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Sample records for alveolar soft-part sarcoma

  1. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Paillard, Catherine; Coulomb, Aurore; Helfre, Sylvie; Orbach, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma, ASPS, is a rare malignant tumor, with preferential primary localization in limbs, usually occurring in adolescents and young adults. This sarcoma, well defined histologically and at molecular level, has an indolent course, but a high potential metastatic pulmonary and cerebral evolution, sometimes late. ASPS is characterized by an almost specific translocation t(X, 17)(p11;25) which creates a fusion protein, APSL-TFE3, acting as an aberrant transcription factor. An in-bloc resection of the primary tumor is the treatment of choice in cases of localized disease. Conventional chemotherapy is generally ineffective. The role of radiotherapy is discussed in case of micro- or macroscopical incomplete residue. It seems to reduce local recurrence, but did not influence overall survival. The 5 years survival rate in children, adolescents and young adults is close to 80% in case of localized disease but poorer in presence of metastases. Recently, systemic anti-tumoral treatments have been focused on the use of targeted therapies. Anti-angiogenic drugs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the most promising approaches, but require further study. Prognostic risk factors in the literature are age (>10Y), tumor size (>5cm) and presence of metastases. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis modalities, radiographic characteristics and therapeutic strategy of this disease in the pediatric population. PMID:26235420

  2. Alveolar soft part sarcoma of tongue in 14-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Kinger, Mallika; Chakrabarti, Preeti; Varma, Amit; Doshi, Bhavesh

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare, aggressive malignancy of uncertain histological origin with propensity of vascular invasion and distant metastasis. ASPS demonstrates strong predilection for adolescents and young adults with a female preponderance. The head and neck region is the commonly affected region in the pediatric population with orbit and tongue being most common. The indolent clinical course and asymptomatic nature often leads to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. Herein, we present a case of ASPS affecting the tongue in 14-year-old boy which clinically mimicked hemangioma, common benign vascular tumor of tongue. PMID:25593886

  3. Alveolar soft part sarcoma associated with lung and brain metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingguang; Li, Jinxing; Huan, Linchun; Meng, Fanguo; Pang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The present case report aimed to improve the understanding of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) by investigating the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and therapeutic methods used to treat ASPS associated with lung and brain metastases. The clinical data of a single patient diagnosed with ASPS by postoperative pathology was studied retrospectively, and additional associated reports and previous studies of similar cases were reviewed. Clinical symptoms were markedly alleviated following surgical treatment, followed by a chemotherapy regime. During post-treatment follow-up, no tumor recurrence was observed.

  4. Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma of Urinary Bladder Occurring as a Second Primary Malignancy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sitthideatphaiboon, Piyada; Thanakit, Voranuch; Pukiat, Sulada; Panumatrassamee, Kamol; Opanuraks, Julin; Santi-Ngamkun, Apirak

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bladder alveolar soft part sarcoma in an 18-year-old Thai male patient who had been treated with testicular radiation and systemic chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse. He presented with recurrent dysuria and gross hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a 2-centimeter irregular sessile mass at the bladder base adjacent to left ureteral orifice. Transurethral resection of the tumor was performed. The histopathological diagnosis was alveolar soft part sarcoma. Chest and abdominal computed tomography showed no evidence of metastasis. He was treated with partial cystectomy and left ureteral reimplantation with negative surgical margin. No evidence of recurrence was found during a 28-month follow-up period with surveillance cystoscopy and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen. PMID:27547480

  5. Metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma of the lung: Metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma of the lung-a morphologic pitfall on cytology and aberrant CD10 expression on histology.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Jain, Deepali; Malik, Prabhat; Arava, Sudheer; Mathur, Sandeep R

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare aggressive soft tissue sarcoma of young adults, typically arising in the deep soft tissue of lower extremities. Although cytomorphology is characteristic enough for an accurate diagnosis in typical clinical scenarios, problems arise when it occurs in older patients, atypical sites, or in primary evaluation at metastatic sites. A 48-year-old smoker presented with breathlessness and headache for 2 months. Imaging showed a heterogeneous enhancing lesion of 6 cm × 6 cm in right middle lobe of lung, smaller miliary nodules in bilateral lungs, multiple bilateral cerebral lesions, and a mass of 3 cm × 3 cm in the left thigh. Primary lung carcinoma with brain and thigh metastases was the clinical diagnosis. Fine-needle aspiration smears of the lung lesion showed cohesive fragments of large cells with a prominent traversing branching capillary network and discohesion at periphery resulting in a pseudo-papillary appearance. Tumor cells had fine granular to vacuolated cytoplasm, frayed borders, and prominent nucleoli. Trucut biopsy from the same showed a tumor arranged in nests composed of large polygonal cells, immunopositive for CD10. Possibility of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was offered. Abdominal imaging was, however, normal. Core biopsy from thigh showed a similar tumor, immunonegative for epithelial markers, with cytoplasmic periodic-acid-schiff positive rhomboid crystals, clinching the final diagnosis of ASPS with lung and brain metastases. There is considerable morphological and immunohistochemical overlap between ASPS and RCC. Bare nuclei on air dried smears, binucleation, metachromatic basement membrane material are subtle pointers toward ASPS. PMID:26693959

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography features of alveolar soft-part sarcoma in the right deltoid muscle: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONGMEI; SUN, JUN; YE, JING; WU, JINGTAO

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare, highly vascular malignant soft-tissue tumor that predominantly affects young adults. The tumor can occur in any bodily region, but is most frequently observed in the lower deep soft tissues of the extremities, and is rarely observed in the upper extremities. The present study reported a case of ASPS of the right deltoid muscle. The patient presented with a 3-year history of a mass on the right shoulder that exhibited rapid growth in the month prior to diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The lesion mainly demonstrated isointense or mildly hyperintense signals compared with the muscle on the T1-weighted images of the MRI, and heterogeneous high signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. CT enhancement showed a homogeneous enhanced mass. The tumor was resected and submitted for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was verified as ASPS by microscopic examination and immunohistochemical analysis. No distant metastases were noted. No evidence of local tumor recurrence was seen at 6 weeks following the wide surgical excision. The CT scan revealed no metastatic nodules in either lung during the follow-up. ASPS should be considered as a possible diagnosis when a slow-growing, large mass is detected in young adults in the soft tissue of the extremities, with high signal intensity and numerous signal voids on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and T2WI, and strong contrast-enhancement. PMID:27073564

  7. Alveolar soft part sarcoma presenting as a breast metastasis in a patient with a history of thyroid cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Andrey; Sampatanukul, Pichet

    2015-01-01

    Metastases to the breast are uncommon, accounting for 0.5% of breast tumors, and most of them are originated from lymphoma, melanoma and carcinomas of various organs. Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a very rare neoplasm that is usually found in the lower extremities. Lungs are the common site of dissemination and may represent initial manifestation of disease. We report a clinically unsuspected case of ASPS presenting as a breast metastasis in a 25-year-old woman. The patient’s medical history was notable for a thyroid cancer treated by surgery and radioiodine ablation 2 years ago. Core needle biopsy of slowly growing breast mass yielded polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm arranged into solid pattern. Differential diagnosis between apocrine cell carcinoma, paraganglioma, granular cell tumor, neuroendocrine carcinoma, ASPS and metastatic hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma was rendered by immunohistochemistry. Strong nuclear TFE3 immunoreactivity confirmed a diagnosis of ASPS. Retrospectively a primary tumor was found in the thigh. Most likely, ASPS and thyroid cancer in the patient were growing synchronously and independently. PMID:26464747

  8. Modeling alveolar soft part sarcomagenesis in the mouse: a role for lactate in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Matthew L.; Jin, Huifeng; Straessler, Krystal; Smith-Fry, Kyllie; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Monument, Michael J.; Grossmann, Allie; Randall, R. Lor; Capecchi, Mario R.; Jones, Kevin B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a deadly soft tissue malignancy with a predilection for adolescents and young adults, associates consistently with t(X;17) translocations that generate the fusion gene ASPSCR1-TFE3. We proved the oncogenic capacity of this fusion gene by driving sarcomagenesis in mice from conditional ASPSCR1-TFE3 expression. The completely penetrant tumors were indistinguishable from human ASPS by histology and gene expression. They formed preferentially in the anatomic environment highest in lactate--the cranial vault--, expressed high levels of lactate importers, harbored abundant mitochondria, metabolized lactate as a metabolic substrate and responded to the administration of exogenous lactate with tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. These data demonstrate lactate’s role as a driver of alveolar soft part sarcomagenesis. PMID:25453902

  9. Trial of Dasatinib in Advanced Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-17

    Rhabdomyosarcoma; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors; Chondrosarcoma; Sarcoma, Ewing's; Sarcoma, Alveolar Soft Part; Chordoma; Epithelioid Sarcoma; Giant Cell Tumor of Bone; Hemangiopericytoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

  10. T1-201 chloride scintigraphy for bone tumors and soft part sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terui, S.; Oyamada, H.; Nishikawa, K.; Beppu, Y.; Fukuma, H.

    1984-01-01

    The author investigated T1-201 chloride as a tumor scanning agent of both tumors and soft part sarcomas. Six bone tumors (2 with Ewing sarcoma, 3 with osteosarcoma and 1 with giant cell tumor) and 3 soft part sarcoma (1 with liposarcoma and 2 with malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) were examined. All but one MFH were untreated primary cases. The diagnosis was determined from biopsy specimen. One patient with Ewing sarcoma had bone metastases. All cases were subsequently received chemotherpeutic agents. Surgery or local irradiation were also used in treatment. T1-201 scintigraphy were performed with intravenous administration of 2 mCi of T1-201 chloride before initiation of therapy. In addition, follow-up examinations were done in 4 patients (2 with Ewing sarcoma and 2 with osteosarcoma) to study the effect of chemotherapy on T1-201 uptake by the tumor. Tc-99m bone scans were available for comparison in 6 tumor. Ga-67 citrate scans were also examined for the 3 soft part sarcomas. The untreated tumors even in the metastatic lesions of Ewing sarcoma were distinctly visualized with T1-201 in all cases. The distribution of T1-201 in the tumors was sometimes different from that of Tc-99m and similar to that of Ga-67. Of 3 out of the 4 follow-up patients, the post-therapy scan showed reduction in T1-201 uptake more markedly than Tc-99m uptake during effective chemotherapy. The other one patient had not responded to the treatment so that the scan showed no changes in T1-201 uptake. These findings indicate that the tumor imaging with T1-201 is useful in the diagnosis of these malignant tumors and may be of value in assessing the response of bone tumors to chemotherapy.

  11. Observation, Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adult Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  12. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Relapsed Solid Neoplasm; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  13. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  14. Cixutumumab and Temsirolimus in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Gliosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  15. Depsipeptide (Romidepsin) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  16. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Refractory Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  17. Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses (malignant melanoma of soft parts) in the duodenum: the first visceral case.

    PubMed

    Ekfors, T O; Kujari, H; Isomäki, M

    1993-03-01

    An ulcerated tumour was removed by a Whipple's operation from the descending part of the duodenum of a 38-year-old male. The tumour cells were mainly spindle-shaped, arranged in nests and had very prominent nucleoli. A few cells contained melanin and melanosomes. Immunoreactivity for S-100 protein and focally for HMB-45 was observed. These features are diagnostic for clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses. Because no other primary tumour could be found and the search for similar cases from the literature was unsuccessful, we believe that this tumour is the first reported clear cell sarcoma in a visceral location. PMID:7684355

  18. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  19. Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Adult Fibrosarcoma; Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Angiomatoid Fibrous Histiocytoma; Atypical Fibroxanthoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Tissue; Epithelioid Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Epithelioid Sarcoma; Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Fibrohistiocytic Neoplasm; Glomus Tumor of the Skin; Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor; Intimal Sarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma; Liposarcoma; Low Grade Fibromyxoid Sarcoma; Low Grade Myofibroblastic Sarcoma; Malignant Cutaneous Granular Cell Tumor; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Triton Tumor; Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Myxoinflammatory Fibroblastic Sarcoma; Nerve Sheath Neoplasm; PEComa; Pericytic Neoplasm; Plexiform Fibrohistiocytic Tumor; Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma; Stage IB Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIB Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Synovial Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma; Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  20. Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    HaDuong, Josephine H; Martin, Andrew A; Skapek, Stephen X; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2015-02-01

    Malignant bone tumors (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma) and soft-tissue sarcomas (rhabdomyosarcoma, nonrhabdomyosarcoma) account for approximately 14% of childhood malignancies. Successful treatment of patients with sarcoma depends on a multidisciplinary approach to therapy, including oncology, surgery, radiation oncology, radiology, pathology, and physiatry. By combining systemic treatment with chemotherapy and primary tumor control using surgery and/or radiation, survival rates for localized disease range from 70% to 75%. However, children with metastatic or recurrent disease continue to have dismal outcomes. A better understanding of the biology underlying both bone and soft-tissue sarcomas is required to further improve outcomes for children with these tumors. PMID:25435119

  1. [Cytogenetics of bone sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Poitout, D

    There has been much progress in the cytogenesis, and molecular biology of bone tumours such as Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcomas, greatly improving diagnostic possibilities and prognosis. Ewing's sarcoma is an indifferentiated sarcoma with round cells which usually occurs in children or adolescents. Ewing's sarcoma corresponds to 6% of all bone tumours. Histologically Ewing's sarcoma belongs to a group of small round cell tumours including neuroblastoma, embryon and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Differential diagnosis is difficult. Cytogenetic examinations can now differentiate Ewing's sarcoma from other small round cell tumours. There is a specific 11:12 translocation (q24; q12) which can be used as a marker. PMID:8785922

  2. TERT promoter hotspot mutations are recurrent in myxoid liposarcomas but rare in other soft tissue sarcoma entities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, recurrent point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter region have been found in many human cancers, leading to a new transcription factor binding site, increased induction of TERT and subsequently to telomere maintenance. We determined the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in soft tissue sarcomas of 341 patients comprising 16 entities and in 16 sarcoma cell lines covering 7 different soft tissue sarcoma types. Methods The sarcoma tissue samples were collected from the archives of the Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg and were composed of 39 myxoid liposarcomas (MLS), 61 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 15 pleomorphic liposarcomas, 27 leiomyosarcomas, 25 synovial sarcomas (SS), 35 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), 40 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas, 17 myxofibrosarcomas, 9 low grade fibromyxoid sarcomas, 10 cases of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, 31 solitary fibrous tumors (SFT), 8 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 9 angiosarcomas, 6 alveolar soft part sarcomas, 5 clear cell sarcomas and 4 epithelioid sarcomas. Sarcoma cell lines were obtained from the raising laboratories. A 193 bp fragment of the TERT promoter region covering the hot-spot mutations C228T and C250T was amplified, and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results TERT promoter mutations were detected in 36/341 sarcomas. They were highly recurrent in MLS (29/39; 74%) and were in the present MLS series not associated with the phenotype (myxoid vs. round cell variant), tumor grade, tumor site and patients’ median age or gender. In the remaining cases, TERT promoter mutations were found only in 7/302 sarcoma samples and confined to SFTs (4/31; 13%), MPNSTs (2/35; 6%), and SSs (1/25; 4%). Within the collection of sarcoma cell lines examined, TERT promoter mutations were detected in two MLS and in one of three MPNST cell lines. Conclusions TERT promoter mutations are frequent in MLSs including

  3. Preclinical activity of selinexor, an inhibitor of XPO1, in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Robert; Zhang, Yi-Xiang; Czaplinski, Jeffrey T; Anatone, Alex J; Sicinska, Ewa T; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Demetri, George D; Wagner, Andrew J

    2016-03-29

    Selinexor is an orally bioavailable selective inhibitor of nuclear export that has been demonstrated to have preclinical activity in various cancer types and that is currently in Phase I and II clinical trials for advanced cancers. In this study, we evaluated the effects of selinexor in several preclinical models of various sarcoma subtypes. The efficacy of selinexor was investigated in vitro and in vivo using 17 cell lines and 9 sarcoma xenograft models including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcomas, and alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). Most sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to selinexor with IC50s ranging from 28.8 nM to 218.2 nM (median: 66.1 nM). Selinexor suppressed sarcoma tumor xenograft growth, including models of ASPS that were resistant in vitro. In GIST cells with KIT mutations, selinexor induced G1- arrest without attenuation of phosphorylation of KIT, AKT, or MAPK, in contrast to imatinib. In LPS cell lines with MDM2 and CDK4 amplification, selinexor induced G1-arrest and apoptosis irrespective of p53 expression or mutation and irrespective of RB expression. Selinexor increased p53 and p21 expression at the protein but not RNA level, indicating a post-transcriptional effect. These results indicate that selinexor has potent in vitro and in vivo activity against a wide variety of sarcoma models by inducing G1-arrest independent of known molecular mechanisms in GIST and LPS. These studies further justify the exploration of selinexor in clinical trials targeting various sarcoma subtypes. PMID:26918731

  4. Preclinical activity of selinexor, an inhibitor of XPO1, in sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Robert; Zhang, Yi-Xiang; Czaplinski, Jeffrey T.; Anatone, Alex J.; Sicinska, Ewa T.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Demetri, George D.; Wagner, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Selinexor is an orally bioavailable selective inhibitor of nuclear export that has been demonstrated to have preclinical activity in various cancer types and that is currently in Phase I and II clinical trials for advanced cancers. In this study, we evaluated the effects of selinexor in several preclinical models of various sarcoma subtypes. The efficacy of selinexor was investigated in vitro and in vivo using 17 cell lines and 9 sarcoma xenograft models including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcomas, and alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). Most sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to selinexor with IC50s ranging from 28.8 nM to 218.2 nM (median: 66.1 nM). Selinexor suppressed sarcoma tumor xenograft growth, including models of ASPS that were resistant in vitro. In GIST cells with KIT mutations, selinexor induced G1- arrest without attenuation of phosphorylation of KIT, AKT, or MAPK, in contrast to imatinib. In LPS cell lines with MDM2 and CDK4 amplification, selinexor induced G1-arrest and apoptosis irrespective of p53 expression or mutation and irrespective of RB expression. Selinexor increased p53 and p21 expression at the protein but not RNA level, indicating a post-transcriptional effect. These results indicate that selinexor has potent in vitro and in vivo activity against a wide variety of sarcoma models by inducing G1-arrest independent of known molecular mechanisms in GIST and LPS. These studies further justify the exploration of selinexor in clinical trials targeting various sarcoma subtypes. PMID:26918731

  5. Malignant giant cell tumor of soft parts in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Marryatt, Paige A.

    2003-01-01

    Two subcutaneous masses were removed from the elbow of a mare. Histologically they were composed of islands of polygonal to plump spindlelioid cells with large nuclei, coarsely stippled chromatin, and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Findings were diagnostic for a malignant giant cell tumor of soft parts, a rare tumor with a fair prognosis. PMID:14524631

  6. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:27542645

  7. Kaposi sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV, a weakened immune system, and the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). Kaposi sarcoma has been linked ... on foot References Kaye KM. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus type 8). In: Mandell GL, Bennett ...

  8. Ewing sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Bone cancer - Ewing sarcoma; Ewing family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET); Bone neoplasm - Ewing sarcoma ... NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN guidelines): bone cancer. Updated 2016. www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/ ...

  9. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  10. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla.

    PubMed

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  11. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a cancer that causes patches of abnormal tissue to grow under the skin, in the lining of ... of cancer cells, blood vessels, and blood cells. KS is caused by infection with human herpesvirus-8 ( ...

  13. Uterine sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer called retinoblastoma also increases the risk of uterine sarcoma. Symptoms Fibroids in the uterus are a common problem in women. Common symptoms of fibroids include abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, and a pelvic ...

  14. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  15. Evaluation of NKX2-2 expression in round cell sarcomas and other tumors with EWSR1 rearrangement: imperfect specificity for Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yin P; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-04-01

    Ewing sarcoma shows considerable histologic overlap with other round cell tumors. NKX2-2, a homeodomain transcription factor involved in neuroendocrine/glial differentiation and a downstream target of EWSR1-FLI1, has been reported as an immunohistochemical marker for Ewing sarcoma. We assessed the specificity of NKX2-2 for Ewing sarcoma compared with other round cell malignant neoplasms and other soft tissue tumors with EWSR1 translocations. We evaluated whole-tissue sections from 270 cases: 40 Ewing sarcomas (4 with atypical/large cell features), 20 CIC-DUX4 sarcomas, 5 BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas, 9 unclassified round cell sarcomas, 10 poorly differentiated synovial sarcomas, 10 lymphoblastic lymphomas, 10 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, 10 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 10 Merkel cell carcinomas, 10 small cell carcinomas, 20 melanomas, 5 NUT midline carcinomas, 10 Wilms tumors, 10 neuroblastomas, 10 olfactory neuroblastomas, 12 mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, 10 angiomatoid fibrous histiocytomas, 10 clear cell sarcomas, 5 gastrointestinal clear cell sarcoma-like tumors, 5 desmoplastic small round cell tumors, 10 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 10 soft tissue and cutaneous myoepitheliomas, and 19 myoepithelial carcinomas. NKX2-2 positivity was defined as moderate-to-strong nuclear immunoreactivity in at least 5% of cells. NKX2-2 was positive in 37/40 (93%) Ewing sarcomas, including all atypical Ewing sarcomas and cases with known EWSR1-FLI1 or EWSR1-ERG fusion; 85% of Ewing sarcomas showed diffuse (>50%) staining. NKX2-2 was positive in 9 (75%) mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, 8 (80%) olfactory neuroblastomas, 1 CIC-DUX4 sarcoma, 1 poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma, 1 neuroblastoma, 2 unclassified round cell sarcomas, and 3 small cell carcinomas; all other EWSR1-associated tumors were negative for NKX2-2, apart from 1 desmoplastic small round cell tumor, 1 myoepithelioma, and 1 myoepithelial carcinoma. In summary, NKX2-2 is a sensitive but imperfectly specific marker for

  16. Numb chin syndrome in Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Antunes, N L; Gorlick, R; Callaja, E; Lis, E

    2000-01-01

    The numb chin syndrome consists of unilateral hypesthesia of the chin and lower lip. In adults, it is often associated with metastatic disease to the mandible, base of the skull, or leptomeninges. In children, it has been associated with infiltration of the inferior alveolar nerve by leukemic cells. We describe two cases of numb chin syndrome in children with Ewing sarcoma. In a child with a solid tumor, this symptom seems to have an ominous meaning and should lead to the investigation of progressive skeletal involvement. PMID:11132220

  17. Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Can Kaposi sarcoma be prevented? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused by the Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus ( ... to protect people against KSHV. For now, preventing KS depends on reducing the chance of becoming infected ...

  18. The soft tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Eilber, F.R.; Morton, D.L.; Sondak, V.K.; Economou, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    New advances in multimodality therapy of sarcomas in all anatomic sites are thoroughly described. Multimodality therapy with limb-salvage surgery for extremity tumors, sarcomas of the head and neck, trunk, intraabdominal, visceral, and genitourinary tract and cardiopulmonary system are presented. Separate sections are devoted to the management of pediatric sarcomas, pulmonary metastasis and to the pathology and radiobiology, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy of sarcomas. The text also stresses the philosophy of achieving adequate local control without radical amputation by combined surgery and chemo/radiotherapy.

  19. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26363896

  20. [Primary pulmonary sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Jakubcová, T; Jakubec, P

    2009-01-01

    Primary pulmonary sarcomas are rare diseases unlike lung carcinomas. The occurence of these sarcomas is between 0.013-0.40% of all malignant lung tumours. There are malignant mesenchymal tumours. They are flowing from the soft tissue of lung. The pulmonary sarcomas are heterogenic group with various biological behaviour. Their morfologic structure does not digger from the sarcomas of soft tissue. The primary pulmonary sarcomas occur more often in childhood and in young people unlike lung carcinomas. Radiation and some toxic substances are noted risk factors. Some gene mutations, infectious pathoghens and contraception have a possible impact on the origin of some types of the sarcomas. The current hypothesis is, that most of the sarcomas, if not all sarcomas, stem from primitive multipotent mesenchymal cell by malignant transformation in one or more lines. The diagnostic standard is biopsy from tumour with histologic and immunohistochemistry examination of a sample. The basic diagnostic problem is exclusion of a secondary origin of sarcomatic cells in the lung, because pulmonary metastasis of extrapulmonary sarcomas are more often than the primary pulmonary involvement.The optimal treatment is a resection of the tumour.The other therapeutic modalities are radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but results of these modalities are unsatisfactory. There are various chemotherapeutic regimes, monotherapy or combination regimes. The basic cytostatics are doxorubicine, iphosphamide, dacarbazine. Problems of the chemotherapy are high toxicity and relatively low curative effect about 20%.The first studies with biological treatment of the sarcomas of soft tissue have been published recently.This types of drugs could be a part of the complex management of these primary pulmonary tumours in the future. The primary pulmonary sarcomas have mostly aggresive course and often recur. Their prognosis is usually not very good. The survival median is 48 months and 5-years survival ranges

  1. A technique for calculating particle systems containing rigid and soft parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that can simulate the systems containing both rigid and soft parts with rigid body constraints. The idea was to consider the characteristics of rigid parts in their center of mass with three rotational degrees of freedom. In order to compute the systems containing both flexible and rigid parts, standard techniques in molecular dynamics were utilized for flexible parts. However, special procedures were proposed and formulated for rigid parts. Some details on the implementation of the proposed algorithm on GPU were also presented. Next, two case studies were solved. In the first example, a ball mill with the rigid particle of different shapes was considered and the performance of the proposed algorithm was checked and compared with the results obtained from others. In the second example, different self-assembly phases of a mixed rigid and non-rigid polymer molecule with Lennard-Jones pairwise interaction were studied. It was shown that the obtained self-assembly phases were identical to those reported by other researchers.

  2. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend <0.001). A recent meta-analysis reported that children with a history of hernias have a greater risk of developing Ewing’s sarcoma (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9, 5.7). Bone development during pubertal growth spurts has been associated with osteosarcoma development. Occupational factors such as job type, industry, and exposures to chemicals such as herbicides and chlorophenols have been suggested as risk factors for sarcomas. A case-control study found a significant increase in soft tissue sarcoma risk among gardeners (adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.00, 14.00), but not among those strictly involved in farming. A European-based study reported an increased risk in bone tumors among blacksmiths, toolmakers, or machine-tool operators (adjusted OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.08, 4.26). Maternal and paternal characteristics such as occupation, age, smoking status, and health conditions experienced during pregnancy also have been suggested as sarcoma risk factors and would be important to assess in future studies. The limited studies we identified demonstrate significant relationships with sarcoma risk, but many of

  3. Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses: a review.

    PubMed

    Dim, Daniel C; Cooley, Linda D; Miranda, Roberto N

    2007-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses, also referred to as malignant melanoma of soft parts, is a rare malignancy derived from neural crest cells. It usually presents in the distal lower extremities of young adults, frequently attached to tendons or aponeuroses. It behaves like a high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and is associated with poor overall survival. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of the lesion reveal T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, and gadolinium uptake. Grossly, the tumor is usually circumscribed with a histologic pattern of uniform polygonal to fusiform cells with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm divided into variably sized clusters by fibrous septa. Immunohistochemical studies in most cases show that the neoplastic cells are positive with HMB-45 and react with antibody against S100 protein. Most cases show a reciprocal cytogenetic translocation t(12;22)(q13;q12) that creates a unique chimeric fusion EWSR1/ATF1 gene transcript. Metastasis occurs mainly to regional lymph nodes and lungs. Poor prognostic indicators include a tumor size equal to or more than 5 cm, presence of metastasis, and necrosis. The mainstay of treatment is wide excision of the tumor. The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy may become an important procedure in detecting occult regional metastasis and guiding the extent of surgery. The beneficial effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy have not been fully evaluated. This article provides a short overview of the current knowledge of clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses. PMID:17227118

  4. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Borie, R; Danel, C; Debray, M-P; Taille, C; Dombret, M-C; Aubier, M; Epaud, R; Crestani, B

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare pulmonary disease characterised by alveolar accumulation of surfactant. It may result from mutations in surfactant proteins or granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor genes, it may be secondary to toxic inhalation or haematological disorders, or it may be auto-immune, with anti-GM-CSF antibodies blocking activation of alveolar macrophages. Auto-immune alveolar proteinosis is the most frequent form of PAP, representing 90% of cases. Although not specific, high-resolution computed tomography shows a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern. In most cases, bronchoalveolar lavage findings establish the diagnosis. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy, especially for auto-immune disease. Novel therapies targeting alveolar macrophages (recombinant GM-CSF therapy) or anti-GM-CSF antibodies (rituximab and plasmapheresis) are being investigated. Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of PAP has improved in the past 20 yrs, but therapy for PAP still needs improvement. PMID:21632797

  5. Ossifying Fibromyxoid Tumor of Soft Parts: A Clinicopathologic, Proteomic and Genomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rondell P.D.; Dry, Sarah; Li, Xinmin; Binder, Scott; Bahrami, Armita; Raimondi, Susana C.; Dogan, Ahmet; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Souchek, Joshua J.; Folpe, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor of soft parts (OFMT) is a rare soft tissue and bone tumor of borderline malignancy displaying an uncertain line of differentiation. The existence of fully malignant OFMT is controversial. In order to better understand the natural history and line of differentiation taken by OFMT, we studied 46 cases by light microscopic, immunohistochemical (IHC), genomic, proteomic, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods. Cases were classified according to the 2003 Folpe and Weiss system. Clinical and follow-up information was obtained. IHC for S-100 protein, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), cytokeratins, smooth muscle actin (SMA), INI-1, neurofilament protein (NFP), CD56d excitatory amino acid transporter-4 (EAAT4), and MUC4 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Gene expression profiling and proteomic studies were performed on FFPE tissues from 13 and 5 cases, respectively. FISH for INI-1 was performed on 10 cases. The 46 tumors arose in 29 males and 17 females (median age 52 years, range 39-63 years) and involved the proximal (N=17) and distal extremities (N=13), head and neck (N=9) and trunk (N=5). Median tumor size was 5.4 cm (range 1.0-21.0 cm). Cases were classified as typical OFMT (26 of 46, 57%), atypical OFMT (5 of 46, 11%) and malignant OFMT (15 of 46 cases, 32%). Clinical follow-up (27 cases, median 55 months duration) showed all patients with typical and atypical OFMT to be alive without disease. Adverse events, including 3 local recurrences, 3 metastases, and 3 deaths, were seen only in malignant OFMT. IHC results were: S100 protein (30/41, 73%), desmin (15/39, 38%), cytokeratin (4/35 11%), EMA (5/32, 16%), SMA (2/34, 6%), INI-1 (lost in mosaic pattern in 14/19, 74%), EAAT4 (31/39, 80%), MUC4 (3/14, 21%), NFP (8/10, 80%) and CD56 (6/14, 43%). Gene expression profiling showed typical and malignant OFMT to cluster together, distinct from schwannian tumors. Proteomic study showed expression

  6. What Is Uterine Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... supporting tissues of the uterus (womb). About the uterus The uterus is a hollow organ, about the ... a baby out during childbirth. Cancers of the uterus and endometrium Sarcomas are cancers that start from ...

  7. Epidemic Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy are used to treat Kaposi sarcoma lesions . Photon radiation therapy treats lesions with high-energy light. ... complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information ...

  8. Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy are used to treat Kaposi sarcoma lesions . Photon radiation therapy treats lesions with high-energy light. ... complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information ...

  9. CREATE: Cross-tumoral Phase 2 With Crizotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Type 1; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

  10. General Information about Ewing Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Ewing Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ewing Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. General Information about Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. General Information About Uterine Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Uterine Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Floarea-Strat, Alina; Stanciu, Adriana; Creţeanu, Mihai

    2003-01-01

    It is a disease of obscure cause that is characterized by the accumulation of a granular material that contains abundant lipid within the alveoli of lung. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) has been divided into a congenital and an adult form. The acquired form has been subdivided into a idiopathic form and a secondary form associated with a know disorder or exposure as silica, aluminium, titanium. Dyspnea and cough are the most common presenting symptoms. Chest pain, hemoptysis, fever and weight loss are variably reported. Pathogenesis remains unknown, but evidence points to a dysfunction of alveolar macrophages. Mice genetically deficient in granulocyte macrophagecolony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) show an alveolar proteinosis. A neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF was found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of patients with idiopathic PAP. Currently, no specific therapy exists for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sequential whole lung lavage is standard treatment. PMID:14756054

  14. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Hutyrová, B

    2007-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease characterised by excessive accumulation of surfactant components in the alveoli and the distal airways with minimum inflammatory reaction and fibrosis of pulmonary interstitium. Three clinical forms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are distinguished - congenital, primary and secondary. Results of ultrastructural, biochemical and functional analyses and studies performed on genetically modified mice support the presumption that accumulation of surfactant in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a result of a degradation disorder and of diminished clearance of the surfactant from the alveolar space rather than of excessive synthesis of surfactant components. Over the last 15 years, significant discoveries have been made which have helped to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. A number of gene mutations have been discovered which lead to the development of congenital pulmonary proteinosis. Apart from impaired surfactant protein function, a key role in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is played by the signal pathway of granulocyte and macrophage colonies stimulating growth factor (GM-CSF) which is necessary for the functioning of alveolar macrophages and for surfactant homeostasis. The role of GM-CSF has been proven especially in primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis which is currently considered an auto-immune disease involving the development of GM-CSF neutralising autoantibodies. In most cases, the prognosis for the disease in adult patients is good, even though there is a 10 to 15% rate of patients who develop respiratory failure. Total pulmonary lavage is considered to be the standard method of treatment. In recent years, recombinant human GM-CSF has been studied as a prospective therapy for the treatment of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:18072433

  15. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  16. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  17. First description of the soft part anatomy of Ilyocypris ramirezi Cusminsky & Whatley (Crustacea, Ostracoda) from Argentina, South America.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, D Sabina; Díaz, Analía R; García, Adriana; Claps, María Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the soft parts of Ilyocypris ramirezi Cusminsky & Whatley, 1996 is described and illustrated for the first time, based on findings of this species from water bodies in the shallow areas of the Llancanelo basin, south-west of Mendoza Province, Argentina. This species is common in Quaternary and extant environments of the Pampa and Patagonian regions. Its distribution is now extending in Argentina to the Central-West area, locally named "Cuyo region". Ilyocypris ramirezi is a good environmental indicator and constitutes a useful tool in paleolimnological studies. PMID:26249053

  18. Clear cell sarcoma of soft tissue in right parapharyngeal region: report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chuifeng; Yu, Juanhan; Yang, Lianhe; Lin, Xuyong; Wang, Enhua

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS), initially named malignant melanoma of soft parts, is a rare malignant neoplasm typically involving deep soft tissue of the extremities, in close proximity to tendons and aponeuroses. Here we describe a case of clear cell sarcoma of the right parapharyngeal region in a young female aged 20 years. MRI detected a mass about 4.4 cm×3.4 cm×3.0 cm, located in the right parapharyngeal area and between the external pterygoid and the medial pterygoid. Microscopically, most of the tumor cells were epithelioid with palely eocinophilic cytoplasm arranged in sheets. Pleophorism of tumor cells were not marked. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, S-100, HMB45 and MelanA, and negative for AE1/AE3, actin-sm, desmin, CD117, TFE-3, and P63. Ki67 index was about 5%. PMID:26617810

  19. Management of Truncal Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mullinax, John E; Gonzalez, Ricardo J

    2016-10-01

    The management of truncal sarcoma presents unique challenges to the treating physician for reasons specific to this tumor location. First, the reconstruction options after resection of the abdominal or chest wall require a balance between cosmesis and structural integrity due to the multiplanar forces exerted on this region. Second, the histologies that commonly arise in this region are often associated with high local recurrence rates, which often require complex decision making due to prior therapy. Finally, sarcomas of the trunk in the inguinal region involve those organs in the genitourinary system, of which resection can have significant psychosocial implications. PMID:27542639

  20. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ajmal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare but potentially treatable disease, characterized by impaired surfactant metabolism that leads to accumulation in the alveoli of proteinaceous material rich in surfactant protein and its component. Novel insights from an animal model aided the discovery of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies as a pathogenetic mechanism in human pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The vast majority of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurs as an autoimmune disease; less commonly, it is congenital or secondary to an underlying disorder such as infection, hematological malignancy, or immunodeficiency. The subacute indolent course of this disease often delays the diagnosis by months to years. Crazy-paving appearance in a geographic distribution is a characteristic feature of this disease visible on high-resolution computed tomography (CT). A definitive diagnosis, however, requires lung biopsy, which typically shows partial or complete filling of alveoli with periodic-acid-Schiff-positive granular and eosinophilic material in preserved alveolar architecture. Patients with minimal symptoms are managed conservatively, whereas patients with hypoxemia require a more aggressive approach. Whole-lung lavage is the most widely accepted therapy for symptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Correction of GM-CSF deficiency with exogenous GM-CSF is an alternative therapy. The combination of a systemic treatment (GM-CSF) and a local treatment (whole-lung lavage) augmenting the action of one another is a promising new approach. As the knowledge about this rare disease increases, the role of novel therapies is likely to be better defined and optimized. PMID:21496372

  1. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep M; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Reynolds, Jordan P; Krowka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PAP demonstrate that the idiopathic form is due to antigranulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies. Therapeutic targets that replace granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or remove these antibodies are being actively developed. The current standard of care is to perform whole lung lavage on these patients to clear the alveolar space to help improve respiratory physiology. A case of PAP is reported, followed by a literature review on the diagnosis and management of this rare condition with the aim of increasing awareness among physicians when treating patients who present with alveolar infiltrates. PMID:22891182

  2. Soft-part anatomy of the Early Cambrian bivalved arthropods Kunyangella and Kunmingella: significance for the phylogenetic relationships of Bradoriida

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xianguang; Williams, Mark; Siveter, David J.; Siveter, Derek J.; Aldridge, Richard J.; Sansom, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Bradoriids are small bivalved marine arthropods that are widespread in rocks of Cambrian to Early Ordovician age. They comprise seven families and about 70 genera based on shield (‘carapace’) morphology. New bradoriid specimens with preserved soft-part anatomy of Kunmingella douvillei (Kunmingellidae) are reported from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte of China together with, for the first time to our knowledge, a second bradoriid species with preserved soft parts, Kunyangella cheni (Comptalutidae). Kunmingella douvillei has a 10-segmented limb-bearing body with uniramous ninth and tenth appendages and a series of homogeneous, apparently (proximal parts not preserved) unspecialized post-antennal biramous limbs with setose leaf-shaped exopods. Each endopod consists of five podomeres. A presumed penultimate instar of Ky. cheni preserves remnants of three head and two trunk appendages, and the adult is reconstructed as having four head appendages. This material allows testing of the affinity of the Bradoriida. Kunmingella is identified as a stem crustacean in character-based analyses, through both morphological comparisons and cladistic reconstructions. Global parsimony analysis recovers a monophyletic Bradoriida as the sister group to crown crustaceans. PMID:20181565

  3. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Surender; Mohapatra, Prasanta R.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance) are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation. PMID:23741096

  4. Alveolar wall relations.

    PubMed

    Gil, J

    1982-01-01

    We have presented a highly dynamic view of the alveolar septum and its main enclosed structure, the dense capillary network. The septal or perimicrovascular interstitium is the space between alveolar epithelial sheets after exclusion of the capillary network. It contains cells, fibers, and a viscous matrix. Capillaries form a very complex network, which closely follows the geometry of the terminal airways and participates in functional adaptations of the wall, particularly septal pleating. The level of filling and configuration of different capillaries ranging from collapse to full distension are variable, depending on factors such as transmural balance of forces but also on tissular configuration. Alveolar flooding of any cause will produce an immediate change of capillary configuration and volume. PMID:6953828

  5. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... free at 5 years. Most people who survive 5 years can expect to be cancer-free at 10 years. ... most soft tissue sarcomas, and there is no way to prevent it. ... them can increase your chance of surviving this type of cancer.

  6. Microenvironmental Targets in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehnman, Monika; Larsson, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting all age groups. They are typically classified according to their resemblance to corresponding normal tissue. Their heterogeneous features, for example, in terms of disease-driving genetic aberrations and body location, complicate both disease classification and development of novel treatment regimens. Many years of failure of improved patient outcome in clinical trials has led to the conclusion that novel targeted therapies are likely needed in combination with current multimodality regimens. Sarcomas have not, in contrast to the common carcinomas, been the subject of larger systematic studies on how tumor behavior relates to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. There is consequently an urgent need for identifying suitable molecular targets, not only in tumor cells but also in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses preclinical and clinical data about potential molecular targets in sarcomas. Studies on targeted therapies involving the tumor microenvironment are prioritized. A greater understanding of the biological context is expected to facilitate more successful design of future clinical trials in sarcoma. PMID:26583076

  7. Management of Bone Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Basu-Mallick, Atrayee; Abraham, John A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of bone sarcoma requires careful planning and involvement of an experienced multidisciplinary team. Significant advancements in systemic therapy, radiation, and surgery in recent years have contributed to improved functional and survival outcomes for patients with these difficult tumors, and emerging technologies hold promise for further advancement. PMID:27542644

  8. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  9. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Lymphoid leukosis has been the most common form of L/S group of diseases seen in field flocks, although myeloid leuk...

  10. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen S; Chou, Alexander J; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing's family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  11. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen S.; Chou, Alexander J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing’s family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  12. Bioenergetic properties of human sarcoma cells help define sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Issaq, Sameer H; Teicher, Beverly A; Monks, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a diverse group of malignancies with distinct molecular and pathological features. A better understanding of the alterations associated with specific sarcoma subtypes is critically important to improve sarcoma treatment. Renewed interest in the metabolic properties of cancer cells has led to an exploration of targeting metabolic dependencies as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we have characterized key bioenergetic properties of human sarcoma cells in order to identify metabolic vulnerabilities between sarcoma subtypes. We have also investigated the effects of compounds that inhibit glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration, either alone or in combination, and examined relationships between bioenergetic parameters and sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors. Using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a competitive inhibitor of glycolysis, oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP synthase, and metformin, a widely used anti-diabetes drug and inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, we evaluated the effects of metabolic inhibition on sarcoma cell growth and bioenergetic function. Inhibition of glycolysis by 2-DG effectively reduced the viability of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells vs. embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and normal cells. Interestingly, inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration did not significantly affect viability, but were able to increase sensitivity of sarcomas to inhibition of glycolysis. Additionally, inhibition of glycolysis significantly reduced intracellular ATP levels, and sensitivity to 2-DG-induced growth inhibition was related to respiratory rates and glycolytic dependency. Our findings demonstrate novel relationships between sarcoma bioenergetics and sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors, and suggest that inhibition of metabolic pathways in sarcomas should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:24553119

  13. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma This page lists ... soft tissue sarcoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin ...

  14. Doxorubicin With Upfront Dexrazoxane for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Sarcoma, Soft Tissue; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma; Liposarcoma; Synovial Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Angiosarcoma; Fibrosarcoma; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Epithelioid Sarcoma

  15. Synovial sarcoma: laryngopharynx a challenge.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ravinder; Verma, Ravneet Ravinder; Verma, Rohan Ravinder; Sardana, N K

    2014-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor. It derives from a mesenchymal precursor stem cell that is unrelated to mature synovial tissue. Synovial sarcoma classically affects lower limbs between the ages of 15 and 40 years and the proportion of male-to-female patients is 3:2. It is very rare in the head and neck region especially in laryngopharynx. Till date, only six cases of synovial sarcoma involving laryngopharynx have been reported in the English literature. Painless mass, hoarseness, upper respiratory distress, and dysphagia characterize the original complaints in laryngopharyngeal synovial sarcoma. Because head and neck synovial sarcoma in clinical practice is so uncommon, early diagnosis is difficult and the treatment protocol is unclear. Therefore, every case report should include complete information on presentation and management. Also, long-term prognostic indices need to be evaluated. We hereby report a case of large laryngopharyngeal synovial sarcoma confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry with review of literature. PMID:24822167

  16. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma in a 69-Year-Old Woman Receiving Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zyczynski, Laura E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Gribbin, Thomas E.; Schuetze, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) of the nasopharynx. She has a history of catastrophic thromboembolic event in the abdomen that caused short-gut syndrome and dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) twelve hours per day. She was treated for short-gut syndrome with teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, which led to reduction of TPN requirements. However, a few months later, she developed metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Though a causative relationship is unlikely between the peptide and ARMS due to the brief time course between teduglutide therapy and sarcoma diagnosis, neoplastic growth may have been accelerated by the GLP-2 analog, causing release of IGF-1. The transmembrane receptor for IGF-1 is frequently overexpressed in ARMS and is implicated in cell proliferation and metastatic behavior. This case describes a rare incidence of metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a sexagenarian and possibly the first case reported associated with the use of teduglutide. Teduglutide was discontinued due to a potential theoretical risk of acceleration of sarcoma growth, and the patient's rhabdomyosarcoma is in remission following sarcoma chemotherapy. PMID:26266067

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tisha; Lazar, Catherine A; Fishbein, Michael C; Lynch, Joseph P

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by the accumulation of surfactant lipids and protein in the alveolar spaces, with resultant impairment in gas exchange. The clinical course can be variable, ranging from spontaneous resolution to respiratory failure and death. PAP in all forms is caused by excessive accumulation of surfactant within the alveolar spaces. Autoimmune PAP accounts for the vast majority of cases in humans and is caused by autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which results in impaired catabolism and clearance of surfactant lipids and proteins. Inherited or congenital forms of PAP are exceptionally rare and caused by mutations of genes encoding for surfactant proteins. Secondary forms of PAP are associated with diverse clinical disorders and are caused by reduced alveolar macrophage numbers or function with resultant reduced pulmonary clearance of surfactant. PAP is characterized by progressive exertional dyspnea and nonproductive cough with hypoxemia. Bilateral infiltrates are typically present on chest radiograph, and high-resolution computed tomography reveals diffuse ground-glass opacities and airspace consolidation with interlobular septal thickening in a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern. Although surgical lung biopsy will provide a definitive diagnosis, a combination of typical clinical and imaging features with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive material on bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies is usually sufficient. The standard of care for treatment of PAP remains whole lung lavage, but treatment is not required in all patients. Autoimmune PAP has also been successfully treated with GM-CSF, both inhaled and systemic, but the optimal dose, duration, and route of administration of GM-CSF have not been elucidated. PMID:23001804

  18. Alveolar development and disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  19. Alveolar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  20. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Park, Haein; Greene, Joseph; Zhou, Sophia X.; Albert, Catherine M.; Moy, Fred; Sachdev, Deepali; Yee, Douglas; Rader, Christoph; Hamby, Carl V.; Loeb, David M.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Zhou, Xianzheng

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15) and ROR1 (11/15) were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients. PMID:26173023

  1. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Park, Haein; Greene, Joseph; Pao, James; Mulvey, Erin; Zhou, Sophia X; Albert, Catherine M; Moy, Fred; Sachdev, Deepali; Yee, Douglas; Rader, Christoph; Hamby, Carl V; Loeb, David M; Cairo, Mitchell S; Zhou, Xianzheng

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15) and ROR1 (11/15) were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients. PMID:26173023

  2. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas (Extremity Sarcoma Closed to Entry as of 5/30/07)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-01

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  3. Collecting and Storing Biological Samples From Patients With Ewing Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Askin Tumor; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  4. Diagnostic Study of Tumor Characteristics in Patients With Ewing's Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-20

    Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  5. [Synovial sarcoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Abdulfatah, Bishr; Telekes, András

    2016-02-01

    In 2013 there were 94,770 new cancer patients reported in Hungary. Synovial sarcoma accounts for 0.05-0.1% of all cancers and, therefore its incidence is predicted to be 47-94 patients/year in Hungary. The authors report the history of a 18-year-old man who was operated on a right upper abdominal wall tumor with R1 resection. During the next 5 months the tumor grew up to 8 cm in largest diameter. Histology revealed monophasic synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed bcl2, focal CD99 and high molecular weight cytokeratin positivity, while smooth muscle actin, S100 and CD34 immunostainings were negative. Becose of this reoperation was not possible, curative six cycles of doxorubicine and ifosfamide with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support and 60 Gy radiotherapy was given to the tumor bed. After these treatments computed tomography scan was negative and the patient attended regular imaging every 3 months. At the age of 20 years the patient developed two neoplastic lesions in the surgical scar measuring 10 mm and 45 × 10 mm in size. R0 resection, partial rib resection and abdominal wall reconstruction were performed. Histology confirmed residual monophasic synovial sarcoma. Radiotherapy was not given because of a risk of intestinal wall perforation. Staging positron emission tomography-computed tomography proved to be negative. At the age of 22 years magnetic resonance imaging scans indicated no tumor recurrence, but after one month a rapidly growing tumorous lesion was found on ultrasound in the surgical scar measuring 20 × 20 × 12 mm in size. Cytology confirmed local recurrence and fluorescence in situ hibridization indicated t(x;18). R0 exstirpation and partial mesh resection were performed and histology showed the same monophasic synovial sarcoma. Because of the presence of vascular invasion and a close resection margin (1 mm) the patient underwent 3 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (doxorubicine and ifosfamide) with granulocyte colony stimulating

  6. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Ioachimescu, O C; Kavuru, M S

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare syndrome characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of surfactant components and cellular debris, with minimal interstitial inflammation or fibrosis. The condition has a variable clinical course, from spontaneous resolution to respiratory failure and death due to disease progression or superimposed infections. The standard of care for alveolor proteinosis therapy is represented by whole lung lavage. Important discoveries have been made in the last decade with respect to disease pathogenesis and therapy of both congenital and acquired forms of the disease. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) pathway has been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis of both acquired and congenital disease. Furthermore, anti-GM-CSF blocking autoantibodies have been found in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and seem to interfere with the surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages in many acquired cases. In the congenital form, the most common defects identified to date are several mutations of the genes encoding GM-CSF receptor subunits or surfactant proteins. Using GM-CSF as a therapeutic tool has also been shown to be effective in at least half of the acquired cases treated, while the importance of quantitative determination of anti-GM-CSF antibodies before and during the course of the therapy, as well as the autoantibody titer-GM-CSF dose relationship are to be elucidated. The congenital form of the disease does not respond to therapy with GM-CSF, consistent with the known primary defects and differences in disease pathogenesis. PMID:16916009

  7. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by the accumulation of surfactant in alveoli and terminal airways resulting in respiratory failure. PAP comprises part of a spectrum of disorders of surfactant homeostasis (clearance and production). The surfactant production disorders are caused by mutations in genes required for normal surfactant production. The PAP syndrome is identified based on history, radiologic, and bronchoalveolar lavage and/or histopathologic findings. The diagnosis of PAP-causing diseases in secondary PAP requires further studies. Whole-lung lavage is the current standard therapy and promising new pharmacologic therapies are in development. PMID:27514590

  8. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  9. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  10. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma after treatment of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yasushi; Iwabuchi, Haruko; Takachi, Takayuki; Hosokai, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Sakiko; Imamura, Masaru; Watanabe, Akihiro; Umezu, Hajime; Hotta, Tetsuo; Ogose, Akira; Imai, Chihaya

    2013-08-01

    Secondary rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) after treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) is rare. Reported here is the case of a metachronous RMS in the nasal cavity, developing 12 years after successful treatment of non-metastatic OS. The patient was diagnosed as having OS of the femur at 2 years of age. Chemotherapy for OS included doxorubicin (cumulative dose, 488 mg/m(2) ). No radiotherapy was given. There was no family history suggestive of cancer predisposition syndrome. At 14 years of age, alveolar RMS was diagnosed on histopathology. PAX3-FKHR fusion transcripts were detected on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Germline TP53 mutation was not seen on standard DNA sequencing. The occurrence of secondary sarcomas, in the Children's Cancer Survivor study conducted in North America, has been associated with high cumulative doses of anthracyclines, which may also have played a role in the development of RMS in the present case. In the future, novel molecular technologies might uncover genetic cancer predisposition in patients with metachronous cancers. PMID:23910806

  11. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Bahri, Maiya; Burney, Ikram A.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm with a non-specific and insidious presentation further complicated by the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. It has a low to intermediate risk of recurrence and metastasis. Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas or histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, cytogenetic studies are very limited in FDCS cases. Although no specific chromosomal marker has yet been established, complex aberrations and different ploidy types have been documented. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with FDCS who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2013. Ultrastructural, immunophenotypical and histological findings are reported. In addition, karyotypic findings showed deletions of the chromosomes 1p, 3q, 6q, 7q, 8q and 11q. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, these have not been reported previously in this tumour. Techniques such as spectral karyotyping may help to better characterise chromosomal abnormalities in this type of tumour. PMID:26355964

  12. Identification of cancer-testis genes expressed by melanoma and soft tissue sarcoma using bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Segal, Neil H; Blachere, Nathalie E; Guevara-Patiño, Jose A; Gallardo, Humilidad F; Shiu, Ho Yin A; Viale, Agnes; Antonescu, Cristina R; Wolchok, Jedd D; Houghton, Alan N

    2005-02-01

    Cancer-testis or germ cell antigens (GCAs) are a category of tumor antigens expressed by male germ cells and by cancers of diverse histological origin, but not usually by normal adult somatic tissue. These antigens include products encoded by the MAGE, BAGE, GAGE, SSX, and LAGE/NY-ESO-1 families that encode antigenic peptides recognized by T lymphocytes. In this study, we exploit oligonucleotide technology to identify genes in melanoma and soft tissue sarcoma (STS) that display a cancer-testis/GCA expression profile. We identified 59 such genes, including GCAs we knew to be recognized by T lymphocytes. Among our findings are the expression of PRAME in monophasic synovial sarcoma, PRAME and NY-ESO-1 in myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, and SSX2 and members of the GAGE family in malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Furthermore, the proto-oncogene DBL/MCF2 was identified as encoding a novel candidate GCA expressed by clear cell sarcoma/melanoma of soft parts (MSP). DBL/MCF2 peptides that are bound to HLA-A*0201 were identified and recognized by T lymphocytes. These results show the utility of high-throughput expression analysis in the efficient screening and identification of GCA candidates in cancer, and its application to the discovery of candidate targets for T cell immunity against GCAs expressed by cancer. PMID:15683221

  13. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  14. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-02

    Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Liposarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Uterine Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for uterine sarcoma? What should you ask your doctor about uterine sarcoma? It is important for you ... and Staging Treating Uterine Sarcoma Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Uterine Sarcoma Research? ...

  16. Primary alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of fallopian tube masquerading as a unilateral adnexal mass: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Nisreen Abu; Alqaisy, Amin; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a high-grade sarcoma that predominantly affects children, and rarely, the adult population. RMS demonstrates three major histologic variants: Embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic. A limited number of documented pure RMS cases of the gynecologic organs in adult women are found in the literature. Of these reports, the fallopian tube (FT) is reported as the primary site in only three cases, those included one of embryonal and two of the pleomorphic histologic variants. Herein, we report the first case of alveolar RMS arising in the FT of an adult woman and presenting as a unilateral adnexal mass. PMID:26549082

  17. Treatment Options for Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy are used to treat Kaposi sarcoma lesions . Photon radiation therapy treats lesions with high-energy light. ... complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy are used to treat Kaposi sarcoma lesions . Photon radiation therapy treats lesions with high-energy light. ... complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Synovial sarcoma in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Israels, S.J.; Chan, H.S.L.; Daneman, A.; Weitzman, S.S.

    1984-04-01

    The clinical and radiologic findings in seven children with synovial sarcoma are described. The five boys and two girls had a mean age at presentation of 4.4 years. All seven had the lesion situated in an extremity. Plain radiographs in four revealed the presence of a soft-tissue mass with no calcification or bone and joint involvement. In two patients studied with computed tomography (CT), the primary lesions had peripheral irregular areas of enhancement with central areas of poor enhancement, reflecting the necrotic, cystic, and hemorrhagic changes found in the centers of these tumors. Although the exact margins of these lesions were difficult to define accurately even with intravenous contrast enhancement, CT is still recommended as the best imaging method for assessing the local extent of the primary tumor and is a useful tool in the planning of appropriate therapy as well as the gauging of the tumor response to ongoing treatment.

  1. Soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities in patients of pediatric age

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Michela; Meazza, Cristina; Gronchi, Alessandro; Fiore, Marco; Zaffignani, Elena; Podda, Marta; Collini, Paola; Gandola, Lorenza

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The extremity site is a peculiar location for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of children and adolescents. Here we report the experience of the Pediatric Oncology Unit of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan, Italy, concerning 204 patients with STS of the limbs treated between 1977 and 2006. Methods The study series included 52 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)(65% of which were of the alveolar subtype), nine with extraosseous Ewing sarcoma and 143 with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcomas (NRSTS), 38% of which were synovial sarcoma. Patients were treated with a multimodality approach including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Results For the RMS patients, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 37.1%, with distant metastases being the main cause of treatment failure. The outcome was particularly poor for patients with large invasive tumors, hand/foot involvement and/or nodal or distant metastases, and for patients who were not given radiotherapy. For the extraosseous Ewing sarcoma cases, 5-year EFS was 74%. For the NRSTS cases, the 5-year EFS was 72.6%: tumor size and local invasiveness, tumor grade, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) histology, and distant metastases were the main prognostic factors. Discussion While the limbs are the most common sites of NRSTS and are often characterized by a more favorable prognosis than for axial tumors, the clinical features of extremity RMS often differ from those of RMS of other sites, with a higher incidence of unfavorable prognostic factors (e.g., alveolar subtype) and consequently unsatisfactory treatment results. The treatment of these patients is complex and necessarily multidisciplinary, and it demands not only adequate experience of treating children and adolescents in clinical trials, but also particular skills in the field of orthopedic surgery. PMID:19308495

  2. Alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lilja, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In patients with cleft lip and palate, bone grafting in the mixed dentition in the residual alveolar cleft has become a well-established procedure. The main advantages can be summarised as follows: stabilisation of the maxillary arch; facilitation of eruption of the canine and sometimes facilitation of the lateral incisor eruption; providing bony support to the teeth adjacent to the cleft; raising the alar base of the nose; facilitation of closure of an oro-nasal fistula; making it possible to insert a titanium fixture in the grafted site and to obtain favourable periodontal conditions of the teeth within and adjacent to the cleft. The timing of the ABG surgery take into consideration not only eruption of the canine but also that of the lateral incisor, if present. The best time for bone grafting surgery is when a thin shell of bone still covers the soon erupting lateral incisor or canine tooth close to the cleft. PMID:19884665

  3. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  4. Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Treatment Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  5. Pericardial Synovial Sarcoma: A Rare Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Joshua; Saxena, Pankaj; McGiffin, David C; Zimmet, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare form of primary malignancy of the pericardium. We present a case of primary synovial sarcoma of the pericardium followed by a review of the literature. PMID:26347295

  6. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. General Information about Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations. PMID:27523415

  9. Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic How are soft tissue sarcomas treated? Survival by stage of soft tissue sarcoma Survival rates ... observed, not relative survival): Stage 5-year observed survival rate I 90% II 81% III 56% IV ...

  10. Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor of soft parts: case report with unusual ganglion-like cells and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Yi-Che; Bocskai, Pál; Kovács, Ilona; Hargitai, Zoltán; Kollár, Sándor; Török, Miklós

    2014-12-01

    Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor (PHAT) is a recently described, non-metastasizing tumor of uncertain lineage. This tumor distributes equally between the genders and has a predilection for the subcutaneous soft tissue, particularly in lower extremity, other locations are rare. Based on the recent literature, PHAT is suspected to encompass the morphological spectrum with other tumors such as myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS) and hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor (HFLT), although cytogenetic data remain inconsistent. We report a case of PHAT that arose in the upper arm with unusual morphology which showed ganglion-like cells similar to Reed-Sternberg-like cells found in MIFS. The tumor had strong immunohistochemical expression of CD34, CD99, and was negative for S-100. The ganglion-like cells were positive for both CD34 and CD68 but negative for CD30. The translocation between chromosome 1 and 10, a frequent finding of MIFS and HFLT, was not identified by FISH excluding the possibility of hybrid PHAT and MIFS. We conclude FISH can be a potential useful tool to separate PHAT with atypical morphology from hybrid tumor in doubted cases. Due to the rarity of PHAT and lack of consistent pathogenetic signatures, more cases and further studies will be needed to elucidate the pathogenesis and nature of this tumor. PMID:24857338

  11. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  12. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  13. Clear cell sarcoma of the jejunum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clear cell sarcoma (CCS), also known as malignant melanoma of soft parts, is a rare type of soft tissue sarcoma which exhibits morphological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural similarity with malignant melanoma. It is rarely localized in the intestine and the natural history of this tumor is not yet clear. Case report A 49-year-old woman presented with diffuse abdominal colicky pain and vomitus over the previous seven days. An X-ray of the abdomen revealed obstruction of the small intestine. The patient underwent contrast enhanced abdominal computerized tomography (CT), which confirmed the obstruction at the jejunum and an associated circumferential wall thickening extending about 3 cm in length, causing concentric narrowing of the lumen. At laparotomy, a mass was recognized at the level of the jejunum in the small intestine, which caused almost complete obstruction of the lumen. At the point of obstruction, adhered loops of small intestine were found. A segmental small bowel resection was performed with 5 cm clear margins and its respective mesenteric lymph nodes. Results Histological examination of the specimen revealed a tumor (3×3×2cm) with epithelioid cell characteristics and eosinophilic or clear cytoplasm and focal translucent nuclei. Immunohistochemistry was positive for S100, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and synaptophysin. The tumor was pankeratin AE1/AE2, GFAP, HMB45 and MART-1/Melan-A negative. Twelve lymph nodes were retrieved and were free of neoplastic infiltration. Cytogenetic examination revealed translocation of the EWSR1 gene. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and left the hospital seven days after her admission in good general condition. After 20 months of follow-up the patient remains asymptomatic without any clinical or radiological evidence of recurrence. Conclusion CCS sarcoma can be rarely localized in the jejunum. Due to its morphological similarity to malignant melanoma, cytogenetic examination

  14. Benign Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Human Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexei; Downey, Robert J.; Healey, John; Moreira, Andre L.; Lou, Emil; Leung, Roland; Edgar, Mark; Singer, Samuel; LaQuaglia, Michael; Maki, Robert G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that at least some sarcomas arise through aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but MSCs have never been isolated directly from human sarcoma specimens. Experimental Design We examined human sarcoma cell lines and primary adherent cultures derived from human sarcoma surgical samples for features of MSCs. We further characterized primary cultures as either benign or malignant by the presence of tumor-defining genetic lesions and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. Results We show that a dedifferentiated liposarcoma cell line DDLS8817 demonstrates fat, bone and cartilage trilineage differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Primary sarcoma cultures have the morphology, surface immunophenotype and differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Surprisingly, many of these cultures are benign as they do not form tumors in mice and lack sarcoma-defining genetic lesions. Consistent with the recently proposed pericyte origin of MSCs in normal human tissues, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs express markers of pericytes and cooperate with endothelial cells in tube formation assays. In human sarcoma specimens, a subset of CD146-positive microvascular pericytes express CD105, an MSC marker, while malignant cells largely do not. In an in vitro co-culture model, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs as well as normal human pericytes markedly stimulate the growth of sarcoma cell lines. Conclusions Sarcoma-derived benign MSCs/pericytes represent a previously undescribed stromal cell type in sarcoma which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:21138865

  15. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. PMID:27106779

  16. Uterine Sarcoma: The Indian Scenario.

    PubMed

    Sivakumari, S; Rajaraman, R; Subbiah, S

    2015-09-01

    Uterine sarcomas are rare, highly malignant tumours comprising < 1 % of all gynaecologic malignancies. To evaluate clinical presentation, histolopathologic pattern and outcome of uterine sarcomas presenting to a tertiary referral centre over an 8 year period (2004-2012). All histologically proven uterine sarcomas were retrospectively analysed. Clinical presentation, histology, treatment and outcome were analysed. Mean age was 42 years. Predominant histopathology was endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 13); 9 were low grade, carcinosarcoma (n = 8) and leiomyosarcoma (n = 2). Fourteen patients had Stage I disease, 3 Stage II, 4 Stage III and 2 were Stage IV at presentation. Patients with disease confined to uterus received no adjuvant treatment (61 %). Of these, 11 were endometrial stromal sarcoma (7 were low grade) and 3 were carcinosarcomas. Four patients received adjuvant EBRT following hysterectomy (17 %). Two patients who presented with metastases received palliative chemotherapy. Mean follow-up period was 46 months (0-86 months). Eleven patients (47 %) developed disease recurrence. Seven (30 %) had local recurrence, while 4 (17 %) developed pulmonary metastases. A total of eight patients died and all deaths were within 1 year of recurrence. The only prognostic factor that correlated with survival was the stage of disease at diagnosis. PMID:27217670

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  18. Micromechanics of alveolar edema.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Lederer, David J; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2011-01-01

    The decrease of lung compliance in pulmonary edema underlies ventilator-induced lung injury. However, the cause of the decrease in compliance is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in pulmonary edema, the mechanical effects of liquid-filled alveoli increase tissue stress in adjacent air-filled alveoli. By micropuncture of isolated, perfused rat lungs, we established a single-alveolus model of pulmonary edema that we imaged using confocal microscopy. In this model, we viewed a liquid-filled alveolus together with its air-filled neighbor at different transpulmonary pressures, both before and after liquid-filling. Instilling liquid in an alveolus caused alveolar shrinkage. As a result, the interalveolar septum was stretched, causing the neighboring air-filled alveolus to bulge. Thus, the air-filled alveolus was overexpanded by virtue of its adjacency to a liquid-filled alveolus. Confocal microscopy at different depths of the liquid-filled alveolus revealed a meniscus. Lung inflation to near-total lung capacity (TLC) demonstrated decreased compliance of the air-filled but not liquid-filled alveolus. However, at near TLC, the air-filled alveolus was larger than it was in the pre-edematous control tissue. In pulmonary edema, liquid-filled alveoli induce mechanical stress on air-filled alveoli, reducing the compliance of air-filled alveoli, and hence overall lung compliance. Because of increased mechanical stress, air-filled alveoli may be susceptible to overdistension injury during mechanical ventilation of the edematous lung. PMID:20118224

  19. CIC-rearranged Sarcomas: A Study of 20 Cases and Comparisons With Ewing Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Goto, Keisuke; Kodaira, Makoto; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Taisuke; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Endo, Otone; Kodama, Narihito; Kushima, Ryoji; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Motoi, Toru; Kawai, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The CIC gene rearrangement exists in a subset of small round cell sarcomas. As the nosologic relationship of these sarcomas to Ewing sarcomas remains undetermined, we examined 20 CIC-rearranged sarcomas to compare their clinicopathologic features with those of Ewing sarcomas. The CIC-rearranged sarcomas were from a group of 14 men and 6 women with a median age of 24.5 years. The primary tumor sites included the limbs, trunk wall, internal trunk, lung, cerebrum, and pharynx. A comparison of the demographic and clinical characteristics of the 20 patients with CIC-rearranged sarcomas with those of the 53 near-consecutive patients with EWSR1-rarranged Ewing sarcomas showed that there were no differences with respect to their ages and sexes. Although none of the CIC-rearranged sarcomas arose in the bone, 40% of the Ewing sarcomas primarily affected the skeleton. The overall survival of patients with Ewing sarcomas was significantly better than that for patients with CIC-rearranged sarcomas. A histologic comparison of the CIC-rearranged sarcomas with 20 EWSR1-rearranged Ewing sarcomas showed significantly higher degrees of lobulation, nuclear pleomorphism, the prominence of the nucleoli, spindle cell elements, and myxoid changes in the CIC-rearranged sarcomas. Distinguishing immunohistochemical features included heterogenous CD99 reactivity, nuclear WT1 expression, and calretinin expression in the CIC-rearranged sarcomas and NKX2.2 expression in the Ewing sarcomas. CIC-rearranged sarcomas are distinct from Ewing sarcomas clinically, morphologically, and immunohistochemically, and they should be considered a separate entity rather than being grouped within the same family of tumors. PMID:26685084

  20. [Therapeutic options for synovial sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Telekes, András

    2015-05-31

    Synovial sarcomas account for approximately 5 to 10% of soft tissue sarcomas and 0.05 to 0.1% of all malignant neoplasms. They predominantly affect the extremities but can occur in any part of the body. More than 50% of the patients are expected to develop metastatic disease within 3-5 years. In some patients disease recurrence may develop after 20 years. The 5-year overall survival rate is 10% for patients with metastatic disease and 76% for patients with localized one. Age, tumour size, histological subtype, and adjuvant radiotherapy influence prognosis. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy has not been proven yet. There are several ongoing clinical trials to determine the efficacy of active agents used for therapy of locally advanced, relapsed/refractory or metastatic disease. Better understanding of the biological behaviour of synovial sarcomas would provide the future way for the targeted therapy in combination with conventional treatments. PMID:26004546

  1. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A; Islam, Mohammad N; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S; Prince, Alice S; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-27

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca(2+) waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca(2+)-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. PMID:24463523

  2. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  3. Clear cell sarcoma-like tumor of the gastrointestinal tract: an evolving entity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; Thway, Khin

    2015-03-01

    Clear cell sarcoma-like tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (CCSLGT) is a rare malignant neoplasm that occurs in the wall of the small bowel, stomach, or large bowel, predominantly in young adults. It is an aggressive neoplasm that frequently presents with metastatic disease and has a high mortality rate. Histologically, it is usually composed of medium-sized primitive ovoid or epithelioid cells with pale or clear cytoplasm that are arranged in sheets or in papillary or alveolar architectures. Clear cell sarcoma-like tumor of the gastrointestinal tract is positive for S100 protein, invariably negative for melanocyte-specific markers and is often also positive for neuroendocrine markers. The etiology of CCSLGT is unknown, but many studies have shown associations with EWSR1-CREB1 gene fusions and, less frequently, with EWSR1-ATF1 fusions. Here, we discuss the current status of CCSLGT, including histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings. PMID:25724038

  4. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Conley, Anthony P; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma), adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma) in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. PMID:23700373

  5. Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Young, Lisa R.; Carey, Brenna C.; Wood, Robert E.; Luisetti, Maurizio; Wert, Susan E.; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kevill, Katharine; Chalk, Claudia; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Stevens, Carrie; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Campo, Ilaria; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: We identified a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), impaired granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor function, and increased GM-CSF. Objectives: Increased serum GM-CSF may be useful to identify individuals with PAP caused by GM-CSF receptor dysfunction. Methods: We screened 187 patients referred to us for measurement of GM-CSF autoantibodies to diagnose autoimmune PAP. Five were children with PAP and increased serum GM-CSF but without GM-CSF autoantibodies or any disease causing secondary PAP; all were studied with family members, subsequently identified patients, and controls. Measurement and Main Results: Eight children (seven female, one male) were identified with PAP caused by recessive CSF2RA mutations. Six presented with progressive dyspnea of insidious onset at 4.8 ± 1.6 years and two were asymptomatic at ages 5 and 8 years. Radiologic and histopathologic manifestations were similar to those of autoimmune PAP. Molecular analysis demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling was absent in six and severely reduced in two patients. The GM-CSF receptor β chain was detected in all patients, whereas the α chain was absent in six and abnormal in two, paralleling the GM-CSF signaling defects. Genetic analysis revealed multiple distinct CSF2RA abnormalities, including missense, duplication, frameshift, and nonsense mutations; exon and gene deletion; and cryptic alternative splicing. All symptomatic patients responded well to whole-lung lavage therapy. Conclusions: CSF2RA mutations cause a genetic form of PAP presenting as insidious, progressive dyspnea in children that can be diagnosed by a combination of characteristic radiologic findings and blood tests and treated successfully by whole-lung lavage. PMID:20622029

  6. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Docetaxel, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Uterine Sarcoma That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-16

    Stage IA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  7. Immunotherapy in Sarcoma: Future Horizons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Melissa; Gorantla, Vikram; Weiss, Kurt; Tawbi, Hussein

    2015-11-01

    Immunologic approaches to cancer are over a century old. Over the years, the strategy has been fine-tuned from inciting infections in subjects to inhibiting negative regulatory signals from the innate immune system. Sarcomas are among the first tumors to be considered for immune interventions. From Coley's toxin to cytokine-based therapies to adoptive cell therapy, there have been numerous immunotherapeutic investigations in this patient population. A promising strategy includes adoptive T cell therapy which has been studied in small cohorts of synovial sarcoma, a subtype that is known to widely express the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. Additionally, recent data in metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma demonstrate the utility and tremendous efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade with increased rates of durable responses compared to standard therapies. Responses in traditionally "non-immunogenic" tumors, such as lung and bladder cancers, provide ample rationale for the study of immune checkpoint inhibitors in sarcoma. While immunotherapy has induced some responses in sarcomas, further research will help clarify optimal patient selection for future clinical trials and new combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26423769

  8. Molecular Approaches to Sarcoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, R. J.; Tarantolo, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise a heterogeneous group of aggressive tumors that have a relatively poor prognosis. Although conventional therapeutic regimens can effectively cytoreduce the overall tumor mass, they fail to consistently achieve a curative outcome. Alternative gene-based approaches that counteract the underlying neoplastic process by eliminating the clonal aberrations that potentiate malignant behavior have been proposed. As compared to the accumulation of gene alterations associated with epithelial carcinomas, sarcomas are frequently characterized by the unique presence of a single chromosomal translocation in each histological subtype. Similar to the Philadelphia chromosome associated with CML, these clonal abnormalities result in the fusion of two independent unrelated genes to generate a unique chimeric protein that displays aberrant activity believed to initiate cellular transformation. Secondary gene mutations may provide an additional growth advantage that further contributes to malignant progression. The recent clinical success of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, STI571, suggests that therapeutic approaches specifically directed against essential survival factors in sarcoma cells may be effective. This review summarizes published approaches targeting a specific molecular mechanism associated with sarcomagenesis. The strategy and significance of published translational studies in six distinct areas are presented. These include: (1) the disruption of chimeric transcription factor activity; (2) inhibition of growth stimulatory post-translational modifications; (3) restoration of tumor suppressor function; (4) interference with angiogenesis; (5) induction of apoptotic pathways; and (6) introduction of toxic gene products. The potential for improving outcomes in sarcoma patients and the conceptual obstacles to be overcome are discussed. PMID:18521343

  9. Postradiation sarcoma involving the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, N.; Huvos, A.G.; Krol, G.; Hughes, J.E.; Cahan, W.G.

    1986-06-01

    Postradiation sarcomas arising many years after treatment of cancer are long term sequelae of therapy. We describe the clinical features, radiographic findings, and results of treatment in 13 patients with such sarcomas encountered over a 6-year period. Of these patients, 9 had bone sarcomas and the remaining 4 had paraspinal tumors arising from adjacent soft tissue and nerve. The primary cancer for which radiation was given included Hodgkin's disease (4 patients), breast cancer (2 patients), cervix cancer (2 patients), and a variety of others (5 patients). The latent interval to the occurrence of the second neoplasm varied from 6 to 30 years (median, 10 years) after treatment of the original tumor. Despite aggressive treatment, the overall prognosis was poor. The median survival was 8 months, with only 3 surviving more than 2 years. Although rare, postradiation sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with late onset of spinal pain or neurological symptoms after clinical remission of an original cancer.

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sitas, F; Newton, R

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma was endemic in South Africa even before the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Between 1988 and 1996, the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in South Africa has risen at least threefold and continues to increase as the HIV epidemic grows. Research from South Africa has shown that infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma but not with any other major cancer site or type. In addition, the risk of Kaposi's sarcoma increases with increasing antibody titer to HHV8, but, for a given titer, the risk is greater in HIV-seropositive compared with HIV-seronegative individuals. The age- and sex-standardized seroprevalence of HHV8 in black South African hospital patients was found to be slightly more than 30%; the seroprevalence of HHV8 increased with age and was similar in men and in women. The modes of transmission of HHV8 are yet to be fully elucidated. Limited evidence exists for sexual transmission in black South African adults, but mother-to-child and person-to-person transmission in childhood is also likely. Furthermore, the seroprevalence of HHV8 decreases with increasing levels of education and is lower in whites than in blacks, suggesting that factors associated with poverty may be important determinants of transmission. Future research should focus on risk factors for Kaposi's sarcoma in HHV8-infected individuals, on determinants and mode of transmission of HHV8, and on the elucidation of the effect of primary HHV8 infection in adults and in children. PMID:11158199

  11. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma or Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  12. Sapanisertib or Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    High Grade Sarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Synovial Sarcoma; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  13. What's New in Soft Tissue Sarcomas Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for soft tissue sarcoma What`s new in soft tissue sarcoma research and treatment? Research ... develop. This information is already being applied to new tests to diagnose and classify sarcomas. This is ...

  14. Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan

    PubMed Central

    Usubalieva, Jumagul; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Ziadinov, Iskender; Deplazes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human echinococcosis is a reportable disease in Kyrgyzstan. Between 1995 and 2011, human alveolar echinococcosis increased from <3 cases per year to >60 cases per year. The origins of this epidemic, which started in 2004, may be linked to the socioeconomic changes that followed the dissolution of the former Soviet Union. PMID:23763935

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare and heterogeneous diseases that affect a younger population than most epithelial cancers. Epidemiologic studies suggest a strong genetic component to sarcomas, and many familial cancer syndromes have been described, in which sarcomas are a feature. The best known of these are the Li-Fraumeni and retinoblastoma syndromes, study of which has been pivotal to elucidating the molecular basis for the cell response to DNA damage and the cell division. Although much has been learnt about cancer biology from the study of sarcoma families, in general clinical management of increased sarcoma risk has lagged behind other cancer predisposition syndromes. With the advent of genomic tools for genetic testing, it is likely that a substantial fraction of sarcoma patients will be identified as carriers of known risk alleles. The translation of this knowledge into effective risk management programs and cancer treatments will be essential to changes in routine clinical practice. PMID:27075354

  16. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  17. Penile Sarcoma: Report of a Rare Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Chaturvedi, Arun; Vishnoi, Jeevan Ram; Dontula, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Squamous cell carcinoma constitutes approximately 95% of all histology. Non-squamous malignancies are rare in penis. Sarcomas of penis are rarer among them. Spindle cell sarcoma is one of the extremely rare sarcoma of penis. To best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported so far, one in English literature and other in Japanese. We are presenting this uncommon case of spindle cell sarcoma of penis, which was diagnosed with microscopy with its characteristic immunohistochemistry. The disease had an aggressive course with multiple recurrences in a short duration despite margin negative resection. Disease responded poorly with the chemotherapy and patient succumbed to the disease.

  18. [Sarcomas of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Beyrouti, M L; Abid, M; Beyrouti, R; Ben Amar, M; Gargouri, F; Frikha, F; Affes, N; Boujelbene, S; Ghorbel, A

    2005-03-12

    Sarcomas of the small intestine are rare, clearly differentiated, malignant, mesenchymatous tumours that can be of smooth muscle, Schwann cell or fibroblastic origin. From a clinical point of view, the pain and abdominal mass are the 2 types of symptoms that frequently reveal the disease. In rare cases, sarcomas of the small intestine are manifested by an acute complication. No imaging method can clearly confirm the diagnosis. Before immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis was made on undifferentiated mesenchymatous "stromal" tumours, which are also rare. Exeresis must be complete and without perforation of the tumour because of the risk of locoregional relapse. The benefits provided by chemotherapy and radiotherapy are limited because of the low mitotic activity of the tumour cells and its weak vascularisation. Long-term survival is limited by poor prognosis criteria: high grade malignancy, size greater than 5 cm, tumour extension, perforation of the tumour, quality of surgical resection and histological type. PMID:15859576

  19. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  20. Synovial sarcoma of the foot.

    PubMed

    Bekarev, Mikhail; Elsinger, Elisabeth C; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza; Borzykowski, Ross M; Geller, David S

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old male who underwent lung lobectomy for presumed lung cancer. Thereafter, he presented with a painful mass between the third and fourth metatarsal heads in the foot that was assumed to be Morton's neuroma. After extensive oncologic evaluation, the foot mass was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma. In retrospect, his lung lesion was understood to be metastatic disease. PMID:23632071

  1. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  2. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fernández F, Cristina; Salinas F, Mauricio; de Grazia K, José Andrés; Díaz P, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an extremely rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of calcified spherical particles (called microliths), due to a mutation of the gene encoding a membrane transport protein of the alveolar surface. Most patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis. The course of the disease is slowly progressive, with development of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. The "sandstorm" pattern is the characteristic finding of this disease. We report a 39-year-old female presenting with progressive dyspnea. A chest X ray showed ground-glass opacities and a high resolution CT scan showed numerous calcified lung micronodules. A surgical lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:25427025

  3. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans.

    PubMed

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-09-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  4. Kaposi sarcoma in unusual locations

    PubMed Central

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Dezube, Bruce J

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, vascular lesion of low-grade malignant potential that presents most frequently in mucocutaneous sites. KS also commonly involves lymph nodes and visceral organs. This article deals with the manifestation of KS in unusual anatomic regions. Unusual locations of KS involvement include the musculoskeletal system, central and peripheral nervous system, larynx, eye, major salivary glands, endocrine organs, heart, thoracic duct, urinary system and breast. The development of KS within wounds and blood clots is also presented. KS in these atypical sites may prove difficult to diagnose, resulting in patient mismanagement. Theories to explain the rarity and development of KS in these unusual sites are discussed. PMID:18605999

  5. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-01-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  6. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient. PMID:24231484

  7. Management of the alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Pedro E; Schuster, Lindsay A; Levy-Bercowski, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Orthopedic and orthodontic management of patients born with clefts of the lip, alveolus and palate is based on the application of basic biomechanical principles adapted to the individualized cleft anatomy. This article focuses on orthopedic and orthodontic preparation for 2 stages of interdisciplinary orthodontic/surgical cleft care: presurgical infant orthopedics (nasoalveolar molding) for lip/alveolus/nasal surgical repair and maxillary arch preparation for secondary alveolar bone grafting. These preparatory stages of orthopedic/orthodontic therapy are undertaken with the goal of restoring normal anatomic relationships to assist the surgeon in providing the best possible surgical care. PMID:24607190

  8. Therapeutic Angiotensin-(1-7) in Treating Patients With Metastatic Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Bone Cancer; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma

  9. Kaposi Sarcoma in a Non HIV Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Rafi A; Koul, Parvaiz A; Ahmed, Manzoor; Shah, Sonaullah; Mufti, Showkat A; War, Fayaz A

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a 45 year old non HIV infected female, who presented with multiple painful, livid reddish brown plaques, papules and nodules on both lower limbs and left index finger. The cutaneous nodular lesions on biopsy showed characteristic features of Kaposi’s sarcoma. This case is reported due to paucity of Kapsi’s sarcoma in non HIV Persons. It is typically a disease of older men from European and Mediterranean region. Here we present a case report of classic Kaposi’s Sarcoma in a young Indian female. PMID:21475497

  10. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Ranjan, Kumar Rajiv; Chakrabortty, Debasis; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) or primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) typically occurs in long or flat bones, the chest wall, extra-skeletal soft tissue, and rarely in solid organs. Incidence of adrenal Ewing's sarcoma is very rare. Here we report a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the right adrenal gland in an 8-year-old girl who presented with an abdominal mass. The huge tumor was managed by preoperative neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. She died due to metastasis after five months of surgery. PMID:27398321

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin. PMID:26347781

  12. Synthesis of Dipalmitoyl Lecithin by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.; Huber, Gary; Vaughan, Martha

    1972-01-01

    A reliable, relatively simple method for isolation and quantification of disaturated lecithins is described. In rabbit lung, 34% of the lecithins were disaturated, in alveolar macrophages, 19%. More than 95% of the fatty acids of the disaturated lecithins from lung and alveolar macrophages was palmitic. Hence, the disaturated lecithins from these sources were essentially all dipalmitoyl lecithin. Both heterophils and alveolar macrophages incorporated 14C-labeled choline and palmitate into disaturated lecithins. Liver slices in which only about 1% of the lecithins were disaturated incorporated very little of these precursors into this fraction. Of the palmitate incorporated in vitro into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages, heterophils, and lung slices, 37% was in the 1 position. In disaturated lecithins isolated from pulmonary lavage fluid, alveolar macrophages, and lung of rabbit 8-12 hr after a single intravenous injection of palmitic-1-14C acid, 45% of the 14C was in position 1. At earlier times, from 20-240 min after injection, the distribution of 14C was similar in the samples from lung, but in those from alveolar macrophages and lavage fluid, the percentage in position 1 was slightly lower. Glycerol-U-14C was incorporated into disaturated lecithins by alveolar macrophages and by lung slices in vitro. Both tissues incorporated very little label from ethanolamine or from methyl-labeled methionine into this fraction. All of the data are consistent with the view that alveolar macrophages synthesize dipalmitoyl lecithin via the cytidine diphosphate-choline pathway. PMID:5066597

  13. Pulse granuloma of the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Mincer, H H; McCoy, J M; Turner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Six examples of pulse granulomas of the alveolar ridge are presented. The lesion consists of a foreign-body granuloma containing identifiable particles of leguminous foods. The vegetable matter is introduced through an alveolar defect, usually a postextraction socket. Simple curettage is apparently adequate treatment to effect cure. PMID:382018

  14. Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gynecologic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  15. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Matuschak, George M

    2008-06-01

    This study describes an unusual patient with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) in whom diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) developed as a complication of alemtuzumab therapy following renal transplantation. A 26-year-old man with XLAS underwent retransplantation with a cadaveric renal allograft. He received alemtuzumab therapy as a part of an immunosuppressive induction protocol, and dyspnea and hemoptysis developed. A chest CT scan showed diffuse alveolar opacities. Bronchoscopy was performed to determine the cause of hemoptysis and hypoxia. BAL showed a characteristic increasingly bloody return in the sequential aliquots. There was no growth of pathogenic bacteria or evidence of opportunistic infection. Clinical improvement occurred with the initiation of steroids, and the patient required short-term mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DAH associated with use of alemtuzumab therapy, although other pulmonary toxicities have been described. The prevalence of this form of pulmonary toxicity is unclear and requires further systematic study. PMID:18574290

  16. [Grading of soft tissue and bone sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Petersen, I; Wardelmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Malignancy grading is an essential element in the classification of sarcomas. It correlates with the prognosis of the disease and the risk of metastasis. This article presents the grading schemes for soft tissue, bone and pediatric sarcomas. It summarizes the histological criteria of the Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer (FNCLCC) system and the Pediatric Oncology Group as well as the grading of bone tumors by the College of American Pathologists (CAP). Furthermore, the potential relevance of gene expression signatures, the complexity index in sarcoma (CINSARC) and single genetic alterations (p53, MDM2, p16, SWI/SNF, EWSR1 fusions and PAX3/PAX7-FOXO1 fusions) for the prognosis of sarcomas are discussed. PMID:27384333

  17. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Joseph P.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; King, Gregory S.; Carden, Juan O.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung. PMID:27239183

  18. Soft Tissue Sarcomas and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on soft tissue sarcoma and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... report " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " and other updates that there ...

  19. Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Kaposi Sarcoma + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention TOPICS Document Topics ...

  20. Postirradiation sarcomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Maisel, R.H.; Manivel, J.C.; Porto, D.P.; Stanley, M.

    1989-09-01

    We discuss four cases of postirradiation sarcomas of the head and neck. Two cases were metachronous sarcomas that appeared after operation and irradiation for primary sarcomas, 1 case was a mandibular malignant fibrous histiocytoma that developed on the opposite side of the jaw from a malignant histiocytic neoplasm that was irradiated 8 years previously, and 1 case was a laryngeal tumor that appeared 5 years after combined operative and radiation therapy for a laryngeal squamous carcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies more precisely defined and classified these tumors, and assisted in determining a therapeutic protocol. The therapy for postirradiation sarcomas includes extirpative operation when possible, but the role of chemotherapy is uncertain. The aggressive behavior of these neoplasms was attested to by the death of three patients within 18 months of their operations.

  1. Sarcomas of Soft Tissue and Bone.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Andrea; Dirksen, Uta; Bielack, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The definition of soft tissue and bone sarcomas include a large group of several heterogeneous subtypes of mesenchymal origin that may occur at any age. Among the different sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma are aggressive high-grade malignancies that often arise in adolescents and young adults. Managing these malignancies in patients in this age bracket poses various clinical problems, also because different therapeutic approaches are sometimes adopted by pediatric and adult oncologists, even though they are dealing with the same condition. Cooperation between pediatric oncologists and adult medical oncologists is a key step in order to assure the best treatment to these patients, preferably through their inclusion into international clinical trials. PMID:27595362

  2. Adjuvant radiation for soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Colleen I; Haas, Rick; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades, limb-preservation surgery in combination with radiotherapy achieves local control rates exceeding 90% for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Local control is not as successful for retroperitoneal sarcoma (approximately 60%) despite aggressive surgical approaches including en bloc resection of uninvolved adjacent organs combined with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This review will discuss the indications for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for primary presentation of soft tissue sarcoma: "What," referring to the type and manner of planning and delivery of RT; "When," referring to the timing and scheduling of RT; and "Why," referring to the rationale for the use of RT will be addressed. From a practical stand point, this Educational Chapter on "adjuvant RT" will focus on pre- and postoperative RT in the context of gross total resection for extremity and retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma, the two most frequent paradigms for the use of adjuvant RT. PMID:25993234

  3. Immunosuppressive Therapy-Related Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy are used to treat Kaposi sarcoma lesions . Photon radiation therapy treats lesions with high-energy light. ... complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information ...

  4. Isolated Limb Perfusion of Melphalan With or Without Tumor Necrosis Factor in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Arm or Leg

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-14

    Stage IVB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIC Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  5. Local Recurrence of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Whitney M; Deneve, Jeremiah L

    2016-10-01

    The management of recurrent soft tissue sarcoma is a challenging problem for clinicians and has a significant physical, mental, emotional, and oncologic impact for the patient. Despite excellent limb-preservation therapies, approximately one-quarter of patients may eventually develop recurrence of disease. How to most appropriately manage these patients is a matter of debate. Several treatment options exist, including surgical resection, irradiation, systemic chemotherapy, amputation, and regional therapies. This article highlights the management of recurrent extremity soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:27542648

  6. Surgical management of soft tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Arlen, M.; Marcove, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume reflects the latest thinking in surgical and adjuvant forms of therapy that can be offered to the sarcoma patient. Based on their analysis of sarcoma patients, the authors stress management based on site of origin, and discuss tumors on and about the shoulder girdle, hip joint, extremity, retroperitoneum, etc. Coverage includes methods for limb preservation; techniques for regional node resection; indications and methods for arterial perfusion, cryosurgery and isotope implantation; pre- and post-operative immunotherapy chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  7. Imaging in Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Current Updates.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are heterogeneous malignant tumors that have nonspecific imaging features. A combination of clinical, demographic, and imaging characteristics can aid in the diagnosis. Imaging provides important information regarding the tumor extent, pretreatment planning, and surveillance of patients with STS. In this article, we illustrate the pertinent imaging characteristics of the commonly occurring STS and some uncommon sarcomas with unique imaging characteristics. PMID:27591491

  8. Undifferentiated Embryonal Sarcoma of Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kallam, Avyakta; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Kozel, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is a rare malignant hepatic tumor. A 47 year old male presented with symptoms of sour taste in his mouth, occasional nausea, indigestion and 15-pound weight loss over two months. He had an unremarkable upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Imaging showed a large liver mass in the left hepatic lobe that was resected and then reported as UESL. He went on to develop lung metastases and was initially treated with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by switching of therapy to gemcitabine and docetaxel due to progression of disease. He had a good response after two cycles and went on to receive four more cycles, achieving stable disease. We can therefore conclude that the combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel is a potential therapeutic option for patients with UESL. PMID:26788276

  9. Acroangiodermatitis (Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Manchanda, Kajal

    2014-01-01

    Acroangiodermatitis or Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma is a rare angioproliferative entity, related to chronic venous insufficiency or certain other vascular anomalies. It is often associated with chronic venous insufficiency, arteriovenous malformation of the legs, chronic renal failure treated with dialysis, paralyzed legs and amputation stumps. We hereby describe a case of 45 year old female presenting with pitting pedal edema, multiple ulcers over bilateral lower limbs with irregular margins with erythema and hyperpigmentation of the surrounding skin. Color Doppler study of bilateral lower limbs was normal. Histopathological examination from one of the lesions showed hyperplastic epidermis, proliferation of capillaries in dermis, hemosiderin deposits and lymphocytic infiltrate. These features thus confirmed the diagnosis of Acroangiodermatitis. PMID:25165656

  10. Undifferentiated Embryonal Sarcoma of Liver.

    PubMed

    Kallam, Avyakta; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Kozel, Jessica; Shonka, Nicole

    2015-12-29

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is a rare malignant hepatic tumor. A 47 year old male presented with symptoms of sour taste in his mouth, occasional nausea, indigestion and 15-pound weight loss over two months. He had an unremarkable upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Imaging showed a large liver mass in the left hepatic lobe that was resected and then reported as UESL. He went on to develop lung metastases and was initially treated with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by switching of therapy to gemcitabine and docetaxel due to progression of disease. He had a good response after two cycles and went on to receive four more cycles, achieving stable disease. We can therefore conclude that the combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel is a potential therapeutic option for patients with UESL. PMID:26788276

  11. Imaging sarcomas of the great vessels and heart.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Emily C; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Araoz, Philip A

    2011-10-01

    Primary sarcomas of the aorta, pulmonary artery, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, and the heart are rare neoplasms. Aortic sarcomas are broadly categorized as either primarily luminal or primarily mural, with luminal sarcomas more likely to be misdiagnosed as thrombus. Pulmonary artery sarcomas are often mistaken for pulmonary embolism both clinically and at imaging. Vena caval sarcomas appear as intraluminal or extraluminal masses connecting to or filling the veins. The most common are leiomyosarcomas of the inferior vena cava. Primary sarcomas of the heart are rare and usually appear as heterogeneous aggressive masses. PMID:21963161

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA's role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  13. Application of Proteomics to Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tadashi; Kubota, Daisuke; Kawai, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare and account for less than 1% of all malignant cancers. Other than development of intensive therapies, the clinical outcome of patients with soft tissue sarcoma remains very poor, particularly when diagnosed at a late stage. Unique mutations have been associated with certain soft tissue sarcomas, but their etiologies remain unknown. The proteome is a functional translation of a genome, which directly regulates the malignant features of tumors. Thus, proteomics is a promising approach for investigating soft tissue sarcomas. Various proteomic approaches and clinical materials have been used to address clinical and biological issues, including biomarker development, molecular target identification, and study of disease mechanisms. Several cancer-associated proteins have been identified using conventional technologies such as 2D-PAGE, mass spectrometry, and array technology. The functional backgrounds of proteins identified were assessed extensively using in vitro experiments, thus supporting expression analysis. These observations demonstrate the applicability of proteomics to soft tissue sarcoma studies. However, the sample size in each study was insufficient to allow conclusive results. Given the low frequency of soft tissue sarcomas, multi-institutional collaborations are required to validate the results of proteomic approaches. PMID:22778956

  14. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  15. What's New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for Kaposi sarcoma What’s new in Kaposi sarcoma research and treatment? A great ... once it has developed. Treatment Researchers are studying new and different ways to treat KS. Imiquimod (Aldara) ...

  16. What's New in Uterine Sarcoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for uterine sarcoma What`s new in uterine sarcoma research and treatment? Molecular pathology ... the chromosomes leads to the formation of a new gene, called JAZF1/JJAZ. This gene may help ...

  17. What Are the Key Statistics about Uterine Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for uterine sarcoma? What are the key statistics about uterine sarcoma? The American Cancer Society's estimates ... uterine corpus. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for soft tissue sarcomas? What are the key statistics about soft tissue sarcomas? The American Cancer Society's ... in the United States for 2016 are (these statistics include both adults and children): About 12,310 ...

  19. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Kaposi sarcoma? What should you ask your doctor about Kaposi sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi ... need to have honest, open discussions with your doctor. You should ask any question on your mind ...

  20. What Are the Key Statistics about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about Kaposi sarcoma? Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi sarcoma (KS) was rare in the United ... were classic and transplant-related. With the AIDS epidemic, the rate of KS in this country increased ...

  1. Explant culture of sarcoma patients' tissue.

    PubMed

    Muff, Roman; Botter, Sander M; Husmann, Knut; Tchinda, Joelle; Selvam, Philomina; Seeli-Maduz, Franziska; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Human sarcomas comprise a heterogeneous group of rare tumors that affect soft tissues and bone. Due to the scarcity and heterogeneity of these diseases, patient-derived cells that can be used for preclinical research are limited. In this study, we investigated whether the tissue explant technique can be used to obtain sarcoma cell lines from fresh as well as viable frozen tissue obtained from 8 out of 12 soft tissue and 9 out of 13 bone tumor entities as defined by the World Health Organization. The success rate, defined as the percent of samples that yielded sufficient numbers of outgrowing cells to be frozen, and the time to freeze were determined for a total of 734 sarcoma tissue specimens. In 552 cases (75%) enough cells were obtained to be frozen at early passage. Success rates were higher in bone tumors (82%) compared with soft tissue tumors (68%), and the mean time to freezing was lower in bone tumors (65 days) compared with soft tissue tumors (84 days). Overall, from 40% of the tissues cells could be frozen at early passage within <2 month after tissue removal. Comparable results as with fresh tissue were obtained after explant of viable frozen patient-derived material. In a selected number of bone and soft tissue sarcoma entities, conventional karyotyping and/or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis revealed a high amount (>60%) of abnormal cells in 41% of analyzed samples, especially in bone sarcomas (osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma). In conclusion, the explant technique is well suited to establish patient-derived cell lines for a large majority of bone and soft tissue sarcoma entities with adequate speed. This procedure thus opens the possibility for molecular analysis and drug testing for therapeutic decision making even during patient treatment. PMID:27111283

  2. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  3. Adult human sarcomas. II. Medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2007-02-01

    Human sarcoma cells can be killed by radio- and chemotherapy, but tumor cells acquiring resistance frequently kill the patient. A keen understanding of the intracellular course of oncogenic cascades leads to the discovery of small molecular inhibitors of the involved phosphorylated kinases. Targeted therapy complements chemotherapy. Oncogene silencing is feasible by small interfering RNA. The restoration of some of the mutated or deleted tumor-suppressor genes (p53, Rb, PTEN, hSNF, INK/ARF and WT) by demethylation or reacetylation of their histones has been accomplished. Genetically engineered or naturally oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumors and leave healthy tissues intact. Adeno- or retroviral vectors deliver genes of immunological costimulators, tumor antigens, chemo- or cytokines and/or tumor-suppressor proteins into tumor (sarcoma) cells. Suicide gene delivery results in apoptosis induction. Genes of enzymes that target prodrugs as their substrates render tumor cells highly susceptible to chemotherapy, with the prodrug to be targeted intracellularly. It will be combinations of sophisticated surgical removal of the nonencapsulated and locally invasive primary sarcomas, advanced forms of radiotherapy to the involved sites and immunotherapy with sarcoma vaccines that will cure primary sarcomas. Adoptive immunotherapy with immune lymphocytes will be operational in metastatic disease only when populations of regulatory T cells are controlled. Targeted therapy with small molecular inhibitors of oncogene cascades, the driving forces of sarcoma cells, alteration of the tumor stroma from a supportive to a tumor-hostile environment, reactivation or replacement of wild-type tumor-suppressor genes, and radio-chemotherapy (with much reduced toxicity) will eventually accomplish the cure of metastatic sarcomas. PMID:17288529

  4. Fatal Alveolar Echinococcosis of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Keutgens, Aurore; Simoni, Paolo; Detrembleur, Nancy; Frippiat, Frédéric; Giot, Jean-Baptiste; Spirlet, François; Aghazarian, Saro; Descy, Julie; Meex, Cécile; Huynen, Pascale; Melin, Pierrette; Müller, Norbert; Gottstein, Bruno; Carlier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    For the last 10 years, the southern part of Belgium has been recognized as a low-risk area of endemicity for alveolar echinococcosis. This infection, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis, usually induces a severe liver condition and can sometimes spread to other organs. However, alveolar echinococcosis involving bones has been described only very rarely. Here, a fatal case of spondylodiscitis due to E. multilocularis contracted in southern Belgium is reported. PMID:23175265

  5. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Betal, Dibendu; Babu, Ramesh; Mehmet, Veysi

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare form of soft tissue sarcomas. We present a case of a 62 year-old male presenting with a left thyroid lump initially though to be a thyroid adenoma but subsequently diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case. PMID:19335917

  6. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Lung: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parveen; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma of lung is a rare tumor with few case reports in literature. Though named synovial sarcoma due to its resemblance to synovium on light microscopy, it arises from mesenchymal tissue. Here, we present a case of synovial sarcoma of lung in a 7-year old boy, with main emphasis on difficulty faced in the management. PMID:27170917

  7. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Lung: A Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Raj, Prince; Kumar, Parveen; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma of lung is a rare tumor with few case reports in literature. Though named synovial sarcoma due to its resemblance to synovium on light microscopy, it arises from mesenchymal tissue. Here, we present a case of synovial sarcoma of lung in a 7-year old boy, with main emphasis on difficulty faced in the management. PMID:27170917

  8. Major Types of Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... 253-8690 info@curesarcoma.org Follow @CureSarcoma on Twitter 11h Way to go, Damon and @happy2badad! #CureSarcoma ... to the extent permitted by law. Facebook Google+ Twitter LinkedIn YouTube © 2016 Sarcoma Foundation of America | All ...

  9. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  10. Targeted Therapies in Sarcomas: Challenging the Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Martín Liberal, Juan; Lagares-Tena, Laura; Sáinz-Jaspeado, Miguel; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García del Muro, Xavier; Tirado, Oscar M.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies that very often lead to death. Nowadays, chemotherapy is the only available treatment for most sarcomas but there are few active drugs and clinical results still remain very poor. Thus, there is an imperious need to find new therapeutic alternatives in order to improve sarcoma patient's outcome. During the last years, there have been described a number of new molecular pathways that have allowed us to know more about cancer biology and tumorigenesis. Sarcomas are one of the tumors in which more advances have been made. Identification of specific chromosomal translocations, some important pathways characterization such as mTOR pathway or the insulin-like growth factor pathway, the stunning development in angiogenesis knowledge, and brand new agents like viruses have lead to the development of new therapeutic options with promising results. This paper makes an exhaustive review of preclinical and clinical evidence of the most recent targeted therapies in sarcomas and provides a future view of treatments that may lead to improve prognosis of patients affected with this disease. PMID:22701332

  11. The role of inflammation in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Radons, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas encompass a heterogenous group of tumors with diverse pathologically and clinically overlapping features. It is a rarely curable disease, and their management requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Chronic inflammation has emerged as one of the hallmarks of tumors including sarcomas. Classical inflammation-associated sarcomas comprise the inflammatory malignant fibrous histiocytoma and Kaposi sarcoma. The identification of specific chromosomal translocations and important intracellular signaling pathways such as Ras/Raf/MAPK, insulin-like growth factor, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, sonic hedgehog and Notch together with the increasing knowledge of angiogenesis has led to development of targeted therapies that aim to interrupt these pathways. Innovative agents like oncolytic viruses opened the way to design new therapeutic options with encouraging findings. Preclinical evidence also highlights the therapeutic potential of anti-inflammatory nutraceuticals as they can inhibit multiple pathways while being less toxic. This chapter gives an overview of actual therapeutic standards, newest evidence-based studies and exciting options for targeted therapies in sarcomas. PMID:24818727

  12. Primary osteogenic sarcoma of the mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takaaki; Ishihara, Tsuneo; Yoshimatsu, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Murakami, Masaru; Kobayashi, Koichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Masao

    1974-01-01

    Ikeda, T., Ishihara, T., Yoshimatsu, H., Kikuchi, K., Murakami, M., Kobayashi, K., Inoue, H., and Kasahara, M. (1974). Thorax, 582-588. Primary osteogenic sarcoma of the mediastinum. A 22-year-old man with primary osteogenic sarcoma of the superior mediastinum is reported. This case is the second instance of primary osteogenic sarcoma of the mediastinum and the first case of superior mediastinal origin to be reported. The patient had local recurrence one year after the first operation. After resection of the recurrent tumour with left upper lobectomy and partial pericardectomy followed by radiation, he has been well for more than five years without recurrence. Extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma of soft tissue is very rare and has been reported in 103 patients. The five-year survival of patients with extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma is 22·4%. The distribution and prognosis of this tumour are similar to those of rhabdomyosarcoma in soft tissue. Primary amputation or wide excision is the treatment of choice. Images PMID:4530480

  13. Novel PAX3-NCOA1 Fusions in Biphenotypic Sinonasal Sarcoma With Focal Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Ghossein, Ronald A; Bishop, Justin A; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Tse-Ching; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas arising in the sinonasal region are uncommon and encompass a wide variety of tumor types, including the newly described biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma (BSNS), which is characterized by a monomorphic spindle cell proliferation with dual neural and myogenic phenotypes. Most BSNSs harbor a pathognomonic PAX3-MAML3 fusion driven by t(2;4)(q35;q31.1), whereas the alternative fusion partner gene remains unidentified in a subset of PAX3-rearranged cases. As NCOA1 on 2p23 is a known partner in PAX3-related fusions in other tumor types (ie, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma), we investigated its status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays in 2 BSNS cases showing only PAX3 gene rearrangements. Novel PAX3-NCOA1 fusions were identified in these 2 index cases showing an inv(2)(q35p23) by FISH and confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Five additional BSNS cases with typical morphology were studied by FISH, revealing a PAX3-MAML3 fusion in 4 cases and only PAX3 rearrangement in the remaining case without abnormalities in MAML3 or NCOA1 gene. Except for 1 case with surface ulceration, all other tumors lacked increased mitotic activity or necrosis, and all cases immunohistochemically coexpressed S100 protein and actin, but lacked SOX10 reactivity. Interestingly, the 2 PAX3-NCOA1-positive cases showed desmin reactivity and displayed a small component of rhabdomyoblastic cells, which were not seen in the more common PAX3-MAML3 fusion cases. In conclusion, we report a novel PAX3-NCOA1 fusion in BSNS, which appears to be associated with focal rhabdomyoblastic differentiation and should be distinguished from PAX3-NCOA1-positive alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma or malignant Triton tumor. SOX10 immunohistochemistry is a useful marker in distinguishing BSNS from peripheral nerve sheath tumors. PMID:26371783

  14. Uterine sarcoma Part II-Uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma: The TAG systematic review.

    PubMed

    Horng, Huann-Cheng; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jen; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Ng, Heung-Tat

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial stromal tumors are rare uterine tumors (<1%). Four main categories include endometrial stromal nodule, low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (HG-ESS), and uterine undifferentiated sarcoma (UUS). This review is a series of articles discussing the uterine sarcomas. LG-ESS, a hormone-dependent tumor harboring chromosomal rearrangement, is an indolent tumor with a favorable prognosis, but characterized by late recurrences even in patients with Stage I disease, suggesting the requirement of a long-term follow-up. Patients with HG-ESS, based on the identification of YWHAE-NUTM2A/B (YWHAE-FAM22A/B) gene fusion, typically present with advanced stage diseases and frequently have recurrences, usually within a few years after initial surgery. UUS is, a high-grade sarcoma, extremely rare, lacking a specific line of differentiation, which is a diagnosis of exclusion (the wastebasket category, which fails to fulfill the morphological and immunohistochemical criteria of translocation-positive ESS). Surgery is the main strategy in the management of uterine sarcoma. Due to rarity, complex biological characteristics, and unknown etiology and risk factors of uterine sarcomas, the role of adjuvant therapy is not clear. Only LG-ESS might respond to progestins or aromatase inhibitors. PMID:27590366

  15. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The alveolar cleft is a bony defect that is present in 75% of the patients with cleft lip and palate. Although secondary alveolar cleft repair is commonly accepted for these patients, nowadays, controversy still remains regarding the surgical technique, the timing of the surgery, the donor site, and whether the use of allogenic materials improve the outcomes. The purpose of the present review was to evaluate the protocol, the surgical technique and the outcomes in a large population of patients with alveolar clefts that underwent secondary alveolar cleft repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 109 procedures in 90 patients with alveolar cleft were identified retrospectively after institutional review board approval was obtained. The patients were treated at a single institution during a period of 10 years (2001-2011). Data were collected regarding demographics, type of cleft, success parameters of the procedure (oronasal fistulae closure, unification of the maxillary segments, eruption and support of anterior teeth, support to the base of the nose, normal ridge form for prosthetic rehabilitation), donor site morbidity, and complications. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination was performed by means of orthopantomogram and computed tomography (CT) scan. Results: The average patient age was 14.2 years (range 4–21.3 years). There were 4 right alveolar-lip clefts, 9 left alveolar-lip clefts, 3 bilateral alveolar-lip clefts, 18 right palate-lip clefts, 40 left palate-lip clefts and 16 bilateral palate-lip clefts. All the success parameters were favorable in 87 patients. Iliac crest bone grafts were employed in all cases. There were three bone graft losses. In three cases, allogenic materials used in a first surgery performed in other centers, underwent infection and lacked consolidation. They were removed and substituted by autogenous iliac crest bone graft. Conclusions: The use of autogenous iliac crest for secondary alveolar bone grafting

  16. [Soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, P

    2016-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors that represent a major challenge due to varying clinical presentations and often interdisciplinary treatment concepts. Gold standard for the treatment of localized resectable soft tissue sarcomas is complete surgical removal. In metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, systemic therapy is the treatment of choice. The most active drugs are anthracyclines and ifosfamide. Combination chemotherapy has improved both response rate and progression-free survival at the cost of increased toxicity. Imatinib at a dose of 400 mg/day is the gold standard for patients with advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In patients with a mutation in KIT exon 9, 800 mg/day is the recommended dose. In imatinib refractory or intolerant patients, sunitinib is recommended. Regorafenib has been approved for third-line therapy. PMID:26907871

  17. Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

    2013-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3 years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

  18. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  19. Synovial sarcoma of kidney in a child: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Dhanushkodi, Manikandan; Narayanswamy, Kathiresan; Raja, Anand; Sundersingh, Shirley; Sagar, Tenali

    2016-01-01

    There are no reported cases in the literature of primary renal synovial sarcoma in pediatric patients. The management of renal synovial sarcoma has been extrapolated from the management of soft tissue sarcomas at other sites. We present a 4-year-old female who was suspected to have Wilms' tumor. The patient underwent guided biopsy as she did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Wilms' tumor. The biopsy was consistent with primary renal synovial sarcoma. The child was treated with change in her neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen and surgery. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by demonstrating the t (X, 18) translocation using polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27046979

  20. Synovial sarcoma of kidney in a child: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Dhanushkodi, Manikandan; Narayanswamy, Kathiresan; Raja, Anand; Sundersingh, Shirley; Sagar, Tenali

    2016-01-01

    There are no reported cases in the literature of primary renal synovial sarcoma in pediatric patients. The management of renal synovial sarcoma has been extrapolated from the management of soft tissue sarcomas at other sites. We present a 4-year-old female who was suspected to have Wilms’ tumor. The patient underwent guided biopsy as she did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Wilms’ tumor. The biopsy was consistent with primary renal synovial sarcoma. The child was treated with change in her neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen and surgery. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by demonstrating the t (X, 18) translocation using polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27046979

  1. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Fact, Opinion, and Controversy.

    PubMed

    Gladdy, Rebecca A; Gupta, Abha; Catton, Charles N

    2016-10-01

    After diagnosis of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS), detailed imaging and multidisciplinary discussion should guide treatment including surgical resection and in select cases, neoadjuvant therapy. Local recurrence is common in RPS and is associated with grade, histologic subtype, completeness of resection, and size. As guidelines to standardize RPS patient management emerge, expert pathologic assessment and management in centers of excellence are benchmarks of quality of care. The efficacy of current chemotherapy is limited and there is a critical need to understand the molecular basis of sarcoma so that new drug therapies are developed. Multicenter clinical trials are needed to limit opinion and controversy in this complex and challenging disease. PMID:27591493

  2. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of adults soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Bui-Nguyen, B; Italiano, A; Delva, F; Toulmond, M

    2010-06-01

    The main progress in the management of soft tissue sarcomas have been obtained in the field of local control. Although the main evolutive, vital, risk of these diseases is metastatic dissemination, efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial issue. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy cannot be considered as a standard for any situation. The last results of clinical trials, meta-analysis and population studies are presented and discussed in this article. New therapeutic strategies are to be developed to prevent metastases in soft tissue sarcomas. This needs a better understanding of the biology of those tumors, of metastases risk factors and of the determinants of systemic therapies efficacy in these tumors. PMID:20547481

  3. Systemic Therapy for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jennifer Y; Movva, Sujana

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors that present with distant metastasis in up to 10% of patients. Survival has improved significantly because of advancements in histologic classification and improved management approaches. Older agents such as doxorubicin, ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel continue to demonstrate objective response rates from 18% to 25%. Newer agents such as trabectedin, eribulin, aldoxorubicin, and olaratumab have demonstrated improvements in progression-free survival, overall survival, or toxicity profiles. Future studies on treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma will continue to concentrate on reducing toxicity, personalization of therapy, and targeting novel pathways. PMID:27542647

  4. Primary pulmonary monophasic synovial sarcoma: Evading diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus; Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Abid, Qamar

    2016-02-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is a very rare tumor, thus there is no consensus as to the most appropriate management. A 78-year-old man presented with nonspecific symptoms of weight loss and shortness of breath. Imaging confirmed a large right-sided mass and accompanying pleural effusion. Strong 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was found on positron-emission tomography. The preoperative work-up and intraoperative frozen section were inconclusive. Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis confirmed the diagnosis of primary pulmonary monophasic synovial sarcoma. PMID:26612959

  5. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells. PMID:11325605

  6. Osteosarcoma With Apparent Ewing Sarcoma Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Melissa D; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lu; Berger, Michael F; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges because of their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and deletions RB1, PTCH1, and ATRX, supporting the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. This illustrates the potential of clinical genomic profiling to improve diagnosis and enable specifically targeted therapies for cancers with complex pathologies. PMID:27352193

  7. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  8. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  9. Innovative radiotherapy of sarcoma: Proton beam radiation.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F; Haas, Rick L M

    2016-07-01

    This review on proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) focusses on an historical overview, cost-effectiveness, techniques, acute and late toxicities and clinical results of PBT for sarcoma patients. PBT has gained its place among the armamentarium of modern radiotherapy techniques. For selected patients, it can be cost-effective. PMID:27258968

  10. Instantánea del sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    Información sobre las tendencias de incidencia, mortalidad y financiamiento del NCI sobre el sarcoma; así como ejemplos de actividades del NCI y adelantos en la investigación de este tipo de cáncer.

  11. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  12. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  13. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  14. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  15. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  16. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tokman, Sofya; Hahn, M Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patel, Vipul J; Walia, Rajat; Omar, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  17. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Kumar Gupta, Mukesh; Dhungel, Kanchan; Lal Sah, Panna; Ansari, Sajid; Kumar Rauniyar, Raj

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an uncommon infiltrative pulmonary disease characterized by deposition of microliths in the alveoli. We present the case of a young adult with complaints of shortness of breath on exertion. Chest radiograph showed innumerable small, dense nodules, diffusely involving both the lungs - predominantly in the lower zones. High-resolution CT scan illustrated widespread intra-alveolar microliths, diffuse ground-glass attenuation areas, septal thickening, and black pleural lines - predominantly in the basal regions. Transbronchial biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:24174699

  18. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Kumar Gupta, Mukesh; Dhungel, Kanchan; Lal Sah, Panna; Ansari, Sajid; Kumar Rauniyar, Raj

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an uncommon infiltrative pulmonary disease characterized by deposition of microliths in the alveoli. We present the case of a young adult with complaints of shortness of breath on exertion. Chest radiograph showed innumerable small, dense nodules, diffusely involving both the lungs - predominantly in the lower zones. High-resolution CT scan illustrated widespread intra-alveolar microliths, diffuse ground-glass attenuation areas, septal thickening, and black pleural lines - predominantly in the basal regions. Transbronchial biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:24174699

  19. Simple bone augmentation for alveolar ridge defects.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Christopher J; Vogel, Christopher T; Fisher, G Rawleigh

    2015-05-01

    Dental implant procedures, both surgical placement and preimplant bone augmentation, have become an integral aspect of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's practice. The number of dental implants placed each year continues to increase as a result of increasing patient exposure and awareness of dental implants, the increased functional and esthetic dental demands of general practitioners and patients, the overall increase in age of the US patient population, and expanded insurance coverage of dental implant-related procedures. This article outlines relevant surgical procedures aimed toward reconstructing alveolar ridge defects to restore intra-arch alveolar discrepancies before restoration-driven dental implant placement. PMID:25951957

  20. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  1. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  2. Current management of pediatric soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric soft tissue sarcomas are a group of malignant neoplasms arising within embryonic mesenchymal tissues during the process of differentiation into muscle, fascia and fat. The tumors have a biphasic peak for age of incidence. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is diagnosed more frequently in younger children, whereas adult-type non-RMS soft tissue sarcoma is predominately observed in adolescents. The latter group comprises a variety of rare tumors for which diagnosis can be difficult and typically requires special studies, including immunohistochemistry and molecular genetic analysis. Current management for the majority of pediatric sarcomas is based on the data from large multi-institutional trials, which has led to great improvements in outcomes over recent decades. Although surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, the curative aim cannot be achieved without adjuvant treatment. Pre-treatment staging and risk classification are of prime importance in selecting an effective treatment protocol. Tumor resectability, the response to induction chemotherapy, and radiation generally determine the risk-group, and these factors are functions of tumor site, size and biology. Surgery provides the best choice of local control of small resectable tumors in a favorable site. Radiation therapy is added when surgery leaves residual disease or there is evidence of regional spread. Chemotherapy aims to reduce the risk of relapse and improve overall survival. In addition, upfront chemotherapy reduces the aggressiveness of the required surgery and helps preserve organ function in a number of cases. Long-term survival in low-risk sarcomas is feasible, and the intensity of treatment can be reduced. In high-risk sarcoma, current research is allowing more effective disease control. PMID:26566481

  3. Current management of pediatric soft tissue sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric soft tissue sarcomas are a group of malignant neoplasms arising within embryonic mesenchymal tissues during the process of differentiation into muscle, fascia and fat. The tumors have a biphasic peak for age of incidence. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is diagnosed more frequently in younger children, whereas adult-type non-RMS soft tissue sarcoma is predominately observed in adolescents. The latter group comprises a variety of rare tumors for which diagnosis can be difficult and typically requires special studies, including immunohistochemistry and molecular genetic analysis. Current management for the majority of pediatric sarcomas is based on the data from large multi-institutional trials, which has led to great improvements in outcomes over recent decades. Although surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, the curative aim cannot be achieved without adjuvant treatment. Pre-treatment staging and risk classification are of prime importance in selecting an effective treatment protocol. Tumor resectability, the response to induction chemotherapy, and radiation generally determine the risk-group, and these factors are functions of tumor site, size and biology. Surgery provides the best choice of local control of small resectable tumors in a favorable site. Radiation therapy is added when surgery leaves residual disease or there is evidence of regional spread. Chemotherapy aims to reduce the risk of relapse and improve overall survival. In addition, upfront chemotherapy reduces the aggressiveness of the required surgery and helps preserve organ function in a number of cases. Long-term survival in low-risk sarcomas is feasible, and the intensity of treatment can be reduced. In high-risk sarcoma, current research is allowing more effective disease control. PMID:26566481

  4. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  5. Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

  6. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  7. Selective alveolar corticotomy to intrude overerupted molars.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; de Oliveira, Bruno Franco; de Araújo Brito, Helio Henrique; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Medeiros, Paulo José

    2008-06-01

    Orthodontic intrusion of overerupted molars in adults is challenging for most clinicians. Efficient intrusion can be achieved by combining selective alveolar corticotomies with a modified full-coverage maxillary splint to reduce surgical risks, treatment time, and costs for both orthodontists and patients. PMID:18538256

  8. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  9. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mônica; Vilasboas, Virginia; Mendes, Luciana; Talhari, Carolina; Talhari, Sinésio

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few indolent lesions to an aggressive diffuse disease. Advanced Kaposi's sarcoma lesions, typically those on the lower extremities, are often associated with lymphedema. In this paper, we report a case of a patient with a rare form of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma called lymphangiectatic Kaposis's sarcoma. PMID:23739700

  10. Harvey Sarcoma Virus: A Second Murine Type C Sarcoma Virus with Rat Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Scolnick, Edward M.; Parks, Wade P.

    1974-01-01

    The nucleic acid sequences found in the Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus have been analyzed by RNA·[3H]DNA and [3H]RNA·DNA hybridization techniques. The Harvey strain of murine sarcoma virus has been found to possess at least two sets of nucleic acid sequences. One set of sequences is contained in the Moloney strain of mouse type-C virus, and the other set is contained in DNA transcripts synthesized in endogenous reactions containing rat type-C virus(es). The nucleic acid sequences that are detected in the Harvey sarcoma virus with the DNA probes synthesized from the rat type-C virus(es) are related to the rat sequences detected in the Kirsten strain of murine sarcoma virus. The results support the model that both Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses arose through a process of recombination or reassortment between mouse type-C viruses and sequences in rat cells and suggest that the information for transformation of fibroblasts may be contained in the rat type-C or cellular genome. PMID:4364897

  11. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-06-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  12. Radiation-induced prostatic sarcoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Scully, J.M.; Uno, J.M.; McIntyre, M.; Mosely, S. )

    1990-09-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic sarcoma 8 years after transurethral prostatectomy and radical bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection with insertion of 125-iodine implants for stage B1N carcinoma of the prostate. Therapy for the sarcoma consisted of isolated pelvic perfusion and then pelvic exenteration with creation of an ileal conduit and colostomy. The pathology report showed well encapsulated grade 2 spindle cell sarcoma of the prostate. Multiple small metallic particles were embedded in the tumor specimen.

  13. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  14. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chaulagain, Chakra P; Pilichowska, Monika; Brinckerhoff, Laurence; Tabba, Maher; Erban, John K

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), characterized by deposition of intra-alveolar PAS positive protein and lipid rich material, is a rare cause of progressive respiratory failure first described by Rosen et al. in 1958. The intra-alveolar lipoproteinaceous material was subsequently proven to have been derived from pulmonary surfactant in 1980 by Singh et al. Levinson et al. also reported in 1958 the case of 19-year-old female with panmyelosis afflicted with a diffuse pulmonary disease characterized by filling of the alveoli with amorphous material described as "intra-alveolar coagulum". This is probably the first reported case of PAP in relation to hematologic malignancy. Much progress has been made on PAP first described by Rosen which is currently classified as idiopathic or primary or autoimmune PAP. Idiopathic PAP occurs as a result of auto-antibodies directed against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) impeding the surfactant clearing function of alveolar macrophages leading to progressive respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage and GM-CSF therapy has improved outcomes in patients with idiopathic PAP. Despite major advancement in the management of hematologic malignancy and its complications, little is known about the type of PAP first described by Levinson and now known as secondary PAP; a term also used when PAP occurs due to other causes such as occupational dusts. In this article we review and analyze the limited literature available in secondary PAP due to hematologic malignancies and present a case of PAP associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia successfully treated with bendamustine and rituximab. PMID:25300566

  15. An Australasian perspective on sarcoma research, translational biology and clinical trials: the Australasian Sarcoma Study Group (ASSG).

    PubMed

    Bae, Susie; Caruso, Denise; Desai, Jayesh

    2014-02-01

    Each year approximately 800 Australians are diagnosed with sarcoma, accounting for less than 1% of cancer diagnoses overall. A significant proportion of these sarcoma cases are in children and adolescents. The rarity and heterogeneity of this group of tumours, coupled with Australasia's relative geographical isolation, pose significant challenges in developing locoregional basic, translational and clinical research. The Australasian Sarcoma Study Group (ASSG) was established in 2008 as a Cooperative Cancer Clinical Research Group and is now the peak body for sarcoma research in Australasia, providing a mechanism to drive and coordinate collaborative research, promote education and assist with advocating for sarcoma within the region. This paper describes the development of ASSG and examines the current state of play with regard to sarcoma research in Australasia. PMID:24378392

  16. Refractory ulcerative colitis and iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Serio, G; Rocca, E; Rocca, F

    2009-02-01

    Colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpes virus-8 associated mesenchymal tumour, is exceedingly rare in human immunodeficiency virus-negative subjects and almost always reported in association with severe, refractory, inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper we report a case--the second from Italy--of a colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative, heterosexual man with severe refractory ulcerative colitis. Kaposi's sarcoma developed after starting glucocorticosteroid therapy, supporting the theory that colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma associated with ulcerative colitis is iatrogenic. PMID:18054849

  17. Recent advances in targeted therapy for Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pishas, Kathleen I.; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasm of solid bone that disproportionally afflicts the young. Despite intensive multi-modal therapy and valiant efforts, 70% of patients with relapsed and metastatic Ewing sarcoma will succumb to their disease. The persistent failure to improve overall survival for this subset of patients highlights the urgent need for rapid translation of novel therapeutic strategies. As Ewing sarcoma is associated with a paucity of mutations in readily targetable signal transduction pathways, targeting the key genetic aberration and master regulator of Ewing sarcoma, the EWS/ETS fusion, remains an important goal.

  18. Granulocytic Sarcoma in MLL-Positive Infant Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Chong Jai; Cho, Han Ik

    2001-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is considered to be rare and its frequent occurrence is associated with specific genetic changes such as t(8;21). To investigate an association between MLL (mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid-lymphoid leukemia) rearrangement and granulocytic sarcoma, we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of the 11q23/MLL rearrangements on the bone marrow cells of 40 patients with childhood acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Nine (22.5%) of 40 patients exhibited MLL rearrangements. Three (33.3%) of these nine patients had granulocytic sarcoma and were younger than 12 months of age. Of these three patients one presented as granulocytic sarcoma of both testes with cerebrospinal fluid involvement, the second case presented in the form of an abdominal mass, and the third as a periorbital granulocytic sarcoma. On the other hand, no granulocytic sarcomas were found among MLL-negative patients. It is likely that MLL-positive infant AML may predispose granulocytic sarcoma. Regarding the findings of our study and those of other reports, we would guess that the incidence of granulocytic sarcoma in pediatric MLL-positive AML may be equal to or greater than the 18 to 24% described in AML with t(8;21). Further investigations designed to identify 11q23/MLL abnormalities of leukemic cells or extramedullary tumor may be helpful for the precise diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:11733351

  19. [Synovial sarcoma of the nasal cavity. A case report].

    PubMed

    Acosta Díaz, Hander; Trinidad Ruiz, Gabriel; Rejas, Eladio; Pando, Jesús; Cabrera, J J

    2011-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare tumour found in soft tissue; it is a mesenchymal spindle cell tumour that is not related to the synovial membrane. This tumour has a low incidence, the most frequent place of occurrence being the lower extremities in young adults. Synovial sarcoma of the head and neck accounts for 3-5% of sarcomas in this anatomical region. The treatment of choice for synovial sarcoma of the head and neck is complete surgical excision of the tumour mass followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:20466354

  20. Thyroid carcino-sarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Antonio; Grant, Jessica; Benoit, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    An adult male greyhound was diagnosed with a thyroid carcino-sarcoma by means of histopathology and positive immuno-histochemistry staining for cytokeratin and vimentin. Surgery and radiotherapy of the area were successful in local tumour control. Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended to treat and prevent further metastasis. The use of carboplatin, metronomic cyclophosphamide chemotherapy and toceranib failed to control the progression of distant metastasis. The survival time was seven months from the time of diagnosis. This is the eighth case of carcino-sarcoma of the thyroid documented in veterinary medicine and the first one treated with a multimodal approach based on surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. As documented in human medicine, chemotherapy appeared to be ineffective to prevent or delay the progression of the metastatic disease in this case. PMID:23718201

  1. Bone Sarcomas: From Biology to Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Nathalie; Di Giannatale, Angela; Geoerger, Birgit; Redini, Françoise; Corradini, Nadège; Enz-Werle, Natacha; Tirode, Franck; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Gentet, Jean-Claude; Laurence, Valérie; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Oberlin, Odile; Brugieres, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Primary malignant bone tumours, osteosarcomas, and Ewing sarcomas are rare diseases which occur mainly in adolescents and young adults. With the current therapies, some patients remain very difficult to treat, such as tumour with poor histological response to preoperative CT (or large initial tumour volume for Ewing sarcomas not operated), patients with multiple metastases at or those who relapsed. In order to develop new therapies against these rare tumours, we need to unveil the key driving factors and molecular abnormalities behind the malignant characteristics and to broaden our understanding of the phenomena sustaining the metastatic phenotype and treatment resistance in these tumours. In this paper, starting with the biology of these tumours, we will discuss potential therapeutic targets aimed at increasing local tumour control, limiting metastatic spread, and finally improving patient survival. PMID:23226965

  2. Aortic intimal sarcoma with embolic metastases.

    PubMed

    Wright, E P; Glick, A D; Virmani, R; Page, D L

    1985-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman died from massive bowel infarction. At autopsy, a primary sarcoma was found growing along the intimal surface of the aorta at the level of the celiac axis. Tumor emboli were found in distal aortic branches and most abdominal organs. Immunoperoxidase for Factor VIII and electron microscopy (EM) did not support an endothelial origin. EM showed myofibroblastic differentiation. Review of the literature yields an array of diagnostic histologic terms for these tumors, hampering case comparison. The literature does suggest, however, that the clinical presentation of these rare neoplasms correlates nicely with the location and gross morphology of the lesion. We therefore propose a clinicopathologic classification, categorizing the lesions as intimal (obstructive and nonobstructive) and mural. The former are typically pleomorphic sarcomas and are probably of myofibroblastic origin, whereas the latter are usually leiomyosarcomas or fibrosarcomas that probably originate in the media or adventitia. PMID:3000205

  3. The Role of Mirk Kinase in Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the tyrosine kinase KIT in gastrointestinal stromal tumors has led to improved treatment. Other kinases might serve as therapeutic targets in the more common forms of sarcoma. The kinase Mirk/dyrk1B is highly expressed in the vast majority of osteosarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas and mediates their growth, as depletion of Mirk led to tumor cell apoptosis. Mirk is known to increase the expression of a series of antioxidant genes, which scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) within various tumor cells, mediating their survival. As a result, depleting Mirk led to increased levels of damaging ROS. Tumor cells depleted of Mirk were also sensitized to low levels of chemotherapeutic drugs that increase ROS levels. In contrast, Mirk expression is quite low in most normal cells, and Mirk depletion or embryonic knockout of Mirk did not detectably affect cell survival. Thus targeting Mirk for intervention in sarcomas might spare most normal tissues. PMID:21559261

  4. Soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, T. M.; Sheehan, M.; Collins, D.; O'Connor, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective review of 33 cases of soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity presenting over a 10 year period was undertaken. The history, patterns of referral, diagnostic investigations, procedures undertaken and outcomes were studied. We found there was a frequent delay in diagnosis and sometimes misinterpretation of biopsy specimens. Patients were seen by a variety of specialists from disciplines such as general surgery, plastic surgery, orthopaedic surgery and rheumatology. Considerable progress has been made in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, often allowing local control of the tumour without amputation. We believe there should be early referral of patients having these tumours to a centre where a combined multidisciplinary approach can be undertaken. PMID:8881731

  5. Multimodality Local Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paryani, Nitesh N.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Marcus, Robert B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum are rare tumors comprising less than 1% of all malignancies. Although surgery continues as the mainstay of treatment, the large size of these tumors coupled with their proximity to critical structures make resection with wide margins difficult to achieve. The role and timing of radiotherapy are controversial. This study updates our institutional experience using multimodality local therapy for resectable retroperitoneal sarcoma and identifies prognostic factors impacting disease control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 2007, 58 patients with nonmetastatic retroperitoneal sarcoma were treated with surgery and radiation at University of Florida. The median age at radiotherapy was 57 years old (range, 18-80 years). Forty-two patients received preoperative radiotherapy and 16 received postoperative radiotherapy. Nineteen patients received 1.8 Gy once daily and 39 patients received 1.2 Gy twice daily. Variables analyzed for prognostic value included age, grade, kidney involvement, histology, de novo versus recurrent presentation, tumor diameter, margin status, radiotherapy sequencing (preoperative vs. postoperative), total radiation dose, fractionation scheme, and treatment era. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rates were 49%, 58%, and 62%, respectively. Nearly two-thirds of disease failures involved a component of local progression. On multivariate analysis, only margin status was significantly associated with improved 5-year local control (85%, negative margins; 63%, microscopic positive margins; 0%, gross positive margins; p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival (64%, negative margins; 56%, microscopic positive margins; 13%, gross positive margins; p = 0.0012). Thirty-one Grade 3 or greater toxicities were observed in 22 patients, including two treatment-related deaths (3%). Conclusion: For retroperitoneal sarcoma, local control remains a

  6. Nonrhabdomyosarcomatous abdominopelvic sarcomas: Analysis of prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida; Shukla, Nootan K.; Deo, S. V. S.; Agarwala, Sandeep; Sharma, D. N.; Sharma, Meher C.; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data concerning treatment outcome and prognostic factors in sarcomas of abdomen and pelvis are sparse in literature. Methods and Results: Of 696 patients with nonrhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcoma registered at our center between June 2003 and December 2012, 112 (16%) patients of sarcomas arising from abdomen and pelvis were identified, of which 88 patients were analyzed for treatment outcome and prognostic factors. The median age was 40 years (range: 1–78 years) with a male: female ratio of 0.7:1. Twenty-one (24%) patients were metastatic at baseline. The most common tumor sites were retroperitoneum in 70% patients and abdominal wall in 18% patients. Leiomyosarcoma was the most common histological subtype in 36% patients followed by liposarcoma in 17% patients. Thirty-five (40%) patients had Grade III tumors. Forty-six (52%) patients underwent surgical resection. At a median follow-up of 43 months (range: 2–94 months), the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 35% and 42%, with a median of 22 months and 43 months, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified male gender (P - 0.03, hazard ratio [HR] - 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] - 0.23–0.92), baseline metastatic disease (P - 0.01, HR - 2.98, 95% CI - 1.27–6.98) and Grade III tumors (P - 0.02, HR - 1.84, 95% CI - 1.08–3.13) as factors associated with poor EFS, whereas baseline metastatic disease (P < 0.001, HR - 5.45, 95% CI - 2.31–12.87) and unresectability (P - 0.01, HR - 2.72, 95% CI - 1.27–5.83) were associated with poor OS. Conclusion: This is a single-institutional study of patients with abdominopelvic sarcomas where gender was identified as a new factor affecting survival apart from baseline presentation, histologic grade, and surgical resection. PMID:27168708

  7. Primary Thyroid Sarcoma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Surov, Alexey; Gottschling, Sebastian; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Dralle, Henning

    2015-10-01

    Different types of malignant tumors can occur within the thyroid. Primary cancer is the most common type of thyroid malignancy. Non-epithelial malignancies can also arise within the thyroid. The aim of the present study was to analyze clinical and radiological characteristics of reported primary thyroid sarcomas (PTS), based on a large sample of cases. The PubMed database was screened for articles from between 1990 and 2014. Overall, 86 articles with 142 patients were identified. Ultrasound evaluation was reported for 36 patients. Data regarding computed tomography of the neck were available for 29 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for eight patients. The following data were retrieved for the identified sarcomas: localization, size, homogeneity, internal texture, and margin characteristics. In most cases, PTS occurred in patients over 40 years of age, with a peak incidence for the group aged 60-79 years. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed in 29 cases (20.4%), followed by malignant hemangioendothelioma (n=23, 16.3%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n=20, 14.1%), leiomyosarcoma (n=16, 11.3%), and fibrosarcoma (n=13, 9.2%). In most patients (n=113, 79.6%), PTS manifested clinically as a painless goiter. On ultrasound, PTS were predominantly mixed hypo-to-hyperechoic in comparison to the normal thyroid tissue. On non-contrast computed tomography, most sarcomas were inhomogeneous hypo-to-hyperdense. On post-contrast magnetic resonance images, most sarcomas showed marked non-homogenous enhancement. In 26.8%, infiltration of the adjacent organs was seen. The trachea or esophagus was affected more frequently in patients with malignant histiocytoma and liposarcoma. Different strategies were used in the treatment of PTS. Our analysis provides clinical and radiological characteristics of PTS. The described features should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of thyroid tumors. PMID:26408676

  8. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF RETROPERITONEAL AND PELVIC SARCOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Marcus C. B.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2014-01-01

    Management of retroperitoneal sarcomas presents technical and oncological challenges. Imaging is crucial for diagnosis and to define local tumor extent. Complete gross resection at initial presentation is the best chance for cure, but there is controversy as to how this can be best achieved. There is a long-term risk of local recurrence, which is best treated with repeat resection if feasible. The roles of radiation and chemotherapy remain undefined. PMID:25482329

  9. Management of soft tissue and bone sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Van Oosterom, A.T.; Van Unnik, J.A.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 papers. Some of the titles are: Adjuvant Treatment for Osteosarcoma of the Limbs; Trial 20781 of the SIOP and the EORTC Radiotherapy/Chemotherapy; Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Diagnosis and Follow-up During Treatment of Bone Tumors; Radiological Assessment of Local Involvement in Bone Sarcomas; and Prevention of Lung Metastases by Irradiation Alone or Combined with Chemotherapy in an Animal Model.

  10. In vivo radiolocalization of antiosteogenic sarcoma monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Hosoi, S.; Yamamuro, T.; Higashi, S.; Mikawa, H.; Endo, K.; Toyama, S.

    1984-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies Ost6 and Ost7 (mouse Immunoglobulin G1) to human osteogenic sarcoma were isolated from ascitic fluid and labeled with radioiodine. After injection into athymic nu/nu mice with s.c. xenografts of human osteogenic sarcoma, the uptake of radioactivity in tumors, visceral organs, and blood was determined. Five days after injection, Ost6 and Ost7 showed preferential accumulation in tumors (tumor:blood ratio, 4.3). Furthermore, with testicular and bladder tumors, both unreactive with Ost7, there was no localization of radiolabeled Ost7 in xenograft growths. When Ost7 was labeled with /sup 131/I, its accumulation into human osteogenic sarcoma could be clearly visualized by whole-body gamma-scintigraphy without computer-assisted data processing.