frank, James A.; Briot, Raphael; Lee, Jae Woo; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Uchida, Tokujiro; Matthay, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    To study air space fluid clearance (AFC) under conditions that resemble the clinical setting of pulmonary edema in patients, we developed a new perfused human lung preparation. We measured AFC in 20 human lungs rejected for transplantation and determined the contribution of AFC to lung fluid balance. AFC was then compared with air space and perfusate levels of a biological marker of epithelial injury. The majority of human lungs rejected for transplant had intact basal (75%) and β2-adrenergic agonist-stimulated (70%) AFC. For lungs with both basal and stimulated AFC, the basal AFC rate was 19 ± 10%/h, and the β2-adrenergic-stimulated AFC rate was 43 ± 13%/h. Higher rates of AFC were associated with less lung weight gain (Pearson coefficient −0.90, P < 0.0001). Air space and perfusate levels of the type I pneumocyte marker receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were threefold and sixfold higher, respectively, in lungs without basal AFC compared with lungs with AFC (P < 0.05). These data show that preserved AFC is a critical determinant of favorable lung fluid balance in the perfused human lung, raising the possibility that β2-agonist therapy to increase edema fluid clearance may be of value for patients with acute lung injury and pulmonary edema. Also, although additional studies are needed, a biological marker of alveolar epithelial injury may be useful clinically in predicting preserved AFC. PMID:17351061

  15. Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on alveolar epithelial permeability in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Azghani, A.O.; Connelly, J.C.; Peterson, B.T.; Gray, L.D.; Collins, M.L.; Johnson, A.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Elastase-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than the wild type and are easily cleared from the lungs of guinea pigs. The effect of P. aeruginosa elastase on lung epithelium, however, is not yet understood. We addressed the hypothesis that breach of the epithelial barrier by elastase from P. aeruginosa allows invading organisms and toxic substances to penetrate the interstitium. We measured the clearance of aerosolized technetium-labeled albumin (molecular weight, 69,000) from the lungs of anesthetized guinea pigs with the aid of a gamma camera and a dedicated computer. Aerosols of the elastase (0.1 to 5 micrograms) increased the rate of clearance of labeled albumin from the lungs in proportion to the elastase dose. Electron microscopic studies using horseradish peroxidase as a tracer revealed that elastase interrupts intercellular tight junctions of the epithelial lining, thereby increasing the permeability to macromolecules. The amounts of elastase used in this report did not cause interstitial or alveolar edema, as determined by both postmortem extravascular lung water volume measurement and morphological examination. The data indicate that the elastase is a potentially important virulence factor in acute lung infection.

  16. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone. PMID:24551445

  17. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone. PMID:24551445

  18. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor promotes bronchial epithelial repair after injury through vitronectin binding.

    PubMed

    Adair, Jennifer E; Stober, Vandy; Sobhany, Mack; Zhuo, Lisheng; Roberts, John D; Negishi, Masahiko; Kimata, Koji; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2009-06-19

    Pulmonary epithelial injury is central to the pathogenesis of many lung diseases, such as asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Regulated epithelial repair is crucial for lung homeostasis and prevents scar formation and inflammation that accompany dysregulated healing. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in epithelial repair after injury. Vitronectin is a major ECM component that promotes epithelial repair. However, the factors that modify cell-vitronectin interactions after injury and help promote epithelial repair are not well studied. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (IaI) is an abundant serum protein. IaI heavy chains contain von Willebrand A domains that can bind the arginine-glycine-aspartate domain of vitronectin. We therefore hypothesized that IaI can bind vitronectin and promote vitronectin-induced epithelial repair after injury. We show that IaI binds vitronectin at the arginine-glycine-aspartate site, thereby promoting epithelial adhesion and migration in vitro. Furthermore, we show that IaI-deficient mice have a dysregulated response to epithelial injury in vivo, consisting of decreased proliferation and epithelial metaplasia. We conclude that IaI interacts not only with hyaluronan, as previously reported, but also other ECM components like vitronectin and is an important regulator of cellular repair after injury. PMID:19395377

  19. Translocation of Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes across Human Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelium: Dominant Role of Epithelial Type 1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Hu, Sheng; Melbourne, Jodie; Sweeney, Sinbad; Thorley, Andrew J; Skepper, Jeremy N; Shaffer, Milo S P; Tetley, Teresa D; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-05-24

    Uptake and translocation of short functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (short-fMWCNTs) through the pulmonary respiratory epithelial barrier depend on physicochemical property and cell type. Two monoculture models, immortalized human alveolar epithelial type 1 (TT1) cells and primary human alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AT2), which constitute the alveolar epithelial barrier, were employed to investigate the uptake and transport of 300 and 700 nm in length, poly(4-vinylpyridine)-functionalized, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p(4VP)-MWCNTs) using quantitative imaging and spectroscopy techniques. The p(4VP)-MWCNT exhibited no toxicity on TT1 and AT2 cells, but significantly decreased barrier integrity (*p < 0.01). Uptake of p(4VP)-MWCNTs was observed in 70% of TT1 cells, correlating with compromised barrier integrity and basolateral p(4VP)-MWCNT translocation. There was a small but significantly greater uptake of 300 nm p(4VP)-MWCNTs than 700 nm p(4VP)-MWCNTs by TT1 cells. Up to 3% of both the 300 and 700 nm p(4VP)-MWCNTs reach the basal chamber; this relatively low amount arose because the supporting transwell membrane minimized the amount of p(4VP)-MWCNT translocating to the basal chamber, seen trapped between the basolateral cell membrane and the membrane. Only 8% of AT2 cells internalized p(4VP)-MWCNT, accounting for 17% of applied p(4VP)-MWCNT), with transient effects on barrier function, which initially fell then returned to normal; there was no MWCNT basolateral translocation. The transport rate was MWCNT length modulated. The comparatively lower p(4VP)-MWCNT uptake by AT2 cells is proposed to reflect a primary barrier effect of type 2 cell secretions and the functional differences between the type 1 and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:27035850

  20. Mitochondria-targeted Ogg1 and Aconitase-2 Prevent Oxidant-induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage in Alveolar Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Williams, David; Cheng, Yuan; Ridge, Karen; Schumacker, Paul T.; Weitzman, Sigmund; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Kamp, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (mt-hOgg1) and aconitase-2 (Aco-2) each reduce oxidant-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis, but it is unclear whether protection occurs by preventing AEC mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. Using quantitative PCR-based measurements of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage, mtDNA damage was preferentially noted in AEC after exposure to oxidative stress (e.g. amosite asbestos (5–25 μg/cm2) or H2O2 (100–250 μm)) for 24 h. Overexpression of wild-type mt-hOgg1 or mt-long α/β 317–323 hOgg1 mutant incapable of DNA repair (mt-hOgg1-Mut) each blocked A549 cell oxidant-induced mtDNA damage, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and intrinsic apoptosis as assessed by DNA fragmentation and cleaved caspase-9. In contrast, compared with controls, knockdown of Ogg1 (using Ogg1 shRNA in A549 cells or primary alveolar type 2 cells from ogg1−/− mice) augmented mtDNA lesions and intrinsic apoptosis at base line, and these effects were increased further after exposure to oxidative stress. Notably, overexpression of Aco-2 reduced oxidant-induced mtDNA lesions, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and apoptosis, whereas siRNA for Aco-2 (siAco-2) enhanced mtDNA damage, mitochondrial p53 translocation, and apoptosis. Finally, siAco-2 attenuated the protective effects of mt-hOgg1-Mut but not wild-type mt-hOgg1 against oxidant-induced mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel role for mt-hOgg1 and Aco-2 in preserving AEC mtDNA integrity, thereby preventing oxidant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, p53 mitochondrial translocation, and intrinsic apoptosis. Furthermore, mt-hOgg1 chaperoning of Aco-2 in preventing oxidant-mediated mtDNA damage and apoptosis may afford an innovative target for the molecular events underlying oxidant-induced toxicity. PMID:24429287

  1. Asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis. The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Kamp, David W; Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Mueller, Amanda; Lam, Anna P; Trejo, Humberto; Williams, David; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Baker, Margaret; Ridge, Karen; Chandel, Navdeep S; Beri, Rohinee

    2013-12-01

    Asbestos exposure results in pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) and malignancies (bronchogenic lung cancer and mesothelioma) by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis is important in the development of pulmonary fibrosis after exposure to an array of toxins, including asbestos. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) apoptosis occur in AECs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease with similarities to asbestosis. Asbestos induces AEC intrinsic apoptosis, but the role of the ER is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether asbestos causes an AEC ER stress response that promotes apoptosis. Using human A549 and rat primary isolated alveolar type II cells, amosite asbestos fibers increased AEC mRNA and protein expression of ER stress proteins involved in the unfolded protein response, such as inositol-requiring kinase (IRE) 1 and X-box-binding protein-1, as well as ER Ca²(2+) release ,as assessed by a FURA-2 assay. Eukarion-134, a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, as well as overexpression of Bcl-XL in A549 cells each attenuate asbestos-induced AEC ER stress (IRE-1 and X-box-binding protein-1 protein expression; ER Ca²(2+) release) and apoptosis. Thapsigargin, a known ER stress inducer, augments AEC apoptosis, and eukarion-134 or Bcl-XL overexpression are protective. Finally, 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone that attenuates ER stress, blocks asbestos- and thapsigargin-induced AEC IRE-1 protein expression, but does not reduce ER Ca²(2+) release or apoptosis. These results show that asbestos triggers an AEC ER stress response and subsequent intrinsic apoptosis that is mediated in part by ER Ca²(2+) release. PMID:23885834

  2. Asbestos-Induced Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Mueller, Amanda; Lam, Anna P; Trejo, Humberto; Williams, David; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Baker, Margaret; Ridge, Karen; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Beri, Rohinee

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure results in pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) and malignancies (bronchogenic lung cancer and mesothelioma) by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis is important in the development of pulmonary fibrosis after exposure to an array of toxins, including asbestos. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) apoptosis occur in AECs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease with similarities to asbestosis. Asbestos induces AEC intrinsic apoptosis, but the role of the ER is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether asbestos causes an AEC ER stress response that promotes apoptosis. Using human A549 and rat primary isolated alveolar type II cells, amosite asbestos fibers increased AEC mRNA and protein expression of ER stress proteins involved in the unfolded protein response, such as inositol-requiring kinase (IRE) 1 and X-box–binding protein-1, as well as ER Ca²2+ release ,as assessed by a FURA-2 assay. Eukarion-134, a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, as well as overexpression of Bcl-XL in A549 cells each attenuate asbestos-induced AEC ER stress (IRE-1 and X-box–binding protein-1 protein expression; ER Ca²2+ release) and apoptosis. Thapsigargin, a known ER stress inducer, augments AEC apoptosis, and eukarion-134 or Bcl-XL overexpression are protective. Finally, 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone that attenuates ER stress, blocks asbestos- and thapsigargin-induced AEC IRE-1 protein expression, but does not reduce ER Ca²2+ release or apoptosis. These results show that asbestos triggers an AEC ER stress response and subsequent intrinsic apoptosis that is mediated in part by ER Ca²2+ release. PMID:23885834

  3. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells. PMID:26523279

  4. Sulfidation of silver nanowires inside human alveolar epithelial cells: a potential detoxification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Thorley, Andrew J.; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Skepper, Jeremy; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Shaffer, Milo S.; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2013-09-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are being developed for use in optoelectronics. However before widespread usage, it is crucial to determine their potential effects on human health. It is accepted that Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) exert toxic effects by releasing Ag+ ions, but much less is known about whether Ag+ reacts with compounds, or any downstream bioactive effects of transformed AgNPs. Analytical high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been employed to elucidate cellular uptake and reactivity of AgNWs inside human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells. AgNWs were observed in the cytoplasm and membrane-bound vesicles, and precipitation of Ag2S within the cell occurred after 1 h exposure. Cell viability studies showed no evidence of cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species were not observed on exposure of cells to AgNWs. We suggest that Ag2S formation acts as a `trap' for free Ag+, significantly limiting short-term toxicological effects - with important consequences for the safety of Ag-nanomaterials to human health.Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are being developed for use in optoelectronics. However before widespread usage, it is crucial to determine their potential effects on human health. It is accepted that Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) exert toxic effects by releasing Ag+ ions, but much less is known about whether Ag+ reacts with compounds, or any downstream bioactive effects of transformed AgNPs. Analytical high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been employed to elucidate cellular uptake and reactivity of AgNWs inside human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells. AgNWs were observed in the cytoplasm and membrane-bound vesicles, and precipitation of Ag2S within the cell occurred after 1 h exposure. Cell viability studies showed no evidence of cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species were not observed on exposure of cells to AgNWs. We suggest that Ag2S formation acts as a `trap' for free Ag+, significantly limiting short-term toxicological effects

  5. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xu-Guang; Ji, Tian-Xing; Xia, Yong; Ma, Yue-Yun

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  6. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells can elicit the transendothelial migration of CD14+ monocytes and CD3+ lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eghtesad, M; Jackson, H E; Cunningham, A C

    2001-01-01

    The ability of freshly isolated primary human alveolar epithelial cells (type II pneumocytes) to induce leucocyte migration across an endothelial monolayer was investigated. Three-way factorial analysis of variance (anova) demonstrated that resting alveolar endothelial cells (AEC) could produce detectable quantities of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), which was upregulated in response to tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) had no significant effect on this process. TNF-α and IFN-γ both induced AEC to provoke migration of CD14+ monocytes and CD3+ lymphocytes across endothelium. IFN-γ and TNF-α synergized in their ability to induce production of T lymphocyte, but not monocyte, chemoattractants from AEC. Leucocyte transendothelial migration was inhibited by anti-MCP-1 neutralizing antibody and by heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan (GAG). These data suggest that human AEC play a role in the multiple mechanisms that facilitate monocyte and T lymphocyte migration into the alveolar compartment of the lung under homeostasis and inflammatory conditions. One of these mechanisms is mediated via constitutive MCP-1 production by alveolar epithelial cells, which is upregulated by TNF-α. PMID:11260320

  7. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their underlying mechanisms. We found that PAM could selectively activate and expand human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. PAM-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently killed influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and inhibited virus replication. The cytotoxic activity of PAM-expanded Vγ9Vδ2-T cells was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and required NKG2D activation. Perforin–granzyme B, tumor-necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas–Fas ligand (FasL) pathways were involved in their cytotoxicity. Our study suggests that targeting γδ-T cells by PAM can potentially offer an alternative option for the treatment of influenza virus. PMID:23353835

  8. Effect of P2X7 receptor knockout on AQP-5 expression of type I alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Hofmann, Falk; Augstein, Antje; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis. PMID:24941004

  9. Effect of P2X7 Receptor Knockout on AQP-5 Expression of Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Hofmann, Falk; Augstein, Antje; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis. PMID:24941004

  10. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  11. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Keiko; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12) were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC), an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX), 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation. PMID:26167183

  12. Culture of fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Fraslon, C; Rolland, G; Bourbon, J R; Rieutort, M; Valenza, C

    1991-11-01

    A serum-free culture medium (defined medium = DM) was elaborated by adding to Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM), non-essential amino acids, transferrin, putrescine, tripeptide glycyl-histidyl-lysine, somatostatin, sodium selenite, ethanolamine, phosphoethanolamine, sodium pyruvate, and metal trace elements. This medium was tested for its ability to support sustained surfactant biosynthesis in fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells. For up to 8 days, ultrastructure was maintained with persistence of lamellar inclusion bodies. Thymidine incorporation into DNA was enhanced about 50% in DM as compared with MEM, whereas it was enhanced 300% in 10% fetal bovine serum. With DM, the incorporation of tritiated choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) of isolated surfactant material was about twice that with MEM. Deletion experiments evidenced the prominent role of pyruvate, transferrin, and selenium in the stimulation of surfactant PC biosynthesis. The addition of biotin to DM enhanced surfactant PC biosynthesis slightly and nonsurfactant PC biosynthesis markedly. The presence of nucleosides seemed unfavorable to the synthesis of surfactant PC. Type II cells responded to the addition of epidermal growth factor and insulinlike growth factor-I both by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and choline incorporation into PC. It is concluded that DM represents a useful tool for cultivating type II cells without loss of their specialized properties and for studying the regulation of cell proliferation and surfactant biosynthesis in a controlled environment. PMID:1748624

  13. Apoptosis induced by ozone and oxysterols in human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kosmider, Beata; Loader, Joan E.; Murphy, Robert C.; Mason, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of ozone-induced lung cell injury is poorly understood. One hypothesis is that ozone induces lipid peroxidation and that these peroxidased lipids produce oxidative stress and DNA damage. Oxysterols are lipid peroxide formed by the direct effect of ozone on pulmonary surfactant and cell membranes. We studied the effects of ozone and the oxysterol 5β,6β-epoxycholesterol (β-epoxide) and its metabolite cholestan-6-oxo-3,5-diol (6-oxo-3,5-diol) on human alveolar epithelial type I-like cells (ATI-like cells) and type II cells (ATII cells). Ozone and oxysterols induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity in ATI-like cells. They also generated reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Ozone and β-epoxide were strong inducers of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra1) protein expressions. Furthermore, we found higher sensitivity of ATI-like cells than ATII cells exposed to ozone or treated with β-epoxide or 6-oxo-3,5-diol. In general the response to the cholesterol epoxides was similar to the effect of ozone. The importance of understanding the response of human ATI-like cells and ATII cells to oxysterols may be useful for further studies, because these compounds may represent useful biomarkers in other diseases. PMID:20219673

  14. Rv3351c, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene that affects bacterial growth and alveolar epithelial cell viability.

    PubMed

    Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Fine-Coulson, Kari; Gupta, Tuhina; Quinn, Frederick D; Posey, James E; Willby, Melisa; Castro-Garza, Jorge; Karls, Russell K

    2015-12-01

    Despite the interactions known to occur between various lower respiratory tract pathogens and alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), few reports examine factors influencing the interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and AECs during infection. Importantly, in vitro studies have demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis hbha and esxA gene products HBHA and ESAT6 directly or indirectly influence AEC survival. In this report, we identify Rv3351c as another M. tuberculosis gene that impacts the fate of both the pathogen and AEC host. Intracellular replication of an Rv3351c mutant in the human AEC type II pneumocyte cell line A549 was markedly reduced relative to the complemented mutant and parent strain. Deletion of Rv3351c diminished the release of lactate dehydrogenase and decreased uptake of trypan blue vital stain by host cells infected with M. tuberculosis bacilli, suggesting attenuated cytotoxic effects. Interestingly, an isogenic hbha mutant displayed reductions in AEC killing similar to those observed for the Rv3351c mutant. This opens the possibility that multiple M. tuberculosis gene products interact with AECs. We also observed that Rv3351c aids intracellular replication and survival of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. This places Rv3351c in the same standing as HBHA and ESAT6, which are important factors in AECs and macrophages. Defining the mechanism(s) by which Rv3351c functions to aid pathogen survival within the host may lead to new drug or vaccine targets. PMID:26492080

  15. Methotrexate influx via folate transporters into alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Kawami, Masashi; Miyamoto, Mioka; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2015-08-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a drug used for the treatment of certain cancers as well as rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes induces serious interstitial lung injury. Although lung toxicity of MTX is related to its accumulation, the information concerning MTX transport in the lungs is lacking. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying MTX influx into human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. MTX influx into A549 cells was time-, pH-, and temperature-dependent and showed saturation kinetics. The influx was inhibited by folic acid with IC50 values of 256.1 μM at pH 7.4 and 1.6 μM at pH 5.5, indicating that the mechanisms underlying MTX influx would be different at these pHs. We then examined the role of two folate transporters in MTX influx, reduced folate carrier (RFC) and proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). The expression of RFC and PCFT mRNAs in A549 cells was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, MTX influx was inhibited by thiamine monophosphate, an RFC inhibitor, at pH 7.4, and by sulfasalazine, a PCFT inhibitor, at pH 5.5. These results indicated that RFC and PCFT are predominantly involved in MTX influx into A549 cells at pH 7.4 and pH 5.5, respectively. PMID:26190800

  16. Regulation and function of the two-pore-domain (K2P) potassium channel Trek-1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Teng, Bin; Ghosh, Manik; West, Alina Nico; Makena, Patrudu; Gorantla, Vijay; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    Hyperoxia can lead to a myriad of deleterious effects in the lung including epithelial damage and diffuse inflammation. The specific mechanisms by which hyperoxia promotes these pathological changes are not completely understood. Activation of ion channels has been proposed as one of the mechanisms required for cell activation and mediator secretion. The two-pore-domain K(+) channel (K2P) Trek-1 has recently been described in lung epithelial cells, but its function remains elusive. In this study we hypothesized that hyperoxia affects expression of Trek-1 in alveolar epithelial cells and that Trek-1 is involved in regulation of cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. We found gene expression of several K2P channels in mouse alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12), and expression of Trek-1 was significantly downregulated in cultured cells and lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. Similarly, proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 expression were downregulated by exposure to hyperoxia. We developed an MLE-12 cell line deficient in Trek-1 expression using shRNA and found that Trek-1 deficiency resulted in increased cell proliferation and upregulation of PCNA but not Cyclin D1. Furthermore, IL-6 and regulated on activation normal T-expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES) secretion was decreased in Trek-1-deficient cells, whereas release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was increased. Release of KC/IL-8 was not affected by Trek-1 deficiency. Overall, deficiency of Trek-1 had a more pronounced effect on mediator secretion than exposure to hyperoxia. This is the first report suggesting that the K(+) channel Trek-1 could be involved in regulation of alveolar epithelial cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, but a direct association with hyperoxia-induced changes in Trek-1 levels remains elusive. PMID:21949155

  17. The Oxygen Environment at Birth Specifies the Population of Alveolar Epithelial Stem Cells in the Adult Lung.

    PubMed

    Yee, Min; Gelein, Robert; Mariani, Thomas J; Lawrence, B Paige; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells (AEC2) maintain pulmonary homeostasis by producing surfactant, expressing innate immune molecules, and functioning as adult progenitor cells for themselves and alveolar epithelial type I cells (AEC1). How the proper number of alveolar epithelial cells is determined in the adult lung is not well understood. Here, BrdU labeling, genetic lineage tracing, and targeted expression of the anti-oxidant extracellular superoxide dismutase in AEC2s are used to show how the oxygen environment at birth influences postnatal expansion of AEC2s and AEC1s in mice. Birth into low (12%) or high (≥60%) oxygen stimulated expansion of AEC2s through self-renewal and differentiation of the airway Scgb1a1 + lineage. This non-linear or hormesis response to oxygen was specific for the alveolar epithelium because low oxygen stimulated and high oxygen inhibited angiogenesis as defined by changes in V-cadherin and PECAM (CD31). Although genetic lineage tracing studies confirmed adult AEC2s are stem cells for AEC1s, we found no evidence that postnatal growth of AEC1s were derived from self-renewing Sftpc + or the Scbg1a1 + lineage of AEC2s. Taken together, our results show how a non-linear response to oxygen at birth promotes expansion of AEC2s through two distinct lineages. Since neither lineage contributes to the postnatal expansion of AEC1s, the ability of AEC2s to function as stem cells for AEC1s appears to be restricted to the adult lung. Stem Cells 2016;34:1396-1406. PMID:26891117

  18. Reversal of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema and promotion of alveolar epithelial cell proliferation by simvastatin in mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saeko; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Seki, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Furuuchi, Momoyo; Nakajima, Takahiro; Tsujimura, Shuko; Shirahata, Toru; Nakamura, Miho; Minematsu, Naoto; Yamasaki, Motohiro; Tateno, Hiroki; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2008-05-01

    Besides lowering cholesterol, statins exert multiple effects, such as anti-inflammatory activity and improvement of endothelial cell function. We examined whether simvastatin (SS) protects against the development of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by using mean linear intercepts of alveoli (Lm) as a morphometric parameter of emphysema. After injection of intratracheal elastase on day 0, C57BL/6 mice were treated daily with SS (SS+ group) or PBS (SS- group) for 2 wk. A 21% decrease in Lm on day 7 was observed in the SS+ group vs. the SS- group. Anti-inflammatory effects of SS were observed as a decrease in percentage of neutrophils up to day 3, and in hydroxyproline concentration on day 3, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). SS also increased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive alveolar epithelial cells between days 3 and 14. To confirm the role of statins in promoting proliferation of alveolar cells, mice were treated with SS (SS+) vs. PBS (SS-) for 12 days, starting 3 wk after elastase administration. After SS treatment, Lm decreased by 52% and PCNA-positive alveolar epithelial cells increased compared with the SS- group. Concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor in BALF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression in pulmonary vessels tended to be higher in the SS+ group vs. the SS- group in this protocol. In conclusion, SS inhibited the development of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice. This therapeutic effect was due not only to anti-inflammation but also to the promotion of alveolar epithelial cell regeneration, partly mediated by restoring endothelial cell functions. PMID:18310229

  19. Transcriptional profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicating in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryndak, Michelle B; Singh, Krishna K; Peng, Zhengyu; Laal, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection is initiated by the few bacilli inhaled into the alveolus. Studies in lungs of aerosol-infected mice provided evidence for extensive replication of M. tb in non-migrating, non-antigen-presenting cells in the alveoli during the first 2-3 weeks post-infection. Alveoli are lined by type II and type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) which outnumber alveolar macrophages by several hundred-fold. M. tb DNA and viable M. tb have been demonstrated in AEC and other non-macrophage cells of the kidney, liver, and spleen in autopsied tissues from latently-infected subjects from TB-endemic regions indicating systemic bacterial dissemination during primary infection. M. tb have also been demonstrated to replicate rapidly in A549 cells (type II AEC line) and acquire increased invasiveness for endothelial cells. Together, these results suggest that AEC could provide an important niche for bacterial expansion and development of a phenotype that promotes dissemination during primary infection. In the current studies, we have compared the transcriptional profile of M. tb replicating intracellularly in A549 cells to that of M. tb replicating in laboratory broth, by microarray analysis. Genes significantly upregulated during intracellular residence were consistent with an active, replicative, metabolic, and aerobic state, as were genes for tryptophan synthesis and for increased virulence (ESAT-6, and ESAT-6-like genes, esxH, esxJ, esxK, esxP, and esxW). In contrast, significant downregulation of the DevR (DosR) regulon and several hypoxia-induced genes was observed. Stress response genes were either not differentially expressed or were downregulated with the exception of the heat shock response and those induced by low pH. The intra-type II AEC M. tb transcriptome strongly suggests that AEC could provide a safe haven in which M. tb can expand dramatically and disseminate from the lung prior to the elicitation of adaptive immune responses

  20. Transcriptional Profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replicating in Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhengyu; Laal, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection is initiated by the few bacilli inhaled into the alveolus. Studies in lungs of aerosol-infected mice provided evidence for extensive replication of M. tb in non-migrating, non-antigen-presenting cells in the alveoli during the first 2–3 weeks post-infection. Alveoli are lined by type II and type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) which outnumber alveolar macrophages by several hundred-fold. M. tb DNA and viable M. tb have been demonstrated in AEC and other non-macrophage cells of the kidney, liver, and spleen in autopsied tissues from latently-infected subjects from TB-endemic regions indicating systemic bacterial dissemination during primary infection. M. tb have also been demonstrated to replicate rapidly in A549 cells (type II AEC line) and acquire increased invasiveness for endothelial cells. Together, these results suggest that AEC could provide an important niche for bacterial expansion and development of a phenotype that promotes dissemination during primary infection. In the current studies, we have compared the transcriptional profile of M. tb replicating intracellularly in A549 cells to that of M. tb replicating in laboratory broth, by microarray analysis. Genes significantly upregulated during intracellular residence were consistent with an active, replicative, metabolic, and aerobic state, as were genes for tryptophan synthesis and for increased virulence (ESAT-6, and ESAT-6-like genes, esxH, esxJ, esxK, esxP, and esxW). In contrast, significant downregulation of the DevR (DosR) regulon and several hypoxia-induced genes was observed. Stress response genes were either not differentially expressed or were downregulated with the exception of the heat shock response and those induced by low pH. The intra-type II AEC M. tb transcriptome strongly suggests that AEC could provide a safe haven in which M. tb can expand dramatically and disseminate from the lung prior to the elicitation of adaptive immune responses

  1. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Matković, Ivana; Federico, Giuseppina; Sun, Tianliang; Franz, Timo; Brakebusch, Cord H; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Friedel, Roland H; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central regulatory mechanism of mitotic spindle orientation necessary for the alignment of epithelial cell divisions with the epithelial plane. PMID:25892012

  2. Estradiol activates epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar cells through the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Megan M; Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D; Yu, Ling; Yue, Qiang; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Harrell, Constance S; Neigh, Gretchen N; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-12-01

    Female sex predisposes individuals to poorer outcomes during respiratory disorders like cystic fibrosis and influenza-associated pneumonia. A common link between these disorders is dysregulation of alveolar fluid clearance via disruption of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. Recent evidence suggests that female sex hormones directly regulate expression and activity of alveolar ENaC. In our study, we identified the mechanism by which estradiol (E2) or progesterone (P4) independently regulates alveolar ENaC. Using cell-attached patch clamp, we measured ENaC single-channel activity in a rat alveolar cell line (L2) in response to overnight exposure to either E2 or P4. In contrast to P4, E2 increased ENaC channel activity (NPo) through an increase in channel open probability (Po) and an increased number of patches with observable channel activity. Apical plasma membrane abundance of the ENaC α-subunit (αENaC) more than doubled in response to E2 as determined by cell surface biotinylation. αENaC membrane abundance was approximately threefold greater in lungs from female rats in proestrus, when serum E2 is greatest, compared with diestrus, when it is lowest. Our results also revealed a significant role for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (Gper) to mediate E2's effects on ENaC. Overall, our results demonstrate that E2 signaling through Gper selectively activates alveolar ENaC through an effect on channel gating and channel density, the latter via greater trafficking of channels to the plasma membrane. The results presented herein implicate E2-mediated regulation of alveolar sodium channels in the sex differences observed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. PMID:24097558

  3. Evidence of K+ channel function in epithelial cell migration, proliferation, and repair

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Efficient repair of epithelial tissue, which is frequently exposed to insults, is necessary to maintain its functional integrity. It is therefore necessary to better understand the biological and molecular determinants of tissue regeneration and to develop new strategies to promote epithelial repair. Interestingly, a growing body of evidence indicates that many members of the large and widely expressed family of K+ channels are involved in regulation of cell migration and proliferation, key processes of epithelial repair. First, we briefly summarize the complex mechanisms, including cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation, engaged after epithelial injury. We then present evidence implicating K+ channels in the regulation of these key repair processes. We also describe the mechanisms whereby K+ channels may control epithelial repair processes. In particular, changes in membrane potential, K+ concentration, cell volume, intracellular Ca2+, and signaling pathways following modulation of K+ channel activity, as well as physical interaction of K+ channels with the cytoskeleton or integrins are presented. Finally, we discuss the challenges to efficient, specific, and safe targeting of K+ channels for therapeutic applications to improve epithelial repair in vivo. PMID:24196531

  4. Characterization of the gene and promoter for RTI40, a differentiation marker of type I alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Vanderbilt, J N; Dobbs, L G

    1998-10-01

    In an effort to understand the processes that establish and maintain the differentiated state of the alveolar epithelium, we have analyzed the gene for rat type I cell 40 kD protein (RTI40), an apical integral plasma membrane protein expressed in type I but not type II alveolar epithelial cells. The RTI40 gene spans 35 kilobase pairs; it contains 6 exons and at least 6 rat Identifier repetitive elements. Three exons encode the predicted RTI40 extracellular domain and one encodes the single transmembrane spanning domain. The final exon encodes one amino acid followed by a stop codon. RTI40 gene transcription starts downstream from a TATA homology, which is immediately adjacent to putative binding sites for thyroid transcription factor 1 and Sp1. In H441 cell transfections, mutagenesis of a 5'-flanking fragment (-2496 to +104) revealed two regions that contribute to promoter activity: -1247 through -795 and -163 through -81. Heterologous promoter fusion experiments suggest that a cooperative interaction between these regions activates transcription. In transfected type II cells, deletion across the proximal region produced a 6-fold drop in promoter activity, whereas deletion across the distal region was without apparent effect. These results provide a foundation to analyze further the factors that govern alveolar epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:9761764

  5. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D. PMID:25163675

  6. Regulation of Alveolar Epithelial Na+ Channels by ERK1/2 in Chlorine-Breathing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Chen, Lan; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Gang; Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the exposure of mice to Cl2 decreases vectorial Na+ transport and fluid clearance across their distal lung spaces have not been elucidated. We examined the biophysical, biochemical, and physiological changes of rodent lung epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) after exposure to Cl2, and identified the mechanisms involved. We measured amiloride-sensitive short-circuit currents (Iamil) across isolated alveolar Type II (ATII) cell monolayers and ENaC single-channel properties by patching ATII and ATI cells in situ. α-ENaC, γ-ENaC, total and phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2, and advanced products of lipid peroxidation in ATII cells were measured by Western blot analysis. Concentrations of reactive intermediates were assessed by electron spin resonance (ESR). Amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels with conductances of 4.5 and 18 pS were evident in ATI and ATII cells in situ of air-breathing mice. At 1 hour and 24 hours after exposure to Cl2, the open probabilities of these two channels decreased. This effect was prevented by incubating lung slices with inhibitors of ERK1/2 or of proteasomes and lysosomes. The exposure of ATII cell monolayers to Cl2 increased concentrations of reactive intermediates, leading to ERK1/2 phosphorylation and decreased Iamil and α-ENaC concentrations at 1 hour and 24 hours after exposure. The administration of antioxidants to ATII cells before and after exposure to Cl2 decreased concentrations of reactive intermediates and ERK1/2 activation, which mitigated the decrease in Iamil and ENaC concentrations. The reactive intermediates formed during and after exposure to Cl2 activated ERK1/2 in ATII cells in vitro and in vivo, leading to decreased ENaC concentrations and activity. PMID:21997487

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Tolerance to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Neagos, Jacqueline; Standiford, Theodore J; Newstead, Michael W; Zeng, Xianying; Huang, Steven K; Ballinger, Megan N

    2015-12-01

    To protect the host against exuberant inflammation and injury responses, cells have the ability to become hyporesponsive or "tolerized" to repeated stimulation by microbial and nonmicrobial insults. The lung airspace is constantly exposed to a variety of exogenous and endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, yet the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to be tolerized has yet to be examined. We hypothesize that type II AECs will develop a tolerance phenotype upon repeated TLR agonist exposure. To test this hypothesis, primary AECs isolated from the lungs of mice and a murine AEC cell line (MLE-12) were stimulated with either a vehicle control or a TLR ligand for 18 hours, washed, then restimulated with either vehicle or TLR ligand for an additional 6 hours. Tolerance was assessed by measurement of TLR ligand-stimulated chemokine production (monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1/CCL2, keratinocyte chemoattractant [KC]/CXCL1, and macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-2/CXCL2). Sequential treatment of primary AECs or MLE-12 cells with TLR agonists resulted in induction of either tolerance or cross-tolerance. The induction of tolerance was not due to expression of specific negative regulators of TLR signaling (interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase [IRAK]-M, Toll-interacting protein [Tollip], single Ig IL-1-related receptor [SIGIRR], or suppressor of cytokine signaling [SOCS]), inhibitory microRNAs (miRs; specifically, miR-155 and miR146a), or secretion of inhibitory or regulatory soluble mediators (prostaglandin E2, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, or IFN-α/β). Moreover, inhibition of histone demethylation or DNA methylation did not prevent the development of tolerance. However, treatment of AECs with the histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A or suberoylanilide hyrozamine resulted in reversal of the tolerance phenotype. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which epigenetic modification regulates the induction of tolerance in AECs

  8. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1-7/Mas axis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-09-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1-7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1-7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1-7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1-7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1-7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1-7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1-7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1-7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1-7. They also suggest that ANG1-7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1-7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  9. Microfluidic shear stress-regulated surfactant secretion in alveolar epithelial type II cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahto, Sanjeev Kumar; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Greenblum, Ayala; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the role of flow-induced shear stress on the mechanisms regulating surfactant secretion in type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) using microfluidic models. Following flow stimulation spanning a range of wall shear stress (WSS) magnitudes, monolayers of ATII (MLE-12 and A549) cells were examined for surfactant secretion by evaluating essential steps of the process, including relative changes in the number of fusion events of lamellar bodies (LBs) with the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular redistribution of LBs. F-actin cytoskeleton and calcium levels were analyzed in A549 cells subjected to WSS spanning 4-20 dyn/cm(2). Results reveal an enhancement in LB fusion events with the PM in MLE-12 cells upon flow stimulation, whereas A549 cells exhibit no foreseeable changes in the monitored number of fusion events for WSS levels ranging up to a threshold of ∼8 dyn/cm(2); above this threshold, we witness instead a decrease in LB fusion events in A549 cells. However, patterns of LB redistribution suggest that WSS can potentially serve as a stimulus for A549 cells to trigger the intracellular transport of LBs toward the cell periphery. This observation is accompanied by a fragmentation of F-actin, indicating that disorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton might act as a limiting factor for LB fusion events. Moreover, we note a rise in cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) levels following stimulation of A549 cells with WSS magnitudes ranging near or above the experimental threshold. Overall, WSS stimulation can influence key components of molecular machinery for regulated surfactant secretion in ATII cells in vitro. PMID:24487389

  10. Oxidative damage in human epithelial alveolar cells exposed in vitro to oil fly ash transition metals.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Angela; Visalli, Giuseppa; Munaò, Fortunato; Baluce, Barbara; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Primerano, Patrizia; Corigliano, Francesco; De Flora, Silvio

    2009-03-01

    Among particulate matter emissions from combustion processes, oil fly ash (OFA) displays a marked oxidative and inflammogenic reactivity, due to the high content of bioavailable transition metals. In the present study, we evaluated the biological effects of an OFA water solution, composed of the transition metals Fe (57.5%), V (32.4%), and Ni (10.1%), in human epithelial alveolar cells (A549 line). The fluorimetric analysis by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein showed a significant, dose- and time-dependent induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by OFA metal components at subtoxic doses. The metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylsulfoxide attenuated the metal-induced generation of ROS. Confocal microscopy observations strengthened these findings and showed an intense cytoplasmic fluorescence with perinuclear thickenings in A549 cells, in the absence of morphological damage. Metal-induced generation of ROS was significantly correlated with a dose- and time-dependent DNA damage, as assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Catalase was able to decrease dramatically DNA damage. Fluorimetric analyses by diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine showed a parallelism between generation of ROS and formation of lipid peroxides. The results obtained in the experiments evaluating the effects of individual metal solutions did not show any significant difference in DNA damage between Fe(III) and V(IV), but highlighted the higher capability of V(IV) to increase ROS in the cytoplasmic compartment. The different behavior of these two elements, confirmed by the weak Fe-induced lipid peroxidation, may be ascribed to the presence of Fe-binding proteins, such as ferritin, in the cytoplasm. Finally, Ni(II) had negligible effects on ROS production. On the whole, the results obtained in this study show the strong capability of transition metals adsorbed to OFA to cause widespread damage to biological macromolecules, and suggest potential

  11. Linking progression of fibrotic lung remodeling and ultrastructural alterations of alveolar epithelial type II cells in the amiodarone mouse model.

    PubMed

    Birkelbach, Bastian; Lutz, Dennis; Ruppert, Clemens; Henneke, Ingrid; Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Günther, Andreas; Ochs, Matthias; Mahavadi, Poornima; Knudsen, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Chronic injury of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2 cells) represents a key event in the development of lung fibrosis in animal models and in humans, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Intratracheal delivery of amiodarone to mice results in a profound injury and macroautophagy-dependent apoptosis of AE2 cells. Increased autophagy manifested in AE2 cells by disturbances of the intracellular surfactant. Hence, we hypothesized that ultrastructural alterations of the intracellular surfactant pool are signs of epithelial stress correlating with the severity of fibrotic remodeling. With the use of design-based stereology, the amiodarone model of pulmonary fibrosis in mice was characterized at the light and ultrastructural level during progression. Mean volume of AE2 cells, volume of lamellar bodies per AE2 cell, and mean size of lamellar bodies were correlated to structural parameters reflecting severity of fibrosis like collagen content. Within 2 wk amiodarone leads to an increase in septal wall thickness and a decrease in alveolar numbers due to irreversible alveolar collapse associated with alveolar surfactant dysfunction. Progressive hypertrophy of AE2 cells and increase in mean individual size and total volume of lamellar bodies per AE2 cell were observed. A high positive correlation of these AE2 cell-related ultrastructural changes and the deposition of collagen fibrils within septal walls were established. Qualitatively, similar alterations could be found in IPF samples with mild to moderate fibrosis. We conclude that ultrastructural alterations of AE2 cells including the surfactant system are tightly correlated with the progression of fibrotic remodeling. PMID:25957292

  12. ERK/GSK3ß/Snail signaling mediates radiation-induced alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Devipriya; Melo, Tahira; Deng, Zhiyong; Almeida, Celine; Zhao, Weiling

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major treatment regimes for thoracic malignancies, but can lead to severe lung complications including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Recent studies suggest that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue injury leading to organ fibrosis. To investigate whether radiation can induce EMT in lung epithelial cells and also understand the potential mechanism(s) associated with this change, rat alveolar type II lung epithelial RLE-6TN cells were irradiated with 8 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in E-cadherin with a concomitant increase in α-SMA and vimentin after radiation, suggesting that the epithelial cells acquired mesenchymal-like morphology. Protein levels and nuclear translocation of Snail, the key inducer of EMT, were significantly elevated in the irradiated cells. Radiation also induced a time-dependent inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3ß), an endogenous inhibitor of Snail. A marked increase in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but not JNKs or p38, was observed in irradiated RLE-6TN cells. Silencing ERK1/2 using siRNAs and the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the radiation-induced phosphorylation of GSK3ß and altered the protein levels of Snail, α-SMA and E-cadherin in RLE-6TN cells. Pre-incubating RLE-6TN cells with N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, abolished the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ERK and altered protein levels of Snail, E-cadherin and α-SMA. These findings reveal, for the first time, that radiation-induced EMT in alveolar type II epithelial cells is mediated by the ERK/GSK3ß/Snail pathway. PMID:22198183

  13. ERK/GSK3β/Snail signaling mediates radiation-induced alveolar epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Devipriya; Melo, Tahira; Deng, Zhiyong; Almeida, Celine; Zhao, Weiling

    2012-03-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the major treatment regimes for thoracic malignancies, but can lead to severe lung complications including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Recent studies suggest that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue injury leading to organ fibrosis. To investigate whether radiation can induce EMT in lung epithelial cells and also to understand the potential mechanism(s) associated with this change, rat alveolar type II lung epithelial RLE-6TN cells were irradiated with 8 Gy of (137)Cs γ-rays. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in E-cadherin with a concomitant increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin after radiation, suggesting that the epithelial cells acquired a mesenchymal-like morphology. Protein levels and nuclear translocation of Snail, the key inducer of EMT, were significantly elevated in the irradiated cells. Radiation also induced a time-dependent inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), an endogenous inhibitor of Snail. A marked increase in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but not JNK or p38, was observed in irradiated RLE-6TN cells. Silencing ERK1/2 using siRNAs and the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the radiation-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and altered the protein levels of Snail, α-SMA, and E-cadherin in RLE-6TN cells. Preincubating RLE-6TN cells with N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, abolished the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ERK and altered protein levels of Snail, E-cadherin, and α-SMA. These findings reveal, for the first time, that radiation-induced EMT in alveolar type II epithelial cells is mediated by the ERK/GSK3β/Snail pathway. PMID:22198183

  14. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) mediates renal epithelial cell repair via ERK MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Cai, Cindy X

    2016-01-01

    The expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), a very promising sensitive and specific urinary biomarker for acute renal injury, is markedly upregulated in injured and regenerating renal proximal tubular epithelial cells following ischemic or toxic insults, suggesting a possible role for this molecule in renal repair process. In the present study we report that expression of KIM-1 facilitates renal tubular epithelial cell repair by promoting cell migration and proliferation. KIM-1 expression also enhances ERK MAPK activation, and the modulatory effect of KIM-1 on cellular repair process is likely mediated via ERK MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27084535

  15. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) mediates renal epithelial cell repair via ERK MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Cai, Cindy X

    2016-05-01

    The expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), a very promising sensitive and specific urinary biomarker for acute renal injury, is markedly upregulated in injured and regenerating renal proximal tubular epithelial cells following ischemic or toxic insults, suggesting a possible role for this molecule in renal repair process. In the present study, we report that expression of KIM-1 facilitates renal tubular epithelial cell repair by promoting cell migration and proliferation. KIM-1 expression also enhances ERK MAPK activation, and the modulatory effect of KIM-1 on cellular repair process is likely mediated via ERK MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27084535

  16. Effects of particle exposure and particle-elicited inflammatory cells on mutation in rat alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, K E; Deyo, L C; Carter, J M; Howard, B W; Hassenbein, D G; Bertram, T A

    1997-02-01

    To investigate mechanisms underlying development of lung adenomas and carcinomas in rats exposed to poorly soluble particles the relationships between particle exposure, inflammation and mutagenesis in rat alveolar type II cells were characterized. Rats were exposed to saline or saline suspensions of 10 and 100 mg/kg of alpha-quartz, carbon black or titanium dioxide by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen months after exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were characterized as to number and type and lung histopathology performed. The alveolar type II cells were isolated and cultured in 6 thioguanine (6TG) containing media to select for mutation in the hprt gene. The potential contribution of lung inflammatory cells to in vivo mutagenic responses, were evaluated by co-culturing BAL cells with the rat alveolar epithelial cell line, RLE-6TN for 24 h and the RLE-6TN cells selected for 6TG resistance. Neutrophilic inflammation was detected in all rats exposed to 10 and 100 mg/kg of alpha-quartz and carbon black and 100 mg/kg titanium dioxide; epithelial hyperplasia was observed in rats exposed to 10 and 100 mg/kg of alpha-quartz and 100 mg/kg carbon black. Hprt mutation frequency was increased in alveolar type II cells from rats exposed to 10 and 100 mg/kg of alpha-quartz, 100 mg/kg carbon black and 100 mg/kg titanium dioxide. In vitro exposure of RLE-6TN cells to BAL cells from rats treated with 10 and 100 mg/kg of alpha-quartz or 100 mg/kg carbon black increased hprt mutant frequency. Both macrophage and neutrophil enriched BAL cell populations were mutagenic to RLE-6TN cells, however, the mutagenic activity appeared greatest for neutrophils. Addition of catalase to BAL cell:RLE-6TN co-cultures inhibited the increase in hprt mutation frequency. These studies demonstrate exposure of rats to doses of particles producing significant neutrophilic inflammation is associated with increased mutation in rat alveolar type II cells. The ability of particle

  17. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of FITC-albumin in alveolar type II epithelial cell line RLE-6TN.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Ryoko; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Okamoto, Miho; Katayama, Hirokazu; Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2006-05-01

    We examined mechanisms of FITC-albumin uptake by alveolar type II epithelial cells using cultured RLE-6TN cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of cytokeratin 19 mRNA, which are characteristic features of alveolar type II epithelial cells, were detected in RLE-6TN cells. The uptake of FITC-albumin by the cells was time and temperature dependent and showed the saturation kinetics of high- and low-affinity transport systems. FITC-albumin uptake was inhibited by native albumin, by chemically modified albumin, and by metabolic inhibitors and bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis after FITC-albumin uptake showed punctate localization of fluorescence in the cells, which was partly localized in lysosomes. FITC-albumin taken up by the cells gradually degraded over time, as shown by fluoroimage analyzer after SDS-PAGE. The uptake of FITC-albumin by RLE-6TN cells was not inhibited by nystatin, indomethacin, or methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (inhibitors of caveolae-mediated endocytosis) but was inhibited by phenylarsine oxide and chlorpromazine (inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) in a concentration-dependent manner. Uptake was also inhibited by potassium depletion and hypertonicity, conditions known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results indicate that the uptake of FITC-albumin in cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN, is mediated by clathrin-mediated but not by caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and intracellular FITC-albumin is gradually degraded in lysosomes. Possible receptors involved in this endocytic system are discussed. PMID:16361359

  18. Effect of laser phototherapy on human alveolar bone repair: micro tomographic and histomorphometrical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romão, Marcia M. A.; Marques, Márcia M.; Cortes, Arthur R. G.; Horliana, Anna C. R. T.; Moreira, Maria S.; Lascala, Cesar A.

    2015-06-01

    The immediate dental implant placement in the molars region is critical, because of the high amount of bone loss and the discrepancy between the alveolar crest thickness and the dental implant platform. Laser phototherapy (LPT) improves bone repair thus could accelerate the implant placement. Twenty patients were selected for the study. Ten patients were submitted to LPT with GaAlAs diode laser (808nm) during molar extraction, immediately after, 24h, 48h, 72h, 96h and 7 days. The irradiations were applied in contact and punctual mode (100mW, 0.04cm2, 0.75J/cm2, 30s per point, 3J per point). The control group (n=10) received the same treatment; however with the power of the laser off. Forty days later samples of the tissue formed inside the sockets were obtained for further microtomography (microCTs) and histomorphometry analyses. Data were compared by the Student t test, whereas those from the different microCT parameters were compared by the Pearson correlation test (p<0.05). The relative bone volume, as well as area was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the lased than the control group. In the control group there were negative correlations between number and thickness, and between number and separation of trabecula (p<0.01). Between thickness and separation of trabecula the correlation was positive (p<0.01). The laser group showed significant negative correlation between the number and the thickness of trabecula (p<0.01). LPT accelerated bone repair. By the Pearson correlation test it was possible to infer that the lased group presented a more homogeneous trabecular configuration, which would allow earlier dental implant placement.

  19. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  20. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  1. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  2. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  3. Troglitazone attenuates TGF-β1-induced EMT in alveolar epithelial cells via a PPARγ-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Beiyun; Buckley, Stephen T; Patel, Vipul; Liu, Yixin; Luo, Jiao; Krishnaveni, Manda Sai; Ivan, Mihaela; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Crandall, Edward D; Borok, Zea

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are effective antifibrotic agents in a number of tissues. Effects of these agents on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of primary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) and potential mechanisms underlying effects on EMT have not been well delineated. We examined effects of troglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ agonist, on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in primary rat AEC and an alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell line (RLE-6TN). TGF-β1 (2.5 ng/mL) induced EMT in both cell types, as evidenced by acquisition of spindle-like morphology, increased expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and downregulation of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Concurrent treatment with troglitazone (or rosiglitazone), ameliorated effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, following stimulation with TGF-β1 for 6 days, troglitazone reversed EMT-related morphological changes and restored both epithelial and mesenchymal markers to control levels. Treatment with GW9662 (an irreversible PPARγ antagonist), or overexpression of a PPARγ dominant negative construct, failed to inhibit these effects of troglitazone in AEC. Troglitazone not only attenuated TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, but also inhibited nuclear translocation of β-catenin, phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 and upregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factor SNAI1. These results demonstrate inhibitory actions of troglitazone on TGF-β1-induced EMT in AEC via a PPARγ-independent mechanism likely through inhibition of β-catenin-dependent signaling downstream of TGF-β1, supporting a role for interactions between TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in EMT. PMID:22745681

  4. Troglitazone Attenuates TGF-β1-Induced EMT in Alveolar Epithelial Cells via a PPARγ-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vipul; Liu, Yixin; Luo, Jiao; Krishnaveni, Manda Sai; Ivan, Mihaela; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Crandall, Edward D.; Borok, Zea

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are effective antifibrotic agents in a number of tissues. Effects of these agents on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of primary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) and potential mechanisms underlying effects on EMT have not been well delineated. We examined effects of troglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ agonist, on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in primary rat AEC and an alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell line (RLE-6TN). TGF-β1 (2.5 ng/mL) induced EMT in both cell types, as evidenced by acquisition of spindle-like morphology, increased expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and downregulation of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Concurrent treatment with troglitazone (or rosiglitazone), ameliorated effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, following stimulation with TGF-β1 for 6 days, troglitazone reversed EMT-related morphological changes and restored both epithelial and mesenchymal markers to control levels. Treatment with GW9662 (an irreversible PPARγ antagonist), or overexpression of a PPARγ dominant negative construct, failed to inhibit these effects of troglitazone in AEC. Troglitazone not only attenuated TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, but also inhibited nuclear translocation of β-catenin, phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 and upregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factor SNAI1. These results demonstrate inhibitory actions of troglitazone on TGF-β1-induced EMT in AEC via a PPARγ-independent mechanism likely through inhibition of β-catenin-dependent signaling downstream of TGF-β1, supporting a role for interactions between TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in EMT. PMID:22745681

  5. DNA repair and mutagen sensitivity of epithelial cells and lymphocytes in oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    REITER, MAXIMILIAN; BAUMEISTER, PHILIPP; JAISER, SONJA; REISS, ANDREAS; SCHWENK-ZIEGER, SABINA; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT; HARRÉUS, ULRICH

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-associated nitrosamines are known carcinogens causing DNA damage in epithelial cells of the head and neck. A matched case-control study was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the oropharynx, and controls to tobacco-associated nitrosamines. Quantitative DNA repair was evaluated following a period of 15 and 30 min. Fresh biopsies from 100 male donors of macroscopically healthy oropharyngeal cells and lymphocytes (50 SCC patients and 50 controls) were incubated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). DNA damage in epithelial cells and lymphocytes was assessed using the comet assay. Following incubation with NDEA, cells underwent a period of DNA repair. All of the nitrosamines caused equivalent genotoxic damage in mucosal cells and lymphocytes of the two groups. Lymphocyte DNA repair capacity in the control group (26.8 and 37.1% after 15 and 30 min) was comparable to the tumor group (23.6 and 40.6%). However, epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of carcinoma patients was significantly reduced to 17.1% (15 min) and 23% (30 min) compared to the DNA repair of the control group (36.2%, 15 min and 46.0%, 30 min). Mutagen sensitivity was comparable in patients and controls. Thus, reduced epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of tumor patients is a possible endogenous risk factor for the development of head and neck squamous cell cancer. PMID:22740863

  6. Alveolar Epithelial Cells Secrete Chemokines in Response to IL-1β and Lipopolysaccharide but Not to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Rizwan; Wang, Jieru; Nishina, Kahoru; McConville, Glen; Mason, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Ozone exposure produces acute inflammation and neutrophil influx in the distal lung. Alveolar epithelial cells cover a large surface area, secrete chemokines, and may initiate or modify the inflammatory response. The effect of ozone on chemokine production by these cells has not been defined. Isolated rat type II cells were cultured in different conditions to express the morphologic appearance and biochemical markers for the type I and the type II cell phenotypes. These cells were exposed to ozone at an air/liquid interface. The type I–like cells were more susceptible to injury than the type II cells and showed signs of injury at exposure levels of 100 ppb ozone for 60 min. Both phenotypes showed evidence of lipid peroxidation after ozone exposure as measured by 8-isoprostane production, but neither phenotype secreted increased amounts of MIP-2 (CXCL3), CINC-1 (CXCL1), or MCP-1 (CCL2) in response to ozone. Both cell phenotypes secreted MIP-2 and MCP-1 in response to IL-1β or lipopolysaccharide, but there was no priming or synergy with ozone. It is likely that the inflammatory response to ozone in the alveolar compartment is not due to the direct effect of ozone on epithelial cells. PMID:16239643

  7. M2 polarized macrophages induced by CSE promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Shi, Hengfei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Weiyun; Dong, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the genesis of lung cancer, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are believed to accelerate the process. We therefore sought to clarify the relationship between cigarette smoking, TAMs and tumorigenesis. We treated macrophages (THP-1) with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α decreased, while TGF-β mRNA levels increased. CSE significantly inhibited the phagocytic ability of macrophages, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of FITC-dextran internalization. JAK2/STAT3 was significantly activated by CSE, as determined by Western blot analysis. When the scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of M2 macrophages, was analyzed by flow cytometry, its expression was significantly increased. After inducing M2 polarization of THP-1 cells, we co-cultured macrophages and alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549). The proliferation of A549 cells was detected by the MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, while their migration and invasion were detected by scratch wound assay and transwell assay. The results showed that the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 cells were significantly promoted by M2 macrophages but were slightly inhibited by CSE. In conclusion, we demonstrated that macrophage M2 polarization induced by CSE promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells. PMID:26253658

  8. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells by transforming growth factor-beta1: potential role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Willis, Brigham C; Liebler, Janice M; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Nicholson, Andrew G; Crandall, Edward D; du Bois, Roland M; Borok, Zea

    2005-05-01

    The hallmark of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the myofibroblast, the cellular origin of which in the lung is unknown. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may serve as a source of myofibroblasts through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Effects of chronic exposure to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 on the phenotype of isolated rat AECs in primary culture and a rat type II cell line (RLE-6TN) were evaluated. Additionally, tissue samples from patients with IPF were evaluated for cells co-expressing epithelial (thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 and pro-surfactant protein-B (pro-SP-B), and mesenchymal (alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA)) markers. RLE-6TN cells exposed to TGF-beta1 for 6 days demonstrated increased expression of mesenchymal cell markers and a fibroblast-like morphology, an effect augmented by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Exposure of rat AECs to TGF-beta1 (100 pmol/L) resulted in increased expression of alpha-SMA, type I collagen, vimentin, and desmin, with concurrent transition to a fibroblast-like morphology and decreased expression of TTF-1, aquaporin-5 (AQP5), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and cytokeratins. Cells co-expressing epithelial markers and alpha-SMA were abundant in lung tissue from IPF patients. These results suggest that AECs undergo EMT when chronically exposed to TGF-beta1, raising the possibility that epithelial cells may serve as a novel source of myofibroblasts in IPF. PMID:15855634

  9. Hypotonic shock modulates Na(+) current via a Cl(-) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent mechanism in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, André; Tessier, Marie-Claude; Tatur, Sabina; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Berthiaume, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells are involved in Na(+) absorption via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), an important process for maintaining an appropriate volume of liquid lining the respiratory epithelium and for lung oedema clearance. Here, we investigated how a 20% hypotonic shock modulates the ionic current in these cells. Polarized alveolar epithelial cells isolated from rat lungs were cultured on permeant filters and their electrophysiological properties recorded. A 20% bilateral hypotonic shock induced an immediate, but transient 52% rise in total transepithelial current and a 67% increase in the amiloride-sensitive current mediated by ENaC. Amiloride pre-treatment decreased the current rise after hypotonic shock, showing that ENaC current is involved in this response. Since Cl(-) transport is modulated by hypotonic shock, its contribution to the basal and hypotonic-induced transepithelial current was also assessed. Apical NPPB, a broad Cl(-) channel inhibitor and basolateral DIOA a potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC) inhibitor reduced the total and ENaC currents, showing that transcellular Cl(-) transport plays a major role in that process. During hypotonic shock, a basolateral Cl(-) influx, partly inhibited by NPPB is essential for the hypotonic-induced current rise. Hypotonic shock promoted apical ATP secretion and increased intracellular Ca(2+). While apyrase, an ATP scavenger, did not inhibit the hypotonic shock current response, W7 a calmodulin antagonist completely prevented the hypotonic current rise. These results indicate that a basolateral Cl(-) influx as well as Ca(2+)/calmodulin, but not ATP, are involved in the acute transepithelial current rise elicited by hypotonic shock. PMID:24019969

  10. Multiple cis Regulatory Elements Control RANTES Promoter Activity in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Haeberle, Helene; Elliott, Todd F.; Lin, Rongtuan; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) produces intense pulmonary inflammation, in part through its ability to induce chemokine synthesis in infected airway epithelial cells. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normally T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) is a CC chemokine which recruits and activates monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, all cell types present in the lung inflammatory infiltrate induced by RSV infection. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of RSV-induced RANTES promoter activation in human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells). Promoter deletion and mutagenesis experiments indicate that RSV requires the presence of five different cis regulatory elements, located in the promoter fragment spanning from −220 to +55 nucleotides, corresponding to NF-κB, C/EBP, Jun/CREB/ATF, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) binding sites. Although site mutations of the NF-κB, C/EBP, and CREB/AP-1 like sites reduce RSV-induced RANTES gene transcription to 50% or less, only mutations affecting IRF binding completely abolish RANTES inducibility. Supershift and microaffinity isolation assays were used to identify the different transcription factor family members whose DNA binding activity was RSV inducible. Expression of dominant negative mutants of these transcription factors further established their central role in virus-induced RANTES promoter activation. Our finding that the presence of multiple cis regulatory elements is required for full activation of the RANTES promoter in RSV-infected alveolar epithelial cells supports the enhanceosome model for RANTES gene transcription, which is absolutely dependent on binding of IRF transcription factors. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of RANTES gene expression is fundamental for rational design of inhibitors of RSV-induced lung inflammation. PMID:11413310

  11. GM-CSF provides autocrine protection for murine alveolar epithelial cells from oxidant-induced mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Anne; Seedahmed, Elfateh; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Boltax, Jonathan; McManus, Michael L; Paine, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Exposure of mice to hyperoxia induces alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury, acute lung injury and death. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung protects against these effects, although the mechanisms are not yet clear. Hyperoxia induces cellular injury via effects on mitochondrial integrity, associated with induction of proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. We hypothesized that GM-CSF protects AEC through effects on mitochondrial integrity. MLE-12 cells (a murine type II cell line) and primary murine type II AEC were subjected to oxidative stress by exposure to 80% oxygen and by exposure to H(2)O(2). Exposure to H(2)O(2) induced cytochrome c release and decreased mitochondrial reductase activity in MLE-12 cells. Incubation with GM-CSF significantly attenuated these effects. Protection induced by GM-CSF was associated with Akt activation. GM-CSF treatment also resulted in increased expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Mcl-1. Primary murine AEC were significantly more tolerant of oxidative stress than MLE-12 cells. In contrast to MLE-12 cells, primary AEC expressed significant GM-CSF at baseline and demonstrated constitutive activation of Akt and increased baseline expression of Mcl-1. Treatment with exogenous GM-CSF further increased Akt activation and Mcl-1 expression in primary AEC. Conversely, suppression of AEC GM-CSF expression by use of GM-CSF-specific small interfering RNA resulted in decreased tolerance of oxidative stress, Furthermore, silencing of Mcl-1 prevented GM-CSF-induced protection. We conclude that GM-CSF protects alveolar epithelial cells against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial injury via the Akt pathway and its downstream components, including Mcl-1. Epithelial cell-derived GM-CSF may contribute to intrinsic defense mechanisms limiting lung injury. PMID:22140071

  12. Elastolytic activity and alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage after chronic LPS inhalation: Effects of dexamethasone and rolipram

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Frederick J. . E-mail: JohnsonFJ@Cardiff.ac.uk; Reynolds, Lucy J.; Toward, Toby J.

    2005-09-15

    This study investigated whether a correlation between leukocyte-derived elastolytic activity, alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage, and leukocyte infiltration of the airways existed in guinea-pigs chronically exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The airway pathology of this model, notably the neutrophilia, resembles chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effect of the corticosteroid, dexamethasone, or the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4)-inhibitor, rolipram, on these features was studied. Conscious guinea-pigs were exposed for 1 h to single or repeated (nine) doses of LPS (30 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). Dexamethasone (20 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) or rolipram (1 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) was administered 24 and 0.5 h before the first exposure and daily thereafter. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was removed and elastolytic activity determined as the elastase-like release of Congo Red from impregnated elastin. The presence of the specific epithelial cell type-1 protein (40-42 kDa) RT1{sub 40} in BALF was identified by Western blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody and semi-quantified by dot-blot analysis. The antibody was found to identify guinea-pig RT1{sub 40}. BALF inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils and macrophages, and elastolytic activity were increased in chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, the latter by 90%. Chronic LPS exposure also increased (10.5-fold) RT1{sub 40} levels, indicating significant alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage. Dexamethasone or rolipram treatment reduced the influx of inflammatory cells, the elastolytic activity (by 40% and 38%, respectively), and RT1{sub 40} levels (by 50% and 57%, respectively). In conclusion, chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, like COPD, exhibit elastolytic lung damage. This was prevented by a PDE4 inhibitor and supports their development for suppressing this leukocyte-mediated pathology.

  13. Role of matrix metalloproteinases in radiation-induced lung injury in alveolar epithelial cells of Bama minipigs

    PubMed Central

    YUE, HAIYING; HU, KAI; LIU, WENQI; JIANG, JIE; CHEN, YUHUA; WANG, RENSHENG

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication associated with thoracic radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single 15-Gy dose of right-thoracic lung irradiation on the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and other proteins in the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells of Bama minipigs. All minipigs received either right-thoracic irradiation or sham irradiation under anesthesia, and were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12 or 24 weeks after irradiation. Collagen deposition was measured using Massons trichrome staining. Surfactant protein A (SP-A), transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), MMP2, MMP9, vimentin and E-cadherin protein expression levels were evaluated using western blot analysis, and the MMP2 and MMP9 gelatinase activities were tested using gelatin zymography. SP-A and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) co-localization was visualized using double immunofluorescence staining. At each time-point following irradiation, a significant increase in TGFβ1, α-SMA, MMP2, MMP9 and vimentin protein expression levels and MMP2 and MMP9 gelatinase activity were observed in the irradiated lungs compared with the sham-irradiated controls. By contrast, SP-A and E-cadherin protein expression levels decreased in a time-dependent manner post-irradiation. SP-A and α-SMA co-localization was observed in irradiated alveolar epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that E-cadherin, SP-A, MMP2 and MMP9 may function as sensitive predictors of RILI. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs in the irradiated lungs of Bama minipigs, and MMP2 and MMP9 may contribute to EMT in AE2 cells by regulating TGFβ1. Therefore, EMT may serve a crucial function in the development of RILI. PMID:26622503

  14. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  15. Hypoxia increases transepithelial electrical conductance and reduces occludin at the plasma membrane in alveolar epithelial cells via PKC-ζ and PP2A pathway.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Yshii, Cecilia; Butti, Maria L; Westphal, Whitney; Borcherding, Jennifer A; Allamargot, Chantal; Comellas, Alejandro P

    2011-04-01

    During pulmonary edema, the alveolar space is exposed to a hypoxic environment. The integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier is required for the reabsorption of alveolar fluid. Tight junctions (TJ) maintain the integrity of this barrier. We set out to determine whether hypoxia creates a dysfunctional alveolar epithelial barrier, evidenced by an increase in transepithelial electrical conductance (G(t)), due to a decrease in the abundance of TJ proteins at the plasma membrane. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) exposed to mild hypoxia (Po(2) = 50 mmHg) for 30 and 60 min decreased occludin abundance at the plasma membrane and significantly increased G(t). Other cell adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and claudins were not affected by hypoxia. AEC exposed to hypoxia increased superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Overexpression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) but not SOD2 prevented the hypoxia-induced G(t) increase and occludin reduction in AEC. Also, overexpression of catalase had a similar effect as SOD1, despite not detecting any increase in H(2)O(2) during hypoxia. Blocking PKC-ζ and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) prevented the hypoxia-induced occludin reduction at the plasma membrane and increase in G(t). In summary, we show that superoxide, PKC-ζ, and PP2A are involved in the hypoxia-induced increase in G(t) and occludin reduction at the plasma membrane in AEC. PMID:21257729

  16. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  17. Spectral Monitoring of Surfactant Clearance during Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Robin J.; Kemp, Sarah J.; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetley, Teresa D.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we report on the noninvasive identification of spectral markers of alveolar type II (ATII) cell differentiation in vitro using Raman microspectroscopy. ATII cells are progenitor cells for alveolar type I (ATI) cells in vivo, and spontaneously differentiate toward an ATI-like phenotype in culture. We analyzed undifferentiated and differentiated primary human ATII cells, and correlated Raman spectral changes to cellular changes in morphology and marker protein synthesis (surfactant protein C, alkaline phosphatase, caveolin-1). Undifferentiated ATII cells demonstrated spectra with strong phospholipid vibrations, arising from alveolar surfactant stored within cytoplasmic lamellar bodies (Lbs). Differentiated ATI-like cells yielded spectra with significantly less lipid content. Factor analysis revealed a phospholipid-dominated spectral component as the main discriminator between the ATII and ATI-like phenotypes. Spectral modeling of the data revealed a significant decrease in the spectral contribution of cellular lipids—specifically phosphatidyl choline, the main constituent of surfactant, as ATII cells differentiate. These observations were consistent with the clearance of surfactant from Lbs as ATII cells differentiate, and were further supported by cytochemical staining for Lbs. These results demonstrate the first spectral characterization of primary human ATII cells, and provide insight into the biochemical properties of alveolar surfactant in its unperturbed cellular environment. PMID:18820234

  18. Analysis of TGF-β1- and drug-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cultured alveolar epithelial cell line RLE/Abca3.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Yamamoto, Chieko; Yamaguchi, Koki; Kawami, Masashi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and drugs in genetically engineered type II alveolar epithelial cell line RLE/Abca3. Treatment of RLE/Abca3 cells with TGF-β1 induced marked changes in cell morphology from epithelial-like to elongated fibroblast-like morphology. With these morphological changes, mRNA expression of epithelial markers such as cytokeratin 19 (CK19) decreased, while that of mesenchymal markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) increased. TGF-β1 treatment also decreased the mRNA expression of Abca3, a type II cell marker, and formation of lamellar body structures. Interestingly, the effect of TGF-β1 on Abca3 mRNA expression was observed in RLE/Abca3 cells, but not in wild-type RLE-6TN, A549, and H441 cells. Treatment of RLE/Abca3 cells with bleomycin (BLM) and methotrexate (MTX) induced similar morphological and mRNA expression changes. In addition, the increase in α-SMA and the decrease in Abca3 mRNA expression by these drugs were observed only in RLE/Abca3 cells. These findings suggest that, like TGF-β1, BLM and MTX induce EMT in RLE/Abca3 cells, and RLE/Abca3 cells would be a good model to study drug-induced EMT. The effect of pirfenidone, an antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory drug, on EMT induced by TGF-β1 was also discussed. PMID:25760538

  19. Epithelial stem cells and implications for wound repair.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Gay, Denise L; Treffeisen, Elsa; Wang, Anne; Supapannachart, Rarinthip June; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-12-01

    Activation of epithelial stem cells and efficient recruitment of their proliferating progeny plays a critical role in cutaneous wound healing. The reepithelialized wound epidermis has a mosaic composition consisting of progeny that can be traced back both to epidermal and several types of hair follicle stem cells. The contribution of hair follicle stem cells to wound epidermis is particularly intriguing as it involves lineage identity change from follicular to epidermal. Studies from our laboratory show that hair follicle-fated bulge stem cells commit only transient amplifying epidermal progeny that participate in the initial wound re-epithelialization, but eventually are outcompeted by other epidermal clones and largely disappear after a few months. Conversely, recently described stem cell populations residing in the isthmus portion of hair follicle contribute long-lasting progeny toward wound epidermis and, arguably, give rise to new interfollicular epidermal stem cells. The role of epithelial stem cells during wound healing is not limited to regenerating stratified epidermis. By studying regenerative response in large cutaneous wounds, our laboratory uncovered that epithelial cells in the center of the wound can acquire greater morphogenetic plasticity and, together with the underlying wound dermis, can engage in an embryonic-like process of hair follicle neogenesis. Future studies should uncover the cellular and signaling basis of this remarkable adult wound regeneration phenomenon. PMID:23085626

  20. Epithelial Stem Cells and Implications for Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Gay, Denise L.; Treffeisen, Elsa; Wang, Anne; Supapannachart, Rarinthip June; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-01-01

    Activation of epithelial stem cells and efficient recruitment of their proliferating progeny plays a critical role in cutaneous wound healing. The reepithelialized wound epidermis hasa mosaic composition consisting of progeny that can be traced back both to epidermal and several types of hair follicle stem cells. The contribution of hair follicle stem cells to wound epidermis is particularly intriguing as it involves lineage identity change from follicular to epidermal. Studies from our laboratory show that hair follicle-fated bulge stem cells commit only transient amplifying epidermal progeny that participate in the initial wound re-epithelialization, but eventually are outcompeted by other epidermal clones and largely disappear after a few months. Conversely, recently described stem cell populations residing in the isthmus portion of hair follicle contribute long-lasting progeny toward wound epidermis and, arguably, give rise to new inter-follicular epidermal stem cells. The role of epithelial stem cells during wound healing is not limited to regenerating stratified epidermis. By studying regenerative response in large cutaneous wounds, our laboratory uncovered that epithelial cells in the center of the wound can acquire greater morphogenetic plasticity and, together with the underlying wound dermis, can engage in an embryonic-like process of hair follicle neogenesis. Future studies should uncover cellular and signaling basis of this remarkable adult wound regeneration phenomenon. PMID:23085626

  1. Airway epithelial repair in health and disease: Orchestrator or simply a player?

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Thomas; Garratt, Luke W; Coombe, Deirdre R; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial cells represent the most important surface of contact in the body and form the first line of defence of the body to external environment. Consequently, epithelia have numerous roles in order to maintain a homeostatic defence barrier. Although the epithelium has been extensively studied over several decades, it remains the focus of new research, indicating a lack of understanding that continues to exist around these cells in specific disease settings. Importantly, evidence is emerging that airway epithelial cells in particular have varied complex functions rather than simple passive roles. One area of current interest is its role following injury. In particular, the epithelial-specific cellular mechanisms regulating their migration during wound repair remain poorly understood and remain an area that requires much needed investigation. A better understanding of the physiological, cellular and molecular wound repair mechanisms could assist in elucidating pathological processes that contribute to airway epithelial pathology. This review attempts to highlight migration-specific and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) aspects of repair used by epithelial cells under normal and disease settings, in the context of human airways. PMID:26804630

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine expression in alveolar epithelial cells: role of PKCζ-mediated p47phox phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Leverence, Jeremy T; Medhora, Meetha; Konduri, Girija G; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2011-01-15

    Chronic inflammation incited by bacteria in the saccular lung of premature infants contributes to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). LPS-mediated type II alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that trigger pulmonary neutrophil influx, alveolar matrix degradation and lung remodeling. We hypothesized that NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent mechanisms mediate LPS-induced cytokine expression in AEC. We examined the role of p47phox in mediating LPS-dependent inflammatory cytokine expression in A549 cells (which exhibit phenotypic features characteristic of type II AEC) and elucidated the proximal signaling events by which Nox is activated by LPS. LPS-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression was associated with increased superoxide formation in AEC. LPS-mediated oxidative stress and cytokine expression was inhibited by apocynin and augmented by PMA demonstrating that Nox-dependent redox signaling regulates LPS-dependent pro-inflammatory signaling in AEC. In LPS-treated cells, p47phox translocated from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and co-localized with gp91phox. LPS also induced a temporal increase in p47phox serine304 phosphorylation in AEC. While inhibition of classical PKC and novel PKC with calphostin and rottlerin did not inhibit ICAM-1 or IL-8 expression, the myristolyated PKCζ pseudosubstrate peptide (a specific inhibitor of PKCζ) inhibited LPS-induced cytokine expression in AEC. Inhibition of PKCζ also attenuated LPS-mediated p47phox phosphorylation and perinuclear translocation in AEC. Consistent with these data, LPS activated PKCζ in AEC as evidenced by increased threonine410 phophorylation. We conclude that PKCζ-mediated p47phox activation regulates LPS-dependent cytokine expression in AEC. Selective inhibition of PKCζ or p47phox might attenuate LPS-mediated inflammation and alveolar remodeling in BPD. PMID:20920494

  3. Notch induces myofibroblast differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells via transforming growth factor-{beta}-Smad3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi-Ikeda, Kana; Maeno, Toshitaka; Matsui, Hiroki; Ueno, Manabu; Hara, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Aoki, Fumiaki; Shimizu, Takehisa; Doi, Hiroshi; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Iso, Tatsuya; Suga, Tatsuo; Arai, Masashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2011-07-01

    Notch is an ancient cell-signaling system that regulates the specification of cell fate. This study examined the role of Notch in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and myofibroblast differentiation of cultured RLE-6TN cells (i.e., rat alveolar epithelial cells). The activation of Notch, either by ectopic expression of the Notch intracellular domain or by the co-culture of RLE-6TN cells with L-Jagged1 cells, induces the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) and other mesenchymal marker genes (collagen I and vimentin), and reduces the expression of epithelial marker genes (E-cadherin, occludin, and zonula occludens-1). The pharmacologic inhibition of the endogenous Notch signal significantly inhibited the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced expression of SMA. Cell migratory capacity was increased by Notch. Luciferase assays revealed that the CC(A/T)(6)GG (CArG) box and the TGF-β control element (TCE) are required for Notch-induced SMA gene transcription. DNA microarray analysis revealed that members of the TGF-β family as well as Jagged1 were induced in RLE-6TN cells by Notch. Western blot analysis showed that Notch induced the phosphorylation of Smad3, and the TGF-β receptor type I/activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) kinase inhibitor SB431542 markedly reduced the Notch-induced expression of SMA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays confirmed the production of TGF-β1 from RLE-6TN cells by Notch. Immunohistochemistry of a bleomycin-induced model of pulmonary fibrosis and lung specimens from patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias showed that Notch was strongly expressed in myofibroblasts, identified as SMA-positive cells. These data indicate that Notch induces myofibroblast differentiation through a TGF-β-Smad3 pathway that activates SMA gene transcription in a CArG-dependent and TCE-dependent manner in alveolar epithelial cells. Our data also imply that Notch induces the EMT phenotype, with increased migratory behavior in

  4. Staining histological lung sections with Sudan Black B or Sudan III for automated identification of alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Pedersen, Lars; Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells produce, store and secrete pulmonary surfactant and serve as progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium. They are thus an interesting target in wide fields of pulmonary research. Stereological methods allow their quantification based on measurements on histological sections. A proper AE2 cell quantification, however, requires a method of tissue processing that results in little tissue shrinkage during processing. It was recently shown that a primary fixation with a mixture of glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, postfixation with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate and embedding in glycol methacrylate fulfills this requirement. However, a proper quantification, furthermore, requires a secure identification of the cells under the microscope. Classical approaches using routine stainings, high magnifications and systematic uniform random sampling can result in a tedious counting procedure. In this article we show that Sudan Black B and Sudan III staining in combination with the previously described "low shrinkage method" of tissue processing result in good staining of lamellar bodies of AE2 cells (their storing organelles of surfactant) and thus provide a good signal of AE2 cells, which allows their easy and secure identification even at rather low magnifications. We further show that this signal enables automated detection of AE2 cells by image analysis, which should make this method a suitable staining method for the recently developed and more efficient proportionator sampling. PMID:26558990

  5. Fas activation in alveolar epithelial cells induces KC (CXCL1) release by a MyD88-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farnand, Alex W; Eastman, Alison J; Herrero, Raquel; Hanson, Josiah F; Mongovin, Steve; Altemeier, William A; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2011-09-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is associated with activation of apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways that lead to the development of acute lung injury. Previous studies in chimeric mice and macrophage-depleted mice suggested that the main effector cell in Fas-mediated lung injury is not a myeloid cell, but likely an epithelial cell. The goal of this study was to determine whether epithelial cells release proinflammatory cytokines after Fas activation, and to identify the relevant pathways. Incubation of the murine alveolar epithelial cell line, MLE-12, with the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody, Jo2, resulted in release of the CXC chemokine, KC, in a dose-dependent manner. KC release was not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Silencing of the adaptor protein, MyD88, with small interfering (si)RNA resulted in attenuation of KC release in response to Jo2. Fas activation resulted in phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and pharmacologic inhibition of ERK and JNK attenuated KC release in a dose-response manner. Similarly, primary human small airways epithelial cells released IL-8 in response to soluble FasL, and this was abrogated by inhibition of JNK and ERK. In vivo confirmatory studies showed that MyD88-null mice are protected from Fas-induced acute lung injury. In summary, we conclude that Fas induces KC release in MLE-12 cells by a mechanism requiring MyD88, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and likely activator protein-1. PMID:21257927

  6. Mechanisms of suppression of alveolar epithelial cell GM-CSF expression in the setting of hyperoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Anne; Vollbrecht, Timothy; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; McManus, Michael; Wilcoxen, Steven E; Paine, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary expression of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for normal functional maturation of alveolar macrophages. We found previously that lung GM-CSF is dramatically suppressed in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF in the peripheral lung, and in vivo hyperoxia resulted in greatly reduced expression of GM-CSF protein by AEC ex vivo. We now explore the mechanisms responsible for this effect, using primary cultures of murine AEC exposed to hyperoxia in vitro. Exposure of AEC to 80% oxygen/5% CO(2) for 48 h did not induce overt toxicity, but resulted in significantly decreased GM-CSF protein and mRNA expression compared with cells in normoxia. Similar effects were seen when AEC were stressed with serum deprivation, an alternative inducer of oxidative stress. The effects in AEC were opposite those in a murine lung epithelial cell line (MLE-12 cells), in which hyperoxia induced GM-CSF expression. Both hyperoxia and serum deprivation resulted in increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC. Hyperoxia and serum deprivation induced significantly accelerated turnover of GM-CSF mRNA. Treatment of AEC with catalase during oxidative stress preserved GM-CSF protein and mRNA and was associated with stabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We conclude that hyperoxia-induced suppression of AEC GM-CSF expression is a function of ROS-induced destabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We speculate that AEC oxidative stress results in significantly impaired pulmonary innate immune defense due to effects on local GM-CSF expression in the lung. PMID:20034963

  7. Regulatory effects of hydrogen sulfide on alveolar epithelial cell endoplasmic reticulum stress in rats with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-wei; Wang, Hai-ying; Guan, Lan; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study was undertaken to examine the regulatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on endoplasmic reticulum stress in alveolar epithelial cells of rats with acute lung injury (ALI) induced by oleic acid (OA). METHODS: Seventy-two male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control group, oleic acid-induced ALI group (OA group), oleic acid-induced ALI with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) pretreatment group (OA+NaHS group), and sodium hydrosulfide treatment group (NaHS group). Rats of each group were further subdivided into 3 subgroups. Index of quantitative assessment of histological lung injury (IQA), wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) and H2S level of lung tissues were measured. The expressions of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 (elF2α) in lung tissues were measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. RESULTS: The IQA score and W/D ratio of lung tissues at the three time points significantly increased in rats injected with OA, but significantly decreased in other rats injected with OA and NaHS. The level of H2S in lung tissue at the three time points significantly decreased in rats injected with OA, but significantly increased in other rats injected with both OA and NaHS. GRP78 and elF2α decreased in rats injected with OA, but increased in other rats injected with both OA and NaHS, especially at 4-hour and 6-hour time points. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that H2S could promote alveolar epithelial cell endoplasmic reticulum stress in rats with ALI. PMID:25802570

  8. Role of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide induced by intermittent hypoxia in airway epithelial wound repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Sato, Atsuyasu; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Satooka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Tanimura, Kazuya; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Muro, Shigeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-15

    The airway epithelium acts as a frontline barrier against various environmental insults and its repair process after airway injury is critical for the lung homeostasis restoration. Recently, the role of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as transcription-independent damage signaling has been highlighted in the wound repair process. Both conditions of continuous hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia (IH) induce ROS. Although IH is important in clinical settings, the roles of IH-induced ROS in the airway repair process have not been investigated. In this study, we firstly showed that IH induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and significantly decreased bronchial epithelial cell migration, prevented by catalase treatment in a wound scratch assay. RhoA activity was higher during repair process in the IH condition compared to in the normoxic condition, resulting in the cellular morphological changes shown by immunofluorescence staining: round cells, reduced central stress fiber numbers, pronounced cortical actin filament distributions, and punctate focal adhesions. These phenotypes were replicated by exogenous H2O2 treatment under the normoxic condition. Our findings confirmed the transcription-independent role of IH-induced intracellular ROS in the bronchial epithelial cell repair process and might have significant implications for impaired bronchial epithelial cell regeneration. PMID:27093911

  9. In Vivo Epithelial Wound Repair Requires Mobilization of Endogenous Intracellular and Extracellular Calcium*

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Eitaro; Hentz, Courtney L.; Korman, Abraham M.; Perry, Nicholas P. J.; Prasad, Vikram; Shull, Gary E.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    2013-01-01

    We report that a localized intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ mobilization occurs at the site of microscopic epithelial damage in vivo and is required to mediate tissue repair. Intravital confocal/two-photon microscopy continuously imaged the surgically exposed stomach mucosa of anesthetized mice while photodamage of gastric epithelial surface cells created a microscopic lesion that healed within 15 min. Transgenic mice with an intracellular Ca2+-sensitive protein (yellow cameleon 3.0) report that intracellular Ca2+ selectively increases in restituting gastric epithelial cells adjacent to the damaged cells. Pretreatment with U-73122, indomethacin, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, or verapamil inhibits repair of the damage and also inhibits the intracellular Ca2+ increase. Confocal imaging of Fura-Red dye in luminal superfusate shows a localized extracellular Ca2+ increase at the gastric surface adjacent to the damage that temporally follows intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Indomethacin and verapamil also inhibit the luminal Ca2+ increase. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid/acetoxymethyl ester, BAPTA/AM) fully inhibits intracellular and luminal Ca2+ increases, whereas luminal calcium chelation (N-(2-hydroxyetheyl)-ethylendiamin-N,N,N′-triacetic acid trisodium, HEDTA) blocks the increase of luminal Ca2+ and unevenly inhibits late-phase intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Both modes of Ca2+ chelation slow gastric repair. In plasma membrane Ca-ATPase 1+/− mice, but not plasma membrane Ca-ATPase 4−/− mice, there is slowed epithelial repair and a diminished gastric surface Ca2+ increase. We conclude that endogenous Ca2+, mobilized by signaling pathways and transmembrane Ca2+ transport, causes increased Ca2+ levels at the epithelial damage site that are essential to gastric epithelial cell restitution in vivo. PMID:24121509

  10. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    During the past ten years, functions of alveolar type II cells have been well characterized with isolated cells in vitro. Some of the functions were well known from studies in vivo, but others such as transepithelial sodium transport were unsuspected. A better understanding of this important pulmonary cell type improves our knowledge of the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome and may in time lead to new therapeutic strategies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:3909639

  11. Pirfenidone inhibits p38-mediated generation of procoagulant microparticles by human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Lombardi, Stefania; Faìta, Francesca; Petrini, Silvia; Balìa, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Pirfenidone is a drug recently approved for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis but its mechanisms of action are partially unknown. We have previously demonstrated that the airways of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis contain procoagulant microparticles that activate coagulation factor X to its active form, Xa, a proteinase that signals fibroblast growth and differentiation, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. We also reported that in vitro exposure of human alveolar cells to H2O2 causes microparticle generation. Since p38 activation is involved in microparticle generation in some cell models and p38 inhibition is one of the mechanisms of action of pirfenidone, we investigated the hypothesis that H2O2-induced generation of microparticles by alveolar cells is dependent on p38 phosphorylation and is inhibited by pirfenidone. H2O2 stimulation of alveolar cells caused p38 phosphorylation that was inhibited by pirfenidone. The drug also inhibited H2O2 induced microparticle generation as assessed by two independent methods (solid phase thrombin generation and flow cytometry). The shedding of microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was also inhibited by pirfenidone. Inhibition of p38-mediated generation of procoagulant microparticle is a previously unrecognized mechanism of action of the antifibrotic drug, pirfenidone. PMID:27237042

  12. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells. PMID:20364299

  13. Brief mechanical ventilation causes differential epithelial repair along the airways of fetal, preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Deptula, Nicole; Royse, Emily; Kemp, Matthew W; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H; Hillman, Noah H

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical ventilation of preterm lambs causes lung inflammation and injury to the airway epithelium, which is repaired by 15 days after ventilation. In mice, activated basal cells (p63+, KRT14+, KRT8+) initiate injury repair to the trachea, whereas club cells coordinate distal airway repair. In both human and sheep, basal cells line the pseudostratified airways to the distal bronchioles with club cells only present in terminal bronchioles. Mechanical ventilation causes airway epithelial injury that is repaired through basal cell activation in the fetal lung. Ewes at 123 ± 1 day gestational age had the head and chest of the fetus exteriorized and tracheostomy placed. With placental circulation intact, fetal lambs were mechanically ventilated with up to 15 ml/kg for 15 min with 95% N2/5% CO2 Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for up to 24 h. The trachea, left mainstem bronchi, and peripheral lung were evaluated for epithelial injury and cellular response consistent with repair. Peripheral lung tissue had inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, epithelial growth factor receptor ligand upregulation, increased p63 expression, and proliferation of pro-SPB, TTF-1 positive club cells. In bronchi, KRT14 and KRT8 mRNA increased without increases in Notch pathway mRNA or proliferation. In trachea, mRNA increased for Notch ligands, SAM pointed domain-containing Ets transcription factor and mucin 5B, but not for basal cell markers. A brief period of mechanical ventilation causes differential epithelial activation between trachea, bronchi, and peripheral lung. The repair mechanisms identified in adult mice occur at different levels of airway branching in fetal sheep with basal and club cell activation. PMID:27343193

  14. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  15. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Jérémie; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Carles, Michel; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Dickinson, Dale A.; Iles, Karen E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury (ALI) who retain maximal alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) have better clinical outcomes. Experimental and small clinical studies have shown that β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists enhance AFC via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. However, two multicenter phase 3 clinical trials failed to show that β2AR agonists provide a survival advantage in patients with ALI. We hypothesized that IL-8, an important mediator of ALI, directly antagonizes the alveolar epithelial response to β2AR agonists. Short-circuit current and whole-cell patch-clamping experiments revealed that IL-8 or its rat analog CINC-1 decreases by 50% β2AR agonist-stimulated vectorial Cl− and net fluid transport across rat and human alveolar epithelial type II cells via a reduction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity and biosynthesis. This reduction was mediated by heterologous β2AR desensitization and down-regulation (50%) via the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)/PI3K signaling pathway. Inhibition of CINC-1 restored β2AR agonist-stimulated AFC in an experimental model of ALI in rats. Finally, consistent with the experimental results, high pulmonary edema fluid levels of IL-8 (>4000 pg/ml) were associated with impaired AFC in patients with ALI. These results demonstrate a novel role for IL-8 in inhibiting β2AR agonist-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanisms.—Roux, J., McNicholas, C. M., Carles, M., Goolaerts, A., Houseman, B. T., Dickinson, D. A., Iles, K. E., Ware, L. B., Matthay, M. A., Pittet, J.-F. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism. PMID:23221335

  16. Evaluation of hydroxylapatite particles in repair of alveolar clefts in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cullum, P E; Frost, D E; Newland, T B; Keane, T M; Ehler, W J

    1988-04-01

    Twelve adult mongrel dogs were used to evaluate the use of hydroxylapatite (HA) in the closure of alveolar clefts. Bilateral alveolar clefts were surgically created in each animal. After healing, they were implanted randomly with either HA or particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM). The results were evaluated clinically, radiographically, and histologically for healing, acceptance of the implant, closure of the fistula, and bony ingrowth. The results show that HA was as successful in closure of the fistulas and re-establishing an intact maxilla as PCBM. Minimal osteoid and bone was interspersed in the HA implant sites. No complications resulted from the HA graft. PMID:2834525

  17. Immunohistochemical characteristics of epithelial cell rests of Malassez during cementum repair.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Naohiko; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Tetsuji; Uchida, Takashi; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2003-02-01

    To clarify the roles of epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ECRM) during periodontal repair, experimental root resorption was induced in rats and then the ECRM that existed in periodontal ligament during cementum repair was investigated using morphological and immunohistochemical approaches. At day 7, after mechanical injury, root resorption was observed and ECRM were present adjacent to the site of resorption lacunae. They were observed in periodontal ligament adjacent to site of the resorption lacunae. These ECRM were immunoreactive for bone morphogenetic protein-2. During the stage of early cementum repair, the ECRM were immunoreactive for osteopontin and ameloblastin. They strongly reacted to proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In uninjured control sections, ECRM located in the periodontal ligament adjacent to cementum were not immunoreactive for any antibodies. These findings suggested that ECRM may be related to cementum repair by activating their potential to secrete matrix proteins which have been expressed in tooth development. PMID:12558937

  18. OZONE-INDUCED RELEASE OF CYTOKINES AND FIBRONECTIN BY ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although airway epithelial cells appear damaged following exposure of humans and animals to ozone, the contribution of these cells to inflammation observed after ozone exposure is unclear. ince human airway cells are infrequently available for in vitro studies, we have investigat...

  19. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. PMID:25620604

  20. Selective targeting of alveolar type II respiratory epithelial cells by anti-surfactant protein-C antibody-conjugated lipoplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun; Ma, Junyu; Woods, Parker S.; Chesarino, Nicholas M.; Liu, Chang; Lee, L. James; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P.; Davis, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar type II (ATII) respiratory epithelial cells are essential to normal lung function. They may be also central to the pathogenesis of diseases such as acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence, ATII cells are important therapeutic targets. However, effective ATII cell-specific drug delivery in vivo requires carriers of an appropriate size, which can cross the hydrophobic alveolar surfactant film and polar aqueous layer overlying ATII cells, and be taken up without inducing ATII cell dysfunction, pulmonary inflammation, lung damage, or excessive systemic spread and side-effects. We have developed lipoplexes as a versatile nanoparticle carrier system for drug/RNA delivery. To optimize their pulmonary localization and ATII cell specificity, lipoplexes were conjugated to an antibody directed against the ATII cell-specific antigen surfactant protein-C (SP-C) then administered to C57BL/6 mice via the nares. Intranasally-administered, anti-SP-C-conjugated lipoplexes targeted mouse ATII cells with >70% specificity in vivo, were retained within ATII cells for at least 48 hours, and did not accumulate at significant levels in other lung cell types or viscera. 48 hours after treatment with anti-SP-C-conjugated lipoplexes containing the test microRNA miR-486, expression of mature miR-486 was approximately 4-fold higher in ATII cells than whole lung by qRT-PCR, and was undetectable in other viscera. Lipoplexes induced no weight loss, hypoxemia, lung dysfunction, pulmonary edema, or pulmonary inflammation over a 6-day period. These findings indicate that ATII cell-targeted lipoplexes exhibit all the desired characteristics of an effective drug delivery system for treatment of pulmonary diseases that result primarily from ATII cell dysfunction. PMID:25687308

  1. Selective targeting of alveolar type II respiratory epithelial cells by anti-surfactant protein-C antibody-conjugated lipoplexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Ma, Junyu; Woods, Parker S; Chesarino, Nicholas M; Liu, Chang; Lee, L James; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Davis, Ian C

    2015-04-10

    Alveolar type II (ATII) respiratory epithelial cells are essential to normal lung function. They may be also central to the pathogenesis of diseases such as acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence, ATII cells are important therapeutic targets. However, effective ATII cell-specific drug delivery in vivo requires carriers of an appropriate size, which can cross the hydrophobic alveolar surfactant film and polar aqueous layer overlying ATII cells, and be taken up without inducing ATII cell dysfunction, pulmonary inflammation, lung damage, or excessive systemic spread and side-effects. We have developed lipoplexes as a versatile nanoparticle carrier system for drug/RNA delivery. To optimize their pulmonary localization and ATII cell specificity, lipoplexes were conjugated to an antibody directed against the ATII cell-specific antigen surfactant protein-C (SP-C) then administered to C57BL/6 mice via the nares. Intranasally-administered, anti-SP-C-conjugated lipoplexes targeted mouse ATII cells with >70% specificity in vivo, were retained within ATII cells for at least 48h, and did not accumulate at significant levels in other lung cell types or viscera. 48h after treatment with anti-SP-C-conjugated lipoplexes containing the test microRNA miR-486, expression of mature miR-486 was approximately 4-fold higher in ATII cells than whole lung by qRT-PCR, and was undetectable in other viscera. Lipoplexes induced no weight loss, hypoxemia, lung dysfunction, pulmonary edema, or pulmonary inflammation over a 6-day period. These findings indicate that ATII cell-targeted lipoplexes exhibit all the desired characteristics of an effective drug delivery system for the treatment of pulmonary diseases that result primarily from ATII cell dysfunction. PMID:25687308

  2. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  3. Thyroid hormone stimulates Na-K-ATPase activity and its plasma membrane insertion in rat alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianxun; Nowbar, Sogol; Mariash, Cary N; Ingbar, David H

    2003-09-01

    Na-K-ATPase protein is critical for maintaining cellular ion gradients and volume and for transepithelial ion transport in kidney and lung. Thyroid hormone, 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), given for 2 days to adult rats, increases alveolar fluid resorption by 65%, but the mechanism is undefined. We tested the hypothesis that T3 stimulates Na-K-ATPase in adult rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC), including primary rat alveolar type II (ATII) cells, and determined mechanisms of the T3 effect on the Na-KATPase enzyme using two adult rat AEC cell lines (MP48 and RLE-6TN). T3 at 10-8 and 10-5 M increased significantly hydrolytic activity of Na-K-ATPase in primary ATII cells and both AEC cell lines. The increased activity was dose dependent in the cell lines (10-9-10-4 M) and was detected within 30 min and peaked at 6 h. Maximal increases in Na-K-ATPase activity were twofold in MP48 and RLE-6TN cells at pharmacological T3 of 10-5 and 10-4 M, respectively, but increases were statistically significant at physiological T3 as low as 10-9 M. This effect was T3 specific, because reverse T3 (3,3',5'-triiodo-l-thyronine) at 10-9-10-4 M had no effect. The T3-induced increase in Na-K-ATPase hydrolytic activity was not blocked by actinomycin D. No significant change in mRNA and total cell protein levels of Na-K-ATPase were detected with 10-9-10-5 M T3 at 6 h. However, T3 increased cell surface expression of Na-K-ATPase alpha1- or beta1-subunit proteins by 1.7- and 2-fold, respectively, and increases in Na-K-ATPase activity and cell surface expression were abolished by brefeldin A. These data indicate that T3 specifically stimulates Na-K-ATPase activity in adult rat AEC. The upregulation involves translocation of Na-K-ATPase to plasma membrane, not increased gene transcription. These results suggest a novel nontranscriptional mechanism for regulation of Na-K-ATPase by thyroid hormone. PMID:12740220

  4. Tracking translocation of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) across alveolar epithelial monolayers in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joel M.; Derk, Raymond; Wang, Liying; Godleski, John; Kobzik, Lester; Brain, Joseph; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the fate of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the lungs. Inhalation exposure and subsequent translocation of ENMs across the epithelial lining layer of the lung might contribute to clearance, toxic effects or both. To allow precise quantitation of translocation across lung epithelial cells, we developed a method for tracking industrially-relevant metal oxide ENMs in vitro using neutron activation. The versatility and sensitivity of the proposed In Vitro Epithelial Translocation (INVET) system was demonstrated using a variety of industry relevant ENMs including CeO2 of various primary particle diameter, ZnO, and SiO2-coated-CeO2 and ZnO particles. ENMs were neutron activated, forming gamma emitting isotopes 141Ce and 65Zn respectively. Calu-3 lung epithelial cells cultured to confluency on transwell inserts were exposed to neutron-activated ENM dispersions at sub-lethal doses to investigate the link between ENM properties and translocation potential. The effects of ENM exposure on monolayer integrity was monitored by various methods. ENM translocation across the cellular monolayer was assessed by gamma spectrometry following 2, 4 and 24 hours of exposure. Our results demonstrate that ENMs translocated in small amounts (e.g. <0.01% of the delivered dose at 24 h), predominantly via transcellular pathways without compromising monolayer integrity or disrupting tight junctions. It was also demonstrated that the delivery of particles in suspension to cells in culture is proportional to translocation, emphasizing the importance of accurate dosimetry when comparing ENM-cellular interactions for large panels of materials. The reported INVET system for tracking industrially relevant ENMs while accounting for dosimetry can be a valuable tool for investigating nano-bio interactions in the future. PMID:24479615

  5. Mono- and Cocultures of Bronchial and Alveolar Epithelial Cells Respond Differently to Proinflammatory Stimuli and Their Modulation by Salbutamol and Budesonide.

    PubMed

    Haghi, Mehra; Hittinger, Marius; Zeng, Qingxiang; Oliver, Brian; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Huwer, Hanno; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in transport and effectiveness of salbutamol sulfate (SAL) and budesonide (BD) following stimulation with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in mono- and coculture models of bronchial and alveolar epithelium. Primary bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, grown at air interface on filters, either as monocultures or in coculture with airway smooth muscle cells or alveolar macrophages, respectively, were stimulated with TGF-β. The biological response was modulated by depositing aerosolized SAL and BD on bronchial and alveolar models, respectively. Barrier integrity, permeability to fluorescein-Na, transport of the deposited drug, and the pharmacological response to SAL (cAMP and IL-8 levels) or BD (IL-6 and -8 levels) were measured. While stimulation with TGF-β did not have any significant effect on the transepithelial electrical resistance and permeability to fluorescein-Na in mono- and coculture models, transport of SAL and BD were affected in cultures from some of the patients (6 out of 12 for bronchial and 2 out of 4 for alveolar cells). The bronchial coculture showed a better responsiveness to SAL in terms of cAMP release than the monoculture. In contrast, the difference between alveolar mono- and cocultures to TGF-β mediated interleukin release and its modulation by BD was less pronounced. Our data point to intrinsic differences in the transport of, and responsiveness to, SAL and BD when epithelial cell cultures originate from different patients. Moreover, if the biological responses (e.g., IL-8, cAMP) involve communication between different cell types, coculture models are more relevant to measure such effects than monocultures. PMID:26147243

  6. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

    PubMed Central

    Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Goldmann, Torsten; Ludwig, Corinna; Prasse, Antje; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Zissel, Gernot

    2005-01-01

    The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11) in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II). AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response. PMID:16033640

  7. Protein kinase A-Iα regulates Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to high CO(2) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lecuona, Emilia; Sun, Haiying; Chen, Jiwang; Trejo, Humberto E; Baker, Margaret A; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2013-05-01

    Elevated concentrations of CO2 (hypercapnia) lead to alveolar epithelial dysfunction by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. In the present report, we investigated whether the CO2/HCO3(-) activated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates this process. We found that hypercapnia increased the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and stimulated protein kinase A (PKA) activity via sAC, which was necessary for Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. During hypercapnia, cAMP was mainly produced in specific microdomains in the proximity of the plasma membrane, leading to PKA Type Iα activation. In alveolar epithelial cells exposed to high CO2 concentrations, PKA Type Iα regulated the time-dependent phosphorylation of the actin cytoskeleton component α-adducin at serine 726. Cells expressing small hairpin RNA for PKAc, dominant-negative PKA Type Iα, small interfering RNA for α-adducin, and α-adducin with serine 726 mutated to alanine prevented Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a new mechanism by which hypercapnia via sAC, cAMP, PKA Type Iα, and α-adducin regulates Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:23349050

  8. Protein Kinase A-Iα Regulates Na,K-ATPase Endocytosis in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Exposed to High CO2 Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiying; Chen, Jiwang; Trejo, Humberto E.; Baker, Margaret A.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of CO2 (hypercapnia) lead to alveolar epithelial dysfunction by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. In the present report, we investigated whether the CO2/HCO3− activated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates this process. We found that hypercapnia increased the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and stimulated protein kinase A (PKA) activity via sAC, which was necessary for Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. During hypercapnia, cAMP was mainly produced in specific microdomains in the proximity of the plasma membrane, leading to PKA Type Iα activation. In alveolar epithelial cells exposed to high CO2 concentrations, PKA Type Iα regulated the time-dependent phosphorylation of the actin cytoskeleton component α-adducin at serine 726. Cells expressing small hairpin RNA for PKAc, dominant-negative PKA Type Iα, small interfering RNA for α-adducin, and α-adducin with serine 726 mutated to alanine prevented Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a new mechanism by which hypercapnia via sAC, cAMP, PKA Type Iα, and α-adducin regulates Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:23349050

  9. Phagosomal pH and glass fiber dissolution in cultured nasal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N F

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution rate of glass fibers has been shown to be pH sensitive using in vitro lung fluid simulant models. The current study investigated whether there is a difference in phagosomal pH (ppH) between rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and rat nasal epithelial cells (RNEC) and whether such a difference would influence the dissolution of glass fibers. The ppH was measured in cultured AM and RNEC using flow cytometric, fluorescence-emission rationing techniques with fluorescein-labeled, amorphous silica particles. Glass fiber dissolution was determined in AM and RNEC cultured for 3 weeks with fast dissolving glass fibers (GF-A) or slow dissolving ones (GF-B). The mean diameters of GF-A were 2.7 microns and of GF-B, 2.6 microns, the average length of both fibers was approximately 22 to 25 microns. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the length and diameter of intracellular fibers and estimating the volume, assuming a cylindrical morphology. The ppH of AM was 5.2 to 5.8, and the ppH of RNEC was 7.0 to 7.5. The GF-A dissolved more slowly in RNEC than in AM, and no dissolution was evident in either cell type with GF-B. The volume loss with GF-A after a 3-week culture with AM was 66% compared to 45% for cultured RNEC. These results are different from those obtained using in vitro lung fluid-simulant models where dissolution is faster at higher pH. This difference suggests that dissolution rates of glass fibers in AM should not be applied to the dissolution of fibers in epithelial cells. Images Figure 1. a Figure 1. b Figure 2. a Figure 2. b Figure 3. a Figure 3. b PMID:7882965

  10. Understanding Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Airway Epithelial Repair: Selecting the Most Appropriate Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya, B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and repair of airway epithelial structures demands close characterization of the associated cellular and molecular events. The choice of an animal model system to study these processes and the role of lung stem cells is debatable since ideally the chosen animal model should offer a valid comparison with the human lung. Species differences may include the complex three-dimensional lung structures, cellular composition of the lung airway as well as transcriptional control of the molecular events in response to airway epithelium regeneration, and repair following injury. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the study of the lung repair and regeneration including the role of putative stem cells in small- and large-animal models. At the end of this paper, the author discuss the potential for using sheep as a model which can help bridge the gap between small-animal model systems and humans. PMID:23049478

  11. Low-affinity transport of FITC-albumin in alveolar type II epithelial cell line RLE-6TN.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Maki; Yumoto, Ryoko; Oda, Keisuke; Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2008-01-01

    FITC-albumin uptake by cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN, is mediated by high- and low-affinity transport systems. In this study, characteristics of the low-affinity transport system were evaluated. The uptake of FITC-albumin was time and temperature dependent and was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors and bafilomycin A1. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed punctate localization of the fluorescence in the cells, which was partly localized in lysosomes. FITC-albumin taken up by the cells gradually degraded over time, as shown by fluoroimage analyzer after SDS-PAGE. The uptake of FITC-albumin by RLE-6TN cells was not inhibited by caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitors such as nystatin, but was inhibited by clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitors such as phenylarsine oxide. The uptake was also inhibited by potassium depletion and hypertonicity, conditions known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, macropinocytosis inhibitors such as 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride inhibited the uptake. These results indicate that the low-affinity transport of FITC-albumin in RLE-6TN cells is at least in part mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but not by caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Possible involvement of macropinocytosis was also suggested. PMID:18974609

  12. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth’s biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  13. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  14. Disruption of β-catenin/CBP signaling inhibits human airway epithelial-mesenchymal transition and repair.

    PubMed

    Moheimani, Fatemeh; Roth, Hollis M; Cross, Jennifer; Reid, Andrew T; Shaheen, Furquan; Warner, Stephanie M; Hirota, Jeremy A; Kicic, Anthony; Hallstrand, Teal S; Kahn, Michael; Stick, Stephen M; Hansbro, Philip M; Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Knight, Darryl A

    2015-11-01

    The epithelium of asthmatics is characterized by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the basal cell markers ck-5 and p63 that is indicative of a relatively undifferentiated repairing epithelium. This phenotype correlates with increased proliferation, compromised wound healing and an enhanced capacity to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The transcription factor β-catenin plays a vital role in epithelial cell differentiation and regeneration, depending on the co-factor recruited. Transcriptional programs driven by the β-catenin/CBP axis are critical for maintaining an undifferentiated and proliferative state, whereas the β-catenin/p300 axis is associated with cell differentiation. We hypothesized that disrupting the β-catenin/CBP signaling axis would promote epithelial differentiation and inhibit EMT. We treated monolayer cultures of human airway epithelial cells with TGFβ1 in the presence or absence of the selective small molecule ICG-001 to inhibit β-catenin/CBP signaling. We used western blots to assess expression of an EMT signature, CBP, p300, β-catenin, fibronectin and ITGβ1 and scratch wound assays to assess epithelial cell migration. Snai-1 and -2 expressions were determined using q-PCR. Exposure to TGFβ1 induced EMT, characterized by reduced E-cadherin expression with increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and EDA-fibronectin. Either co-treatment or therapeutic administration of ICG-001 completely inhibited TGFβ1-induced EMT. ICG-001 also reduced the expression of ck-5 and -19 independent of TGFβ1. Exposure to ICG-001 significantly inhibited epithelial cell proliferation and migration, coincident with a down regulation of ITGβ1 and fibronectin expression. These data support our hypothesis that modulating the β-catenin/CBP signaling axis plays a key role in epithelial plasticity and function. PMID:26315281

  15. Changes in the rat lung after exposure to radon and its progeny: Effects on incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine in epithelial cells and on the incidence of nuclear aberrations in Alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, A.; Morgan, A.; Baker, S.T.; Humphreys, J.A.H.; Collier, C.G.; Bisson, M.

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate some responses of cells in the rat respiratory tract as a function of time after inhalation exposure to various levels of radon and its progeny. Rats were exposed to a constant concentration of radon and its progeny to give cumulative exposure levels of 120, 225, 440 and 990 working level months (WLM). An additional unexposed group of rats served as controls. The end points selected for investigation were (a) the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in epithelial cells of the conducting airways and of the alveolar region of the respiratory tract and (b) the incidence of alveolar macrophages with nuclear aberrations. After exposure, the incidence of epithelial cells incorporating BrdU-the labeling index-increased in all regions of the respiratory tract examined, but the increase occurred later in alveolar than in airway epithelial cells. The highest labeling index was found in bronchial epithelial cells, which probably received the highest radiation dose. After an initial induction period, the incidence of alveolar macrophages with nuclear aberrations also increased. The possibility of using the labeling index of alveolar and airway epithelial cells, and/or the incidence of nuclear aberrations in alveolar macrophages, to estimate the radiation dose to various regions of the respiratory tract after exposure of rats to radon and its progeny is discussed. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Tissue-engineered endothelial and epithelial implants differentially and synergistically regulate airway repair.

    PubMed

    Zani, Brett G; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A; Edelman, Elazer R

    2008-05-13

    The trilaminate vascular architecture provides biochemical regulation and mechanical integrity. Yet regulatory control can be regained after injury without recapitulating tertiary structure. Tissue-engineered (TE) endothelium controls repair even when placed in the perivascular space of injured vessels. It remains unclear from vascular repair studies whether endothelial implants recapitulate the vascular epithelial lining or expose injured tissues to endothelial cells (ECs) with unique healing potential because ECs line the vascular epithelium and the vasa vasorum. We examined this issue in a nonvascular tubular system, asking whether airway repair is controlled by bronchial epithelial cells (EPs) or by ECs of the perfusing bronchial vasculature. Localized bronchial denuding injury damaged epithelium, narrowed bronchial lumen, and led to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia, hypervascularity, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Peribronchial TE constructs embedded with EPs or ECs limited airway injury, although optimum repair was obtained when both cells were present in TE matrices. EC and EP expression of PGE(2), TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, GM-CSF, IL-8, MCP-1, and soluble VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 was altered by matrix embedding, but expression was altered most significantly when both cells were present simultaneously. EPs may provide for functional control of organ injury and fibrous response, and ECs may provide for preservation of tissue perfusion and the epithelium in particular. Together the two cells optimize functional restoration and healing, suggesting that multiple cells of a tissue contribute to the differentiated biochemical function and repair of a tissue, but need not assume a fixed, ordered architectural relationship, as in intact tissues, to achieve these effects. PMID:18458330

  17. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates early epithelial repair of porcine ileum.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Rhoads, J Marc; Argenzio, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    Reports conflict regarding the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on intestinal epithelium. In chronic injury, NO appears detrimental by combining with reactive oxygen to form potent-free radicals. In contrast, inhibition of NO synthesis after acute injury exacerbates damage and inflammation. Recent studies have disclosed constitutive expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by normal intestinal epithelia, yet little attention has been given to the role of iNOS in acute epithelial repair. We studied the local effects of iNOS on early epithelial repair of porcine ileal mucosa injured by deoxycholate within Ussing chambers. iNOS was constitutively expressed by the villous epithelium, and after deoxycholate injury, iNOS was expressed by injured and detaching enterocytes. Selective inhibition of iNOS abolished increases in NO synthesis and villous reepithelialization after injury. Exogenous L-arginine rescued baseline reepithelialization from NOS inhibitors but was only capable of stimulating additional repair in the presence of serum. These results demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is a key mediator of early villous reepithelialization following acute mucosal injury. PMID:12065303

  18. Direct and indirect air particle cytotoxicity in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Orona, N S; Astort, F; Maglione, G A; Saldiva, P H N; Yakisich, J S; Tasat, D R

    2014-08-01

    Air particulate matter has been associated with adverse impact on the respiratory system leading to cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects. The biological mechanisms behind these associations may be initiated by inhaled small size particles, particle components (soluble fraction) and/or mediators released by particle-exposed cells (conditioned media). The effect of Urban Air Particles from Buenos Aires (UAP-BA) and Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA) a surrogate of ambient air pollution, their Soluble Fractions (SF) and Conditioned Media (CM) on A549 lung epithelial cells was examined. After 24 h exposure to TP (10 and 100 μg/ml), SF or CM, several biological parameters were assayed on cultured A549 cells. We tested cell viability by MTT, superoxide anion (O₂(-)) generation by NBT and proinflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-6 and IL-8) production by ELISA. UAP-BA particles or its SF (direct effect) did not modify cell viability and generation of O₂(-) for any of the doses tested. On the contrary, UAP-BA CM (indirect effect) reduced cell viability and increased both generation of O₂(-) and IL-8 production. Exposure to ROFA particles, SF or ROFA CM reduced proliferation and O₂(-) but, stimulated IL-8. It is worth to note that UAP-BA and ROFA depicted distinct effects on particle-exposed A549 cells implicating morphochemical dependence. These in vitro findings support the hypothesis that particle-induced lung inflammation and disease may involve lung-derived mediators. PMID:24590061

  19. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Heilmann, J.; Rink, H.

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. While in the cortex and nucleus radiation interacts with proteins, experimental results from cultured lenses and lens epithelial cells demonstrate mutagenic and cytotoxic effects in the epithelium. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the radiation's relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because cosmic rays differ significantly from X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiations. Irradiations were performed either with 300 kV X-rays or at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. For strand break measurements hydroxyapatite chromatography of alka-line unwound DNA (overall strand breaks) and non-denaturing filter elution technique (double strand breaks) were applied. Experiments showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV/μm more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of

  20. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SALAS, JUAN; MORÁN, ANDREA; SUAZO, IVÁN

    2013-01-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects. PMID:24250728

  1. Image-based finite element modeling of alveolar epithelial cell injury during airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Dailey, H L; Ricles, L M; Yalcin, H C; Ghadiali, S N

    2009-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by fluid accumulation in small pulmonary airways. The reopening of these fluid-filled airways involves the propagation of an air-liquid interface that exerts injurious hydrodynamic stresses on the epithelial cells (EpC) lining the airway walls. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that these hydrodynamic stresses may cause rupture of the plasma membrane (i.e., cell necrosis) and have postulated that cell morphology plays a role in cell death. However, direct experimental measurement of stress and strain within the cell is intractable, and limited data are available on the mechanical response (i.e., deformation) of the epithelium during airway reopening. The goal of this study is to use image-based finite element models of cell deformation during airway reopening to investigate how cell morphology and mechanics influence the risk of cell injury/necrosis. Confocal microscopy images of EpC in subconfluent and confluent monolayers were used to generate morphologically accurate three-dimensional finite element models. Hydrodynamic stresses on the cells were calculated from boundary element solutions of bubble propagation in a fluid-filled parallel-plate flow channel. Results indicate that for equivalent cell mechanical properties and hydrodynamic load conditions, subconfluent cells develop higher membrane strains than confluent cells. Strain magnitudes were also found to decrease with increasing stiffness of the cell and membrane/cortex region but were most sensitive to changes in the cell's interior stiffness. These models may be useful in identifying pharmacological treatments that mitigate cell injury during airway reopening by altering specific biomechanical properties of the EpC. PMID:19008489

  2. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Mitigates the Inhibition of Airway Epithelial Cell Repair by Neutrophil Elastase.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Luke W; Sutanto, Erika N; Ling, Kak-Ming; Looi, Kevin; Iosifidis, Thomas; Martinovich, Kelly M; Shaw, Nicole C; Buckley, Alysia G; Kicic-Starcevich, Elizabeth; Lannigan, Francis J; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity is associated with many destructive lung diseases and is a predictor for structural lung damage in early cystic fibrosis (CF), which suggests normal maintenance of airway epithelium is prevented by uninhibited NE. However, limited data exist on how the NE activity in airways of very young children with CF affects function of the epithelia. The aim of this study was to determine if NE activity could inhibit epithelial homeostasis and repair and whether any functional effect was reversible by antiprotease alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1AT) treatment. Viability, inflammation, apoptosis, and proliferation were assessed in healthy non-CF and CF pediatric primary airway epithelial cells (pAECnon-CF and pAECCF, respectively) during exposure to physiologically relevant NE. The effect of NE activity on pAECCF wound repair was also assessed. We report that viability after 48 hours was significantly decreased by 100 nM NE in pAECnon-CF and pAECCF owing to rapid cellular detachment that was accompanied by inflammatory cytokine release. Furthermore, both phenotypes initiated an apoptotic response to 100 nM NE, whereas ≥ 50 nM NE activity significantly inhibited the proliferative capacity of cultures. Similar concentrations of NE also significantly inhibited wound repair of pAECCF, but this effect was reversed by the addition of α1AT. Collectively, our results demonstrate free NE activity is deleterious for epithelial homeostasis and support the hypothesis that proteases in the airway contribute directly to CF structural lung disease. Our results also highlight the need to investigate antiprotease therapies in early CF disease in more detail. PMID:26221769

  4. Differential regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by hydrogen peroxide and flagellin in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Noriko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Toku, Seikichi; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-02-01

    In previous studies, we found that stimulation of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) by flagellin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2) through activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in cultured alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Our studies strongly suggested that MAPKAPK-2 phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Ser1047. It has been reported that phosphorylation of Ser1047 after treatment with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced the internalization of EGFR. In the present study, we first found that treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide induced the activation of MAPKAPK-2 and phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 within 30 min. This was different from flagellin treatment because hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1173 as well as Ser1047, indicating the activation of EGFR. We also found that KN93, an inhibitor of CaM kinase II, inhibited the hydrogen peroxide-induced phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 through inhibition of the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we examined the internalization of EGFR by three different methods. Flow cytometry with an antibody against the extracellular domain of EGFR and biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that flagellin, but not hydrogen peroxide, decreased the amount of cell-surface EGFR. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by EGF treatment was reduced by flagellin pre-treatment. These results strongly suggested that hydrogen peroxide activated the p38 MAPK pathway via activation of CaM kinase II and that flagellin and hydrogen peroxide regulate the functions of EGFR by different mechanisms. PMID:25542757

  5. The role of alveolar epithelial cells in initiating and shaping pulmonary immune responses: communication between innate and adaptive immune systems.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Rahman, Muhammad J; Hartl, Katharina; Singh, Mahavir; Fernández, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM) isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes) were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES) by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli. PMID:22393384

  6. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  7. The effect of TGF-β1 and Smad7 gene transfer on the phenotypic changes of rat alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Ping; Li, Qing-Quan; Cao, Xi-Xi; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Zhong-Hua; Diao, Zi-Qiang; Xu, Zu-De

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) could induce alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro, and whether Smad7 gene transfer could block this transition. We also aimed to elucidate the possible mechanisms of these processes. The Smad7 gene was transfected to the rat type II alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN). Expression of the EMT-associated markers was assayed by Western Blot and Real-time PCR. Morphological alterations were examined via phase-contrast microscope and fluorescence microscope, while ultrastructural changes were examined via electron microscope. TGF-β1 treatment induced a fibrotic phenotype of RLE-6TN with increased expression of fibronectin (FN), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin, and decreased expression of E-cadherin (E-cad) and cytokeratin19 (CK19). After transfecting the RLE-6TN with the Smad7 gene, the expression of the mesenchymal markers was downregulated while that of the epithelial markers was upregulated. TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h resulted in the separation of RLE-6TN from one another and a change into elongated, myofibroblast-like cells. After the RLE-6TN had been transfected with the Smad7 gene, TGF-β1 treatment had no effect on the morphology of the RLE-6TN. TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h resulted in an abundant expression of α-SMA in the RLE-6TN. If the RLE-6TN were transfected with the Smad7 gene, TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h could only induce a low level of α-SMA expression. Furthermore, TGF-β1 treatment for 12 h resulted in the degeneration and swelling of the osmiophilic multilamellar bodies, which were the markers of type II alveolar epithelial cells. TGF-β1 can induce alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro, which is dependent on the Smads signaling pathway to a certain extent. Overexpression of the Smad7 gene can partially block this process. PMID:17457524

  8. IL-1β stimulation of CCD-18co myofibroblasts enhances repair of epithelial monolayers through Wnt-5a.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Meera; Marchbank, Tania; Moyer, Mary P; Playford, Raymond J; Sanderson, Ian R; Kruidenier, Laurens

    2012-12-01

    Subepithelial myofibroblasts are involved in the initiation and coordination of intestinal epithelial repair, but the molecular signaling pathways are largely unknown. The cellular adaptations that occur during repair range from dedifferentiation and migration to proliferation and redifferentiation, in a way that is strongly reminiscent of normal crypt-to-villus epithelial maturation. We therefore hypothesized that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may have a pivotal role in intestinal epithelial wound repair. We used the established scratch wound method in Caco-2 cells and in nontransformed NCM460 cells to monitor the effects of IL-1β-stimulated colonic myofibroblasts (CCD-18co) on intestinal epithelial repair, with immunoblotting and immunodepletion to examine the conditioned media. Conditioned media from IL-1β-stimulated, but not -untreated, myofibroblasts increased Caco-2 wound closure twofold over 24 h. IL-1β-stimulated myofibroblasts downregulated the differentiation marker sucrase-isomaltase in the Caco-2 cells, whereas the proliferation marker c-myc was upregulated. Array expression profiling identified Wnt-5a as the Wnt-related gene that was most upregulated (28-fold) by IL-1β stimulation of CCDs. Recombinant Wnt-5a enhanced proliferation of Caco-2 and NCM460 cells. In scratch assays, it increased migration of the leading edge in both cell lines. Wnt-5a immunodepletion of the IL-1β-CCD conditioned media abrogated the ability to enhance the repair. Wnt-5a often acts through a noncanonical signal transduction pathway. Further experiments supported this pathway in epithelial wound healing: IL-1β-CCD-mediated repair was not affected by the addition of the canonical Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1. Furthermore, media from stimulated myofibroblasts (but not Wnt-5a-depleted media) increased c-jun in Caco-2 cell nuclear extracts. Myofibroblast-mediated noncanonical Wnt-5a signaling is therefore important in the dedifferentiation and migration stages of epithelial wound

  9. Alveolar Epithelial Cells Are Critical in Protection of the Respiratory Tract by Secretion of Factors Able To Modulate the Activity of Pulmonary Macrophages and Directly Control Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Petursdottir, Dagbjort H.; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity. PMID:23147039

  10. Alveolar Epithelial Cell-Derived Prostaglandin E2 Serves as a Request Signal for Macrophage Secretion of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 during Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Speth, Jennifer M; Bourdonnay, Emilie; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Mancuso, Peter; Moore, Bethany B; Weinberg, Jason B; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Preservation of gas exchange mandates that the pulmonary alveolar surface restrain unnecessarily harmful inflammatory responses to the many challenges to which it is exposed. These responses reflect the cross-talk between alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and resident alveolar macrophages (AMs). We recently determined that AMs can secrete suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins within microparticles. Uptake of these SOCS-containing vesicles by epithelial cells inhibits cytokine-induced STAT activation. However, the ability of epithelial cells to direct AM release of SOCS-containing vesicles in response to inflammatory insults has not been studied. In this study, we report that SOCS3 protein was elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both virus- and bacteria-infected mice, as well as in an in vivo LPS model of acute inflammation. In vitro studies revealed that AEC-conditioned medium (AEC-CM) enhanced AM SOCS3 secretion above basal levels. Increased amounts of PGE2 were present in AEC-CM after LPS challenge, and both pharmacologic inhibition of PGE2 synthesis in AECs and neutralization of PGE2 in AEC-CM implicated this prostanoid as the major AEC-derived factor mediating enhanced AM SOCS3 secretion. Moreover, pharmacologic blockade of PGE2 synthesis or genetic deletion of a PGE2 synthase similarly attenuated the increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid SOCS3 noted in lungs of mice challenged with LPS in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel tunable form of cross-talk in which AECs use PGE2 as a signal to request SOCS3 from AMs to dampen their endogenous inflammatory responses during infection. PMID:27183597