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Sample records for alzheimer disease brains

  1. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens to ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain ...

  2. Brain capillaries in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baloyannis, Stavros J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of irreversible dementia, affecting mostly the presenile and senile age, shaping a tragic profile in the epilogue of the life of the suffering people. Due to the severity and the social impact of the disease an ongoing research activity is in climax nowadays, associated with many legal, social, ethical, humanitarian, philosophical and economic considerations. From the neuropathological point of view the disease is characterized by dendritic pathology, loss of synapses and dendritic spines, affecting mostly selective neuronal networks of critical importance for memory and cognition, such as the basal forebrain cholinergic system, the medial temporal regions, the hippocampus and many neocortical association areas. Tau pathology consisted of intracellular accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorilated tau protein and accumulation of Aβ-peptide's deposits, defined as neuritic plaques, are the principal neuropathological diagnostic criteria of the disease. The neurotoxic properties of the oligomerics of the Aβ-peptide and tau mediated neurodegeneration are among the main causative factors of impaired synaptic plasticity, neuronal loss, dendritic alterations and tremendous synaptic loss. The gradual degeneration of the organelles, particularly mitochondria, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, visualized clearly by electron microscopy (EM), emphasize the importance of the oxidative stress and amyloid toxicity in the pathogenetic cascade of the disease. The vascular factor may be an important component of the whole spectrum of the pathogenesis of AD. It is of substantial importance the concept that the structural alterations of the brain capillaries, may contribute in the pathology of AD, given that the disruption of the BBB may induce exacerbation of AD pathology, by promoting inflammation around the blood capillaries and in the neuropile space diffusely. From the morphological point of view

  3. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  4. Physical activity, brain plasticity, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Weinstein, Andrea M; Lopez, Oscar L

    2012-11-01

    In this review we summarize the epidemiological, cross-sectional, and interventional studies examining the association between physical activity and brain volume, function, and risk for Alzheimer's disease. The epidemiological literature provides compelling evidence that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of dementia in late life. In addition, randomized interventions using neuroimaging tools have reported that participation in physical activity increases the size of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas, which may lead to a reduction in memory impairments. Consistent with these findings, longitudinal studies using neuroimaging tools also find that the volume of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas are larger in individuals who engaged in more physical activity earlier in life. We conclude from this review that there is convincing evidence that physical activity has a consistent and robust association with brain regions implicated in age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to summarizing this literature we provide recommendations for future research on physical activity and brain health. PMID:23085449

  5. Metabolic profiling of Alzheimer's disease brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Toyo'Oka, Toshimasa

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease and can be definitively diagnosed after death through an examination of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in several brain regions. It is to be expected that changes in the concentration and/or localization of low-molecular-weight molecules are linked to the pathological changes that occur in AD, and determining their identity would provide valuable information regarding AD processes. Here, we propose definitive brain metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. The acquired data were subjected to principal components analysis to differentiate the frontal and parietal lobes of the AD/Control groups. Significant differences in the levels of spermine and spermidine were identified using S-plot, mass spectra, databases and standards. Based on the investigation of the polyamine metabolite pathway, these data establish that the downstream metabolites of ornithine are increased, potentially implicating ornithine decarboxylase activity in AD pathology.

  6. Robust gene dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuemei; Bai, Zhouxian; Wang, Jiajia; Xie, Bin; Sun, Jiya; Han, Guangchun; Song, Fuhai; Crack, Peter J; Duan, Yong; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    The brain transcriptome of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reflects the prevailing disease mechanism at the gene expression level. However, thousands of genes have been reported to be dysregulated in AD brains in existing studies, and the consistency or discrepancy among these studies has not been thoroughly examined. Toward this end, we conducted a comprehensive survey of the brain transcriptome datasets for AD and other neurological diseases. We first demonstrated that the frequency of observed dysregulation in AD was highly correlated with the reproducibility of the dysregulation. Based on this observation, we selected 100 genes with the highest frequency of dysregulation to illustrate the core perturbation in AD brains. The dysregulation of these genes was validated in several independent datasets for AD. We further identified 12 genes with strong correlation of gene expression with disease progression. The relevance of these genes to disease progression was also validated in an independent dataset. Interestingly, we found a transcriptional "cushion" for these 100 genes in the less vulnerable visual cortex region, which may be a critical component of the protection mechanism for less vulnerable brain regions. To facilitate the research in this field, we have provided the expression information of ~8000 relevant genes on a publicly accessible web server AlzBIG (http://alz.big.ac.cn). PMID:24662101

  7. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitsch, R. M.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Pittas, A. G.; Slack, B. E.; Growdon, J. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease.

  8. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) is one form of dementia. It affects ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely to ...

  9. Brain injury, neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    With as many as 300,000 United States troops in Iraq and Afghanistan having suffered head injuries (Miller, 2012), traumatic brain injury (TBI) has garnered much recent attention. While the cause and severity of these injuries is variable, severe cases can lead to lifelong disability or even death. While aging is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is now becoming clear that a history of TBI predisposes the individual to AD later in life (Sivanandam and Thakur, 2012). In this review article, we begin by defining hallmark pathological features of AD and the various forms of TBI. Putative mechanisms underlying the risk relationship between these two neurological disorders are then critically considered. Such mechanisms include precipitation and ‘spreading’ of cerebral amyloid pathology and the role of neuroinflammation. The combined problems of TBI and AD represent significant burdens to public health. A thorough, mechanistic understanding of the precise relationship between TBI and AD is of utmost importance in order to illuminate new therapeutic targets. Mechanistic investigations and the development of preclinical therapeutics are reliant upon a clearer understanding of these human diseases and accurate modeling of pathological hallmarks in animal systems. PMID:23874297

  10. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  11. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:26443701

  12. Brain atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Pini, Lorenzo; Pievani, Michela; Bocchetta, Martina; Altomare, Daniele; Bosco, Paolo; Cavedo, Enrica; Galluzzi, Samantha; Marizzoni, Moira; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to its safety and accessibility, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensively used in clinical routine and research field, largely contributing to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the main findings in AD and normal aging over the past twenty years, focusing on the patterns of gray and white matter changes assessed in vivo using MRI. Major progresses in the field concern the segmentation of the hippocampus with novel manual and automatic segmentation approaches, which might soon enable to assess also hippocampal subfields. Advancements in quantification of hippocampal volumetry might pave the way to its broader use as outcome marker in AD clinical trials. Patterns of cortical atrophy have been shown to accurately track disease progression and seem promising in distinguishing among AD subtypes. Disease progression has also been associated with changes in white matter tracts. Recent studies have investigated two areas often overlooked in AD, such as the striatum and basal forebrain, reporting significant atrophy, although the impact of these changes on cognition is still unclear. Future integration of different MRI modalities may further advance the field by providing more powerful biomarkers of disease onset and progression. PMID:26827786

  13. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  14. Disrupted modular brain dynamics reflect cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    de Haan, W; van der Flier, W M; Koene, T; Smits, L L; Scheltens, P; Stam, C J

    2012-02-15

    The relation between pathology and cognitive dysfunction in dementia is still poorly understood, although disturbed communication between different brain regions is almost certainly involved. In this study we combine magneto-encephalography (MEG) and network analysis to investigate the role of functional sub-networks (modules) in the brain with regard to cognitive failure in Alzheimer's disease. Whole-head resting-state (MEG) was performed in 18 Alzheimer patients (age 67 ± 9, 6 females, MMSE 23 ± 5) and 18 healthy controls (age 66 ± 9, 11 females, MMSE 29 ± 1). We constructed functional brain networks based on interregional synchronization measurements, and performed graph theoretical analysis with a focus on modular organization. The overall modular strength and the number of modules changed significantly in Alzheimer patients. The parietal cortex was the most highly connected network area, but showed the strongest intramodular losses. Nonetheless, weakening of intermodular connectivity was even more outspoken, and more strongly related to cognitive impairment. The results of this study demonstrate that particularly the loss of communication between different functional brain regions reflects cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. These findings imply the relevance of regarding dementia as a functional network disorder. PMID:22154957

  15. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research. PMID:26921134

  16. Mapping cortical change in Alzheimer's disease, brain development, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul M; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Janke, Andrew L; Rose, Stephen E; Semple, James; Doddrell, David M; Wang, Yalin; van Erp, Theo G M; Cannon, Tyrone D; Toga, Arthur W

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes algorithms that can identify patterns of brain structure and function associated with Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, normal aging, and abnormal brain development based on imaging data collected in large human populations. Extraordinary information can be discovered with these techniques: dynamic brain maps reveal how the brain grows in childhood, how it changes in disease, and how it responds to medication. Genetic brain maps can reveal genetic influences on brain structure, shedding light on the nature-nurture debate, and the mechanisms underlying inherited neurobehavioral disorders. Recently, we created time-lapse movies of brain structure for a variety of diseases. These identify complex, shifting patterns of brain structural deficits, revealing where, and at what rate, the path of brain deterioration in illness deviates from normal. Statistical criteria can then identify situations in which these changes are abnormally accelerated, or when medication or other interventions slow them. In this paper, we focus on describing our approaches to map structural changes in the cortex. These methods have already been used to reveal the profile of brain anomalies in studies of dementia, epilepsy, depression, childhood- and adult-onset schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, fetal alcohol syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Williams syndrome, and in methamphetamine abusers. Specifically, we describe an image analysis pipeline known as cortical pattern matching that helps compare and pool cortical data over time and across subjects. Statistics are then defined to identify brain structural differences between groups, including localized alterations in cortical thickness, gray matter density (GMD), and asymmetries in cortical organization. Subtle features, not seen in individual brain scans, often emerge when population-based brain data are averaged in this way. Illustrative examples are presented to show the profound

  17. Boosting brain connectome classification accuracy in Alzheimer's disease using higher-order singular value decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Liu, Yashu; Wang, Yalin; Zhou, Jiayu; Jahanshad, Neda; Ye, Jieping; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disease. Accurate detection of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), are crucial. There is also a growing interest in identifying brain imaging biomarkers that help to automatically differentiate stages of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we focused on brain structural networks computed from diffusion MRI and proposed a new feature extraction and classification framework based on higher order singular value decomposition and sparse logistic regression. In tests on publicly available data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, our proposed framework showed promise in detecting brain network differences that help in classifying different stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26257601

  18. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  19. Regional brain stiffness changes across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum☆

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew C.; Jones, David T.; Jack, Clifford R.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P.; Carter, Rickey E.; Ehman, Richard L.; Huston, John

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an MRI-based technique to noninvasively measure tissue stiffness. Currently well established for clinical use in the liver, MRE is increasingly being investigated to measure brain stiffness as a novel biomarker of a variety of neurological diseases. The purpose of this work was to apply a recently developed MRE pipeline to measure regional brain stiffness changes in human subjects across the Alzheimer's disease (AD) spectrum, and to gain insights into the biological processes underlying those stiffness changes by correlating stiffness with existing biomarkers of AD. The results indicate that stiffness changes occur mostly in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, in accordance with the known topography of AD pathology. Furthermore, stiffness in those areas correlates with existing imaging biomarkers of AD including hippocampal volumes and amyloid PET. Additional analysis revealed preliminary but significant evidence that the relationship between brain stiffness and AD severity is nonlinear and non-monotonic. Given that similar relationships have been observed in functional MRI experiments, we used task-free fMRI data to test the hypothesis that brain stiffness was sensitive to structural changes associated with altered functional connectivity. The analysis revealed that brain stiffness is significantly and positively correlated with default mode network connectivity. Therefore, brain stiffness as measured by MRE has potential to provide new and essential insights into the temporal dynamics of AD, as well as the relationship between functional and structural plasticity as it relates to AD pathophysiology. PMID:26900568

  20. Brain connectivity and novel network measures for Alzheimer's disease classification.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Gautam; Joshi, Shantanu H; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    We compare a variety of different anatomic connectivity measures, including several novel ones, that may help in distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from controls. We studied diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging from 200 subjects scanned as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We first evaluated measures derived from connectivity matrices based on whole-brain tractography; next, we studied additional network measures based on a novel flow-based measure of brain connectivity, computed on a dense 3-dimensional lattice. Based on these 2 kinds of connectivity matrices, we computed a variety of network measures. We evaluated the measures' ability to discriminate disease with a repeated, stratified 10-fold cross-validated classifier, using support vector machines, a supervised learning algorithm. We tested the relative importance of different combinations of features based on the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and feature ranking of the classification of 200 people into normal healthy controls and people with early or late mild cognitive impairment or AD. PMID:25264345

  1. Clearance systems in the brain-implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tarasoff-Conway, Jenna M; Carare, Roxana O; Osorio, Ricardo S; Glodzik, Lidia; Butler, Tracy; Fieremans, Els; Axel, Leon; Rusinek, Henry; Nicholson, Charles; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Frangione, Blas; Blennow, Kaj; Ménard, Joël; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wisniewski, Thomas; de Leon, Mony J

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation of toxic protein aggregates-amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau tangles-is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ accumulation has been hypothesized to result from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance; indeed, Aβ clearance seems to be impaired in both early and late forms of AD. To develop efficient strategies to slow down or halt AD, it is critical to understand how Aβ is cleared from the brain. Extracellular Aβ deposits can be removed from the brain by various clearance systems, most importantly, transport across the blood-brain barrier. Findings from the past few years suggest that astroglial-mediated interstitial fluid (ISF) bulk flow, known as the glymphatic system, might contribute to a larger portion of extracellular Aβ (eAβ) clearance than previously thought. The meningeal lymphatic vessels, discovered in 2015, might provide another clearance route. Because these clearance systems act together to drive eAβ from the brain, any alteration to their function could contribute to AD. An understanding of Aβ clearance might provide strategies to reduce excess Aβ deposits and delay, or even prevent, disease onset. In this Review, we describe the clearance systems of the brain as they relate to proteins implicated in AD pathology, with the main focus on Aβ. PMID:26195256

  2. Brain imaging of neurovascular dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Axel; Nation, Daniel A; Pa, Judy; Sweeney, Melanie D; Toga, Arthur W; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-01

    Neurovascular dysfunction, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and cerebral blood flow (CBF) dysregulation and reduction, are increasingly recognized to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial and temporal relationships between different pathophysiological events during preclinical stages of AD, including cerebrovascular dysfunction and pathology, amyloid and tau pathology, and brain structural and functional changes remain, however, still unclear. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, i.e., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), offer new possibilities to understand how the human brain works in health and disease. This includes methods to detect subtle regional changes in the cerebrovascular system integrity. Here, we focus on the neurovascular imaging techniques to evaluate regional BBB permeability (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), regional CBF changes (arterial spin labeling- and functional-MRI), vascular pathology (structural MRI), and cerebral metabolism (PET) in the living human brain, and examine how they can inform about neurovascular dysfunction and vascular pathophysiology in dementia and AD. Altogether, these neuroimaging approaches will continue to elucidate the spatio-temporal progression of vascular and neurodegenerative processes in dementia and AD and how they relate to each other. PMID:27038189

  3. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  4. Network Analysis of Intrinsic Functional Brain Connectivity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Menon, Vinod; Rubin, Daniel; Musen, Mark; Greicius, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Functional brain networks detected in task-free (“resting-state”) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have a small-world architecture that reflects a robust functional organization of the brain. Here, we examined whether this functional organization is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Task-free fMRI data from 21 AD subjects and 18 age-matched controls were obtained. Wavelet analysis was applied to the fMRI data to compute frequency-dependent correlation matrices. Correlation matrices were thresholded to create 90-node undirected-graphs of functional brain networks. Small-world metrics (characteristic path length and clustering coefficient) were computed using graph analytical methods. In the low frequency interval 0.01 to 0.05 Hz, functional brain networks in controls showed small-world organization of brain activity, characterized by a high clustering coefficient and a low characteristic path length. In contrast, functional brain networks in AD showed loss of small-world properties, characterized by a significantly lower clustering coefficient (p<0.01), indicative of disrupted local connectivity. Clustering coefficients for the left and right hippocampus were significantly lower (p<0.01) in the AD group compared to the control group. Furthermore, the clustering coefficient distinguished AD participants from the controls with a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 78%. Our study provides new evidence that there is disrupted organization of functional brain networks in AD. Small-world metrics can characterize the functional organization of the brain in AD, and our findings further suggest that these network measures may be useful as an imaging-based biomarker to distinguish AD from healthy aging. PMID:18584043

  5. Directed progression brain networks in Alzheimer's disease: properties and classification.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric J; Young, Karl; Asif, Danial; Jutla, Inderjit; Liang, Michael; Wilson, Scott; Landsberg, Adam S; Schuff, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces a new approach in brain connectomics aimed at characterizing the temporal spread in the brain of pathologies like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main instrument is the development of "directed progression networks" (DPNets), wherein one constructs directed edges between nodes based on (weakly) inferred directions of the temporal spreading of the pathology. This stands in contrast to many previously studied brain networks where edges represent correlations, physical connections, or functional progressions. In addition, this is one of a few studies showing the value of using directed networks in the study of AD. This article focuses on the construction of DPNets for AD using longitudinal cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance imaging data. The network properties are then characterized, providing new insights into AD progression, as well as novel markers for differentiating normal cognition (NC) and AD at the group level. It also demonstrates the important role of nodal variations for network classification (i.e., the significance of standard deviations, not just mean values of nodal properties). Finally, the DPNets are utilized to classify subjects based on their global network measures using a variety of data-mining methodologies. In contrast to most brain networks, these DPNets do not show high clustering and small-world properties. PMID:24901258

  6. Alzheimer's disease: Is this a brain specific diabetic condition?

    PubMed

    Rani, Vanita; Deshmukh, Rahul; Jaswal, Priya; Kumar, Puneet; Bariwal, Jitender

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are the two major health issues affecting millions of elderly people worldwide, with major impacts in the patient's daily life. Numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The principal biological mechanisms that associate with the progression of diabetes and AD are not completely understood. Impaired insulin signaling, uncontrolled glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, abnormal protein processing, and the stimulation of inflammatory pathways are common features to both AD and T2DM. In recent years brain specific abnormalities in insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF) signaling considered as a major trigger involved in the etiopathogenesis of AD, showing T2DM like milieu. This review summarizes the pathways that might link diabetes and AD and the effect of diminished insulin. PMID:27235734

  7. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  8. Coexistence of reactive plasticity and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer diseased brains.

    PubMed

    Guevara, J; Dilhuydy, H; Espinosa, B; Delacourte, A; Quirion, R; Mena, R; Joanette, Y; Zenteno, E; Robitaille, Y

    2004-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a pathological process characterized by neuron degeneration and, as recently suggested, brain plasticity. In this work, we compared the reactive plasticity in AD brains associated to O-glycosydically linked glycans, recognized by lectins from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MRL), and the tau neuritic degeneration. The neuritic degenerative process was evaluated by the quantification of aggregated neuritic structures. Lesions were determined using antibodies against hyperphosphorylated-tau (AD2), amyloid-beta, and synaptophysin. In these conditions, we classified and quantified three pathological structures associated to the neuritic degenerative process: 1) Amyloid-beta deposits (AbetaDs), 2) Classic neuritic plaques (NPs), and 3) Dystrophic neurites clusters (DNCs) lacking amyloid-beta deposits. Reactive plasticity structures were constituted by meganeuritic clusters (MCs) and peri-neuronal sprouting in neurons of the CA4 region of the hippocampus, immunoreactive to synaptophysin (exclusively in AD brains) and GAP-43. Besides, MCs were associated to sialylated O-glycosydically linked glycans as determined by positive labeling with ALL and MRL. Considering that these lectins are specific for the synaptic sprouting process in AD, our results suggest the co-occurrence of of several areas of reactive plasticity and neuron degeneration in AD. PMID:15375749

  9. Brain tocopherols related to Alzheimer's disease neuropathology in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Martha Clare; Schneider, Julie A; Li, Hong; Tangney, Christy C; Nag, Sukriti; Bennett, David A; Honer, William G; Barnes, Lisa L

    2015-01-01

    Randomized trials of α-tocopherol supplements on cognitive decline are negative, whereas studies of dietary tocopherols have shown benefit. We investigated these inconsistencies by analyzing the relations of α- and γ-tocopherol brain concentrations to Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology among 115 deceased participants of the prospective Rush Memory and Aging Project. Associations of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangle severity with brain tocopherol concentrations were examined in separate adjusted linear regression models. γ-Tocopherol concentrations were associated with lower amyloid load (β = -2.10, P = .002) and lower neurofibrillary tangle severity (β = -1.16, P = .02). Concentrations of α-tocopherol were not associated with AD neuropathology, except as modified by γ-tocopherol: high α-tocopherol was associated with higher amyloid load when γ-tocopherol levels were low and with lower amyloid levels when γ-tocopherol levels were high (P for interaction = 0.03). Brain concentrations of γ- and α-tocopherols may be associated with AD neuropathology in interrelated, complex ways. Randomized trials should consider the contribution of γ-tocopherol. PMID:24589434

  10. Chronic divalproex sodium use and brain atrophy in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Truran, D.; Mai, J.T.; Langbaum, J.B.S.; Aisen, P.S.; Cummings, J.L.; Jack, C.R.; Weiner, M.W.; Thomas, R.G.; Schneider, L.S.; Tariot, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effect of the divalproex sodium formulation of valproic acid on brain volumes using MRI in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) and assessed for changes associated with behavioral and cognitive effects. Methods: Eighty-nine of 313 participants randomized to divalproex or placebo in a 24-month, parallel-group trial received MRI scans at baseline and 12 months. Interval MRI annual percent changes in whole brain, ventricular, and hippocampal volumes were the primary outcomes of interest. Change from baseline in clinical outcomes was assessed at 6-month intervals. Results: There were no baseline differences between active treatment and placebo groups in age, education, brain volumes, clinical rating scores, or APOE ϵ4 carrier status. The group treated with divalproex showed a greater rate of decline in left and right hippocampal and brain volumes (−10.9% and −12.4% vs −5.6% and −6.3%, and −3.5% vs −1.4%, respectively), and a greater rate of ventricular expansion (24.5% vs 9.9%) (p < 0.001). Mini-Mental State Examination scores showed a more rapid decline with divalproex through month 12 (placebo = −2.0 ± 4.3, divalproex = −3.9 ± 4.0) (p = 0.037), although there were no changes on other cognitive, behavioral, or functional ratings at 12 and 24 months. Conclusions: Divalproex treatment was associated with accelerated brain volume loss over 1 year and perhaps with greater cognitive impairment. The long-term clinical effects of these changes are not known. PMID:21917762

  11. Brain tissue modifications induced by cholinergic therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bozzali, Marco; Parker, Geoff J M; Spanò, Barbara; Serra, Laura; Giulietti, Giovanni; Perri, Roberta; Magnani, Giuseppe; Marra, Camillo; G Vita, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara

    2013-12-01

    A previous preliminary investigation based on a novel MRI approach to map anatomical connectivity revealed areas of increased connectivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but not in mild cognitive impairment patients. This prompted the hypothesis tested here, that these areas might reflect phenomena of brain plasticity driven by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). Thirty-eight patients with probable AD (19 under medication with AChEIs and 19 drug-naïve) were recruited together with 11 healthy controls. All subjects had MRI scanning at 3T, including volumetric and diffusion-weighted scans. Probabilistic tractography was used to initiate streamlines from all parenchymal voxels, and anatomical connectivity maps (ACMs) were obtained by counting, among the total number of streamlines initiated, the fraction passing through each brain voxel. After normalization into standard space, ACMs were used to test for between-group comparisons, and for interactions between the exposure to AChEIs and global level of cognition. Patients with AD had reduced ACM values in the fornix, cingulum, and supramarginal gyri. The ACM value was strongly associated with the AChEI dosage-x-duration product in the anterior limb (non-motor pathway) of the internal capsule. Tractography from this region identified the anterior thalamic radiation as the main white matter (WM) tract passing through it. The reduced connectivity in WM bundles connecting the hippocampi with the rest of the brain (fornix/cingulum) suggests a possible mechanism for the spread of AD pathology. An intriguing explanation for the interaction between AChEIs and ACM is related to the mechanisms of brain plasticity, partially driven by neurotrophic properties of acetylcholine replacement. PMID:22711258

  12. Therapeutic targets of brain insulin resistance in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports roles for brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance and metabolic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether the underlying problem stems from a primary disorder of central nervous system (CNS) neurons and glia, or secondary effects of systemic diseases such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, the end-results include impaired glucose utilization, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the propagation of cascades that result in the accumulation of neurotoxic misfolded, aggregated, and ubiquitinated fibrillar proteins. This article reviews the roles of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism, and discusses therapeutic strategies and lifestyle approaches that could be used to prevent, delay the onset, or reduce the severity of AD. Finally, it is critical to recognize that AD is heterogeneous and has a clinical course that fully develops over a period of several decades. Therefore, early and multi-modal preventive and treatment approaches should be regarded as essential. PMID:22201977

  13. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  14. Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Nicole; Duda, John E.; Wolk, David A.; Doshi, Jimit; Xie, Sharon X.; Davatzikos, Christos; Clark, Christopher M.; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests overlap in brain regions undergoing neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. To assess the clinical significance of this, we applied a validated Alzheimer's disease-spatial pattern of brain atrophy to patients with Parkinson's disease with a range of cognitive abilities to determine its association with cognitive performance and decline. At baseline, 84 subjects received structural magnetic resonance imaging brain scans and completed the Dementia Rating Scale-2, and new robust and expanded Dementia Rating Scale-2 norms were applied to cognitively classify participants. Fifty-nine non-demented subjects were assessed annually with the Dementia Rating Scale-2 for two additional years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were quantified using both a region of interest approach and voxel-based morphometry analysis, and a method for quantifying the presence of an Alzheimer's disease spatial pattern of brain atrophy was applied to each scan. In multivariate models, higher Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score was associated with worse global cognitive performance (β = −0.31, P = 0.007), including in non-demented patients (β = −0.28, P = 0.05). In linear mixed model analyses, higher baseline Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score predicted long-term global cognitive decline in non-demented patients [F(1, 110) = 9.72, P = 0.002], remarkably even in those with normal cognition at baseline [F(1, 80) = 4.71, P = 0.03]. In contrast, in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses there was no association between region of interest brain volumes and cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease with normal cognition. These findings support involvement of the hippocampus and parietal–temporal cortex with cognitive impairment and long-term decline in Parkinson's disease. In addition, an Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy may be a preclinical biomarker of cognitive decline

  15. Multimodal nanoprobes to target cerebrovascular amyloid in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Swaminathan, Suresh K; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Lowe, Val J; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-02-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) results from the accumulation of Aβ proteins primarily within the media and adventitia of small arteries and capillaries of the cortex and leptomeninges. CAA affects a majority of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and is associated with a rapid decline in cognitive reserve. Unfortunately, there is no pre-mortem diagnosis available for CAA. Furthermore, treatment options are few and relatively ineffective. To combat this issue, we have designed nanovehicles (nanoparticles-IgG4.1) capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) and serving as early diagnostic and therapeutic agents. These nanovehicles were loaded with Gadolinium (Gd) based (Magnevist(®)) magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) agents, such as (125)I. In addition, the nanovehicles carry either anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic agents such as curcumin or immunosuppressants such as dexamethasone, which were previously shown to reduce cerebrovascular inflammation. Owing to the anti-amyloid antibody (IgG4.1) grafted on the surface, the nanovehicles are capable of specifically targeting CVA deposits. The nanovehicles effectively marginate from the blood flow to the vascular wall as determined by using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology. They demonstrate excellent distribution to the brain vasculature and target CVA, thus providing MRI and SPECT contrast specific to the CVA in the brain. In addition, they also display the potential to carry therapeutic agents to reduce cerebrovascular inflammation associated with CAA, which is believed to trigger hemorrhage in CAA patients. PMID:24331706

  16. Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease (AD). What Can Proteomics Tell Us About the Alzheimer's Brain?

    PubMed

    Moya-Alvarado, Guillermo; Gershoni-Emek, Noga; Perlson, Eran; Bronfman, Francisca C

    2016-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's diseases (AD), are becoming more prevalent as the population ages. However, the mechanisms that lead to synapse destabilization and neuron death remain elusive. The advent of proteomics has allowed for high-throughput screening methods to search for biomarkers that could lead to early diagnosis and treatment and to identify alterations in the cellular proteome that could provide insight into disease etiology and possible treatment avenues. In this review, we have concentrated mainly on the findings that are related to how and whether proteomics studies have contributed to two aspects of AD research, the development of biomarkers for clinical diagnostics, and the recognition of proteins that can help elucidate the pathways leading to AD brain pathology. As a result of these studies, several candidate cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are now available for further validation in different AD cohorts. Studies in AD brain and AD transgenic models support the notion that oxidative damage results in the alterations of metabolic enzymes and that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to AD neuropathology. PMID:26657538

  17. Data set of interactomes and metabolic pathways of proteins differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Minjarez, Benito; Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Herrera-Aguirre, María Esther; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Mena, Raul; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer׳s disease is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly and its frequency is on the rise worldwide. It is considered the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, being many of them unknown. Therefore, there is a dire necessity for the identification of novel molecular players for the understanding of this disease. In this data article we determined the protein expression profiles of whole protein extracts from cortex regions of brains from patients with Alzheimer׳s disease in comparison to a normal brain. We identified 721 iTRAQ-labeled polypeptides with more than 95% in confidence. We analyzed all proteins that changed in their expression level and located them in the KEGG metabolic pathways, as well as in the mitochondrial complexes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. In addition, we analyzed the over- and sub-expressed polypeptides through IPA software, specifically Core I and Biomarkers I modules. Data in this article is related to the research article "Identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer's disease using iTRAQ labeling and tandem mass spectrometry" (Minjarez et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27257613

  18. A derangement of the brain wound healing process may cause some cases of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Rheinstein, Peter H

    2016-08-01

    A derangement of brain wound healing may cause some cases of Alzheimer's disease. Wound healing, a highly complex process, has four stages: hemostasis, inflammation, repair, and remodeling. Hemostasis and the initial phases of inflammation in brain tissue are typical of all vascularized tissue, such as skin. However, distinct differences arise in brain tissue during the later stages of inflammation, repair, and remodeling, and closely parallel the changes of Alzheimer's disease. Our hypothesis -- Alzheimer's disease is brain wound healing gone awry at least in some cases -- could be tested by measuring progression with biomarkers for the four stages of wound healing in humans or appropriate animal models. Autopsy studies might be done. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy might also result from the brain wound healing process. PMID:27585229

  19. Caloric restriction: beneficial effects on brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Vandendriessche, Charysse; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Dietary interventions such as caloric restriction (CR) extend lifespan and health span. Recent data from animal and human studies indicate that CR slows down the aging process, benefits general health, and improves memory performance. Caloric restriction also retards and slows down the progression of different age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the specific molecular basis of these effects remains unclear. A better understanding of the pathways underlying these effects could pave the way to novel preventive or therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms and effects of CR on aging and Alzheimer's disease. A potential alternative to CR as a lifestyle modification is the use of CR mimetics. These compounds mimic the biochemical and functional effects of CR without the need to reduce energy intake. We discuss the effect of two of the most investigated mimetics, resveratrol and rapamycin, on aging and their potential as Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. However, additional research will be needed to determine the safety, efficacy, and usability of CR and its mimetics before a general recommendation can be proposed to implement them. PMID:27240590

  20. Imaging the Alzheimer Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, J. Wesson; Salehi, Ahmad; Furst, Ansgar; Bayley, Peter; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Sabri, Osama; Adamson, Maheen M.; Coburn, Kerry L.; Olichney, John; Schuff, Norbert; Spielman, Daniel; Edland, Steven D.; Black, Sandra; Rosen, Allyson; Kennedy, David; Weiner, Michael; Perry, George

    2013-01-01

    This supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease contains more than half of the chapters from The Handbook of Imaging the Alzheimer Brain, which was first presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris, in July, 2011. While the Handbook contains 27 chapters that are modified articles from 2009, 2010, and 2011 issues of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, this supplement contains the 31 new chapters of that book and an introductory article drawn from the introductions to each section of the book. The Handbook was designed to provide a multilevel overview of the full field of brain imaging related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Handbook, as well as this supplement, contains both reviews of the basic concepts of imaging, the latest developments in imaging, and various discussions and perspectives of the problems of the field and promising directions. The Handbook was designed to be useful for students and clinicians interested in AD as well as scientists studying the brain and pathology related to AD. PMID:21971448

  1. Brain interleukin 1 and S-100 immunoreactivity are elevated in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, W S; Stanley, L C; Ling, C; White, L; MacLeod, V; Perrot, L J; White, C L; Araoz, C

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin 1, an immune response-generated cytokine that stimulates astrocyte proliferation and reactivity (astrogliosis), was present in up to 30 times as many glial cells in tissue sections of brain from patients with Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with age-matched control subjects. Most interleukin 1-immunoreactive glia in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease were classified as microglia. The number of interleukin 1 immunoreactive neurons did not appear to differ in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with control brain. Numerous temporal lobe astrocytes in Alzheimer disease and postnatal Down syndrome were intensely interleukin 1-, S-100-, and glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive and had reactive structure. Interleukin 1 levels in Alzheimer disease temporal lobe homogenates were elevated, as were the levels of S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, two proteins reportedly elevated in reactive astrocytes. These data suggest that increased expression of S-100 in Down syndrome, resulting from duplication of the gene on chromosome 21 that encodes the beta subunit of S-100, may be augmented by elevation of interleukin 1. As a corollary, the astrogliosis in Alzheimer disease may be promoted by elevation of interleukin 1. Images PMID:2529544

  2. Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage'

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159116.html Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage' Normally, blood-brain barrier ... HealthDay News) -- People in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease may have more "leaks" in the barrier ...

  3. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical. PMID:26844268

  4. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klosinski, Lauren P.; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N.; Harrington, Michael G.; Christensen, Trace A.; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical. PMID:26844268

  5. A protein homeostasis signature in healthy brains recapitulates tissue vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Freer, Rosie; Sormanni, Pietro; Vecchi, Giulia; Ciryam, Prajwal; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, aggregates of Aβ and tau in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread progressively across brain tissues following a characteristic pattern, implying a tissue-specific vulnerability to the disease. We report a transcriptional analysis of healthy brains and identify an expression signature that predicts-at ages well before the typical onset-the tissue-specific progression of the disease. We obtain this result by finding a quantitative correlation between the histopathological staging of the disease and the expression patterns of the proteins that coaggregate in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, together with those of the protein homeostasis components that regulate Aβ and tau. Because this expression signature is evident in healthy brains, our analysis provides an explanatory link between a tissue-specific environmental risk of protein aggregation and a corresponding vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27532054

  6. Focally Elevated Creatine Detected in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice and Alzheimer Disease Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gallant,M.; Rak, M.; Szeghalmi, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Westaway, D.; Yang, J.; Julian, R.; Gough, K.

    2006-01-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine system, regulated by creatine kinase, plays an important role in maintaining energy balance in the brain. Energy metabolism and the function of creatine kinase are known to be affected in Alzheimer diseased brain and in cells exposed to the {beta}-amyloid peptide. We used infrared microspectroscopy to examine hippocampal, cortical, and caudal tissue from 21-89-week-old transgenic mice expressing doubly mutant (K670N/M671L and V717F) amyloid precursor protein and displaying robust pathology from an early age. Microcrystalline deposits of creatine, suggestive of perturbed energetic status, were detected by infrared microspectroscopy in all animals with advanced plaque pathology. Relatively large creatine deposits were also found in hippocampal sections from post-mortem Alzheimer diseased human brain, compared with hippocampus from non-demented brain. We therefore speculate that this molecule is a marker of the disease process.

  7. Preclinical Alzheimer Disease: Brain Oxidative Stress, Aβ Peptide & Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Aluise, Christopher D.; Robinson, Renã A. Sowell; Beckett, Tina L.; Murphy, M. Paul; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William M.; Markesbery, William R.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progressive memory loss and subsequent dementia and neuropathologically by senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and synapse loss. Interestingly, a small percentage of individuals with normal antemortem psychometric scores meet the neuropathological criteria for AD (termed `preclinical' AD (PCAD)). In this study, inferior parietal lobule (IPL) from PCAD and control subjects were compared for oxidative stress markers by immunochemistry, amyloid beta-peptide by ELISA, and identification of protein expression differences by proteomics. We observed a significant increase in highly insoluble monomeric Aβ42, but no significant differences in oligomeric Aβ nor in oxidative stress measurements between controls and PCAD subjects. Expression proteomics identified proteins whose trends in PCAD are indicative of cellular protection, possibly correlating with previous studies showing no cell loss in PCAD. Our analyses may reveal processes involved in a period of protection from neurodegeneration that mimic the clinical phenotype of PCAD. PMID:20399861

  8. Microprobe PIXE analysis of aluminium in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Kakimi, S.; Fujii, K.

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), we examined aluminium (Al) in the rat liver, and in the brains (hippocampus) of Alzheimer's disease patients using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobe and proton (2 MeV) microprobe PIXE analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+) have several time's higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. (1) In the rat liver, Al was detected in the cell nuclei, where phosphorus (P) was most densely distributed. (2) We also demonstrated Al in the cell nuclei isolated from Alzheimer's disease brains using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobes. Al spectra were detected using 2 MeV proton microprobes in the isolated brain cell nuclei. Al could not be observed in areas where P was present in relatively small amounts, or was absent. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells.

  9. Clock Drawing Performance and Brain Morphology in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomann, Philipp A.; Toro, Pablo; Santos, Vasco Dos; Essig, Marco; Schroder, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely used instrument in the neuropsychological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CDT performance necessitates several cognitive functions (e.g., visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive functioning), an interaction of multiple brain regions is likely. Fifty-one subjects with mild cognitive…

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact Sheet Treatment for Mild to ...

  11. Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Introduction Many ...

  12. Repurposing Diabetes Drugs for Brain Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarchoan, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of clinical and epidemiological research suggests that two of the most common diseases of aging, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and Alzheimer disease (AD), are linked. The nature of the association is not known, but this observation has led to the notion that drugs developed for the treatment of T2DM may be beneficial in modifying the pathophysiology of AD and maintaining cognitive function. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of T2DM have resulted in a growing number of therapies that are approved or in clinical development for this disease. This review summarizes the evidence that T2DM and AD are linked, with a focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms in common, and then assesses the various clinical-stage diabetes drugs for their potential activity in AD. At a time when existing therapies for AD offer only limited symptomatic benefit for some patients, additional clinical trials of diabetes drugs are needed to at least advance the care of T2DM patients at risk for or with comorbid AD and also to determine their value for AD in general. PMID:24931035

  13. Increased acetyl and total histone levels in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Pritika J; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a critical role in chromatin remodelling and transcriptional regulation. There is increasing evidence that epigenetic modifications may become compromised in aging and increase susceptibility to the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Immunohistochemical labelling of free-floating sections from the inferior temporal gyrus (Alzheimer's disease, n=14; control, n=17) and paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays containing tissue from the middle temporal gyrus (Alzheimer's disease, n=29; control, n=28) demonstrated that acetyl histone H3 and acetyl histone H4 levels, as well as total histone H3 and total histone H4 protein levels, were significantly increased in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease brain tissue compared to age- and sex-matched neurologically normal control brain tissue. Changes in acetyl histone levels were proportional to changes in total histone levels. The increase in acetyl histone H3 and H4 was observed in Neuronal N immunopositive pyramidal neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain. Using immunolabelling, histone markers correlated significantly with the level of glial fibrillary acidic protein and HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR immunopositive cells and with the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (hyperphosphorylated tau load and β-amyloid plaques). Given that histone acetylation changes were correlated with changes in total histone protein, it was important to evaluate if protein degradation pathways may be compromised in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, significant positive correlations were also found between ubiquitin load and histone modifications. The relationship between histone acetylation and ubiquitin levels was further investigated in an in vitro model of SK-N-SH cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor Mg132 and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. In this model, compromised protein degradation caused by Mg132 lead to elevated histone

  14. The effect of aging on brain barriers and the consequences for Alzheimer's disease development.

    PubMed

    Gorlé, Nina; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased in most developed countries, which has led to an increase in the proportion of elderly people in the world's population. However, this increase in life expectancy is not accompanied by a lengthening of the health span since aging is characterized with progressive deterioration in cellular and organ functions. The brain is particularly vulnerable to disease, and this is reflected in the onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Research shows that dysfunction of two barriers in the central nervous system (CNS), the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), plays an important role in the progression of these neurodegenerative diseases. The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells of the blood capillaries, whereas the BCSFB is formed by the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), both of which are affected during aging. Here, we give an overview of how these barriers undergo changes during aging and in Alzheimer's disease, thereby disturbing brain homeostasis. Studying these changes is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of aging at the brain barriers, which might lead to the development of new therapies to lengthen the health span (including mental health) and reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27143113

  15. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  16. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition. PMID:25579215

  17. Neuropathology of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer first pointed out that the disease which would later bear his name has a distinct and recognizable neuropathological substrate. Since then, much has been added to our understanding of the pathological lesions associated with the condition. The 2 primary cardinal lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease are the neurofibrillary tangle and the senile plaque. The neurofibrillary tangle consists of abnormal accumulations of abnormally phosphorylated tau within the perikaryal cytoplasm of certain neurons. The senile plaque consists of a central core of beta-amyloid, a 4-kD peptide, surrounded by abnormally configured neuronal processes or neurites. Other neuropathological lesions are encountered in cases of Alzheimer's disease, but the disease is defined and recognized by these 2 cardinal lesions. Other lesions include poorly understood changes such as granulovacuolar degeneration and eosinophilic rod-like bodies (Hirano bodies). The loss of synaptic components is a change that clearly has a significant impact on cognitive function and represents another important morphological alteration. It is important to recognize that distinguishing between Alzheimer's disease, especially in its early stages, and normal aging may be very difficult, particularly if one is examining the brains of patients who died at an advanced old age. It is also noted that instances of pure forms of Alzheimer's disease, in the absence of other coexistent brain disease processes, such as infarctions or Parkinson's disease–related lesions, are relatively uncommon, and this must be taken into account by researchers who employ postmortem brain tissues for research. PMID:20101720

  18. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  19. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Hanaichi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-10

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 degree sign C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  20. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  1. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  2. From Molecular Circuit Dysfunction to Disease: Case Studies in Epilepsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dulla, Chris G; Coulter, Douglas A; Ziburkus, Jokubas

    2016-06-01

    Complex circuitry with feed-forward and feed-back systems regulate neuronal activity throughout the brain. Cell biological, electrical, and neurotransmitter systems enable neural networks to process and drive the entire spectrum of cognitive, behavioral, and motor functions. Simultaneous orchestration of distinct cells and interconnected neural circuits relies on hundreds, if not thousands, of unique molecular interactions. Even single molecule dysfunctions can be disrupting to neural circuit activity, leading to neurological pathology. Here, we sample our current understanding of how molecular aberrations lead to disruptions in networks using three neurological pathologies as exemplars: epilepsy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epilepsy provides a window into how total destabilization of network balance can occur. TBI is an abrupt physical disruption that manifests in both acute and chronic neurological deficits. Last, in AD progressive cell loss leads to devastating cognitive consequences. Interestingly, all three of these neurological diseases are interrelated. The goal of this review, therefore, is to identify molecular changes that may lead to network dysfunction, elaborate on how altered network activity and circuit structure can contribute to neurological disease, and suggest common threads that may lie at the heart of molecular circuit dysfunction. PMID:25948650

  3. Discriminant analysis of intermediate brain atrophy rates in longitudinal diagnosis of alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease through MRI neuroimaging biomarkers has been used as a complementary marker for traditional clinical markers to improve diagnostic accuracy and also help in developing new pharmacotherapeutic trials. It has been revealed that longitudinal analysis of the whole brain atrophy has the power of discriminating Alzheimer's disease and elderly normal controls. In this work, effect of involving intermediate atrophy rates and impact of using uncorrelated principal components of these features instead of original ones on discriminating normal controls and Alzheimer's disease subjects, is inspected. In fact, linear discriminative analysis of atrophy rates is used to classify subjects into Alzheimer's disease and controls. Leave-one-out cross-validation has been adopted to evaluate the generalization rate of the classifier along with its memorization. Results show that incorporating uncorrelated version of intermediate features leads to the same memorization performance as the original ones but higher generalization rate. As a conclusion, it is revealed that in a longitudinal study, using intermediate MRI scans and transferring them to an uncorrelated feature space can improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:22035255

  4. Differential Expression of Ribosomal Genes in Brain and Blood of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lucas; de Labio, Roger W; Viani, Gustavo A; Chen, Elizabeth; Villares, Joao; Bertolucci, Paulo-Henrique; Minett, Thais S; Turecki, Gustavo; Cecyre, Danielle; Drigo, Sandra A; Smith, Marilia C; Payao, Spencer L M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in rRNA and rDNA expression have been associated with cellular and organism aging and have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the mRNA expression of ribosomal genes (28S/18S) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in different post mortem brain tissue regions (the entorhinal and auditory cortices and the hippocampus) of AD patients and elderly control subjects and also evaluated the extent of expression in peripheral blood from young, healthy, elderly, and Alzheimer's disease patients in order to investigate whether these individuals experienced the effects of aging. The comparative threshold cycle (CT) method via Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and the Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were used to analyze gene expression and the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, respectively. When the brain areas were analyzed collectively, we observed a significant decrease in APP expression and a significant increase in levels of mRNA of 18S and 28S in Alzheimer's disease patients compared to healthy elderly individuals. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of 28SrRNA in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, but not in the auditory cortex of patients with AD. On the other hand, tests of blood samples verified a decreased expression of 28S rRNA in patients with AD. These results support the hypothesis that changes in rRNA are present in AD patients, are tissue-specific, and seem to occur independently and differently in each tissue. However, the next challenge is to discover the mechanisms responsible for the differences in expression observed in the blood and the brain in both healthy elderly individuals and Alzheimer's disease patients, as well as the impact of these genes on AD pathogenesis. PMID:26502820

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD. PMID:24967286

  6. Disruption of brain zinc homeostasis promotes the pathophysiological progress of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is abundant in the brain, where it plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and in learning; however, excessive zinc is toxic to neuronal cells, and dyshomeostasis of zinc in the brain is a contributing factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Deposition of zinc has been detected in senile plaques in the form of zinc-Aβ (β-amyloid) complexes. Recent studies have demonstrated that zinc exposure to the brain enhances β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and plaque burden. Furthermore, alterations in zinc transporters, which are responsible for zinc homeostasis, occur in AD human brain and transgenic mouse models. These suggest that abnormal brain zinc homeostasis is involved in the pathophysiological progress of AD. PMID:26883958

  7. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  8. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... decisions. Inside a normal healthy brain, billions of cells called neurons constantly communicate with one another. They ... Plaques form when specific proteins in the neuron's cell membrane are processed differently. Normally, an enzyme called ...

  9. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovjan, A.C.; Miller, L.; Kretlow, A.; Lanzirotti, A.; Barrea,R.; Vogt, S.

    2010-11-23

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Prediabetes and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bitra, V. R.; Rapaka, Deepthi; Akula, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Aging patients with diabetes are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Emerging evidences demonstrate the role of brain insulin resistance, which is a key mediator in prediabetes and diabetes mellitus that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Insulin and insulin-like growth factors regulate many biological processes such as axonal growth, protein synthesis, cell growth, gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, and development. Among these, the energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity are the major transduction processes regulated by insulin, which are the core objectives for learning and memory. It was also proposed that hyper insulinemia induced insulin resistance results in injury to the central nervous system by the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β which is the key ailment in the cognitive decline. Hence, the endogenous brain specific insulin impairments and signaling account for the majority of Alzheimer's abnormalities. PMID:26798163

  11. Expression and distribution of carboxypeptidase B in the hippocampal subregions of normal and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Papp, Henrietta; Török, I; Matsumoto, A; Enomoto, T; Matsuyama, S; Kása, P

    2003-01-01

    Earlier neurochemical studies suggested that human brain carboxypeptidase B may play a significant role in the degradation of amyloid-beta1-42 in the brain. Using an immimohistochemical technique we report here on the neuronal expression and distribution of this enzyme in the segments (CA1a, CA1b and CA1c) of the CA1 subfield and in area CA4 of the hippocampus in normal and Alzheimer's disease brain samples. Its distribution was compared with the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles in the same brain sample. For immunohistochemical localization of carboxypeptidase B, a specific C14-module antibody was applied, together with the Gallyas silver impregnation technique for the demonstration of neurofibrillary tangles. The results revealed that, in the control samples, most of the immunoreactivity appeared in segment CA1a in the pyramidal cells, less in segment CA1b and least in segment CA1c. In the Alzheimer's disease samples, there was no particular immunostaining in the neurons, but, a large number of silver-impregnated degenerated neurons appeared. The results support the suggestion that carboxypeptidase B may play a significant role in elimination of the intracellular accumulation and toxicity of amyloid-beta in the human brain and thereby protect the neurons from degeneration. PMID:12705322

  12. Brain excitability and connectivity of neuronal assemblies in Alzheimer's disease: from animal models to human findings.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Marcello; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2012-10-01

    The human brain contains about 100 billion neurons forming an intricate network of innumerable connections, which continuously adapt and rewire themselves following inputs from external and internal environments as well as the physiological synaptic, dendritic and axonal sculpture during brain maturation and throughout the life span. Growing evidence supports the idea that Alzheimer's disease (AD) targets selected and functionally connected neuronal networks and, specifically, their synaptic terminals, affecting brain connectivity well before producing neuronal loss and compartmental atrophy. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the dismantling of neuronal circuits and the implementation of 'clinically oriented' methods to map-out the dynamic interactions amongst neuronal assemblies will enhance early/pre-symptomatic diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression. More important, this will open the avenues to innovative treatments, bridging the gap between molecular mechanisms and the variety of symptoms forming disease phenotype. In the present review a set of evidence supports the idea that altered brain connectivity, exhausted neural plasticity and aberrant neuronal activity are facets of the same coin linked to age-related neurodegenerative dementia of Alzheimer type. Investigating their respective roles in AD pathophysiology will help in translating findings from basic research to clinical applications. PMID:22789698

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  14. A Structural Parametrization of the Brain Using Hidden Markov Models-Based Paths in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Murcia, Francisco J; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Ortiz, Andres

    2016-11-01

    The usage of biomedical imaging in the diagnosis of dementia is increasingly widespread. A number of works explore the possibilities of computational techniques and algorithms in what is called computed aided diagnosis. Our work presents an automatic parametrization of the brain structure by means of a path generation algorithm based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The path is traced using information of intensity and spatial orientation in each node, adapting to the structure of the brain. Each path is itself a useful way to characterize the distribution of the tissue inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image by, for example, extracting the intensity levels at each node or generating statistical information of the tissue distribution. Additionally, a further processing consisting of a modification of the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) can be used to characterize the textural changes that occur throughout the path, yielding more meaningful values that could be associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as providing a significant feature reduction. This methodology achieves moderate performance, up to 80.3% of accuracy using a single path in differential diagnosis involving Alzheimer-affected subjects versus controls belonging to the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI). PMID:27354189

  15. Late-onset Alzheimer disease risk variants mark brain regulatory loci

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mariet; Kachadoorian, Michaela; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Karhade, Aditya; Manly, Lester; Burgess, Jeremy D.; Wang, Chen; Serie, Daniel; Wang, Xue; Siuda, Joanna; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis; Crook, Julia; Medway, Christopher; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly; Lincoln, Sarah; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Asmann, Yan W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the top late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk loci detected or confirmed by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project for association with brain gene expression levels to identify variants that influence Alzheimer disease (AD) risk through gene expression regulation. Methods: Expression levels from the cerebellum (CER) and temporal cortex (TCX) were obtained using Illumina whole-genome cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay (WG-DASL) for ∼400 autopsied patients (∼200 with AD and ∼200 with non-AD pathologies). We tested 12 significant LOAD genome-wide association study (GWAS) index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cis association with levels of 34 genes within ±100 kb. We also evaluated brain levels of 14 LOAD GWAS candidate genes for association with 1,899 cis-SNPs. Significant associations were validated in a subset of TCX samples using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq). Results: We identified strong associations of brain CR1, HLA-DRB1, and PILRB levels with LOAD GWAS index SNPs. We also detected other strong cis-SNPs for LOAD candidate genes MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4. MEF2C and SLC24A4, but not ZCWPW1 cis-SNPs, also associate with LOAD risk, independent of the index SNPs. The TCX expression associations could be validated with RNAseq for CR1, HLA-DRB1, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4. Conclusions: Our results suggest that some LOAD GWAS variants mark brain regulatory loci, nominate genes under regulation by LOAD risk variants, and annotate these variants for their brain regulatory effects. PMID:27066552

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease: Is Inflammatory Signaling a Key Player?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Sabbir, Mohammad Golam; Albensi, Benedict C

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a significant medical and social concern within the last 30 years. TBI has acute devastating effects, and in many cases, seems to initiate long-term neurodegeneration. With advances in medical technology, many people are now surviving severe brain injuries and their long term consequences. Post trauma effects include communication problems, sensory deficits, emotional and behavioral problems, physical complications and pain, increased suicide risk, dementia, and an increased risk for chronic CNS diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, we provide an introduction to TBI and hypothesize how it may lead to neurodegenerative disease in general and AD in particular. In addition, we discuss the evidence that supports the hypothesis that TBI may lead to AD. In particular, we focus on inflammatory responses as key processes in TBI-induced secondary injury, with emphasis on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling. PMID:26899581

  17. Distribution of PSA-NCAM in normal, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Murray, Helen C; Low, Victoria F; Swanson, Molly E V; Dieriks, Birger V; Turner, Clinton; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A

    2016-08-25

    Polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a membrane bound glycoprotein widely expressed during nervous system development. While commonly described in the neurogenic niches of the adult human brain, there is limited evidence of its distribution in other brain regions. PSA-NCAM is an important regulator of cell-cell interactions and facilitates cell migration and plasticity. Recent evidence suggests these functions may be altered in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). This study provides a detailed description of the PSA-NCAM distribution throughout the human brain and quantitatively compares the staining load in cortical regions and sub-cortical structures between the control, AD and PD brain. Our results provide evidence of widespread, yet specific, PSA-NCAM expression throughout the human brain including regions devoid of PSA-NCAM in the rodent brain such as the caudate nucleus (CN) and cerebellum (CB). We also detected a significant reduction in PSA-NCAM load in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of cases that was inversely correlated with hyperphosphorylated tau load. These results demonstrate that PSA-NCAM-mediated structural plasticity may not be limited to neurogenic niches and is conserved in the aged brain. We also provide evidence that PSA-NCAM is reduced in the EC, a region severely affected by AD pathology. PMID:27282086

  18. Predicting Alzheimer's disease by classifying 3D-Brain MRI images using SVM and other well-defined classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoug, S.; Abdel-Dayem, A.; Passi, K.; Gross, W.; Alqarni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting seniors age 65 and over. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan. Advanced medical imaging and pattern recognition techniques are good tools to create a learning database in the first step and to predict the class label of incoming data in order to assess the development of the disease, i.e., the conversion from prodromal stages (mild cognitive impairment) to Alzheimer's disease, which is the most critical brain disease for the senior population. Advanced medical imaging such as the volumetric MRI can detect changes in the size of brain regions due to the loss of the brain tissues. Measuring regions that atrophy during the progress of Alzheimer's disease can help neurologists in detecting and staging the disease. In the present investigation, we present a pseudo-automatic scheme that reads volumetric MRI, extracts the middle slices of the brain region, performs segmentation in order to detect the region of brain's ventricle, generates a feature vector that characterizes this region, creates an SQL database that contains the generated data, and finally classifies the images based on the extracted features. For our results, we have used the MRI data sets from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

  19. Aneuploidy in the normal, Alzheimer's disease and ataxia-telangiectasia brain: differential expression and pathological meaning.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Liehr, Thomas; Yurov, Yuri B

    2009-05-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the human brain contains aneuploid cells; however the nature and magnitude of neural aneuploidy in health and disease remain obscure. Here, we have monitored aneuploidy in the cerebral cortex of the normal, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) brain by molecular cytogenetic approaches scoring more than 480,000 neural cells. Using arbitrarily selected set of DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 7, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, X and Y we have determined the mean rate of stochastic aneuploidy per chromosome as 0.5% in the normal human brain (95%CI 0.2-0.7%; SD 0.2%). The overall proportion of aneuploid cells in the normal brain has been estimated at approximately 10%. In the AT brain, we observed a 2-to-5 fold increase of stochastic aneuploidy randomly affecting different chromosomes (mean 2.1%; 95%CI - 1.5-2.6%; SD 0.8%). The overall proportion of aneuploid cells in the brain of AT individuals was estimated at approximately 20-50%. Compared with sex- and age-matched controls, the level of stochastic aneuploidy in the AD brain was not significantly increased. However, a dramatic 10-fold increase of chromosome 21-specific aneuploidy (both hypoploidy and hyperploidy) was detected in the AD cerebral cortex (6-15% versus 0.8-1.8% in control). We conclude that somatic mosaic aneuploidy differentially contributes to intercellular genomic variation in the normal, AD and AT brain. Neural aneuploidy leading to altered cellular physiology may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These data indicate neural aneuploidy to be a newly identified feature of neurodegenerative diseases, similar to other devastative disorders hallmarked by aneuploidy such as chromosome syndromes and cancer. PMID:19344645

  20. Antioxidant Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ye; Wang, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease featuring progressive impairments in memory, cognition, and behavior and ultimately leads to death. The histopathological changes of Alzheimer's disease include neuronal and synaptic loss, formation of extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in brain. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress not only strongly participates in an early stage of Alzheimer's disease prior to cytopathology, but plays an important role in inducing and activating multiple cell signaling pathways that contribute to the lesion formations of toxic substances and then promotes the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many years of studies show that antioxidant therapies have enjoyed general success in preclinical studies. Therefore, this paper mainly focuses on the recent developments of common used antioxidant therapies for Alzheimer's disease and thus provides indications for future potential antioxidant therapeutic strategies of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22888398

  1. Elevated levels of an exocrine pancreatic secretory protein in Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, M; de la Monte, S M; Gross, J; Wands, J R

    1989-01-01

    We identified by a monoclonal antibody-based immunoradiometric assay high concentrations of an exocrine pancreatic protein called pancreatic thread protein (PTP) in several areas of Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. The saline-extractable soluble immunoreactivity shares at least three epitopes in common with the native pancreatic form of the protein; the Mr varies from approximately 17,000 to 20,000. Quantitative measurements of PTP immunoreactivity in various regions of several AD brains revealed levels varying from 12 to 295 ng/g of tissue (mean, 116 ng/g) compared with 1-11 ng/g of tissue (mean, 5 ng/g) found in comparable areas of control brains. Immunocytochemistry performed with the anti-PTP monoclonal antibodies demonstrate PTP immunoreactivity within large pyramidal neurons--many of which contain neurofibrillary tangles in both AD and Down syndrome. Less accumulation was observed in astrocytes, and some PTP immunoreactivity was found extracellularly. The highest number of labeled cells in AD and Down syndrome was seen in the hippocampal formation. Fewer positive-staining cells were noted in normal and disease control brains. We conclude, therefore, that an exocrine pancreatic protein is present in the central nervous system of normal individuals at low levels; in AD brain concentrations of this protein are much higher. Images PMID:2463628

  2. The construction of common and specific significance subnetworks of Alzheimer's disease from multiple brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Mou, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Na; Zeng, Weiming; Li, Shasha; Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively and fatally neurodegenerative disorder and leads to irreversibly cognitive and memorial damage in different brain regions. The identification and analysis of the dysregulated pathways and subnetworks among affected brain regions will provide deep insights for the pathogenetic mechanism of AD. In this paper, commonly and specifically significant subnetworks were identified from six AD brain regions. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) data were integrated to add molecular biological information to construct the functional modules of six AD brain regions by Heinz algorithm. Then, the simulated annealing algorithm based on edge weight is applied to predicting and optimizing the maximal scoring networks for common and specific genes, respectively, which can remove the weak interactions and add the prediction of strong interactions to increase the accuracy of the networks. The identified common subnetworks showed that inflammation of the brain nerves is one of the critical factors of AD and calcium imbalance may be a link among several causative factors in AD pathogenesis. In addition, the extracted specific subnetworks for each brain region revealed many biologically functional mechanisms to understand AD pathogenesis. PMID:25866779

  3. The Construction of Common and Specific Significance Subnetworks of Alzheimer's Disease from Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Na; Zeng, Weiming; Li, Shasha; Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively and fatally neurodegenerative disorder and leads to irreversibly cognitive and memorial damage in different brain regions. The identification and analysis of the dysregulated pathways and subnetworks among affected brain regions will provide deep insights for the pathogenetic mechanism of AD. In this paper, commonly and specifically significant subnetworks were identified from six AD brain regions. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) data were integrated to add molecular biological information to construct the functional modules of six AD brain regions by Heinz algorithm. Then, the simulated annealing algorithm based on edge weight is applied to predicting and optimizing the maximal scoring networks for common and specific genes, respectively, which can remove the weak interactions and add the prediction of strong interactions to increase the accuracy of the networks. The identified common subnetworks showed that inflammation of the brain nerves is one of the critical factors of AD and calcium imbalance may be a link among several causative factors in AD pathogenesis. In addition, the extracted specific subnetworks for each brain region revealed many biologically functional mechanisms to understand AD pathogenesis. PMID:25866779

  4. Altered Expression of Diabetes-Related Genes in Alzheimer's Disease Brains: The Hisayama Study

    PubMed Central

    Hokama, Masaaki; Oka, Sugako; Leon, Julio; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Iwaki, Toru; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Tomio; LaFerla, Frank M.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered to be a risk factor for dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this risk is not well understood. We examined gene expression profiles in postmortem human brains donated for the Hisayama study. Three-way analysis of variance of microarray data from frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and hippocampus was performed with the presence/absence of AD and vascular dementia, and sex, as factors. Comparative analyses of expression changes in the brains of AD patients and a mouse model of AD were also performed. Relevant changes in gene expression identified by microarray analysis were validated by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The hippocampi of AD brains showed the most significant alteration in gene expression profile. Genes involved in noninsulin-dependent DM and obesity were significantly altered in both AD brains and the AD mouse model, as were genes related to psychiatric disorders and AD. The alterations in the expression profiles of DM-related genes in AD brains were independent of peripheral DM-related abnormalities. These results indicate that altered expression of genes related to DM in AD brains is a result of AD pathology, which may thereby be exacerbated by peripheral insulin resistance or DM. PMID:23595620

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Duke University Medical Center MalaCards: alzheimer disease MalaCards: alzheimer disease risk factor Merck Manual Consumer Version: Alzheimer Disease Quick Facts ...

  6. Glucose Metabolic Brain Networks in Early-Onset vs. Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Eunjoo; Na, Duk L.; Jeong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) shows distinct features from late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). To explore the characteristics of EAD, clinical, neuropsychological, and functional imaging studies have been conducted. However, differences between EAD and LAD are not clear, especially in terms of brain connectivity and networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD by adopting graph theory measures. Methods: We analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images to investigate the distinct features of metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD. Using metabolic connectivity and graph theory analysis, metabolic network differences between LAD and EAD were explored. Results: Results showed the decreased connectivity centered in the cingulate gyri and occipital regions in EAD, whereas decreased connectivity in the occipital and temporal regions as well as increased connectivity in the supplementary motor area were observed in LAD when compared with age-matched control groups. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were decreased in EAD but not in LAD. EAD showed progressive network deterioration as a function of disease severity and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, mainly in terms of connectivity between the cingulate gyri and occipital regions. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were also decreased along with disease severity. Conclusion: These results indicate that EAD and LAD have distinguished features in terms of metabolic connectivity, with EAD demonstrating more extensive and progressive deterioration. PMID:27445800

  7. Immunohistoblot analysis on whole human hemispheres from normal and Alzheimer diseased brains.

    PubMed

    Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Varszegi, Szilvia; Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer; Kasa, Peter; Gulya, Karoly

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of the histoblot immunostaining of cryosections of whole hemispheres of healthy and Alzheimer diseased (AD) human brains by localizing a neuron-specific marker, the anti-neuronal nuclei (NeuN) antigen. As expected, cortical NeuN-immunopositive regions were generally thinner and lighter in the AD brains than in the controls. The advantages of using whole hemisphere histoblots: (1) they provide a low-resolution overview/outline of the antigen distribution in a large surface area, (2) large, thick, and/or unfixed tissue sections from post-mortem samples (perhaps of inferior tissue quality) can be compared, and (3) subsequent immunohistochemistry can be performed on the tissue sections used for the histoblots. PMID:18832000

  8. About Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiving

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiving On this page: Caregiving Tip Sheets and ... Care Caregiving News Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease can have high physical, emotional, and financial costs. ...

  9. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26590911

  10. Alzheimer's disease-like pathology has transient effects on the brain and blood metabolome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaobei; Nasaruddin, Muhammad Bin; Elliott, Christopher T; McGuinness, Bernadette; Passmore, Anthony P; Kehoe, Patrick G; Hölscher, Christian; McClean, Paula L; Graham, Stewart F; Green, Brian D

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex involving multiple contributing factors. The extent to which AD pathology affects the metabolome is still not understood nor is it known how disturbances change as the disease progresses. For the first time, we have profiled longitudinally (6, 8, 10, 12, and 18 months) both the brain and plasma metabolome of APPswe/PS1deltaE9 double transgenic and wild-type mice. A total of 187 metabolites were quantified using a targeted metabolomic methodology. Multivariate statistical analysis produced models that distinguished APPswe/PS1deltaE9 from wild-type mice at 8, 10, and 12 months. Metabolic pathway analysis found perturbed polyamine metabolism in both brain and blood plasma. There were other disturbances in essential amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, and also in the neurotransmitter serotonin. Pronounced imbalances in phospholipid and acylcarnitine homeostasis were evident in 2 age groups. AD-like pathology, therefore, affects greatly on both the brain and blood metabolomes, although there appears to be a clear temporal sequence whereby changes to brain metabolites precede those in blood. PMID:26827653

  11. Nitric oxide as an initiator of brain lesions during the development of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Palacios, Hector H; Lipsitt, Amanda E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Lamb, Bruce T; Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis; Gasimov, Eldar; Bragin, Valentin

    2009-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule for the host defense that plays a fundamental role in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. NO is synthesized through the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which is found in three isoforms classified as neuronal (nNOS), inducible (iNOS), and endothelial (eNOS). Recent evidence supports the theory that this bioactive molecule has an influential role in the disruption of normal brain and vascular homeostasis, a condition known to elucidate chronic hypoperfusion which ultimately causes the development of brain lesions and the pathology that typify Alzheimer disease (AD). In addition, vascular NO activity appears to be a major contributor to this pathology before any overexpression of NOS isoforms is observed in the neuron, glia, and microglia of the brain tree, where the overexpression the NOS isoforms causes the formation of a large amount of NO. We hypothesize that since an imbalance between the NOS isoforms and endothelin-1 (ET-1), a human gene that encodes for blood vessel constriction, can cause antioxidant system insufficiency; by using pharmacological intervention with NO donors and/or NO suppressors, the brain lesions and the downstream progression of brain pathology and dementia in AD should be delayed or minimized. PMID:19526276

  12. Preliminary study of Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis based on brain electrical signals using wireless EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, N.; Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.; Taruno, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to study brain's electrical signals recorded using EEG as a basis for the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The subjects consisted of patients with AD, and normal subjects are used as the control. Brain signals are recorded for 3 minutes in a relaxed condition and with eyes closed. The data is processed using power spectral analysis, brain mapping and chaos test to observe the level of complexity of EEG's data. The results show a shift in the power spectral in the low frequency band (delta and theta) in AD patients. The increase of delta and theta occurs in lobus frontal area and lobus parietal respectively. However, there is a decrease of alpha activity in AD patients where in the case of normal subjects with relaxed condition, brain alpha wave dominates the posterior area. This is confirmed by the results of brain mapping. While the results of chaos analysis show that the average value of MMLE is lower in AD patients than in normal subjects. The level of chaos associated with neural complexity in AD patients with lower neural complexity is due to neuronal damage caused by the beta amyloid plaques and tau protein in neurons.

  13. Apolipoprotein E ε4 modulates functional brain connectome in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Xiao; He, Yi; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali; He, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele is a well-established genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent research has demonstrated an APOE ɛ4-mediated modulation of intrinsic functional brain networks in cognitively normal individuals. However, it remains largely unknown whether and how APOE ɛ4 affects the brain's functional network architecture in patients with AD. Using resting-state functional MRI and graph-theory approaches, we systematically investigated the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks in 16 APOE ɛ4 carriers and 26 matched noncarriers with AD at three levels: global whole-brain, intermediate module, and regional node/connection. Neuropsychological analysis showed that the APOE ɛ4 carriers performed worse on delayed memory but better on a late item generation of a verbal fluency task (associated with executive function) than noncarriers. Whole-brain graph analyses revealed that APOE ɛ4 significantly disrupted whole-brain topological organization as characterized by (i) reduced parallel information transformation efficiency; (ii) decreased intramodular connectivity within the posterior default mode network (pDMN) and intermodular connectivity of the pDMN and executive control network (ECN) with other neuroanatomical systems; and (iii) impaired functional hubs and their rich-club connectivities that primarily involve the pDMN, ECN, and sensorimotor systems. Further simulation analysis indicated that these altered connectivity profiles of the pDMN and ECN largely accounted for the abnormal global network topology. Finally, the changes in network topology exhibited significant correlations with the patients' cognitive performances. Together, our findings suggest that the APOE genotype modulates large-scale brain networks in AD and shed new light on the gene-connectome interaction in this disease. PMID:25619771

  14. Divergent brain functional network alterations in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Peraza, Luis R.; Taylor, John-Paul; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The clinical phenotype of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is different from Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting a divergence between these diseases in terms of brain network organization. To fully understand this, we studied functional networks from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively matched DLB and AD patients. The DLB group demonstrated a generalized lower synchronization compared with the AD and healthy controls, and this was more severe for edges connecting distant brain regions. Global network measures were significantly different between DLB and AD. For instance, AD showed lower small-worldness than healthy controls, while DLB showed higher small-worldness (AD < controls < DLB), and this was also the case for global efficiency (DLB > controls > AD) and clustering coefficient (DLB < controls < AD). Differences were also found for nodal measures at brain regions associated with each disease. Finally, we found significant associations between network performance measures and global cognitive impairment and severity of cognitive fluctuations in DLB. These results show network divergences between DLB and AD which appear to reflect their neuropathological differences. PMID:26115566

  15. Activation of brain histaminergic neurotransmission: a mechanism for cognitive effects of memantine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Motawaj, M; Burban, A; Davenas, E; Arrang, J-M

    2011-02-01

    We previously reported that some N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonists enhanced histamine neuron activity in rodents. Here, we have investigated the effects of memantine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, on histaminergic neurotransmission. In vitro, memantine antagonized native NMDA receptors with a micromolar potency but had no effect at recombinant human histamine receptors. In vivo, a single administration of memantine increased histamine neuron activity, as shown by the 60% increase of tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) levels observed in the brain of mice. This increase occurred with an ED(50) of 0.3 ± 0.1 mg/kg, similar to that found on inhibition of ex vivo [(3)H]dizocilpine maleate (MK-801) binding (1.8 ± 1.3 mg/kg). Two days after pretreatment of mice with memantine at 5 mg/kg twice daily for 5 days, t-MeHA levels were enhanced by 50 ± 7% (p < 0.001), indicating a long-lasting activation of histamine neurons. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to explore genes involved in this persistent effect. H(3) receptor mRNAs were strongly increased, but the density of H(3) receptor binding sites was increased solely in hypothalamus (by 141 ± 24%). Up-regulations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NMDA-receptor 1 subunit mRNAs were also found but were restricted to hippocampus. mRNA expression of α7-nicotinic receptors remained unchanged in any region. Considering the well established cognitive effects of histamine neurons, the increase in brain t-MeHA levels after single or repeated administration of therapeutic doses of memantine suggests that the drug exerts its beneficial effects on cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease, at least partly, by activating histamine neurons. PMID:21057059

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. RESULTS Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and

  17. Identifying and Mapping Connectivity Patterns of Brain Network Hubs in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengjia; Yan, Chaogan; Li, Kuncheng; Wang, Zhiqun; Wang, Jinhui; Cao, Miao; Lin, Qixiang; Shu, Ni; Xia, Mingrui; Bi, Yanchao; He, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated not only with regional gray matter damages, but also with abnormalities in functional integration between brain regions. Here, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and voxel-based graph-theory analysis to systematically investigate intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of whole-brain networks in 32 AD patients and 38 healthy controls (HCs). We found that AD selectively targeted highly connected hub regions (in terms of nodal functional connectivity strength) of brain networks, involving the medial and lateral prefrontal and parietal cortices, insula, and thalamus. This impairment was connectivity distance-dependent (Euclidean), with the most prominent disruptions appearing in the long-range connections (e.g., 100-130 mm). Moreover, AD also disrupted functional connections within the default-mode, salience and executive-control modules, and connections between the salience and executive-control modules. These disruptions of hub connectivity and modular integrity significantly correlated with the patients' cognitive performance. Finally, the nodal connectivity strength in the posteromedial cortex exhibited a highly discriminative power in distinguishing individuals with AD from HCs. Taken together, our results emphasize AD-related degeneration of specific brain hubs, thus providing novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of connectivity dysfunction in AD and suggesting the potential of using network hub connectivity as a diagnostic biomarker. PMID:25331602

  18. Scopolamine effects on functional brain connectivity: a pharmacological model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bajo, R; Pusil, S; López, M E; Canuet, L; Pereda, E; Osipova, D; Maestú, F; Pekkonen, E

    2015-01-01

    Scopolamine administration may be considered as a psychopharmacological model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we studied a group of healthy elderly under scopolamine to test whether it elicits similar changes in brain connectivity as those observed in AD, thereby verifying a possible model of AD impairment. We did it by testing healthy elderly subjects in two experimental conditions: glycopyrrolate (placebo) and scopolamine administration. We then analyzed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data corresponding to both conditions in resting-state with eyes closed. This analysis was performed in source space by combining a nonlinear frequency band-specific measure of functional connectivity (phase locking value, PLV) with network analysis methods. Under scopolamine, functional connectivity between several brain areas was significantly reduced as compared to placebo, in most frequency bands analyzed. Besides, regarding the two complex network indices studied (clustering and shortest path length), clustering significantly decreased in the alpha band while shortest path length significantly increased also in alpha band both after scopolamine administration. Overall our findings indicate that both PLV and graph analysis are suitable tools to measure brain connectivity changes induced by scopolamine, which causes alterations in brain connectivity apparently similar to those reported in AD. PMID:26130273

  19. A biophysical model of shape changes due to atrophy in the brain with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a model of brain deformation triggered by atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We introduce a macroscopic biophysical model assuming that the density of the brain remains constant, hence its volume shrinks when neurons die in AD. The deformation in the brain parenchyma minimizes the elastic strain energy with the prescribed local volume loss. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is modelled differently to allow for fluid readjustments occuring at a much faster time-scale. PDEs describing the model is discretized in staggered grid and solved using Finite Difference Method. We illustrate the power of the model by showing different deformation patterns obtained for the same global atrophy but prescribed in gray matter (GM) or white matter (WM) on a generic atlas MRI, and with a realistic AD simulation on a subject MRI. This well-grounded forward model opens a way to study different hypotheses about the distribution of brain atrophy, and to study its impact on the observed changes in MR images. PMID:25485361

  20. Elevation of the level and activity of acid ceramidase in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2004-12-01

    Protein glycosylation modifies the processing of several key proteins involved in the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aberrant glycosylation of tau and down-regulation of sialyltransferase in AD brain suggest a possible dysregulation of protein glycosylation that may play a role in AD. We therefore isolated major glycoproteins from AD brain by using lectin-affinity chromatographies and ion-exchange chromatography and further separated them using SDS-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis of 11 isolated glycoproteins led to their identification as: neuronal cell adhesion molecule, beta-globin, IgM heavy chain VH1 region precursor, contactin precursor, dipeptidylpeptidase VI, CD81 partner 3, prenylcysteine lyase, adipocyte plasma-associated protein, acid ceramidase and two novel proteins. We found that the level and activity of acid ceramidase (AC), one of the major identified human brain glycoproteins, were significantly elevated in AD brain. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that AC was located mainly in the cell bodies of neurons and colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles. Our findings suggest that AC might play a role in controlling neuronal apoptosis and that AC-mediated signalling pathways might be involved in the molecular mechanism of AD. PMID:15610181

  1. The impact of cognitive reserve on brain functional connectivity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bozzali, Marco; Dowling, Claire; Serra, Laura; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Marra, Camillo; Castelli, Diana; Dowell, Nicholas G; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara

    2015-01-01

    One factor believed to impact brain resilience to the pathological damage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the so-called "cognitive reserve" (CR). A critical issue that still needs to be fully understood is the mechanism by which environmental enrichment interacts with brain plasticity to determine resilience to AD pathology. Previous work using PET suggests that increased brain connectivity might be at the origin of the compensatory mechanisms implicated in this process. This study aims to further clarify this issue using resting-state functional MRI. Resting-state functional MRI was collected for 11 patients with AD, 18 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 16 healthy controls, and analyzed to isolate the default mode network (DMN). A quantitative score of CR was obtained by combining information about number of years of education and type of schools attended. Consistent with previous reports, education was found to modulate functional connectivity in the posterior cingulate cortex, whose disconnection with the temporal lobes is known to be critical for the conversion from MCI to AD. This effect was highly significant in AD patients, less so in patients with MCI, and absent in healthy subjects. These findings show the potential neural mechanisms underlying the individual's ability to cope with brain damage, although they should be treated with some caution based on small numbers. PMID:25201783

  2. Brain changes in older adults at very low risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; McEvoy, Linda; Holland, Dominic; Dale, Anders M; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a slow onset, so it is challenging to distinguish brain changes in healthy elderly persons from incipient AD. One-year brain changes with a distinct frontotemporal pattern have been shown in older adults. However, it is not clear to what extent these changes may have been affected by undetected, early AD. To address this, we estimated 1-year atrophy by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 132 healthy elderly persons who had remained free of diagnosed mild cognitive impairment or AD for at least 3 years. We found significant volumetric reductions throughout the brain. The sample was further divided into low-risk groups based on clinical, biomarker, genetic, or cognitive criteria. Although sample sizes varied, significant reductions were observed in all groups, with rates and topographical distribution of atrophy comparable to that of the full sample. Volume reductions were especially pronounced in the default mode network, closely matching the previously described frontotemporal pattern of changes in healthy aging. Atrophy in the hippocampus predicted change in memory, with no additional default mode network contributions. In conclusion, reductions in regional brain volumes can be detected over the course of 1 year even in older adults who are unlikely to be in a presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:23658162

  3. Automated detection of brain atrophy patterns based on MRI for the prediction of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Claudia; Teipel, Stefan J.; Oswald, Annahita; Böhm, Christian; Meindl, Thomas; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina; Bokde, Arun W.; Hampel, Harald; Ewers, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have an increased risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-based MRI studies have demonstrated that widely distributed cortical and subcortical brain areas show atrophic changes in MCI, preceding the onset of AD-type dementia. Here we developed a novel data mining framework in combination with three different classifiers including support vector machine (SVM), Bayes statistics, and voting feature intervals (VFI) to derive a quantitative index of pattern matching for the prediction of the conversion from MCI to AD. MRI was collected in 32 AD patients, 24 MCI subjects and 18 healthy controls (HC). Nine out of 24 MCI subjects converted to AD after an average follow-up interval of 2.5 years. Using feature selection algorithms, brain regions showing the highest accuracy for the discrimination between AD and HC were identified, reaching a classification accuracy of up to 92%. The extracted AD clusters were used as a search region to extract those brain areas that are predictive of conversion to AD within MCI subjects. The most predictive brain areas included the anterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex. The best prediction accuracy, which was cross-validated via train-and-test, was 75% for the prediction of the conversion from MCI to AD. The present results suggest that novel multivariate methods of pattern matching reach a clinically relevant accuracy for the a priori prediction of the progression from MCI to AD. PMID:19961938

  4. [Theoretic basis on the same therapeutic program for different degenerative brain diseases in terms of the Governor Vessel: Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Wu, Junyan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Junlong

    2015-05-01

    Through the consultation of TCM ancient classical theory, the relationship of kidney essence, marrow and brain is analyzed. It is discovered that the degenerative brain diseases, represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) share the same etiological basis as "kidney essence deficiency and brain marrow emptiness" and have the mutual pathological outcomes as yang qi declining. The Governor Vessel gathers yang qi of the whole body and maintains the normal functional activity of zangfu organs in the human body through the storage, regulation and invigoration of yang qi. It is viewed that the theory of the Governor Vessel is applied to treat the different degenerative brain diseases, which provides the theoretic support and practice guide for the thought of TCM as the same therapeutic program for the different diseases. As a result, the degenerative brain diseases can be retarded and the approach is provided to the effective prevention and treatment of degenerative diseases in central nerve system: PMID:26255528

  5. Novel late-onset Alzheimer disease loci variants associate with brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mariet; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S.; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Schultz, Debra; Rakhshan, Fariborz; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) identified 9 novel risk loci. Discovery of functional variants within genes at these loci is required to confirm their role in Alzheimer disease (AD). Single nucleotide polymorphisms that influence gene expression (eSNPs) constitute an important class of functional variants. We therefore investigated the influence of the novel LOAD risk loci on human brain gene expression. Methods: We measured gene expression levels in the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied AD subjects and those with other brain pathologies (∼400 total subjects). To determine whether any of the novel LOAD risk variants are eSNPs, we tested their cis-association with expression of 6 nearby LOAD candidate genes detectable in human brain (ABCA7, BIN1, CLU, MS4A4A, MS4A6A, PICALM) and an additional 13 genes ±100 kb of these SNPs. To identify additional eSNPs that influence brain gene expression levels of the novel candidate LOAD genes, we identified SNPs ±100 kb of their location and tested for cis-associations. Results: CLU rs11136000 (p = 7.81 × 10−4) and MS4A4A rs2304933/rs2304935 (p = 1.48 × 10−4–1.86 × 10−4) significantly influence temporal cortex expression levels of these genes. The LOAD-protective CLU and risky MS4A4A locus alleles associate with higher brain levels of these genes. There are other cis-variants that significantly influence brain expression of CLU and ABCA7 (p = 4.01 × 10−5–9.09 × 10−9), some of which also associate with AD risk (p = 2.64 × 10−2–6.25 × 10−5). Conclusions: CLU and MS4A4A eSNPs may at least partly explain the LOAD risk association at these loci. CLU and ABCA7 may harbor additional strong eSNPs. These results have implications in the search for functional variants at the novel LOAD risk loci. PMID:22722634

  6. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents The ... Suncoast Gerontology Center, University of South Florida. How Alzheimer's Changes the Brain The only definite way to ...

  7. Sex differences in metabolic aging of the brain: insights into female susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Woody, Sarah K; Brinton, Roberta D

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of clinical aspects of sex differences in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms, for instance, how sex modifies AD risk and why the female brain is more susceptible to AD, are not clear. The purpose of this study is to elucidate sex disparities in brain aging profiles focusing on 2 major areas-energy and amyloid metabolism-that are most significantly affected in preclinical development of AD. Total RNA isolated from hippocampal tissues of both female and male 129/C57BL/6 mice at ages of 6, 9, 12, or 15 months were comparatively analyzed by custom-designed Taqman low-density arrays for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of a total of 182 genes involved in a broad spectrum of biological processes modulating energy production and amyloid homeostasis. Gene expression profiles revealed substantial differences in the trajectory of aging changes between female and male brains. In female brains, 44.2% of genes were significantly changed from 6 months to 9 months and two-thirds showed downregulation. In contrast, in male brains, only 5.4% of genes were significantly altered at this age transition. Subsequent changes in female brains were at a much smaller magnitude, including 10.9% from 9 months to 12 months and 6.1% from 12 months to 15 months. In male brains, most changes occurred from 12 months to 15 months and the majority were upregulated. Furthermore, gene network analysis revealed that clusterin appeared to serve as a link between the overall decreased bioenergetic metabolism and increased amyloid dyshomeostasis associated with the earliest transition in female brains. Together, results from this study indicate that: (1) female and male brains follow profoundly dissimilar trajectories as they age; (2) female brains undergo age-related changes much earlier than male brains; (3) early changes in female brains signal the onset of a hypometabolic phenotype at risk for AD. These

  8. [Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-18

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing. Subsequent analysis of pooled data from both phase III trials with solanezumab showed a reduction in cognitive decline in patients with mild AD. Solanezumab and new monoclonal antibodies are being tested in patients with prodromal and preclinical AD in search for a disease-modifying treatment. PMID:26815584

  9. PSEN1 and PSEN2 gene expression in Alzheimer's disease brain: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Delabio, Roger; Rasmussen, Lucas; Mizumoto, Igor; Viani, Gustavo-Arruda; Chen, Elizabeth; Villares, João; Costa, Isabela-Bazzo; Turecki, Gustavo; Linde, Sandra Aparecido; Smith, Marilia Cardoso; Payão, Spencer-Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) genes encode the major component of y-secretase, which is responsible for sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid precursor proteins and the subsequent formation of amyloid-β peptides. 150 RNA samples from the entorhinal cortex, auditory cortex and hippocampal regions of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and controls elderly subjects were analyzed with using real-time rtPCR. There were no differences between groups for PSEN1 expression. PSEN2 was significantly downregulated in the auditory cortex of AD patients when compared to controls and when compared to other brain regions of the patients. Alteration in PSEN2 expression may be a risk factor for AD. PMID:24927704

  10. Brain metabolism and Alzheimer's disease: the prospect of a metabolite-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S C; Alhasawi, A; Appanna, V P; Auger, C; Appanna, V D

    2015-01-01

    The brain is one of the most energy-demanding organs in the body. It has evolved intricate metabolic networks to fulfill this need and utilizes a variety of substrates to generate ATP, the universal energy currency. Any disruption in the supply of energy results in various abnormalities including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition with markedly diminished cognitive ability. Astrocytes are an important participant in maintaining the cerebral ATP budget. However, under oxidative stress induced by numerous factors including aluminum toxicity, the ability of astroctyes to generate ATP is impaired due to dysfunctional mitochondria. This leads to globular, glycolytic, lipogenic and ATP-deficient astrocytes, cerebral characteristics common in AD patients. The reversal of these perturbations by such natural metabolites as pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate and L-carnitine provides valuable therapeutic cues against AD. PMID:25560817

  11. Voxel-based discriminant map classification on brain ventricles for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingnan; de Haan, Gerard; Unay, Devrim; Soldea, Octavian; Ekin, Ahmet

    2009-02-01

    One major hallmark of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the loss of neurons in the brain. In many cases, medical experts use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to qualitatively measure the neuronal loss by the shrinkage or enlargement of the structures-of-interest. Brain ventricle is one of the popular choices. It is easily detectable in clinical MR images due to the high contrast of the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) with the rest of the parenchyma. Moreover, atrophy in any periventricular structure will directly lead to ventricle enlargement. For quantitative analysis, volume is the common choice. However, volume is a gross measure and it cannot capture the entire complexity of the anatomical shape. Since most existing shape descriptors are complex and difficult-to-reproduce, more straightforward and robust ways to extract ventricle shape features are preferred in the diagnosis. In this paper, a novel ventricle shape based classification method for Alzheimer's disease has been proposed. Training process is carried out to generate two probability maps for two training classes: healthy controls (HC) and AD patients. By subtracting the HC probability map from the AD probability map, we get a 3D ventricle discriminant map. Then a matching coefficient has been calculated between each training subject and the discriminant map. An adjustable cut-off point of the matching coefficients has been drawn for the two classes. Generally, the higher the cut-off point that has been drawn, the higher specificity can be achieved. However, it will result in relatively lower sensitivity and vice versa. The benchmarked results against volume based classification show that the area under the ROC curves for our proposed method is as high as 0.86 compared with only 0.71 for volume based classification method.

  12. Cellular model studies of brain-mediated phototherapy on Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Hu, Bina; Li, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Yong-Qing

    2008-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now the most common neurodegenerative disease. Despite approval of several drugs for AD, the disease continues to rob millions of their memories and their lives. We have studied the cellular models of brain-mediated phototherapy on AD, and the studies will be reviewed in this paper. Genetic studies have shown that dysfunction of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) or tau is sufficient to cause AD. Aβ or Aβ induced redox stress induced neuron apoptosis might be as a cellular model of AD. We found red light at 640+/-15 nm from light emitting diode array (RLED640) might inhibit Aβ 25-35 induced PC12 cell apoptosis, which is mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and it might inhibit hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced differentiated PC12 cell (dPC12) apoptosis, which is mediated by tyrosine hydroxylase. There is rhythm dysfunction in AD. We found low intensity 810 nm laser irradiation might rehabilitate TNF-alpha induced inhibition of clock gen expression of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Our studies provide a foundation for photobiomodulation on brain to rehabilitate AD.

  13. Intranasal nanoparticles of basic fibroblast growth factor for brain delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Chen, Jie; Feng, Chengcheng; Shao, Xiayan; Liu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-01-30

    Disabilities caused by neurodegeneration have become one of the main causes of mortality in elderly population, with drug distribution to the brain remaining one of the most difficult challenges in the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) diseases due to the existence of blood-brain barrier. Lectins modified polyethylene glycol-polylactide-polyglycolide (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles could enhance the drug delivery to the brain following intranasal administration. In this study, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was entrapped in nanoparticles conjugated with Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), which selectively binds to N-acetylglucosamine on the nasal epithelial membrane for its brain delivery. The resulting nanoparticles had uniform particle size and negative zeta potential. The brain distribution of the formulations following intranasal administration was assessed using radioisotopic tracing method. The areas under the concentration-time curve of (125)I-bFGF in the olfactory bulb, cerebrum, and cerebellum of rats following nasal application of STL modified nanoparticles (STL-bFGF-NP) were 1.79-5.17 folds of that of rats with intravenous administration, and 0.61-2.21 and 0.19-1.07 folds higher compared with intranasal solution and unmodified nanoparticles, respectively. Neuroprotective effect was evaluated using Mirror water maze task in rats with intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid25-35 and ibotenic acid. The spatial learning and memory of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats in STL-bFGF-NP group were significantly improved compared with AD model group, and were also better than other preparations. The results were consistent with the value of choline acetyltransferase activity of rat hippocampus as well as the histological observations of rat hippocampal region. The histopathology assays also confirmed the in vivo safety of STL-bFGF-NP. These results clearly indicated that STL-NP was a promising drug delivery system for peptide and protein drugs such as

  14. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... light on this question. For example, scientists are learning how age-related changes in the brain may ...

  15. Opposite roles of apolipoprotein E in normal brains and in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, C; Angelini, G; Dapino, D; Piccini, A; Piombo, G; Schettini, G; Chen, S; Teller, J K; Zaccheo, D; Gambetti, P; Tabaton, M

    1998-12-22

    We have characterized the interaction between apolipoprotein E (apoE) and amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) in the soluble fraction of the cerebral cortex of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control subjects. Western blot analysis with specific antibodies identified in both groups a complex composed of the full-length apoE and Abeta peptides ending at residues 40 and 42. The apoE-Abeta soluble aggregate is less stable in AD brains than in controls, when treated with the anionic detergent SDS. The complex is present in significantly higher quantity in control than in AD brains, whereas in the insoluble fraction an inverse correlation has previously been reported. Moreover, in the AD subjects the Abeta bound to apoE is more sensitive to protease digestion than is the unbound Abeta. Taken together, our results indicate that in normal brains apoE efficiently binds and sequesters Abeta, preventing its aggregation. In AD, the impaired apoE-Abeta binding leads to the critical accumulation of Abeta, facilitating plaque formation. PMID:9861015

  16. Alzheimer's disease: connecting findings from graph theoretical studies of brain networks.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Wink, Alle Meije; de Haan, Willem; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik

    2013-08-01

    The interrelationships between pathological processes and emerging clinical phenotypes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are important yet complicated to study, because the brain is a complex network where local disruptions can have widespread effects. Recently, properties in brain networks obtained with neuroimaging techniques have been studied in AD with tools from graph theory. However, the interpretation of graph alterations remains unclear, because the definition of connectivity depends on the imaging modality used. Here we examined which graph properties have been consistently reported to be disturbed in AD studies, using a heuristically defined "graph space" to investigate which theoretical models can best explain graph alterations in AD. Findings from structural and functional graphs point to a loss of highly connected areas in AD. However, studies showed considerable variability in reported group differences of most graph properties. This suggests that brain graphs might not be isometric, which complicates the interpretation of graph measurements. We highlight confounding factors such as differences in graph construction methods and provide recommendations for future research. PMID:23541878

  17. Altered brain development in an early-onset murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allemang-Grand, R; Scholz, J; Ellegood, J; Cahill, L S; Laliberté, C; Fraser, P E; Josselyn, S A; Sled, J G; Lerch, J P

    2015-02-01

    Murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been used to draw associations between atrophy of neural tissue and underlying pathology. In this study, the early-onset TgCRND8 mouse model of AD and littermate controls were scanned longitudinally with in vivo manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) before and after the onset of amyloid plaque deposition at 12 weeks of age. Separate cohorts of mice were scanned at 1 week (ex vivo imaging) and 4 weeks (MEMRI) of age to investigate early life alterations in the brain. Contrary to our expectations, differences in neuroanatomy were found in early post-natal life, preceding plaque deposition by as much as 11 weeks. Many of these differences remained at all imaging time points, suggesting that they were programmed early in life and were unaffected by the onset of pathology. Furthermore, rather than showing atrophy, many regions of the TgCRND8 brain grew at a faster rate compared to controls. These regions contained the greatest density of amyloid plaques and reactive astrocytes. Our findings suggest that pathological processes as well as an alteration in brain development influence the TgCRND8 neuroanatomy throughout the lifespan. PMID:25311279

  18. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A Spherical Brain Mapping of MR Images for the Detection of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Murcia, F J; Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Ortiz, A; For The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is of fundamental importance in neuroscience, providing good contrast and resolution, as well as not being considered invasive. Despite the development of newer techniques involving radiopharmaceuticals, it is still a recommended tool in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) neurological practice to assess neurodegeneration, and recent research suggests that it could reveal changes in the brain even before the symptomatology appears. In this paper we propose a method that performs a Spherical Brain Mapping, using different measures to project the three-dimensional MR brain images onto two-dimensional maps revealing statistical characteristics of the tissue. The resulting maps could be assessed visually, but also perform a significant feature reduction that will allow further supervised or unsupervised processing, reducing the computational load while maintaining a large amount of the original information. We have tested our methodology against a MRI database comprising 180 AD affected patients and 180 normal controls, where some of the mappings have revealed as an optimum strategy for the automatic processing and characterization of AD patterns, achieving up to a 90.9% of accuracy, as well as significantly reducing the computational load. Additionally, our maps allow the visual analysis and interpretation of the images, which can be of great help in the diagnosis of this and other types of dementia. PMID:26971941

  20. Brain Insulin Resistance and Deficiency as Therapeutic Targets in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease [AD] is the most common cause of dementia in North America. Despite 30+ years of intense investigation, the field lacks consensus regarding the etiology and pathogenesis of sporadic AD, and therefore we still do not know the best strategies for treating and preventing this debilitating and costly disease. However, growing evidence supports the concept that AD is fundamentally a metabolic disease with substantial and progressive derangements in brain glucose utilization and responsiveness to insulin and insulin-like growth factor [IGF] stimulation. Moreover, AD is now recognized to be heterogeneous in nature, and not solely the end-product of aberrantly processed, misfolded, and aggregated oligomeric amyloid-beta peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau. Other factors, including impairments in energy metabolism, increased oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin and IGF resistance, and insulin/IGF deficiency in the brain should be incorporated into all equations used to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to AD. Herein, the contributions of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism are reviewed. In addition, we discuss current therapeutic strategies and suggest additional approaches based on the hypothesis that AD is principally a metabolic disease similar to diabetes mellitus. Ultimately, our ability to effectively detect, monitor, treat, and prevent AD will require more efficient, accurate and integrative diagnostic tools that utilize clinical, neuroimaging, biochemical, and molecular biomarker data. Finally, it is imperative that future therapeutic strategies for AD abandon the concept of uni-modal therapy in favor of multi-modal treatments that target distinct impairments at different levels within the brain insulin/IGF signaling cascades. PMID:22329651

  1. The role of calsyntenin-3 in dystrophic neurite formation in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya

    2016-03-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers may play an important role in the early pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: cognitive impairment caused by synaptic dysfunction. Dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques, another pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, are plaque-associated neuritic alterations preceding the appearance of synaptic loss. In the present review, we focus on the mechanism of dystrophic neurite formation by Aß oligomers, and discuss the neurotoxic role of Aβ-induced calsyntenin-3 in mediating dystrophic neurite formation. PMID:27018282

  2. A spectral graph regression model for learning brain connectivity of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenhui; Cheng, Lin; Sepulcre, Jorge; Johnson, Keith A; Fakhri, Georges E; Lu, Yue M; Li, Quanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding network features of brain pathology is essential to reveal underpinnings of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we introduce a novel graph regression model (GRM) for learning structural brain connectivity of Alzheimer's disease (AD) measured by amyloid-β deposits. The proposed GRM regards 11C-labeled Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging data as smooth signals defined on an unknown graph. This graph is then estimated through an optimization framework, which fits the graph to the data with an adjustable level of uniformity of the connection weights. Under the assumed data model, results based on simulated data illustrate that our approach can accurately reconstruct the underlying network, often with better reconstruction than those obtained by both sample correlation and ℓ1-regularized partial correlation estimation. Evaluations performed upon PiB-PET imaging data of 30 AD and 40 elderly normal control (NC) subjects demonstrate that the connectivity patterns revealed by the GRM are easy to interpret and consistent with known pathology. Moreover, the hubs of the reconstructed networks match the cortical hubs given by functional MRI. The discriminative network features including both global connectivity measurements and degree statistics of specific nodes discovered from the AD and NC amyloid-beta networks provide new potential biomarkers for preclinical and clinical AD. PMID:26024224

  3. Characterization of an O-glycosylated plaque-associated protein from Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Blanca; Guevara, Jorge; Hernández, Pedro; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Guzmán, Aida; Martínez-Cairo, Salvador; Zenteno, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    In this work we characterized a 90-kDa glycoprotein from Alzheimer disease (9OAzgp) brain extracts that is recognized by the GalNAc-specific lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL), as determined through Western blot. The 90Azgp was purified by electro-elution, and its amino acid sequence determined from peptides obtained after trypsin digestion through MALDI-TOF (Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight), and compared with the relative values obtained from the NCBInr (Swiss-Prot 10/01/2001) database. The 90Azgp showed 32% and 42% homology with the KIAA0310 protein from human brain and the human gastric mucin, respectively. Presence of O-glycosidically linked glycans in the proteins recognized by ALL was confirmed by inhibition of the lectin-glycoprotein interaction through hapten-inhibition assays and also by elimination of the O-glycosidically linked glycans after treatment with O-glycanase from Diplococcus pneumoniae. Electron transmission microscopy confirmed that the receptor recognized by the lectin is processed in the Golgi apparatus of AD neurons. Although the specific role of this glycoprotein has not been identified, considering that the presence of this lectin receptor co-localized with neuritic plaques and in AD sprouting neurons, it could suggest that the O-glycosyl-protein identified by the A. leucocarpus lectin participates in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:12528816

  4. Comparative lipidomic analysis of mouse and human brain with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Robin B; Oliveira, Tiago G; Cortes, Etty P; Honig, Lawrence S; Duff, Karen E; Small, Scott A; Wenk, Markus R; Shui, Guanghou; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2012-01-20

    Lipids are key regulators of brain function and have been increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, a systems-based approach was employed to determine the lipidome of brain tissues affected by AD. Specifically, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile extracts from the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and cerebellum of late-onset AD (LOAD) patients, as well as the forebrain of three transgenic familial AD (FAD) mouse models. Although the cerebellum lacked major alterations in lipid composition, we found an elevation of a signaling pool of diacylglycerol as well as sphingolipids in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, the diseased entorhinal cortex showed specific enrichment of lysobisphosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, the ganglioside GM3, and cholesterol esters, all of which suggest common pathogenic mechanisms associated with endolysosomal storage disorders. Importantly, a significant increase in cholesterol esters and GM3 was recapitulated in the transgenic FAD models, suggesting that these mice are relevant tools to study aberrant lipid metabolism of endolysosomal dysfunction associated with AD. Finally, genetic ablation of phospholipase D(2), which rescues the synaptic and behavioral deficits of an FAD mouse model, fully normalizes GM3 levels. These data thus unmask a cross-talk between the metabolism of phosphatidic acid, the product of phospholipase D(2), and gangliosides, and point to a central role of ganglioside anomalies in AD pathogenesis. Overall, our study highlights the hypothesis generating potential of lipidomics and identifies novel region-specific lipid anomalies potentially linked to AD pathogenesis. PMID:22134919

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Marta M.; Zheng, Bin; Lu, Tao; Yan, Zhenyu; Py, Bénédicte F.; Ng, Aylwin; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Li, Cheng; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Yuan, Junying

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy, a cellular catabolic mechanism essential for degradation of misfolded proteins, has been implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that lead to the autophagy dysfunction are still not clear. Based on the results of a genome-wide screen, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as common mediators upstream of the activation of the type III PI3 kinase, which is critical for the initiation of autophagy. Furthermore, ROS play an essential function in the induction of the type III PI3 kinase and autophagy in response to amyloid β peptide, the main pathogenic mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, lysosomal blockage also caused by Aβ is independent of ROS. In addition, we demonstrate that autophagy is transcriptionally down-regulated during normal aging in the human brain. Strikingly, in contrast to normal aging, we observe transcriptional up-regulation of autophagy in the brains of AD patients, suggesting that there might be a compensatory regulation of autophagy. Interestingly, we show that an AD drug and an AD drug candidate have inhibitory effects on autophagy, raising the possibility that decreasing input into the lysosomal system may help to reduce cellular stress in AD. Finally, we provide a list of candidate drug targets that can be used to safely modulate levels of autophagy without causing cell death. PMID:20660724

  6. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C.; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D.; Levin, Eli C.; Nagele, Robert G.; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  7. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D; Levin, Eli C; Nagele, Robert G; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses-a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin-were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  8. A Neuroprotective Brain-penetrating Endopeptidase Fusion Protein Ameliorates Alzheimer Disease Pathology and Restores Neurogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Brian; Verma, Inder; Desplats, Paula; Morvinski, Dinorah; Rockenstein, Ed; Adame, Anthony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by widespread neurodegeneration throughout the association cortex and limbic system, deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the neuropil and around the blood vessels, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The endopeptidase neprilysin has been successfully used to reduce the accumulation of Aβ following intracranial viral vector delivery or ex vivo manipulated intracranial delivery. These therapies have relied on direct injections into the brain, whereas a clinically desirable therapy would involve i.v. infusion of a recombinant enzyme. We previously characterized a recombinant neprilysin that contained a 38-amino acid brain-targeting domain. Recombinant cell lines have been generated expressing this brain-targeted enzyme (ASN12). In this report, we characterize the ASN12 recombinant protein for pharmacology in a mouse as well as efficacy in two APPtg mouse models of AD. The recombinant ASN12 transited to the brain with a t½ of 24 h and accumulated to 1.7% of injected dose at 24 h following i.v. delivery. We examined pharmacodynamics in the tg2576 APPtg mouse with the prion promoter APP695 SWE mutation and in the Line41 mThy1 APP751 mutation mouse. Treatment of either APPtg mouse resulted in reduced Aβ, increased neuronal synapses, and improved learning and memory. In addition, the Line41 APPtg mice showed increased levels of C-terminal neuropeptide Y fragments and increased neurogenesis. These results suggest that the recombinant brain-targeted neprilysin, ASN12, may be an effective treatment for AD and warrant further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:24825898

  9. Redox Proteomics Analysis to Decipher the Neurobiology of Alzheimer-like Neurodegeneration: Overlaps in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Swomley, Aaron M.; Head, Elizabeth; Perluigi, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage is a common feature of neurodegeneration that together with mitochondrial dysfunction point to the fact that reactive oxygen species are major contributors to loss of neuronal homeostasis and cell death. Among several targets of oxidative stress, free radical-mediated damage to proteins is particularly important in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In the majority of cases, oxidative stress mediated post-translational modifications cause non-reversible modifications of protein structure that consistently lead to impaired function. Redox proteomics methods are powerful tools to unravel the complexity of neurodegeneration, by identifying brain proteins with oxidative post-translational modifications that are detrimental for protein function. The present review discusses the current literature showing evidence of impaired pathways linked to oxidative stress possibly involved in the neurodegenerative process leading to the development of Alzheimer-like dementia. In particular, we focus attention on dysregulated pathways that underlie neurodegeneration in both aging adults with Down syndrome (DS) and AD. Since AD pathology is age-dependent in DS and shows similarities with AD, identification of common oxidized proteins by redox proteomics in both DS and AD can improve our understanding of the overlapping mechanisms that lead from normal aging to development of AD. The most relevant proteomics findings highlight that disturbance of protein homeostasis and energy production are central mechanisms of neurodegeneration and overlap in aging DS and AD. Protein oxidation impacts crucial intracellular functions and may be considered a “leitmotif” of degenerating neurons. Therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing/reducing multiple components of processes leading to accumulation of oxidative damage will be critical in future studies. PMID:25242166

  10. [Proceeding memory in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Anlló, Eva Ma; Chamorro-Sánchez, Jorge; Díaz-Marta, Juan Poveda; Gil, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Procedural learning can acquire or develop skills through performance and repetition of a task unconsciously or unintentionally. Procedural skills are considered as the cornerstone in the neuropsychological rehabilitation to promote the autonomy of patients with brain damage, as those with Alzheimer's disease. This review presents data about procedural skills in Alzheimer's disease. Over the past three decades, we have found 40 articles studying various procedural skills in the Alzheimer's disease: motor, perceptual-motor, cognitive, perceptual-cognitive and those developed through serial reaction-time paradigm. We analyzed every study evaluating a procedural skill, indicating the used task and preservation or no preservation of procedural learning. Overall, most of the papers published describe conservation of learning procedures or relatively conserved in Alzheimer's disease, which could be used to promote patient autonomy. PMID:24021069

  11. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of urinary tract and other serious infections. Malnutrition or dehydration: People who have Alzheimer’s disease may ... swallow. It’s important to watch for signs of malnutrition. If you think that a loved one might ...

  12. The Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Pathogenesis of Senile Plaques in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Provias, J.; Jeynes, B.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of beta-amyloid [Aβ] within senile plaques [SP] is characteristic of these lesions in Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ42, in particular, in the superior temporal [ST] cortex may result from an inability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) to regulate the trans-endothelial transport and clearance of the amyloid. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein [LRP] and P-glycoprotein [P-gp] facilitate the efflux of Aβ out of the brain, whereas receptor for advanced glycation end products [RAGE] facilitates Aβ influx. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] and endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] may influence the trans-BBB transport of Aβ. In this study we examined ST samples and compared SP burden of all types with the capillary expression of LRP, p-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and e-NOS in samples from 15 control and 15 Alzheimer brains. LRP, P-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries and Aβ42 plaques were quantified and statistical analysis of the nonparametric data was performed using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In the Alzheimer condition P-gp, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries were negatively correlated with SP burden, but LRP and RAGE were positively correlated with SP burden. These results indicate altered BBB function in the pathogenesis of SPs in Alzheimer brains. PMID:25309772

  13. CFH Variants Affect Structural and Functional Brain Changes and Genetic Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Jin; Wu, Huan; Cui, Yue; Bi, Rui; Zhou, He-Jiang; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Dong; Kong, Qing-Peng; Li, Tao; Fang, Yiru; Jiang, Tianzi; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The immune response is highly active in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of genetic risk contributed by immune genes to AD may provide essential insight for the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we performed a genetic screening for AD-related top immune genes identified in Europeans in a Chinese cohort, followed by a multiple-stage study focusing on Complement Factor H (CFH) gene. Effects of the risk SNPs on AD-related neuroimaging endophenotypes were evaluated through magnetic resonance imaging scan, and the effects on AD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) and CFH expression changes were measured in aged and AD brain tissues and AD cellular models. Our results showed that the AD-associated top immune genes reported in Europeans (CR1, CD33, CLU, and TREML2) have weak effects in Chinese, whereas CFH showed strong effects. In particular, rs1061170 (P(meta)=5.0 × 10(-4)) and rs800292 (P(meta)=1.3 × 10(-5)) showed robust associations with AD, which were confirmed in multiple world-wide sample sets (4317 cases and 16 795 controls). Rs1061170 (P=2.5 × 10(-3)) and rs800292 (P=4.7 × 10(-4)) risk-allele carriers have an increased entorhinal thickness in their young age and a higher atrophy rate as the disease progresses. Rs800292 risk-allele carriers have higher CSF tau and Aβ levels and severe cognitive decline. CFH expression level, which was affected by the risk-alleles, was increased in AD brains and cellular models. These comprehensive analyses suggested that CFH is an important immune factor in AD and affects multiple pathological changes in early life and during disease progress. PMID:26243271

  14. Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes-related alterations in brain mitochondria, autophagy and synaptic markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristina; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy in the brain of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. Isolated brain mitochondria and homogenates from cerebral cortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT), triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) and T2D mice were used to evaluate mitochondrial functional parameters and protein levels of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and synaptic integrity markers, respectively. A significant decrease in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and energy levels was observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Also, a significant decrease in the levels of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) and glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) was observed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Moreover, both brain regions of 3xTg-AD mice present lower levels of nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) 1 while the levels of NRF2 are lower in both brain regions of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. A decrease in mitochondrial encoded, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) was also observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice although only statistically significant in T2D cortex. Furthermore, a decrease in the levels of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) in the cerebral cortex of 3xTg-AD mice and in hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice and a decrease in the levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP 25) in the hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice were observed suggesting synaptic integrity loss. These results support the idea that alterations in mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy cause synaptic damage in AD and T2D. PMID:25960150

  15. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD. PMID:27425034

  16. Regulation of complement factor H (CFH) by multiple miRNAs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Alexandrov, Peter N

    2012-08-01

    Human brain cells rely on a specific subset of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) to shape their gene expression patterns, and this is mediated through microRNA effects on messenger RNA (mRNA) speciation and complexity. In recent studies (a) in short post-mortem interval Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissues versus age-matched controls, and (b) in pro-inflammatory cytokine- and Aβ42 peptide-stressed human neuronal-glial (HNG) cells in primary culture, we have identified several brain-abundant miRNA species found to be significantly up-regulated, including miR-125b and miR-146a. Both of these nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-activated, 22 nucleotide small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) target the mRNA of the key, innate-immune- and inflammation-related regulatory protein, complement factor-H (CFH; chr 1q32), resulting in significant decreases in CFH expression (p < 0.01, ANOVA). Our results further indicate that HNG cells respond to IL-1β + Aβ42-peptide-induced stress by significant NF-κB-modulated up-regulation of miRNA-125b- and miRNA-146a. The complex interactive signaling of NF-κB, miR-125b, miR-146a, and perhaps other miRNAs, further illustrate interplay between inducible transcription factors and multiple pro-inflammatory sncRNAs that regulate CFH expression. The novel concept of miRNA actions involving mRNA target convergence and divergence are proposed and discussed. The combinatorial use of NF-кB inhibitors with anti-miRNAs (AMs; antagomirs) may have potential against CFH-driven pathogenic signaling in neurodegenerative disease, and may redirect our therapeutic perspectives to novel treatment strategies that have not yet been considered. PMID:22302353

  17. Brain region-specific monoaminergic correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are present during the disease course of nearly all AD patients and consist of psychosis, agitation/aggression, and depression, among others. Given their detrimental consequences regarding life expectancy, cognition, and socio-economic costs, it is essential to elucidate their neurochemical etiology to facilitate the development of novel and effective pharmacotherapeutics. This study attempted to identify brain region-specific monoaminergic correlates of NPS by measuring the levels of eight monoamines and metabolites in nine relevant postmortem brain regions of 40 behaviorally characterized AD patients, i.e., dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine and their respective metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), using RP-HPLC-ECD. Likewise, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score correlates of monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations were calculated. As a result, MMSE scores, used as a measure of dementia severity, correlated positively with hippocampal 5-HIAA levels as well as with 5-HT levels of the superior temporal gyrus and cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, hippocampal 5-HIAA levels inversely correlated with agitation scores, whereas thalamic MHPG levels comparably did with the presence of hallucinations. Finally, in the cerebellar cortex, DOPAC/DA ratios, indicative of DA turnover, correlated with physically agitated behavior while MHPG levels correlated with affective disturbances. These findings support the assumption that specific NPS features in AD might be (in)directly related to brain region-specific monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations. Additionally, the effect of AD pathology on neurochemical alterations in the cerebellum requires further examination due to its important but underestimated role in the neurochemical pathophysiology of NPS in AD. PMID:24685637

  18. Amyloid Triggers Extensive Cerebral Angiogenesis Causing Blood Brain Barrier Permeability and Hypervascularity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Kaan E.; Dickstein, Dara L.; Gopaul, Rayshad; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity preceding other Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology provides a strong link between cerebrovascular angiopathy and AD. However, the “Vascular hypothesis”, holds that BBB leakiness in AD is likely due to hypoxia and neuroinflammation leading to vascular deterioration and apoptosis. We propose an alternative hypothesis: amyloidogenesis promotes extensive neoangiogenesis leading to increased vascular permeability and subsequent hypervascularization in AD. Cerebrovascular integrity was characterized in Tg2576 AD model mice that overexpress the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) containing the double missense mutations, APPsw, found in a Swedish family, that causes early-onset AD. The expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, occludin and ZO-1, were examined in conjunction with markers of apoptosis and angiogenesis. In aged Tg2576 AD mice, a significant increase in the incidence of disrupted TJs, compared to age matched wild-type littermates and young mice of both genotypes, was directly linked to an increased microvascular density but not apoptosis, which strongly supports amyloidogenic triggered hypervascularity as the basis for BBB disruption. Hypervascularity in human patients was corroborated in a comparison of postmortem brain tissues from AD and controls. Our results demonstrate that amylodogenesis mediates BBB disruption and leakiness through promoting neoangiogenesis and hypervascularity, resulting in the redistribution of TJs that maintain the barrier and thus, provides a new paradigm for integrating vascular remodeling with the pathophysiology observed in AD. Thus the extensive angiogenesis identified in AD brain, exhibits parallels to the neovascularity evident in the pathophysiology of other diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21909359

  19. Ultrasound Delivery of an Anti-Aβ Therapeutic Agent to the Brain in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordão, Jessica F.; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A.; Chopra, Rajiv; McLaurin, JoAnne; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Plaques composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides represent a pathological hallmark in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Aβ oligomers are considered cytotoxic and several therapeutic approaches focus on reducing Aβ load in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. The efficacy of most anti-Aβ agents is significantly limited because they do not cross the blood-brain-barrier. Innovative technologies capable of enhancing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby allowing entry of therapeutic agents into the brain, show great promise in circumventing this problem. The application of low-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of an ultrasound contrast agent causes localized and transient permeability of the blood-brain barrier. We demonstrate the value of this technology for the delivery of anti-Aβ antibodies to the brain of TgCRND8 mice, a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease exhibiting Aβ plaques. BAM-10, an anti-Aβ antibody, was injected into the tail vein simultaneously with exposure to MRI-guided, low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) to one hemisphere of TgCNRD8 mice. Four hours after treatment, antibodies were detected at significant amounts only in the brain of mice receiving FUS in addition to BAM-10. This data provides a proof-of-concept that FUS allows anti-Aβ therapeutics to efficiently enter the brain and target Aβ plaques. Four days following a single treatment with BAM-10 and MRI-guided FUS, a significant decrease in the number of Aβ plaques on the side of the treated hemisphere was observed in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion low-intensity, focused ultrasound is effective in delivering Aβ antibodies to the brain. This technology has the potential to enhance current anti-Aβ treatments by allowing increased exposure of amyloid plaques to treatment agents.

  20. Neuronal LR11 expression does not differentiate between clinically-defined Alzheimer's disease and control brains.

    PubMed

    Sager, Kristen L; Wuu, Joanne; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Mufson, Elliott J; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Because the pathological changes underlying this disease can begin decades prior to the onset of cognitive impairment, identifying the earliest events in the AD pathological cascade has critical implications for both the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We previously reported that compared to autopsy confirmed healthy control brain, expression of LR11 (or SorLA) is markedly reduced in AD brain as well as in a subset of people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a prodromal clinical stage of AD. Recent studies of the LR11 gene SORL1 have suggested that the association between SORL1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and AD risk may not be universal. Therefore, we sought to confirm our earlier findings in a population chosen solely based on clinical criteria, as in most genetic studies. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to measure LR11 expression in 43 cases from the Religious Orders Study that were chosen based on a final pre-mortem clinical diagnosis of MCI, mild/moderate AD or no cognitive impairment (NCI). LR11 expression was highly variable in all three diagnostic groups, with no significant group differences. Low LR11 cases were identified using the lowest tertile of LR11 expression observed across all cases as a threshold. Contrary to previous reports, low LR11 expression was found in only 29% of AD cases. A similar proportion of both the MCI and NCI cases also displayed low LR11 expression. AD-associated lesions were present in the majority of cases regardless of diagnostic group, although we found no association between LR11 levels and pathological variables. These findings suggest that the relationship between LR11 expression and the development of AD may be more complicated than originally believed. PMID:22927900

  1. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  2. Longitudinal Changes in Functional Brain Connectivity Predicts Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Serra, Laura; Cercignani, Mara; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Torso, Mario; Spanò, Barbara; Makovac, Elena; Viola, Vanda; Giulietti, Giovanni; Marra, Camillo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bozzali, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates the modifications in structure and function occurring to typical Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains over a 2-year follow-up, from pre-dementia stages of disease, with the aim of identifying biomarkers of prognostic value. Thirty-one patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment were recruited and followed-up with clinical, neuropsychological, and MRI assessments. Patients were retrospectively classified as AD Converters or Non-Converters, and the data compared between groups. Cross-sectional MRI data at baseline, assessing volume and functional connectivity abnormalities, confirmed previous findings, showing a more severe pattern of regional grey matter atrophy and default-mode network disconnection in Converters than in Non-Converters. Longitudinally, Converters showed more grey matter atrophy in the frontotemporal areas, accompanied by increased connectivity in the precuneus. Discriminant analysis revealed that functional connectivity of the precuneus within the default mode network at baseline is the parameter able to correctly classify patients in Converters and Non-Converters with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. PMID:26890769

  3. Analysis of RNA from Alzheimer's Disease Post-mortem Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Clement, Christian; Hill, James M; Dua, Prerna; Culicchia, Frank; Lukiw, Walter J

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a uniquely human, age-related central nervous system (CNS) disorder for which there is no adequate experimental model. While well over 100 transgenic murine models of AD (TgAD) have been developed that recapitulate many of the neuropathological features of AD, key pathological features of AD such as progressive neuronal atrophy, neuron cell loss, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation have not been observed in any TgAD model to date. To more completely analyze and understand the neuropathology, altered neuro-inflammatory and innate-immune signaling pathways, and the complex molecular-genetics and epigenetics of AD, it is therefore necessary to rigorously examine short post-mortem interval (PMI) human brain tissues to gain a deeper and more thorough insight into the neuropathological mechanisms that characterize the AD process. This perspective-methods paper will highlight some important recent findings on the utilization of short PMI tissues in sporadic (idiopathic; of unknown origin) AD research with focus on the extraction and quantification of RNA, and in particular microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) and analytical strategies, drawing on the authors' combined 125 years of laboratory experience into this investigative research area. We sincerely hope that new investigators in the field of "gene expression analysis in neurological disease" will benefit from the observations presented here and incorporate these recent findings and observations into their future experimental planning and design. PMID:25631714

  4. Memantine and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Fox, Nick C; Barkhof, Frederik; Phul, Ravinder; Lemming, Ole; Scheltens, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of total brain atrophy (TBA) with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using the Brain Boundary Shift Integral (BBSI), in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the course of 52 weeks of treatment with memantine or placebo. This was a multi-national, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose 1-year study. Patients were randomized (1 : 1) to treatment with placebo or memantine. Patients randomized to memantine were up-titrated to the target dose of 20 mg/day over 4 weeks. MRI scans were collected at screening and at Weeks 4, 42, and 52. Secondary efficacy assessments included several cognitive and behavioral scales. 518 patients were screened, 278 patients were randomized, and 217 patients completed the study. In the primary efficacy analysis, the differences in TBA rates between memantine (15.2 mL/year) and placebo (15.3 mL/year) were not statistically significant (-0.04 mL/year [(95% CI: -2.60, 2.52), p = 0.98]). There was a statistically significant correlation between change in TBA and change in most cognitive and behavioral scale scores. Patients who were not treated with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) showed a significantly lower TBA rate than patients treated with AChEIs. Memantine had a placebo-level incidence of adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences between memantine and placebo in total brain or hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with probable AD treated for 1 year. The biological relevance of cerebral atrophy was supported by a significant correlation between rate of atrophy and decline in cognitive and behavioral outcomes. PMID:22269160

  5. Exosomes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Malm, Tarja; Loppi, Sanna; Kanninen, Katja M

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles secreted by most cell types, are found everywhere in the body. The role of exosomes in cellular functions has in the past years developed from being considered little more than cellular trashcans, to being proven important intercellular messengers and notable contributors to both health and in disease. A vast number of studies have revealed the multiple, and somewhat controversial role of exosomes in Alzheimer's disease, the most common neurodegenerative disease. Exosomes have been shown to spread toxic amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau between cells, and they have been suspected of inducing apoptosis and thereby contributing to neuronal loss. On the other hand, exosomes seem to possess the ability to reduce brain amyloid-beta through microglial uptake, and they are known to transfer neuroprotective substances between cells. These features, among many others, make exosomes extremely interesting from the point of view of developing novel therapeutic approaches. The fact that exosomes derived from the central nervous system can be found in bodily fluids also makes them an appealing target for biomarker development, which is not limited only to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27131734

  6. Optical fiber spectroscopy measures perfusion of the brain in a murine Alzheimer's disease model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hyung Jin; Strickland, Sidney; Krueger, James; Gareau, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Optical fiber spectroscopy is a versatile tool for measuring diffuse reflectance and extracting absorption information that can noninvasively quantify the presence of chromophores such as oxyhemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissues. Cerebrovascular abnormalities were widely recognized in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We analyzed blood volume fraction and level of oxygenated hemoglobin in Tg6799 mice, which are transgenic mice expressing five different familial Alzheimer disease-associated mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes. Diffuse reflectance spectra were iteratively fit as weighted sums of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. Our observations showed slightly hypoxic conditions and significantly increased blood volume in the Alzheimer's mice versus wild type. These results suggest that hyperperfusion of our AD mice may be a compensating mechanism for impaired cerebral vascular function and somehow relevant with early stage of AD patients. Ongoing work focuses on developing a cannula fixture that allows measurement in awake, behaving animals.

  7. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations in postmortem brain regions of depressed and aggressive patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-12-01

    Depression and aggression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are 2 of the most severe and prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS). Altered monoaminergic neurotransmitter system functioning has been implicated in both NPS, although their neurochemical etiology remains to be elucidated. Left frozen hemispheres of 40 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients were regionally dissected. Dichotomization based on depression and aggression scores resulted in depressed/nondepressed (AD + D/AD - D) and aggressive/nonaggressive (AD + Agr/AD - Agr) groups. Concentrations of dopamine, serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), and respective metabolites were determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly lower 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and higher homovanillic acid levels were observed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and 10 of AD + D compared with AD - D. In AD + Agr, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in BA9, 5-HIAA to 5-HT ratios in BA11, and MHPG, NE, and 5-HIAA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased compared with AD - Agr. These findings indicate that brain region-specific altered monoamines and metabolites may contribute to the occurrence of depression and aggression in AD. PMID:24997673

  8. Voxel-based Morphometry of Brain MRI in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using structural brain MRI has been widely used for assessment of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). VBM of MRI data comprises segmentation into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid partitions, anatomical standardization of all the images to the same stereotactic space using linear affine transformation and further non-linear warping, smoothing, and finally performing a statistical analysis. Two techniques for VBM are commonly used, optimized VBM using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 2 or SPM5 with non-linear warping based on discrete cosine transforms and SPM8 plus non-linear warping based on diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL). In normal aging, most cortical regions prominently in frontal and insular areas have been reported to show age-related gray matter atrophy. In contrast, specific structures such as amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus have been reported to be preserved in normal aging. On the other hand, VBM studies have demonstrated progression of atrophy mapping upstream to Braak's stages of neurofibrillary tangle deposition in AD. The earliest atrophy takes place in medial temporal structures. Stand-alone VBM software using SPM8 plus DARTEL running on Windows has been newly developed as an adjunct to the clinical assessment of AD. This software provides a Z-score map as a consequence of comparison of a patient's MRI with a normal database. PMID:23423504

  9. Atherosclerotic lesions and mitochondria DNA deletions in brain microvessels: implication in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Gasimov, Eldar; Obrenovich, Mark E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Shenk, Justin C; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis that is primarily responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) appears to involve chronic hypoperfusion. We studied the ultrastructural features of vascular lesions and mitochondria in brain vascular wall cells from human AD biopsy samples and two transgenic mouse models of AD, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and C57B6/SJL Tg (+), which overexpress human amyloid beta precursor protein (AbetaPP). In situ hybridization using probes for normal and 5 kb deleted human and mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was performed along with immunocytochemistry using antibodies against the Abeta peptide processed from AbetaPP, 8-hydroxy-2'-guanosine (8OHG), and cytochrome c oxidase (COX). More amyloid deposition, oxidative stress markers as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions and structural abnormalities were present in the vascular walls of the human AD samples and the AbetaPP-YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+) transgenic mice compared to age-matched controls. Ultrastructural damage in perivascular cells highly correlated with endothelial lesions in all samples. Therefore, pharmacological interventions, directed at correcting the chronic hypoperfusion state, may change the natural course of the development of dementing neurodegeneration. PMID:18827923

  10. Automated Classification to Predict the Progression of Alzheimer's Disease Using Whole-Brain Volumetry and DTI

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won Beom; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study proposes an automated diagnostic method to classify patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) of degenerative etiology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers. Methods Twenty-seven patients with subjective memory impairment (SMI), 18 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 27 patients with AD participated. MRI protocols included three dimensional brain structural imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to assess the cortical thickness, subcortical volume and white matter integrity. Recursive feature elimination based on support vector machine (SVM) was conducted to determine the most relevant features for classifying abnormal regions and imaging parameters, and then a factor analysis for the top-ranked factors was performed. Subjects were classified using nonlinear SVM. Results Medial temporal regions in AD patients were dominantly detected with cortical thinning and volume atrophy compared with SMI and MCI patients. Damage to white matter integrity was also accredited with decreased fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity (MD) across the three groups. The microscopic damage in the subcortical gray matter was reflected in increased MD. Classification accuracy between pairs of groups (SMI vs. MCI, MCI vs. AD, SMI vs. AD) and among all three groups were 84.4% (±13.8), 86.9% (±10.5), 96.3% (±4.6), and 70.5% (±11.5), respectively. Conclusion This proposed method may be a potential tool to diagnose AD pathology with the current clinical criteria. PMID:25670951

  11. Adrenomedullin Expression in Alzheimer's Brain.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana Patricia; Masa, Julia Serrano; Guedan, María Atocha; Futch, Hunter S; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent vasodilator peptide highly expressed throughout the brain and originally isolated from pheochromocytoma cells. In addition to its vasoactive properties, AM is considered a neuromodulator that possesses antiapoptotic and antioxidant properties that suggest that this peptide can protect the brain from damage. In a previous study, we found that AM exerts a neuroprotective action in the brain and that this effect may be mediated by regulation of nitric oxide synthases, matrix metalloproteases, and inflammatory mediators. AM upregulation contributes to neuroprotection, but understanding the precise roles played by AM and its receptor (RAMP2) in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer´s disease (AD), awaits further research. In search of Alzheimer´s biomarkers, the expression levels of peptides with endothelial vasodilatory action, including AM, were found to be significantly altered in mild AD or during pre-dementia stage of mild cognitive impairment. These studies concluded that ratio of AM or its precursor fragment mid-regional proAM in blood hold promise as diagnostic marker for AD. We are now presenting a study regarding the hypothesis that the AMRAMP2 system might be implicated in the pathophysiology of AD. PMID:26923268

  12. Expression and distribution of amyloid precursor protein-like protein-2 in Alzheimer's disease and in normal brain.

    PubMed Central

    Crain, B. J.; Hu, W.; Sze, C. I.; Slunt, H. H.; Koo, E. H.; Price, D. L.; Thinakaran, G.; Sisodia, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid precursor-like protein-2 (APLP-2) belongs to a family of homologous amyloid precursor-like proteins. In the present study we report on the expression and distribution of APLP-2 in fetal and adult human brain and in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that APLP-2 mRNAs encoding isoforms predicted to undergo post-translational modification by chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans are elevated in fetal and aging brains relative to the brains of young adults. Immunocytochemical labeling with APLP-2-specific antibodies demonstrates APLP-2 immunoreactivity in cytoplasmic compartments in neurons and astrocytes, in large part overlapping the distribution of the amyloid precursor protein. In Alzheimer's disease brain, APLP-2 antibodies also label a subset of neuritic plaques. APLP-2 immunoreactivity is particularly conspicuous in large dystrophic neurites that also label with antibodies specific for APP and chromogranin A. In view of the age-dependent increase in levels of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan-modified forms of APLP-2 in aging brain and the accumulation of APLP-2 in dystrophic presynaptic elements, we suggest that APLP-2 may play roles in neuronal sprouting or in the aggregation, deposition, and/or persistence of beta-amyloid deposits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8863657

  13. Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Brain Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Gach, H. Michael; Longstreth, W. T.; Teverovskiy, Leonid; Kuller, Lewis H.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a novel imaging biomarker to assess the associations between physical activity (PA), body mass index (BMI), and brain structure in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD). We studied 963 participants (mean age: 74.1 ± 4.4) from the multi-site Cardiovascular Health Study including healthy controls (n=724), AD (n=104), and MCI (n=135). Volumetric brain images were processed using tensor-based morphometry for analyzing regional brain volumes. We regressed the local brain tissue volume on reported PA and computed BMI, and performed conjunction analyses using both variables. Covariates included age, sex and study site. PA was independently associated with greater whole brain and regional brain volumes, and reduced ventricular dilation. People with higher BMI had lower whole brain and regional brain volumes. A PA-BMI conjunction analysis showed brain preservation with PA and volume loss with increased BMI in overlapping brain regions. In one of the largest voxel-based cross-sectional studies to date, PA and lower BMI may be beneficial to the brain across the spectrum of aging and neurodegeneration. PMID:25248607

  14. Altered whole-brain white matter networks in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Florian Udo; Wolf, Dominik; Scheurich, Armin; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Surrogates of whole-brain white matter (WM) networks reconstructed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are novel markers of structural brain connectivity. Global connectivity of networks has been found impaired in clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to cognitively healthy aging. We hypothesized that network alterations are detectable already in preclinical AD and investigated major global WM network properties. Other structural markers of neurodegeneration typically affected in prodromal AD but seeming largely unimpaired in preclinical AD were also examined. 12 cognitively healthy elderly with preclinical AD as classified by florbetapir-PET (mean age 73.4 ± 4.9) and 31 age-matched controls without cerebral amyloidosis (mean age 73.1 ± 6.7) from the ADNI were included. WM networks were reconstructed from DTI using tractography and graph theory. Indices of network capacity and the established imaging markers of neurodegeneration hippocampal volume, and cerebral glucose utilization as measured by fludeoxyglucose-PET were compared between the two groups. Additionally, we measured surrogates of global WM integrity (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, volume). We found an increase of shortest path length and a decrease of global efficiency in preclinical AD. These results remained largely unchanged when controlling for WM integrity. In contrast, neither markers of neurodegeneration nor WM integrity were altered in preclinical AD subjects. Our results suggest an impairment of WM networks in preclinical AD that is detectable while other structural imaging markers do not yet indicate incipient neurodegeneration. Moreover, these findings are specific to WM networks and cannot be explained by other surrogates of global WM integrity. PMID:26288751

  15. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator. PMID:26414955

  16. Pomegranate from Oman Alleviates the Brain Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Braidy, Nady; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Pomegranates (石榴 Shí Liú) contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances, as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Here, the effects of the antioxidant-rich pomegranate fruit grown in Oman on brain oxidative stress status were tested in the AD transgenic mouse. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice were fed with 4% pomegranate or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress was found in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls. Concomitantly, decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes was observed in Tg2576 mice treated with control diet. Supplementation with 4% pomegranate attenuated oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), and Glutathione S transferase (GST)]. The activities of membrane-bound enzymes [Na+ K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] were altered in the brain regions of Tg2576 mouse treated with control diet, and 4% pomegranate supplementation was able to restore the activities of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. The results suggest that the therapeutic potential of 4% pomegranate in the treatment of AD might be associated with counteracting the oxidative stress by the presence of active phytochemicals in it. PMID:25379464

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Precipitates Cognitive Impairment and Extracellular Aβ Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Toru; Arendash, Gary W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many American soldiers, even those undiagnosed but likely suffering from mild TBI, display Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like cognitive impairments, suggesting a pathological overlap between TBI and AD. This study examined the cognitive and neurohistological effects of TBI in presymptomatic APP/PS1 AD-transgenic mice. AD mice and non-transgenic (NT) mice received an experimental TBI on the right parietal cortex using the controlled cortical impact model. Animals were trained in a water maze task for spatial memory before TBI, and then reevaluated in the same task at two and six weeks post-TBI. The results showed that AD mice with TBI made significantly more errors in the task than AD mice without TBI and NT mice regardless of TBI. A separate group of AD mice and NT mice were evaluated neurohistologically at six weeks after TBI. The number of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ)-deposits significantly increased by at least one fold in the cortex of AD mice that received TBI compared to the NT mice that received TBI or the AD and NT mice that underwent sham surgery. A significant decrease in MAP2 positive cells, indicating neuronal loss, was observed in the cortex of both the AD and NT mice that received TBI compared to the AD and NT mice subjected to sham surgery. Similar changes in extracellular Aβ deposits and MAP2 positive cells were also seen in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate for the first time that TBI precipitates cognitive impairment in presymptomatic AD mice, while also confirming extracellular Aβ deposits following TBI. The recognition of this pathological link between TBI and AD should aid in developing novel treatments directed at abrogating cellular injury and extracellular Aβ deposition in the brain. PMID:24223856

  18. Traumatic brain injury precipitates cognitive impairment and extracellular Aβ aggregation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Kellogg, S Leilani; Shimizu, Toru; Arendash, Gary W; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many American soldiers, even those undiagnosed but likely suffering from mild TBI, display Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like cognitive impairments, suggesting a pathological overlap between TBI and AD. This study examined the cognitive and neurohistological effects of TBI in presymptomatic APP/PS1 AD-transgenic mice. AD mice and non-transgenic (NT) mice received an experimental TBI on the right parietal cortex using the controlled cortical impact model. Animals were trained in a water maze task for spatial memory before TBI, and then reevaluated in the same task at two and six weeks post-TBI. The results showed that AD mice with TBI made significantly more errors in the task than AD mice without TBI and NT mice regardless of TBI. A separate group of AD mice and NT mice were evaluated neurohistologically at six weeks after TBI. The number of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ)-deposits significantly increased by at least one fold in the cortex of AD mice that received TBI compared to the NT mice that received TBI or the AD and NT mice that underwent sham surgery. A significant decrease in MAP2 positive cells, indicating neuronal loss, was observed in the cortex of both the AD and NT mice that received TBI compared to the AD and NT mice subjected to sham surgery. Similar changes in extracellular Aβ deposits and MAP2 positive cells were also seen in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate for the first time that TBI precipitates cognitive impairment in presymptomatic AD mice, while also confirming extracellular Aβ deposits following TBI. The recognition of this pathological link between TBI and AD should aid in developing novel treatments directed at abrogating cellular injury and extracellular Aβ deposition in the brain. PMID:24223856

  19. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study

  20. Brain Substrates of Learning and Retention in Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis and Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Bondi, Mark W.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K.; Hagler, Donald J., Jr.; Jacobson, Mark W.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the underlying qualitative features of memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can provide critical information for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study sought to investigate the utility of both learning and retention measures in (a) the diagnosis of MCI, (b) predicting progression to AD, and (c)…

  1. Recent advances in the neuroimmunology of cell-surface CNS autoantibody syndromes, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Needham, Ed; Zandi, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    In this update, we review recent advances in antibody-associated disorders of the central nervous system, and the immune mechanisms which may contribute to Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia. The field of neuroimmunology is rapidly developing and has concerned itself with an expanding portfolio of diseases. The core neuroimmunological diseases remain, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, primary inflammatory and antibody-associated disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system (including Myasthenia Gravis and other disorders of neuromuscular junction and muscle, paraneoplastic syndromes, paraproteinaemic neuropathies), and the neurological involvement seen in systemic inflammatory diseases including lupus, sarcoidosis and vasculitis. But it is increasingly realised that immune mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain disease and psychiatric diseases including schizophrenia and depression. These common and devastating disorders, often without effective disease-modifying therapies, are yet to be seen in a conventional neuroimmunology clinic, but the immune mechanisms identified have encouraged research into novel therapeutic approaches for them. PMID:25182699

  2. Brain gene expression patterns differentiate Mild Cognitive Impairment from normal Aged and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Nicole C.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beach, Thomas G.; Kim, Ronald C.; Cribbs, David H.; Cotman, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a cognitive state intermediate between normal aging and early Alzheimer Disease (AD). To investigate if the molecular signature of MCI parallels the clinical picture, we use microarrays to extensively profile gene expression in 4 cortical brain regions (entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, superior frontal gyrus, post-central gyrus) using post-mortem tissue from cognitively normal aged controls, MCI, and AD cases. Our data reveal that gene expression patterns in MCI are not an extension of aging, and for the most part, are not intermediate between aged controls and AD. Functional enrichment analysis of significant genes revealed prominent upregulation in MCI brains of genes associated with anabolic and biosynthetic pathways (notably transcription, protein biosynthesis, protein trafficking and turnover) as well as mitochondrial energy generation. In addition, many synaptic genes showed altered expression in MCI, predominantly upregulation, including genes for central components of the vesicle fusion machinery at the synapse, synaptic vesicle trafficking, neurotransmitter receptors, and synaptic structure and stabilization. These data suggest that there is a rebalancing of synaptic transmission in the MCI brain. To investigate if synaptic gene expression levels in MCI were related to cognitive function, Pearson’s correlation coefficient between MMSE and region-specific mRNA expression were computed for MCI cases. A number of synaptic genes showed strong significant correlations (r>0.8, p<0.01) most notably in the EC, with fewer in the HC, and very few in neocortical regions. The synaptic genes with highly significant correlations were predominantly related to synaptic transmission and plasticity, and myelin composition. Unexpectedly, we found that gene expression changes that facilitate synaptic excitability and plasticity were overwhelmingly associated with poorer MMSE, and conversely that gene expression changes that inhibit

  3. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  4. Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid-β Links Lens and Brain Pathology in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Suqian; Burton, Mark A.; Ghosh, Joy G.; Ericsson, Maria; Soscia, Stephanie J.; Mocofanescu, Anca; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Robb, Richard M.; Kuszak, Jer R.; Clark, John I.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Hunter, David G.; Goldstein, Lee E.

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21) encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid precursor protein (APP). Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Aβ accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Aβ pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Aβ accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Aβ aggregates (∼5 to 50 nm) identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Aβ in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Aβ with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Aβ accumulation as a key pathogenic

  5. Impairment of biliverdin reductase-A promotes brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer disease: A new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Di Domenico, Fabio; Cassano, Tommaso; Arena, Andrea; Tramutola, Antonella; Lavecchia, Michele Angelo; Coccia, Raffaella; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies suggest a link between peripheral insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction. Interestingly, post-mortem analyses of Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects demonstrated insulin resistance in the brain proposing a role for cognitive deficits observed in AD. However, the mechanisms responsible for the onset of brain insulin resistance (BIR) need further elucidations. Biliverdin reductase-A (BVR-A) emerged as a unique Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase directly involved in the insulin signaling and represents an up-stream regulator of the insulin signaling cascade. Because we previously demonstrated the oxidative stress (OS)-induced impairment of BVR-A in human AD brain, we hypothesize that BVR-A dysregulation could be associated with the onset of BIR in AD. In the present work, we longitudinally analyze the age-dependent changes of (i) BVR-A protein levels and activation, (ii) total oxidative stress markers levels (PC, HNE, 3-NT) as well as (iii) IR/IRS1 levels and activation in the hippocampus of the triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Furthermore, ad hoc experiments have been performed in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to clarify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying changes observed in mice. Our results show that OS-induced impairment of BVR-A kinase activity is an early event, which starts prior the accumulation of Aβ and tau pathology or the elevation of TNF-α, and that greatly contribute to the onset of BIR along the progression of AD pathology in 3xTg-Ad mice. Based on these evidence we, therefore, propose a new paradigm for which: OS-induced impairment of BVR-A is firstly responsible for a sustained activation of IRS1, which then causes the stimulation of negative feedback mechanisms (i.e. mTOR) aimed to turn-off IRS1 hyper-activity and thus BIR. Similar alterations characterize also the normal aging process in mice, positing BVR-A impairment as a possible bridge in the transition from normal aging to AD. PMID:26698666

  6. Brain structure and function related to cognitive reserve variables in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Bartrés-Faz, David; Junqué, Carme; Vendrell, Pere; Rami, Lorena; Clemente, Imma C; Bosch, Beatriu; Villar, Amparo; Bargalló, Núria; Jurado, M Angeles; Barrios, Maite; Molinuevo, Jose Luis

    2009-07-01

    Cognitive reserve (CR) is the brain's capacity to cope with cerebral damage to minimize clinical manifestations. The 'passive model' considers head or brain measures as anatomical substrates of CR, whereas the 'active model' emphasizes the use of brain networks effectively. Sixteen healthy subjects, 12 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 16 cases with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) were included to investigate the relationships between proxies of CR and cerebral measures considered in the 'passive' and 'active' models. CR proxies were inferred premorbid IQ (WAIS Vocabulary test), 'education-occupation', a questionnaire of intellectual and social activities and a composite CR measure. MRI-derived whole-brain volumes and brain activity by functional MRI during a visual encoding task were obtained. Among healthy elders, higher CR was related to larger brains and reduced activity during cognitive processing, suggesting more effective use of cerebral networks. In contrast, higher CR was associated with reduced brain volumes in MCI and AD and increased brain function in the latter, indicating more advanced neuropathology but that active compensatory mechanisms are still at work in higher CR patients. The right superior temporal gyrus (BA 22) and the left superior parietal lobe (BA 7) showed greatest significant differences in direction of slope with CR and activation between controls and AD cases. Finally, a regression analysis revealed that fMRI patterns were more closely related to CR proxies than brain volumes. Overall, inverse relationships for healthy and pathological aging groups emerged between brain structure and function and CR variables. PMID:18053618

  7. Micronutrients and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Staehelin, Hannes B

    2005-11-01

    The current high life expectancy is overshadowed by neurodegenerative illnesses that lead to dementia and dependence. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common of these conditions, and is considered to be a proteinopathy, with amyloid-beta42 as a key factor, leading via a cascade of events to neurodegeneration. Major factors involved are oxidative stress, perturbed Ca homeostasis and impaired energy metabolism. Protection against oxidative stress by micronutrients (including secondary bioactive substances) has been shown in transgenic Alzheimer model systems to delay AD. Epidemiological evidence is less conclusive, but the vast majority of the evidence supports a protective effect on cognitive functions in old age and AD. Thus, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but also containing meat and fish is the most suitable to provide adequate micronutrients. The strong link between cardiovascular risk and AD may be explained by common pathogenetic mechanisms mediated, for example, by homocysteine and thus dependant on B-vitamins (folate and vitamins B(12) and B(6)). However, micronutrients may also be harmful. The high affinity of amyloid for metals (Fe, Al and Zn) favours the generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers an inflammatory response. Micronutrients in a balanced diet have a long-lasting, albeit low, protective impact on brain aging, hence prevention should be life long. PMID:16313699

  8. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity. PMID:24164734

  9. Brain neural synchronization and functional coupling in Alzheimer's disease as revealed by resting state EEG rhythms.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Marzano, Nicola; Capotosto, Paolo; Soricelli, Andrea; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Cordone, Susanna; Gesualdo, Loreto; Del Percio, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of neurodegenerative disorder, typically causing dementia along aging. AD is mainly characterized by a pathological extracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides that affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, inducing aberrant patterns in neuronal circuits. Growing evidence shows that AD targets cortical neuronal networks related to cognitive functions including episodic memory and visuospatial attention. This is partially reflected by the abnormal mechanisms of cortical neural synchronization and coupling that generate resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. The cortical neural synchronization is typically indexed by EEG power density. The EEG coupling between electrode pairs probes functional (inter-relatedness of EEG signals) and effective (casual effect from one over the other electrode) connectivity. The former is typically indexed by synchronization likelihood (linear and nonlinear) or spectral coherence (linear), the latter by granger causality or information theory indexes. Here we reviewed literature concerning EEG studies in condition of resting state in AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects as a window on abnormalities of the cortical neural synchronization and functional and effective connectivity. Results showed abnormalities of the EEG power density at specific frequency bands (<12Hz) in the MCI and AD populations, associated with an altered functional and effective EEG connectivity among long range cortical networks (i.e. fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal). These results suggest that resting state EEG rhythms reflect the abnormal cortical neural synchronization and coupling in the brain of prodromal and overt AD subjects, possibly reflecting dysfunctional neuroplasticity of the neural transmission in long range cortical networks. PMID:25660305

  10. Stroke risk interacts with Alzheimer's disease biomarkers on brain aging outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Timothy J; Samuels, Lauren R; Liu, Dandan; Gifford, Katherine A; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Benson, Elleena M; Abel, Ty; Ruberg, Frederick L; Jefferson, Angela L

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers and stroke risk factors independently predict cognitive impairment, likely through independent disease pathways. However, limited work has sought to describe the dynamic interplay between these important risk factors. This article evaluated the interaction between stroke risk and AD biomarkers on hippocampal volume and cognitive performance. We first evaluated the interaction between stroke risk factors and AD biomarkers using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, n = 1202). We then extended our findings to an independent autopsy data set from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC, n = 1122) using measures of AD pathology. Stroke risk was quantified using the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile. In ADNI, stroke risk interacted with tau and amyloid levels in relation to baseline and longitudinal cognitive performance. Similarly, in NACC, stroke risk interacted with amyloid and tau positivity on cognitive performance. The effect of stroke risk factors on cognition was strongest in the absence of AD biomarkers or neuropathology, providing additional evidence that AD biomarkers and stroke risk factors relate to cognition through independent pathways. PMID:26119224

  11. Antioxidants for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, Douglas R.; Peskind, Elaine; Clark, Christopher M.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Ringman, John M.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Cotman, Carl; Cottrell, Barbara; Montine, Thomas J.; Thomas, Ronald G.; Aisen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether antioxidant supplements presumed to target specific cellular compartments affected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Design Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting Academic medical centers. Participants Subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. Intervention Random assignment to treatment for 16 weeks with 800 IU/d of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) plus 500 mg/d of vitamin C plus 900 mg/d of α-lipoic acid (E/C/ALA); 400 mg of coenzyme Q 3 times/d; or placebo. Main Outcome Measures Changes from baseline to 16 weeks in CSF biomarkers related to Alzheimer disease and oxidative stress, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), and function (Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale). Results Seventy-eight subjects were randomized; 66 provided serial CSF specimens adequate for biochemical analyses. Study drugs were well tolerated, but accelerated decline in Mini-Mental State Examination scores occurred in the E/C/ALA group, a potential safety concern. Changes in CSF Aβ42, tau, and P-tau181 levels did not differ between the 3 groups. Cerebrospinal fluid F2-isoprostane levels, an oxidative stress biomarker, decreased on average by 19% from baseline to week 16 in the E/C/ALA group but were unchanged in the other groups. Conclusions Antioxidants did not influence CSF biomarkers related to amyloid or tau pathology. Lowering of CSF F2-isoprostane levels in the E/C/ALA group suggests reduction of oxidative stress in the brain. However, this treatment raised the caution of faster cognitive decline, which would need careful assessment if longer-term clinical trials are conducted. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00117403 PMID:22431837

  12. Age-associated changes of brain copper, iron, and zinc in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stewart F; Nasaruddin, Muhammad Bin; Carey, Manus; Holscher, Christian; McGuinness, Bernadette; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth; Passmore, Peter; Elliott, Christopher T; Meharg, Andrew A; Green, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Disease-, age-, and gender-associated changes in brain copper, iron, and zinc were assessed in postmortem neocortical tissue (Brodmann area 7) from patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 14), severe AD (n = 28), dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 15), and normal age-matched control subjects (n = 26). Copper was lower (20%; p < 0.001) and iron higher (10-16%; p < 0.001) in severe AD compared with controls. Intriguingly significant Group*Age interactions were observed for both copper and iron, suggesting gradual age-associated decline of these metals in healthy non-cognitively impaired individuals. Zinc was unaffected in any disease pathologies and no age-associated changes were apparent. Age-associated changes in brain elements warrant further investigation. PMID:25024342

  13. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain have shrunk (above right). Understanding Alzheimer's–Free Videos Can Help The NIHSeniorHealth Web site ( www.nihseniorhealth.gov ) offers a collection of free instructional videos to help the public understand Alzheimer's disease, how ...

  14. Can ketones compensate for deteriorating brain glucose uptake during aging? Implications for the risk and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Vandenberghe, Camille; Pierotti, Tyler; Fortier, Mélanie; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    Brain glucose uptake is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key question is whether cognitive decline can be delayed if this brain energy defect is at least partly corrected or bypassed early in the disease. The principal ketones (also called ketone bodies), β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, are the brain's main physiological alternative fuel to glucose. Three studies in mild-to-moderate AD have shown that, unlike with glucose, brain ketone uptake is not different from that in healthy age-matched controls. Published clinical trials demonstrate that increasing ketone availability to the brain via moderate nutritional ketosis has a modest beneficial effect on cognitive outcomes in mild-to-moderate AD and in mild cognitive impairment. Nutritional ketosis can be safely achieved by a high-fat ketogenic diet, by supplements providing 20-70 g/day of medium-chain triglycerides containing the eight- and ten-carbon fatty acids octanoate and decanoate, or by ketone esters. Given the acute dependence of the brain on its energy supply, it seems reasonable that the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at AD mandates consideration of how the underlying problem of deteriorating brain fuel supply can be corrected or delayed. PMID:26766547

  15. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26946341

  16. [Brain imaging of Alzheimer' disease: state of the art and perspectives for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Trombella, Sara; Assal, Frédéric; Zekry, Dina; Gold, Gabriel; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Garibotto, Valentina; Démonet, Jean-François; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-04-20

    To improve the clinical detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) new diagnostic criteria have been proposed, based on biomarkers of synaptic dysfunction, AD-related neurodegeneration, and Aβ cerebral amyloidosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and position emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging can be configured as powerful means for the detection of medial-temporal atrophy, reduced uptake of 18F-FDG PET or and increased retention of Aβ amyloid protein by amyloïd-PET. In this review, we will discuss these promising techniques that allow assessing in vivo AD pathology and help clinicians to better diagnose and follow-up patients, particularly in clinical trials using disease-modifying treatments. PMID:27276723

  17. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research.

  18. Differences in and correlations between cognitive abilities and brain volumes in healthy control, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer disease groups.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Baek, Ji-Hye; Gim, Seon-Young; Choi, Young Chil; Lee, Beob-Yi; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Boseong

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in and correlations between cognitive abilities and brain volumes in healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) groups. The Korean Version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD-K), which is used to diagnose AD, was used to measure the cognitive abilities of the study subjects, and the volumes of typical brain components related to AD diagnosis-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM)-were acquired. Of the CERAD-K subtests, the Boston Naming Test distinguished significantly among the HC, MCI, and AD groups. GM and WM volumes differed significantly among the three groups. There was a significant positive correlation between Boston Naming Test scores and GM and WM volumes. In conclusion, the Boston Naming Test and GM and WM brain volumes differentiated the three tested groups accurately, and there were strong correlations between Boston Naming Test scores and GM and WM volumes. These results will help to establish a test method that differentiates the three groups accurately and is economically feasible. Clin. Anat. 29:473-480, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26710236

  19. Reducing iron in the brain: a novel pharmacologic mechanism of huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Tian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; He, Xuan; Gong, Qi; Wu, Ka-Chun; Jiang, Li-Rong; Lu, Li-Na; Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2014-05-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase derived from a plant, is a licensed anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United States. In addition to acting as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, HupA possesses neuroprotective properties. However, the relevant mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that the neuroprotective effect of HupA was derived from a novel action on brain iron regulation. HupA treatment reduced insoluble and soluble beta amyloid levels, ameliorated amyloid plaques formation, and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic AD mice. Also, HupA decreased beta amyloid oligomers and amyloid precursor protein levels, and increased A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease Domain 10 (ADAM10) expression in these treated AD mice. However, these beneficial effects of HupA were largely abolished by feeding the animals with a high iron diet. In parallel, we found that HupA decreased iron content in the brain and demonstrated that HupA also has a role to reduce the expression of transferrin-receptor 1 as well as the transferrin-bound iron uptake in cultured neurons. The findings implied that reducing iron in the brain is a novel mechanism of HupA in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24332448

  20. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about ... time Thoughts about death or suicide What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common type ...

  1. Treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Bradford T; Onysko, Mary K; Stob, Christian M; Hazlewood, Kathleen A

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly one-half [corrected] of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among the pathologic manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Although there are no proven modalities for preventing Alzheimer disease, hypertension treatment, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, physical activity, and cognitive engagement demonstrate modest potential. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are first-line medications for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, and are associated with mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living; however, the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. The most common adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. Short-term use of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine can modestly improve measures of cognition, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer disease. Memantine can also be used in combination with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Memantine is generally well tolerated, but whether its benefits produce clinically meaningful improvement is controversial. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can slow the progression of Alzheimer disease, no pharmacologic agents can reverse the progression. Atypical antipsychotics can improve some behavioral symptoms, but have been associated with increased mortality rates in older patients with dementia. There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of selegiline, testosterone, and ginkgo for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. There is no evidence supporting the beneficial effects of vitamin E, estrogen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy. PMID:21671540

  2. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L.; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D.; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Carlson, George A.; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K.; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P.; Müller, Daniel J.; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development. PMID:26458742

  3. Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the fornix for Alzheimer's disease: surgical safety in the ADvance trial.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Francisco A; Asaad, Wael F; Foote, Kelly D; Anderson, William S; Rees Cosgrove, G; Baltuch, Gordon H; Beasley, Kara; Reymers, Donald E; Oh, Esther S; Targum, Steven D; Smith, Gwenn S; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This report describes the stereotactic technique, hospitalization, and 90-day perioperative safety of bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the fornix in patients who underwent DBS for the treatment of mild, probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS The ADvance Trial is a multicenter, 12-month, double-blind, randomized, controlled feasibility study being conducted to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of DBS of the fornix in patients with mild, probable AD. Intraoperative and perioperative data were collected prospectively. All patients underwent postoperative MRI. Stereotactic analyses were performed in a blinded fashion by a single surgeon. Adverse events (AEs) were reported to an independent clinical events committee and adjudicated to determine the relationship between the AE and the study procedure. RESULTS Between June 6, 2012, and April 28, 2014, a total of 42 patients with mild, probable AD were treated with bilateral fornix DBS (mean age 68.2 ± 7.8 years; range 48.0-79.7 years; 23 men and 19 women). The mean planned target coordinates were x = 5.2 ± 1.0 mm (range 3.0-7.9 mm), y = 9.6 ± 0.9 mm (range 8.0-11.6 mm), z = -7.5 ± 1.2 mm (range -5.4 to -10.0 mm), and the mean postoperative stereotactic radial error on MRI was 1.5 ± 1.0 mm (range 0.2-4.0 mm). The mean length of hospitalization was 1.4 ± 0.8 days. Twenty-six (61.9%) patients experienced 64 AEs related to the study procedure, of which 7 were serious AEs experienced by 5 patients (11.9%). Four (9.5%) patients required return to surgery: 2 patients for explantation due to infection, 1 patient for lead repositioning, and 1 patient for chronic subdural hematoma. No patients experienced neurological deficits as a result of the study, and no deaths were reported. CONCLUSIONS Accurate targeting of DBS to the fornix without direct injury to it is feasible across surgeons and treatment centers. At 90 days after surgery, bilateral fornix DBS was well tolerated by patients with

  4. Inflammation, Microglia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Brent; Landreth, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia are the brain's tissue macrophage and representative of the innate immune system. These cells normally provide tissue maintenance and immune surveillance of the brain. In the Alzheimer's disease brain amyloid deposition provokes the phenotypic activation of microglia and their elaboration of proinflammatory molecules. Recent work has implicated Toll-like receptors in microglial recognition and response to amyloid fibrils. It is now evident that these cells exhibit more complex and heterogeneous phenotypes than previously appreciated that reflect both the plasticity of cells in this lineage and their ability to transition between activation states. The phenotypic diversity is associated with inactivation of the inflammatory response and tissue repair. We discuss recent evidence that the brain can be infiltrated by circulating monocytes in the diseased brain and that these cells may comprise a unique subpopulation of myeloid cells that may be functionally distinct from the endogenous microglia. PMID:19833208

  5. Alzheimer's disease: neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in human brain identified by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Lin-P'ing; Jackson, Michael; Halliday, William C.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1994-01-01

    The abnormal abundance of (beta) -amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Human central nervous system (CNS) grey matter was probed for characteristics arising from these pathological features. In AD but not normal grey matter, an IR band at 1615 cm-1 is seen, characteristic of a protein in an aggregated state. We speculate that this band arises from (beta) A4-amyloid protein. AD, and 18q- grey matter spectra show increased intensity of phosphate bands in accordance with known hyperphosphorylation of proteins found in neurofibrillary tangles. These spectral features may be useful in the diagnosis of AD.

  6. p75NTR ectodomain is a physiological neuroprotective molecule against amyloid-beta toxicity in the brain of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, X-Q; Jiao, S-S; Saadipour, K; Zeng, F; Wang, Q-H; Zhu, C; Shen, L-L; Zeng, G-H; Liang, C-R; Wang, J; Liu, Y-H; Hou, H-Y; Xu, X; Su, Y-P; Fan, X-T; Xiao, H-L; Lue, L-F; Zeng, Y-Q; Giunta, B; Zhong, J-H; Walker, D G; Zhou, H-D; Tan, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2015-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neurodegenerative signals such as amyloid-beta (Aβ) and the precursors of neurotrophins, outbalance neurotrophic signals, causing synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR) is a receptor of Aβ and mediates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative signals. The shedding of its ectodomain from the cell surface is physiologically regulated; however, the function of the diffusible p75NTR ectodomain (p75ECD) after shedding remains largely not known. Here, we show that p75ECD levels in cerebrospinal fluid and in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice were significantly reduced, due to inhibition of the sheddase-tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme by Aβ. Restoration of p75ECD to the normal level by brain delivery of the gene encoding human p75ECD before or after Aβ deposition in the brain of APP/PS1 mice reversed the behavioral deficits and AD-type pathologies, such as Aβ deposit, apoptotic events, neuroinflammation, Tau phosphorylation and loss of dendritic spine, neuronal structures and synaptic proteins. Furthermore, p75ECD can also reduce amyloidogenesis by suppressing β-secretase expression and activities. Our data demonstrate that p75ECD is a physiologically neuroprotective molecule against Aβ toxicity and would be a novel therapeutic target and biomarker for AD. PMID:25917367

  7. p75NTR ectodomain is a physiological neuroprotective molecule against amyloid-beta toxicity in the brain of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X-Q; Jiao, S-S; Saadipour, K; Zeng, F; Wang, Q-H; Zhu, C; Shen, L-L; Zeng, G-H; Liang, C-R; Wang, J; Liu, Y-H; Hou, H-Y; Xu, X; Su, Y-P; Fan, X-T; Xiao, H-L; Lue, L-F; Zeng, Y-Q; Giunta, B; Zhong, J-H; Walker, D G; Zhou, H-D; Tan, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neurodegenerative signals such as amyloid-beta (Aβ) and the precursors of neurotrophins, outbalance neurotrophic signals, causing synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR) is a receptor of Aβ and mediates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative signals. The shedding of its ectodomain from the cell surface is physiologically regulated; however, the function of the diffusible p75NTR ectodomain (p75ECD) after shedding remains largely not known. Here, we show that p75ECD levels in cerebrospinal fluid and in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice were significantly reduced, due to inhibition of the sheddase-tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme by Aβ. Restoration of p75ECD to the normal level by brain delivery of the gene encoding human p75ECD before or after Aβ deposition in the brain of APP/PS1 mice reversed the behavioral deficits and AD-type pathologies, such as Aβ deposit, apoptotic events, neuroinflammation, Tau phosphorylation and loss of dendritic spine, neuronal structures and synaptic proteins. Furthermore, p75ECD can also reduce amyloidogenesis by suppressing β-secretase expression and activities. Our data demonstrate that p75ECD is a physiologically neuroprotective molecule against Aβ toxicity and would be a novel therapeutic target and biomarker for AD. PMID:25917367

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160137.html Deep Brain Stimulation Tested for Early Alzheimer's Although treatment seems ... 2016 THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Deep brain stimulation appears safe for people with early Alzheimer's ...

  9. Neuronutrition and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balenahalli N.; Rao, T.S. Sathyanarayana; Prakasam, Annamalai; Sambamurti, Kumar; Rao, K.S. Jagannatha

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurological disorder with several unequivocally identified genetic risk factors. Among the several environmental factors proposed for AD, dietary protective and risk factors have been most compelling. In particular, diets rich in saturated fatty acids and alcohol, and deficient in antioxidants and vitamins appear to promote the onset of the disease, while diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants, and wine likely suppress its onset. Evidence suggests that diets rich in polyphenols and some spices suppress the onset of AD by scavenging free radicals and preventing oxidative damage. Metal ions are known to catalyze the production of free radicals and induce mental retardation or dementia. Several studies have also identified metals such as Pb, Fe, Al, Cu and Zn in AD pathogenesis. While specific chelators have been tested for therapy, they have not been very successful probably due to late administration after brain damage has been triggered. Since several dietary polyphenols are known to chelate metals, their routine use may also be protective against the onset of AD. PMID:20308778

  10. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Unwin, Richard D; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. PMID:26957286

  11. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J.; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Unwin, Richard D.; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. PMID:26957286

  12. Brain in situ hybridization maps as a source for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks: Alzheimer's disease insights.

    PubMed

    Acquaah-Mensah, George K; Taylor, Ronald C

    2016-07-15

    Microarray data have been a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes. As an example, brain region-specific transcriptional regulatory events have the potential of providing etiological insights into Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, there is often a paucity of suitable brain-region specific expression data obtained via microarrays or other high throughput means. The Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization (ISH) data sets (Jones et al., 2009) represent a potentially valuable alternative source of high-throughput brain region-specific gene expression data for such purposes. In this study, Allen Brain Atlas mouse ISH data in the hippocampal fields were extracted, focusing on 508 genes relevant to neurodegeneration. Transcriptional regulatory networks were learned using three high-performing network inference algorithms. Only 17% of regulatory edges from a network reverse-engineered based on brain region-specific ISH data were also found in a network constructed upon gene expression correlations in mouse whole brain microarrays, thus showing the specificity of gene expression within brain sub-regions. Furthermore, the ISH data-based networks were used to identify instructive transcriptional regulatory relationships. Ncor2, Sp3 and Usf2 form a unique three-party regulatory motif, potentially affecting memory formation pathways. Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 emerge among regulators of genes involved in AD (e.g. Dhcr24, Aplp2, Tia1, Pdrx1, Vdac1, and Syn2). Further, Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 are sensitive to dietary factors and could be among links between dietary influences and genes in the AD etiology. Thus, this approach of harnessing brain region-specific ISH data represents a rare opportunity for gleaning unique etiological insights for diseases such as AD. PMID:27050105

  13. Region-specific metabolic alterations in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, but its etiology is still not completely understood. The identification of underlying pathological mechanisms is becoming increasingly important for the discovery of biomarkers and therapies, for which metabolomics presents a great potential. In this work, we studied metabolic alterations in different brain regions of the APP/PS1 mice by using a high-throughput metabolomic approach based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistics showed that metabolomic perturbations are widespread, affecting mainly the hippocampus and the cortex, but are also present in regions not primarily associated with AD such as the striatum, cerebellum and olfactory bulbs. Multiple metabolic pathways could be linked to the development of AD-type disorders in this mouse model, including abnormal purine metabolism, bioenergetic failures, dyshomeostasis of amino acids and disturbances in membrane lipids, among others. Interestingly, region-specific alterations were observed for some of the potential markers identified, associated with abnormal fatty acid composition of phospholipids and sphingomyelins, or differential regulation of neurotransmitter amino acids (e.g. glutamate, glycine, serine, N-acetyl-aspartate), not previously described to our knowledge. Therefore, these findings could provide a new insight into brain pathology in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25281826

  14. Algebraic connectivity of brain networks shows patterns of segregation leading to reduced network robustness in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Nir, Talia M.; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Bernstein, Matthew A.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of network topology and connectivity aid the understanding of network breakdown as the brain degenerates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed 3-Tesla diffusion-weighted images from 202 patients scanned by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative – 50 healthy controls, 72 with early- and 38 with late-stage mild cognitive impairment (eMCI/lMCI) and 42 with AD. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural connectivity networks representing connections between pairs of cortical regions. We examined, for the first time in this context, the network's Laplacian matrix and its Fiedler value, describing the network's algebraic connectivity, and the Fiedler vector, used to partition a graph. We assessed algebraic connectivity and four additional supporting metrics, revealing a decrease in network robustness and increasing disarray among nodes as dementia progressed. Network components became more disconnected and segregated, and their modularity increased. These measures are sensitive to diagnostic group differences, and may help understand the complex changes in AD. PMID:26640830

  15. Trends in brain oxygenation during mental and physical exercise measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): potential for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Monica S.; Allen, Jeffery W.; Mikkilineni, Shweta; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    Motivation: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial because symptoms respond best to available treatments in the initial stages of the disease. Recent studies have shown that marked changes in brain oxygenation during mental and physical tasks can be used for noninvasive functional brain imaging to detect Alzheimer"s disease. The goal of our study is to explore the possibility of using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mapping (NIRM) as a diagnostic tool for AD before the onset of significant morphological changes in the brain. Methods: A 16-channel NIRS brain imager was used to noninvasively measure spatial and temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics induced during verbal fluency task and physical activity. The experiments involved healthy subjects (n = 10) in the age range of 25+/-5 years. The NIRS signals were taken from the subjects' prefrontal cortex during the activities. Results and Conclusion: Trends of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex of the brain were observed. During the mental stimulation, the subjects showed significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin [HbO2] with a simultaneous decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin [Hb]. However, physical exercise caused a rise in levels of HbO2 with small variations in Hb. This study basically demonstrates that NIRM taken from the prefrontal cortex of the human brain is sensitive to both mental and physical tasks and holds potential to serve as a diagnostic means for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27203695

  17. What does the broken brain say to the neuroscientist? Oscillations and connectivity in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Başar, E; Schmiedt-Fehr, C; Mathes, B; Femir, B; Emek-Savaş, D D; Tülay, E; Tan, D; Düzgün, A; Güntekin, B; Özerdem, A; Yener, G; Başar-Eroğlu, C

    2016-05-01

    The application of the concept and methods of brain oscillations has been an important research area in neurosciences. In the last decades, besides the application in cognitive processes, the study of changes in brain oscillations in diseases has also become an important focal point of research. In the present paper, some remarkable examples in three different diseases are taken into consideration: 1) schizophrenia (SZ), 2) Alzheimer's disease (AD), 3) bipolar disorders (BD). In the current literature, decreased oscillations in cortical recordings are observed in most of the pathologies. For example, decrease of gamma activity in SZ, decrease of delta activity in almost all diseases, as well as frequency shifts in alpha and the lower frequencies were recorded. However, there are also paradoxical cases in which an increase of oscillatory activities is observed. In BD, whereas alpha activity is greatly decreased, a huge increase of beta activity is observed. Or, in SZ, a paradoxical increase of gamma activity can be observed during cognitive loading. We also observed paradoxical changes in the analysis of connectivity. In AD, we find that alpha, delta, and theta coherences between distant parts of the cortex are greatly decreased, whereas in the gamma band, event-related coherences attain very high values. The comparison of the results and paradoxical changes in diseases may lead to important conclusions related to the web of oscillations and neurotransmitters. In turn, we could gain new insights to approach "brain function", in general. PMID:25660302

  18. Biondi ring tangles in the choroid plexus of Alzheimer's disease and normal aging brains: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Wen, G Y; Wisniewski, H M; Kascsak, R J

    1999-06-19

    The choroid plexus (CP) performs the vital function of producing up to 90% (450-1000 ml/day) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to nourish and to protect the brain in the CSF suspension. The CP also acts as a selective barrier between blood and CSF to regulate ions and other essential molecules. However, the accumulation of intracellular inclusions called Biondi ring tangles (BRTs) in CP cells of Alzheimer's disease (AD)/aging brains may affect these vital functions of the CP. Statistical analysis of quantitative data on the numbers of CP cells containing BRTs from 54 brains (29 AD and 25 normal control), age range 1-100 years, indicated a significant difference (p<0.00004) between AD and control brains, using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with age as covariate. This study compiled the first set of archives to reveal the distribution pattern of BRTs in the CP of AD brains at various ages. Electron microscopy of negatively stained isolated BRTs revealed that these tangles are made of tightly packed bundles of long filaments with diameter around 10 nm that are morphologically distinct from the more loosely packed/shorter bundles of 6-8 nm amyloid fibrils of neuritic plaques (NPs) and from the 24 nm paired helical filaments of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in AD brain. These data suggest that BRTs may represent a significant and measurable biomarker for AD in addition to NPs and NFTs. PMID:10375650

  19. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle encapsulated tarenflurbil: A potential brain targeting strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Dhommati, Raju; Jain, Anjali; Challa, Venu Gopala Swami; Shaheen, M; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-20

    Poor brain penetration of tarenflurbil (TFB) was one of the major reasons for its failure in phase III clinical trials conducted on Alzheimer's patients. Thus there is a tremendous need of developing efficient delivery systems for TFB. This study was designed with the aim of improving drug delivery to brain through intranasally delivered nanocarriers. TFB was loaded into two different nanocarriers i.e., poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (TFB-NPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (TFB-SLNs). Particle size of both the nanocarriers (<200nm) as determined by dynamic light scattering technique and transmission electron microscopy, assured transcellular transport across olfactory axons whose diameter was ≈200nm and then paving a direct path to brain. TFB-NPs and TFB-SLNs resulted in 64.11±2.21% and 57.81±5.32% entrapment efficiencies respectively which again asserted protection of drug from chemical and biological degradation in nasal cavity. In vitro release studies proved the sustained release of TFB from TFB-NPs and TFB-SLNs in comparison with pure drug, indicating prolonged residence times of drug at targeting site. Pharmacokinetics suggested improved circulation behavior of nanoparticles and the absolute bioavailabilities followed this order: TFB-NPs (i.n.)>TFB-SLNs (i.n.)>TFB solution (i.n.)>TFB suspension (oral). Brain targeting efficiency was determined in terms of %drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and drug transport percentage (DTP). The higher %DTE (287.24) and DTP (65.18) were observed for TFB-NPs followed by TFB-SLNs (%DTE: 183.15 and DTP: 45.41) among all other tested groups. These encouraging results proved that therapeutic concentrations of TFB could be transported directly to brain via olfactory pathway after intranasal administration of polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. PMID:27185298

  20. Identification of brain-targeted bioactive dietary quercetin-3-O-glucuronide as a novel intervention for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Lap; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Janle, Elsa M.; Wang, Jun; Gong, Bing; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Lobo, Jessica; Cooper, Bruce; Wu, Qing Li; Talcott, Stephen T.; Percival, Susan S.; Simon, James E.; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and preclinical studies indicate that polyphenol intake from moderate consumption of red wines may lower the relative risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. There is limited information regarding the specific biological activities and cellular and molecular mechanisms by which wine polyphenolic components might modulate AD. We assessed accumulations of polyphenols in the rat brain following oral dosage with a Cabernet Sauvignon red wine and tested brain-targeted polyphenols for potential beneficial AD disease-modifying activities. We identified accumulations of select polyphenolic metabolites in the brain. We demonstrated that, in comparison to vehicle-control treatment, one of the brain-targeted polyphenol metabolites, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, significantly reduced the generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides by primary neuron cultures generated from the Tg2576 AD mouse model. Another brain-targeted metabolite, malvidin-3-O-glucoside, had no detectable effect on Aβ generation. Moreover, in an in vitro analysis using the photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) technique, we found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide is also capable of interfering with the initial protein-protein interaction of Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 that is necessary for the formation of neurotoxic oligomeric Aβ species. Lastly, we found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide treatment, compared to vehicle-control treatment, significantly improved AD-type deficits in hippocampal formation basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation, possibly through mechanisms involving the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Brain-targeted quercetin-3-O-glucuronide may simultaneously modulate multiple independent AD disease-modifying mechanisms and, as such, may contribute to the benefits of dietary supplementation with red wines as an effective intervention for AD.—Ho, L., Ferruzzi, M. G

  1. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  2. Alzheimer's disease markers from structural MRI and FDG-PET brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, Andrea; Bosco, Paolo; Gemme, Gianluca; Morbelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Dario; Sensi, Francesco; Solano, Ilaria; Amoroso, Nicola; Tangaro, Sabina; Longo, Renata; Squarcia, Sandro; Nobili, Flavio

    2012-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of neuroimaging tools (morphological and functional) in the routine diagnostic of cerebral diseases, the information available by the end user -the clinician- remains largely limited to qualitative visual analysis. This restriction greatly reduces the diagnostic impact of neuroimaging in routine clinical practice and increases the risk of misdiagnosis. In this context, researches are focussing on the development of sophisticated automatic analyses able to extract clinically relevant information from the captured data. The identification of biological markers at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) contributes to diagnostic accuracy and adds prognostic value. However, in spite of recent developments, results of structural and functional imaging studies on predicting conversion to AD are not uniform. We provide here an overview of analysis methods and approaches, discussing their contribution to clinical assessment.

  3. Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... NAPA) About ADEAR Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease Introduction Caring for a person with Alzheimer's ...

  4. Leptin in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, C A; Carvalho, M G; Sousa, L P; Caramelli, P; Gomes, K B

    2015-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly population. AD is histologically characterized by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) on extracellular plaques and deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Several studies have shown that obesity may precede dementia and that lifestyle factors play a critical role in the onset of AD. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is an independent risk factor for developing AD. In this scenario, the understanding of the role of adipose tissue in brain health is essential to clarify the establishment of demential processes. The objective of this work was to review studies regarding leptin, an anorexigenic peptide hormone synthesized in adipocytes, in the context of dementia. Some authors proposed that leptin evaluation might be a better predictor of dementia than traditional anthropometric measures. Leptin, once established as a biomarker, could enhance the understanding of late-onset AD risk over the life course, as well as the clinical progression of prodromal state to manifested AD. Other studies have proposed that leptin presents neuroprotective activities, which could be explained by inhibiting the amyloidogenic process, reducing the levels of tau protein phosphorylation and improving the cognitive function. PMID:26279362

  5. Loss of serum IGF-I input to the brain as an early biomarker of disease onset in Alzheimer mice

    PubMed Central

    Trueba-Sáiz, A; Cavada, C; Fernandez, A M; Leon, T; González, D A; Fortea Ormaechea, J; Lleó, A; Del Ser, T; Nuñez, A; Torres-Aleman, I

    2013-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) enters the brain and promotes clearance of amyloid peptides known to accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Both patients and mouse models of AD show decreased level of circulating IGF-I enter the brain as evidenced by a lower ratio of cerebrospinal fluid/plasma IGF-I. Importantly, in presymptomatic AD mice this reduction is already manifested as a decreased brain input of serum IGF-I in response to environmental enrichment. To explore a potential diagnostic use of this early loss of IGF-I input, we monitored electrocorticogram (ECG) responses to systemic IGF-I in mice. Whereas control mice showed enhanced ECG activity after IGF-I, presymptomatic AD mice showed blunted ECG responses. Because nonhuman primates showed identically enhanced electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in response to systemic IGF-I, loss of the EEG signature of serum IGF-I may be exploited as a disease biomarker in AD patients. PMID:24301648

  6. From Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease: A New Perspective in the "Land" of Human Brain Reactivity and Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Paolo Maria; Di Iorio, Riccardo; Granata, Giuseppe; Miraglia, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio

    2016-07-14

    In a recent study, analyzing the modulation of γ-band oscillations, Naro and colleagues demonstrated that transcranial alternating current stimulation could drive the gamma rhythms in the human EEG in cognitive healthy elderly subjects but not in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) prodromal to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in early AD patients. Therefore, this method is proposed to intercept early in the disease course those MCI subjects who are in a pre-symptomatic stage of an already established AD. This prediction index may help the clinician to adopt a better prevention/follow-up strategy. In this direction, the novel advances in EEG analysis for the evaluation of brain reactivity and connectivity-namely via innovative mathematical approach, i.e., graph theory-represent a promising tool for a non-invasive and easy-to-perform neurophysiological marker that could be used for the pre-symptomatic diagnosis of AD and to predict MCI progression to dementia. PMID:27540962

  7. Synchronizing an aging brain: can entraining circadian clocks by food slow Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Kent, Brianne A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global epidemic. Unfortunately, we are still without effective treatments or a cure for this disease, which is having devastating consequences for patients, their families, and societies around the world. Until effective treatments are developed, promoting overall health may hold potential for delaying the onset or preventing neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In particular, chronobiological concepts may provide a useful framework for identifying the earliest signs of age-related disease as well as inexpensive and noninvasive methods for promoting health. It is well reported that AD is associated with disrupted circadian functioning to a greater extent than normal aging. However, it is unclear if the central circadian clock (i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus) is dysfunctioning, or whether the synchrony between the central and peripheral clocks that control behavior and metabolic processes are becoming uncoupled. Desynchrony of rhythms can negatively affect health, increasing morbidity and mortality in both animal models and humans. If the uncoupling of rhythms is contributing to AD progression or exacerbating symptoms, then it may be possible to draw from the food-entrainment literature to identify mechanisms for re-synchronizing rhythms to improve overall health and reduce the severity of symptoms. The following review will briefly summarize the circadian system, its potential role in AD, and propose using a feeding-related neuropeptide, such as ghrelin, to synchronize uncoupled rhythms. Synchronizing rhythms may be an inexpensive way to promote healthy aging and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease such as AD. PMID:25225484

  8. BACE-1 is expressed in the blood-brain barrier endothelium and is upregulated in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Devraj, Kavi; Poznanovic, Slobodan; Spahn, Christoph; Schwall, Gerhard; Harter, Patrick N; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antoniello, Katia; Paganetti, Paolo; Muhs, Andreas; Heilemann, Mike; Hawkins, Richard A; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier form a structural and functional barrier maintaining brain homeostasis via paracellular tight junctions and specific transporters such as P-glycoprotein. The blood-brain barrier is responsible for negligible bioavailability of many neuroprotective drugs. In Alzheimer's disease, current treatment approaches include inhibitors of BACE-1 (β-site of amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme), a proteinase generating neurotoxic β-amyloid. It is known that BACE-1 is highly expressed in endosomes and membranes of neurons and glia. We now provide evidence that BACE-1 is expressed in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells of human, mouse, and bovine origin. We further show its predominant membrane localization by 3D-dSTORM super-resolution microscopy, and by biochemical fractionation that further shows an abluminal distribution of BACE-1 in brain microvessels. We confirm its functionality in processing APP in primary mouse brain endothelial cells. In an Alzheimer's disease mouse model we show that BACE-1 is upregulated at the blood-brain barrier compared to healthy controls. We therefore suggest a critical role for BACE-1 at the blood-brain barrier in β-amyloid generation and in vascular aspects of Alzheimer's disease, particularly in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. PMID:26661166

  9. Elevation of brain glucose and polyol-pathway intermediates with accompanying brain-copper deficiency in patients with Alzheimer's disease: metabolic basis for dementia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J; Patassini, Stefano; McHarg, Selina; Kureishy, Nina; Hollywood, Katherine A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Shaoping; Lin, Wanchang; Herholz, Karl; Turner, Clinton; Synek, Beth J; Curtis, Maurice A; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Lawrence, Catherine B; Kellett, Katherine A B; Hooper, Nigel M; Vardy, Emma R L C; Wu, Donghai; Unwin, Richard D; Faull, Richard L M; Dowsey, Andrew W; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of brain-glucose uptake and brain-copper regulation occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we sought to further elucidate the processes that cause neurodegeneration in AD by measuring levels of metabolites and metals in brain regions that undergo different degrees of damage. We employed mass spectrometry (MS) to measure metabolites and metals in seven post-mortem brain regions of nine AD patients and nine controls, and plasma-glucose and plasma-copper levels in an ante-mortem case-control study. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were markedly elevated in all AD brain regions, whereas copper was correspondingly deficient throughout (all P < 0.0001). In the ante-mortem case-control study, by contrast, plasma-glucose and plasma-copper levels did not differ between patients and controls. There were pervasive defects in regulation of glucose and copper in AD brain but no evidence for corresponding systemic abnormalities in plasma. Elevation of brain glucose and deficient brain copper potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:27276998

  10. Brain Metabolic Dysfunction in Capgras Delusion During Alzheimer's Disease: A Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Jedidi, H; Daury, N; Capa, R; Bahri, M A; Collette, F; Feyers, D; Bastin, C; Maquet, P; Salmon, E

    2015-11-01

    Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24-healthy elderly participants and 26 patients with AD without delusional syndrome. Comparing the healthy group with the AD group, the patient with AD had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In the light of current neural models of face perception, our patients with Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. PMID:23813791

  11. Association of cancer history with Alzheimer's disease onset and structural brain changes

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Kelly N. H.; Risacher, Shannon L.; West, John D.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Gao, Sujuan; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show a reciprocal inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The common mechanistic theory for this effect posits that cells have an innate tendency toward apoptotic or survival pathways, translating to increased risk for either neurodegeneration or cancer. However, it has been shown that cancer patients experience cognitive dysfunction pre- and post-treatment as well as alterations in cerebral gray matter density (GMD) on MRI. To further investigate these issues, we analyzed the association between cancer history (CA±) and age of AD onset, and the relationship between GMD and CA± status across diagnostic groups in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort study. Data was analyzed from 1609 participants with information on baseline cancer history and AD diagnosis, age of AD onset, and baseline MRI scans. Participants were CA+ (N = 503) and CA− (N = 1106) diagnosed with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), significant memory concerns (SMC), and cognitively normal older adults. As in previous studies, CA+ was inversely associated with AD at baseline (P = 0.025); interestingly, this effect appears to be driven by non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the largest cancer category in this study (P = 0.001). CA+ was also associated with later age of AD onset (P < 0.001), independent of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele status, and individuals with two prior cancers had later mean age of AD onset than those with one or no prior cancer (P < 0.001), suggesting an additive effect. Voxel-based morphometric analysis of GMD showed CA+ had lower GMD in the right superior frontal gyrus compared to CA− across diagnostic groups (Pcrit < 0.001, uncorrected); this cluster of lower GMD appeared to be driven by history of invasive cancer types, rather than skin cancer. Thus, while cancer history is associated with a measurable delay in AD onset independent of APOE ε4, the underlying mechanism does not appear to be

  12. [Alzheimer's disease and depression].

    PubMed

    Gallarda, T

    1999-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent cause of dementia (60% of all dementias) and affects nearly 300,000 people in France. Alzheimer's disease is a disease of the elderly which generally begins after 60 years and whose prevalence increases markedly after age 75 years. The elderly population is increasing in all Western countries. Alzheimer's disease thus constitutes a veritable emergent public health problem. The rapid inflation of the epidemiological and etiopathogenetic data have contributed to enhanced nosographic definition and finer semiological characterization of the disease. Thus, the classic concept of senile dementia has been totally abandoned. In contrast, the concept of depressive pseudodementia as defined by Kiloh (1961) remains present in the "psychiatric culture". The concept refers to rare clinical situations in which the controversial concept of "test therapy" with antidepressants retains, in the author's opinion, some utility. Depressive or psychobehavioral signs and symptoms frequently inaugurate Alzheimer's disease giving rise to first-line psychiatric management. The use of multidimensional evaluation instruments such as the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) has enabled demonstration of the signs and symptoms and their quantification through the course of the disease. In the dementia stage, the psychobehavioral symptoms are related to the patient's awareness of the degradation in his intellectual functions and the loss of independence and to specific neuropathological lesions responsible for "frontal deafferentation". Certain clinical forms of depression of late onset are also characterized by symptoms reflecting hypofrontal signs (blunted affect, apathy, defective initiative, etc.) and severe cognitive disorders. Those depressions are associated with risk factors shared with Alzheimer's disease (sex, age, vascular function, APOE 4) and constitute a risk factor for progression to dementia, requiring regular clinical and neuropsychological

  13. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  15. Measurement of global brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease with unsupervised segmentation of spin-echo MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, A; Postiglione, A; Tedeschi, E; Ciarmiello, A; Quarantelli, M; Covelli, E M; Milan, G; Larobina, M; Soricelli, A; Sodano, A; Alfano, B

    2000-03-01

    In 16 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD; NINDS criteria, age range 56-78 years), gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absolute and fractional volumes were measured with an unsupervised multiparametric post-processing segmentation method based on estimates of relaxation rates R1, R2 (R1 = 1/T1; R2 = 1/T2) and proton density [N(H)] from conventional spin-echo studies (Alfano et al. Magn. Reson. Med. 1997;37:84-93). Global brain atrophy, and GM and WM fractions significantly correlated with Mini-Mental Status Examination and Blessed Dementia Scale scores. Compared with normals, brain compartments in AD patients showed decreased GM (-6.84 +/- 1.58%) and WM fractions (-9.79 +/- 2.47%) and increased CSF fractions (+58.80 +/- 10.37%). Changes were more evident in early-onset AD patients. In AD, measurement of global brain atrophy obtained by a computerized procedure based on routine magnetic resonance studies could complement the information provided by neuropsychological tests for the assessment of disease severity. PMID:10739557

  16. Impaired neurogenesis, neuronal loss, and brain functional deficits in the APPxPS1-Ki mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faure, A; Verret, L; Bozon, B; El Tannir El Tayara, N; Ly, M; Kober, F; Dhenain, M; Rampon, C; Delatour, B

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid-β peptide species accumulating in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease are assumed to have a neurotoxic action and hence to be key actors in the physiopathology of this neurodegenerative disease. We have studied a new mouse mutant (APPxPS1-Ki) line developing both early-onset brain amyloid-β deposition and, in contrast to most of transgenic models, subsequent neuronal loss. In 6-month-old mice, we observed cell layer atrophies in the hippocampus, together with a dramatic decrease in neurogenesis and a reduced brain blood perfusion as measured in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. In these mice, neurological impairments and spatial hippocampal dependent memory deficits were also substantiated and worsened with aging. We described here a phenotype of APPxPS1-Ki mice that summarizes several neuroanatomical alterations and functional deficits evocative of the human pathology. Such a transgenic model that displays strong face validity might be highly beneficial to future research on AD physiopathogeny and therapeutics. PMID:19398247

  17. Participation in cognitively-stimulating activities is associated with brain structure and cognitive function in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stephanie A; Larson, Jordan; Oh, Jennifer; Koscik, Rebecca; Dowling, Maritza N; Gallagher, Catherine L; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Rowley, Howard A; Bendlin, Barbara B; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce P; Johnson, Sterling C; Sager, Mark; LaRue, Asenath; Okonkwo, Ozioma C

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that frequent participation in cognitively-stimulating activities, specifically those related to playing games and puzzles, is beneficial to brain health and cognition among middle-aged adults at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three hundred twenty-nine cognitively normal, middle-aged adults (age range, 43.2-73.8 years) enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) participated in this study. They reported their current engagement in cognitive activities using a modified version of the Cognitive Activity Scale (CAS), underwent a structural MRI scan, and completed a comprehensive cognitive battery. FreeSurfer was used to derive gray matter (GM) volumes from AD-related regions of interest (ROIs), and composite measures of episodic memory and executive function were obtained from the cognitive tests. Covariate-adjusted least squares analyses were used to examine the association between the Games item on the CAS (CAS-Games) and both GM volumes and cognitive composites. Higher scores on CAS-Games were associated with greater GM volumes in several ROIs including the hippocampus, posterior cingulate, anterior cingulate, and middle frontal gyrus. Similarly, CAS-Games scores were positively associated with scores on the Immediate Memory, Verbal Learning & Memory, and Speed & Flexibility domains. These findings were not modified by known risk factors for AD. In addition, the Total score on the CAS was not as sensitive as CAS-Games to the examined brain and cognitive measures. For some individuals, participation in cognitive activities pertinent to game playing may help prevent AD by preserving brain structures and cognitive functions vulnerable to AD pathophysiology. PMID:25358750

  18. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future. PMID:22665688

  19. Non-invasive brain stimulation to assess and modulate neuroplasticity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Boggio, Paulo Sérgio; Valasek, Claudia Aparecida; Campanhã, Camila; Giglio, Ana Carolina Alem; Baptista, Nathalia Ishikawa; Lapenta, Olivia Morgan; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative and progressive disease related to a gradual decline in cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perceptual-spatial abilities, language, and executive functions. Recent evidence has suggested that interventions promoting neural plasticity can induce significant cognitive gains especially in subjects at risk of or with mild AD. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive techniques that can induce significant and long-lasting changes in focal and non-focal neuroplasticity. In this review, we present initial preliminary evidence that TMS and tDCS can enhance performance in cognitive functions typically impaired in AD. Also, we reviewed the initial six studies on AD that presented early findings showing cognitive gains such as in recognition memory and language associated with TMS and tDCS treatment. In addition, we showed that TMS has also been used to assess neuroplasticity changes in AD supporting the notion that cortical excitability is changed in AD due to the neurodegenerative process. Due to the safe profile, cost of these tools, and initial clinical trials results, further studies are warranted in order to replicate and extend the initial findings of rTMS and tDCS as cognitive enhancers in AD. Further trials should explore different targets of stimulation along with different paradigms of stimulation including combination with behavioural interventions. PMID:21942868

  20. Cellular signaling roles of TGF beta, TNF alpha and beta APP in brain injury responses and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, M P; Barger, S W; Furukawa, K; Bruce, A J; Wyss-Coray, T; Mark, R J; Mucke, L

    1997-02-01

    beta-Amyloid precursor protein (beta APP), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) are remarkably pleiotropic neural cytokines/neurotrophic factors that orchestrate intricate injury-related cellular and molecular interactions. The links between these three factors include: their responses to injury; their interactive effects on astrocytes, microglia and neurons; their ability to induce cytoprotective responses in neurons; and their association with cytopathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes and microglia each produce and respond to TGF beta and TNF alpha in characteristic ways when the brain is injured. TGF beta, TNF alpha and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP) can protect neurons against excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative insults and may thereby serve neuroprotective roles. On the other hand, under certain conditions TNF alpha and the fibrillogenic amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) derivative of beta APP can promote damage of neuronal and glial cells, and may play roles in neurodegenerative disorders. Studies of genetically manipulated mice in which TGF beta, TNF alpha or beta APP ligand or receptor levels are altered suggest important roles for each factor in cellular responses to brain injury and indicate that mediators of neural injury responses also have the potential to enhance amyloidogenesis and/or to interfere with neuroregeneration if expressed at abnormal levels or modified by strategic point mutations. Recent studies have elucidated signal transduction pathways of TGF beta (serine/threonine kinase cascades), TNF alpha (p55 receptor linked to a sphingomyelin-ceramide-NF kappa B pathway), and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP; receptor guanylate cyclase-cGMP-cGMP-dependent kinase-K+ channel activation). Knowledge of these signaling pathways is revealing novel molecular targets on which to focus neuroprotective therapeutic strategies in disorders ranging from stroke to Alzheimer's disease

  1. Putative Role of Red Wine Polyphenols against Brain Pathology in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Mario; Cauchi, Ruben; Vassallo, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorders and hence pose remarkable socio-economical burdens to both families and state. Although AD and PD have different clinical and neuropathological features, they share common molecular mechanisms that appear to be triggered by multi-factorial events, such as protein aggregation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress (OS), and neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to neuronal cell death. Currently, there are no established and validated disease-modifying strategies for either AD or PD. Among the various lifestyle factors that may prevent or slow age-related neurodegenerative diseases, epidemiological studies on moderate consumption of red wine, especially as part of a holistic Mediterranean diet, have attracted increasing interest. Red wine is particularly rich in specific polyphenolic compounds that appear to affect the biological processes of AD and PD, such as quercetin, myricetin, catechins, tannins, anthocyanidins, resveratrol, and ferulic acid. Indeed, there is now a consistent body of in vitro and in vivo data on the neuroprotective effects of red wine polyphenols (RWP) showing that they do not merely possess antioxidant properties, but may additionally act upon, in a multi-target manner, the underlying key mechanisms featuring in both AD and PD. Furthermore, it is important that bioavailability issues are addressed in order for neuroprotection to be relevant in a clinical study scenario. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the major classes of RWP and places into perspective their potential to be considered as nutraceuticals to target neuropathology in AD and PD. PMID:27570766

  2. Multi-resolution statistical analysis of brain connectivity graphs in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Adluru, Nagesh; Chung, Moo K; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Johnson, Sterling C; B Bendlin, Barbara; Singh, Vikas

    2015-09-01

    There is significant interest, both from basic and applied research perspectives, in understanding how structural/functional connectivity changes can explain behavioral symptoms and predict decline in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first step in most such analyses is to encode the connectivity information as a graph; then, one may perform statistical inference on various 'global' graph theoretic summary measures (e.g., modularity, graph diameter) and/or at the level of individual edges (or connections). For AD in particular, clear differences in connectivity at the dementia stage of the disease (relative to healthy controls) have been identified. Despite such findings, AD-related connectivity changes in preclinical disease remain poorly characterized. Such preclinical datasets are typically smaller and group differences are weaker. In this paper, we propose a new multi-resolution method for performing statistical analysis of connectivity networks/graphs derived from neuroimaging data. At the high level, the method occupies the middle ground between the two contrasts - that is, to analyze global graph summary measures (global) or connectivity strengths or correlations for individual edges similar to voxel based analysis (local). Instead, our strategy derives a Wavelet representation at each primitive (connection edge) which captures the graph context at multiple resolutions. We provide extensive empirical evidence of how this framework offers improved statistical power by analyzing two distinct AD datasets. Here, connectivity is derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images by running a tractography routine. We first present results showing significant connectivity differences between AD patients and controls that were not evident using standard approaches. Later, we show results on populations that are not diagnosed with AD but have a positive family history risk of AD where our algorithm helps in identifying potentially

  3. A biophysical model of brain deformation to simulate and analyze longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We propose a framework for developing a comprehensive biophysical model that could predict and simulate realistic longitudinal MRIs of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The framework includes three major building blocks: i) atrophy generation, ii) brain deformation, and iii) realistic MRI generation. Within this framework, this paper focuses on a detailed implementation of the brain deformation block with a carefully designed biomechanics-based tissue loss model. For a given baseline brain MRI, the model yields a deformation field imposing the desired atrophy at each voxel of the brain parenchyma while allowing the CSF to expand as required to globally compensate for the locally prescribed volume loss. Our approach is inspired by biomechanical principles and involves a system of equations similar to Stokes equations in fluid mechanics but with the presence of a non-zero mass source term. We use this model to simulate longitudinal MRIs by prescribing complex patterns of atrophy. We present experiments that provide an insight into the role of different biomechanical parameters in the model. The model allows simulating images with exactly the same tissue atrophy but with different underlying deformation fields in the image. We explore the influence of different spatial distributions of atrophy on the image appearance and on the measurements of atrophy reported by various global and local atrophy estimation algorithms. We also present a pipeline that allows evaluating atrophy estimation algorithms by simulating longitudinal MRIs from large number of real subject MRIs with complex subject-specific atrophy patterns. The proposed framework could help understand the implications of different model assumptions, regularization choices, and spatial priors for the detection and measurement of brain atrophy from longitudinal brain MRIs. PMID:27039699

  4. Exercise for the diabetic brain: how physical training may help prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease in T2DM patients.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Sebastian; Brixius, Klara; Brinkmann, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review, which is based on recent studies, presents a molecular framework that links the two diseases and explains how physical training could help counteract neurodegeneration in T2DM patients. Inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic changes in T2DM patients cause cerebrovascular complications and can lead to blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown. Peripherally increased pro-inflammatory molecules can then pass the BBB more easily and activate stress-activated pathways, thereby promoting key pathological features of dementia/AD such as brain insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and accumulation of neurotoxic beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers, leading to synaptic loss, neuronal dysfunction, and cell death. Ceramides can also pass the BBB, induce pro-inflammatory reactions, and disturb brain insulin signaling. In a vicious circle, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory environment intensify, leading to further cognitive decline. Low testosterone levels might be a common risk factor in T2DM and AD. Regular physical exercise reinforces antioxidative capacity, reduces oxidative stress, and has anti-inflammatory effects. It improves endothelial function and might increase brain capillarization. Physical training can further counteract dyslipidemia and reduce increased ceramide levels. It might also improve Aβ clearance by up-regulating Aβ transporters and, in some cases, increase basal testosterone levels. In addition, regular physical activity can induce neurogenesis. Physical training should therefore be emphasized as a part of prevention programs developed for diabetic patients to minimize the risk of the onset of neurodegenerative diseases among this specific patient group. PMID:27160819

  5. Structural brain alterations in heart failure: a review of the literature and implications for risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alosco, Michael L; Hayes, Scott M

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a recognized contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Heart failure (HF) is a cardiovascular subtype that can be used to model the contribution of cardiovascular disease to AD. Neuroimaging research indicates that HF patients exhibit a diverse range of structural brain alterations and epidemiological studies suggest HF may be an important risk factor for AD. The neural alterations observed in HF may overlap with those observed in AD and contribute to increased risk of AD in HF patients. To examine this possibility, we reviewed structural MRI studies in persons with HF. We examined subcortical brain regions affected in the early stages of AD (medial temporal lobes), as well as cortical alterations that typically occur in the later stages of AD. Our review indicates that patients with HF exhibit greater neural atrophy and white matter microstructural alterations of nearly every region of the Papez circuit (e.g., hippocampus, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, mammillary bodies, and fornix), as well-significant alterations in cortical and cerebellar regions. Based on animal research and past work in AD patients, the mechanisms for structural brain changes in HF may stem from reductions in cerebral blood flow subsequent to cardiac deficiency. This review supports the hypothesis that HF may contribute to AD risk via widespread structural brain changes, including many of the same regions affected by AD. Case-controlled prospective neuroimaging studies with long-term follow-ups are needed to clarify the risk of AD in HF and elucidate the neural underpinnings of AD risk in HF. PMID:25896528

  6. Role of Methylglyoxal in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder. The major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are extracellular aggregation of amyloid β peptides and, the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles formed by precipitation/aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is multifactorial and a full understanding of its pathogenesis remains elusive. Some years ago, it has been suggested that glycation may contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Glycation is an endogenous process that leads to the production of a class of compounds known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Interestingly, increased levels of AGEs have been observed in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methylglyoxal, a reactive intermediate of cellular metabolism, is the most potent precursor of AGEs and is strictly correlated with an increase of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Many studies are showing that methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24734229

  7. Etanercept in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Butchart, Joseph; Brook, Laura; Hopkins, Vivienne; Teeling, Jessica; Püntener, Ursula; Culliford, David; Sharples, Richard; Sharif, Saif; McFarlane, Brady; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Passmore, Peter; Perry, V. Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor etanercept is well tolerated and obtain preliminary data on its safety in Alzheimer disease dementia. Methods: In a double-blind study, patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease dementia were randomized (1:1) to subcutaneous etanercept (50 mg) once weekly or identical placebo over a 24-week period. Tolerability and safety of this medication was recorded including secondary outcomes of cognition, global function, behavior, and systemic cytokine levels at baseline, 12 weeks, 24 weeks, and following a 4-week washout period. This trial is registered with EudraCT (2009-013400-31) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01068353). Results: Forty-one participants (mean age 72.4 years; 61% men) were randomized to etanercept (n = 20) or placebo (n = 21). Etanercept was well tolerated; 90% of participants (18/20) completed the study compared with 71% (15/21) in the placebo group. Although infections were more common in the etanercept group, there were no serious adverse events or new safety concerns. While there were some interesting trends that favored etanercept, there were no statistically significant changes in cognition, behavior, or global function. Conclusions: This study showed that subcutaneous etanercept (50 mg/wk) was well tolerated in this small group of patients with Alzheimer disease dementia, but a larger more heterogeneous group needs to be tested before recommending its use for broader groups of patients. Classification of evidence: This study shows Class I evidence that weekly subcutaneous etanercept is well tolerated in Alzheimer disease dementia. PMID:25934853

  8. Comparison of positron emission tomography, cognition, and brain volume in Alzheimer's disease with and without severe abnormalities of white matter.

    PubMed Central

    DeCarli, C; Grady, C L; Clark, C M; Katz, D A; Brady, D R; Murphy, D G; Haxby, J V; Salerno, J A; Gillette, J A; Gonzalez-Aviles, A; Rapoport, S I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine cerebral metabolism, cognitive performance, and brain volumes in healthy controls and two groups of patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, one group with severe abnormalities of white matter (DAT+) and the other group with none, or minimal abnormalities (DAT-). METHODS--Neuropsychological tests, CT, MRI, quantitative MRI, and PET studies were carried out to allow comparison between the DAT+ and DAT- groups and the healthy controls. RESULTS--Compared with the healthy controls, both demented groups had significantly reduced global and regional cerebral metabolism, significant brain atrophy, and significantly lower scores on neuropsychological testing. The DAT- patient group showed a pattern of parietal-temporal cerebral metabolic reductions and neuropsychological performance deficits typical of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, metabolism in the association neocortex (AD ratio) and measures of neuropsychological task performance were significantly correlated in the DAT- patient group. Comparison of DAT+ with DAT- patients showed a significantly higher ratio of parietal to whole brain glucose utilisation for the DAT+ group. Moreover, when comparing group z score differences from the healthy controls, the DAT+ group had, on average, smaller differences from controls in the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions than did the DAT- group. Discriminant analysis using metabolic ratios of the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions showed cerebral metabolic patterns to be significantly different among the DAT+, the DAT-, and the healthy controls. These differences were due primarily to relatively higher frontal, parietal, and temporal metabolic ratios in the DAT+ group which resulted in discriminant scores for the DAT+ group between the healthy controls and the DAT- group. Group mean scores on tests of neuropsychological performance were not significantly different between the DAT- and DAT+ patients. By contrast with the DAT- group, however, no

  9. Intranasal Piperine-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles as Brain-Targeted Therapy in Alzheimer's Disease: Optimization, Biological Efficacy, and Potential Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Elnaggar, Yosra S R; Etman, Samar M; Abdelmonsif, Doaa A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2015-10-01

    Piperine (PIP) is a phytopharmaceutical with reported neuroprotective potential in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Oral PIP delivery suffers from its hydrophobicity and pre-systemic metabolism. In this article, mono-disperse intranasal chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) were elaborated for brain targeting of PIP. Formula optimization was based on particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), polydispersity index (PDI), % entrapment efficiency (% EE), release studies, and transmission electron microscopy. AD was induced in 48 male Wistar rats on which full behavioral and biochemical testing was conducted. Brain toxicity was assessed based on Caspase-3 assay for apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor for inflammation. Spherical NPs with optimum % EE (81.70), PS (248.50 nm), PDI (0.24), and ZP (+56.30 mV) were elaborated. PIP-NPs could significantly improve cognitive functions as efficient as standard drug (donpezil injection) with additional advantages of dual mechanism (Ach esterase inhibition and antioxidant effect). CS-NPs could significantly alleviate PIP nasal irritation and showed no brain toxicity. This work was the first to report additional mechanism of PIP in AD via anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammatory effects. To conclude, mucoadhesive CS-NPs were successfully tailored for effective, safe, and non-invasive PIP delivery with 20-folds decrease in oral dose, opening a gate for a future with lower AD morbidity. PMID:26147711

  10. In Situ FTIR Microspectroscopy of Brain Tissue from a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rak,M.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.; Gough, K.

    2007-01-01

    Plaques composed of the A{beta} peptide are the main pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Dense-core plaques are fibrillar deposits of A{beta}, showing all the classical properties of amyloid including {beta}-sheet secondary structure, while diffuse plaques are amorphous deposits. We studied both plaque types, using synchrotron infrared (IR) microspectroscopy, a technique that allows the chemical composition and average protein secondary structure to be investigated in situ. We examined plaques in hippocampal, cortical and caudal tissue from 5- to 21-month-old TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model expressing doubly mutant amyloid precursor protein, and displaying impaired hippocampal function and robust pathology from an early age. Spectral analysis confirmed that the congophilic plaque cores were composed of protein in a {beta}-sheet conformation. The amide I maximum of plaque cores was at 1623 cm-1, and unlike for in vitro A{beta} fibrils, the high-frequency (1680-1690 cm-1) component attributed to antiparallel {beta}-sheet was not observed. A significant elevation in phospholipids was found around dense-core plaques in TgCRND8 mice ranging in age from 5 to 21 months. In contrast, diffuse plaques were not associated with IR detectable changes in protein secondary structure or relative concentrations of any other tissue components.

  11. Transthyretin and the brain re-visited: Is neuronal synthesis of transthyretin protective in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1990's a trickle of publications from scattered independent laboratories have presented data suggesting that the systemic amyloid precursor transthyretin (TTR) could interact with the amyloidogenic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The notion that one amyloid precursor could actually inhibit amyloid fibril formation by another seemed quite far-fetched. Further it seemed clear that within the CNS, TTR was only produced in choroid plexus epithelial cells, not in neurons. The most enthusiastic of the authors proclaimed that TTR sequestered Aβ in vivo resulting in a lowered TTR level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients and that the relationship was salutary. More circumspect investigators merely showed in vitro interaction between the two molecules. A single in vivo study in Caenorhabditis elegans suggested that wild type human TTR could suppress the abnormalities seen when Aβ was expressed in the muscle cells of the worm. Subsequent studies in human Aβ transgenic mice, including those from our laboratory, also suggested that the interaction reduced the Aβ deposition phenotype. We have reviewed the literature analyzing the relationship including recent data examining potential mechanisms that could explain the effect. We have proposed a model which is consistent with most of the published data and current notions of AD pathogenesis and can serve as a hypothesis which can be tested. PMID:22112803

  12. Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159116.html Early Alzheimer's Linked to Brain 'Leakage' Normally, blood-brain barrier prevents this from happening To use the ... more "leaks" in the barrier that separates the brain from the bloodstream, a small study suggests. Known ...

  13. Oxidative modification of brain proteins in Alzheimer's disease: perspective on future studies based on results of redox proteomics studies.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Butterfield, D Allan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor associated with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Until now no clear understanding of the mechanisms of initiation and progression of this dementing disorder exists. Based on the studies that have been conducted so far amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a protein found in senile plaques, one of the key pathological hallmarks of AD, has been reported to be critical in the pathogenesis of AD. Studies from our laboratory and others showed that Aβ can induce oxidative stress, which leads to oxidative modification of biomolecules, thereby diminishing the normal functions of neuronal cells and eventually leading to loss of neurons and AD. In this review paper, we summarize evidence of oxidative stress in brains of AD and mild cognitive impairment patients, as well as the results from redox proteomics studies. The investigations have provided insights into the downstream effects of oxidative modification of key brain proteins in the pathogenesis of AD. Based on these redox proteomics results, we suggest future areas of research that could be considered to better understand this devastating dementing disorder. PMID:22683528

  14. Candidate PET Radioligand Development for Neurofibrillary Tangles: Two Distinct Radioligand Binding Sites Identified in Postmortem Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lisheng; Qu, Baoxi; Hurtle, Bryan T; Dadiboyena, Sureshbabu; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Pike, Victor W

    2016-07-20

    [(18)F]THK-523 and [(18)F]807 are promising radioligands for imaging neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) with positron emission tomography (PET) in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and traumatic brain injury. Although [(18)F]THK-523 and [(18)F]T807 are considered high-affinity selective radioligands for NFTs, uncertainty has existed as to whether PET radioligands for imaging NFTs bind to the same molecular site because in vitro assays for ligands binding to NFTs have been lacking. We labeled THK-523 and T807 with tritium to serve as reference radioligands for in vitro binding assays with AD brain homogenates for newly synthesized ligands. With these radioligands, we identified two distinct binding sites for small molecules, one site with high affinity for THK-523 and the other with high affinity for T807. Moreover, binding assays with [(3)H]PIB confirmed that the two newly identified binding sites are also distinct from the thioflavin-T binding site where all current clinically useful PET radioligands for imaging β-amyloid plaque bind with high affinity. The two newly identified binding sites are considered to reside on NFTs rather than on β-amyloid plaques. Furthermore, we applied all three binding assays to a set of newly prepared compounds, based on chain modifications to THK-523. Some compounds with high affinity and selectivity for the THK-523 binding site emerged from this set, including one with amenability to labeling with fluorine-18, namely, ligand 10b. PMID:27171905

  15. Whole-brain patterns of (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Su, L; Blamire, A M; Watson, R; He, J; Hayes, L; O'Brien, J T

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated metabolite changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB); however, their pattern and relationship to clinical symptoms is unclear. To determine whether the spatial patterns of brain-metabolite changes in AD and DLB are regional or diffused, and to examine whether the key metabolite levels are associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms, we acquired whole-brain spatially resolved 3T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from subjects with AD (N=36), DLB (N=35) and similarly aged controls (N=35). Voxel-wise measurement of N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), choline to Cr (Cho/Cr), myo-inositol to Cr (mI/Cr) as well as glutamate and glutamine to Cr (Glx/Cr) ratios were determined using MRSI. Compared with controls, AD and DLB groups showed a significant decrease in most brain metabolites, with NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr levels being reduced in posterior cingulate, thalamus, frontotemporal areas and basal ganglia. The Glx/Cr level was more widely decreased in DLB (posterior cingulate, hippocampus, temporal regions and caudate) than in AD (only in posterior cingulate). DLB was also associated with increased levels of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr and mI/Cr in occipital regions. Changes in metabolism in the brain were correlated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms in the DLB but not in the AD group. The different patterns between AD and DLB may have implications for improving diagnosis, better understanding disease-specific neurobiology and targeting therapeutics. In addition, the study raised important questions about the role of occipital neuroinflammation and glial activation as well as the glutamatergic treatment in DLB. PMID:27576166

  16. Differences in structural covariance brain networks between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G P; Jiskoot, Lize C; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; van Swieten, John C; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2016-03-01

    Disease-specific patterns of gray matter atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) overlap with distinct structural covariance networks (SCNs) in cognitively healthy controls. This suggests that both types of dementia target specific structural networks. Here, we study SCNs in AD and bvFTD. We used structural magnetic resonance imaging data of 31 AD patients, 24 bvFTD patients, and 30 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. Ten SCNs were defined based on structural covariance of gray matter density using independent component analysis. We studied group differences in SCNs using F-tests, with Bonferroni corrected t-tests, adjusted for age, gender, and study center. Associations with cognitive performance were studied using linear regression analyses. Cross-sectional group differences were found in three SCNs (all P < 0.0025). In bvFTD, we observed decreased anterior cingulate network integrity compared with AD and controls. Patients with AD showed decreased precuneal network integrity compared with bvFTD and controls, and decreased hippocampal network and anterior cingulate network integrity compared with controls. In AD, we found an association between precuneal network integrity and global cognitive performance (P = 0.0043). Our findings show that AD and bvFTD target different SCNs. The comparison of both types of dementia showed decreased precuneal (i.e., default mode) network integrity in AD and decreased anterior cingulate (i.e., salience) network integrity in bvFTD. This confirms the hypothesis that AD and bvFTD have distinct anatomical networks of degeneration and shows that structural covariance gives valuable insights in the understanding of network pathology in dementia. PMID:26660857

  17. A neuronal antigen in the brains of Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Wolozin, B L; Pruchnicki, A; Dickson, D W; Davies, P

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody was prepared against pooled homogenates of brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. This antibody recognizes an antigen present in much higher concentration in certain brain regions of Alzheimer patients than in normal brain. The antigen appears to be a protein present in neurons involved in the formation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and in some morphologically normal neurons in sections from Alzheimer brains. Partial purification and Western blot analysis revealed the antigen from Alzheimer brain to be a single protein with a molecular weight of 68,000. Application of the same purification procedure to normal brain tissue results in the detection of small amounts of a protein of lower molecular weight. PMID:3083509

  18. Hierarchical brain tissue segmentation and its application in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Moonis, Gul; Schwartz, Eric; Balcer, Laura

    2005-04-01

    Based on Fuzzy Connectedness (FC) object delineation principles and algorithms, a hierarchical brain tissue segmentation technique has been developed for MR images. After MR image background intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity standardization, three FC objects for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) are generated via FC object delineation, and an intracranial (IC) mask is created via morphological operations. Then, the IC mask is decomposed into parenchymal (BP) and CSF masks, while the BP mask is separated into WM and GM masks. WM mask is further divided into pure and dirty white matter masks (PWM and DWM). In Multiple Sclerosis studies, a severe white matter lesion (LS) mask is defined from DWM mask. Based on the segmented brain tissue images, a histogram-based method has been developed to find disease-specific, image-based quantitative markers for characterizing the macromolecular manifestation of the two diseases. These same procedures have been applied to 65 MS (46 patients and 19 normal subjects) and 25 AD (15 patients and 10 normal subjects) data sets, each of which consists of FSE PD- and T2-weighted MR images. Histograms representing standardized PD and T2 intensity distributions and their numerical parameters provide an effective means for characterizing the two diseases. The procedures are systematic, nearly automated, robust, and the results are reproducible.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Krasner, Neville

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, and causes steady memory loss and mental regression. It is also accompanied by severe atrophy of the brain. However, the pathological biomarkers of the disease can only be confirmed and examined upon the death of the patient. A commercial (Renishaw PLC, UK) Raman system with an 830 nm NIR diode laser was used to analyse brain samples, which were flash frozen at post-mortem. Ethical approval was sought for these samples. The Alzheimer's diseased samples contained a number of biomarkers, including neuritic plaques and tangles. The Raman spectra were examined by order to differentiate between normal and Alzheimer's diseased brain tissues. Preliminary results indicate that Alzheimer's diseased tissues can be differentiated from control tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra differ in terms of peak intensity, and the presence of a stronger amide I band in the 1667 cm-1 region which occurs more prominently in the Alzheimer's diseased tissue. These preliminary results indicate that the beta-amyloid protein originating from neuritic plaques can be identified with Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns

    PubMed Central

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-01-01

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20–90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (P<0.05), anti-hypertensive (P<0.05), anti-diabetic drug use (men P<0.05, women P=0.06) and waist circumference for the male cohort (P<0.05), after adjusting for age. Subjects with ABA had spatially extensive gray matter loss in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes (false-discovery-rate-corrected q<0.001). ABA patterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD. PMID:27045845

  1. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns.

    PubMed

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-01-01

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20-90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (P<0.05), anti-hypertensive (P<0.05), anti-diabetic drug use (men P<0.05, women P=0.06) and waist circumference for the male cohort (P<0.05), after adjusting for age. Subjects with ABA had spatially extensive gray matter loss in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes (false-discovery-rate-corrected q<0.001). ABA patterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD. PMID:27045845

  2. Alzheimer's Disease: An Exacerbation of Senile Phenoptosis.

    PubMed

    Isaev, N K; Stelmashook, E V; Genrikhs, E E; Oborina, M V; Kapkaeva, M R; Skulachev, V P

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline accompanied by degeneration of neuronal synapses, massive loss of neurons in the brain, eventually resulting in complete degradation of personality and death. Currently, the cause of the disease is not fully understood, but it is believed that the person's age is the major risk factor for development of Alzheimer's disease. People who have survived after cerebral stroke or traumatic brain injury have substantially increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Social exclusion, low social activity, physical inactivity, poor mental performance, and low level of education are among risk factors for development of this neurodegenerative disease, which is consistent with the concept of phenoptosis (Skulachev, V. P., et al. (1999) Biochemistry (Moscow), 64, 1418-1426; Skulachev, M. V., and Skulachev, V. P. (2014) Biochemistry (Moscow), 79, 977-993) stating that rate of aging is related to psychological and social aspects in human behavior. Here we assumed that Alzheimer's disease might be considered as an exacerbation of senile phenoptosis. If so, then development of this disease could be slowed using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants due to the accumulated data demonstrating a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress both with normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26638682

  3. Expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling genes in human elderly and Alzheimer's disease brains and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Walker, D G; Whetzel, A M; Lue, L-F

    2015-08-27

    Multiple cellular systems exist to prevent uncontrolled inflammation in brain tissues; the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins have key roles in these processes. SOCS proteins are involved in restricting cellular signaling pathways by enhancing the degradation of activated receptors and removing the stimuli for continued activation. There are eight separate SOCS genes that code for proteins with similar structures and properties. All SOCS proteins can reduce signaling of activated transcription factors Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), but they also regulate many other signaling pathways. SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 have particular roles in regulating inflammatory processes. Chronic inflammation is a key feature of the pathology present in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-affected brains resulting from responses to amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles, the pathological hallmarks of AD. The goal of this study was to examine SOCS gene expression in human non-demented (ND) and AD brains and in human brain-derived microglia to determine if AD-related pathology resulted in a deficit of these critical molecules. We demonstrated that SOCS-1, SOCS-2, SOCS-3 and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (CIS) mRNA expression was increased in amyloid beta peptide (Aβ)- and inflammatory-stimulated microglia, while SOCS-6 mRNA expression was decreased by both types of treatments. Using human brain samples from the temporal cortex from ND and AD cases, SOCS-1 through SOCS-7 and CIS mRNA and SOCS-1 through SOCS-7 protein could be detected constitutively in ND and AD human brain samples. Although, the expression of key SOCS genes did not change to a large extent as a result of AD pathology, there were significantly increased levels of SOCS-2, SOCS-3 and CIS mRNA and increased protein levels of SOCS-4 and SOCS-7 in AD brains. In summary, there was no evidence of a deficit of these key inflammatory regulating proteins in aged or AD

  4. Preventing Alzheimer's Disease: What Do We Know?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know? Introduction The news ...

  5. Advanced glycation end products are mitogenic signals and trigger cell cycle reentry of neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Angela; Ludwig, Sophie C; Kuhla, Björn; Münch, Gerald; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-02-01

    Neurons that reenter the cell cycle die rather than divide, a phenomenon that is associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reexpression of cell-cycle related genes in differentiated neurons in AD might be rooted in aberrant mitogenic signaling. Because microglia and astroglia proliferate in the vicinity of amyloid plaques, it is likely that plaque components or factors secreted from plaque-activated glia induce neuronal mitogenic signaling. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein-bound oxidation products of sugar, might be one of those mitogenic compounds. Cyclin D1 positive neurons are colocalized with AGEs or directly surrounded by extracellular AGE deposits in AD brain. However, a direct proof of DNA replication in these cells has been missing. Here, we report by using fluorescent in situ hybridization that consistent with the expression of cell cycle proteins, hyperploid neuronal cells are in colocalization with AGE staining in AD brains but not in nondemented controls. To complement human data, we used apolipoprotein E-deficient mice as model of neurodegeneration and showed that increased oxidative stress caused an intensified neuronal deposition of AGEs, being accompanied by an activation of the MAPK cascade via RAGE. This cascade, in turn, induced the expression of cyclin D1 and DNA replication. In addition, reduction of oxidative stress by application of α-lipoic acid decreased AGE accumulations, and this decrease was accompanied by a reduction in cell cycle reentry and a more euploid neuronal genome. PMID:25448604

  6. Plasma protein biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease endophenotypes in asymptomatic older twins: early cognitive decline and regional brain volumes

    PubMed Central

    Kiddle, S J; Steves, C J; Mehta, M; Simmons, A; Xu, X; Newhouse, S; Sattlecker, M; Ashton, N J; Bazenet, C; Killick, R; Adnan, J; Westman, E; Nelson, S; Soininen, H; Kloszewska, I; Mecocci, P; Tsolaki, M; Vellas, B; Curtis, C; Breen, G; Williams, S C R; Lovestone, S; Spector, T D; Dobson, R J B

    2015-01-01

    There is great interest in blood-based markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially in its pre-symptomatic stages. Therefore, we aimed to identify plasma proteins whose levels associate with potential markers of pre-symptomatic AD. We also aimed to characterise confounding by genetics and the effect of genetics on blood proteins in general. Panel-based proteomics was performed using SOMAscan on plasma samples from TwinsUK subjects who are asymptomatic for AD, measuring the level of 1129 proteins. Protein levels were compared with 10-year change in CANTAB-paired associates learning (PAL; n=195), and regional brain volumes (n=34). Replication of proteins associated with regional brain volumes was performed in 254 individuals from the AddNeuroMed cohort. Across all the proteins measured, genetic factors were found to explain ~26% of the variability in blood protein levels on average. The plasma level of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) MAPKAPK5 protein was found to positively associate with the 10-year change in CANTAB-PAL in both the individual and twin difference context. The plasma level of protein MAP2K4 was found to suggestively associate negatively (Q<0.1) with the volume of the left entorhinal cortex. Future studies will be needed to assess the specificity of MAPKAPK5 and MAP2K4 to eventual conversion to AD. PMID:26080319

  7. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  8. An MRI-Based Semiquantitative Index for the Evaluation of Brain Atrophy and Lesions in Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Song, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yunting; Darvesh, Sultan; Zhang, Ningnannan; D'Arcy, Ryan C.N.; Black, Sandra; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigates how T1-weighted MRI can be used to evaluate brain anatomical changes. We investigated these changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal aging. Methods A semiquantitative brain atrophy and lesion index (BALI) was constructed by adapting existing visual rating scales and validated in 3 datasets. Results The T1- and T2-weighted-imaging-based scores were highly correlated. They were both closely associated with age and with cognitive test scores. Conclusion The T1-based BALI helps describe brain structural variability in AD, mild cognitive impairment and normal aging. PMID:20733305

  9. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  10. When Memories Disappear | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease When Memories Disappear Understanding and Dealing with Alzheimer's Disease Past ... progressive brain disease that slowly destroys a person's memory, thinking skills, and the ability to perform simple, ...