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Sample records for alveolar macrophages isolated

  1. Synthesis of Dipalmitoyl Lecithin by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.; Huber, Gary; Vaughan, Martha

    1972-01-01

    A reliable, relatively simple method for isolation and quantification of disaturated lecithins is described. In rabbit lung, 34% of the lecithins were disaturated, in alveolar macrophages, 19%. More than 95% of the fatty acids of the disaturated lecithins from lung and alveolar macrophages was palmitic. Hence, the disaturated lecithins from these sources were essentially all dipalmitoyl lecithin. Both heterophils and alveolar macrophages incorporated 14C-labeled choline and palmitate into disaturated lecithins. Liver slices in which only about 1% of the lecithins were disaturated incorporated very little of these precursors into this fraction. Of the palmitate incorporated in vitro into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages, heterophils, and lung slices, 37% was in the 1 position. In disaturated lecithins isolated from pulmonary lavage fluid, alveolar macrophages, and lung of rabbit 8-12 hr after a single intravenous injection of palmitic-1-14C acid, 45% of the 14C was in position 1. At earlier times, from 20-240 min after injection, the distribution of 14C was similar in the samples from lung, but in those from alveolar macrophages and lavage fluid, the percentage in position 1 was slightly lower. Glycerol-U-14C was incorporated into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages and by lung slices in vitro. Both tissues incorporated very little label from ethanolamine or from methyl-labeled methionine into this fraction. All of the data are consistent with the view that alveolar macrophages synthesize dipalmitoyl lecithin via the cytidine diphosphate-choline pathway. PMID:5066597

  2. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A B; Cline, M J

    1971-07-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. PMID

  3. Toxicity of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants to Alveolar Macrophages Isolated from Human Volunteers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latch, Judith N.; Hamilton, Raymond F., Jr.; Holian, Andrij; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control, but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of the scavenger receptor (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, a result similar to treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  4. Toxicity of lunar and martian dust simulants to alveolar macrophages isolated from human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Latch, Judith N; Hamilton, Raymond F; Holian, Andrij; James, John T; Lam, Chiu-wing

    2008-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to those of lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 lunar soil simulant and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of scavenger receptors (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the dust simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, an effect similar to that of treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications. PMID:18236230

  5. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  6. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  7. Down modulation of IFN-{gamma} signaling in alveolar macrophages isolated from smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhillon, Navneet K.; Murphy, William J.; Filla, Michael B.; Crespo, Ana J.; Latham, Heath A.; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy

    2009-05-15

    The master cytokine, IFN-{gamma} possesses a wide spectrum of biological effects and is crucial for development of the highly activated macrophage phenotype characteristically found during inflammation. However, no data exists regarding the potential influence of cigarette smoke on the status of the expression of the cell surface receptor for IFN-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}R) on alveolar macrophages (AM) of smokers. Here in, we report reduction in the expression of the IFN-{gamma}R {alpha}-chain on AM of cigarette smokers, when compared with non-smokers. Ensuing from the loss of receptor expression on the AM of smokers there was a decrease in IFN-{gamma}-mediated cell signaling. This included a decrease in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and induction of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1. Further, diminished activation/induction of transcription factors did not appear to result from induction of known members of the 'suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)' family. Decreased IFN-{gamma} signal transduction in AM from smokers may have an important implication regarding the use of therapeutic IFN-{gamma} in the lungs of patients that develop respiratory disorders as a result of tobacco use.

  8. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing. PMID:27016754

  9. Alveolar Macrophages Isolated Directly From Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV)–Seropositive Individuals Are Sites of HCMV Reactivation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Emma; Juss, Jatinder K.; Krishna, Benjamin; Herre, Jurgen; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes significant morbidity in the immunocompromised host. Following primary infection, the virus establishes latent infection in progenitor cells of the myeloid lineage. These cells exhibit limited viral gene transcription and no evidence of de novo virion production. It is well recognized that differentiation of latently infected myeloid progenitor cells to dendritic or macrophage-like cells permits viral reactivation in vitro. This has been used to support the concept that viral reactivation in HCMV carriers routinely occurs from such terminally differentiated myeloid cells in vivo. However, to date this has not been shown for in vivo–differentiated macrophages. This study is the first to demonstrate that alveolar macrophages from HCMV carriers express immediate early lytic genes and produce infectious virus. This supports the view, until now based on in vitro data, that terminally differentiated myeloid cells in vivo are sites of HCMV reactivation and potential centers of viral dissemination in latently infected individuals with no evidence of virus disease or dissemination. PMID:25552371

  10. Purification and properties of rabbit alveolar macrophage lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S F; Martinez, R J

    1979-01-01

    Lysozyme was isolated from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-elicited rabbit alveolar macrophages by acid extraction and purified to homogeneity by a single-column procedure. Yields of the purified enzyme averaged between 20 and 30 mg per rabbit, values far in excess of those obtained with previously published methods. Rabbit lysozyme has a molecular weight of 14,300 and exhibits optimal lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus at an ionic strength of 0.04, pH 6.5. Our results indicate that lysozyme and other granule components can be fractionated from elicited alveolar macrophages by using simple techniques, suggesting methods for the bulk purification of lysosomal constituents. Images PMID:37167

  11. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  12. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A; Islam, Mohammad N; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S; Prince, Alice S; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-27

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca(2+) waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca(2+)-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. PMID:24463523

  13. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  14. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  15. Relative effects of asbestos and wollastonite on alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Pailes, W.H.; Judy, D.J.; Resnick, H.; Castranova, V.

    1984-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were exposed in culture to chrysotile asbestos, wollastonite, or latex, and the effects on various biochemical and physiological parameters related to cellular viability and fibrogenicity were determined. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to asbestos, wollastonite, or latex for 3 d has no effect on oxygen consumption or cellular volume. However, treatment of alveolar macrophages with as little as 25 ..mu..g asbestos/ml for 1 d increases lysosomal enzyme release and decreases membrane integrity, i.e., decreases trypan blue exclusion and increases leakage of cytosolic enzymes. In contrast, exposure of alveolar macrophages to wollastonite or latex at 250 ..mu..g/ml does not induce lysosomal enzyme release or alter membrane integrity even after 3 d of exposure in culture. These data suggest that chrysotile asbestos damages rabbit alveolar macrophages, while wollastonite, a potential substitute for asbestos, is far less cyctotoxic. 35 references, 8 figures.

  16. Effects of immunopotentiating agents on alveolar macrophage properties.

    PubMed

    Charley, B

    1986-01-01

    Infectious respiratory diseases in man and in domestic animals are characterized by the presence of a large number of different microorganisms: viruses, bacterias, mycoplasmas. It is therefore necessary to stimulate non-specific defense mechanisms in the lung and especially alveolar macrophages (AM). These cells, located in the alveolar air-spaces, play a major role in the lung clearance mechanisms and exert antibacterial, antiviral and antitumoral activities. Activation of alveolar macrophages was studied in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lymphokines or mycobacterial derivatives (MDP). Rodent alveolar macrophages were rendered cytotoxic by in vitro exposure to LPS, free MDP or liposome-encapsulated MDP derivatives. In vivo, intravenously administered liposomes containing lipophilic MDP derivatives induced cytotoxic alveolar macrophages and protected mice against the development of pulmonary metastases. PMID:3539492

  17. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  18. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  19. Lung epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Gershnabel, Shoham; Kalina, Moshe

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of alveolar epithelial cells on inflammatory responses in macrophages. Lung epithelial cells (either rat RLE-6TN or human A549 cells) reduced LPS-induced NO production in alveolar macrophages (AM) in a contact-independent mechanism. The inhibitory effect of the epithelial cells was present already at the transcriptional level: LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was significantly smaller. Surfactant protein A (SP-A)-induced NO production by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of A549 cells, though, by a different kinetics. LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production (another inflammatory pathway) by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of RLE-6TN cells. These data suggest a role for lung epithelial cells in the complicated modulation of inflammatory processes, and provide an insight into the mechanism underlying. PMID:17851743

  20. Immunoproteasome dysfunction augments alternative polarization of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Kammerl, I E; Vosyka, O; Baumann, T; Yu, Y; Wu, Y; Irmler, M; Overkleeft, H S; Beckers, J; Eickelberg, O; Meiners, S; Stoeger, T

    2016-06-01

    The proteasome is a central regulatory hub for intracellular signaling by degrading numerous signaling mediators. Immunoproteasomes are specialized types of proteasomes involved in shaping adaptive immune responses, but their role in innate immune signaling is still elusive. Here, we analyzed immunoproteasome function for polarization of alveolar macrophages, highly specialized tissue macrophages of the alveolar lung surface. Classical activation (M1 polarization) of primary alveolar macrophages by LPS/IFNγ transcriptionally induced all three immunoproteasome subunits, low molecular mass protein 2 (LMP2), LMP7 and multicatalytic endopeptidase complex-like 1, which was accompanied by increased immunoproteasome activity in M1 cells. Deficiency of LMP7 had no effect on the LPS/IFNγ-triggered M1 profile indicating that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for classical alveolar macrophage activation. In contrast, IL-4 triggered alternative (M2) activation of primary alveolar macrophages was accompanied by a transcriptionally independent amplified expression of LMP2 and LMP7 and an increase in immunoproteasome activity. Alveolar macrophages from LMP7 knockout mice disclosed a distorted M2 profile upon IL-4 stimulation as characterized by increased M2 marker gene expression and CCL17 cytokine release. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed enrichment of IL-4-responsive genes and of genes involved in cellular response to defense, wounding and inflammation in LMP7-deficient alveolar macrophages indicating a distinct M2 inflammation resolving phenotype. Moreover, augmented M2 polarization was accompanied by amplified AKT/STAT6 activation and increased RNA and protein expression of the M2 master transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 in LMP7(-/-) alveolar macrophages. IL-13 stimulation of LMP7-deficient macrophages induced a similar M2-skewed profile indicative for augmented signaling via the IL-4 receptor α (IL4Rα). IL4Rα expression was generally

  1. Cytotoxic effect of uranium dioxide on rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tasat, D.R.; de Rey, B.M.

    1987-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchial lavage were used to assess the response of these cells to cultivation in media containing increasing concentrations of particulate UO/sub 2/. The characteristic time course of uranium effects on alveolar macrophages was determined by analyzing cell viability and incorporation of uranium particles. This study reveals the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize uranium particles despite the high toxicity the metal exerts on cell membranes. However, lethal effects soon become evident. Ultrastructural analysis showed uranium particles confined within membrane bound vacuoles or free in the cytoplasm. Marked ultrastructural alterations consistent with cell death were frequently observed. The elimination of the first biological barrier hinders the scavenging of particulate contaminants in alveolar spaces, thus favoring the translocation to target organs.

  2. Isolation and Quantitative Estimation of Diesel Exhaust and Carbon Black Particles Ingested by Lung Epithelial Cells and Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new procedure for isolating and estimating ingested carbonaceous diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or carbon black (CB) particles by lung epithelial cells and macrophages is described. Cells were incubated with DEP or CB to examine cell-particle interaction and ingestion. After va...

  3. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, S.C.; Altman, L.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.

    1982-03-01

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms.

  4. Metabolic enhancement and increase of alveolar macrophages induced by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Mochitate, K.; Miura, T.

    1989-06-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.2 ppm ozone (O3) for 14 days and at intervals alveolar macrophages were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage to examine the effects of O3. The specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase of alveolar macrophages increased to 1.6-fold (on the 3rd day) and 1.5-fold (on the 5th day), respectively, those of the control values. Similarly, the specific activities of pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and hexokinase also increased to 1.6-fold, 1.4-fold, and 1.2-fold, respectively, those of the control values on the 3rd day. The activities of all enzymes tested were maintained at significantly higher levels until the 14th day. Furthermore, the incorporation of (14C)thymidine into alveolar macrophages increased twice the control values on the 1st and 3rd days and was almost completely inhibited by the addition of 1.23 x 10(-4) M aphidicolin, a competitive inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. The number of alveolar macrophages collected from exposed animals also increased to 1.5-fold that of the control value on the 3rd day and was maintained at significantly higher level until the 14th day. It was noted that alveolar macrophages of small size preferentially increased between the 5th and 14th days. These results show that exposures to 0.2 ppm O3 induced a metabolic enhancement of the peroxidative metabolism, glycolysis, and DNA synthesis in alveolar macrophages and increased the macrophages of small size.

  5. Alveolar macrophages. II. Inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation by purified macrophages from rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P G

    1979-01-01

    Macrophages were prepared from the lung, peritoneal cavity and blood of normal, unstimulated rats from a number of strains. The macrophages were purified by adherence, and characterized via surface markers, enzyme activity and phagocytic capacity, and subsequently tested for activity in cultures of mitogen-stimulated syngeneic lymphocytes. Peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes were mildly stimulatory, or ineffective in modulating mitogen-induced DNA synthesis; peritoneal macrophages reconstituted the blastogenic responses of macrophage-depleted lymph node cell cultures to normal limits. In contrast, alveolar macrophages were markedly inhibitory to lymphocyte proliferation; in some instances inhibitory activity was demonstrable when added alveolar macrophages comprised only 0.04% of the total cells in culture. Lymphocyte proliferation induced by T-cell mitogens was more susceptible to this inhibition than was proliferation induced by the B-cell mitogen LPS. Alveolar macrophages recovered from SPF rats, while less in number, exhibited comparable inhibitory activity. These results form part of an emerging picture picture of the normal alveolar macrophage as a potential 'suppressor' of T-cell activity in the lung. PMID:468308

  6. Tissue factor activity. A marker of alveolar macrophage maturation in rabbits. Effects of granulomatous pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; McGee, M P; Lee, T K

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine relationships between alveolar macrophage maturity and amounts of tissue factor (Clotting Factor III) in these cells under physiologic conditions and during immunologically induced pneumonitis. Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, alveolar macrophages from healthy rabbits were rapidly isolated into five subpopulations at different stages of maturation, as demonstrated by morphologic and morphometric evaluation. Very large amounts of tissue factor activity were found in fully mature cells that were purified in the lowest density subpopulation and assayed without preliminary in vitro stimulation or culture. In the remaining four subpopulations of increasing density, amounts of tissue factor were found to progressively diminish in direct correlation with declines of cell maturity. These differences at mean levels were as great as 35-fold. In addition, blood monocytes had less than 1/219 and less than 1/6 of the activity of the fully mature and the least mature subpopulations, respectively. After 16 h culture of the five isolated subpopulations in the absence of lymphokines or of significant numbers of lymphocytes, tissue factor activity increased in inverse correlation with the preincubation stage of cell maturity (2,387 and 109% in the least mature and most mature subpopulations, respectively). These increases required protein synthesis and were accompanied by morphologic and morphometric changes which indicated cellular maturation during the period of tissue factor activity generation in vitro, thus further demonstrating relationships between macrophage maturity and tissue factor content. In additional experiments, direct correlations between cell maturity and tissue factor activity content were also found in activated alveolar macrophage populations from rabbits with Bacillus Calmette Guering (BCG)-induced granulomatous pneumonitis. However, as compared with controls, the BCG populations had increased total

  7. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  8. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage PMID:24475687

  9. EVALUATION OF TRACE-ELEMENT INTERACTIONS USING CULTURED ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is important to consider the interactions of toxic trace elements in an evaluation of the toxicity of environmental pollutants. The in vitro toxicity screening system, using the rabbit alveolar macrophage, provides a particularly useful system for evaluating trace-element inte...

  10. Ozone Exposure of Macrophages Induces an Alveolar Epithelial Chemokine Response through IL-1α

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Rizwan; Dinarello, Charles A.; McConville, Glen; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone is known to produce an acute influx of neutrophils, and alveolar epithelial cells can secrete chemokines and modulate inflammatory processes. However, direct exposure of alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages to ozone (O3) produces little chemokine response. To determine if cell–cell interactions might be responsible, we investigated the effect of alveolar macrophage–conditioned media after ozone exposure (MO3CM) on alveolar epithelial cell chemokine production. Serum-free media were conditioned by exposing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 to ozone for 1 hour. Ozone stimulated secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 from NR8383 cells, but there was no secretion of chemokines or TNF-α. Freshly isolated type II cells were cultured, so as to express the biological markers of type I cells, and these cells are referred to as type I–like cells. Type I–like cells were exposed to diluted MO3CM for 24 hours, and this conditioned medium stimulated secretion of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemattractant-1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2). Secretion of these chemokines was inhibited by the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Although both recombinant IL-1α and IL-1β stimulated alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines, recombinant IL-1α was 100-fold more potent than IL-1β. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-rat IL-1α antibodies inhibited the secretion of chemokines by alveolar epithelial cells, whereas neutralizing anti-rat IL-1β antibodies had no effect. These observations indicate that secretion of IL-1α from macrophages stimulates alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines that can elicit an inflammatory response. PMID:17901407

  11. Entry and Elimination of Marine Mammal Brucella spp. by Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Anett K.; Nymo, Ingebjørg H.; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  12. Magnetometric evaluation for the effect of chrysotile on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keira, T; Okada, M; Katagiri, H; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1998-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages are thought to play an important role in fibrogenesis due to asbestos exposure. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect mainly by unique magnetometry and also by conventional methods such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity measurement and morphological observations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from Syrian golden hamsters by bronchoalveolar lavages were exposed 18 hours in vitro to Fe3O4 as an indicator for magnetometry and chrysotile for experiments. A rapid decrease of the remanent magnetic field, so called "relaxation", was observed after the cessation of an external magnetic field in macrophages phagocytizing Fe3O4 alone, while relaxation was delayed in those concurrently exposed to chrysotile. Since relaxation is thought due to the cytoskeleton-driven random rotation of phagosomes containing iron oxide particles, chrysotile is considered to interfere with the cytoskeletal function of macrophages. Release of LDH from chrysotile-exposed macrophages into the medium was recognized, but it was not significantly higher than the controls. Apoptosis was negligible in macrophages exposed to chrysotile by the DNA ladder detection, the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method and morphological observations. Electron microscopical examinations revealed early necrotic changes in macrophages exposed to chrysotile. These findings indicate that cell magnetometry detects impaired cytoskeletal function due to in vitro exposure to chrysotile. PMID:10223613

  13. Secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Wolber, F. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if alveolar macrophages (AMs) are a source of monocyte chemoattractants and the role bleomycin interaction with AMs may play in the recruitment of monocytes to the lung in a rodent model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. AMs isolated from rats with bleomycin-induced fibrosis secreted significantly greater amounts of monocyte chemoattractants than those isolated from normal rats. When AMs from normal rats were stimulated with bleomycin in vitro, monocyte chemotactic activity was secreted into the medium. Chemotactic activity secretion by AM stimulated with 0.01 to 0.1 micrograms/ml bleomycin was significantly higher than that of cells incubated in medium alone. This activity was truly chemotactic for monocytes, but caused only minimal migration of normal AMs. Bleomycin itself at concentrations of 1 pg/ml to 10 micrograms/ml had no monocyte chemoattractant activity. Characterization of the chemotactic activity in conditioned media (CM) from bleomycin-stimulated AM demonstrated that the major portion of the activity bound to gelatin, was heterogeneous, with estimated molecular weights of 20 to 60 kd, and was inactivated by specific antifibronectin antibody. These findings suggest that fibronectin fragments are primarily responsible for the monocyte chemotactic activity secreted by AMs. Through increased secretion of such chemotactic substances, AMs could play a key role in the recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes into the lung in inflammatory lung disease and fibrosis. PMID:2476935

  14. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-01-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  15. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-08-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  16. Immunosuppressive properties of surfactant and plasma on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Allen, J N; Moore, S A; Pope-Harman, A L; Marsh, C B; Wewers, M D

    1995-03-01

    Alveolar macrophages have been shown to be major producers of the potent proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. During the adult respiratory distress syndrome the normally surfactant-coated alveolus becomes flooded with plasma proteins, altering the milieu of alveolar cells such as alveolar macrophages. To understand alveolar macrophage function during the adult respiratory distress syndrome, the individual and combined effects of surfactant and plasma on alveolar macrophage cytokine production was examined. A synthetic surfactant (Exosurf) and a bovine-derived surfactant (Survanta) both inhibited production of interleukin-1 beta, pro-interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was noted when both endotoxin and heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus were used as stimuli. Autologous plasma also inhibited interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner, but, unlike surfactant, plasma did not inhibit interleukin-1 receptor antagonist release. Similarly, the combination of plasma and surfactant inhibited interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release but not interleukin-1 receptor antagonist release. In support of these data, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was detectable in five of six bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome at a mean concentration of 465 pg/ml; on the other hand, interleukin-1 beta was not detectable in any of these samples. These results indicate that the relative production of interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist can be altered depending on the local concentration of both surfactant and plasma. PMID:7897303

  17. Pulmonary contusion induces alveolar type 2 epithelial cell apoptosis: role of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Perl, Mario; Mangold, Stefanie; Neddermann, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoixa; Bachem, Max G; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Knöferl, Markus W

    2008-11-01

    Alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cell apoptosis is an important mechanism during lung inflammation, lung injury, and regeneration. Blunt chest trauma has been shown to activate inflammatory cells such as alveolar macrophages (AMs) or neutrophils (polymorphonuclear granulocytes [PMNs]), resulting in an inflammatory response. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of different components/cells of the alveolar compartment (AMs, PMNs, or bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluids) to induce apoptosis in AT-2 cells following blunt chest trauma. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham procedure or blunt chest trauma induced by a single blast wave. Various time points after injury (6 h to 7 d), the lungs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, for AT-2 cells, or with antibodies directed against caspase 3, caspase 8, Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), BAX, and BCL-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and soluble FasL were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, cultures of AT-2 cells isolated from healthy rats were incubated with supernatants of AMs, PMNs, or BAL fluids obtained from either trauma or sham-operated animals in the presence or absence of oxidative stress. Annexin V staining or TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase) assay was used to detect apoptotic AT-2 cells. Histological evaluation revealed that the total number of AT-2 cells was significantly reduced at 48 h following trauma. Fas, FasL, active caspase 8, and active caspase 3 were markedly up-regulated in AT-2 cells after chest trauma. BAX and BCL-2 did not show any significant changes between sham and trauma. IL-1beta, but not TNF-alpha, levels were markedly increased at 24 h after the injury, and soluble FasL concentrations were significantly enhanced at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the insult. Apoptosis of AT-2 cells incubated with supernatants from cultured AMs, isolated at 48 h following chest trauma was markedly increased when

  18. Antioxidant properties of taurine in rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Castranova, V.; Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown )

    1990-02-26

    Isolated rat alveolar macrophages (RAM) which had taken-up and accumulated extracellular (0-500 {mu}M) taurine (TAU) were exposed to 0.45 {plus minus} 0.05 ppm ozone for 30 minutes in a modified tissue culture flask containing TAU-supplemented medium. Recovered cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Cell viability significantly increased, while recovery of cells decreased (possibly due to increased adherence) with increasing TAU. At 100 {mu}M (rat plasma TAU level), TAU protected against the ozone-induced increase in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence, diminished leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein into the medium, and partially restored the ozone-inactivated Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity of RAM. Efflux of oxidized glutathione was maximized and K{sup +} leakage was minimized by the addition of 250 {mu}M TAU. At 250-500 {mu}M TAU, leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein were enhanced, while the intracellular TAU content dramatically increased. These results indicate that TAU has both direct and indirect antioxidant properties at low levels and pro-oxidant properties at high levels in RAM.

  19. Expression of β-Defensin Genes in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Rhodes, Janice; Bhat, Meenakshi; Diamond, Gill

    1998-01-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were examined for the expression of β-defensins and to determine whether their expression could be upregulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as observed with β-defensins expressed in bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Four β-defensins were expressed constitutively in BAM, with bovine neutrophil β-defensin (BNBD)-4 and BNBD-5 being the most predominant. This is the first evidence of β-defensin gene expression in a mature myeloid cell. LPS had no effect on β-defensin expression in BAM, even though tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was induced. Nonbacterial inflammatory particles had little effect on β-defensin gene expression or TNF-α production in BAM. We hypothesize that constitutively expressed β-defensins of alveolar macrophages may have a role in lung host defense. PMID:9453661

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate experimental asthma by inducing polarization of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolian; Xie, Shuanshuan; Lu, Kun; Wang, Changhui

    2015-04-01

    The reparative and immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have made them attractive candidates for cellular therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of the effects of transplanted MSCs on allergic asthma remains elusive. Here, we show that administration of MSCs isolated from human bone marrow provoked a pronounced polarization in alveolar macrophages to M2 subtypes, rather than induced an increase in the total macrophage number, and efficiently inhibited hallmark features of asthma, including airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilic accumulation. Moreover, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway appeared to mediate the effects of MSCs on macrophage polarization and subsequently the inhibition of hallmark features of asthma. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling was sufficient to inhibit the macrophage polarization in response to MSCs and consequently reserved the inhibitory effects of macrophage polarization on hallmark features of asthma. Collectively, our data demonstrate that human MSCs have immunosuppressive activity on asthma, which is mediated by TGF-β-signaling-dependent alveolar macrophage polarization. PMID:24958014

  1. A Distinctive Alveolar Macrophage Activation State Induced by Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Prescott G.; Koth, Laura L.; Yang, Yee Hwa; Rodriguez, Madeleine W.; Favoreto, Silvio; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Paquet, Agnes C.; Erle, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Macrophages are believed to play a central role in emphysema based largely on data from mouse models. However, the relevance of these models to smoking-related lung disease in humans is uncertain. Objectives: We sought to comprehensively characterize the effects of smoking on gene expression in human alveolar macrophages and to compare these with effects seen in transgenic mouse models of emphysema. Methods: We used DNA microarrays with genomewide coverage to analyze alveolar macrophages from 15 smokers, 15 nonsmokers, and 15 subjects with asthma (disease control). Selected gene expression changes were validated by polymerase chain reaction and ELISA. Expression changes were compared with those identified by microarray analysis of interleukin-13–overexpressing and integrin-β6–deficient mice, which both develop emphysema. Measurements and Main Results: All 15 smokers shared a common pattern of macrophage gene expression that distinguished them from nonsmokers, a finding not observed in subjects with asthma. We identified 110 genes as differentially expressed in smokers despite using conservative statistical methods. Matrix metalloproteinase 12, a proteinase that plays a critical role in mouse models, was the third most highly induced gene in smokers (ninefold, p < 0.0001). However, most changes in smokers were not reflected in mouse models. One such finding was increased osteopontin expression in smokers (fourfold, p = 0.006), which was confirmed at the protein level and correlated with the degree of airway obstruction. Conclusions: Smoking induces a remarkably consistent and distinctive pattern of alveolar macrophage activation. These studies identify aspects of mouse models that are directly relevant to human smokers and also reveal novel potential mediators of smoking-related diseases. PMID:16166618

  2. Alveolar macrophages are critical for the inhibition of allergic asthma by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Louisa J; Khong, Sacha M L; Spyroglou, Lisa; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Thorburn, Alison N; Boyd, Richard L; Heng, Tracy S P

    2013-12-15

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess reparative and immunoregulatory properties, making them attractive candidates for cellular therapy. However, the majority of MSCs administered i.v. encounter a pulmonary impasse and soon disappear from the lungs, raising the question of how they induce such durable immunosuppressive effects. Using a mouse model of allergic asthma, we show that administration of MSCs isolated from human bone marrow, umbilical cord, or adipose tissue provoked a pronounced increase in alveolar macrophages and inhibited hallmark features of asthma, including airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic accumulation, and Th2 cytokine production. Importantly, selective depletion of this macrophage compartment reversed the therapeutic benefit of MSC treatment on airway hyperresponsiveness. Our data demonstrate that human MSCs exert cross-species immunosuppressive activity, which is mediated by alveolar macrophages in allergic asthma. As alveolar macrophages are the predominant immune effector cells at the air-tissue interface in the lungs, this study provides a compelling mechanism for durable MSC effects in the absence of sustained engraftment. PMID:24249728

  3. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  4. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  5. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Poncy, J L; Metivier, H; Dhilly, M; Verry, M; Masse, R

    1992-01-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. Macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly functional macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U3O8) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca2+. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 +/- 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 microns(sigma g = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U3O8 preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. PMID:1396447

  6. Trace elements in human alveolar macrophages studied by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Roelandts, I.; Corhay, J. L.; Radermecker, M.; Delavignette, J. P.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the metal content of alveolar macrophages by PIXE from 94 subjects divided into two groups as follows: group (1) — subjects with non-occupational exposure to industrial dust: 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 16 patients suffering from lung cancer; group (2) — 48 healthy steel workers from the Liège area (blast-furnace [ n=29] and coke oven [ n=19]). We hope to define more precisely the influence of carcinoma, smoking habit, pathology and occupational exposure in the steel industry on the macrophage metal content. This study has shown: (a) an Fe and Sr increase and a Br decrease in the macrophages of smokers (especially in heavy smokers): (b) a significant Fe, Ti, Br and Cu increase and a trend to Pb, Cr, As and Sr increase in macrophages of healthy steel workers (especially blast-furnace workers) in comparison with non-exposed controls; (c) a significant Fe, Br, Cu and Zn increase and a trend to Pb, As and Ni increase in macrophages of non-exposed patients with lung cancer by comparison with non-exposed controls. The mechanism of metal change could be explained by professional exposure and endogenous changes (protein synthesis, inflammation, bronchial bleeding, …)

  7. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  8. Formation of diacyl and alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine in rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, T.; Sekiguchi, N.; Nakagawa, Y.; Waku, K.

    1987-08-01

    The incorporation of various labeled precursors into alkenylacyl, alkylacyl and diacyl phospholipids in rabbit alveolar macrophages was studied. The incorporation rates of the individual precursors were shown to be quite different among the three subclasses of phospholipids. (/sup 3/H)Glycerol, (/sup 14/C)16:0, (/sup 14/C)18:1, (/sup 14/C)18:2 and (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate were preferentially incorporated into choline glycerophospholipids (CGP), especially into diacyl glycerophosphocholine (GPC), indicating that the de novo synthesis of diacyl GPC is extremely high. Considerable portions of the radioactivities of (/sup 14/C)16:0, (/sup 14/C)18:1, (/sup 14/C)18:2 and (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate were also found in alkylacyl GPC, the incorporation being higher than or comparable to that in the case of diacyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE). We then examined the activities of cholinephosphotransferase and ethanol-aminephosphotransferase, and found that the activity of cholinephosphotransferase was remarkably high in macrophage microsomes compared with that in microsomes from several other tissues. This suggests that diradylglycerols were preferentially utilized by choline-phosphotransferase, which is consistent with the results obtained for intact cells. We confirmed that a considerably higher amount of diacyl GPC as well as alkylacyl GPC was formed through this enzyme reaction with macrophage microsomes than with brain microsomes. The high formation of alkylacyl GPC could be responsible, at least in part, for the accumulation of this unique ether phospholipid, a stored precursor form of platelet-activating factor in macrophages.

  9. Role of alveolar macrophage lysosomes in metal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Berry, J P; Zhang, L; Galle, P; Ansoborlo, E; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Donnadieu-Claraz, M

    1997-02-15

    The intracellular behaviour of different toxic mineral elements inhaled as soluble aerosols or as insoluble particles was studied in the rat by electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction. This study showed that, after inhalation, aerosols of soluble elements like cerous chloride, chromic chloride, uranyl nitrate, and aluminium chloride, are concentrated in the lysosomes of alveolar macrophages and are precipitated in the lysosomes in the form of insoluble phosphate, probably due to the activity of acid phosphatase (intralysosomial enzyme). Also, after inhalation of crystalline particles that are insoluble or poorly soluble in water such as the illites (phyllosilicates), ceric oxides (opaline), and industrial uranium oxides (U3O8), the small crystals are captured by the alveolar macrophage lysosomes and transformed over time into an amorphous form. This structural transformation is associated with changes in the chemical nature of particles inhaled in the oxide form. Microanalysis of amorphous deposits observed after inhalation of uranium or ceric oxides has shown that they contain high concentrations of phosphorus associated with the initial elements cerium and uranium. These different processes tend to limit the diffusion of these toxic elements within the organism, whether they are inhaled in soluble form or not. PMID:9140931

  10. Inhibition of immunological function mediated DNA damage of alveolar macrophages caused by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takahiro; Hirono, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Hutei, Yoshimi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Pinkerton, Kent E; Takeuchi, Minoru

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke impairs the pulmonary immune system, including alveolar macrophage function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully elucidated. This study investigates the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages, which is required for antigen-specific response to T cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 days using a Hamburg II smoking machine, and alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages was significantly inhibited in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. Major histocompatibility complex class II cell surface molecule-positive cells, B7-1 molecule-positive cells, and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression in alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. In contrast, DNA damage and generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in alveolar macrophages were significantly increased by cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that inhibition of the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages may result from decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and B7-1 molecules and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression following cigarette smoke exposure. Furthermore, inhibition of antigen presentation in alveolar macrophage may result from DNA damage induced by excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species being generated by alveolar macrophages following cigarette smoke exposure. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke impairs the immunological function of alveolar macrophages and, as a result, increases the risk for pulmonary infection. PMID:19922407

  11. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  12. Ambient fine and coarse particle suppression of alveolar macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, M T; Sioutas, C; Chang, M C; Boere, A J F; Cassee, F R

    2003-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are part of the innate immunological defense system and are among the first cells to respond to the effects of inhaled particles. Study of macrophage responses to particles is, therefore, relevant to understanding the mechanisms by which inhaled particles can adversely affect health. Size-fractionated ambient particles were collected at traffic-dominated sites in The Netherlands using a mobile high volume slit impactor system. AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from adult as well as aged rats and were incubated with for 4 h with collected particles at concentrations of 25-1000 pg per cell. Free radical generation by AM was measured with and without stimulation of AM with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). There were dose-dependent decreases in macrophage production of superoxide radicals as measured by the chemiluminescent method. Coarse particles were more toxic than were fine particles. Suppression of free radical production did not seem to be related to the presence of bioavailable iron or to endotoxin associated with the particles. There were no statistically significant differences related to age or strain of the rats tested. We conclude that in vitro tests using AM is a useful and rapid method for delineating differences in toxicity between environmental samples of size fractionated ambient particles. PMID:12523957

  13. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Cytotoxicity of ammonium metavanadate to cultured bovine alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, C.; Misra, H.P.

    1982-05-01

    Cytotoxicity of ammonium metavanadate to cultured bovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages was measured by cell viability, inhibition of phagocytosis, and reduction of superoxide-dependent chemiluminescence. The degree of toxicity was dependent on the levels of vanadium, the temperature, and the time of exposure. Thus macrophages exposed to vanadium at 0.01 and 0.1 ..mu..g/ml did not exhibit cytotoxic effects even with up to 24 h of exposure, as measured by cell viability and phagocytic index. Vanadium at 0.5 ..mu..g/ml, however, reduced cell viability to 24% and the phagocytic index to 2% of the control within 8 h of exposure. Exposure to NH/sub 4/VO/sub 3/ (up to 1 ..mu..g vanadium/ml) for short periods of time stimulated phagocytic activity. Vanadium toxicity was also demonstrated in suspension culture at 37/sup 0/C by chemiluminescence assay. This assay seems to be more sensitive than the conventional viability and phagocytic index tests. Thus, the peak light production by macrophages during zymosan phagoctyosis was reduced to 93, 59, and 63% by vanadium at 0.1 ..mu..g/ml exposing for 2, 4, and 8 h, respectively, and to 71, 27, and 24% by vanadium at 1.0 ..mu..g/ml for the same time periods. The phagoctyic activity of macrophages as measured by chemiluminescence response was not significantly altered by exposure to either 0.1 or 1.0 ..mu..g vanadium/ml measured during the first 24 h of culture at 4/sup 0/C.

  15. Extracellular Paracoccidioides brasiliensis phospholipase B involvement in alveolar macrophage interaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phospholipase B (PLB) has been reported to be one of the virulence factors for human pathogenic fungi and has also been described as necessary for the early events in infection. Based on these data, we investigated the role of PLB in virulence and modulation of the alveolar pulmonary immune response during infection using an in-vitro model of host-pathogen interaction, i.e. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells infecting alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. Results The effect of PLB was analyzed using the specific inhibitor alexidine dihydrochloride (0.25 μM), and pulmonary surfactant (100 μg mL-1), during 6 hours of co-cultivation of P. brasiliensis and MH-S cells. Alexidine dihydrochloride inhibited PLB activity by 66% and significantly decreased the adhesion and internalization of yeast cells by MH-S cells. Genes involved in phagocytosis (trl2, cd14) and the inflammatory response (nfkb, tnf-α, il-1β) were down-regulated in the presence of this PLB inhibitor. In contrast, PLB activity and internalization of yeast cells significantly increased in the presence of pulmonary surfactant; under this condition, genes such as clec2 and the pro-inflammatory inhibitor (nkrf) were up-regulated. Also, the pulmonary surfactant did not alter cytokine production, while alexidine dihydrochloride decreased the levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and increased the levels of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In addition, gene expression analysis of plb1, sod3 and icl1 suggests that P. brasiliensis gene re-programming is effective in facilitating adaptation to this inhospitable environment, which mimics the lung-environment interaction. Conclusion P. brasiliensis PLB activity is involved in the process of adhesion and internalization of yeast cells at the MH-S cell surface and may enhance virulence and subsequent down-regulation of macrophage activation. PMID:20843362

  16. Normal human alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage have a limited capacity to release interleukin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wewers, M D; Rennard, S I; Hance, A J; Bitterman, P B; Crystal, R G

    1984-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a mediator released by stimulated mononuclear phagocytes that is thought to play an important role in modulating T and B lymphocyte activation as well as in contributing to the febrile response and other inflammatory processes. Circulating mononuclear phagocytes, blood monocytes, readily release IL-1 when stimulated. However, the ability of lung mononuclear phagocytes, alveolar macrophages, to dispose of the large daily burden of inhaled antigens without stimulating an inflammatory response suggests that the release of IL-1 by alveolar macrophages may differ significantly from that of blood monocytes. To evaluate this hypothesis, normal autologous alveolar macrophages, obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage, were compared with blood monocytes for their ability to release IL-1 in response to a standard stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Alveolar macrophages were found to be at least 1,000 times less sensitive to LPS than blood monocytes. Furthermore, alveolar macrophages released significantly less IL-1 than blood monocytes (26 +/- 11 vs. 128 +/- 21 U/10(6) cells X 24 h, respectively, after stimulation with 10 micrograms/ml of LPS, P less than 0.001). This difference was not due to the release of substances by macrophages, which inhibited lymphocyte proliferation in response to IL-1, or to degradation of IL-1 by macrophages. Culturing macrophages in the presence of indomethacin and dialysis of macrophage supernatants did not affect the difference, and culturing macrophages with monocytes did not decrease detectable IL-1 activity from the monocytes. The IL-1 produced by the two cell types was indistinguishable by anion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and isoelectric focusing. In addition, consistent with the findings for alveolar macrophages, macrophages generated by the in vitro maturation of blood monocytes were also deficient in their ability to release IL-1. These findings suggest that if the population of alveolar macrophages

  17. ISOLATION OF A SOLUBLE CADMIUM-BINDING PROTEIN FROM PULMONARY MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A soluble cadmium-binding protein, with properties similar to metallothionein, has been isolated from rabbit alveolar macrophages. The macrophages were cultured in Medium 199 with Earle's salts for 24 hr in the presence of 10 micromoles CdCl2 and carrier-free 109Cd as a tracer. T...

  18. Alveolar Macrophage Secretory Products Effect Type 2 Pneumocytes Undergoing Hypoxia/Reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    McCourtie, Anton S.; Farivar, Alexander S.; Woolley, Steven M.; Merry, Heather E.; Wolf, Patrick S.; Mackinnon-Patterson, Brendan; Keech, John C.; FitzSullivan, Elizabeth; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Activation of the alveolar macrophage is centrally important to the development of lung ischemia reperfusion injury. Alveolar macrophages and type 2 pneumocytes secrete a variety of proinflammatory mediators in response to oxidative stress. The manner in which they interact and how the macrophage may influence pneumocyte responses in lung ischemia reperfusion injury is unknown. Utilizing an in vitro model of hypoxia and reoxygenation, we sought to determine if the proinflammatory response of type 2 pneumocytes to oxidative stress would be amplified by alveolar macrophage secretory products. Methods Cultured pneumocytes were exposed to control media or media from cultured macrophages exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Pneumocytes were subsequently subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation and assessed for both nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion. To examine for any reciprocal interactions, we reversed the experiment, exposing macrophages to conditioned pneumocyte media. Results In the presence of media from stimulated macrophages, production of proinflammatory mediators by type 2 pneumocytes was dramatically enhanced. In contrast, exposure of the macrophage to conditioned pneumocyte media had an inhibitory effect on macrophage responses subsequently exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Conclusions The alveolar macrophage drives the development of lung reperfusion injury in part through amplification of the inflammatory response of type 2 pneumocytes subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:19021974

  19. Surface morphology and function of human pulmonary alveolar macrophages from smokers and non-smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M; Sugimoto, M; Nishi, R; Suga, M; Horio, S; Kohrogi, H; Shimazu, K; Araki, S

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages were obtained by saline lavage from 23 healthy male volunteers--10 non-smokers and 13 cigarette smokers. Lavage produced three times as many alveolar macrophages in smokers than in non-smokers. When macrophages from smokers and from non-smokers were incubated in vitro, more cells from smokers adhered to glass, spread out, and showed enhanced nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The surface morphology of alveolar macrophages from smokers showed more with a plate like appearance and ridge like membrane surface, while the macrophages from non-smokers were predominantly spherical with ruffles. The proportions of cells which stained highly for beta galactosidase were 55% in smokers and 11% in non-smokers. Thus, in a resting state in vitro, alveolar macrophages from smokers were more active than those from non-smokers. When, however, macrophages from smokers and non-smokers were incubated with immunobeads and with opsonised or non-opsonised BCG, the phagocytic activity and stimulated NBT reduction of alveolar macrophages from smokers were similar to or somewhat less than those of non-smokers. Images PMID:6438822

  20. Depletion of resident alveolar macrophages does not prevent Fas-mediated lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, R A; Farnand, A W; Wong, V; Koski, A; Rosenfeld, M E; van Rooijen, N; Frevert, C W; Martin, T R; Matute-Bello, G

    2008-08-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system in the lungs results in a form of injury characterized by alveolar epithelial apoptosis and neutrophilic inflammation. Studies in vitro show that Fas activation induces apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. The main goal of this study was to determine the contribution of alveolar macrophages to Fas-induced lung inflammation in mice, by depleting alveolar macrophages using clodronate-containing liposomes. Liposomes containing clodronate or PBS were instilled by intratracheal instillation. After 24 h, the mice received intratracheal instillations of the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody Jo2 or an isotype control antibody and were studied 18 h later. The Jo2 MAb induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total neutrophils, lung caspase-3 activity, and BALF total protein and worsened histological lung injury in the macrophage-depleted mice. Studies in vitro showed that Fas activation induced the release of the cytokine KC in a mouse lung epithelial cell line, MLE-12. These results suggest that the lung inflammatory response to Fas activation is not primarily dependent on resident alveolar macrophages and may instead depend on cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:18556802

  1. MODULATION OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE PROPERTIES BY OZONE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3) (0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hours). he functions studied reflect concern that 03 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the broncho-alveolar spaces. xposure of HAM to cau...

  2. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  3. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: oxidant mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, Amy; Ning, YaoYu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-acetyl cysteine (20mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 uM) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase, 10 uM/hr), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H2O2. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H2O2 but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H2O2-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H2O2 released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity. PMID:17222881

  4. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Zhang, Yingze; Reddy, Raju C.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease, thought to be largely transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) driven, for which there is no effective therapy. We assessed the potential benefits in IPF of nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), which are unique endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear hormone receptor that exhibits wound-healing and antifibrotic properties potentially useful for IPF therapy. We found that pulmonary PPARγ is down-regulated in patients with IPF. In vitro, knockdown or knockout of PPARγ expression in isolated human and mouse lung fibroblasts induced a profibrotic phenotype, whereas treating human fibroblasts with NFAs up-regulated PPARγ and blocked TGFβ signaling and actions. NFAs also converted TGFβ to inactive monomers in cell-free solution, suggesting an additional mechanism through which they may inhibit TGFβ. In vivo, treating mice bearing experimental pulmonary fibrosis with NFAs reduced disease severity. Also, NFAs up-regulated the collagen-targeting factor milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8), stimulated collagen uptake and degradation by alveolar macrophages, and promoted myofibroblast dedifferentiation. Moreover, treating mice with established pulmonary fibrosis using NFAs reversed their existing myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition. These findings raise the prospect of treating IPF with NFAs to halt and perhaps even reverse the progress of IPF.—Reddy, A. T., Lakshmi, S. P., Zhang, Y., Reddy, R. C. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages. PMID:25252739

  5. Effects of acute radon progeny exposure on rat alveolar macrophage number and function

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Newton, G.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Alveolar macrophages play a key role in removal and translocation of inhaled particles and have been shown to influence proliferation of Alveolar Type II cells and fibroblasts. The effect of radon progeny on alveolar macrophage number and function is not documented. Functional impairment of alveolar macrophages may be an ancillary event in the induction of pulmonary lesions and may also indicate dose to the peripheral lung. In our study, rats were exposed to 1000 working level months (WLM) of radon progeny over a 3- to 5-h period, with a vector aerosol of environmental tobacco smoke. Groups of animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were lavaged immediately after exposure and on days 2, 18, 16, 21 and 29 after exposure. The numbers and viabilities of the lavaged macrophages were determined. Cytological preparations were made to determine the number of binucleated/multinucleated macrophages and macrophages containing micronuclei. The DNA content was measured flow-cytometrically using Hoechst 33342, and phagocytosis was assayed by determining the uptake of fluorescent microspheres. The numbers and viabilities of macrophages recovered from exposed animals were similar to the values measured for control animals. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction during any period after radon progeny exposure. Nuclear atypia, evidenced by increases in the number of binucleated cells and cells with micronuclei, occurred in animals 8 days after exposure, and this response peaked at 21 days after exposure. The phagocytic capability of the alveolar macrophages was not significantly affected at any time point after exposure. These results show that there was little functional impairment of alveolar macrophages in rats after acute radon-progeny exposure; however, there was long-standing interference with cell division, resulting in binucleated and micronucleated macrophages.

  6. A novel 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-activin A pathway in human alveolar macrophages is dysfunctional in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP).

    PubMed

    Barna, Barbara P; Malur, Anagha; Dalrymple, Heidi; Karnekar, Reema; Culver, Daniel A; Abraham, Susamma; Singh, Ravinder J; Brescia, Donald; Kavuru, Mani S; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that activin A, a cytokine implicated in regulating B-cell proliferation, is severely deficient in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), an autoimmune disorder characterized by surfactant accumulation and neutralizing autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Mechanisms of activin regulation in alveolar macrophages are not well understood. Based on previous gene array results from PAP bronchoalveolar lavage cells suggesting deficiencies in vitamin D target genes, and on recent evidence of vitamin D receptor elements (VDREs) in the human activin A gene promoter, we investigated the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D(3)) on activin A expression in alveolar macrophages from healthy individuals and PAP patients. Activin A expression was stimulated by LPS in cultures of either healthy control or PAP alveolar macrophages; in contrast, vitamin D(3) increased activin A only in healthy controls but not in PAP. Compared to healthy controls, freshly obtained (uncultured) PAP alveolar macrophages displayed healthy intrinsic vitamin D receptor expression but deficient expression of vitamin D target genes, cathelicidin and thioredoxin interacting protein. PAP patients also demonstrated a relative insufficiency of circulating vitamin D. Investigation of activin A in murine alveolar macrophages confirmed a lack of functional response to vitamin D as anticipated since murine activin A does not contain VDREs. Results suggest that mechanisms of activin A deficiency in PAP alveolar macrophages may involve dysregulation of a novel species-specific vitamin D-activin A pathway. PMID:18803071

  7. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05). PMID:21251696

  8. Cigarette smoking decreases bioactive interleukin-6 secretion by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soliman, D M; Twigg, H L

    1992-10-01

    Studies suggest smokers have decreased alveolar macrophage (AM) accessory cell (AC) function and a reduced incidence of immune-mediated lung diseases such as sarcoidosis. Impaired AM secretion of cytokines important in T-cell immune responses could explain this observation. We investigated production and secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in smokers and nonsmokers. Lipopolysaccharide-induced AM IL-1 secretion in smokers was significantly reduced compared with nonsmoker AM. However, intracellular IL-1 in smoker AM was higher than in nonsmokers, suggesting that reduced IL-1 secretion was due to impaired release rather than reduced production. Smoker AM secreted significantly less bioactive IL-6 measured in a bioassay compared with nonsmoker AM. Intracellular IL-6 was virtually undetectable in both groups. In some smokers IL-6 production determined by immunoprecipitation was reduced. However, as a group antigenic IL-6 secretion determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was similar in smokers and nonsmokers, suggesting that smoker AM may cosecrete an inhibitor of IL-6 bioactivity. Indeed, AM supernatants from smokers inhibited B9 proliferation in response to maximal recombinant IL-6 stimulation, whereas supernatants from nonsmokers did not. We conclude that AM from smokers secrete less cytokines important in T-cell proliferation than AM from nonsmokers and suggest that for IL-6 this impairment is related to both decreased production of antigenic protein as well as cosecretion of an IL-6 inhibitor. PMID:1415725

  9. The localization of catalase in the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Davies, P; Drath, D B; Engel, E E; Huber, G L

    1979-02-01

    A combined biochemical and cytochemical study of catalase was performed on alveolar macrophages lavaged from the lungs of adult male rats. Biochemically, catalase activity was present in both a high-speed granule fraction and in the supernatant. The granule-associated activity exhibited latency. Two methods of cell breakage, sonication and homogenization, yielded similar levels and distributions of catalase activity. Catalase activity in whole cells was identified cytochemically by the alkaline diaminobenzidine method and was localized within membrane-lined cytoplasmic granules similar in size to microperoxisomes and associated with cisternae of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of the reaction product was inhibited by 0.04 M aminotriazole, by cyanide, and by boiling prior to incubation. The cytochemical reaction continued in the absence of exogenous peroxide, but could be prevented by addition of catalase or pyruvate to the peroxide-free medium. Enzyme activity was also localized within a portion of the membrane-bound granules present in the cell fractions used for the biochemical assays. PMID:431040

  10. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  11. MODULATION OF EICOSANOID PRODUCTION BY HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES EXPOSED TO SILICA IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Repeated inhalation of silica dust can lead to inflammation and fibrosis in human lung and in experimental animal models. he alveolar macrophage is believed to play a pivotal role in this process. umerous macrophage-derived growth factors, cytokines and arachidonic acid metabolit...

  12. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  13. Neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced murine mastitis is strictly dependent on mammary alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Sharon; Gonen, Erez; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Rosenshine, Ilan; Shpigel, Nahum Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary tissue, is a common disease in dairy animals and mammary pathogenic Escherichia coli (MPEC) is a leading cause of the disease. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important virulence factor of MPEC and inoculation of the mammary glands with bacterial LPS is sufficient to induce an inflammatory response. We previously showed using adoptive transfer of normal macrophages into the mammary gland of TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice that LPS/TLR4 signaling on mammary alveolar macrophages is sufficient to elicit neutrophil recruitment into the alveolar space. Here we show that TLR4-normal C3H/HeN mice, depleted of alveolar macrophages, were completely refractory to LPS intramammary challenge. These results indicate that alveolar macrophages are both sufficient and essential for neutrophil recruitment elicited by LPS/TLR4 signaling in the mammary gland. Using TNFα gene-knockout mice and adoptive transfer of wild-type macrophages, we show here that TNFα produced by mammary alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/TLR4 signaling is an essential mediator eliciting blood neutrophil recruitment into the milk spaces. Furthermore, using the IL8 receptor or IL1 receptor gene-knockout mice we observed abrogated recruitment of neutrophils into the mammary gland and their entrapment on the basal side of the alveolar epithelium in response to intramammary LPS challenge. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils to IL1 receptor knockout mice, just before LPS challenge, restored normal neutrophil recruitment into the milk spaces. We conclude that neutrophil recruitment to the milk spaces is: (i) mediated through TNFα, which is produced by alveolar macrophages in response to LPS/TLR4 signaling and (ii) is dependent on IL8 and IL1β signaling and regulated by iNOS-derived NO. PMID:19828114

  14. Generation and Identification of GM-CSF Derived Alveolar-like Macrophages and Dendritic Cells From Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yifei; Arif, Arif A; Poon, Grace F T; Hardman, Blair; Dosanjh, Manisha; Johnson, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are innate immune cells found in tissues and lymphoid organs that play a key role in the defense against pathogens. However, they are difficult to isolate in sufficient numbers to study them in detail, therefore, in vitro models have been developed. In vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells are well-established and valuable methods for immunological studies. Here, a method for culturing and identifying both DCs and macrophages from a single culture of primary mouse bone marrow cells using the cytokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is described. This protocol is based on the established procedure first developed by Lutz et al. in 1999 for bone marrow-derived DCs. The culture is heterogeneous, and MHCII and fluoresceinated hyaluronan (FL-HA) are used to distinguish macrophages from immature and mature DCs. These GM-CSF derived macrophages provide a convenient source of in vitro derived macrophages that closely resemble alveolar macrophages in both phenotype and function. PMID:27404290

  15. Expression and kinetics of induced procoagulant activity in bovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Car, B D; Slauson, D O; Suyemoto, M M; Doré, M; Neilsen, N R

    1991-01-01

    Leukocytes, especially macrophages, are important cellular mediators of fibrin deposition and removal at tissue sites of inflammation. Pulmonary fibrin deposition is a prominent feature of bovine acute lung injury; therefore, we studied the resting and stimulated procoagulant responses of bovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) and peripheral blood neutrophils (PMN). Freshly isolated normal PAM and PMN expressed negligible procoagulant activity. PAM stimulated with endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and bovine recombinant interleukin-1 beta (rBIL-1 beta) exhibited protein synthesis- and dose-dependent enhancement of procoagulant activity in 8-h cultures. Bovine recombinant granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rBGM-CSF) and recombinant human gamma-interferon (rHIFN-gamma) did not induce procoagulant activity. The kinetics of LPS- and PMA-enhanced PAM procoagulant activity differed: LPS-induced enhancement developed earlier and more rapidly than PMA-induced enhancement. Pasteurella haemolytica LPS was more potent than Escherichia coli LPS in enhancing PAM procoagulant activity, while dexamethasone decreased both baseline and LPS- or PMA-stimulated activity by approximately 50%. PAM procoagulant activity resulted from tissue factor expression. Bovine PMN produced negligible procoagulant activity when stimulated, and are thus unlikely to be major contributors to procoagulant activity in bovine lung. Activity inhibitory to bovine tissue factor was present in both calf and adult sera, and was partly dependent on the presence of factor X for activity. Rapid induction of bovine PAM procoagulant activity by inflammatory mediators, and subsequent resistance to degradation, may thus combine to promote an alveolar microenvironment permissive to fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury. PMID:1959504

  16. Proinflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced by alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha during pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Fernandez, Lucas G; Awad, Alaa S; Kron, Irving L; Laubach, Victor E

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury entails acute activation of alveolar macrophages followed by neutrophil sequestration. Although proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from macrophages are known to modulate acute IR injury, the contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to IR injury and their intercellular interactions with other cell types such as alveolar macrophages and neutrophils remain unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that following IR, alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha further induces alveolar epithelial cells to produce key chemokines that could then contribute to subsequent lung injury through the recruitment of neutrophils. Cultured RAW264.7 macrophages and MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to acute hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) as an in vitro model of pulmonary IR. H/R (3 h/1 h) significantly induced KC, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), RANTES, and IL-6 (but not TNF-alpha) by MLE-12 cells, whereas H/R induced TNF-alpha, MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-2 (but not KC) by RAW264.7 cells. These results were confirmed using primary murine alveolar macrophages and primary alveolar type II cells. Importantly, using macrophage and epithelial coculture methods, the specific production of TNF-alpha by H/R-exposed RAW264.7 cells significantly induced proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression (KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-6) by MLE-12 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alveolar type II cells, in conjunction with alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha, contribute to the initiation of acute pulmonary IR injury via a proinflammatory cascade. The release of key chemokines, such as KC and MIP-2, by activated type II cells may thus significantly contribute to neutrophil sequestration during IR injury. PMID:17416740

  17. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  18. Effects of diesel engine exhaust on pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Weller, M.A.; Barnhart, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    The in vivo effects of inhalation of diesel engine exhaust (DEE) on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) was studied in 73 guinea pigs and 48 rats. Animals were exposed in individual cages in special chambers to 3 different dose levels of DEE expressed in terms of the concentration of soot or carbon particles (-P); 250, 1500, 6000 micrograms DEE-P/M3. Exposure durations for guinea pigs were 1 and 3 days, 1 and 2 weeks, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months while rats were exposed 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months. Age matched controls were similarly exposed concurrently to clean air. PAM obtained by bronchopulmonary lavage from exposed animals had viabilities comparable to controls. PAM diameters and relative surface areas increased 2 to 3 fold over controls and in relation to both the dose of DEE-P given and the exposure duration. Most of the in vivo exposed PAM had phagocytized DEE-P which did not appear to be cytotoxic and remained confined in phagosomes as discrete particles with diameters of 0.014 to 0.072 micrometer. Ability of PAM to adhere and spread on test surfaces was greater in the DEE-P sets than in controls. DEE-P containing PAM were still able to phagocytize latex particles when fed in vitro. However, such PAM had defective phagocytosis ability, and did not in the same time interval take up as much fluorescent latex as controls when studied by flow system technology. Absolute numbers of PAM in guinea pig lavages from exposures to 250 and 1500 microgram DEE-P/M3 for 2 months were not significantly changed over concurrent controls. Exudative leukocytes (eosinophils in guinea pigs and neutrophils in rats) appeared in the lavage in greater numbers as dose and duration of exposure increased. Another species difference was the appearance in DEE-P exposed guinea pig lavages of reactive monocytes.

  19. Arachidonic acid metabolism in silica-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Englen, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro production of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in adherent bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) incubated with silica was investigated. BAM were pre-labelled with {sup 3}H-AA, and lipid metabolites released into the culture medium were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was simultaneously assayed to provide an indication of cell injury. Increasing doses of silica selectively stimulated the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of AA metabolism, while cyclooxygenase metabolite output was suppressed. LDH release increased in a linear, dose-dependent fashion over the range of silica doses used. Moreover, within 15 min following addition of a high silica dose, a shift to the production of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites occurred, accompanied by a reduction in cyclooxygenase products. This rapid alteration in AA metabolism preceded cell injury. To examine the relationship between cytotoxicity and AA metabolite release by BAM exposed to silicas with different cytotoxic and fibrogenic activities, BAM were exposed to different doses of DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silicas, and carbonyl iron beads. The median effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of each particulate to stimulate the release of AA metabolites and LDH was calculated. The ED{sub 50} values for DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silica showed that the relative cytotoxicities of the different silicas for BAM corresponded to the relative potencies of the silicas to elicit 5-lipoxygenase metabolites from BAM. These results indicate that the cytotoxic, and presumed fibrogenic potential, of a silica is correlated with the potency to stimulate the release of leukotrienes from AM.

  20. HUMAN ALVEOLAR AND PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES MEDIATE FUNGISTASIS INDEPENDENTLY OF L-ARGININE OXIDATION TO NITRITE OR NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human alveolar macrophages (HAM) from 28 normal volunteers were found to inhibit replication of Cryptoccous neoformans. onditions under which fungistasis occurred were different than those required for mouse peritoneal macrophage-mediated fungi stasis. nhibition of fungal replica...

  1. Marked differences between MARC-145 cells and swine alveolar macrophages in IFN beta-induced activation of antiviral state against PRRSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The replication kinetics of field isolates and a vaccine virus of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were evaluated in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). In MARC-145 cells, the eclipse period of the vaccine virus was about 10 hours and was shorter than t...

  2. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  3. Toxicity of hexavalent chromium to the alveolar macrophage in vivo and in vitro. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, J.B.; Oberg, S.G.

    1984-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro systems were used to evaluate hexavalent chromium toxicity to alveolar macrophages. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed to 2 ..mu..g calcium chromate (CaCrO/sub 4/, insoluble) or 2 ..mu..g chromium trioxide (CrO/sub 3/, soluble) in live animals, in vivo, and in tissue culture, in vitro, collected by lavage from the lung. Chemiluminescence and oxygen consumption were measured as indicators of toxicity. Trypan blue dye exclusion was used to determine macrophage viability. In vivo exposure of the macrophage to either chromium compound showed no toxic effects at a 2-..mu..g dose. Macrophages exposed in tissue culture, however, had values significantly different from controls. The untreated controls for both exposure methods were compared to evaluate differences resulting from methods alone.

  4. Effects of ozone and photochemical oxidants on interferon production by rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shingu, H.; Sugiyama, M.; Watanabe, M.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained in this study demonstrated that the capacity of interferon production by alveolar macrophage was depressed immediately after exposure to O/sub 3/ greater than 1 ppM or Ox exceeding average of 0.3 ppM (max. 0.7 ppM) for 3 hours. In these experiments, it was shown that depression in interferon production corresponded in degree to elevation of gas concentration. This finding suggested that alveolar macrophages, existing in a state of single cell in the lung, were probably exposed directly to the inhaled gas in this experimental system. The results that depression of interferon production in Dutch rabbit under the same O/sub 3/ concentration was greater in degree than that in rabbit suggest that sensitivity of alveolar macrophage to O/sub 3/ or presumably to other irritating gases is different among species.

  5. Environmental sulfur dioxide: toxicity toward the alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Butenhoff, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if SO/sub 2/ and/or its associated ions in solution (H/sub 3/O/sup +/, HSO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup =/ and SO/sub 4//sup =/) are cytotoxic to rat PAM cells in primary culture. The indices of cytotoxicity which were evaluated included cell viability uptake of particles and viable bacteria, inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, cell surface morphology and oxygen utilization. For determining effects on cell viability, function and morphology, exposures were conducted for 20 hours at either 30 or 37 deg. C in Leighton culture tubes of polystyrene petri dishes. In both instances, cells were attached to glass. Cell viability dose-response curves were obtained with H/sub 3/O/sup +/ (HCl and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), SO/sub 2/ (dissolved gas), HSO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup =/ and SO/sub 4//sup =/. Buffer strength and pH were varied to determine the effect of these various molecular species on viability. Sulfur dioxide gas exhibited a weak protentiating effect on H/sub 3/O/sup +/ toxicity below pH 6.4. Significant viability loss did not occur above pH 6.4. Particle uptake was diminished significantly at sulfite concentration greater than or equal to 500 uM, pH 7.2. Sulfite was found to be a potent competitive inhibitor of GSH-peroxidase in vitro. A slight yet significant change in cell morphology occurred at sulfite concentrations of 200 uM and 4000 uM and pH 7.2. There was a significant difference in O/sub 2/ utilization between control and 4000 uM exposed cells, indicating a potential diminution in cell-surface mediated respiratory stimulation. Based on these studies, sulfur dioxide gas exposure may have an effect on alveolar macrophage function depending on the ambient concentration of the gas and its accumulation in the airspaces of the lung.

  6. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tedjad, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-08-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-hase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated fly ash particles. 1-Nitropyren after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/10/sup 6/ macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  7. Bioavailability of 1-nitropyrene from model coal fly ash and its uptake by alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, J.L.; Tejada, S.B.; Jackson, M.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal-combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash were examined for cytotoxicity using rabbit alveolar macrophages and for mutagenicity in the Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay. The results were compared to determine the effects of vapor deposition. The distribution and recovery of 1-nitropyrene from macrophage cultures treated with coated fly ash were determined by using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. 1-Nitropyrene alone was not very toxic, nor did vapor deposition of 1-nitropyrene onto coal fly ash significantly affect the toxicity of the fly ash. Most toxicity resulted from the original, uncoated, fly ash particles, 1-Nitropyrene after being coated onto the particles was bioavailable in agar and aqueous culture medium. The coated fly ash showed mutagenic activity when the particles were tested directly; the uncoated fly ash did not show mutagenic activity. 1-Nitropyrene recovery from alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to the coated fly ash diminished as cell number increased. The rate of 1-nitropyrene loss was 2.7 ng/.000001 macrophages for medium and 4.1 ng/.000001 macrophages for the whole culture. The mutagenic activity recovered from these macrophage cultures also decreased with increasing cell number.

  8. Role of alveolar macrophages in precipitation of mineral elements inhaled as soluble aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, P.; Berry, J.P.; Galle, C. )

    1992-07-01

    The lysosomes of several varieties of cells such as the tubular proximal cell of the kidney and the alveolar macrophage have the ability to concentrate and precipitate several elements inhaled in water-soluble form, usually as phosphate. The mechanism involved is attributed to the high acid phosphatase activity of lysosomes and can be considered as an in vivo Gomori reaction. Among the elements studied, most of them are chemotoxic or radiotoxic (Cr; group IIIA: Al, Ga, In; rare earths: La, Ce, Tm; actinides: Th, U). In the lung macrophage, this mechanism of intralysosomal concentration and precipitation may prevent the diffusion of these toxic elements through the alveolar membrane. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke. PMID:6271676

  10. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke. PMID:6271676

  11. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages via the Alternative Pathway in Herpesvirus-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Ana L.; Torres-González, Edilson; Rojas, Mauricio; Corredor, Claudia; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey; Xu, Jianguo; Roman, Jesse; Brigham, Kenneth; Stecenko, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is unknown. Because viral pathogenesis of IPF has been suggested, we have established a murine model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis by infecting IFN-γR–deficient mice (IFN-γR−/−) with the murine γ-herpesvirus 68. Because alveolar macrophages in humans with IPF have been implicated in driving the profibrotic response, we studied their role in our model. Chronic herpesvirus infection of the lung was associated with recruitment of alveolar macrophages to areas with epithelial hyperplasia and fibrosis in infected lungs. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and RT-PCR techniques, we demonstrated that recruited alveolar macrophages showed high levels of expression of the proteins Ym1/2, FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), insulin-like growth factor-1, and arginase I, and also active transcription of fibronectin, indicative of activation of macrophages by an alternative pathway. Arginase I expression was also evident in interstitial fibroblasts, and increased arginase activity was found in lungs of infected animals. Lung tissue from patients with IPF showed increased expression of arginase I in epithelial cells, fibroblast foci, and alveolar macrophages compared with normal lung. These results suggest that virus-induced upregulation of arginase I could be a mechanism driving lung fibrogenesis. PMID:16709958

  12. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune) or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), scandium (Sc), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), titanium (Ti), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganase (Mn), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in alveolar

  13. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide
    S. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, US

    Epidemiological...

  14. STIMULATION OF OXIDANT PRODUCTION IN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES BY POLLUTANT AND LATEX PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant dusts as well as chemically defined particles were examined for their activating effect on oxidant production (O2- and H2O2) in guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM). Oxidant production was measured as chemiluminescence of albumin-bound luminol. All particles examine...

  15. EFFECTS OF OZONE EXPOSURE ON LIPID METABOLISM IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. ollowing release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active m...

  16. CYTOTOXITY TO ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES OF METAL OXIDES ADSORBED ON FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fly-ash particles fractionated into three size ranges (<2, 2 to 5, and 5 to 8 micrometers) and coated with various metal oxides were used to determine whether particle size and surface area are contributing factors to the in vitro toxicity of trace metals for alveolar macrophages...

  17. BIOAVAILABILITY OF 1-NITROPYRENE FROM MODEL COAL FLY ASH AND ITS UPTAKE BY ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar macrophage cultures exposed to coal fly ash vapor-coated with 1-nitropyrene were used as a model system to study the bioavailability and the uptake of a nitroaromatic hydrocarbon from coal combustion emissions. Initially, 1-nitropyrene-coated fly ash and uncoated fly ash...

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Induced Pulmonary Granulomatous Disease: Twist1 and Alveolar Macrophage M1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Huizar, Isham; Malur, Anagha; McPeek, Matthew; Marshall, Irene; Jacob, Mark; Dobbs, Larry; Kavuru, Mani S.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown cause, has been linked to several environmental risk factors, among which are some that may favor carbon nanotube formation. Using gene array data, we initially observed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from sarcoidosis patients displayed elevated mRNA of the transcription factor, Twist1, among many M1-associated genes compared to healthy controls. Based on this observation we hypothesized that Twist1 mRNA and protein expression might become elevated in alveolar macrophages from animals bearing granulomas induced by carbon nanotube instillation. To address this hypothesis, wild-type and macrophage-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) knock out mice were given oropharyngeal instillation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). BAL cells obtained 60 days later exhibited significantly elevated Twist1 mRNA expression in granuloma-bearing wild-type or PPARγ knock out alveolar macrophages compared to sham controls. Overall, Twist1 expression levels in PPARγ knock out mice were higher than those of wild-type. Concurrently, BAL cells obtained from sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls validated gene array data: qPCR and protein analysis showed significantly elevated Twist1 in sarcoidosis compared to healthy controls. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophages from healthy controls indicated that Twist1 was inducible by classical (M1) macrophage activation stimuli (LPS, TNFα) but not by IL-4, an inducer of alternative (M2) macrophage activation. Findings suggest that Twist1 represents a PPARγ-sensitive alveolar macrophage M1 biomarker which is induced by inflammatory granulomatous disease in the MWCNT model and in human sarcoidosis. PMID:24322444

  19. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. )

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  20. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  1. [Corticosterone reception by alveolar macrophages when their functional activity has changed].

    PubMed

    Shishkina, L N; Maianskiĭ, D N; Shutko, G V; Sergeev, P V

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 3H-corticosterone by rat alveolar macrophages was studied before and after stimulation with zymosan in vivo. Thirty min after incubation of the macrophagal monolayer from intact animals with 3H-corticosterone accumulation of the hormone by the cells came to an end. As the concentration of 3H-corticosterone in the incubation medium was raised, the binding of the hormone with the saturated (receptor) system of alveolar macrophages terminated upon absorption of 10.6 fmol per 10(6) cells. Further raising of the level of the bound hormone was effected by the unsaturated (lipid) system. Stimulation with zymosan led not only to an increase in the number of the cells of the bronchoalveolar tract but also to an elevation of the intensity of 3H-corticosterone engulfment by alveolar macrophages. The number of binding sites per cell in the zymosan-activated macrophages increased 1.5-fold. This may be an important moment determining the development and liquidation of mononuclear infiltrations in the lung. PMID:3967077

  2. The effects of clofibrate ingestion on alveolar macrophage peroxisome content and oxygen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Shorrey, J M; Simpson, P

    1982-07-01

    Respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages in response to particulate and soluble challenges, such as zymosan particles and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), is not nearly as dependent upon membrane stimulation as in neutrophils. Microperoxisomes are subcellular organelles containing catalase and are present in lung macrophages and cells of other organs. Evidence from liver cells indicates that peroxisomes are intimately involved with hydrogen peroxide and lipid metabolism. Clofibrate (2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid ethyl, Atromid-S-), a hypolipidemic drug known to cause peroxisomal proliferation in liver cells, was studied with respect to its ability to cause increases in the microperoxisome content and to alter the cellular metabolism of alveolar macrophages. Liver weight increased over a 2-week drug treatment period while lung weight remained unchanged. Plasma triglyceride levels were decreased by the treatment, indicating the effectiveness of the drug. Unlike the effect on liver cells, however, clofibrate did not cause a proliferation of microperoxisomes, as determined by morphometric analysis. Oxygen consumption and hydrogen peroxide generation by alveolar macrophages in response to either stimulant (zymosan or PMA) was no greater in clofibrate-treated rats than in controls. Superoxide release, when expressed as the change in response to PMA, appeared elevated in the drug group; statistical significance, however, was not demonstrated. The hexose monophosphate shunt (HMP), which produces reducing equivalents for lipid biosynthesis, was elevated in macrophages from clofibrate-treated rats when expressed similarly. The significance of these results in relation to the known effects of the drug on liver cells. PMID:6291347

  3. Enzyme release and superoxide anion production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A; Voisin, C

    1980-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages specifically released lysosomal beta-glucuronidase and neutral proteases when successively incubated with IgE, and then, for 30 min, with anti-IgE. Superoxide anion O2- generation was obtained when anti-IgE-opsonized zymosan was added to IgE-incubated cells. Macrophages from smokers excreted twice as much enzymes and superoxide as cells from non-smokers. It was possible to induce the specific release of beta-glucuronidase with normal alveolar macrophages successively incubated with the serum of patients allergic to house dust or to grass pollen and then with the specific allergen. This characteristic opens the field to a direct test for allergic sera by analogy with the allergen-induced degranulation test of sensitized basophils. PMID:6254706

  4. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in murine alveolar macrophages and related lung pathology is associated with MWCNT nickel contamination

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Raymond F.; Buford, Mary; Xiang, Chengcheng; Wu, Nianqiang; Holian, Andrij

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been reported to cause lung pathologies in multiple studies. However, the mechanism responsible for the bioactivity has not been determined. This study used nine different well-characterized MWCNT and examined the outcomes in vitro and in vivo. MWCNT, from a variety of sources that differed primarily in overall purity and metal contaminants, were examined for their effects in vitro (toxicity and NLRP3 inflammasome activation using primary alveolar macrophages isolated from C57Bl/6 mice). In addition, in vivo exposures were conducted to determine the inflammatory and pathogenic potency. The particles produced a differential magnitude of responses, both in vivo and in vitro, that was associated most strongly with nickel contamination on the particle. Furthermore, the mechanism of action for the Ni-contaminated particles was in their ability to disrupt macrophage phagolysosomes, which resulted in NLRP3 activation and subsequent cytokine release associated with prolonged inflammation and lung pathology. PMID:23216160

  5. Morphometry of in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from control and ozone-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, H.; Tyler, W.S.; Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.

    1983-07-01

    Effects of ambient levels of ozone on cell size and compartments were determined morphometrically for both in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to filtered air or to filtered air with 0.60 ppm ozone. The ozone exposure was 8 hr/day for 3 days. Significant exposure-related compartmental volume density changes of in situ centriacinar macrophages were: decreased endoplasm (p less than 0.01); increased lysosome-like structures (p less than 0.01); decreased primary lysosomes (p less than 0.01); increased small and large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.001); and decreased phagosomes/autophagosomes (p less than 0.05). In lavaged macrophages, the only significant exposure-related change was an increase in the density of large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.01). Mean profile areas of in situ centriacinar macrophages from control and exposed rats were 86.94 micrometers/sup 2/ and 112.04 micrometers/sup 2/, respectively. The average mean cell volume V and mean caliper diameter D of macrophages lavaged from control rats were 1128.45 micrometers/sup 3/ and 12.92 micrometers, respectively, whereas those from exposed rats were 1583.08 micrometers/sup 3/ and 14.46 micrometers, respectively. Exposure-related increases in cell size were seen in both in situ and lavaged macrophages, but more significant differences in cell compartments were seen in the in situ centriacinar macrophages. Morphometry of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after ambient levels of ozone indicated increased uptake, storage, or both rather than cell damage. Comparison of in situ centriacinar and lavaged macrophages from both control and exposed rats revealed significant differences in their volume fractions of nucleus, cytoplasm, ectoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome-like structures, lipid droplets, vacuoles, and phagosome/autophagosomes. These differences between centriacinar and lavaged macrophages indicate different cell populations are sampled by these two methods.

  6. Suppression of alveolar macrophage membrane receptor-mediated phagocytosis by model and actual particle-adsorbate complexes. Initial contact with the alveolar macrophage membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, G J; Risby, T H; Sehnert, S S; Hmieleski, R R; Farrington, J E

    1990-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages were treated with carbon blacks and adsorbates in order to evaluate the biologic effect of adsorbate, adsorbent and adsorbate-adsorbent complexes. Their capacity to phagocytize a subsequent challenge via the Fc-membrane receptor was quantified. Phagocytosis was suppressed in a dose-related manner with increasing concentrations of both carbon blacks and adsorbates. Carbon black N339 covered with 0.5 monolayers of the adsorbates suppressed phagocytosis more than N339 without the adsorbates. Increasing the adsorbate acrolein coverage from 0.5 to greater than 2.0 monolayers suppressed phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. Finally, samples of diesel particulate matter collected from an engine operated on a pure hydrocarbon fuel with various oxidizers, air (PSU #1) and an oxidizer free of nitrogen (N-free) were tested. Treatment of the macrophages with PSU #1 had a negligible effect on phagocytosis whereas the N-free sample suppressed phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. The data show that alveolar macrophage Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis is affected by: carbon black and adsorbate identity and concentration, coverage of the carbon black with adsorbates, and the oxidizer used in the generation of particles emitted by a diesel engine. Images FIGURE 6. PMID:2401270

  7. Rabbit alveolar macrophages after inhalation of hexa- and trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Wiernik, A.; Jarstrand, C.; Camner, P.

    1986-04-01

    Rabbits inhaled aerosols of hexavalent chromium (Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/) and trivalent chromium (Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/) at concentrations of 0.9 and 0.6 mg/m/sup 3/ of the metal, respectively, for 4-6 weeks (5 days/week and 6 hr/day). Significantly more macrophages were obtained from the lungs of rabbits exposed to Cr(VI) but not from rabbits exposed to Cr(III) as compared with the controls. Macrophages from rabbits exposed to Cr(III) showed several conspicuous changes. About one-third of the macrophages contained round dark inclusions, 0.5-1.5 ..mu..m diameter, rich in chromium. Most cells had very large lysosomes which contained membranous fragments of different sizes surrounded by a more homogeneous matrix. Laminated inclusions similar to the lamellar bodies in the type II cells increased in number as did the percentage of cells with a smooth cell surface. Also macrophages from rabbits exposed to Cr(VI) showed morphological changes. The most pronounced one was enlarged lysosomes which contained short lamellae and electron-dense patchy inclusions. Only Cr(III) produced functional changes of the macrophages. The metabolic activity measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium was increased and the phagocytic activity reduced.

  8. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  9. The effect of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and function of rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Harper, A; Gharibian, J; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1978-04-01

    Alveolar macrophages harvested by bronchopulmonary lavage from rats exposed to tobacco smoke for 30 days ("smokers") showed alterations in oxidative metabolism, lactate production and phagocytosis of inert starch particles when compared with control macrophages. Phagocytosis of viable Staphylococcus aureus was unaffected by tobacco smoke. Glucose oxidation measured by conversion of glucose-1-14C to 14CO2 moderately affected while oxidation of glucose-6-14C to 14CO2 was not. Smokers routinely yielded fewer cells than controls, though these cells contained approximately 17% more protein than did controls. Opsonization of particles was not necessary for macrophages from either smoker or control animals to manifest a respiratory burst and increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide release during phagocytosis. The glycolytic inhibitors, sodium fluoride and iodoacetamide, while effectively blocking glycolysis, did not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophages from either group. The results reported clearly distinguish alveolar macrophages from other phagocytic cells (peritoneal macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes) and suggest a state of non-specific activation caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:205549

  10. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P.; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T.; Kolls, Jay K.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M.; Foster, W. Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  11. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Vera, Miguel; Xiong, Zeyu; Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T; Kolls, Jay K; McVerry, Bryan J; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M; Foster, W Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  12. Cigarette Smoke Exposure Impairs Pulmonary Bacterial Clearance and Alveolar Macrophage Complement-Mediated Phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, John C.; Aronoff, David M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Goel, Deepti; O'Brien, Edmund; Mancuso, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pulmonary and invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most commonly isolated organism from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite this association, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke exposure diminishes host defense against S. pneumoniae infections are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the responses of BALB/c mice following an intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae after 5 weeks of exposure to room air or cigarette smoke in a whole-body exposure chamber in vivo and the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae in vitro. Bacterial burdens in cigarette smoke-exposed mice were increased at 24 and 48 h postinfection, and this was accompanied by a more pronounced clinical appearance of illness, hypothermia, and increased lung homogenate cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We also found greater numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from cigarette smoke-exposed mice following a challenge with heat-killed S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, overnight culture of alveolar macrophages with 1% cigarette smoke extract, a level that did not affect alveolar macrophage viability, reduced complement-mediated phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, while the ingestion of unopsonized bacteria or IgG-coated microspheres was not affected. This murine model provides robust additional support to the hypothesis that cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and defines a novel cellular mechanism to help explain this immunosuppressive effect. PMID:20008540

  13. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes. PMID:10739163

  14. Pharmacologic reduction in tumor necrosis factor activity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Fisher, B J; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1993-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), an inflammatory cytokine released by macrophages, may be a mediator of lung injury during septicemia. We previously reported that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen and histamine receptor antagonists cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) attenuate lung injury and reduce circulating TNF surges during porcine sepsis. Since pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) may participate in early sepsis by producing TNF, we hypothesized that the TNF activity of PAM is reduced by ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. To test this, we examined changes in PAM-derived TNF bioactivity and cell viability of freshly isolated porcine PAM during exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS), ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. The TNF activity (% L929 cytotoxicity of PAM conditioned medium) was elevated in LPS-stimulated PAM cultures (15 to 25% increase at 1 to 6 h and 40 to 43% increase at 6 to 48 h, compared with non-LPS-stimulated cultures), and ibuprofen (150 micrograms/ml) added with LPS decreased the TNF activity for 24 h (20 to 28% reduction at 1 to 24 h). Ibuprofen added 1 h after LPS was less effective in reducing the PAM-derived TNF activity (20 to 22% reduction at 2 to 6 h). Cimetidine (112 micrograms/ml) reduced the TNF activity of LPS-stimulated PAM cultures during the first 4 h of LPS exposure (15 to 24% decrease at 1 to 4 h). Diphenhydramine (150 micrograms/ml) attenuated the PAM-derived TNF activity but also decreased viability of PAM, indicating a toxic effect of this agent on PAM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8093999

  15. Long-term effects of ozone and nitrogen dioxide on the metabolism and population of alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mochitate, K.; Ishida, K.; Ohsumi, T.; Miura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    To investigate how alveolar macrophages adapt themselves to oxidative pollutants in the long term, rats were exposed to a strong oxidant, ozone (O3), or a weak oxidant, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), for a maximum duration of 12 wk. After exposures, alveolar macrophages were collected by pulmonary lavage. Throughout 11 wk of exposure to 0.2 ppm O3, the specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glutathione peroxidase of the peroxidative metabolic pathway and pyruvate kinase and hexokinase of the glycolytic pathway were 40-70% elevated over the controls in alveolar macrophages. The population of alveolar macrophages was consistently 60% higher than the controls. The small-sized macrophages, immature macrophages, preferentially increased. To the contrary, the thymidine incorporation per cell was always 20-30% lower than in the controls, although the total incorporation remained unchanged. No infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes occurred. By 12 wk of exposures to 1.2 and 4.0 ppm NO2, the population of alveolar macrophages increased 30% over the control. Among the enzymes examined, however, only the G6PDH activity increased 10% for 4.0 ppm NO2. No increase in the enzyme activities occurred for 1.2 ppm NO2. Based on these results, alveolar macrophages adapt themselves to the long-term exposure of O3 or NO2 by recruiting immature macrophages through an apparent influx of monocytes. During the exposure to O3, the peroxidative metabolic and glycolytic pathways are enhanced persistently in alveolar macrophages, whereas both pathways were not enhanced by the exposures to NO2.

  16. IL-1α induces CD11b(low) alveolar macrophage proliferation and maturation during granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Huaux, François; Lo Re, Sandra; Giordano, Giulia; Uwambayinema, Francine; Devosse, Raynal; Yakoub, Yousof; Panin, Nadtha; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Rabolli, Virginie; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Dauguet, Nicolas; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lison, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages play a central role in immune and tissue responses of granulomatous lung diseases induced by pathogens and foreign bodies. Circulating monocytes are generally viewed as central precursors of these tissue effector macrophages. Here, we provide evidence that granulomas derive from alveolar macrophages serving as a local reservoir for the expansion of activated phagocytic macrophages. By exploring lung granulomatous responses to silica particles in IL-1-deficient mice, we found that the absence of IL-1α, but not IL-1β, was associated with reduced CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophage accumulation and fewer granulomas. This defect was associated with impaired alveolar clearance and resulted in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Reconstitution of IL-1α(-/-) mice with recombinant IL-1α restored lung clearance functions and the pulmonary accumulation of CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophages. Mechanistically, IL-1α induced the proliferation of CD11b(low) alveolar macrophages and differentiated these cells into CD11b(high) macrophages which perform critical phagocytic functions and organize granuloma. We newly discovered here that IL-1α triggers lung responses requiring macrophage proliferation and maturation from tissue-resident macrophages. PMID:25421226

  17. Zinc Insufficiency Mediates Ethanol-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction in the Pregnant Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Konomi, Juna V.; Harris, Frank L.; Ping, Xiao-Du; Gauthier, Theresa W.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (a) Establish the minimum number of weeks of chronic ethanol ingestion needed to perturb zinc homeostasis, (b) Examine intracellular zinc status in the alveolar macrophages (AMs) when ethanol ingestion is combined with pregnancy, (c) Investigate whether in vitro zinc treatment reverses the effects of ethanol ingestion on the AM. Methods: C57BL/6 female mice were fed a liquid diet (±25% ethanol-derived calories) during preconception and pregnancy. The control group was pair-fed to the ethanol group. In the isolated AMs, we measured intracellular AM zinc levels, zinc transporter expression, alternative activation and phagocytic index. Zinc acetate was added to some cells prior to analysis. Results: Intracellular zinc levels in the AM decreased within 3 weeks of ethanol ingestion. After ethanol ingestion prior to and during pregnancy, zinc transporter expression and intracellular zinc levels were decreased in the AMs when compared with controls. Bacterial clearance was decreased because the AMs were alternatively activated. In vitro additions of zinc reversed these effects of ethanol. Conclusion: Ethanol ingestion prior to and during pregnancy perturbed AM zinc balance resulting in impaired bacterial clearance, but these effects were ameliorated by in vitro zinc treatments. PMID:25371044

  18. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin. PMID:26855331

  19. Hyperoxic exposure in humans. Effects of 50 percent oxygen on alveolar macrophage leukotriene B4 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, D E; Garcia, J G; James, H L; Callahan, K S; Iriana, S; Holiday, D

    1992-02-01

    The pathogenesis of oxygen toxicity remains unknown but may involve leukocyte mediated injury. The effects of hyperoxia on several lower respiratory tract parameters were examined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of normal nonsmoking subjects who inhaled a fractional inspired oxygen concentration of 50 percent (mean exposure: 44 h). Evidence that 50 percent O2 produced oxidative stress in the lung included recovery of fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation and partial oxidation of alpha 1-antitrypsin in BAL fluid obtained after O2 exposure. To examine whether alveolar macrophage-derived leukotriene B4 may be generated in response to 50 percent O2, AM were isolated from O2-exposed subjects and compared with AM recovered from subjects breathing room air. Leukotriene B4 levels were elevated in supernatants from both unstimulated and arachidonic acid-stimulated AM obtained from hyperoxia-exposed subjects. In hyperoxia-exposed individuals, LTB4 levels were also elevated in extracted BAL fluid. The percentage of BAL neutrophils was also significantly increased after O2 exposure (2.8 +/- 0.6 vs 1.2 +/- 0.4 percent, p = 0.05). We conclude that an FIO2 of 50 percent inhaled for 44 h is associated with enhanced oxidative stress, stimulation of AM to release LTB4, and a small but significantly increased percentage of neutrophils recovered in BAL fluid. PMID:1310457

  20. POLY(1):POLY(C)-ENHANCED ALVEOLAR AND PERITONEAL MACROPHAGE PHAGOCYTOSIS: QUANTIFICATION BY A NEW METHOD UTILIZING FLUOROESCENT BEADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for quantifying nonspecific phagocytosis of alveolar and peritoneal macrophages in the same animal has been developed utilizing fluorescent polystyrene beads. When incorporated into inhalation studies, the technique can be used to determine whether the toxic effect of...

  1. Alveolar macrophages and lung lesions after combined exposure to nickel, cobalt, and trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Curstedt, T.; Jarstrand, C.; Camner, P. )

    1992-07-01

    In earlier inhalation exposures of rabbits, nickel increased the production of surfactant by type II cells, with secondary effects on morphology and function of alveolar macrophages. Cobalt induced mainly a nodular growth pattern of the type II cells. Trivalent chromium seemed to impair the capacity of macrophages to catabolize surfactant but did not affect the type II cells. The authors exposed the rabbits by inhalation to combinations of nickel (0.6 mg/m3 as NiCl2) and trivalent chromium [1.2 mg/m3 as Cr(NO3)3] (Ni-Cr), cobalt (0.5 mg/m3 as CoCl2) and nickel (0.5 mg/m3) (Co-Ni), or cobalt (0.5 mg/m3) and chromium (1.2 mg/m3) (Co-Cr) for 4 months, 5 days/week, 6 hr/day. Alveolar macrophages, alveolar type II cells, and lung content of phospholipids were determined. All combined exposures induced more pronounced lung lesions than exposures for each of the metals. Phospholipid concentrations were significantly higher. There were significantly higher percentages of macrophages filled with surfactant-like inclusions and a smooth surface. Accumulations of macrophages in alveoli were more widespread. Chromium potentiated the effects of nickel and cobalt on the type II cells, which led to secondary effects on the macrophages. Nickel potentiated the specific effects of cobalt, i.e., type II cell nodule formation. The result indicates that noxious effects could also be induced in man by combined exposure to nickel, cobalt, and trivalent chromium in concentrations similar to those occurring in some occupational settings.

  2. Altered expression of Fas receptor on alveolar macrophages and inflammatory effects of soluble Fas ligand following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Palmer, Annette; Niesler, Ulrike; Braumüller, Sonja T; Bauknecht, Simon; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2011-06-01

    Blunt chest trauma impairs the outcome of multiply-injured patients. Lung contusion induces inflammatory alterations and Fas-dependent apoptosis of alveolar type 2 epithelial (AT2) cells has been described. The Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system seems to exhibit a proinflammatory potential. We aimed to elucidate the involvement of the Fas/FasL system in the inflammatory response after lung contusion. Chest trauma was induced in male rats by a pressure wave. Soluble FasL concentrations were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and alveolar macrophage (AMΦ) supernatants. Alveolar macrophages and AT2 cells were isolated to determine the surface expression (FACS) of Fas/FasL, the mRNA expression (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) of Fas, FasL, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 and to measure the release of IL-6 and IL-10 after culture with or without stimulation with FasL. After chest trauma, FasL concentration was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AMΦ supernatants and Fas and FasL protein were downregulated on AMΦs and unchanged on AT2 cells. The mRNA expression of Fas was increased in AMΦs and AT2 cells and that of FasL only in AMΦs isolated after lung contusion. Fas ligand stimulation further enhanced IL-6 and suppressed IL-10 release in AMΦs after trauma.The results indicate that the Fas/FasL system is activated after chest trauma, and FasL is associated with the inflammatory response after lung contusion. The proinflammatory response of AMΦs is enhanced by FasL stimulation. Both AMΦs and AT2 cells seem to contribute to the mediator release after lung contusion. These results confirm the importance of the Fas/FasL system in the inflammatory response after chest trauma. PMID:21330946

  3. Effects of X irradiation on the cytoskeleton of rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ladyman, S.J.; Townsend, K.M.S.; Edwards, C.

    1984-07-01

    The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons has been used to demonstrate that an absorbed dose of 120 Gy from X rays causes a distinctive and reproducible alteration of the cytoskeleton of intact rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The alteration has also been shown to be rapidly and completely ''repaired'' and to be apparently similar to alterations caused by colchicine but dissimilar to those caused by cytochalasin B. From these observations and those of other workers who have studied the irradiation of extracted microtubular proteins in vitro, the authors think it likely that microtubules rather than microfilaments are the radiosensitive component of the macrophage cytoskeleton.

  4. Role of alveolar macrophages in the dissolution of two different industrial uranium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hengé-Napoli, M H; Ansoborlo, E; Claraz, M; Berry, J P; Cheynet, M C

    1996-05-01

    This study was aimed at assessing and understanding some mechanisms involved in the intracellular particle transformation of two uranium oxides (U3O8 and UO2 + Umetal) produced by a new isotopic enrichment plant using laser technology. Instillations were conducted on rats with both uranium compounds and alveolar macrophages were harvested at different dates and prepared in order to be studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The presence of particles in the cells was observed from the first day after instillation, and crystalline needles of uranyl phosphate appeared in the cytoplasm of the cells. These needles were more numerous after instillation with the mixture UO2 + Umetal than after administration of U3O8 and may be correlated with the higher solubility of UO2 + Umetal observed in vitro. The formation of insoluble needles in lysosomes is consistent with the insolubilisation of uranium observed after phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. PMID:8793194

  5. Different pathways of degradation of SP-A and saturated phosphatidylcholine by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baritussio, A; Alberti, A; Armanini, D; Meloni, F; Bruttomesso, D

    2000-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages degrade surfactant protein (SP) A and saturated phosphatidycholine [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)]. To clarify this process, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, we analyzed the effect of drugs known to affect phagocytosis, pinocytosis, clathrin-mediated uptake, caveolae, the cytoskeleton, lysosomal pH, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on the degradation of SP-A and DPPC. We found the following: 1) SP-A binds to the plasma membrane, is rapidly internalized, and then moves toward degradative compartments. Uptake could be clathrin mediated, whereas phagocytosis, pinocytosis, or the use of caveolae are less likely. An intact cytoskeleton and an acidic milieu are necessary for the degradation of SP-A. 2) Stimulation of protein kinase C increases the degradation of SP-A. 3) PI3K influences the degradation of SP-A by regulating both the speed of internalization and subsequent intracellular steps, but its inhibition does not prevent SP-A from reaching the lysosomal compartment. 4) The degradation of DPPC is unaffected by most of the treatments able to influence the degradation of SP-A. Thus it appears that DPPC is degraded by alveolar macrophages through mechanisms very different from those utilized for the degradation of SP-A. PMID:10893207

  6. Transcription Analysis of the Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25098731

  7. Urban particle-induced apoptosis and phenotype shifts in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Holian, A; Hamilton, R F; Morandi, M T; Brown, S D; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report a small but positive association between short-term increases in airborne particulate matter and small increases in morbidity and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular disease in urban areas. However, the lack of a mechanistic explanation to link particle exposure and human health effects makes it difficult to validate the human health effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that urban particles could cause apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages(AM) and a shift of their phenotypes to a higher immune active state, which would provide a mechanism to explain an inflammatory response. Freshly isolated human AM were incubated for 24 hr with urban particles (#1648 and #1649), Mount Saint Helen's ash (MSH), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA).Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis was demonstrated by morphology, cell death ELISA, and DNA ladder formation. Additionally, AM were characterized according to RFD1(+) (immune stimulatory macrophages) and RFD1(+)7(+) (suppressor macrophages) phenotypes by flow cytometry. ROFA particles caused AM necrosis at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, urban particles had no effect except at 200 microg/ml, and MSH had no effect at 200 microg/ml. ROFA (25 microg/ml) and particles #1648 or #1649 (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of AM by all three criteria, but 200 microg/ml MSH had no effect. Finally, 25 microg/ml ROFA and 100 microg/ml particles #1648 or #1649 up regulated the expression of the RFD1(+) AM phenotype, while only ROFA decreased the RFD1(+)7(+) phenotype. Consequently, ROFA and urban particles can induce apoptosis of human AM and increase the ratio of AM phenotypes toward a higher immune active state (i.e., increased RFD1(+):RFD1(+)7(+) ratio). Ifurban particles cause similar changes in vivo, this could result in lung inflammation and possible increased pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  8. In vivo Targeting of Alveolar Macrophages via RAFT-Based Glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ho; Manganiello, Matthew J.; Chow, Yu-Hua; Ghosn, Bilal; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Partick S.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting cell populations via endogenous carbohydrate receptors is an appealing approach for drug delivery. However, to be effective, this strategy requires the production of high affinity carbohydrate ligands capable of engaging with specific cell-surface lectins. To develop materials that exhibit high affinity towards these receptors, we synthesized glycopolymers displaying pendant carbohydrate moieties from carbohydrate-functionalized monomer precursors via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. These glycopolymers were fluorescently labeled and used to determine macrophage-specific targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Mannose- and N-acetylglucosamine-containing glycopolymers were shown to specifically target mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner as compared to a galactose-containing glycopolymer (30- and 19-fold higher uptake, respectively). In addition, upon macrophage differentiation, the mannose glycopolymer exhibited enhanced uptake in M2-polarized macrophages, an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype prevalent in injured tissue. This carbohydrate-specific uptake was retained in vivo, as alveolar macrophages demonstrated 6-fold higher internalization of mannose glycopolymer, as compared to galactose, following intratracheal administration in mice. We have shown the successful synthesis of a class of functional RAFT glycopolymers capable of macrophage-type specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo, with significant implications for the design of future targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22770567

  9. Human alveolar macrophages synthesize factor VII in vitro. Possible role in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, H A; Allen, C L; Stone, O L; Fair, D S

    1985-01-01

    Both fibrin and tissue macrophages are prominent in the histopathology of chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease. We therefore examined the procoagulant activity of freshly lavaged human alveolar macrophages in vitro. Intact macrophages (5 X 10(5) cells) from 13 healthy volunteers promoted clotting of whole plasma in a mean of 65 s. Macrophage procoagulant activity was at least partially independent of exogenous Factor VII as judged by a mean clotting time of 99 s in Factor VII-deficient plasma and by neutralization of procoagulant activity by an antibody to Factor VII. Immunoprecipitation of extracts of macrophages metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine by Factor VII antibody and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a labeled protein consistent in size with the known molecular weight of blood Factor VII, 48,000. The addition of 50 micrograms of unlabeled, purified Factor VII blocked recovery of the 48,000-mol wt protein. In addition, supernatants of cultured macrophages from six normal volunteers had Factor X-activating activity that was suppressed an average of 71% after culture in the presence of 50 microM coumadin or entirely by the Factor VII antibody indicating that Factor VII synthesized by the cell was biologically active. Endotoxin in vitro induced increases in cellular tissue factor but had no consistent effect on macrophage Factor VII activity. We also examined the tissue factor and Factor VII activities of freshly lavaged alveolar cells from nine subjects with clinical and/or histologic evidence of sarcoidosis. Four of the nine subjects expressed increased tissue factor and seven of nine had increased Factor VII activity over the normal range (P less than 0.01). We estimate the mean Factor VII associated with the cells of sarcoid patients to be 4.7 ng/10(6) cells (range 0.4-20) as compared to a mean of 0.74 ng/10(6) cells (range 0.2-2) for that of normal subjects. Along with previous data showing synthesis

  10. Alveolar Macrophage Recruitment and Activation by Chronic Second Hand Smoke Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Almut; Solon, Margaret; Cambier, Christopher J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Koth, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of cases of COPD occur in non-smokers. Among the potential risk factors for COPD in non-smokers is second hand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, the Surgeon General reported in 2006 that the evidence linking second hand smoke and COPD is insufficient to infer a causal relationship, largely because current evidence does not establish a biological link. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine whether SHS exposure can induce alveolar macrophage recruitment and expression of activation markers that we have previously demonstrated in human smokers and in mouse models of emphysema. To achieve these goals, we studied mice exposed to an ambient mixture of predominantly [89%] sidestream smoke at increasing doses over 3 months. Results We found that second hand smoke exposure induced a dose-dependent increase in alveolar macrophage recruitment (mean ± sd; 224,511 ± 52,330 vs 166,152 ± 47,989 macrophages/ml of bronchoalveolar lavage in smoke-exposed vs air-exposed controls at 3 months, p=0.003). We also found increased expression of several markers of alveolar macrophage activation (PLA2g7, dkfzp434l142, Trem-2, and pirin, all p<0.01 at 3 months) and increased lavage levels of two inflammatory mediators associated with COPD (CCL2 [MCP-1], 58 ± 12 vs. 43 ± 22 pg/ml, p=0.03; and TNFα, 138 ± 43 vs 88 ± 78 pg/ml, p=0.04 at 3 months). Conclusions These findings indicate that second smoke exposure can cause macrophage recruitment and activation, providing a biological link between second hand smoke exposure and the development of inflammatory processes linked to COPD. PMID:19378221

  11. Glutathione attenuates ethanol-induced alveolar macrophage oxidative stress and dysfunction by downregulating NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Harris, Frank L; Hart, C Michael; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases lung oxidative stress and susceptibility to respiratory infections by impairing alveolar macrophage (AM) function. NADPH oxidases (Nox) are major sources of reactive oxygen species in AMs. We hypothesized that treatment with the critical antioxidant glutathione (GSH) attenuates chronic alcohol-induced oxidative stress by downregulating Noxes and restores AM phagocytic function. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and AMs were isolated from male C57BL/6J mice (8-10 wk) treated ± ethanol in drinking water (20% wt/vol, 12 wk) ± orally gavaged GSH in methylcellulose vehicle (300 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), during week 12). MH-S cells, a mouse AM cell line, were treated ± ethanol (0.08%, 3 days) ± GSH (500 μM, 3 days or last 1 day of ethanol). BAL and AMs were also isolated from ethanol-fed and control mice ± inoculated airway Klebsiella pneumoniae (200 colony-forming units, 28 h) ± orally gavaged GSH (300 mg/kg, 24 h). GSH levels (HPLC), Nox mRNA (quantitative RT-PCR) and protein levels (Western blot and immunostaining), oxidative stress (2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate and Amplex Red), and phagocytosis (Staphylococcus aureus internalization) were measured. Chronic alcohol decreased GSH levels, increased Nox expression and activity, enhanced oxidative stress, impaired phagocytic function in AMs in vivo and in vitro, and exacerbated K. pneumonia-induced oxidative stress. Although how oral GSH restored GSH pools in ethanol-fed mice is unknown, oral GSH treatments abrogated the detrimental effects of chronic alcohol exposure and improved AM function. These studies provide GSH as a novel therapeutic approach for attenuating alcohol-induced derangements in AM Nox expression, oxidative stress, dysfunction, and risk for pneumonia. PMID:24441868

  12. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  13. Response of perifused alveolar macrophages to glass fibers: effect of exposure duration and fiber length

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, G.; Lacroix, M.J.; Brown, R.C.; Evans, P.H.; Sirois, P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages was studied with a new perifusion technique which allows the sequential determination of cell-derived inflammatory mediators as well as estimation of cell viability and aggregation at the end of the incubation period. Results showed that glass fibers induced dose-dependent release of prostaglandins and B-glucuronidase from macrophages and the aggregation and death of these cells. These deleterious effects were clearly related to the length of the fibers, with the longer fibers (greater than or equal to4-5 ..mu..m) being more active than the shorter ones (<3 ..mu..m). Furthermore, a short exposure of 1 hr followed by an 18-hr perifusion induced the same inflammatory and toxic effects on the macrophages as did leaving the fibers undisturbed for the complete 18-hr perifusion. Measurement of prostaglandins was performed by radioimmunoassay. It is concluded that glass fibers produce effects in cultures of rat alveolar macrophages qualitatively similar to those of asbestos, and that fiber length appears to be a critical determinant of toxicity.

  14. Metabolic and functional characteristics of alveolar macrophages recovered from rats exposed to marijuana smoke.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Price, L; Huber, G L

    1979-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchopulmonary lavage from male rats after 30 consecutive days of in vivo exposure to marijuana and tobacco smoke. No significant differences were found between either group of experimental animals and controls in the number of cells recovered, the protein content per 10(6) cells, or the percentage of cells that adhered to plastic surfaces. The ability of macrophages to phagocytize viable bacteria was not affected by exposure to either marijuana or tobacco smoke in that both treatment groups ingested Staphylococcus aureus over a 60-min period as well as did control cells. Differences were found between the groups, however, with respect to cellular metabolism. Marijuana smoke inhalation caused a small decrease in the amount of oxygen consumed by macrophages during phagocytosis, as compared with control cells. This may have been reflected in the even greater decrease in superoxide formation observed during particle engulfment by these treated cells. Tobacco smoke, on the other hand, increased oxygen consumption and was without effect on superoxide release. Neither tobacco nor marijuana smoke treatment had an effect on the direct oxidation of glucose via the hexose monophosphate shunt. Our results indicate that, despite several metabolic alterations in response to marijuana and tobacco smoke, alveolar macrophages were not compromised with respect to their ability to ingest a particulate challenge. PMID:225274

  15. Role of alveolar macrophages in dissemination of Marek’s disease virus from lungs to lymphoid organs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the specific role of macrophages in the control or exacerbation of Marek’s disease (MD), alveolar macrophages of chickens were depleted by intra-tracheal (IT) instillation of Cl2MBP. Forty-eight hours post treatment chicks were inoculated with 100 micro liter of cell-free MD virus (MD...

  16. Investigation of the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of cement dusts in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    van Berlo, Damien; Haberzettl, Petra; Gerloff, Kirsten; Li, Hui; Scherbart, Agnes M; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F

    2009-09-01

    Exposure to cement dust, a specifically alkaline and irritant dust, is one of the most common occupational dust exposures worldwide. Although several adverse respiratory health effects have been associated with cement dust exposure, the evidence is not conclusive. In the current study, cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects as well as oxidative stress elicited by a number of cement dusts, including a limestone and cement clinker sample, were tested using the NR8383 rat alveolar macrophage cell line and primary rat alveolar macrophages. DQ12 quartz and TiO(2) were included as positive and negative controls, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay and the lactate dehydrogenase assay, oxidative stress was determined by measurement of the depletion of total cellular glutathione, and electron spin resonance was applied to determine reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The release of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. None of the dust samples were found to cause toxicity to the macrophages or notable glutathione depletion when compared to DQ12. The cement samples also failed to activate macrophages for the generation of ROS and the production of inflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and MIP-2. In contrast, however, most of the cement dusts were found to activate macrophage TNFalpha production, and this was significantly associated with their content of CaO. Further research is needed to determine the relevance of these in vitro observations for occupational cement dust exposure settings. PMID:19697923

  17. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  18. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersions were characterized for various biopharmaceutical parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and targeting to alveolar macrophages. The formulated polymeric nanoparticles were in the particle size range of 45.51 to 300.4 nm with a maximum drug entrapment efficiency of 80.9%. The stability study of optimized batch conducted at 40±2°/75±5% relative humidity showed no significant changes up to 90 days. X-Ray Diffraction spectrum exhibits the transformation of crystalline form of drug to amorphous in the formulation. Scanning Electron Microscope image showed nanoparticles spherical in shape with smooth surface. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature with burst release followed by controlled release over a period of 24 h obeying diffusion mechanism. In vivo and ex vivo studies results of the study show significant uptake of the nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages through fluorescent micrograph. Polymeric nanoparticles formulation of pyrazinamide could encompass significant uptake by alveolar macrophages, the high first-pass metabolism, sustain the release of drug leading to reduction in dose, toxicity and improvement of patient compliance. PMID:26180270

  19. Phagostimulatory effect of uptake of PLGA microspheres loaded with rifampicin on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Keiji; Hasegawa, Taizo; Nakajima, Takehisa; Makino, Kimiko; Terada, Hiroshi

    2011-10-15

    Our previous results on the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (Mϕs) toward poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres (PLGA MS) loaded with the anti-tuberculosis agent rifampicin (R-PLGA MS) suggest that the phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS enhances the phagocytic activity of Mϕ cells. To confirm this possibility, we examined the effect of phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS and polystyrene latex (PSL) MS on the phagocytic uptake of fluorescent PSL (F-PSL) MS by cells of the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 at 37°C. Phagocytic activity was examined in terms of the population of Mϕ cells that had phagocytosed MS (N(total)) and the total number of MS phagocytosed (n(total)) by counting the phagocytic Mϕ cells and the MS ingested in optical microscopic fields. Phagocytosis of R-PLGA MS enhanced about 1.5 times the values of N(total) and n(total) of the phagocytosis of F-PSL MS under the conditions where the phagocytosis of F-PSL MS did not attain the saturated level. In contrast, the phagocytosis of PSL MS did not enhance the phagocytic activity of Mϕ cells toward F-PSL MS. In conclusion, R-PLGA MS are favorable for drug delivery of anti-tuberculosis agents into alveolar Mϕs due to their ability to up-regulate the phagocytosis of MS. PMID:21700434

  20. Effect of inhaled alpha-emitting nuclides on mouse alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, R.J.; Nicholls, L.; Morgan, A.; Moores, S.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The effects of inhaled alpha emitters on the free cell population of the mouse lung were investigated up to 100 days after exposure. Groups of mice inhaled aerosols of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}, {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}, or {sup 241}Am(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} to give alveolar deposits resulting in lung-averaged cumulative absorbed doses of about 20 Gy by the end of the study. Initially, with {sup 238}Pu most of the activity was associated with relatively few pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), whereas with {sup 241}Am, all pulmonary alveolar macrophages were labeled and a substantial fraction was extracellular. The free cell population of the lung was sampled using bronchoalveolar lavage. The main parameters investigated were (a) the recovery and total numbers of free cells, including PAM, lymphocytes, and neutrophils; (b) the incidence of nuclear abnormalities in PAM (cells with more than one nucleus or with micronuclei); and (c) metabolic activation of PAM from measurements of their size and associated beta-glucuronidase activity. All three actinides produced depletions in total numbers of PAM, increased incidences of nuclear abnormalities, and metabolic activation of PAM, without a marked infiltration of inflammatory cells. Americium-241, which is distributed relatively uniformly in PAM, produced the most marked changes in that population and {sup 238}Pu, which gave the most inhomogeneous distribution of activity, produced the least.

  1. Alendronate inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by induction of apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Ogata, Fusa; Masubuchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Aoki, Fumiaki; Suga, Tatsuo; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. Here we show that delivery of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate alendronate via aerosol inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced emphysema in mice. Inhaled, but not orally ingested, alendronate inhibits airspace enlargement after elastase instillation, and induces apoptosis of macrophages in bronchoalveolar fluid via caspase-3- and mevalonate-dependent pathways. Cytometric analysis indicates that the F4/80(+)CD11b(high)CD11c(mild) population characterizing inflammatory macrophages, and the F4/80(+)CD11b(mild)CD11c(high) population defining resident alveolar macrophages take up substantial amounts of the bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense680 after aerosol inhalation. We further show that alendronate inhibits macrophage migratory and phagocytotic activities and blunts the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signalling. Given that the alendronate inhalation effectively induces apoptosis in both recruited and resident alveolar macrophages, we suggest this strategy may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of emphysema. PMID:25757189

  2. Simvastatin inhibits induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in rat alveolar macrophages exposed to cigarette smoke extract

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Eun; Thuy, Tran Thi Thanh; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ro, Jai Youl; Bae, Young-An; Kong, Yoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Lee, Dong-Soon; Oh, Yeon-Mock; Lee, Sang-Do

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) may play an important role in emphysematous change in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. We previously reported that simvastatin, an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, attenuates emphysematous change and MMP-9 induction in the lungs of rats exposed to cigarette smoke. However, it remained uncertain how cigarette smoke induced MMP-9 and how simvastatin inhibited cigarette smoke-induced MMP-9 expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs), a major source of MMP-9 in the lungs of COPD patients. Presently, we examined the related signaling for MMP-9 induction and the inhibitory mechanism of simvastatin on MMP-9 induction in AMs exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). In isolated rat AMs, CSE induced MMP-9 expression and phosphorylation of ERK and Akt. A chemical inhibitor of MEK1/2 or PI3K reduced phosphorylation of ERK or Akt, respectively, and also inhibited CSE-mediated MMP-9 induction. Simvastatin reduced CSE-mediated MMP-9 induction, and simvastatin-mediated inhibition was reversed by farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Similar to simvastatin, inhibition of FPP transferase or GGPP transferase suppressed CSE-mediated MMP-9 induction. Simvastatin attenuated CSE-mediated activation of RAS and phosphorylation of ERK, Akt, p65, IκB, and nuclear AP-1 or NF-κB activity. Taken together, these results suggest that simvastatin may inhibit CSE-mediated MMP-9 induction, primarily by blocking prenylation of RAS in the signaling pathways, in which Raf-MEK-ERK, PI3K/Akt, AP-1, and IκB-NF-κB are involved. PMID:19299917

  3. Human Alveolar Macrophage Gene Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains H37Ra and H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard F.; Walrath, Jessica; Lee, Hung; Jacobson, Bruce A.; Horton, Heidi; Bowman, Michael R.; Nocka, Karl; Sypek, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    H37Rv and H37Ra have been widely used as models of virulent and avirulent strains, respectively, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Since the sequencing of H37Rv, microarrays have been used to investigate gene expression of M. tuberculosis strains under various conditions, and to compare gene expression of specific isolates of the organism. Because differences in the virulence of these organisms could also be manifest via their differential induction of host genes, we used Affymetrix Human Genome Arrays U133A and U133B to evaluate human alveolar macrophage (AM) responses to infection with H37Rv and H37Ra. H37Rv altered expression of far more genes than did H37Ra. Moreover, the genes induced by H37Rv to a greater extent than by H37Ra were predominantly associated with the development of effective immunity. H37Rv markedly increased expression of IL-23 p19, whereas neither organism significantly induced IL-12 p35 expression. Quantitative PCR confirmed that H37Rv induced significantly more AM p19 expression than did H37Ra. After low-level infection of both AM and peripheral blood monocytes (MN) with H37Rv, neither cell type produced IL-12 (by ELISA). In contrast, AM displayed significant IL-23 production in response to H37Rv, whereas MN did not. Our findings thus suggest an important role for IL-23 in human host responses to pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis, and are consistent with epidemiologic and genetic studies that imply that H37Rv may not have unusual capacity to cause human disease. PMID:18787177

  4. Vitamin E prevents NRF2-suppression by allergen in asthmatic alveolar macrophages in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dworski, Ryszard; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hoskins, Aimee; Freeman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with increased generation of reactive oxidant species and disturbed antioxidant defenses. NRF2 is the master transcription factor that regulates the expression of Phase II antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Disruption of NRF2 augments oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma suggesting a protective role of NRF2 in the lungs in vivo. Yet, little is known about the regulation and function of NRF2 in human asthmatics. Using segmental allergen challenge, a well established experimental model of IgE-mediated asthma exacerbation in human atopic asthmatics, we investigated the effect of a specific allergen and the modulatory role of vitamin E on NRF2 and a NRF2-target gene, superoxide dismutase, in alveolar macrophages recovered from the airways at 24h after allergen instillation in vivo. Allergen-provoked airway inflammation in sensitive asthmatics caused a profound inhibition of macrophage NRF2 activity and superoxide dismutase, rendering them incapable of responding to the NRF2 inducers. Prolonged treatment with high doses of the antioxidant vitamin E lessened this allergen-induced drop in alveolar macrophage NRF2. These results are the first to demonstrate that NRF2 expression in human asthmatics is compromised upon allergen challenge but can be rescued by vitamin E in vivo. PMID:21605660

  5. Effects of asbestos and silica on superoxide anion production in the guinea pig alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asbestos and silica on the activation pathway of the guinea pig alveolar macrophage. Activation of macrophages by physiological agents results in stimulation of phospholipase C causing phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. Phosphatidyl inositol turnover produces diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C causing superoxide anion production. Chrysotile stimulated alveolar macrophages to produce superoxide anion. This stimulation proceeded via phospholipase C, since chrysotile stimulated phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. The possible involvement of a coupling protein was evaluated by pretreating cells with pertussis toxin. Potential binding sites for chrysotile stimulation were examined using a series of nine lectins. Chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production was blocked by pretreatment with lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine, but not by lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, inhibited chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production, suggesting that chrysotile stimulated superoxide anion production by binding to N-acetylglucosamine residues. On the other hand, silica did not stimulate superoxide anion production. The effect of silica on agonist stimulation of this pathway was examined using two stimulants of superoxide anion production, N-formyl-nle-leu-phe (FNLP, which stimulates through phospholipase C) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (which directly activates protein kinase C).

  6. Alveolar macrophage-derived chemotactic factor: kinetics of in vitro production and partial characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, W W; Naegel, G P; Matthay, R A; Reynolds, H Y

    1980-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are the initial phagocytic cells that encounter foreign material and particulates deposited in the terminal airways. We have examined a mechanism by which these cells, after phagocytic challenge, may control or amplify the inflammatory response in lung parenchyma. Normal human alveolar macrophages (AM) were studied from eight subjects. With in vitro culture, AM produced and released two substances into culture media which have potent chemoattractant activity for blood polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) and negligible activity for mononuclear cells. Release of these factors is maximally stimulated by aggregated human immunoglobulin (Ig)G or zymosan particles; however, simple adhesion of the macrophages to plastic surfaces is also sufficient to stimulate release of these chemotactic substances. The larger substance (10,000 daltons) is immunologically distinct from C5a and interacts with a different PMN membrane receptor than that known to exist for formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Its chemotactic activity is sensitive to the enzymatic effect of trypsin. Although producing a single elution peak on gelfiltration chromatography, electrofocusing in polyacrylamide gels yielded five peaks of radioactivity. Chemotactic activity was localized to a fraction with a pI = 5.0. The smaller molecular weight substance has been less well characterized. Thus, the human AM can produce at least two factors which attract PMN and this capability may augment the local inflammatory response in the lung. PMID:7356678

  7. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  8. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  9. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  10. Macrophage-stimulating protein differently affects human alveolar macrophages from smoker and non-smoker patients: evaluation of respiratory burst, cytokine release and NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Gunella, Gabriele; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Viano, Ilario; Balbo, Piero; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2006-06-01

    Macrophage activation is a key feature of inflammatory reactions occurring during bacterial infections, immune responses and tissue injury. We previously demonstrated that human macrophages of different origin express the tyrosine kinase receptor recepteur d'origine nantaise, the human receptor for MSP (RON) and produce superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) when challenged with macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP), the endogenous ligand for RON. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of MSP in alveolar macrophages (AM) isolated from healthy volunteers and patients with interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), either smokers or non-smokers, by evaluating the respiratory burst, cytokine release and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation. MSP effects were compared with those induced by known AM stimuli, for example, phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide.MSP evokes O(2)(-) production, cytokine release and NF-kappaB activation in a concentration-dependent manner. By evaluating the respiratory burst, we demonstrate a significantly increased O(2)(-) production in AM from healthy smokers or smokers with pulmonary fibrosis, as compared to non-smokers, thus suggesting MSP as an enhancer of cigarette smoke toxicity. Besides inducing interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, MSP triggers an enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release, especially in healthy and pulmonary fibrosis smokers. On the contrary, MSP-induced IL-10 release is higher in AM from healthy non-smokers. MSP activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB; this effect is more potent in healthy and fibrosis smokers (2.5-fold increase in p50 subunit translocation). This effect is receptor-mediated, as it is prevented by a monoclonal anti-human MSP antibody. The higher effectiveness of MSP in AM from healthy smokers and patients with pulmonary fibrosis is suggestive of its role in these clinical conditions

  11. Dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Crapster-Pregont, Margaret; Yeo, Janice; Sanchez, Raquel L.; Kuperman, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background IL-13 in the airway induces pathologies that are highly characteristic of asthma, including mucus metaplasia, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway inflammation. As such, it is important to identify the IL-13–responding cell types that mediate each of the above pathologies. For example, IL-13’s effects on epithelium contribute to mucus metaplasia and AHR. IL-13’s effects on smooth muscle also contribute to AHR. However, it has been difficult to identify the cell types that mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Objective We sought to determine which cell types mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Methods We treated the airways of mice with IL-13 alone or in combination with IFN-γ. We associated the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production with cell types in the lung that coexpress IL-13 and IFN-γ receptors. We then evaluated IL-13–induced responses in CD11c promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor–expressing mice that were depleted of both dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages and in CD11b promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor– expressing mice that were depleted of dendritic cells. Results Dendritic cell and alveolar macrophage depletion protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL11, CCL24, CCL22, and CCL17 chemokine production. Preferential depletion of dendritic cells protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL22 and CCL17 chemokine production but not from IL-13–induced CCL11 and CCL24 chemokine production. In either case mice were not protected from IL-13–induced AHR and mucus metaplasia. Conclusions Pulmonary dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;129:1621-7.) PMID:22365581

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Calhoun, William J; Ameredes, Bill T; Clark, Melissa P; Deye, Gregory J; Baron, Paul; Jones, William; Blake, Terri; Castranova, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs) are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral) wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm). It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number) of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was observed in fiber

  13. Murine Alveolar Macrophages Are Highly Susceptible to Replication of Coxiella burnetii Phase II In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Talita D; Cunha, Larissa D; Ribeiro, Juliana M; Massis, Liliana M; Lima-Junior, Djalma S; Newton, Hayley J; Zamboni, Dario S

    2016-09-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes Q fever in humans. Q fever is an atypical pneumonia transmitted through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In mammalian lungs, C. burnetii infects and replicates in several cell types, including alveolar macrophages (AMs). The innate immunity and signaling pathways operating during infection are still poorly understood, in part because of the lack of relevant host cell models for infection in vitro In the study described here, we investigated and characterized the infection of primary murine AMs by C. burnetii phase II in vitro Our data reveal that AMs show a pronounced M2 polarization and are highly permissive to C. burnetii multiplication in vitro Murine AMs present an increased susceptibility to infection in comparison to primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. AMs support more than 2 logs of bacterial replication during 12 days of infection in culture, similar to highly susceptible host cells, such as Vero and THP-1 cells. As a proof of principle that AMs are useful for investigation of C. burnetii replication, we performed experiments with AMs from Nos2(-/-) or Ifng(-/-) mice. In the absence of gamma interferon and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), AMs were significantly more permissive than wild-type cells. In contrast, AMs from Il4(-/-) mice were more restrictive to C. burnetii replication, supporting the importance of M2 polarization for the permissiveness of AMs to C. burnetii replication. Collectively, our data account for understanding the high susceptibility of alveolar macrophages to bacterial replication and support the use of AMs as a relevant model of C. burnetii growth in primary macrophages. PMID:27297388

  14. Alveolar Macrophages Play a Key Role in Cockroach-Induced Allergic Inflammation via TNF-α Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Young; Sohn, Jung Ho; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Chein-Soo; Lee, Joo-Shil; Park, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    The activity of the serine protease in the German cockroach allergen is important to the development of allergic disease. The protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, which is expressed in numerous cell types in lung tissue, is known to mediate the cellular events caused by inhaled serine protease. Alveolar macrophages express PAR-2 and produce considerable amounts of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We determined whether the serine protease in German cockroach extract (GCE) enhances TNF-α production by alveolar macrophages through the PAR-2 pathway and whether the TNF-α production affects GCE-induced pulmonary inflammation. Effects of GCE on alveolar macrophages and TNF-α production were evaluated using in vitro MH-S and RAW264.6 cells and in vivo GCE-induced asthma models of BALB/c mice. GCE contained a large amount of serine protease. In the MH-S and RAW264.7 cells, GCE activated PAR-2 and thereby produced TNF-α. In the GCE-induced asthma model, intranasal administration of GCE increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell infiltration, productions of serum immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13 and TNF-α production in alveolar macrophages. Blockade of serine proteases prevented the development of GCE induced allergic pathologies. TNF-α blockade also prevented the development of such asthma-like lesions. Depletion of alveolar macrophages reduced AHR and intracellular TNF-α level in pulmonary cell populations in the GCE-induced asthma model. These results suggest that serine protease from GCE affects asthma through an alveolar macrophage and TNF-α dependent manner, reflecting the close relation of innate and adaptive immune response in allergic asthma model. PMID:23094102

  15. Chronic Household Air Pollution Exposure Is Associated with Impaired Alveolar Macrophage Function in Malawian Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Chimpini, Chikondi; Semple, Sean; Russell, David G.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Household air pollution in low income countries is an important cause of mortality from respiratory infection. We hypothesised that chronic smoke exposure is detrimental to alveolar macrophage function, causing failure of innate immunity. We report the relationship between macrophage function and prior smoke exposure in healthy Malawians. Methods Healthy subjects exposed daily to cooking smoke at home volunteered for bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophage particulate content was measured as a known correlate of smoke exposure. Phagocytosis and intraphagosomal function (oxidative burst and proteolysis) were measured by a flow cytometric assay. Cytokine responses in macrophages were compared following re-exposure in vitro to wood smoke, before and after glutathione depletion. Results Volunteers had a range of alveolar macrophage particulate loading. The macrophage capacity for phagosomal oxidative burst was negatively associated with alveolar macrophage particulate content (n = 29, r2 = 0.16, p = 0.033), but phagocytosis per se and proteolytic function were unaffected. High particulate content was associated with lower baseline CXCL8 release (ratio 0.51, CI 0.29–0.89) and lower final concentrations on re-exposure to smoke in vitro (ratio 0.58, CI 0.34–0.97). Glutathione depletion augmented CXCL8 responses by 1.49x (CI 1.02–2.17) compared with wood smoke alone. This response was specific to smoke as macrophages response to LPS were not modulated by glutathione. Conclusion Chronic smoke exposure is associated with reduced human macrophage oxidative burst, and dampened inflammatory cytokine responses. These are critical processes in lung defence against infection and likely to underpin the relationship between air pollution and pneumonia. PMID:26406307

  16. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  17. Modulation of the effects of alveolar macrophages on lung fibroblast collagen production rate

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.G.; Greenberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) may function as effector cells that can either stimulate or inhibit lung fibroblast collagen production. However, conditions that determine the predominant effect of AM on fibroblasts are not well understood. To delineate factors that modulate the effects of AM on lung fibroblasts, we studied the interaction of AM products and fibroblasts in vitro. The AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of hamsters with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Conditioned medium (CM) from the AM cultures was incubated in varying amounts with lung fibroblast (IMR-90) cultures. After metabolic labeling with (/sup 3/H)proline, fibroblast collagen production based on procollagen-specific radioactivity was determined. Macrophage CM in concentrations greater than 5% suppressed collagen production, an event attributed to the macrophage-derived suppressive factor that we have previously characterized. Macrophages were also determined to produce PGE2 in culture. Authentic PGE2 at concentrations found in CM was found to suppress fibroblast collagen production, indicating that AM-derived PGE2 contributes to the suppressive activity in CM. To examine possible stimulatory factors in CM, the fibroblasts were preincubated with indomethacin. This approach was based on our previous observation that AM-derived suppressive factor increases endogenous fibroblast PGE2 and that its activity can be blocked by indomethacin. Macrophage CM in a concentration of 20% did not suppress the collagen production of indomethacin-treated fibroblasts. However, CM concentrations of 5 and 10% increased collagen production (173 and 143% of control values, respectively), indicating the presence of stimulatory factor(s) in macrophage-conditioned medium.

  18. Identification of beta 2-adrenoceptors on guinea pig alveolar macrophages using (-)-3-( sup 125 I)iodocyanopindolol

    SciTech Connect

    Leurs, R.; Beusenberg, F.D.; Bast, A.; Van Amsterdam, J.G.; Timmerman, H. )

    1990-08-01

    The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (-)-3-({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol (({sup 125}I)ICYP) binds with high affinity and in saturable way to membranes of guinea pig alveolar macrophages. The equilibrium dissociation constant for ({sup 125}I)ICYP is 24.3 +/- 1.2 pM, and the number of binding sites is 166.3 +/- 13.7 fmol/mg protein (N = 4, +/- SEM). Displacement studies with selective antagonists showed that ({sup 125}I)ICYP labels beta 2-adrenoceptors on guinea pig alveolar macrophages.

  19. Restoring cigarette smoke-induced impairment of efferocytosis in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, R; Mukherjee, S; Chen, H; Keshava, S; Neuenschwander, P; Shams, H

    2016-07-01

    Cigarette smoke has been associated with susceptibility to different pulmonary and airway diseases. Impaired alveolar macrophages (AMs) that are major phagocytes in the lung have been associated with patients with airway diseases and active smokers. In the current report, we show that exposure to second-hand cigarette smoke (SHS) significantly reduced efferocytosis in vivo. More importantly, delivery of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to the alveolar space restored and refurbished the efferocytosis capability of AMs. Exposure to SHS significantly reduced expression of CD16/32 on AMs, and treatment with GM-CSF not only restored but also significantly increased the expression of CD16/32 on AMs. GM-CSF treatment increased uptake and digestion/removal of apoptotic cells by AMs. The latter was attributed to increased expression of Rab5 and Rab7. Increased efferocytosis of AMs was also tested in a disease condition. AMs from GM-CSF-treated, influenza-infected, SHS-exposed mice showed significantly better efferocytosis activity, and mice had significantly less morbidity compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated group. GM-CSF-treated mice had increased amphiregulin levels in the lungs, which in addition to efferocytosis of AMs may have attributed to their protection against influenza. These results will have great implications for developing therapeutic approaches by harnessing mucosal innate immunity to treat lung and airway diseases and protect against pneumonia. PMID:26577570

  20. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  1. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Impair Alveolar Macrophages through PD-1 Receptor Ligation during Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Guang-Sheng; Zhang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were recently found to accumulate in the lungs during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). Adoptive transfer of these cells caused lung damage in recipient mice, suggesting that MDSC accumulation is a mechanism of pathogenesis in PcP. In this study, the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (AMs) was found to decrease by 40% when they were incubated with MDSCs from Pneumocystis-infected mice compared to those incubated with Gr-1+ cells from the bone marrow of uninfected mice. The expression of the PU.1 gene in AMs incubated with MDSCs also was decreased. This PU.1 downregulation was due mainly to decreased histone 3 acetylation and increased DNA methylation caused by MDSCs. MDSCs were found to express high levels of PD-L1, and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were found to express high levels of PD-1 during PcP. Furthermore, PD-1 expression in AMs from uninfected mice was increased by 18-fold when they were incubated with MDSCs compared to those incubated with Gr-1+ cells from the bone marrow of uninfected mice. The adverse effects of MDSCs on AMs were diminished when the MDSCs were pretreated with anti-PD-L1 antibody, suggesting that MDSCs disable AMs through PD-1/PD-L1 ligation during PcP. PMID:25404033

  2. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A. Nicole; Leach, Sonia M.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  3. Surfactant and varespladib co-administration in stimulated rat alveolar macrophages culture.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Daniele; Vendittelli, Francesca; Trias, Joaquim; Fraser, Heather; Minucci, Angelo; Gentile, Leonarda; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Conti, Giorgio; Antonelli, Massimo; Capoluongo, Ettore D

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening condition characterized by surfactant dysfunction and raised secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity. Varespladib is a sPLA2 inhibitor shown to be effective in animal models of acute lung injury. We aimed at investigating the effect of co-administration of surfactant and varespladib on sPLA2 activity. Alveolar macrophages were cultured and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and then treated with either varespladib, surfactant, varespladib followed by surfactant or nothing. sPLA2 activity, free fatty acids, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and protein concentrations were measured in culture supernatants. Treatment with varespladib (p=0.019) and varespladib + surfactant (p=0.013), reduced the enzyme activity by approximately 15% from the basal level measured in the untreated cultures. Surfactant, varespladib and varespladib + surfactant, respectively decreased free fatty acids by -45% (p=0.045), - 62% (p=0.009) and -48% (p=0.015), from the baseline concentration of the untreated cultures. Varespladib and poractant- α co-administration reduces sPLA2 activity and free fatty acids release in cultured rat alveolar macrophages, although a clear drug synergy was not evident. Since co-administration may be useful to reduce inflammation and surfactant inactivation in acute lung injury, further in vivo studies are warranted to verify its clinical usefulness. PMID:23590147

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of several plant extracts on porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Bravo, D; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-08-01

    Certain plant extracts are bioactive substances of some foods or traditional herbs, known to possess antioxidant, antibacterial, and perhaps immunoregulatory effects. This study investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of 7 plant extracts (anethol, capsicum oleoresin, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, garlicon, and turmeric oleoresin) on porcine alveolar macrophages collected from weaned pigs (n = 6 donor pigs) by bronchoalveolar lavage. The experimental design for this assay was a 2 [with or without 1 μg lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/mL] × 5 (5 different amounts of each plant extract) factorial arrangements in a randomized complete block design. The application of plant extracts were 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL, except for cinnamaldehyde and turmeric oleoresin, which were 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the number of live cells, Griess assay was applied to detect nitric oxide (NO) production, and ELISA was used to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants of macrophages. The LPS increased (P < 0.001) the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β. Without LPS, anethol and capsicum oleoresin increased (linear, P < 0.001) cell viability of macrophages, whereas other plant extracts reduced (linear, P < 0.001) it. Anethol, capsicum oleoresin, and carvacrol enhanced (linear, P < 0.001) the cell proliferation of LPS-treated macrophages. Without LPS, anethol, capsicum oleoresin, cinnamaldehyde, or turmeric oleoresin stimulated TNF-α secretion, whereas all plant extracts except eugenol enhanced IL-1β concentration in the supernatants of macrophages. However, all plant extracts suppressed (linear, P < 0.001) TNF-α, and all plant extracts except turmeric oleoresin decreased (linear, P < 0.05) IL-1β secretion from LPS-treated macrophages. Anethol and capsicum oleoresin

  5. Immortalized MH-S cells lack defining features of primary alveolar macrophages and do not support mouse pneumovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Todd A; Rice, Tyler A; Anderson, Erik D; Percopo, Caroline M; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2016-04-01

    The SV-40-transformed MH-S cell line maintains some, but not all, features of primary alveolar macrophages (AMs) from BALB/c mice. We show here that MH-S cells produce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CXCL10 in response to challenge with Gram-positive Lactobacillus reuteri, and to TLR2 and NOD2 ligands Pam3CSK4 and MDP, respectively. In contrast, although wild-type AMs are infected in vivo by pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), no virus replication was detected in MH-S cells. Interestingly, the surface immunophenotype of MH-S cells (CD11c(+)Siglec F(-)) differs from that of wild-type AMs (CD11c(+) Siglec F(+)) and is similar to that of immature AMs isolated from granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-deleted mice; AMs from GM-CSF(-/-) mice also support PVM replication. However, MH-S cells do not express the GM-CSF receptor alpha chain (CD116) and do not respond to GM-CSF. Due to these unusual features, MH-S cells should be used with caution as experimental models of AMs. PMID:26916143

  6. Tumour necrosis factor receptors and apoptosis of alveolar macrophages during early infection with attenuated and virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Michele F; Alves, Caio C S; Figueiredo, Bárbara B M; Rezende, Alice B; Wohlres-Viana, Sabine; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Machado, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages has been reported as an effective host strategy to control the growth of intracellular pathogens, including pathogenic mycobacteria. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in the modulation of apoptosis of infected macrophages. It exerts its biological activities via two distinct cell surface receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, whose extracellular domain can be released by proteolysis forming soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2). The signalling through TNFR1 initiates the majority of the biological functions of TNF-α, leading to either cell death or survival whereas TNFR2 mediates primarily survival signals. Here, the expression of TNF-α receptors and the apoptosis of alveolar macrophages were investigated during the early phase of infection with attenuated and virulent mycobacteria in mice. A significant increase of apoptosis and high expression of TNFR1 were observed in alveolar macrophages at 3 and 7 days after infection with attenuated Mycobacterium bovis but only on day 7 in infection with the virulent M. bovis. Low surface expression of TNFR1 and increased levels of sTNFR1 on day 3 after infection by the virulent strain were associated with reduced rates of apoptotic macrophages. In addition, a significant reduction in apoptosis of alveolar macrophages was observed in TNFR1−/− mice at day 3 after bacillus Calmette–Guérin infection. These results suggest a potential role for TNFR1 in mycobacteria-induced alveolar macrophage apoptosis in vivo. In this scenario, shedding of TNFR1 seems to contribute to the modulation of macrophage apoptosis in a strain-dependent manner. PMID:23489296

  7. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Disrupt Neonatal Alveolar Macrophage Mitochondria and Derange Cellular Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Sowmya S; Ping, Xiao Du; Harris, Frank L; Ronda, Necol J; Brown, Lou Ann S; Gauthier, Theresa W

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol exposure alters the function of alveolar macrophages (AM), impairing immune defenses in both adult and neonatal lungs. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are biological markers of prenatal alcohol exposure in newborns. FAEEs contribute to alcohol-induced mitochondrial (MT) damage in multiple organs. We hypothesized that in utero ethanol exposure would increase FAEEs in the neonatal lung and that direct exposure of neonatal AM to FAEEs would contribute to MT injury and cellular dysfunction. Methods FAEEs were measured in neonatal guinea pig lungs after ± in utero ethanol exposure via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The NR8383 cell line and freshly isolated neonatal guinea pig AM were exposed to ethyl oleate (EO) in vitro. MT membrane potential, MT reactive oxygen species generation (mROS), phagocytosis, and apoptosis were evaluated after exposure to EO ± the MT-specific antioxidant mito-TEMPO (mitoT) or ± the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Whole lung FAEEs were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Cellular results were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance, followed by the Student–Newman–Keuls Method for post hoc comparisons. Results In utero ethanol significantly increased ethyl linoleate and the combinations of ethyl oleate + linoleate + linolenate (OLL), and OLL + stearate in the neonatal lung. In vitro EO caused significant MT dysfunction in both NR8383 and primary neonatal AM, as indicated by increased mROS and loss of MT membrane potential. Impaired phagocytosis and apoptosis were significantly increased in both the cell line and primary AM after EO exposure. MitoT conferred significant but only partial protection against EO-induced MT injury, as did caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK. Conclusions In utero ethanol exposure increased FAEEs in the neonatal guinea pig lung. Direct exposure to the FAEE EO significantly contributed to AM dysfunction, in part via oxidant injury to the MT and in part via secondary

  8. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  9. Alveolar Macrophages and Toll-like Receptor 4 Mediate Ventilated Lung Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Arun; Mesa, Kailin R.; Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Xu, Fengyun; Dodd-o, Jeffrey M.; Hellman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Background Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury involves sterile inflammation and is commonly associated with diverse clinical situations such as hemorrhage followed by resuscitation, transient embolic events, and organ transplantation. I/R injury can induce lung dysfunction whether the I/R occurs in the lung itself or in a remote organ. Recently, evidence has emerged that receptors and pathways of the innate immune system are involved in recognizing sterile inflammation and overlap considerably with those involved in recognition and response to pathogens. Methods We used a mouse surgical model of transient unilateral left pulmonary artery occlusion without bronchial involvement to create ventilated lung I/R injury. Additionally, we mimicked nutritional I/R injury in vitro by transiently depriving cells of all nutrients. Results Compared with sham-operated mice, mice subjected to ventilated lung I/R injury had upregulated lung expression of inflammatory mediator messenger RNA for IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL1 and 2, paralleled by histologic evidence of lung neutrophil recruitment, and increased plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1 proteins. This inflammatory response to I/R required toll-like receptor-4. Furthermore, we demonstrated in vitro cooperativity and cross-talk between macrophages and endothelial cells, resulting in augmented inflammatory responses to I/R. Remarkably, we found that selective depletion of alveolar macrophages rendered mice resistant to ventilated lung I/R injury. Conclusions Our data reveal that alveolar macrophages and the pattern recognition receptor, toll-like receptor-4 are required for the generation of the early inflammatory response to lung I/R injury. PMID:22890118

  10. Expression and regulation of the macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha gene by nicotine in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chong, Inn-Wen; Lin, Shiu-Ru; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Wang, Tung-Heng; Hung, Jen-Yu; Paulauskis, Joseph D

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes inflammation mainly confined to the airway and lung. Nicotine is one of the primary constituents in cigarette smoke. Alveolar macrophages apparently play a pivotal role in mediating pulmonary inflammation via the production of chemokines. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha), a member of CC chemokines, has been shown to contribute to monocyte/macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis and activation. Our previous work demonstrated that MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression in macrophages is induced by a variety of stimuli. In the present study, we further investigate whether nicotine can regulate the gene expression of MIP-1 alpha in macrophages and determine the mechanism leading to increased expression. A rat alveolar macrophage (RAM) cell line, NR8383, was treated with nicotine at a dose of 3.1, 31, 310 microM, or 3.1 mM. Northern blot analysis showed that the induction of MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression was dose-dependent. To define the time course of the inflammatory response, RAM cells were exposed to 31 microM nicotine, MIP-1 alpha mRNA was induced as early as 1 h after treatment, was maximally expressed at 4 and 6 hours, and reduced by 8 hours. Western blot analysis demonstrated a single band with an estimated molecular weight of 10 kD for MIP-1 alpha which was induced after nicotine treatment, suggesting that expression of MIP-1 alpha mRNA could reflect in protein synthesis. In addition. the increase in MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression induced by nicotine was attenuated by co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), at doses of 10 and 20 mM, suggesting that the induction of MIP-1 alpha mRNA is mediated via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To further investigate transcriptional regulation of the MIP-1 alpha gene expression, RAM cells were exposed to nicotine. MIP-1 alpha mRNA levels were significantly increased in nuclear RNA preparations, indicating that transcriptional activation is involved in increased

  11. Phagocytosis of viable Candida albicans by alveolar macrophages: flow cytometric quantification.

    PubMed

    Rosseau, S; Seeger, W; Pralle, H; Lohmeyer, J

    1994-08-01

    The phagocytic capacity of blood leukocytes may be assessed by flow cytometric techniques using fluorochrome-labeled particles including viable microorganisms. Application of this approach to alveolar macrophages (AM) is hampered or even rendered impossible by the strong autofluorescence of this cell type, superimposing the fluorescence intensity of the labeled phagocytic targets. Viable Candida albicans were loaded with the membrane-permeable fluorescent dye carboxy-seminaphtorhodafluor 2/acetoxymethylester (carboxy-SNARF 2-AM), which is cleaved intracellularly to generate the membrane-impermeable derivative carboxy-SNARF 2. Fluorescence was excited with the 488-nm line of an argon-ion laser, and the emission peak at 633 nm was used for quantification of dye-associated fluorescence. Rabbit and human AM were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate-coupled monoclonal mouse anti-macrophage antibodies. After coincubation of macrophages and yeast, 4% paraformaldehyde plus 0.5% EDTA in phosphate-buffered saline was used to stop the phagocytic process and detach adherent yeast from the AM surface. Macrophages loaded with yeast displayed a shift from monochromatic (green) to dual (green and red) fluorescence. The percentage of yeast-positive AM and red fluorescence intensity of phagocytosing macrophages were quantified. Yeast opsonization with serum or anti-Candida immunoglobulins was a prerequisite for phagocytosis. Under optimized conditions (0.5-10% serum; 60 min yeast-AM incubation; yeast-AM ratio 8:1 to 12:1), 71-91% of the AM were involved in the phagocytic process. Yeast engulfment was completely inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8074245

  12. Co-spray dried resveratrol and budesonide inhalation formulation for reducing inflammation and oxidative stress in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Valentina; Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela; Scalia, Santo

    2016-04-30

    Oxidative stress is instrumental in the pathogenesis and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Novel therapeutic strategies that target macrophages, based on the use of antioxidant compounds, could be explored to improve corticosteroid responses in COPD patients. In this study, inhalable microparticles containing budesonide (BD) and resveratrol (RES) were prepared and characterized. This approach was undertaken to develop a multi-drug inhalable formulation with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities for treatment of chronic lung diseases. The inhalable microparticles containing different ratios of BD and RES were prepared by spray drying. The physico-chemical properties of the formulations were characterized in terms of surface morphology, particle size, physical and thermal stability. Additionally, in vitro aerosol performances of these formulations were evaluated with the multi-stage liquid impinger (MSLI) at 60 and 90 l/min, respectively. The cytotoxicity effect of the formulations was evaluated using rat alveolar macrophages. The biological responses of alveolar macrophages in terms of cytokine expressions, nitric oxide (NO) production and free radical scavenging activities were also tested. The co-spray dried (Co-SD) microparticles of all formulations exhibited morphologies appropriate for inhalation administration. Analysis of the deposition profiles showed an increase in aerosol performance proportional to BD concentration. Cell viability assay demonstrated that alveolar macrophages could tolerate a wide range of RES and BD concentrations. In addition, RES and BD were able to decrease the levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced alveolar macrophages. This study has successfully established the manufacture of Co-SD formulations of RES and BD with morphology and aerosol properties suitable for inhalation drug delivery, negligible in vitro toxicity and enhanced

  13. Human lung tissue macrophages, but not alveolar macrophages, express matrix metalloproteinases after direct contact with activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Lacraz, S; Nicod, L P; Chicheportiche, R; Welgus, H G; Dayer, J M

    2001-04-01

    Human alveolar macrophages (AM) and lung tissue macrophages (LTM) have a distinct localization in the cellular environment. We studied their response to direct contact with activated T lymphocytes in terms of the production of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), 92-kD gelatinase (MMP-9), and of TIMP-1, one of the counter-regulatory tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Either AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage or LTM obtained by mincing and digestion of lung tissue were exposed for 48 h to plasma membranes of T lymphocytes previously activated with phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin for 24 h. Membranes of activated T cells strongly induced the production of MMP-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 exclusively in LTM but not in AM, whereas membranes from unstimulated T cells failed to induce the release of MMPs. Both populations of mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously released only small amounts of MMPs and TIMP-1. Similar results were obtained when MMP and TIMP-1 expression was analyzed at pretranslational and biosynthetic levels, respectively. Blockade experiments with cytokine antagonists revealed the involvement of T-cell membrane-associated interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in MMP production by LTM upon contact with T cells. These data suggest that the ability of lung macrophages to produce MMPs after direct contact with activated T cells is related to the difference in phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes and cell localization. In addition, these observations indicate that cell-cell contact represents an important biological mechanism in potentiating the inflammatory response of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs. PMID:11306438

  14. SP-D counteracts GM-CSF-mediated increase of granuloma formation by alveolar macrophages in lysinuric protein intolerance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a syndrome with multiple etiologies and is often deadly in lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI). At present, PAP is treated by whole lung lavage or with granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF); however, the effectiveness of GM-CSF in treating LPI associated PAP is uncertain. We hypothesized that GM-CSF and surfactant protein D (SP-D) would enhance the clearance of proteins and dying cells that are typically present in the airways of PAP lungs. Methods Cells and cell-free supernatant of therapeutic bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of a two-year-old patient with LPI were isolated on multiple occasions. Diagnostic BALF samples from an age-matched patient with bronchitis or adult PAP patients were used as controls. SP-D and total protein content of the supernatants were determined by BCA assays and Western blots, respectively. Cholesterol content was determined by a calorimetic assay or Oil Red O staining of cytospin preparations. The cells and surfactant lipids were also analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Uptake of Alexa-647 conjugated BSA and DiI-labelled apoptotic Jurkat T-cells by BAL cells were studied separately in the presence or absence of SP-D (1 μg/ml) and/or GM-CSF (10 ng/ml), ex vivo. Specimens were analyzed by light and fluorescence microscopy. Results Here we show that large amounts of cholesterol, and large numbers of cholesterol crystals, dying cells, and lipid-laden foamy alveolar macrophages were present in the airways of the LPI patient. Although SP-D is present, its bioavailability is low in the airways. SP-D was partially degraded and entrapped in the unusual surfactant lipid tubules with circular lattice, in vivo. We also show that supplementing SP-D and GM-CSF increases the uptake of protein and dying cells by healthy LPI alveolar macrophages, ex vivo. Serendipitously, we found that these cells spontaneously generated granulomas, ex vivo, and GM-CSF treatment

  15. Isolation and Culture of Alveolar Epithelial Type I and Type II Cells from Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Robert F.; Dobbs, Leland G.

    2014-01-01

    The pulmonary alveolar epithelium, comprised of alveolar Type I (TI) and Type II (TII) cells, covers more than 99% of the internal surface area of the lungs. The study of isolated and cultured alveolar epithelial TI and TII cells has provided a large amount of information about the functions of both cell types. This chapter provides information about methods for isolating and culturing both of these cell types from rat lungs. PMID:23097106

  16. Alveolar macrophages in rabbits after combined exposure to nickel and trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Wiernik, A.; Lundborg, M.; Jarstrand, C.; Camner, P.

    1988-08-01

    Rabbits were exposed to a combination of 0.7 mg/m3 Ni2+ as NiCl/sub 2/ and 1.2 mg/m3 of Cr3+ as Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, to 0.6 mg/m3 of Ni2+ as NiCl/sub 2/, or to filtered air for about 4 months, 5 days/week and 6 hr/day. Alveolar macrophages were recovered by lung lavage and studied by light and electron microscopy. Metabolic activity, phagocytic capacity and lysozyme activity in the macrophages were studied. After the combined exposure, the effects on lung weight, number of macrophages, and appearance of surface and number of intracellular laminated inclusions in these cells were more than additive. These effects might be explained by a combination of increased production by Ni2+ and impaired catabolism of surfactant by Cr3+. Because the metal concentrations used were not far above occupational threshold limit values, combined exposures to nickel and trivalent chromium should be considered more seriously.

  17. LPS induces IL-10 production by human alveolar macrophages via MAPKinases- and Sp1-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chanteux, Hugues; Guisset, Amélie C; Pilette, Charles; Sibille, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Background IL-10 is a cytokine mainly produced by macrophages that plays key roles in tolerance to inhaled antigens and in lung homeostasis. Its regulation in alveolar macrophages (HAM), the resident lung phagocytes, remains however unknown. Methods The present study investigated the role of intracellular signalling and transcription factors controlling the production of IL-10 in LPS-activated HAM from normal nonsmoking volunteers. Results LPS (1–1000 pg/ml) induced in vitro IL-10 production by HAM, both at mRNA and protein levels. LPS also activated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPkinases (immunoblots) and Sp-1 nuclear activity (EMSA). Selective inhibitors of MAPKinases (respectively PD98059, SB203580 and SP600125) and of Sp-1 signaling (mithramycin) decreased IL-10 expression in HAM. In addition, whilst not affecting IL-10 mRNA degradation, the three MAPKinase inhibitors completely abolished Sp-1 activation by LPS in HAM. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that expression of IL-10 in lung macrophages stimulated by LPS depends on the concomitant activation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPKinases, which control downstream signalling to Sp-1 transcription factor. This study further points to Sp-1 as a key signalling pathway for IL-10 expression in the lung. PMID:17916230

  18. Insight into human alveolar macrophage and M. tuberculosis interactions via metabolic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Lewis, Nathan E; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Jamshidi, Neema

    2010-10-19

    Metabolic coupling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to its host is foundational to its pathogenesis. Computational genome-scale metabolic models have shown utility in integrating -omic as well as physiologic data for systemic, mechanistic analysis of metabolism. To date, integrative analysis of host-pathogen interactions using in silico mass-balanced, genome-scale models has not been performed. We, therefore, constructed a cell-specific alveolar macrophage model, iAB-AMØ-1410, from the global human metabolic reconstruction, Recon 1. The model successfully predicted experimentally verified ATP and nitric oxide production rates in macrophages. This model was then integrated with an M. tuberculosis H37Rv model, iNJ661, to build an integrated host-pathogen genome-scale reconstruction, iAB-AMØ-1410-Mt-661. The integrated host-pathogen network enables simulation of the metabolic changes during infection. The resulting reaction activity and gene essentiality targets of the integrated model represent an altered infectious state. High-throughput data from infected macrophages were mapped onto the host-pathogen network and were able to describe three distinct pathological states. Integrated host-pathogen reconstructions thus form a foundation upon which understanding the biology and pathophysiology of infections can be developed. PMID:20959820

  19. EFFECT OF PENTAMIDINE ON CYTOKINE (IL-1B, TNFA, IL-6) PRODUCTION BY HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pentamidine (Pe) is an aromatic diamidine drug used clinically to treat Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia by aerosol inhalation. othing has been reported about the effects of this drug on human alveolar macrophage (AM) properties. n this study AM were exposed in vitro to various con...

  20. USE OF QUANTITATIVE TWO-DIMENSIONAL GEL ELECTROPHORESIS TO ANALYZE CHANGES IN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE PROTEINS IN HUMANS EXPOSED TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone is known to cause production of components which mediate inflammation and damage in the lung. he contribution of alveolar macrophages to this process is not well understood. n addition, ozone may cause more extensive cellular changes than...

  1. HUMAL ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSES TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICULATES ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INSOLUBLE OCMPONENTS OF COARSE MATERIAL, INCLUDING PARTICULATE ENDOTOXIN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Inhalation of particulate matter in the ambient air has been shown to cause pulmonary morbidity and exacerbate asthma. Alveolar macrophage (AM) are essential for effective removal of inhaled particles and microbes in the lower airways. While some particles minimally effect AM...

  2. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less

  3. Preferential Destruction of Interstitial Macrophages over Alveolar Macrophages as a Cause of Pulmonary Disease in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanhui; Sugimoto, Chie; Arainga, Mariluz; Midkiff, Cecily C; Liu, David Xianhong; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A; Kim, Woong-Ki; Didier, Elizabeth S; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2015-11-15

    To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that the AIDS virus differentially impacts two distinct subsets of lung macrophages. The predominant macrophages harvested by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), alveolar macrophages (AMs), are routinely used in studies on human lung macrophages, are long-lived cells, and exhibit low turnover. Interstitial macrophages (IMs) inhabit the lung tissue, are not recovered with BAL, are shorter-lived, and exhibit higher baseline turnover rates distinct from AMs. We examined the effects of SIV infection on AMs in BAL fluid and IMs in lung tissue of rhesus macaques. SIV infection produced massive cell death of IMs that contributed to lung tissue damage. Conversely, SIV infection induced minimal cell death of AMs, and these cells maintained the lower turnover rate throughout the duration of infection. This indicates that SIV produces lung tissue damage through destruction of IMs, whereas the longer-lived AMs may serve as a virus reservoir to facilitate HIV persistence. PMID:26432896

  4. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  5. Chronic cigarette smoking enhances spontaneous release of tumour necrosis factor-α from alveolar macrophages of rats

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, G. P.; Paulesu, L.; Corradeschi, F.; Luzzi, E.; Tanzini, M.; Aldinucci, C.; Di Stefano, A.

    1993-01-01

    Some biological effects of chronic cigarette smoking (two cigarettes for 2 h, daily for 4 months) in rats were evaluated. During the smoking period, body weight of smoker rats was always significantly lower than that of control rats. Immediately after the last smoking session the carboxyhaemoglobin concentration in the blood was about 8.5% and the polymorphonuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar fluid increased significantly. At the same time, enzymatic analyses on the supernatants of bronchoalveolar fluid revealed a significant increase of β-glucuronidase in the smoker group. Alveolar macrophages, collected 0, 8 and 24 h after the last smoking session, significantly increased the generation of superoxide anion and, after incubation for 24 h at 37° C in a humidified atmosphere, released significantly high amounts of TNF-α. When challenged with lipopolysaccharide, alveolar macrophages of smoker rats released much more TNF-α but, in such a case, TNF-α release was about one half of that observed in the control group. Peritoneal macrophages of both control and smoker rats were unable either to generate high levels of superoxide anion or to release significant amounts of TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated the activated state of alveolar macrophages and the resting state of peritoneal macrophages. PMID:18475558

  6. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R; Dos Santos, Claudia T; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A M; Souza, Felipe O; Soares, Christiane P; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J S; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a "crown." This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  7. A critical role for the TLR signaling adapter Mal in alveolar macrophage-mediated protection against Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Bernard, N J; Finlay, C M; Tannahill, G M; Cassidy, J P; O'Neill, L A; Mills, K H G

    2015-09-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, an infectious disease of the respiratory tract that is re-emerging despite high vaccine coverage. Here we examined the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) adapter protein Mal in the control of B. pertussis infection in the lungs. We found that B. pertussis bacterial load in the lungs of Mal-defective (Mal(-/-)) mice exceeded that of wild-type (WT) mice by up to 100-fold and bacteria disseminated to the liver in Mal(-/-) mice and 50% of these mice died from the infection. Macrophages from Mal(-/-) mice were defective in an early burst of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and in their ability to kill or constrain intracellular growth of B. pertussis. Importantly, the B. pertussis bacterial load in the lungs inversely correlated with the number of alveolar macrophages. Despite the maintenance and expansion of other cell populations, alveolar macrophages were completely depleted from the lungs of infected Mal(-/-) mice, but not from infected WT mice. Our findings define for the first time a role for a microbial pattern-recognition pathway in the survival of alveolar macrophages and uncover a mechanism of macrophage-mediated immunity to B. pertussis in which Mal controls intracellular survival and dissemination of bacteria from the lungs. PMID:25515629

  8. M2 polarized macrophages induced by CSE promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Shi, Hengfei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Weiyun; Dong, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the genesis of lung cancer, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are believed to accelerate the process. We therefore sought to clarify the relationship between cigarette smoking, TAMs and tumorigenesis. We treated macrophages (THP-1) with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α decreased, while TGF-β mRNA levels increased. CSE significantly inhibited the phagocytic ability of macrophages, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of FITC-dextran internalization. JAK2/STAT3 was significantly activated by CSE, as determined by Western blot analysis. When the scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of M2 macrophages, was analyzed by flow cytometry, its expression was significantly increased. After inducing M2 polarization of THP-1 cells, we co-cultured macrophages and alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549). The proliferation of A549 cells was detected by the MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, while their migration and invasion were detected by scratch wound assay and transwell assay. The results showed that the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 cells were significantly promoted by M2 macrophages but were slightly inhibited by CSE. In conclusion, we demonstrated that macrophage M2 polarization induced by CSE promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells. PMID:26253658

  9. Role of granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor in pulmonary fibrosis following pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare diffuse lung disease characterized by accumulation of lipoproteinacious material in alveoli, with distinct features on high resolution computed tomography and biopsy. Its association with pulmonary fibrosis is infrequently encountered, and a clear understanding of the underlying pathogenesis is yet to be established. We report the case of a 48‐year‐old woman with known autoimmune PAP (aPAP) first diagnosed 20 years ago, who presented with worsening hypoxemia and radiological features consistent with pulmonary fibrosis, after many years of stable disease. We present a review of previously considered mechanisms of causation behind such changes, and in particular, postulate the role of granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor deficiency in pulmonary fibrosis seen in aPAP. PMID:27512562

  10. A photometric analysis of free alveolar macrophages (FAMs) in smoking and nonsmoking firefighters.

    PubMed

    Mehm, W J; Giesecke, G F

    1986-10-01

    The effects of cigarette smoking and chronic smoke inhalation were evaluated in free alveolar macrophages (FAMs) in firefighters and police officers from the city of Denver, CO. Evaluation was accomplished by comparing statistical morphometric and photometric data taken from digital images of FAMs generated by the microscope photometer. Although our results failed to show significant differences between occupations and smoking status in FAM size, degree of size variability, or nuclear/cytoplasmic area ratios, they did demonstrate a significant difference in the degree of nuclear and cytoplasmic optical density (O.D.) between both occupation and smoking status. Firefighters consistently showed significantly greater O.D. values than police officers while smokers demonstrated a significantly greater O.D. than nonsmokers. While the meaning of these findings remains illusive, they do, however, present quantitative data supporting the biological response of the FAM to occupational and cigarette smoke inhalation. PMID:3022703

  11. The role of arachidonic acid metabolism in virus-induced alveolar macrophage dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Laegreid, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) recovered from virus-infected lungs have decreased phagocytic, respiratory burst and bactericidal activities. The studies described below investigated the role of eicosanoids in virus induced AM bactericidal dysfunction. The spectrum of eicosanoid metabolites which bovine AM are capable of producing was determined. Cultured AM were exposed to {sup 3}H-arachidonate for 1 hour, stimulated for 4 hours with A23187, phorbol myristate acetate or zymosan and the supernatants extracted and analyzed by HPLC. All stimuli tested caused the release of these cyclooxygenase metabolites: thromboxane B{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2}, PGD{sub 2} and HHT. The effect of this enhanced release of arachidonate metabolites on the ability of AM to kill bacteria was evaluated. Preincubation with cyclooxygenase inhibitors or dual cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors resulted in partial reversal of the virus-induced bactericidal deficit in PI3 infected AM.

  12. Depression of alveolar macrophage hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion release by mineral dusts: Correlation with antimony, lead, and arsenic contents

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyas, H.; Labedzka, M.; Gercken, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Activated rabbit alveolar macrophages were incubated with airborne dusts from four West German sites (1 to 200 micrograms/10(6) cells) and waste incinerator fly ash fractions (50 to 500 micrograms/10(6) cells). Quartz dust DQ 12 (5 to 200 micrograms/10(6) cells) and Fe2O3 (0.05 to 50 micrograms/10(6) cells) were used as control dusts. The zymosan-stimulated hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion release of the macrophages were not affected significantly by Fe2O3. All other investigated dusts decreased the two cell functions which were correlated negatively with surfaces, particle numbers, and antimony, lead, and arsenic contents of the dusts. The influence of heavy metal antagonisms and dust surfaces on dust toxicity against alveolar macrophages is discussed.

  13. Depression of alveolar macrophage hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion release by mineral dusts: correlation with antimony, lead, and arsenic contents.

    PubMed

    Gulyas, H; Labedzka, M; Gercken, G

    1990-04-01

    Activated rabbit alveolar macrophages were incubated with airborne dusts from four West German sites (1 to 200 micrograms/10(6) cells) and waste incinerator fly ash fractions (50 to 500 micrograms/10(6) cells). Quartz dust DQ 12 (5 to 200 micrograms/10(6) cells) and Fe2O3 (0.05 to 50 micrograms/10(6) cells) were used as control dusts. The zymosan-stimulated hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion release of the macrophages were not affected significantly by Fe2O3. All other investigated dusts decreased the two cell functions which were correlated negatively with surfaces, particle numbers, and antimony, lead, and arsenic contents of the dusts. The influence of heavy metal antagonisms and dust surfaces on dust toxicity against alveolar macrophages is discussed. PMID:2159400

  14. Pulmonary surfactant inhibits LPS-induced nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Rao, K M; Baatz, J E; Huffman, L

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were 1) to report that pulmonary surfactant inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (. NO) production by rat alveolar macrophages, 2) to study possible mechanisms for this effect, and 3) to determine which surfactant component(s) is responsible. NO produced by the cells in response to LPS is due to an inducible. NO synthase (iNOS). Surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 75% at surfactant levels of 100 and 200 microg phospholipid/ml, respectively. The inhibition is not due to surfactant interference with the interaction of LPS with the cells or to disruption of the formation of iNOS mRNA. Also, surfactant does not seem to reduce. NO formation by directly affecting iNOS activity or by acting as an antioxidant or radical scavenger. However, in the presence of surfactant, there is an approximately 80% reduction in the amount of LPS-induced iNOS protein in the cells. LPS-induced. NO production is inhibited by Survanta, a surfactant preparation used in replacement therapy, as well as by natural surfactant. NO formation is not affected by the major lipid components of surfactant or by two surfactant-associated proteins, surfactant protein (SP) A or SP-C. However, the hydrophobic SP-B inhibits. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 90% at SP-B levels of 1-2 and 10 microgram/ml, respectively. These results show that lung surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO production by alveolar macrophages, that the effect is due to a reduction in iNOS protein levels, and that the surfactant component responsible for the reduction is SP-B. PMID:9887071

  15. Induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine alveolar macrophages following stimulation with Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Maheswaran, S K; Lin, G; Townsend, E L; Ames, T R

    1995-01-01

    Bovine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription and then by PCR amplification from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated alveolar macrophage RNA. The amplified cDNAs were cloned into pPow and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The expressed proteins were confirmed as TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and bioassays. We then used the cloned genes as probes in Northern (RNA) blots and investigated the kinetics of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages stimulated with purified LPS from Pasteurella haemolytica 12296. The effect of LPS on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression was dose dependent, and induction was observed at a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml. Both TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression were detectable within 0.5 h after stimulation with 1 microgram of LPS per ml, peaked at 1 to 2 h, steadily declined up to 16 h, and were undetectable by 24 h. Secreted TNF-alpha measured by bioassay peaked at 4 h and accumulated at a lesser concentration in conditioned medium throughout the 24 h. By contrast, secreted IL-1 beta was induced at 8 h and reached a maximal concentration at 24 h after stimulation. The ability of LPS to induce TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion of bioactive proteins were suppressed by polymyxin B. Our findings support a role for LPS from P. haemolytica in the induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:7822000

  16. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  17. Alveolar macrophages are the main target cells in feline calicivirus-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Monné Rodriguez, J M; Soare, T; Malbon, A; Blundell, R; Papoula-Pereira, R; Leeming, G; Köhler, K; Kipar, A

    2014-08-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a pathogen of felids and one of the most common causative agents of feline upper respiratory disease (URD). Reports of natural FCV pneumonia in the course of respiratory tract infections are sparse. Therefore, knowledge on the pathogenesis of FCV-induced lung lesions comes only from experimental studies. The aim of the present study was to assess the type and extent of pulmonary involvement in natural respiratory FCV infections of domestic cats and to identify the viral target cells in the lung. For this purpose, histology, immunohistochemistry and RNA-in situ hybridisation for FCV and relevant cell markers were performed on diagnostic post-mortem specimens collected after fatal URD, virulent systemic FCV or other conditions. All groups of cats exhibited similar acute pathological changes, dominated by multifocal desquamation of activated alveolar macrophages (AM) and occasional type II pneumocytes with fibrin exudation, consistent with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). In fatal cases, this was generally seen without evidence of epithelial regeneration. In cats without clinical respiratory signs, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia was present alongside the other changes, consistent with the post-damage proliferative phase of DAD. FCV infected and replicated in AM and, to a lesser extent, type II pneumocytes. This study shows that lung involvement is an infrequent but important feature of FCV-induced URD. AM are the main viral target cell and pulmonary replication site, and their infection is associated with desquamation and activation, as well as death via apoptosis. PMID:24857252

  18. Sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petrusca, Daniela N; Gu, Yuan; Adamowicz, Jeremy J; Rush, Natalia I; Hubbard, Walter C; Smith, Patricia A; Berdyshev, Evgeni V; Birukov, Konstantin G; Lee, Chao-Hung; Tuder, Rubin M; Twigg, Homer L; Vandivier, R William; Petrache, Irina

    2010-12-17

    A decreased clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) by alveolar macrophages (AM) may contribute to inflammation in emphysema. The up-regulation of ceramides in response to cigarette smoking (CS) has been linked to AM accumulation and increased detection of apoptotic alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells in lung parenchyma. We hypothesized that ceramides inhibit the AM phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Release of endogenous ceramides via sphingomyelinase or exogenous ceramide treatments dose-dependently impaired apoptotic Jurkat cell phagocytosis by primary rat or human AM, irrespective of the molecular species of ceramide. Similarly, in vivo augmentation of lung ceramides via intratracheal instillation in rats significantly decreased the engulfment of instilled target apoptotic thymocytes by resident AM. The mechanism of ceramide-induced efferocytosis impairment was dependent on generation of sphingosine via ceramidase. Sphingosine treatment recapitulated the effects of ceramide, dose-dependently inhibiting apoptotic cell clearance. The effect of ceramide on efferocytosis was associated with decreased membrane ruffle formation and attenuated Rac1 plasma membrane recruitment. Constitutively active Rac1 overexpression rescued AM efferocytosis against the effects of ceramide. CS exposure significantly increased AM ceramides and recapitulated the effect of ceramides on Rac1 membrane recruitment in a sphingosine-dependent manner. Importantly, CS profoundly inhibited AM efferocytosis via ceramide-dependent sphingosine production. These results suggest that excessive lung ceramides may amplify lung injury in emphysema by causing both apoptosis of structural cells and inhibition of their clearance by AM. PMID:20956540

  19. Activated alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte alveolitis in extrathoracic sarcoidosis without radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.C.; Prin, L.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular characteristics of BAL were investigated in 18 patients with proved extrathoracic sarcoidosis (that is, sarcoidosis that affected the skin, eyes, parotid glands, stomach, nose, kidneys, or meninges) without clinical or radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement. Computed tomography of the thorax was performed on five patients: four patients were normal, and one had enlarged lymph nodes (these enlargements were not detectable on the patient's chest roentgenogram). The results of pulmonary function tests were normal in all patients. The total BAL cell count did not differ significantly between controls and patients. Abnormal percentages of alveolar lymphocytes (from 18 to 87%) were noted in 15 out of 18 patients. SACE levels were normal in 15 patients. No pulmonary gallium uptake was detected. The chemiluminescence of AM's, whether spontaneous or PMA induced, was increased in five out of seven patients. The percentages of T3+ lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients did not significantly differ from those in controls. The T4+:T8+ ratio was normal in four patients and slightly increased in one. Follow-up of patients showed that alveolar lymphocytosis is as lasting as extrathoracic involvement. Our data demonstrate increased percentages of lymphocytes and activated AM's in the BAL of patients with extrathoracic sarcoidosis. This may be due to the initial involvement of the respiratory tract in extrathoracic sarcoidosis or to the diffusion of activated macrophages and lymphocytes from an extrathoracic site into the lung.

  20. Alveolar macrophages modulate the epithelial cell response to coal dust in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Rannels, D E

    1996-01-01

    The response of the alveolar epithelium to coal dust exposure is poorly understood. Coal or other dusts may act on the epithelium directly or indirectly through nearby alveolar macrophages (AM) that produce cytokines and other soluble products. AM and type II pneumocytes (T2P) were thus exposed to dust in coculture to evaluate their possible interactions. Anthracite coal dust PSOC 867 increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by T2P. AM alone did not produce ECM. Similarly, coculture of T2P with AM (3.75:1) had little effect on epithelial ECM synthesis. In contrast, coculture of T2P with AM significantly increased PSOC 867 effects on T2P rates of ECM synthesis, ECM fibronectin content, and T2P levels of fibronectin mRNA. AM-conditioned medium did not change the PSOC 867 effect on T2P. Neither control nor PSOC 867-treated AM on Falcon culture inserts (0.45-micron pore size) over T2P stimulated ECM synthesis by either untreated or dust-exposed epithelium. Thus AM-mediated changes in ECM synthesis by PSOC 867-treated T2P require close cell-cell interactions, suggesting a role for cell-cell contact or for short-lived soluble mediators of the AM effects. PMID:8772535

  1. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein enhances the responsiveness of alveolar macrophages to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Implications for cytokine production in normal and injured lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T R; Mathison, J C; Tobias, P S; Letúrcq, D J; Moriarty, A M; Maunder, R J; Ulevitch, R J

    1992-01-01

    A plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) has been shown to regulate the response of rabbit peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes to endotoxin (LPS). We investigated whether LBP is present in lung fluids and the effects of LBP on the response of lung macrophages to LPS. Immunoreactive LBP was detectable in the lavage fluids of patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting, and also by specific immunoassay. In rabbits, the LBP appeared to originate outside of the lungs, inasmuch as mRNA transcripts for LBP were identified in total cellular RNA from liver, but not from lung homogenates or alveolar macrophages. Purified LBP enhanced the response of human and rabbit alveolar macrophages to both smooth form LPS (Escherichia coli O111B:4) and rough form LPS (Salmonella minnesota Re595). In the presence of LBP and LPS, the onset of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) production occurred earlier and at an LPS threshold dose that was as much as 1,000-fold lower for both types of LPS. In rabbit alveolar macrophages treated with LBP and LPS, TNF alpha mRNA appeared earlier, reached higher levels, and had a prolonged half-life as compared with LPS treatment alone. Neither LPS nor LPS and LBP affected pHi or [Cai++] in alveolar macrophages. Specific monoclonal antibodies to CD14, a receptor that binds LPS/LBP complexes, inhibited TNF alpha production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with LPS alone or with LPS/LBP complexes, indicating the importance of CD14 in mediating the effects of LPS on alveolar macrophages. Thus, immunoreactive LBP accumulates in lung lavage fluids in patients with lung injury and enhances LPS-stimulated TNF alpha gene expression in alveolar macrophages by a pathway that depends on the CD14 receptor. LBP may play an important role in augmenting TNF alpha expression by alveolar macrophages within the lungs. Images PMID:1281827

  2. Infection of human alveolar macrophages by human coronavirus strain 229E

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C. Joel; Wang, Jieru; Ito, Yoko; Travanty, Emily A.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2012-01-01

    Human coronavirus strain 229E (HCoV-229E) commonly causes upper respiratory tract infections. However, lower respiratory tract infections can occur in some individuals, indicating that cells in the distal lung are susceptible to HCoV-229E. This study determined the virus susceptibility of primary cultures of human alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs). Fluorescent antibody staining indicated that HCoV-229E could readily infect AMs, but no evidence was found for infection in differentiated alveolar epithelial type II cells and only a very low level of infection in type II cells transitioning to the type I-like cell phenotype. However, a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE) was readily infected. The innate immune response of AMs to HCoV-229E infection was evaluated for cytokine production and interferon (IFN) gene expression. AMs secreted significant amounts of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β/CCL4) in response to HCoV-229E infection, but these cells exhibited no detectable increase in IFN-β or interleukin-29 in mRNA levels. AMs from smokers had reduced secretion of TNF-α compared with non-smokers in response to HCoV-229E infection. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-D are part of the innate immune system in the distal lung. Both surfactant proteins bound to HCoV-229E, and pre-treatment of HCoV-229E with SP-A or SP-D inhibited infection of 16HBE cells. In contrast, there was a modest reduction in infection in AMs by SP-A, but not by SP-D. In summary, AMs are an important target for HCoV-229E, and they can mount a pro-inflammatory innate immune response to infection. PMID:22090214

  3. Acute Hypoxia Decreases E. coli LPS-Induced Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in Alveolar Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Matuschak, George M.; Nayak, Ravi; Doyle, Timothy M.; Lechner, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Reductions in alveolar oxygenation during lung hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury are common after gram-negative endotoxemia. However, the effects of H/R on endotoxin-stimulated cytokine production by alveolar macrophages are unclear and may depend upon thresholds for hypoxic oxyradical generation in situ. Here TNF-α and IL-β production were determined in rat alveolar macrophages stimulated with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, serotype O55:B5) while exposed to either normoxia for up to 24 h, to brief normocarbic hypoxia (1.5 h at an atmospheric PO2 = 10 ± 2 mm Hg), or to combined H/R. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-β were reduced at the peak of hypoxia and by reoxygenation in LPS + H/R cells (P < 0.01) compared with normoxic controls despite no changes in reduced glutathione (GSH) or in PGE2 production. Both TNF-α mRNA and NF-κB activation were reduced by hypoxia that suppressed superoxide anion generation. Thus, dynamic reductions in the ambient PO2 of alveolar macrophages that do not deplete GSH suppress LPS-induced TNF-α expression, IL-β production, and NF-κB activation even as oxyradical production is decreased. PMID:20470909

  4. Azithromycin increases phagocytosis of apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hodge, S; Hodge, G; Brozyna, S; Jersmann, H; Holmes, M; Reynolds, P N

    2006-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased apoptosis and defective phagocytosis in the airway. As uncleared cells can undergo secondary necrosis and perpetuate inflammation, strategies to improve clearance would have therapeutic significance. There is evidence that the 15-member macrolide antibiotic azithromycin has anti-inflammatory properties. Its effects may be increased in the lung due to its ability to reach high concentrations in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The present study investigated the effects of low-dose (500 ng x mL(-1)) azithromycin on the phagocytosis of apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells and neutrophils by AMs. Flow cytometry was applied to measure phagocytosis and receptors involved in AM recognition of apoptotic cells. Cytokines were investigated using cytometric bead array. Baseline phagocytosis was reduced in COPD subjects compared with controls. Azithromycin significantly improved the phagocytosis of epithelial cells or neutrophils by AMs from COPD subjects by 68 and 38%, respectively, often up to levels comparable with controls. The increase in phagocytosis was partially inhibited by phosphatidylserine, implicating the phosphatidylserine pathway in the pro-phagocytic effects of azithromycin. Azithromycin had no effect on other recognition molecules (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CD44, CD31, CD36, CD91, alphavbeta3 integrin). At higher doses, azithromycin decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, low-dose azithromycin therapy could provide an adjunct therapeutic option in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:16737992

  5. RAGE signaling by alveolar macrophages influences tobacco smoke-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Adam B; Johnson, KacyAnn D; Bennion, Brock G; Reynolds, Paul R

    2012-06-01

    Receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) are multiligand cell surface receptors of the immunoglobin family expressed by epithelium and macrophages, and expression increases following exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The present study sought to characterize the proinflammatory contributions of RAGE expressed by alveolar macrophages (AMs) following CSE exposure. Acute exposure of mice to CSE via nasal instillation revealed diminished bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity and fewer AMs in RAGE knockout (KO) mice compared with controls. Primary AMs were obtained from BAL, exposed to CSE in vitro, and analyzed. CSE significantly increased RAGE expression by wild-type AMs. Employing ELISAs, wild-type AMs exposed to CSE had increased levels of active Ras, a small GTPase that perpetuates proinflammatory signaling. Conversely, RAGE KO AMs had less Ras activation compared with wild-type AMs after exposure to CSE. In RAGE KO AMs, assessment of p38 MAPK and NF-κB, important intracellular signaling intermediates induced during an inflammatory response, revealed that CSE-induced inflammation may occur in part via RAGE signaling. Lastly, quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β were detectably decreased in RAGE KO AMs exposed to CSE compared with CSE-exposed wild-type AMs. These results reveal that primary AMs orchestrate CSE-induced inflammation, at least in part, via RAGE-mediated mechanisms. PMID:22505673

  6. Oral gold compound auranofin triggers arachidonate release and cyclooxygenase metabolism in the alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters-Golden, M.; Shelly, C.

    1988-12-01

    We examined the effect of in vitro incubation with the oral gold compound auranofin (AF) on arachidonic acid (AA) release and metabolism by rat alveolar macrophages (AMs). AF stimulated dose- and time-dependent release of /sup 14/C-AA from prelabeled AMs, which reached 4.7 +/- 0.3% (mean +/- SEM) of incorporated radioactivity at 10 micrograms/ml for 90 min, as compared to 0.5 +/- 0.1% release following control incubation for 90 min (p less than 0.001). Similar dose- and time-dependent synthesis of thromboxane (Tx) A2 (measured as TxB2) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 was demonstrated by radioimmunoassay of medium from unlabeled cultures, reaching 18-fold and 9-fold, respectively, of the control values at 10 micrograms/ml AF for 90 min (p less than 0.001 for both). AF-induced TxB2 and PGE2 synthesis was inhibited by indomethacin as well as by pretreatment with methylprednisolone. No increase in the synthesis of immunoreactive leukotrienes (LT) B4 or C4 was noted at any dose or time of AF. High performance liquid chromatographic separation of /sup 14/C-eicosanoids synthesized by prelabeled AMs confirmed that AF induced the release of free AA and its metabolism to cyclooxygenase, but not 5-lipoxygenase, metabolites. The ability of AF to trigger macrophage AA metabolism may be relevant to the exacerbation of certain inflammatory processes which sometimes accompany gold therapy.

  7. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kitz, R.; Boehles, H. J.; Rosewich, M.; Rose, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed. PMID:22448325

  8. Chloroquine inhibits Rhodococcus equi replication in murine and foal alveolar macrophages by iron-starvation.

    PubMed

    Gressler, Leticia T; Bordin, Angela I; McQueen, Cole M; Cohen, Noah D; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2016-05-30

    Rhodococcus equi preferentially infects macrophages causing pyogranulomatous pneumonia in young foals. Both the vapA and rhbC genes are up-regulated in an iron (Fe)-deprived environment, such as that found within macrophages. Chloroquine (CQ) is a drug widely used against malaria that suppresses the intracellular availability of Fe in eukaryotic cells. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of CQ to inhibit replication of virulent R. equi within murine (J774A.1) and foal alveolar macrophages (AMs) and to verify whether the mechanism of inhibition could be Fe-deprivation-dependent. CQ effect on R. equi extracellular survival and toxicity to J774A.1 were evaluated. R. equi survival within J774A.1 and foal AMs was evaluated under CQ (10 and 20μM), bovine saturated transferrin (bHTF), and bovine unsaturated transferrin (bATF) exposure. To explore the action mechanism of CQ, the superoxide anion production, the lysozyme activity, as well as the relative mRNA expression of vapA and rhbC were examined. CQ at≤20μM had no effect on R. equi extracellular multiplication and J774A.1 viability. Exposure to CQ significantly and markedly reduced survival of R. equi within J774A.1 and foal AMs. Treatment with bHTF did not reverse CQ effect on R. equi. Exposure to CQ did not affected superoxide anion production or lysozyme activity, however vapA and rhbC expression was significantly increased. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that intracellular availability of Fe is required for R. equi survival, and our initial hypothesis that CQ can limit replication of R. equi in J774A.1 and foal AMs, most likely by Fe starvation. PMID:27139025

  9. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  10. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  11. Prolonged poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity regulates JP-8-induced sustained cytokine expression in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis A; Smulson, Mark E; Chen, Zun

    2007-05-01

    Environmental pollutants inducing oxidative stress stimulate chronic inflammatory responses in the lung leading to pulmonary tissue dysfunction. In response to oxidative stress, alveolar macrophages produce both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which induce the expression of a wide variety of immune-response genes. We found that a prolonged exposure of alveolar macrophages to a nonlethal dose (8 microg/ml) of JP-8, the kerosene-based hydrocarbon jet fuel, induced the persistent expression of IL-1, iNOS, and COX-2, as well as cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). Because poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), a coactivator of NF-kappaB, regulates inflammatory responses and associated disorders in the airways, we determined whether JP-8 induces the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation automodification of PARP-1 in alveolar macrophages. We observed that PARP-1 is activated in a time-dependent manner, which was temporally coincident with the prolonged activation of NF-kappaB and with the augmented expression of the proinflammatory factors described above. The 4 microg/ml dilution of JP-8 also increased the activity of PARP-1 as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2, indicating that lower doses of JP-8 also affect the regulation of proinflammatory factors in pulmonary macrophages. Together, these results demonstrate that an extensive induction of PARP-1 might coordinate the persistent expression of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar macrophages activated by aromatic hydrocarbons that can result in lung injury from occupational exposure. PMID:17395016

  12. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  13. Effects of in vitro ozone exposure on peroxidative damage, membrane leakage, and taurine content of rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G.; Castranova, V. )

    1990-08-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by pulmonary lavage, allowed to adhere to a tissue culture flask, and then exposed to 0.45 +/- 0.05 ppm ozone. After exposures ranging from 0 to 60 min, the medium was decanted and cells were harvested. Cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Increasing length of exposure to ozone resulted in a decreased number of adherent AM and decreased cell viability. Resting and zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence increased immediately after ozone exposure and reached a maximum at 15-30 min, then declined to initial levels after 60 min of ozone exposure. Lipid peroxidation and leakage of protein and K+ ions increased with increasing length of exposure to ozone, while leakage of reduced and oxidized glutathione increased through 30 min, then declined (reduced) or leveled off (oxidized). Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase decreased with time while intracellular taurine concentration exhibited an initial rise, peaked at 30 min, and then returned to the untreated level. Leakage of taurine into the medium increased with time of exposure, suggesting that exposure of AM to ozone results in a shift from bound to free intracellular taurine. These data indicate that in vitro exposure of AM to ozone results in a time-dependent alteration of cell function, membrane integrity, and viability.

  14. Isolation and Culture of Human Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes.

    PubMed

    Witherden, I R; Tetley, T D

    2001-01-01

    Alveolar type II pneumocytes (alveolar type II cells; TII cells) play an important role in the homeostasis of the alveolar unit. They are the progenitor cells to the type I pneumocyte and are therefore responsible for regeneration of alveolar epithelium following alveolar epithelial cell damage. The type I cell covers over 90% of the alveolar surface, reflecting its capacity to stretch into a flattened cell with very little depth (approx. 0.1 µm), but with a large surface area, to facilitate gas exchange. Nevertheless, the type II cell outnumbers type I cells, estimated to be by 2:1 in rodents. Most of the type II cell lies buried in the interstitium of the alveolus, with only the apical tip of the cell reaching into the airspace, through which another crucial function, provision of alveolar surfactant, occurs. Surfactant synthesis and secretion is a unique feature of type II cells; surfactant consists of a high proportion of phospholipids (approx. 90%) and a small proportion of protein (approx. 10%), which contains surfactant apoprotein (SP), of which four have so far been described, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D (1,2). Surfactant is highly surface active and is essential to prevent alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant has many other roles, including pulmonary host defense. Compromised surfactant synthesis and function are believed to be a feature of numerous disease states (1,2), including infant respiratory distress syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar proteinosis, and microbial infection. PMID:21336897

  15. Production of Fibronectin by the Human Alveolar Macrophage: Mechanism for the Recruitment of Fibroblasts to Sites of Tissue Injury in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1981-11-01

    Because cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are known to produce fibronectin and because alveolar macrophages are activated in many interstitial lung diseases, the present study was designed to evaluate a role for the alveolar macrophage as a source of the increased levels of fibronectin found in the lower respiratory tract in interstitial lung diseases and to determine if such fibronectin might contribute to the development of the fibrosis found in these disorders by being a chemoattractant for human lung fibroblasts. Production of fibronectin by human alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and maintained in short-term culture in serum-free conditions was demonstrated; de novo synthesis was confirmed by the incorporation of [14C]proline. This fibronectin had a monomer molecular weight of 220,000 and was antigenically similar to plasma fibronectin. Macrophages from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis produced fibronectin at a rate 20 times higher than did normal macrophages; macrophages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis produced fibronectin at 10 times the normal rate. Macrophages from 6 of 10 patients with various other interstitial disorders produced fibronectin at rates greater than the rate of highest normal control. Human alveolar macrophage fibronectin was chemotactic for human lung fibroblasts, suggesting a functional role for this fibronectin in the derangement of the alveolar structures that is characteristic of these disorders.

  16. Ozone-enhanced pulmonary infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mice. The role of alveolar macrophage function and capsular virulence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Park, P.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Ozone exposure has been shown to increase the susceptibility of mice to pulmonary bacterial infection. We report here the differences in susceptibility of two strains of mice (C3H/HeJ and C57Bl/6) to pulmonary challenge with Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and demonstrate an association between O3 exposure, reduced alveolar macrophage (AM) function, and increased mortality to infection. After a 3-h exposure to air or to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm O3, mice received an infection of bacteria by aerosol. Subsequent mortality observed over a 20-day period for any given exposure concentration was greater in the C3H/HeJ mice than in the C57Bl/6 mice. Phagocytosis assays identified the AM from O3-exposed lungs as having an impaired ability to engulf the bacteria. Baseline phagocytic activity in C3H/HeJ mice was lower than that in C57Bl/6 mice. Microbiologic assessment of the lungs at various times after infection revealed that the streptococci proliferated rapidly in the lungs of O3-exposed mice, grew more quickly upon isolation, and displayed a mucoid colony appearance indicative of increased encapsulation. In vitro assays confirmed that the encapsulated isolates prevented binding of the bacteria to AM, and reinfection of nonexposed mice with the encapsulated isolate resulted in increased mortality compared with infection with similar numbers of the original unencapsulated bacteria. We have demonstrated that O3 inhalation impairs AM activity in the lung. The streptococci are then able to proliferate and more fully express virulence factors, in particular, the antiphagocytic capsule, which prohibits the ingestion of bacteria by pulmonary phagocytes and leads to increased severity of infection.

  17. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology. PMID:22694285

  18. Depletion of alveolar macrophages during influenza infection facilitates bacterial super-infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghoneim, Hazem E.; Thomas, Paul G.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses such as influenza suppress host immune function by a variety of methods. This may result in significant morbidity through several pathways, including facilitation of secondary bacterial pneumonia from pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. PKH26-PCL dye was administered intranasally to label resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) in a well-established murine model prior to influenza infection to determine turnover kinetics during the course of infection. More than 90% of resident AMs were lost in the first week after influenza, while the remaining cells had a necrotic phenotype. To establish the impact of this innate immune defect, influenza-infected mice were challenged with S. pneumoniae. Early AM-mediated bacterial clearance was significantly impaired in influenza-infected mice - about 50% of the initial bacterial inoculum could be harvested from the alveolar airspace 3 hours later. In mock-infected mice, by contrast, more than 95% of inocula up-to-50-fold higher was efficiently cleared. Co-infection during the AM depletion phase caused significant body weight loss and mortality. Two weeks after influenza, the AM population was fully replenished with successful re-establishment of early innate host protection. Local GM-CSF treatment partially restored the impaired early bacterial clearance with efficient protection against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia. We conclude that resident AM depletion occurs during influenza infection. Among other potential effects, this establishes a niche for secondary pneumococcal infection by altering early cellular innate immunity in the lungs resulting in pneumococcal outgrowth and lethal pneumonia. This novel mechanism will inform development of novel therapeutic approaches to restore lung innate immunity against bacterial super-infections. PMID:23804714

  19. CD14 and tissue factor expression by bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Carter, C D; Miller, M S; Bochsler, P N

    1995-01-01

    The membrane-associated CD14 receptor (mCD14) is a monocyte/macrophage differentiation antigen, and it has been demonstrated to serve as a receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin). Binding of LPS to mCD14 has been shown to be associated with LPS-induced macrophage, monocyte, and neutrophil activation in humans. In this report, we describe the presence and function of an mCD14-like receptor on bovine alveolar macrophages (bAM). An immunofluorescence technique and flow cytometric analysis indicated binding of anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) My4, 3C10, and 60bd to bAM. Binding of anti-CD14 MAb (3C10 and MY4) was reduced over 20% by pretreatment of bAM with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (0.5 to 1.0 U/ml), indicating that bovine mCD14 is a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In addition, pretreatment of bAM with anti-CD14 MAb decreased binding of 125I-labeled LPS to macrophages, suggesting that bovine mCD14 serves as a receptor for LPS. A cDNA probe based on the human sequence for CD14 was used in Northern (RNA) blot analysis, and hybridization to human monocyte CD14 yielded the expected 1.5-kb band. Hybridization to bovine mRNA yielded a 1.5-kb band plus an unexpected 3.1-kb band. Constitutive expression of bovine CD14 mRNA was observed, and the expression level was modestly elevated in bAM stimulated for 24 h with LPS (1 ng/ml) in the presence of bovine serum. The function and activation of bAM were assessed by quantitation of tissue factor (TF) expression on the cells using an activated factor X-related chromogenic assay and S-2222 substrate. LPS (1 ng/ml)-mediated upregulation of TF expression on bAM was dependent on the presence of bovine serum components, and TF expression was inhibited by anti-CD14 MAb. In addition, TF mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated bAM were decreased by pretreatment of cells with anti-CD14 MAb (MAb 60bd, 10 micrograms/ml). PMID:7528735

  20. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Cells Isolated from Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Leland G.; Mason, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    It is unclear what factors control the secretion of pulmonary surface active material from alveolar type II cells in vivo. Other workers have suggested that cholinergic stimuli, adrenergic stimuli, and prostaglandins may all stimulate secretion. We isolated type II cells from the lungs of rats by treatment with elastase, discontinuous density centrifugation, and adherence in primary culture. β-Adrenergic agonists, but not cholinergic agonists, caused an increase in the release of [14C]disaturated phosphatidylcholine, the major component of surface-active material, from type II cells in culture. The β-adrenergic effect was stereo-selective, (−)-isoproterenol being 50 times more potent than (+)-isoproterenol. Terbutaline, 10 μM, a noncatecholamine β-2 adrenergic agonist, caused a release of 2.0±0.5 (mean±SD) times the basal release of [14C]disaturated phosphatidylcholine in 3 h; the concentration of terbutaline causing half maximal stimulation was 800 nM. The terbutaline effect was blocked by propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist (calculated Kd = 6 nM), but not by phentolamine, an α-adrenergic antagonist. Isobutylmethylxanthine, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and 8-Br cyclic AMP, but not 8-Br cyclic guanosine monophosphate, also stimulated release. We conclude that type II cells secrete disaturated phosphatidylcholine in response to treatment with adrenergic stimulation. PMID:34631

  1. Reactomes of Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Infected with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhihua; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Lifan; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Bo; Liu, Bang; Manoranjan, Valipuram S.; Neill, John D.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Miller, Laura C.

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derived from 0 hour mock-infected and 6, 12, 16 and 24 hours PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) produced a total 643,255 sequenced tags with 91,807 unique tags. Differentially expressed (DE) tags were then detected using the Bayesian framework followed by gene/mRNA assignment, arbitrary selection and manual annotation, which determined 699 DE genes for reactome analysis. The DAVID, KEGG and REACTOME databases assigned 573 of the DE genes into six biological systems, 60 functional categories and 504 pathways. The six systems are: cellular processes, genetic information processing, environmental information processing, metabolism, organismal systems and human diseases as defined by KEGG with modification. Self-organizing map (SOM) analysis further grouped these 699 DE genes into ten clusters, reflecting their expression trends along these five time points. Based on the number one functional category in each system, cell growth and death, transcription processes, signal transductions, energy metabolism, immune system and infectious diseases formed the major reactomes of PAMs responding to PRRSV infection. Our investigation also focused on dominant pathways that had at least 20 DE genes identified, multi-pathway genes that were involved in 10 or more pathways and exclusively-expressed genes that were included in one system. Overall, our present study reported a large set of DE genes, compiled a comprehensive coverage of pathways, and revealed system-based reactomes of PAMs infected with PRRSV. We believe that our reactome data provides new insight into molecular mechanisms involved in host genetic complexity of antiviral activities against PRRSV and lays a strong

  2. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar macrophages with in vitro exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bhavaraju, Laya; Shannahan, Jonathan; William, Aaron; McCormick, Robert; McGee, John; Kodavanti, Urmila; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Combustion emissions from diesel engines emit particulate matter which deposits within the lungs. Alveolar macrophages (AM) encounter the particles and attempt to engulf the particles. Emissions particles from diesel combustion engines have been found to contain diverse biologically active components including metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons which cause adverse health effects. However little is known about AM response to particles from the incorporation of biodiesel. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity in Wistar Kyoto rat AM of biodiesel blend (B20) and low sulfur petroleum diesel (PDEP) exhaust particles. Particles were independently suspended in media at a range of 1–500µg/mL. Results indicated B20 and PDEP initiated a dose dependent increase of inflammatory signals from AM after exposure. After 24hr exposure to B20 and PDEP gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) increased. B20 exposure resulted in elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release at lower particle concentrations compared to PDEP. B20 and PDEP demonstrated similar affinity for sequesteration of PGE2 at high concentrations, suggesting detection is not imparied. Our data suggests PGE2 release from AM is dependent on the chemical composition of the particles. Particle analysis including measurments of metals and ions indicate B20 contains more of select metals than PDEP. Other particle components generally reduced by 20% with 20% incoporation of biodiesel into original diesel. This study shows AM exposure to B20 results in increased production of PGE2 in vitro relative to diesel. PMID:24268344

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of the tobacco-specific carcinogen, NNK, on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Therriault, M-J; Proulx, L-I; Castonguay, A; Bissonnette, E Y

    2003-05-01

    Lung cancer is strongly associated with cigarette smoking. More than 20 lung carcinogens have been identified in cigarette smoke and one of the most abundant is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). We hypothesized that NNK modulates alveolar macrophage (AM) mediator production, thus contributing to carcinogenesis. An AM cell line, NR8383, was treated with [3H]NNK and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and NNK metabolites released in supernatants were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). NNK was metabolized by carbonyl reduction to 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butan-1-ol (NNAL) or activated by alpha-carbon hydroxylation. AMs were also treated with NNK (100-1000 micro M), with and without LPS, for different periods of time (6-72 h), and mediators released in supernatants were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or the Griess reaction. NNK inhibited (in a concentration-dependent manner) AM production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interleukin (IL)-12 and nitric oxide (NO), whereas IL-10 production was increased. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors - NS-398 and indomethacin - and anti-prostaglandin E2 (anti-PGE2) antibody abrogated the NNK-inhibitory effect on MIP-1alpha production by AM. NNK stimulated the release of PGE2, and exogenous PGE2 inhibited AM MIP-1alpha production, suggesting that the NNK immunomodulatory effect may be mediated by PGE2 production. Thus, in addition to its carcinogenic effects, NNK may contribute to the lung immunosuppression observed in tobacco smokers. PMID:12699410

  4. Intracellular influx of calcium induced by quartz particles in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Zhu, Tong; Shang, Yu

    2010-01-15

    Historical studies report that cellular injury and silicosis are related to cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+). Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to cellular injury. However, the detail mechanism of the increase in [Ca2+]i and the relationship between [Ca2+]i and ROS production remains unknown. Quartz particle has been found to increase [Ca2+]i and activate the generation of ROS. Our hypothesis is that [Ca2+]i increase induced by quartz particle is from extracellular Ca2+ through the Ca2+ channel, and [Ca2+]i increase is believed to activate ROS production. In order to examine this hypothesis, we treated rat alveolar macrophages with quartz (SiO2) particles and used laser scanning confocal microscopy to measure [Ca2+]i and the fluorescence intensity of ROS. Time- and dose-dependent increases in [Ca2+]I and ROS in macrophages as well as cell viability were observed. Through chelating extracellular Ca2+ with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and releasing intracellular Ca2+ with thapsigargin, we found that 72.7% of the [Ca2+]i increase was due to the influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular environment, via Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane. By adding mannitol to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (OH(.)), and removing surface iron from the quartz particles to reduce OH(.) generation, we observed a reduced level of ROS generation, whereas the increase in [Ca2+]i was unaffected. When using EGTA to reduce [Ca2+]i, we observed a decrease in ROS production. This study suggests that the [Ca2+]i influx was independent of OH(.) production, and the [Ca2+]i increase resulted in ROS production. These results further indicate that there is a strong relationship between cytosolic free Ca2+ content and cellular injury as well as silica exposure. PMID:19835900

  5. Pulmonary surfactant phospholipids modulate priming of rabbit alveolar macrophages for oxidative responses.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, H; Giridhar, G; Myrvik, Q N; Kucera, L

    1992-04-01

    We investigated the effect of individual phospholipids contained in pulmonary surfactant (PS) on the macrophage-activating factor (MAF)-induced priming of rabbit alveolar macrophages (AMs) for oxidative responses elicited by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan (Op-Zym). AMs were incubated with MAF with or without phospholipids for 18 h. After incubation, oxidative responses were elicited with PMA (0.5 micrograms/ml) or Op-Zym (250 micrograms/ml) and monitored by chemiluminescence (CL) assays. The data indicate that natural surfactant inhibited MAF-induced priming of rabbit AMs for PMA- or Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses. Artificial surfactant inhibited PMA-elicited CL responses but enhanced Op-Zym-elicited CL responses. Individual phospholipids differed in modulative activities. Dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) inhibited MAF-induced priming when the oxidative responses were elicited with PMA. Whereas DPPG inhibited Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DOPC primed AMs for increased Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses. DOPC did not affect the binding of phorbol dibutyrate to AMs, which suggests that reduced cell binding of phorbol ester was not responsible for the inhibition of PMA-elicited oxidative responses in AMs treated with DOPC. Similarly, DPPC, DOPC, and DPPG did not affect the number of zymosan particles phagocytosed by AMs compared to the control, which suggested that enhanced or reduced Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses by phospholipids were not due to altered phagocytic activity of AMs. In conclusion, our data indicate that individual surfactant phospholipid differently modulates priming of AMs for oxidative responses, and the effect of individual phospholipids does not account for the effect of complete PS on priming of AMs. PMID:1564401

  6. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  7. Resident alveolar macrophages suppress while recruited monocytes promote allergic lung inflammation in murine models of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zasłona, Zbigniew; Przybranowski, Sally; Wilke, Carol; van Rooijen, Nico; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Osterholzer, John J.; Wilkinson, John E.; Moore, Bethany B.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The role and origin of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in asthma are incompletely defined. We sought to clarify these issues in the context of acute allergic lung inflammation utilizing house dust mite and ovalbumin murine models. Use of liposomal clodronate to deplete resident AMs (rAMs) resulted in increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and eosinophil numbers in lavage fluid and augmented histopathologic evidence of lung inflammation, suggesting a suppressive role of rAMs. Lung digests of asthmatic mice revealed an increased percentage of Ly6Chigh/CD11bpos inflammatory monocytes. Clodronate depletion of circulating monocytes, by contrast, resulted in an attenuation of allergic inflammation. A CD45.1/CD45.2 chimera model demonstrated that recruitment at least partially contributes to the AM pool in irradiated non-asthmatic mice, but its contribution was no greater in asthma. Ki-67 staining of AMs supported a role for local proliferation, which was increased in asthma. Our data demonstrate that rAMs dampen, while circulating monocytes promote, early events in allergic lung inflammation. Moreover, maintenance of the AM pool in the early stages of asthmatic inflammation depends on local proliferation but not recruitment. PMID:25225663

  8. Cell-surface nucleolin is involved in lipopolysaccharide internalization and signalling in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Mao, Mei; Xu, Jian-cheng

    2011-07-01

    C23 (nucleolin) shuttling between the nucleus, cytoplasm and cell surface has been implicated in controlling regulatory processes and may play a role in pathogen infection and autoimmune diseases. It has been reported that cell surface-expressed C23 on THP-1 monocytes is involved in the inflammatory response induced by LPS (lipopolysaccharide). This study investigates whether C23 is a membrane receptor for LPS during LPS-induced AMs (alveolar macrophages) activation. First, using immunofluorescence and microscopy, we detected the expression of C23 on the surface of AMs. Second, using LPS affinity columns, we demonstrated that C23 directly binds to LPS. Third, we found that LPS colocalized with C23 on both the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. Finally, knockdown of C23 expression on the cell surface using siRNA (small interfering RNA) led to significant reductions in the internalization of LPS, in LPS-induced NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)-DNA binding and in the protein expression of TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-α and IL-6 (interleukin-6). These findings provide evidence that cell-surface C23 on AMs may serve as a receptor for LPS and are essential for internalization and transport of LPS. Furthermore, C23 participates in the regulation of LPS-induced inflammation of AMs, which indicates that cell-surface C23 is a new and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:21309751

  9. Increase of bovine alveolar macrophage superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide release by dusts of different origin.

    PubMed

    Berg, I; Schlüter, T; Gercken, G

    1993-07-01

    The release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) from bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) after stimulation with heavy metal-containing dusts was investigated. BAM were obtained by postmortem lavages of bovine lungs. The dusts were collected from waste incineration, sewage sludge incineration, an electric power station, and from two different factories. Three quartz dusts were used as heavy metal-free controls. The dusts were fractionated by sieving and sedimentation and analyzed by electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (AES-ICP). Incubation of BAM with the dusts (12.5-1000 micrograms/ml medium) led to concentration-dependent increases in ROI release. The secretion of ROI was already seen after 15 min and lasted throughout the experiment up to 90 min, with the exception of a waste incinerator ash, which contained the highest contents of some heavy metals and where the release of ROI ceased after 60 min. We suggest that this dust exhibits simultaneously stimulating and inhibiting effects. The ratio of the secreted O2- and H2O2 varied, depending on the dust being investigated. The release of hydrogen peroxide correlated best, in descending order, with the content of iron, manganese, chromium, vanadium, and arsenic in the dusts. PMID:8394434

  10. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V.; Mellits, Kenneth H.; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Regulates Chronic Alcohol-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Mehta, Ashish J; Harris, Frank L; Brown, Lou Ann S; Hart, C Michael

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is critical for alveolar macrophage (AM) function. Chronic alcohol abuse causes AM phagocytic dysfunction and susceptibility to respiratory infections by stimulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidases (Nox), transforming growth factor-β1, and oxidative stress in the AM. Because PPARγ inhibits Nox expression, we hypothesized that alcohol reduces PPARγ, stimulating AM dysfunction. AMs were examined from: (1) patients with alcoholism or control patients; (2) a mouse model of chronic ethanol consumption; (3) PPARγ knockout mice; or (4) MH-S cells exposed to ethanol in vitro. Alcohol reduced AM PPARγ levels and increased Nox1, -2, and -4, transforming growth factor-β1, oxidative stress, and phagocytic dysfunction. Genetic loss of PPARγ recapitulated, whereas stimulating PPARγ activity attenuated alcohol-mediated alterations in gene expression and phagocytic function, supporting the importance of PPARγ in alcohol-induced AM derangements. Similarly, PPARγ activation in vivo reduced alcohol-mediated impairments in lung bacterial clearance. Alcohol increased levels of microRNA-130a/-301a, which bind to the PPARγ 3' untranslated region to reduce PPARγ expression. MicroRNA-130a/-301a inhibition attenuated alcohol-mediated PPARγ reductions and derangements in AM gene expression and function. Alcohol-induced Toll-like receptor 4 endocytosis was reversed by PPARγ activation. These findings demonstrate that targeting PPARγ provides a novel therapeutic approach for mitigating alcohol-induced AM derangements and susceptibility to lung infection. PMID:26677910

  12. Viral respiratory infection increases alveolar macrophage cytoplasmic motility in rats: role of NO.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Sekizawa, K; Yamaya, M; Okinaga, S; Satoh, M; Sasaki, H

    1995-03-01

    Ingested ferrimagnetic (Fe3O4) particles were used to estimate noninvasively the motion of organelles in alveolar macrophages (AM) in intact rats during viral respiratory infection by parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus. Four days after instillation of Fe3O4 particles (3 mg/kg) into the lung, remnant field strength (RFS) was measured at the body surface immediately after magnetization of Fe3O4 particles by an externally applied magnetic field. RFS decreases with time, due to particle rotation (relaxation) which is related to cytoplasmic motility of AM. Viral infection increased the relaxation rate (lambda o per min), and increases in lambda o reached a maximum 3 days after nasal inoculation (day 3). Viral infection (day 3)-induced increases in lambda o were dose dependently inhibited by either the L-arginine analogue N-nitro-L-arginine or by methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from infected rats contained significantly higher levels of nitrite than that from control rats (P < 0.01). In in vitro experiments, AM from infected rats showed significantly higher lambda o, nitrite production, and intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels than those from control rats (P < 0.01). Sodium nitroprusside, known to release nitric oxide concentration dependently, increased lambda o of AM from noninfected rats in vitro. These results suggest that nitric oxide plays an important role in AM cytoplasmic motility during viral respiratory infection. PMID:7900821

  13. [Functional activity of alveolar macrophages in patients with bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Liamina, S V; Kalish, S V; Malysheva, E V; Iurenev, G L; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma (BA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a widespread clinical situation. The two pathologies are known to influence each other leading to disturbances in immune responsiveness. We studied phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity of immune cells (alveolar macrophages) in patients with BA and GERD. It was shown that BA and GERD are largely associated with AM of proinflammatory M2 and anti-inflammatory M1 phenotypes respectively. Population of AM with MI phenotype increases in patients having both BA and GERD compared with that in BA alone. In vitro experiments showed that acidic milieu promotes shifting the phenotype toward the predominance of M1, i.e. simulates the situation characteristic of GERD. Combination of BA and GERD narrows the interval within which AM can change MI phenotype (i.e. makes them more "rigid") but broadens the range in which they can change M2 phenotype. Also, GERD promotes the development of morphological rigidity of AM. Patients with BA given steroid therapy undergo inversion of phenotypic plasticity of AM. These data characterize the immunological component of BA and/or GERD pathogenesis. They help to better understand mechanisms of development of broncho-pulmonary pathology in GERD patients and can be used to work out new methods for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24417067

  14. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Following release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung following O3 exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with 3H-AA or 3H-lysoPAF. Human AM exposed 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 hr released 65 + or - 12% more tritium, derived from 3H-AA, than paired air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O3 exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM PGE2 production (2.0 + or - 0.5 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.01, n=17). In additional studies, using a similar O3 exposure protocol (1.0 ppm for 1 hr), there was also a significant increase in human AM PAF content (1.7 + or - 0.2 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.02, n=5).

  15. Differential Regulation of Membrane CD14 Expression and Endotoxin-Tolerance in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Min; Frevert, Charles W.; Kajikawa, Osamu; Wurfel, Mark M.; Ballman, Kimberly; Mongovin, Stephen; Wong, Venus A.; Selk, Amy; Martin, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CD14 is important in the clearance of bacterial pathogens from lungs. However, the mechanisms that regulate the expression of membrane CD14 (mCD14) on alveolar macrophages (AM) have not been studied in detail. This study examines the regulation of mCD14 on AM exposed to Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro and explores the consequences of changes in mCD14 expression. The expression of mCD14 was decreased on AM exposed to E. coli in vivo and AM incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or E. coli in vitro. Polymyxin B abolished LPS effects but only partially blocked the effects of E. coli. Blockade of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways attenuated LPS and E. coli-induced decrease in mCD14 expression. Inhibition of proteases abrogated the LPS-induced decrease in mCD14 expression on AM and the release of sCD14 into the supernatants, but did not affect the response to E. coli. The production of TNF-α in response to a second challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or zymosan was decreased in AM following incubation with E. coli but not LPS. These studies show that distinct mechanisms regulate the expression of mCD14 and the induction of endotoxin-tolerance in AM and suggest that AM function is impaired at sites of bacterial infection. PMID:15059784

  16. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV. PMID:23522639

  17. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Mellits, Kenneth H; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  18. Fas/FasL pathway-mediated alveolar macrophage apoptosis involved in human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, San-qiao; Rojanasakul, Liying Wang; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Xu, Ying-jun; Bai, Yu-ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Xi-ying; Zhang, Chun-min; Yu, Yan-qin; Shen, Fu-hai; Yuan, Ju-xiang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that lung cell apoptosis is associated with lung fibrosis; however the relationship between apoptosis of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and human silicosis has not been addressed. In the present study, AM apoptosis was determined in whole-lung lavage fluid from 48 male silicosis patients, 13 male observers, and 13 male healthy volunteers. The relationships between apoptosis index (AI) and silica exposure history, soluble Fas (sFas)/membrane-bound Fas (mFas), and caspase-3/caspase-8 were analyzed. AI, mFas, and caspase-3 were significantly higher in lung lavage fluids from silicosis patients than those of observers or healthy volunteers, but the level of sFas demonstrated a decreasing trend. AI was related to silica exposure, upregulation of mFas, and activation of caspase-3 and -8, as well as influenced by smoking status after adjusting for confounding factors. These results indicate that AM apoptosis could be used as a potential biomarker for human silicosis, and the Fas/FasL pathway may regulate this process. The present data from human lung lavage samples may help to understand the mechanism of silicosis and in turn lead to strategies for preventing or treating this disease. PMID:21910009

  19. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary alveolar macrophages of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.; Chen, B.T.; Mauderly, J.L.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Brooks, A.L. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine accurately the potential genetic damage induced by toxic inhaled agents, the cells that receive a high concentration of such agents should be analyzed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) represent such cells. The authors compared the cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on PAMs of rats exposed repeatedly by different methods. This study was part of a larger investigation of the health effects resulting from different methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. Fischer 344/N male rats were randomly selected from five different exposure groups. The rats were exposed 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 22-24 days. All smoke-exposed rats received the same daily concentrations {times} time product of cigarette smoke. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with colchicine at the end of exposure. PAMs were obtained by lung lavage and chromosomal damage was measured. Highly significant smoke-induced differences in both structural and numerical aberrations were observed in continuously exposed rats vs. sham controls, regardless route of exposure. The structural aberrations observed were chromatid-type deletions. Both hypoploid and hyperploid cells were detected. The data suggest that cigarette smoke is clastogenic and may disrupt spindle-fiber formation. These activities may play a role in the induction of human carcinogenesis caused by cigarette smoke exposure.

  20. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  1. Effect of Calcium on Superoxide Production by Phagocytic Vesicles from Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lew, P. Daniel; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1981-01-01

    Phagocytic vesicles from rabbit lung macrophages produced superoxide in the presence of NADH or NADPH. At 37°C, these vesicles generated 51±7.8 nmol O2−/min per mg protein in the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH. The apparent Km for NADPH and NADH (66 and 266 μM, respectively), the pH optimum for the reaction (6.9), and the cyanide insensitivity were similar to properties of plasma membrane-rich fractions of stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes studied by others. The activity of the phagocytic vesicles was trypsin sensitive. The specific superoxide-generating activity of macrophage phagocytic vesicles isolated from cells incubated up to 90 min with phagocytic particles remained constant. Calcium in micromolar concentrations inhibited the NADPH-dependent O2−-generating activity of phagocytic vesicles. In a physiological ionic medium (100 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 30 mM imidazole-HCl, pH 6.9), a maximal inhibition of O2− generation by phagocytic vesicles of 80% was observed at 40 μM free Ca2+. The half maximum inhibitory effect was at 0.7 μM Ca2+. Variations of the calcium concentration resulted in rapid and reversible alterations in O2−-forming activity. Preincubation of phagocytic vesicles in the presence of EGTA rendered their O2− generation rate in the presence of NADPH insensitive to alterations in the free calcium concentration. This desensitization by low EGTA concentrations (≤100 μM) was reversible by the addition of excess calcium, but desensitization by high EGTA concentrations (>1 mM) was not reversible by the addition of calcium either in the presence or absence of purified rabbit lung macrophage or bovine brain calmodulins. Furthermore, trifluoperazine, a drug that inhibits calmodulin-stimulated reactions, did not alter the activity or the calcium sensitivity of the superoxide-generating system of sensitive phagocytic vesicles. Peripheral plasma membrane vesicles (podosomes) prepared by gentle sonication of macrophages possessed on O2

  2. Proprotein Convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) in the Rat Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line NR8383: Localization, Trafficking and Effects on Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Hugo; Refaie, Sarah; Gagnon, Sandra; Desjardins, Roxane; Salzet, Michel; Day, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) is an important post-translational processing enzyme for the activation of precursor proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. Well characterized for its role in the neural and endocrine systems, we recently reported an unconventional role of PC1/3 as a modulator of the Toll-like receptor innate immune response. There are only a few reports that have studied PC1/3 expression in macrophages, and more investigation is needed to better characterize its function. These studies would greatly benefit from model cell lines. Our study aims to identify and characterize PC1/3 in a relevant model macrophage cell line and to determine the links between PC1/3 and innate immune cellular responses. We describe the rat alveolar cell line, NR8383, as expressing PC1/3 and the most common Toll-like receptors. In NR8383 cells, PC1/3 is localized at the Trans-Golgi network and traffics to lysosome related vesicles upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Moreover, we report the co-localization of PC1/3 and Toll-like receptor 4 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Down regulation of PC1/3 by shRNA produce a similar phenotype in NR8383 to what we previously reported in isolated peritoneal macrophages. PC1/3 shRNA induced changes in the cellular organization and expression of the specific trafficking regulator RAB GTPase. As a consequence, NR8383 down-regulated for PC1/3, present an abnormal cytokine secretion profile. We conclude that the NR8383 cell line represents a good model to study PC1/3 in macrophages and we present PC1/3 as an important regulator of vesicle trafficking and secretion in macrophages. PMID:23637853

  3. Phenotypical and functional characterization of alveolar macrophage subpopulations in the lungs of NO2-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Garn, Holger; Siese, Anette; Stumpf, Sabine; Wensing, Anka; Renz, Harald; Gemsa, Diethard

    2006-01-01

    Background Alveolar macrophages (AM) are known to play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions in the lung, e.g. during the development of chronic lung diseases. Exposure of rats to NO2 has recently been shown to induce a shift in the activation type of AM that is characterized by reduced TNF-α and increased IL-10 production. So far it is unclear, whether a functional shift in the already present AM population or the occurrence of a new, phenotypically different AM population is responsible for these observations. Methods AM from rat and mice were analyzed by flow cytometry for surface marker expression and in vivo staining with PKH26 was applied to characterize newly recruited macrophages. Following magnetic bead separation, AM subpopulations were further analyzed for cytokine, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. Following in vitro stimulation, cytokines were quantitated in the culture supernatants by ELISA. Results In untreated rats the majority of AM showed a low expression of the surface antigen ED7 (CD11b) and a high ED9 (CD172) expression (ED7-/ED9high). In contrast, NO2 exposure induced the occurrence of a subpopulation characterized by the marker combination ED7+/ED9low. Comparable changes were observed in mice and by in vivo labeling of resident AM using the dye PKH26 we could demonstrate that CD11b positive cells mainly comprise newly recruited AM. Subsequent functional analyses of separated AM subpopulations of the rat revealed that ED7+ cells showed an increased expression and production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 whereas TNF-α production was lower compared to ED7- AM. However, iNOS and IL-12 expression were also increased in the ED7+ subpopulation. In addition, these cells showed a significantly higher mRNA expression for the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-7, -8, -9, and -12. Conclusion NO2 exposure induces the infiltration of an AM subpopulation

  4. Intracellular influx of calcium induced by quartz particles in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Tian; Tong Zhu; Yu Shang

    2010-01-15

    Historical studies report that cellular injury and silicosis are related to cytosolic free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}). Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to cellular injury. However, the detail mechanism of the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the relationship between [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ROS production remains unknown. Quartz particle has been found to increase [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and activate the generation of ROS. Our hypothesis is that [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase induced by quartz particle is from extracellular Ca{sup 2+} through the Ca{sup 2+} channel, and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is believed to activate ROS production. In order to examine this hypothesis, we treated rat alveolar macrophages with quartz (SiO{sub 2}) particles and used laser scanning confocal microscopy to measure [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the fluorescence intensity of ROS. Time- and dose-dependent increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} and ROS in macrophages as well as cell viability were observed. Through chelating extracellular Ca{sup 2+} with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and releasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} with thapsigargin, we found that 72.7% of the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was due to the influx of Ca{sup 2+} from the extracellular environment, via Ca{sup 2+} channels in the plasma membrane. By adding mannitol to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (OH.), and removing surface iron from the quartz particles to reduce OH. generation, we observed a reduced level of ROS generation, whereas the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was unaffected. When using EGTA to reduce [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, we observed a decrease in ROS production. This study suggests that the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} influx was independent of OH. production, and the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase resulted in ROS production. These results further indicate that there is a strong relationship between cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} content and cellular injury as well as silica exposure.

  5. Immunosuppressive activity induced by nitric oxide in culture supernatant of activated rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, T; Isobe, K I; Hasegawa, Y; Nakashima, I; Shimokata, K

    1992-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) from normal rats had immunosuppressive activity to mitogen-induced proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes. We studied the mechanism and the implication of the nitric oxide synthetase pathway in AM-mediated suppression of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced lymphocyte proliferation. The culture supernatant from AM cultures alone did not have immunosuppressive activity to Con A-induced proliferative responses of non-adherent spleen cells (n-ad SC), but the culture supernatant from co-culture of AM and autologous n-ad SC had this activity. Con A-pulsed AM also liberated the immunosuppressive factor. When AM and autologous n-ad SC were cultured separately under the condition that medium could freely communicate, the culture supernatant did not suppress the Con A-induced proliferative response of n-ad SC. This indicated that the immunosuppressive factor was liberated when AM was activated by cell-to-cell contact with n-ad SC. Further, we examined the immunosuppressive activity of the culture supernatant of co-culture of AM and autologous n-ad SC to Con A-induced responses of allogeneic n-ad SC and xenogeneic murine n-ad SC, and allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction, and found that this culture supernatant could suppress all these proliferative responses. Nitrate (NO2-) synthesis was markedly augmented in the culture supernatants of Con A-pulsed AM and co-culture of AM and n-ad SC. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (MMA), a specific competitive inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthetase pathway (NOSP), extinguished both NO2- synthesis by AM and AM-mediated immunosuppressive activity. These data suggest that NOSP was important in AM-mediated suppression of Con A-induced lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:1385798

  6. Apoptotic and inflammatory effects induced by different particles in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Harder, Shirley D; Soukup, Joleen M

    2004-12-15

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SRM 1648 (SL), Chapel Hill PM10 (CHP), and Mount St. Helens dust (MSH). Human alveolar macrophages (AM) were incubated with these particles at 100 microg/ml. Cell death was assessed by annexin V (AV) expression, histone release, nuclear morphology, caspase 3-like activity and release of caspase 1 for apoptosis, and propidium iodide (PI) for necrosis, and inflammation was measured by interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6. We found that particle effects on these cell death measurements varied, and ROFA affected most (four out of five) endpoints, including nuclear morphological changes. CHP and SL also caused necrosis. For cytokine release, the potency was CHP > SL > ROFA > MSH. The proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects induced by the whole particles were unaltered after the particles were washed with water. The water-soluble fraction was relatively inactive, as were individual soluble metals (V, Ni, Fe). ROFA-induced nuclear fragmentation was associated with upregulation and mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a caspase-independent chromatin condensation factor, and upregulation of DNase II, a lysosomal acid endonuclease. These results indicate that the potential for particles to induce apoptosis does not correlate with their proinflammatory properties, although active components for both processes reside in the water-insoluble core. Both apoptosis and inflammatory endpoints should be included when the toxicity of different pollutant particles is assessed. PMID:15764474

  7. Overexpression of apoptotic cell removal receptor MERTK in alveolar macrophages of cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Kazeros, Angeliki; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Carolan, Brendan J; Vanni, Holly; Krause, Anja; Crystal, Ronald G

    2008-12-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes play an important role in the removal of apoptotic cells by expressing cell surface receptors that recognize and remove apoptotic cells. Based on the knowledge that cigarette smoking is associated with increased lung cell turnover, we hypothesized that alveolar macrophages (AMs) of normal cigarette smokers may exhibit enhanced expression of apoptotic cell removal receptor genes. AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal nonsmokers (n = 11) and phenotypic normal smokers (n = 13; 36 +/- 6 pack-years) were screened for mRNA expression of all known apoptotic cell removal receptors using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips with TaqMan RT-PCR confirmation. Of the 14 known apoptotic receptors expressed, only MER tyrosine kinase (MERTK), a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, was significantly up-regulated in smokers. MERTK expression was then assessed in AMs of smokers versus nonsmokers by TaqMan RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, Western analysis, and flow analysis. Smoker AMs had up-regulation of MERTK mRNA levels (smoker vs. nonsmoker: 3.6-fold by microarray, P < 0.003; 9.5-fold by TaqMan RT-PCR, P < 0.02). Immunocytochemistry demonstrated a qualitative increase in MERTK protein expression on AMs of smokers. Increased protein expression of MERTK on AMs of smokers was confirmed by Western and flow analyses (P < 0.007 and P < 0.0002, respectively). MERTK, a cell surface receptor that recognizes apoptotic cells, is expressed on human AMs, and its expression is up-regulated in AMs of cigarette smokers. This up-regulation of MERTK may reflect an increased demand for removal of apoptotic cells in smokers, an observation with implications for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a disorder associated with dysregulated apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. PMID:18587056

  8. Alveolar Macrophages Infected with Ames or Sterne Strain of Bacillus anthracis Elicit Differential Molecular Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Douglas; Kenny, Tara; Ojeda, Jenifer F.; Zhong, Yang; Che, Jianwei; Zhou, Yingyao; Ribot, Wilson; Kota, Krishna P.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) phagocytose Bacillus anthracis following inhalation and induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to mediate the activation of innate immunity. Ames, the virulent strain of B. anthracis, contains two plasmids that encode the antiphagocytic poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule and the lethal toxin. The attenuated Sterne strain of B. anthracis, which lacks the plasmid encoding capsule, is widely adapted as a vaccine strain. Although differences in the outcome of infection with the two strains may have originated from the presence or absence of an anti-phagocytic capsule, the disease pathogenesis following infection will be manifested via the host responses, which is not well understood. To gain understanding of the host responses at cellular level, a microarray analysis was performed using primary rhesus macaque AMs infected with either Ames or Sterne spores. Notably, 528 human orthologs were identified to be differentially expressed in AMs infected with either strain of the B. anthracis. Meta-analyses revealed genes differentially expressed in response to B. anthracis infection were also induced upon infections with multiple pathogens such as Francisella Novicida or Staphylococcus aureus. This suggests the existence of a common molecular signature in response to pathogen infections. Importantly, the microarray and protein expression data for certain cytokines, chemokines and host factors provide further insights on how cellular processes such as innate immune sensing pathways, anti-apoptosis versus apoptosis may be differentially modulated in response to the virulent or vaccine strain of B. anthracis. The reported differences may account for the marked difference in pathogenicity between these two strains. PMID:24516547

  9. Edema Toxin Impairs Anthracidal Phospholipase A2 Expression by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Benoit; Leduc, Dominique; Ravaux, Lucas; Goffic, Ronan Le; Candela, Thomas; Raymondjean, Michel; Goossens, Pierre Louis; Touqui, Lhousseine

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a spore-forming Gram-positive bacterium. Infection with this pathogen results in multisystem dysfunction and death. The pathogenicity of B. anthracis is due to the production of virulence factors, including edema toxin (ET). Recently, we established the protective role of type-IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) against B. anthracis. A component of innate immunity produced by alveolar macrophages (AMs), sPLA2-IIA is found in human and animal bronchoalveolar lavages at sufficient levels to kill B. anthracis. However, pulmonary anthrax is almost always fatal, suggesting the potential impairment of sPLA2-IIA synthesis and/or action by B. anthracis factors. We investigated the effect of purified ET and ET-deficient B. anthracis strains on sPLA2-IIA expression in primary guinea pig AMs. We report that ET inhibits sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs at the transcriptional level via a cAMP/protein kinase A–dependent process. Moreover, we show that live B. anthracis strains expressing functional ET inhibit sPLA2-IIA expression, whereas ET-deficient strains induced this expression. This stimulatory effect, mediated partly by the cell wall peptidoglycan, can be counterbalanced by ET. We conclude that B. anthracis down-regulates sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs through a process involving ET. Our study, therefore, describes a new molecular mechanism implemented by B. anthracis to escape innate host defense. These pioneering data will provide new molecular targets for future intervention against this deathly pathogen. PMID:18069891

  10. Inhalation of ozone produces a decrease in superoxide anion radical production in mouse alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer-Powder, J.E.; Amoruso, M.A.; Czerniecki, B.; Witz, G.; Goldstein, B.D.

    1988-11-01

    The potentiation of fatal bacterial pneumonia in mice by prior inhalation of ozone occurs at levels of this oxidant pollutant that are frequently present in ambient air. A likely mechanism for this effect is an ozone-induced inhibition in the ability of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) to produce superoxide anion radical (O2-) demonstrated in the present study. A 25% decrease in PAM O2- production, as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, occurred after exposure of Swiss-Webster mice to 0.11 ppm ozone for 3 h (p less than 0.05). After 1 ppm there was almost complete inhibition of O2- release. In contrast, the rat, which is highly resistant to the potentiation of bacterial infections by ozone, was less sensitive to inhibition of PAM O2- production, as measured by cytochrome c reduction (mouse IC50, 0.41 ppm; rat IC50, 3.0 ppm ozone for 3 h). The observed decrement in mouse PAM O2- production was not associated with any change in phagocytic ability, as measured by both latex bead ingestion and 51Cr-labeled sheep red blood cell ingestion. This decrease in O2- production in the presence of normal phagocytic activity is analogous to certain of the findings in the neutrophils of children with chronic granulomatous disease. A decrease in rat PAM membrane cytochrome b558 levels was observed after ozone exposure of 3 ppm for 3 h, preliminarily suggesting that the mechanism by which ozone interferes with PAM O2- production may be through interaction with this heme-containing electron carrier.