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Sample records for alzheimer type onset

  1. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N.

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Gene dose of apolipoprotein E type 4 allele and the risk of Alzheimer's disease in late onset families

    SciTech Connect

    Corder, E.H.; Saunders, A.M.; Strittmatter, W.J.; Gaskell, P.C.; Roses, A.D.; Petricak-Vance, M.A. ); Schmechel, D.E. Durham VA Medical Center, CA ); Small, G.W. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1993-08-13

    The apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (APOE-[epsilon]4) is genetically associated with the common late onset familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Risk for AD increased from 20% to 90% and mean age at onset decreased from 84 to 68 years with increasing number of APOE-[epsilon]4 alleles in 42 families with late onset AD. Thus APOE-[epsilon]4 gene dose is a major risk factor for late onset AD and, in these families, homozygosity for APOE-[epsilon]4 was virtually sufficient to cause AD by age 80.

  3. Early-Onset Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Early-Onset Alzheimer’s What is early-onset Alzheimer’s disease? Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease is when Alzheimer’s affects a person younger than 65 years of age. People ...

  4. First episodes of behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease patients at age 90 and over, and early-onset Alzheimer's disease: comparison with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koji; Oda, Tatsuro; Asaoka, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shoichi; Oyamada, Reiko; Tominaga, Itaru; Inada, Toshiya

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated dementia symptoms to clarify the character of dementia with Alzheimer's disease (AD) observed in the oldest old patients and that of dementia with early-onset AD. Subjects were consecutive AD inpatients admitted for the first time at age of 90 years and over because of behavioral symptoms (demented nonagenarian group: D90G; n=18) and those with 24 consecutive inpatients with AD with early-onset (EOG). The Gottfries, Brane and Steen's scale and the Dementia Behavior Disturbance scale were used to evaluate the symptoms and troublesome behaviors. The scores of these scales in D90G and in EOG were compared with those of 26 sex distribution-, severity of dementia-, and disease duration-matched inpatients with AD with late-onset (LOG). Compared with LOG, wakefulness was more impaired and waking up at night was more frequent in D90G, while memory, orientation and inappropriate behaviors were more severe in EOG. These results suggest that the clinical features of dementia in EOG were quantitatively different from those of LOG. In contrast, the clinical feature of dementia of D90G were sleep-wake pattern disturbance and were qualitatively different from those of LOG. PMID:16401251

  5. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C.

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  9. Differences in lateral hemispheric asymmetries of glucose utilization between early- and late-onset Alzheimer-type dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, E.; Friedland, R.P.; Ober, B.A.; Jagust, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    Positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose revealed greater right than left hemispheric impairment of cortical glucose metabolism in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease who were younger than 65 but not in those over 65. This asymmetry was related to poor visuospatial performance.

  10. Early onset Alzheimer's disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Toral Rios, Danira; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world's population aged more than 60-65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology. PMID:24669286

  11. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  12. Chromosome 14 and late-onset familial alzheimer disease (FAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Anderson, L.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.; Payami, H.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.; Alonso, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) is genetically heterogeneous. Two loci responsible for early-onset FAD have been identified: the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 and the as-yet-unidentified locus on chromosome 14. The genetics of late-onset FAD is unresolved. Maximum-likelihood, affected-pedigree-member (APM), and sib-pair analysis were used, in 49 families with a mean age at onset [>=]60 years, to determine whether the chromosome 14 locus is responsible for late-onset FAD. The markers used were D14S53, D14S43, and D14S52. The LOD score method was used to test for linkage of late-onset FAD to the chromosome 14 markers, under three different models: age-dependent penetrance, an affected-only analysis, and age-dependent penetrance with allowance for possible age-dependent sporadic cases. No evidence for linkage was obtained under any of these conditions for the late-onset kindreds, and strong evidence against linkage (LOD score [>=]2.0) to this region was obtained. Heterogeneity tests of the LOD score results for the combined group of families (early onset, Volga Germans, and late onset) favored the hypothesis of linkage to chromosome 14 with genetic heterogeneity. The positive results are primarily from early-onset families. APM analysis gave significant evidence for linkage of D14S43 and D14S52 to FAD in early-onset kindreds (P<.02). No evidence for linkage was found for the entire late-onset family group. Significant evidence for linkage to D14S52, however, was found for a subgroup of families of intermediate age at onset (mean age at onset [>=]60 years and <70 years). These results indicate that the chromosome 14 locus is not responsible for Alzheimer disease in most late-onset FAD kindreds but could play a role in a subset of these kindreds. 37 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  13. Voice Onset Time Production in Speakers with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Julie; Ryalls, Jack; Brice, Alejandro; Whiteside, Janet

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, voice onset time (VOT) measurements were compared between a group of individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a group of healthy age- and gender-matched peers. Participants read a list of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, which included the six stop consonants. The VOT measurements were made from…

  14. Evidence for apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4 association in early-onset Alzheimer`s patients with late-onset relatives

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Tur, J.; Delacourte, A.; Chartier-Harlin, M.C.

    1995-12-18

    Recently several reports have extended the apolipoprotein E (APOE) {epsilon}4 association found in late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (LOAD) patients to early-onset (EO) AD patients. We have studied this question in a large population of 119 EOAD patients (onset {<=}60 years) in which family history was carefully assessed and in 109 controls. We show that the APOE {epsilon}A allele frequency is increased only in the subset of patients who belong to families where LOAD secondary cases are present. Our sampling scheme permits us to demonstrate that, for an individual, bearing at least one {epsilon}4 allele increases both the risk of AD before age 60 and the probability of belonging to a family with late-onset affected subjects. Our results suggest that a subset of EOAD cases shares a common determinism with LOAD cases. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Genetic Factors Affecting Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Khorrami, Aziz; Yeghaneh, Tarlan; Talebi, Mahnaz; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Heshmati, Yaser; Gharesouran, Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is considered a progressive brain disease in the older population. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) as a multifactorial dementia has a polygenic inheritance. Age, environment, and lifestyle along with a growing number of genetic factors have been reported as risk factors for LOAD. Our aim was to present results of LOAD association studies that have been done in northwestern Iran, and we also explored possible interactions with apolipoprotein E (APOE) status. We re-evaluated the association of these markers in dominant, recessive, and additive models. In all, 160 LOAD and 163 healthy control subjects of Azeri Turkish ethnicity were studied. The Chi-square test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. A Bonferroni-corrected p value, based on the number of statistical tests, was considered significant. Our results confirmed that chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF α), APOE, bridging integrator 1 (BIN1), and phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) are LOAD susceptibility loci in Azeri Turk ancestry populations. Among them, variants of CCR2, ESR1, TNF α, and APOE revealed associations in three different genetic models. After adjusting for APOE, the association (both allelic and genotypic) with CCR2, BIN1, and ESRα (PvuII) was evident only among subjects without the APOE ε4, whereas the association with CCR5, without Bonferroni correction, was significant only among subjects carrying the APOE ε4 allele. This result is an evidence of a synergistic and antagonistic effect of APOE on variant associations with LOAD. PMID:26553058

  16. Clustering and age of onset in familial late onset Alzheimer`s disease are determined at the apoliopoprotein E locus

    SciTech Connect

    Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.

    1994-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is of great importance in the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Thus, inheritance of the ApoE4 allele predisposes to the occurrences of late onset disease and decreases the onset age in families with pathogenic mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene. We analysed ApoE genotypes in 35 families multiply affected by AD and confirm that familial clustering in late onset AD is associated with the ApoE4 allele. This allele occurs in the great majority (82%) of late onset familial Alzheimer cases. Elderly unaffected sibs (80-90 years) have an allele frequency that is not significantly different to that of normal controls. Data presented from our family sets together previously published data is suggestive that the effect of a single ApoE4 allele is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 5 years and that the effect of ApoE4 homozygosity is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 10 years of age. Data shows significant difference between the frequency of the ApoE4 allele in the familial AD probands and controls and in both sets of unaffected sibs, p<0.01.

  17. Age-at-Onset in Late Onset Alzheimer Disease is Modified by Multiple Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; Jun, Gyungah; Reitz, Christiane; Kunkle, Brian W.; Perry, William; Park, YoSon; Beecham, Gary W.; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Wang, Li-San; Kauwe, John S.K.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Crane, Paul K.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Barmada, Michael M.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kramer, Patricia; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Hardy, John; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Larson, Eric B.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J.; Reiman, Eric M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Morris, John C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Goate, Alison M.; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance As APOE locus variants contribute to both risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease and differences in age-at-onset, it is important to know if other established late-onset Alzheimer disease risk loci also affect age-at-onset in cases. Objectives To investigate the effects of known Alzheimer disease risk loci in modifying age-at-onset, and to estimate their cumulative effect on age-at-onset variation, using data from genome-wide association studies in the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC). Design, Setting and Participants The ADGC comprises 14 case-control, prospective, and family-based datasets with data on 9,162 Caucasian participants with Alzheimer’s occurring after age 60 who also had complete age-at-onset information, gathered between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites by participating studies. Data on genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most significantly associated with risk at ten confirmed LOAD loci were examined in linear modeling of AAO, and individual dataset results were combined using a random effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis approach to determine if they contribute to variation in age-at-onset. Aggregate effects of all risk loci on AAO were examined in a burden analysis using genotype scores weighted by risk effect sizes. Main Outcomes and Measures Age at disease onset abstracted from medical records among participants with late-onset Alzheimer disease diagnosed per standard criteria. Results Analysis confirmed association of APOE with age-at-onset (rs6857, P=3.30×10−96), with associations in CR1 (rs6701713, P=7.17×10−4), BIN1 (rs7561528, P=4.78×10−4), and PICALM (rs561655, P=2.23×10−3) reaching statistical significance (P<0.005). Risk alleles individually reduced age-at-onset by 3-6 months. Burden analyses demonstrated that APOE contributes to 3.9% of variation in age-at-onset (R2=0.220) over baseline (R2=0.189) whereas the other nine loci together contribute to 1.1% of

  18. Age at onset of Alzheimer's disease: clue to the relative importance of etiologic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    Clues to the relative importance of possible etiologic factors for dementia of the Alzheimer type may be gained by examining the fit of case series to Sartwell's model of the distribution of incubation periods. If age at disease onset is used as the incubation period of this disease, a genetic or environmental factor acting during the prenatal period is suggested if the distribution of these ages fits the lognormal curve; otherwise, environmental factors acting after birth are implicated. Case series were identified from the literature. Four case series were found which contained sufficiently detailed data to permit this secondary analysis; only one case series was population-based. The distribution of age at disease onset for each series was graphically and statistically assessed for fit to the logarithmic normal distribution. Each case series fit the lognormal curve well. This suggests that research into the etiology of dementia of the Alzheimer type should focus on the prenatal experiences of patients with this disease.

  19. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F.

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. PMID:27016693

  1. Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Bateman, Randall J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Benzinger, Tammie L; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus; Holtzman, David M; Sperling, Reisa A; Mayeux, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Ringman, John M; Salloway, Stephen; McDade, Eric; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M; Fox, Nick C; Koeppe, Robert A; Jack, Clifford R; Mathis, Chester A; Oliver, Angela; Blazey, Tyler M; Moulder, Krista; Buckles, Virginia; Hornbeck, Russ; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Schultz, Aaron P; Goate, Alison M; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-01-01

    Importance Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites. Main Outcomes and Measures For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs. Results Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process. PMID:25069482

  2. Glucose Metabolic Brain Networks in Early-Onset vs. Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Eunjoo; Na, Duk L.; Jeong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) shows distinct features from late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). To explore the characteristics of EAD, clinical, neuropsychological, and functional imaging studies have been conducted. However, differences between EAD and LAD are not clear, especially in terms of brain connectivity and networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD by adopting graph theory measures. Methods: We analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images to investigate the distinct features of metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD. Using metabolic connectivity and graph theory analysis, metabolic network differences between LAD and EAD were explored. Results: Results showed the decreased connectivity centered in the cingulate gyri and occipital regions in EAD, whereas decreased connectivity in the occipital and temporal regions as well as increased connectivity in the supplementary motor area were observed in LAD when compared with age-matched control groups. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were decreased in EAD but not in LAD. EAD showed progressive network deterioration as a function of disease severity and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, mainly in terms of connectivity between the cingulate gyri and occipital regions. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were also decreased along with disease severity. Conclusion: These results indicate that EAD and LAD have distinguished features in terms of metabolic connectivity, with EAD demonstrating more extensive and progressive deterioration. PMID:27445800

  3. A large early-onset Alzheimer`s disease pedigree linked to chromosome 14q24.3

    SciTech Connect

    Hannequin, D.; Campion, D.; Brice, A.

    1994-09-01

    A large French pedigree including 34 subjects with early-onset progressive dementia was identified. In patients, the mean age-at-onset was 46 {plus_minus} 3.5 (SD) years and the mean age at death 52.6 {plus_minus} 5.7 (SD) years. No evidence for anticipation or genetic imprinting was found. Twelve patients were clinically diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s disease (AD) according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. Myoclonus and extrapyramidal signs were common and seizures were found in all affected subjects. At autopsy, neuropathological changes typical of AD were present in two brains. A significant lod score of 5.38 was observed at a recombination fraction of {theta} = 0.0 with the genetic marker D14S43, thereby establishing that the responsible gene was located on chromosome 14q24.3. Furthermore, no obligate recombinant was observed with markers D14S77 and D14S71. Typing other genetic markers in this region will allow us to localize more precisely the pathological gene.

  4. Association of cancer history with Alzheimer's disease onset and structural brain changes

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Kelly N. H.; Risacher, Shannon L.; West, John D.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Gao, Sujuan; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show a reciprocal inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The common mechanistic theory for this effect posits that cells have an innate tendency toward apoptotic or survival pathways, translating to increased risk for either neurodegeneration or cancer. However, it has been shown that cancer patients experience cognitive dysfunction pre- and post-treatment as well as alterations in cerebral gray matter density (GMD) on MRI. To further investigate these issues, we analyzed the association between cancer history (CA±) and age of AD onset, and the relationship between GMD and CA± status across diagnostic groups in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort study. Data was analyzed from 1609 participants with information on baseline cancer history and AD diagnosis, age of AD onset, and baseline MRI scans. Participants were CA+ (N = 503) and CA− (N = 1106) diagnosed with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), significant memory concerns (SMC), and cognitively normal older adults. As in previous studies, CA+ was inversely associated with AD at baseline (P = 0.025); interestingly, this effect appears to be driven by non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the largest cancer category in this study (P = 0.001). CA+ was also associated with later age of AD onset (P < 0.001), independent of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele status, and individuals with two prior cancers had later mean age of AD onset than those with one or no prior cancer (P < 0.001), suggesting an additive effect. Voxel-based morphometric analysis of GMD showed CA+ had lower GMD in the right superior frontal gyrus compared to CA− across diagnostic groups (Pcrit < 0.001, uncorrected); this cluster of lower GMD appeared to be driven by history of invasive cancer types, rather than skin cancer. Thus, while cancer history is associated with a measurable delay in AD onset independent of APOE ε4, the underlying mechanism does not appear to be

  5. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  6. Cerebral glucose metabolic patterns in Alzheimer's disease. Effect of gender and age at dementia onset

    SciTech Connect

    Small, G.W.; Kuhl, D.E.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Ashford, J.W.; Metter, E.J.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    No previous study of Alzheimer's disease has, to our knowledge, assessed the effect of both age at dementia onset and gender on cerebral glucose metabolic patterns. To this end, we used positron emission tomography (fludeoxyglucose F 18 method) to study 24 patients with clinical diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease. Comparisons of the 13 patients with early-onset dementia (less than 65 years of age) with the 11 patients with late-onset dementia (greater than 65 years of age) revealed significantly lower left parietal metabolic ratios (left posterior parietal region divided by the hemispheric average) in the early-onset group. The metabolic ratio of posterior parietal cortex divided by the relatively disease-stable average of caudate and thalamus also separated patients with early-onset dementia from those with late-onset dementia, but not men from women. Further comparisons between sexes showed that, in all brain regions studied, the 9 postmenopausal women had higher nonweighted mean metabolic rates than the 15 men from the same age group, with hemispheric sex differences of 9% on the right and 7% on the left. These results demonstrate decreased parietal ratios in early-onset dementia of Alzheimer's disease, independent of a gender effect.

  7. Late-Onset Alzheimer Risk Variants in Memory Decline, Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Crook, Julia E.; Pedraza, Otto; Thomas, Colleen S.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Allen, Mariet; Nguyen, Thuy; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Lucas, John A.; Smith, Glenn E.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Machulda, Mary M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) identified risk variants. We assessed the association of nine variants with memory and progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or LOAD (MCI/LOAD). Methods Older Caucasians, cognitively normal at baseline and longitudinally evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester and Jacksonville, were assessed for associations of genetic variants with memory decline (n=2,262) using linear mixed models and for incident MCI/LOAD (n=2,674) with Cox proportional hazards models. Each variant was tested both individually and collectively using a single weighted risk score. Results APOE-ε4 was significantly associated with worse memory at baseline (β=-0.88, p=2.78E-03) and increased rate of 5-year decline (β=-1.43, p=3.71E-06) with highly significant overall effect on memory (p=3.88E-09). CLU-locus risk allele rs11136000-G was associated with worse memory at baseline (β=-0.51, p=0.012), but not with increased rate of decline. CLU allele was also associated with incident MCI/LOAD (hazard ratio=HR=1.14, p=0.049) in sensitivity analysis. MS4A6A-locus risk allele rs610932-C was associated with increased incident MCI/LOAD in primary analysis (HR=1.17, p=0.016) and had suggestive association with lower baseline memory (β=-0.35, p=0.08). PICALM-locus risk allele rs3851179-G had nominally significant HR in both primary and sensitivity analysis, but with a protective estimate. LOAD risk alleles ABCA7-rs3764650-C and EPHA1-rs11767557-A associated with increased rates of memory decline in the subset of subjects with a final diagnosis of MCI/LOAD. Risk scores excluding APOE were not significant, whereas APOE-inclusive risk scores associated with worse memory and incident MCI/LOAD. Conclusions The collective influence of the nine top LOAD GWAS variants on memory decline and progression to MCI/LOAD appears limited. Given the significant associations observed with APOE-ε4, discovery of the biologically

  8. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  9. Microcephaly genes and risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Wilmot, Beth; Anur, Pavana; McWeeney, Shannon; Westaway, Shawn K; Silbert, Lisa; Kramer, Patricia; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Brain development in the early stages of life has been suggested to be one of the factors that may influence an individual's risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) later in life. Four microcephaly genes, which regulate brain development in utero and have been suggested to play a role in the evolution of the human brain, were selected as candidate genes that may modulate the risk of AD. We examined the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging common sequence variations in these genes and risk of AD in two case-control samples. We found that the G allele of rs2442607 in microcephalin 1 was associated with an increased risk of AD (under an additive genetic model, P=0.01; odds ratio=3.41; confidence interval, 1.77-6.57). However, this association was not replicated using another case-control sample research participants from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We conclude that the common variations we measured in the 4 microcephaly genes do not affect the risk of AD or that their effect size is small. PMID:21297427

  10. Apolipoprotein E: non-cognitive symptoms and cognitive decline in late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, C; Levy, R; McLoughlin, D M; Powell, J F; Lovestone, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between the epsilon2 and epsilon4 alleles of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and independent measures of cognitive decline and non-cognitive symptomatology in late onset Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: The frequency of the epsilon2 and epsilon4 alleles of ApoE and their association with measures of cognitive decline and non-cognitive symptomatology were assessed in a population based case register study of 164 patients with late onset Alzheimer's disease from the east Lambeth and south Southwark districts of south London. RESULTS: Analysis of a wide range of non-cognitive symptoms against ApoE epsilon4 genotype showed no significant association but a positive relation was found between ApoE epsilon2 genotype and depressive symptomatology (P = 0.004). No relation was found between measurements of cognitive decline and the presence of the ApoE epsilon4 allele. A trend for decreasing age at onset of 3 to 4 years in carriers of the ApoE epsilon4 allele was found, confirming earlier studies. CONCLUSION: Presence of the epsilon4 allele of ApoE is associated with an earlier age at onset but does not seem to be related to either a more severe psychopathology or a more rapid progression of the illness. The epsilon2 allele of ApoE is associated with depressive symptomatology in late onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:8971103

  11. Pure Word Deafness in a Patient with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sook Hui; Suh, Mee Kyung; Seo, Sang Won; Chin, Juhee; Han, Seol-Heui

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The occurrence of PWD in neurodegenerative disease is very rare, and this is the first report of it being related to early-onset AD. We describe a patient with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) who presented with pure word deafness (PWD). Case Report The patient had experienced PWD for 2 years, followed by other cognitive deficits suggestive of parietotemporal dysfunction. Brain imaging including 18FDG-PET and [11C] PIB-PET supported the diagnosis of AD. Conclusions Our case highlights the clinical variability that characterizes early-onset AD. PMID:22259620

  12. Exome sequencing in a consanguineous family clinically diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease identifies a homozygous CTSF mutation.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Djaldetti, Ruth; Alves, Ana Margarida; Mead, Simon; Darwent, Lee; Lleo, Alberto; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Blesa, Rafael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Clarimon, Jordi; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-10-01

    We have previously reported the whole genome genotyping analysis of 2 consanguineous siblings clinically diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this analysis, we identified several large regions of homozygosity shared between both affected siblings, which we suggested could be candidate loci for a recessive genetic lesion underlying the early onset AD in these cases. We have now performed exome sequencing in one of these siblings and identified the potential cause of disease: the CTSF c.1243G>A:p.Gly415Arg mutation in homozygosity. Biallelic mutations in this gene have been shown to cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with some cases resembling the impairment seen in AD. PMID:27524508

  13. Emotional Prosody Perception and Production in Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horley, Kaye; Reid, Amanda; Burnham, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated emotional prosody in patients with moderate Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) With Late Onset. It was expected that both expression and reception of prosody would be impaired relative to age-matched controls. Method: Twenty DAT and 20 control participants engaged in 2 expressive and 2 receptive…

  14. Midlife adiposity predicts earlier onset of Alzheimer's dementia, neuropathology and presymptomatic cerebral amyloid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Y-F; An, Y; Bilgel, M; Wong, D F; Troncoso, J C; O'Brien, R J; Breitner, J C; Ferruci, L; Resnick, S M; Thambisetty, M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how midlife risk factors influence age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may provide clues to delay disease expression. Although midlife adiposity predicts increased incidence of AD, it is unclear whether it affects AAO and severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology. Using a prospective population-based cohort, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), this study aims to examine the relationships between midlife body mass index (BMI) and (1) AAO of AD (2) severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology and (3) fibrillar brain amyloid deposition during aging. We analyzed data on 1394 cognitively normal individuals at baseline (8643 visits; average follow-up interval 13.9 years), among whom 142 participants developed incident AD. In two subsamples of BLSA, 191 participants underwent autopsy and neuropathological assessment, and 75 non-demented individuals underwent brain amyloid imaging. Midlife adiposity was derived from BMI data at 50 years of age. We find that each unit increase in midlife BMI predicts earlier onset of AD by 6.7 months (P=0.013). Higher midlife BMI was associated with greater Braak neurofibrillary but not CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) neuritic plaque scores at autopsy overall. Associations between midlife BMI and brain amyloid burden approached statistical significance. Thus, higher midlife BMI was also associated with greater fibrillar amyloid measured by global mean cortical distribution volume ratio (P=0.075) and within the precuneus (left, P=0.061; right, P=0.079). In conclusion, midlife overweight predicts earlier onset of AD and greater burden of Alzheimer's neuropathology. A healthy BMI at midlife may delay the onset of AD. PMID:26324099

  15. Early-onset dementia and extrapyramidal disease: clinicopathological variant of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker or Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J; Gordon, B

    1990-01-01

    A case of progressive dementia and extrapyramidal signs beginning at age 29, with a ten year course until death, is presented. Necropsy examination showed an assortment of plaque types (including striatal plaques), neurofibrillary tangles, granulovacuolar degeneration, and depigmentation of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus. This case had pathological features found in both Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and in Alzheimer's disease. While somewhat similar to several other cases with features of both diseases, it differs in the presence of dystonia and striatal plaques. Although such cases may be difficult to categorize at present, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of early onset dementia. Images PMID:2283522

  16. Exploratory Data from Complete Genomes of Familial Alzheimer Disease Age-at-Onset Outliers

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, Matthew A.; Garcia, Gloria; Madrigal, Lucia; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Arcila, Mary Luz; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Lopera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genes that modify the age-at-onset (AAO) of Alzheimer disease and targeting them pharmacologically represent a potential treatment strategy. In this exploratory study, we sequenced the complete genomes of six individuals with familial Alzheimer disease due to the autosomal dominant mutation p.Glu280Ala in PSEN1 (MIM# 104311; NM_000021.3:c.839A>C). The disease and its age-at-onset are highly heritable, motivating our search for genetic variants that modulate AAO. The median AAO of dementia in carriers of the mutant allele is 49 years. Extreme phenotypic outliers for AAO in this genetically isolated population with limited environmental variance are likely to harbor onset-modifying genetic variants. A narrow distribution of AAO in this kindred suggests large effect sizes of genetic determinants of AAO in these outliers. Identity by Descent (IBD) analysis and a combination of bioinformatics filters have suggested several candidate variants for AAO modifiers. Future work and replication studies on these variants may provide mechanistic insights into the etiopathology of Alzheimer disease. PMID:22829467

  17. Evidence for three loci modifying age-at-onset of Alzheimer's disease in early-onset PSEN2 families.

    PubMed

    Marchani, Elizabeth E; Bird, Thomas D; Steinbart, Ellen J; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Yu, Chang-En; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2010-07-01

    Families with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) sharing a single PSEN2 mutation exhibit a wide range of age-at-onset, suggesting that modifier loci segregate within these families. While APOE is known to be an age-at-onset modifier, it does not explain all of this variation. We performed a genome scan within nine such families for loci influencing age-at-onset, while simultaneously controlling for variation in the primary PSEN2 mutation (N141I) and APOE. We found significant evidence of linkage between age-at-onset and chromosome 1q23.3 (P < 0.001) when analysis included all families, and to chromosomes 1q23.3 (P < 0.001), 17p13.2 (P = 0.0002), 7q33 (P = 0.017), and 11p14.2 (P = 0.017) in a single large pedigree. Simultaneous analysis of these four chromosomes maintained strong evidence of linkage to chromosomes 1q23.3 and 17p13.2 when all families were analyzed, and to chromosomes 1q23.3, 7q33, and 17p13.2 within the same single pedigree. Inclusion of major gene covariates proved essential to detect these linkage signals, as all linkage signals dissipated when PSEN2 and APOE were excluded from the model. The four chromosomal regions with evidence of linkage all coincide with previous linkage signals, associated SNPs, and/or candidate genes identified in independent AD study populations. This study establishes several candidate regions for further analysis and is consistent with an oligogenic model of AD risk and age-at-onset. More generally, this study also demonstrates the value of searching for modifier loci in existing datasets previously used to identify primary causal variants for complex disease traits. PMID:20333730

  18. Early-onset and late-onset Alzheimer's disease are associated with distinct patterns of memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Sven; Gour, Natalina; Guedj, Eric; Didic, Mira; Guériot, Claude; Koric, Lejla; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Felician, Olivier; Guye, Maxime; Ceccaldi, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the specific patterns of memory breakdown in patients suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Twenty EOAD patients, twenty LOAD patients, twenty matched younger controls, and twenty matched older controls participated in this study. All participants underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment, an MRI scan, an FDG-PET scan, and AD patients had biomarkers as supporting evidence of both amyloïdopathy and neuronal injury. Results of the neuropsychological assessment showed that both EOAD and LOAD groups were impaired in the domains of memory, executive functions, language, praxis, and visuoconstructional abilities, when compared to their respective control groups. EOAD and LOAD groups, however, showed distinct patterns of memory impairment. Even though both groups were similarly affected on measures of episodic, short term and working memory, in contrast semantic memory was significantly more impaired in LOAD than in EOAD patients. The EOAD group was not more affected than the LOAD group in any memory domain. EOAD patients, however, showed significantly poorer performance in other cognitive domains including executive functions and visuoconstructional abilities. A more detailed analysis of the pattern of semantic memory performance among patient groups revealed that the LOAD was more profoundly impaired, in tasks of both spontaneous recall and semantic recognition. Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses showed that impaired semantic performance in patients was associated with reduced gray matter volume in the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, while PET-FDG analyses revealed that poorer semantic performance was associated with greater hypometabolism in the left temporoparietal region, both areas reflecting key regions of the semantic network. Results of this study indicate that EOAD and LOAD patients present with distinct patterns of memory impairment, and that

  19. Exploring the service and support needs of families with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Allison K; Anderson, Keith A; Acocks, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Although often cast as a disease of later life, a growing number of people are being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in their 50s and 60s. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) poses special challenges and needs for individuals and their caregivers, such as employment and access to services. In this cross-sectional study, the researchers surveyed 81 (N = 81) family caregivers to individuals with EOAD to identify service and support usage and need. Descriptive analyses revealed that families utilized a range of formal services (eg, adult day) and informal support from family and friends. In terms of challenges and needs, participants indicated that they struggled most with employment, benefits, and financial issues. Although most caregivers felt that they were coping well, they also indicated that their needs were not well understood by service providers and the public. These findings highlight the need to better understand and respond to the specific issues surrounding EOAD. PMID:25392308

  20. MTHFR Gene Mutations: A Potential Marker of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2015-01-01

    Recent epigenome-wide association studies have confirmed the importance of epigenetic effects mediated by DNA methylation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Metabolic folate pathways and methyl donor reactions facilitated by B-group vitamins may be critical in the pathogenesis of LOAD. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations were studied in consecutive Alzheimer's Disease & Memory Clinic patients up to December 2014. DNA analyses of MTHFR-C667T and - A1298C homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms in 93 consecutive elderly patients revealed high prevalence of MTHFR mutations (92.5%). Findings require confirmation in a larger series, but MTHFR mutations may become a LOAD marker, opening novel possibilities for prevention and treatment. PMID:26401555

  1. A Novel Presenilin 1 Mutation in Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease With Prominent Frontal Features.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Haakon B; Lippa, Carol F; Mehdi, Djekidel; Baehring, Joachim M

    2014-08-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a rare disorder involving known autosomal dominant mutations in the amyloid precursor protein and presenilin (PSEN) 1 and 2. Here, we present a case of early-onset AD with prominent frontal features associated with a novel deletion of codon 40 in the PSEN1 gene. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging and(18)F florbetapir imaging show prominent involvement of the frontal lobes, corresponding with the clinical presentation. This case report illustrates a possible link between a novel PSEN1 mutation and frontal variant AD. PMID:24463146

  2. Case Studies Illustrating Focal Alzheimer's, Fluent Aphasia, Late-Onset Memory Loss, and Rapid Dementia.

    PubMed

    Camsari, Gamze Balci; Murray, Melissa E; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2016-08-01

    Many dementia subtypes have more shared signs and symptoms than defining ones. We review 8 cases with 4 overlapping syndromes and demonstrate how to distinguish the cases. These include focal cortical presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD; posterior cortical atrophy and corticobasal syndrome [CBS]), fluent aphasia (semantic dementia and logopenic aphasia), late-onset slowly progressive dementia (hippocampal sclerosis and limbic predominant AD) and rapidly progressive dementia (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and limbic encephalitis). Recognizing the different syndromes can help the clinician to improve their diagnostic skills, leading to improved patient outcomes by early and accurate diagnosis, prompt treatment, and appropriate counseling and guidance. PMID:27445249

  3. Senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, J.T.; Kenny, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers on Alzheimer's Disease. They are divided into several topics. The topic headings are: Clinical Evaluation, Management, and Treatment; Related Clinical Disorders; Epidemiology and Genetics; Basic Science; and National Perspectives and Future Directions.

  4. Amyloid beta protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid are elevated in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Shoji, M; Harigaya, Y; Watanabe, M; Hosoda, K; Cheung, T T; Shaffer, L M; Golde, T E; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1994-12-01

    The 4-kd amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposited as amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is produced and released by normal proteolytic processing of the amyloid beta protein precursor (beta APP) and is readily detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we present the levels of A beta in CSF from a total of 95 subjects, including 38 patients with AD, 14 with early-onset AD and 24 with late-onset AD, 25 normal control subjects, and 32 patients with other neurological diseases. The level of A beta decreased with normal aging, and there was a significant elevation in the level of A beta in the CSF of early-onset AD patients (4.14 +/- 1.37 pmol/ml, p < 0.01). Neither Mini-Mental State nor Functional Assessment Staging were correlated with the amount of A beta in the CSF. The A beta/secreted form of beta APP ratio was elevated, but the level of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the CSF did not correlate with the level of CSF A beta in early-onset AD patients. Thus, the level of A beta in the CSF is elevated in early-onset AD patients and is suggested to be correlated with the pathology in the brain that characterizes AD. PMID:7998778

  5. The apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster and late-onset Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Nemens, E.; Olson, J.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Kukull, W.A.; Payami, H.; Boehnke, M.; Wijsman, E.M.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele E4 and FAD in late-onset families; the E4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the E4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant. No association between the E4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between E4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the E4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (Z[sub SND] = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained. For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls or allele frequencies from the families were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased. For the ENVG group, results for ApoE and ApoCII were uniformly negative. Affected-pedigree-member analysis gave significant results for the late-onset kindreds, for ApoE, when control allele frequencies were used but not when allele frequencies were derived from the families. 58 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Longitudinal changes of cortical thickness in early- versus late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanna; Jeon, Seun; Kang, Sue J; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Jae-Hong; Kim, Geon Ha; Shin, Ji Soo; Kim, Chi Hun; Noh, Young; Im, Kiho; Kim, Sung Tae; Chin, Juhee; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L

    2013-07-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) has been shown to progress more rapidly than late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). However, no studies have compared the topography of brain volume reduction over time. The purpose of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare EOAD and LOAD in terms of their rates of decline in cognitive testing and topography of cortical thinning. We prospectively recruited 36 patients with AD (14 EOAD and 22 LOAD) and 14 normal controls. All subjects were assessed with neuropsychological tests and with magnetic resonance imaging at baseline, Year 1, and Year 3. The EOAD group showed more rapid decline than the LOAD group in attention, language, and frontal-executive tests. The EOAD group also showed more rapid cortical thinning in widespread association cortices. In contrast, the LOAD group presented more rapid cortical thinning than the EOAD group only in the left parahippocampal gyrus. Our study suggests that patients with EOAD show more rapid cortical atrophy than patients with LOAD, which accounts for faster cognitive decline on neuropsychological tests. PMID:23391426

  7. Altered brain development in an early-onset murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allemang-Grand, R; Scholz, J; Ellegood, J; Cahill, L S; Laliberté, C; Fraser, P E; Josselyn, S A; Sled, J G; Lerch, J P

    2015-02-01

    Murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been used to draw associations between atrophy of neural tissue and underlying pathology. In this study, the early-onset TgCRND8 mouse model of AD and littermate controls were scanned longitudinally with in vivo manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) before and after the onset of amyloid plaque deposition at 12 weeks of age. Separate cohorts of mice were scanned at 1 week (ex vivo imaging) and 4 weeks (MEMRI) of age to investigate early life alterations in the brain. Contrary to our expectations, differences in neuroanatomy were found in early post-natal life, preceding plaque deposition by as much as 11 weeks. Many of these differences remained at all imaging time points, suggesting that they were programmed early in life and were unaffected by the onset of pathology. Furthermore, rather than showing atrophy, many regions of the TgCRND8 brain grew at a faster rate compared to controls. These regions contained the greatest density of amyloid plaques and reactive astrocytes. Our findings suggest that pathological processes as well as an alteration in brain development influence the TgCRND8 neuroanatomy throughout the lifespan. PMID:25311279

  8. Late-onset Alzheimer disease risk variants mark brain regulatory loci

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mariet; Kachadoorian, Michaela; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Karhade, Aditya; Manly, Lester; Burgess, Jeremy D.; Wang, Chen; Serie, Daniel; Wang, Xue; Siuda, Joanna; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis; Crook, Julia; Medway, Christopher; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly; Lincoln, Sarah; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Asmann, Yan W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the top late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk loci detected or confirmed by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project for association with brain gene expression levels to identify variants that influence Alzheimer disease (AD) risk through gene expression regulation. Methods: Expression levels from the cerebellum (CER) and temporal cortex (TCX) were obtained using Illumina whole-genome cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay (WG-DASL) for ∼400 autopsied patients (∼200 with AD and ∼200 with non-AD pathologies). We tested 12 significant LOAD genome-wide association study (GWAS) index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cis association with levels of 34 genes within ±100 kb. We also evaluated brain levels of 14 LOAD GWAS candidate genes for association with 1,899 cis-SNPs. Significant associations were validated in a subset of TCX samples using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq). Results: We identified strong associations of brain CR1, HLA-DRB1, and PILRB levels with LOAD GWAS index SNPs. We also detected other strong cis-SNPs for LOAD candidate genes MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4. MEF2C and SLC24A4, but not ZCWPW1 cis-SNPs, also associate with LOAD risk, independent of the index SNPs. The TCX expression associations could be validated with RNAseq for CR1, HLA-DRB1, ZCWPW1, and SLC24A4. Conclusions: Our results suggest that some LOAD GWAS variants mark brain regulatory loci, nominate genes under regulation by LOAD risk variants, and annotate these variants for their brain regulatory effects. PMID:27066552

  9. SORL1 rare variants: a major risk factor for familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Quenez, O; Bellenguez, C; Grenier-Boley, B; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Le Guennec, K; Bacq, D; Garnier, J-G; Olaso, R; Boland, A; Meyer, V; Deleuze, J-F; Amouyel, P; Munter, H M; Bourque, G; Lathrop, M; Frebourg, T; Redon, R; Letenneur, L; Dartigues, J-F; Génin, E; Lambert, J-C; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2016-06-01

    The SORL1 protein plays a protective role against the secretion of the amyloid β peptide, a key event in the pathogeny of Alzheimer's disease. We assessed the impact of SORL1 rare variants in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) in a case-control setting. We conducted a whole exome analysis among 484 French EOAD patients and 498 ethnically matched controls. After collapsing rare variants (minor allele frequency ≤1%), we detected an enrichment of disruptive and predicted damaging missense SORL1 variants in cases (odds radio (OR)=5.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(2.02-14.99), P=7.49.10(-5)). This enrichment was even stronger when restricting the analysis to the 205 cases with a positive family history (OR=8.86, 95% CI=(3.35-27.31), P=3.82.10(-7)). We conclude that predicted damaging rare SORL1 variants are a strong risk factor for EOAD and that the association signal is mainly driven by cases with positive family history. PMID:26303663

  10. Screening of dementia genes by whole-exome sequencing in early-onset Alzheimer disease: input and lessons.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Charbonnier, Camille; Quenez, Olivier; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Coutant, Sophie; Le Guennec, Kilan; Bacq, Delphine; Garnier, Jean-Guillaume; Olaso, Robert; Boland, Anne; Meyer, Vincent; Deleuze, Jean-François; Munter, Hans Markus; Bourque, Guillaume; Auld, Daniel; Montpetit, Alexandre; Lathrop, Mark; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Martinaud, Olivier; Pariente, Jérémie; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Pasquier, Florence; Le Ber, Isabelle; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Paquet, Claire; Sauvée, Mathilde; Moreaud, Olivier; Gabelle, Audrey; Sellal, François; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Chamard, Ludivine; Blanc, Frédéric; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Causative variants in APP, PSEN1 or PSEN2 account for a majority of cases of autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD, onset before 65 years). Variant detection rates in other EOAD patients, that is, with family history of late-onset AD (LOAD) (and no incidence of EOAD) and sporadic cases might be much lower. We analyzed the genomes from 264 patients using whole-exome sequencing (WES) with high depth of coverage: 90 EOAD patients with family history of LOAD and no incidence of EOAD in the family and 174 patients with sporadic AD starting between 51 and 65 years. We found three PSEN1 and one PSEN2 causative, probably or possibly causative variants in four patients (1.5%). Given the absence of PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP causative variants, we investigated whether these 260 patients might be burdened with protein-modifying variants in 20 genes that were previously shown to cause other types of dementia when mutated. For this analysis, we included an additional set of 160 patients who were previously shown to be free of causative variants in PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP: 107 ADEOAD patients and 53 sporadic EOAD patients with an age of onset before 51 years. In these 420 patients, we detected no variant that might modify the function of the 20 dementia-causing genes. We conclude that EOAD patients with family history of LOAD and no incidence of EOAD in the family or patients with sporadic AD starting between 51 and 65 years have a low variant-detection rate in AD genes. PMID:26242991

  11. Projections of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset.

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S; Kawas, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to project the future prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the potential impact of interventions to delay disease onset. METHODS: The numbers of individuals in the United States with Alzheimer's disease and the numbers of newly diagnosed cases that can be expected over the next 50 years were estimated from a model that used age-specific incidence rates summarized from several epidemiological studies, US mortality rates, and US Bureau of the Census projections. RESULTS: in 1997, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States was 2.32 million (range: 1.09 to 4.58 million); of these individuals, 68% were female. It is projected that the prevalence will nearly quadruple in the next 50 years, by which time approximately 1 in 45 Americans will be afflicted with the disease. Currently, the annual number of new incident cases in 360,000. If interventions could delay onset of the disease by 2 years, after 50 years there would be nearly 2 million fewer cases than projected; if onset could be delayed by 1 year, there would be nearly 800,000 fewer prevalent cases. CONCLUSIONS: As the US population ages, Alzheimer's disease will become an enormous public health problem. interventions that could delay disease onset even modestly would have a major public health impact. PMID:9736873

  12. Screening exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in sporadic early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Imelda S; García-Cárdenas, Jennyfer M; Sakdapanichkul, Chidchanok; Deacon, Christopher; Zapata Erazo, Gabriela; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose; Hernandez, Dena; Singleton, Andrew; Guetta-Baranes, Tamar; Braae, Anne; Clement, Naomi; Patel, Tulsi; Brookes, Keeley; Medway, Christopher; Chappell, Sally; Mann, David M; Morgan, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) can be familial (FAD) or sporadic EOAD (sEOAD); both have a disease onset ≤65 years of age. A total of 451 sEOAD samples were screened for known causative mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. Four samples were shown to be heterozygous for 1 of 3 known causative mutations: p.A713T, p.V717I, and p.V717G; this highlights the importance of screening EOAD patients for causative mutations. Additionally, we document an intronic 6 base pair (bp) deletion located 83 bp downstream of exon 17 (rs367709245, IVS17 83-88delAAGTAT), which has a nonsignificantly increased minor allele frequency in our sEOAD cohort (0.006) compared to LOAD (0.002) and controls (0.002). To assess the effect of the 6-bp deletion on splicing, COS-7 and BE(2)-C cells were transfected with a minigene vector encompassing exon 17. There was no change in splicing of exon 17 from constructs containing either wild type or deletion inserts. Sequencing of cDNA generated from cerebellum and temporal cortex of a patient harboring the deletion found no evidence of transcripts with exon 17 removed. PMID:26803359

  13. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Presenilin-1-immunoreactive neurons are preserved in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, P.; Bouras, C.; Kövari, E.; Shioi, J.; Tezapsidis, N.; Hof, P. R.; Robakis, N. K.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that missense mutations in the presenilin-1 gene are causally related to the majority of familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). To examine the possible involvement of presenilin-1 in late-onset sporadic AD, a quantitative analysis of its distribution in the cerebral cortex of nondemented and AD patients was performed using immunocytochemistry. Stereological analyses revealed that AD brains showed a marked neuronal loss in the CA1 field of the hippocampus and hilus of the dentate gyrus, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. In these areas, however, the fraction of neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-free neurons showing presenilin-1 immunoreactivity was increased compared with nondemented controls. In contrast, cortical areas, which displayed no neuronal loss, did not show any significant increase in the fraction of presenilin-1-positive neurons. Moreover, presenilin-1 immunoreactivity was reduced in NFT-containing neurons. Thus, in AD, the fraction of NFT-free neurons that contained presenilin-1 varied from 0.48 to 0.77, whereas the fraction of NFT-containing neurons that were presenilin-1 positive varied from 0.1 to 0.24. Together, these observations indicate that presenilin-1 may have a neuroprotective role and that in AD low cellular expression of this protein may be associated with increased neuronal loss and NFT formation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9033258

  15. Whole-genome sequencing suggests a chemokine gene cluster that modifies age at onset in familial Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, M A; Bettcher, B M; Arcila, M L; Garcia, G; Guzman, C; Madrigal, L; Ramirez, L; Acosta-Uribe, J; Baena, A; Wojta, K J; Coppola, G; Fitch, R; de Both, M D; Huentelman, M J; Reiman, E M; Brunkow, M E; Glusman, G; Roach, J C; Kao, A W; Lopera, F; Kosik, K S

    2015-01-01

    We have sequenced the complete genomes of 72 individuals affected with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by an autosomal dominant, highly penetrant mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene, and performed genome-wide association testing to identify variants that modify age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease. Our analysis identified a haplotype of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 17 within a chemokine gene cluster associated with delayed onset of mild-cognitive impairment and dementia. Individuals carrying this haplotype had a mean AAO of mild-cognitive impairment at 51.0±5.2 years compared with 41.1±7.4 years for those without these SNPs. This haplotype thus appears to modify Alzheimer's AAO, conferring a large (~10 years) protective effect. The associated locus harbors several chemokines including eotaxin-1 encoded by CCL11, and the haplotype includes a missense polymorphism in this gene. Validating this association, we found plasma eotaxin-1 levels were correlated with disease AAO in an independent cohort from the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. In this second cohort, the associated haplotype disrupted the typical age-associated increase of eotaxin-1 levels, suggesting a complex regulatory role for this haplotype in the general population. Altogether, these results suggest eotaxin-1 as a novel modifier of Alzheimer's disease AAO and open potential avenues for therapy. PMID:26324103

  16. Whole-genome sequencing suggests a chemokine gene cluster that modifies age at onset in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lalli, M A; Bettcher, B M; Arcila, M L; Garcia, G; Guzman, C; Madrigal, L; Ramirez, L; Acosta-Uribe, J; Baena, A; Wojta, K J; Coppola, G; Fitch, R; de Both, M D; Huentelman, M J; Reiman, E M; Brunkow, M E; Glusman, G; Roach, J C; Kao, A W; Lopera, F; Kosik, K S

    2015-11-01

    We have sequenced the complete genomes of 72 individuals affected with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by an autosomal dominant, highly penetrant mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene, and performed genome-wide association testing to identify variants that modify age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease. Our analysis identified a haplotype of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 17 within a chemokine gene cluster associated with delayed onset of mild-cognitive impairment and dementia. Individuals carrying this haplotype had a mean AAO of mild-cognitive impairment at 51.0 ± 5.2 years compared with 41.1 ± 7.4 years for those without these SNPs. This haplotype thus appears to modify Alzheimer's AAO, conferring a large (~10 years) protective effect. The associated locus harbors several chemokines including eotaxin-1 encoded by CCL11, and the haplotype includes a missense polymorphism in this gene. Validating this association, we found plasma eotaxin-1 levels were correlated with disease AAO in an independent cohort from the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. In this second cohort, the associated haplotype disrupted the typical age-associated increase of eotaxin-1 levels, suggesting a complex regulatory role for this haplotype in the general population. Altogether, these results suggest eotaxin-1 as a novel modifier of Alzheimer's disease AAO and open potential avenues for therapy. PMID:26324103

  17. Cholesterol and Alzheimer Type Dementia among Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a summary of research by Warren Zigman and colleagues investigating the link between cholesterol levels and Alzheimer type dementia among adults with Down syndrome. Warren Zigman and colleagues followed 123 adults with Down syndrome between May 1998 and April 2006. The participants were aged between 41 and 78 years at the…

  18. Selective Attention in Early Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Duque, Diego; Black, Sandra E.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored possible deficits in selective attention brought about by Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DAT). In three experiments, we tested patients with early DAT, healthy elderly, and young adults under low memory demands to assess perceptual filtering, conflict resolution, and set switching abilities. We found no evidence of impaired…

  19. Evidence for an association between KIBRA and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Corneveaux, Jason J; Liang, Winnie S; Reiman, Eric M; Webster, Jennifer A; Myers, Amanda J; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta D; Pearson, John V; Hu-Lince, Diane; Craig, David W; Coon, Keith D; Dunckley, Travis; Bandy, Daniel; Lee, Wendy; Chen, Kewei; Beach, Thomas G; Mastroeni, Diego; Grover, Andrew; Ravid, Rivka; Sando, Sigrid B; Aasly, Jan O; Heun, Reinhard; Jessen, Frank; Kölsch, Heike; Rogers, Joseph; Hutton, Michael L; Melquist, Stacey; Petersen, Ron C; Alexander, Gene E; Caselli, Richard J; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2010-06-01

    We recently reported evidence for an association between the individual variation in normal human episodic memory and a common variant of the KIBRA gene, KIBRA rs17070145 (T-allele). Since memory impairment is a cardinal clinical feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the possibility of an association between the KIBRA gene and AD using data from neuronal gene expression, brain imaging studies, and genetic association tests. KIBRA was significantly over-expressed and three of its four known binding partners under-expressed in AD-affected hippocampal, posterior cingulate and temporal cortex regions (P<0.010, corrected) in a study of laser-capture microdissected neurons. Using positron emission tomography in a cohort of cognitively normal, late-middle-aged persons genotyped for KIBRA rs17070145, KIBRA T non-carriers exhibited lower glucose metabolism than did carriers in posterior cingulate and precuneus brain regions (P<0.001, uncorrected). Lastly, non-carriers of the KIBRA rs17070145 T-allele had increased risk of late-onset AD in an association study of 702 neuropathologically verified expired subjects (P=0.034; OR=1.29) and in a combined analysis of 1026 additional living and expired subjects (P=0.039; OR=1.26). Our findings suggest that KIBRA is associated with both individual variation in normal episodic memory and predisposition to AD. PMID:18789830

  20. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD. PMID:22472873

  1. Association of HMGCR polymorphism with late-onset Alzheimer's disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Zhan-Jie; Kong, Ling-Li; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) acts as a potential genetic modifier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous reports identified that HMGCR rs3846662 polymorphism is associated with biosynthesis of cholesterol in AD pathology. In order to assess the involvement of the HMGCR polymorphism in the risk of late-onset AD (LOAD) in northern Han Chinese, we performed a case–control study of 2334 unrelated subjects (984 cases and 1350 age- and gender-matched controls) to evaluate the genotype and allele distributions of the HMGCR rs3846662 with LOAD. The genotype distribution (GG, AG, AA) of rs3846662 was significantly different between LOAD patients and controls (P = 0.003), but the allele distribution did not reach a significant difference (P = 0.614). After adjusting for age, gender and the APOE ε4 status, the minor A allele of rs3846662 was validated as a protective factor for LOAD in dominant model (OR = 0.796, P = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.657–0.965). Interestingly, we observed rs3846662 polymorphism was only significantly associated with LOAD in APOE ε4 non-carriers (OR = 0.735, P = 0.005, 95% CI = [0.593, 0.912]). In conclusion, our study demonstrates A allele of HMGCR rs3846662 acts as a protective factor for LOAD in northern Han Chinese. PMID:27009838

  2. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole-genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta-analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60-3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26411346

  3. Genetic variability in SQSTM1 and risk of early-onset Alzheimer dementia: a European early-onset dementia consortium study.

    PubMed

    Cuyvers, Elise; van der Zee, Julie; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Robberecht, Caroline; Dillen, Lubina; Merlin, Céline; Geerts, Nathalie; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matěj, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Ruiz, Agustín; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2015-05-01

    Meta-analysis of existing genome-wide association studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) showed subgenome-wide association of an intronic variant in the sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) gene with AD. We performed targeted resequencing of SQSTM1 in Flanders-Belgian AD patients selected to be enriched for a genetic background (n = 435) and geographically matched nonaffected individuals (n = 872) to investigate the role of both common and rare SQSTM1 variants. Results were extended to the European early-onset dementia cohorts (926 early-onset Alzheimer's disease [EOAD] patients and 1476 nonaffected individuals). Of the 61 detected exonic variants in SQSTM1, the majority were rare (n = 57). Rare variant (minor allele frequency <0.01) burden analysis did not reveal an increased frequency of rare variants in EOAD patients in any of the separate study populations nor when meta-analyzing all cohorts. Common variants p.D292= and p.R312= showed nominal association with AD (odds ratiop.D292= = 1.11 [95% confidence interval = 1-1.22], p = 0.04), only when including the Flanders-Belgian cohort in the meta-analysis. We cannot exclude a role of SQSTM1 genetic variability in late-onset AD, but our data indicate that SQSTM1 does not play a major role in the etiology of EOAD. PMID:25796131

  4. Novel late-onset Alzheimer disease loci variants associate with brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mariet; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S.; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Schultz, Debra; Rakhshan, Fariborz; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) identified 9 novel risk loci. Discovery of functional variants within genes at these loci is required to confirm their role in Alzheimer disease (AD). Single nucleotide polymorphisms that influence gene expression (eSNPs) constitute an important class of functional variants. We therefore investigated the influence of the novel LOAD risk loci on human brain gene expression. Methods: We measured gene expression levels in the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied AD subjects and those with other brain pathologies (∼400 total subjects). To determine whether any of the novel LOAD risk variants are eSNPs, we tested their cis-association with expression of 6 nearby LOAD candidate genes detectable in human brain (ABCA7, BIN1, CLU, MS4A4A, MS4A6A, PICALM) and an additional 13 genes ±100 kb of these SNPs. To identify additional eSNPs that influence brain gene expression levels of the novel candidate LOAD genes, we identified SNPs ±100 kb of their location and tested for cis-associations. Results: CLU rs11136000 (p = 7.81 × 10−4) and MS4A4A rs2304933/rs2304935 (p = 1.48 × 10−4–1.86 × 10−4) significantly influence temporal cortex expression levels of these genes. The LOAD-protective CLU and risky MS4A4A locus alleles associate with higher brain levels of these genes. There are other cis-variants that significantly influence brain expression of CLU and ABCA7 (p = 4.01 × 10−5–9.09 × 10−9), some of which also associate with AD risk (p = 2.64 × 10−2–6.25 × 10−5). Conclusions: CLU and MS4A4A eSNPs may at least partly explain the LOAD risk association at these loci. CLU and ABCA7 may harbor additional strong eSNPs. These results have implications in the search for functional variants at the novel LOAD risk loci. PMID:22722634

  5. Case-control study of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    French, L.R.; Schuman, L.M.; Mortimer, J.A.; Hutton, J.T.; Boatman, R.A.; Christians, B.

    1985-03-01

    A case-control study to assess factors of possible etiologic significance to dementia of the Alzheimer type was conducted with 78 male cases diagnosed in 1979-1982 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and age-race-sex-matched hospital and neighborhood controls (14 of 16 autopsied cases were histopathologically confirmed). Information was obtained on variables relevant to vital, genetic, and immunologic hypotheses, and on possible occupational and environmental exposures, drug use, psychologic stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The only major difference between patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and controls was a significantly greater occurrence of antecedent head trauma in the patients (odds ratio = 4.50). This finding is consistent with the literature on posttraumatic dementia but its importance is presently unclear.

  6. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment. PMID:26998855

  7. Common variants of ACE contribute to variable age-at-onset of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Andreasen, Niels; Gatz, Maragaret; Wilcock, Gordon K; Cairns, Nigel J; Palmgren, Juni; de Faire, Ulf; Brookes, Anthony J; Pedersen, Nancy L; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2004-04-01

    Studies on the role that genetic variation may play in a complex human disease can be empowered by an assessment of both disease risk in case-control or family models and of quantitative traits that reflect elements of disease etiology. An excellent example of this can be found for the epsilon4 allele of APOE in relation to Alzheimer's disease (AD) for which association with both risk and age-at-onset (AAO) is evident. Following a recent demonstration that variants of the gene encoding angiotensin I converting enzyme ( ACE) contribute to AD risk, we have explored the potential influence of ACE upon AAO in AD. A total of 2861 individuals from three European populations, including six independent AD samples, have been examined in this study. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously demonstrated to have maximum effects upon ACE plasma levels and that span the ACE locus were genotyped in these materials. A strong effect upon AAO was observed for marker rs4343 in exon 17 ( P<0.0001), but evidence was also obtained indicating a possible independent effect of marker rs4291 ( P=0.0095) located in the ACE promoter. Effects were consistent with data from previous studies suggesting association with AD in case-control models, whereby alleles demonstrated to confer risk to disease also appear to reduce AAO. Equivalent effects were evident regardless of APOE epsilon4 carrier status and in both males and females. These results provide an important complement to existing AD risk data, confirming that ACE harbors sequence variants that contribute to aspects of AD pathology. PMID:14986105

  8. Polymorphisms within ASTN2 gene are associated with age at onset of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Tonarelli, Silvina; Luo, Xingguang; Wang, Liang; Su, Brenda; Zuo, Lingjun; Mao, ChunXiang; Rubin, Lewis; Briones, David; Xu, Chun

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurological condition associated with genetic profiles that are still not completely understood. We performed a family-based low-density genome-wide association analysis of age at onset (AAO) in AD (244 patients and their relatives) using Illumina 6 K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) panel and the FBAT-logrank statistic. We observed 10 SNPs associated with AAO in AD with p < 2 × 10(-3). The most significant hit within a known gene, the neuronal protein astrotactin 2 (ASTN2), was SNP rs1334071 (p = 8.74 × 10(-4)). ASTN2 has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including cognitive disorders, autism and schizophrenia. We then conducted a replication study focusing on ASTN2 gene in a Canadian sample of 791 AD patients and 782 controls using the logrank test. Five ASTN2 SNPs (highest association is rs16933774 with p = 0.0053) showed associations with AAO in this Canadian sample (p < 0.05). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of SNP rs16933774 showed that the AAO of AD in individuals heterozygous for AG genotype of rs16933774 (median of AAO = 68.5 years) was approximately 4.5 years earlier than those individuals having the AA genotype (median of AAO = 73 years). In conclusion, a significant association of ASTN2 genetic variants with AAO of AD in two independent samples demonstrates a role for ASTN2 in the pathogenesis of AD. Future functional studies of this gene may help to characterize the genetic architecture of the AAO of AD. Genetic factors in AAO may be a critical factor for early AD intervention and prevention efforts. PMID:25410587

  9. Plasma cytokines profile in older subjects with late onset Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, G; Ranzini, M; Guerra, G; Rossi, L; Munari, M R; Zurlo, A; Volpato, S; Atti, A R; Blè, A; Fellin, R

    2007-10-01

    Some cytokines have been involved in the pathogenesis of late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). A possible increase in plasma cytokines levels has been reported in LOAD and vascular dementia (VD), but the results of previous studies are conflicting. We evaluated the plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-10 in four groups of older individuals: 60 patients with LOAD, 80 patients with VD, 40 subjects with cerebrovascular disease but without dementia (CDND), and 42 controls (C). By analysis of covariance (adjustment for age, gender, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and alcohol consumption) we found that: *IL-1beta was higher in VD, LOAD, and CDND compared with controls (p<0.005). *TNF-alpha was higher in VD and LOAD compared to C (p<0.05), and in VD compared to LOAD (p<0.03). *IL-6 was higher in VD compared with LOAD (p<0.03). No differences in IL-10 values were found (Kruskal-Wallis, Asymp. Sig. 0.14). By logistic regression analysis, we demonstrated that high levels (defined as above the median) of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, but not of IL-6, were associated with increased likelihood of having VD and LOAD compared to C, while high IL-6 levels were associated with a increased probability of having VD, compared with LOAD. Our study support the notion of a low-grade systemic inflammation in older patients with LOAD or VD, characterized by an increase in plasma IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels. The high IL-6 levels found in VD might be not a specific finding, as it might come from several conditions including atherosclerosis and related vascular risk factors, comorbidity, and frailty. PMID:16600299

  10. Polygenic Analysis of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease from Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Maggie Haitian; Zhou, Yafang; Xiao, Tingting; Zhang, Weiwei; Sun, Rui; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Tang, Beisha; Shen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified to be associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) through genome-wide association study data. Identification of SNP-SNP interaction played an important role in better understanding genetic basis of LOAD. In this study, fifty-eight SNPs were screened in a cohort of 229 LOAD cases and 318 controls from mainland China, and their interaction was evaluated by a series of analysis methods. Seven risk SNPs and six protective SNPs were identified to be associated with LOAD. Risk SNPs included rs9331888 (CLU), rs6691117 (CR1), rs4938933 (MS4A), rs9349407 (CD2AP), rs1160985 (TOMM40), rs4945261 (GAB2) and rs5984894 (PCDH11X); Protective SNPs consisted of rs744373 (BIN1), rs1562990 (MS4A), rs597668 (EXOC3L2), rs9271192 (HLA-DRB5/DRB1), rs157581 and rs11556505 (TOMM40). Among positive SNPs presented above, we found the interaction between rs4938933 (risk) and rs1562990 (protective) in MS4A weakened their each effect for LOAD; for three significant SNPs in TOMM40, their cumulative interaction induced the two protective SNPs effects lost and made the risk SNP effect aggravate for LOAD. Finally, we found rs6656401-rs3865444 (CR1-CD33) pairs were significantly associated with decreasing LOAD risk, while rs28834970-rs6656401 (PTK2B-CR1), and rs28834970-rs6656401 (PTK2B-CD33) were associated with increasing LOAD risk. In a word, our study indicates that SNP-SNP interaction existed in the same gene or cross different genes, which could weaken or aggravate their initial single effects for LOAD. PMID:26680604

  11. Evidence that the APOE locus influences rate of disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.; Crawford, F.; Osborne, A.; Diaz, P.

    1995-02-27

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosome 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and non-stringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease free survival age within late onset families. One explanation for the age dependent association reported by other groups, and our results, is that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease process in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause the disease. We suggest this hypothesis is compatible with the current literature regarding APOE and AD. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Over-representation of the APOE*4 allele in autopsy confirmed early- and late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboh, M.I.; DeKosky, S.T.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E binds to {beta}-amyloid peptide in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Recent studies have identified the APOE*4 allele as a major predisposing genetic factor for late-onset familial AD as well as in sporadic AD. Most of these association studies are based on clinically diagnosed AD cases with little data available on autopsy confirmed, definite AD. To characterize the distribution of APOE polymorphism in autopsy confirmed sporadic AD cases, we determined APOE genotypes in 111 DNA samples (aged 51-101 years) extracted from brain tissues which were available from the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. The APOE data was compared between the AD group and 3 samples of population controls from Western Pennsylvania consisting of a young cohort (N=473, aged 18-48 years), middle cohort (N=473, aged 42-50 years) and an old cohort (N=870, aged 65-90 years). The frequency of the APOE*4 allele was similar in the young and middle cohorts (0.12) and slightly lower in the old cohort (0.10). However, the frequency of the APOE*4 allele was three times higher in both early-onset (<65 years; 0.36) and late-onset ({ge}65 years; 0.38) sporadic AD cases compared to the control groups (p<0.0001). In the AD cohort the frequency of the APOE*4 allele was similar across all age groups (<65, 65-75, 76-85, 86+) and so was in men and women (0.40 vs. 0.37). The E*4 homozygosity was observed in 18% of AD cases compared to 1% in each of the three control groups. The E*4 heterozygosity was present in 50% of AD cases compared to 17% in the control old cohort and 22% in both the young and middle control cohorts. These data confirm that the APOE*4 allele is a major risk factor for AD regardless of age-at-diagnosis or family history.

  13. Comparison between Early-Onset and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Amnestic Presentation: CSF and 18F-FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Koch, Giacomo; Toniolo, Sofia; Belli, Lorena; Lorenzo, Francesco Di; Gaudenzi, Sara; Schillaci, Orazio; Bozzali, Marco; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Martorana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the differences in brain glucose consumption between patients with early onset of Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, aged ≤65 years) and patients with late onset of Alzheimer's disease (LOAD, aged >65 years). Methods Differences in brain glucose consumption between the groups have been evaluated by means of Statistical Parametric Mapping version 8, with the use of age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination and cerebrospinal fluid values of AΒ1-42, phosphorylated Tau and total Tau as covariates in the comparison between EOAD and LOAD. Results As compared to LOAD, EOAD patients showed a significant decrease in glucose consumption in a wide portion of the left parietal lobe (BA7, BA31 and BA40). No significant differences were obtained when subtracting the EOAD from the LOAD group. Conclusions The results of our study show that patients with EOAD show a different metabolic pattern as compared to those with LOAD that mainly involves the left parietal lobe. PMID:27195000

  14. Phenotypic profile of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by presenilin-1 E280A mutation.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Glatzel, Markus; Lopera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations are the most common cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). They show a common phenotypic profile characterized by early age of onset, severe dementia and distinct neurodegeneration. The largest population of EOFAD carries the E280A mutation in PS1 and resides in Antioquia, Colombia, currently comprising around 5,000 individuals. Carriers start showing memory impairment in the third decade of life, followed by progressive impairment of language and other cognitive processes. They reach mild cognitive impairment around 45 and dementia around 50 years of age. There is some phenotypic variability among the carriers of this single PS1 mutation. Some patients present with epilepsy, verbal impairment, and cerebellar ataxia. Neuropathologically, PS1 E280A cases show pronounced brain atrophy, severe amyloid-β pathology, distinct hyperphosphorylated tau-related pathology, and cerebellar damage. The earliest event identified by functional magnetic imaging resonance is hyperactivation within the right anterior hippocampus around 33 years of age. This well-studied population with a clear pre-clinical profile and wide phenotypic variability in age of onset and clinical presentation is ideally suited for clinical trials and to study molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22766738

  15. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  16. Discovery of gene-gene interactions across multiple independent data sets of late onset Alzheimer disease from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Timothy J; Bush, William S; Jiang, Lan; Brown-Gentry, Kristin D; Torstenson, Eric S; Dudek, Scott M; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Naj, Adam; Kunkle, Brian W; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2016-02-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) has a complex genetic etiology, involving locus heterogeneity, polygenic inheritance, and gene-gene interactions; however, the investigation of interactions in recent genome-wide association studies has been limited. We used a biological knowledge-driven approach to evaluate gene-gene interactions for consistency across 13 data sets from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP pairs within 3 gene-gene combinations were identified: SIRT1 × ABCB1, PSAP × PEBP4, and GRIN2B × ADRA1A. In addition, we extend a previously identified interaction from an endophenotype analysis between RYR3 × CACNA1C. Finally, post hoc gene expression analyses of the implicated SNPs further implicate SIRT1 and ABCB1, and implicate CDH23 which was most recently identified as an AD risk locus in an epigenetic analysis of AD. The observed interactions in this article highlight ways in which genotypic variation related to disease may depend on the genetic context in which it occurs. Further, our results highlight the utility of evaluating genetic interactions to explain additional variance in AD risk and identify novel molecular mechanisms of AD pathogenesis. PMID:26827652

  17. Current view from Alzheimer disease to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qazi, Aamer M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Manan, Abdul; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Asif, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Iqbal, Zafar; Shaik, Munvar M; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory problems. It has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus at both the molecular and biochemical level. Pancreatic cells have molecular similarities to the brain at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. Several genes have been reported to be responsible for both AD and diabetes. Currently, no proper treatment is available but various therapeutic approaches are utilized worldwide for the management of these disorders and may be nanoparticles and herbal treatment of Bacopa monnieri will make promise for the treatment of AD in future. The formation of amyloids in neurons and the formation of amylin in pancreatic cells are potential links between these two disorders, which can be silent killers. PMID:24059295

  18. Loss of functional connectivity is greater outside the default mode network in nonfamilial early-onset Alzheimer's disease variants.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Manja; Madison, Cindee; Ghosh, Pia M; Miller, Zachary A; Greicius, Michael D; Kramer, Joel H; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Bruce L; Jagust, William J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-10-01

    The common and specific involvement of brain networks in clinical variants of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not well understood. We performed task-free ("resting-state") functional imaging in 60 nonfamilial AD patients, including 20 early-onset AD (age at onset <65 years, amnestic/dysexecutive deficits), 24 logopenic aphasia (language deficits), and 16 posterior cortical atrophy patients (visual deficits), as well as 60 healthy controls. Seed-based connectivity analyses were conducted to assess differences between groups in 3 default mode network (DMN) components (anterior, posterior, and ventral) and 4 additional non-DMN networks: left and right executive-control, language, and higher visual networks. Significant decreases in connectivity were found across AD variants compared with controls in the non-DMN networks. Within the DMN components, patients showed higher connectivity in the anterior DMN, in particular in logopenic aphasia. No significant differences were found for the posterior and ventral DMN. Our findings suggest that loss of functional connectivity is greatest in networks outside the DMN in early-onset and nonamnestic AD variants and may thus be a better biomarker in these patients. PMID:26242705

  19. Early role of vascular dysregulation on late-onset Alzheimer's disease based on multifactorial data-driven analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iturria-Medina, Y.; Sotero, R. C.; Toussaint, P. J.; Mateos-Pérez, J. M.; Evans, A. C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Mesulam, M Marcel; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, AnnMarie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Ponto, Laura L. Boles; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms underlying late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) are poorly characterized from an integrative perspective. Here spatiotemporal alterations in brain amyloid-β deposition, metabolism, vascular, functional activity at rest, structural properties, cognitive integrity and peripheral proteins levels are characterized in relation to LOAD progression. We analyse over 7,700 brain images and tens of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Through a multifactorial data-driven analysis, we obtain dynamic LOAD–abnormality indices for all biomarkers, and a tentative temporal ordering of disease progression. Imaging results suggest that intra-brain vascular dysregulation is an early pathological event during disease development. Cognitive decline is noticeable from initial LOAD stages, suggesting early memory deficit associated with the primary disease factors. High abnormality levels are also observed for specific proteins associated with the vascular system's integrity. Although still subjected to the sensitivity of the algorithms and biomarkers employed, our results might contribute to the development of preventive therapeutic interventions. PMID:27327500

  20. Prominent Neuroleptic Sensitivity in a Case of Early-onset Alzheimer Disease due to Presenilin-1 G206A Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Cercy, Steven P.; Sadowski, Martin J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective We describe atypical motor and cognitive features in a case of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) due to presenilin-1 (PS-1) mutation. Background Extrapyramidal signs (EPS) typically are a late-presenting feature of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), but relatively little data are available regarding EPS in FAD. Method A 59-year-old, right-handed man of Caribbean-Hispanic descent underwent brain imaging studies, laboratory tests for AD, and serial neurologic and neuropsychologic evaluations. Results The patient presented with recent-onset delusional ideation associated with cognitive decline. Prominent EPS developed soon after initiation of an atypical neuroleptic agent. Neuropsychologic evaluation revealed global cognitive deficits; he was found to be a carrier of a PS-1 point mutation at position G206A. EPS resolved completely after discontinuing the neuroleptic agent and coincided with improved motor speed, set initiation, and verbal fluency. Conclusions Severe neuroleptic sensitivity and associated deficits of cognitive speed occurred in response to a dopaminergic antagonist agent; both responded readily to withdrawal of the offending agent. Patients with PS-1 AD may be at substantially increased risk of neuroleptic-induced EPS. That feature underscores the heterogeneity of the FAD clinical phenotype. PMID:18797263

  1. Gene Interactions and Structural Brain Change in Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subjects Using the Pipeline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Zamanyan, Alen; Shi, Ran; Genco, Alex; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article investigates subjects aged 55 to 65 from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database to broaden our understanding of early-onset (EO) cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers. Methods Nine of the subjects had EO-AD (Alzheimer's disease) and 27 had EO-MCI (mild cognitive impairment). The 15 most important neuroimaging markers were extracted with the Global Shape Analysis (GSA) Pipeline workflow. The 20 most significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were chosen and were associated with specific neuroimaging biomarkers. Results We identified associations between the neuroimaging phenotypes and genotypes for a total of 36 subjects. Our results for all the subjects taken together showed the most significant associations between rs7718456 and L_hippocampus (volume), and between rs7718456 and R_hippocampus (volume). For the 27 MCI subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs6446443 and R_superior_frontal_gyrus (volume), and between rs17029131 and L_Precuneus (volume). For the nine AD subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs16964473 and L_rectus gyrus (surface area), and between rs12972537 and L_rectus_gyrus (surface area). Conclusion We observed significant correlations between the SNPs and the neuroimaging phenotypes in the 36 EO subjects in terms of neuroimaging genetics. However, larger sample sizes are needed to ensure that the effects will be detectable for a reasonable false-positive error rate using the GSA and Plink Pipeline workflows. PMID:25670955

  2. Early role of vascular dysregulation on late-onset Alzheimer's disease based on multifactorial data-driven analysis.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Y; Sotero, R C; Toussaint, P J; Mateos-Pérez, J M; Evans, A C

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms underlying late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) are poorly characterized from an integrative perspective. Here spatiotemporal alterations in brain amyloid-β deposition, metabolism, vascular, functional activity at rest, structural properties, cognitive integrity and peripheral proteins levels are characterized in relation to LOAD progression. We analyse over 7,700 brain images and tens of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Through a multifactorial data-driven analysis, we obtain dynamic LOAD-abnormality indices for all biomarkers, and a tentative temporal ordering of disease progression. Imaging results suggest that intra-brain vascular dysregulation is an early pathological event during disease development. Cognitive decline is noticeable from initial LOAD stages, suggesting early memory deficit associated with the primary disease factors. High abnormality levels are also observed for specific proteins associated with the vascular system's integrity. Although still subjected to the sensitivity of the algorithms and biomarkers employed, our results might contribute to the development of preventive therapeutic interventions. PMID:27327500

  3. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease versus frontotemporal dementia: resolution with genetic diagnoses?

    PubMed

    Sha, Sharon J; Khazenzon, Anna M; Ghosh, Pia M; Rankin, Katherine P; Pribadi, Mochtar; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Rabinovici, Gil D; Miller, Bruce L; Lee, Suzee E

    2016-01-01

    We report a diagnostically challenging case of a 64-year-old man with a history of remote head trauma who developed mild behavioral changes and dyscalculia. He was diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), with additional features consistent with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed atrophy in bilateral frontal and parietal cortices and hippocampi on visual inspection and left frontal pole and bilateral anterior temporal encephalomalacia, suspected to be due to head trauma. Consistent with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's pathology, positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh compound B suggested the presence of beta-amyloid. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated hypometabolism in bilateral frontal and temporoparietal cortices. Voxel-based morphometry showed atrophy predominant in ventral frontal regions (bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate/medial superior frontal gyrus), bilateral mid cingulate, bilateral lateral temporal cortex, and posterior insula. Bilateral caudate, thalamus, hippocampi, and cerebellum were prominently atrophied. Unexpectedly, a pathologic hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 was identified in this patient. This report underscores the clinical variability in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and the need to consider mixed pathologies, particularly when imaging studies are inconsistent with a single syndrome or pathology. PMID:26304661

  4. Segregation analysis of Alzheimer pedigrees: Rare Mendelian dominant mutation(s) explain a minority of early-onset cases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.; Campion, D.; Babron, M.C.; Darpoux, F.C.

    1996-02-16

    Segregation analysis of Alzheimer disease (AD) in 92 families ascertained through early-onset ({le}age 60 years) AD (EOAD) probands has been carried out, allowing for a mixture in AD inheritance among probands. The goal was to quantify the proportion of probands that could be explained by autosomal inheritance of a rare disease allele {open_quotes}a{close_quotes} at a Mendelian dominant gene (MDG). Our data provide strong evidence for a mixture of two distributions; AD transmission is fully explained by MDG inheritance in <20% of probands. Male and female age-of-onset distributions are significantly different for {open_quotes}AA{close_quote} but not for {open_quotes}aA{close_quote} subjects. For {open_quotes}aA{close_quote} subjects the estimated penetrance value was close to 1 by age 60. For {open_quotes}AA{close_quotes} subjects, it reaches, by age 90, 10% (males) and 30% (females). We show a clear cutoff in the posterior probability of being an MDG case. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Segregation of a rare TTC3 variant in an extended family with late-onset Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Martin A.; Cukier, Holly N.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Rolati, Sophie; Kunkle, Brian W.; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Züchner, Stephan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Martin, Eden R.; Beecham, Gary W.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gilbert, John R.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Carney, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The genetic risk architecture of Alzheimer disease (AD) is complex with single pathogenic mutations leading to early-onset AD, while both rare and common genetic susceptibility variants contribute to the more widespread late-onset AD (LOAD); we sought to discover novel genes contributing to LOAD risk. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide genotyping were performed on 11 affected individuals in an extended family with an apparent autosomal dominant pattern of LOAD. Variants of interest were then evaluated in a large cohort of LOAD cases and aged controls. Results: We detected a single rare, nonsynonymous variant shared in all 11 LOAD individuals, a missense change in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 3 (TTC3) gene. The missense variant, rs377155188 (p.S1038C), is predicted to be damaging. Affecteds-only multipoint linkage analysis demonstrated that this region of TTC3 has a LOD score of 2.66 in this family. Conclusion: The TTC3 p.S1038C substitution may represent a segregating, rare LOAD risk variant. Previous studies have shown that TTC3 expression is consistently reduced in LOAD patients and negatively correlated with AD neuropathology and that TTC3 is a regulator of Akt signaling, a key pathway disrupted in LOAD. This study demonstrates how utilizing whole-exome sequencing in a large, multigenerational family with a high incidence of LOAD could reveal a novel candidate gene. PMID:27066578

  6. A Mutation in DAOA Modifies the Age of Onset in PSEN1 E280A Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Jorge I.; Rivera, Dora; Mastronardi, Claudio A.; Patel, Hardip R.; Tobón, Carlos; Villegas, Andrés; Cai, Yeping; Easteal, Simon; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported age of onset (AOO) modifier genes in the world's largest pedigree segregating early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), caused by the p.Glu280Ala (E280A) mutation in the PSEN1 gene. Here we report the results of a targeted analysis of functional exonic variants in those AOO modifier genes in sixty individuals with PSEN1 E280A AD who were whole-exome genotyped for ~250,000 variants. Standard quality control, filtering, and annotation for functional variants were applied, and common functional variants located in those previously reported as AOO modifier loci were selected. Multiloci linear mixed-effects models were used to test the association between these variants and AOO. An exonic missense mutation in the G72 (DAOA) gene (rs2391191, P = 1.94 × 10−4, PFDR = 9.34 × 10−3) was found to modify AOO in PSEN1 E280A AD. Nominal associations of missense mutations in the CLUAP1 (rs9790, P = 7.63 × 10−3, PFDR = 0.1832) and EXOC2 (rs17136239, P = 0.0325, PFDR = 0.391) genes were also found. Previous studies have linked polymorphisms in the DAOA gene with the occurrence of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy, aggression, delusions, hallucinations, and psychosis in AD. Our findings strongly suggest that this new conspicuous functional AOO modifier within the G72 (DAOA) gene could be pivotal for understanding the genetic basis of AD. PMID:26949549

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Wands, Jack R.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has characteristic histopathological, molecular, and biochemical abnormalities, including cell loss; abundant neurofibrillary tangles; dystrophic neurites; amyloid precursor protein, amyloid-β (APP-Aβ) deposits; increased activation of prodeath genes and signaling pathways; impaired energy metabolism; mitochondrial dysfunction; chronic oxidative stress; and DNA damage. Gaining a better understanding of AD pathogenesis will require a framework that mechanistically interlinks all these phenomena. Currently, there is a rapid growth in the literature pointing toward insulin deficiency and insulin resistance as mediators of AD-type neurodegeneration, but this surge of new information is riddled with conflicting and unresolved concepts regarding the potential contributions of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), metabolic syndrome, and obesity to AD pathogenesis. Herein, we review the evidence that (1) T2DM causes brain insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and cognitive impairment, but its aggregate effects fall far short of mimicking AD; (2) extensive disturbances in brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling mechanisms represent early and progressive abnormalities and could account for the majority of molecular, biochemical, and histopathological lesions in AD; (3) experimental brain diabetes produced by intracerebral administration of streptozotocin shares many features with AD, including cognitive impairment and disturbances in acetylcholine homeostasis; and (4) experimental brain diabetes is treatable with insulin sensitizer agents, i.e., drugs currently used to treat T2DM. We conclude that the term “type 3 diabetes” accurately reflects the fact that AD represents a form of diabetes that selectively involves the brain and has molecular and biochemical features that overlap with both type 1 diabetes mellitus and T2DM. PMID:19885299

  8. Influence of family history of dementia in the development and progression of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scarabino, Daniela; Gambina, Giuseppe; Broggio, Elisabetta; Pelliccia, Franca; Corbo, Rosa Maria

    2016-03-01

    Family history of dementia (FH) is a recognized risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). We asked whether having FH increases AD risk and influences disease severity (age at onset and cognitive impairment) in 420 AD patients and 109 controls with (FH+) or without (FH-). The relationships of APOE and other AD risk genes with FH were analyzed as well. The proportion of APOE e4 allele carriers was higher among the FH+ than the FH- AD patients (49.6% vs. 38.9%; P = 0.04). The distribution of the risk genotypes of nine AD susceptibility genes previously examined (CHAT, CYP17, CYP19, ESR1, FSHR, P53, P73, P21, PPARG) did not differ between the FH+ and the FH- AD patients, indicating that none contributed significantly to familial clustering of disease. FH was associated with an increased AD risk (odds ratio [OR] 2.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-5.09; P = 0.002) independent of carrying the APOE e4 allele (OR 2.61, 95%CI 1.53-4.44; P = 0.0004). Having a first-degree relative or a parent with dementia was significantly associated with AD risk (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.3-6.4; P = 0.009 and OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1-6.2; P = 0.02) but having a sibling with dementia was not (OR 1.7, 95%CI 0.2 to 14.7; P = 0.6). Among the FH+ AD patients, having one or both parents affected seemed to raise the risk of earlier onset age (P = 0.02) and greater cognitive impairment (P = 0.02) than having only an affected sibling, whereas having two or more affected relatives did not. PMID:26531229

  9. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI. PMID:27395469

  10. Variants in the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA7), Apolipoprotein E ε4, and the Risk of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Jun, Gyungah; Naj, Adam; Rajbhandary, Ruchita; Vardarajan, Badri Narayan; Wang, Li-San; Valladares, Otto; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Larson, Eric B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Evans, Denis; De Jager, Philip L.; Crane, Paul K.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Murrell, Jill R.; Raj, Towfique; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Logue, Mark; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Green, Robert C.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Go, Rodney C. P.; Griffith, Patrick; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Lopez, Oscar L.; Bennett, David A.; Hendrie, Hugh; Hall, Kathleen S.; Goate, Alison M.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Importance Genetic variants associated with susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer disease are known for individuals of European ancestry, but whether the same or different variants account for the genetic risk of Alzheimer disease in African American individuals is unknown. Identification of disease-associated variants helps identify targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment. Objective To identify genetic loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease in African Americans. Design, Setting, and Participants The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) assembled multiple data sets representing a total of 5896 African Americans (1968 case participants, 3928 control participants) 60 years or older that were collected between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites. The association of Alzheimer disease with genotyped and imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was assessed in case-control and in family-based data sets. Results from individual data sets were combined to perform an inverse variance–weighted meta-analysis, first with genome-wide analyses and subsequently with gene-based tests for previously reported loci. Main Outcomes and Measures Presence of Alzheimer disease according to standardized criteria. Results Genome-wide significance in fully adjusted models (sex, age, APOE genotype, population stratification) was observed for a SNP in ABCA7 (rs115550680, allele = G; frequency, 0.09 cases and 0.06 controls; odds ratio [OR], 1.79 [95% CI, 1.47-2.12]; P = 2.2 × 10–9), which is in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs previously associated with Alzheimer disease in Europeans (0.8Alzheimer disease but not reaching significance in genome-wide analyses were replicated in gene-based analyses

  11. A Scan of Chromosome 10 Identifies a Novel Locus Showing Strong Association with Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S. K.; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M.; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J.; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O’Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C.; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10–specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P<.05). Five of these markers replicated at P<.05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P=.0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:16385451

  12. "Boomerang Neuropathology" of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease is Shrouded in Harmful "BDDS": Breathing, Diet, Drinking, and Sleep During Aging.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-07-01

    Brain damage begins years before substantial neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's dementia. Crucial fundamental activities of life are breathing, eating, drinking, and sleeping. When these pivotal functions are maligned over a prolonged period, they impart escalating dyshomeostasis. The latter may lead to disastrous consequences including cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current theme here is that multiple pathophysiological derangements are promoted over a prolonged period by the very fundamental activities of life-when "rendered unhealthy." They may converge on several regulating/modulating factors (e.g., mitochondrial energy production, oxidative stress, innate immunity, and vascular function) and promote insidious neuropathology that culminates in cognitive decline in the aged. This is of course associated with the accumulation of amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Epidemiological, biomarker, and neuroimaging studies have provided significant copious evidence on the presence of indolent prodromal AD neuropathology many years prior to symptomatic onset. Progressive oxidative damage to specific gene promoters may result in gene silencing. A mechanistic link may possibly exist between epigenomic state, DNA damage, and chronically unhealthy/dysfunctional body systems. This paper, therefore, addresses and delineates the deleterious pathophysiological impact triggered by dysfunctional breathing, harmful diet, excess of alcohol consumption, and sleep deprivation; indeed, their impact may alter epigenetic state. It is mandatory, therefore, to abrogate cognitive decline and attenuate AD pathology through adoption of a healthy lifestyle, in conjunction with combination therapy with known moderators of cognitive decline. This strategy may thwart multiple concurrent and synergistic pathologies, including epigenetic dysfunction. A multi-factorial therapeutic intervention is required to overcome wide ranging neuropathology and multi

  13. Experimental induction of type 2 diabetes in aging-accelerated mice triggered Alzheimer-like pathology and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C; Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD. PMID:24121970

  14. Assessment of the genetic variance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Hoyt, Kaitlyn B; Boehme, Kevin; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Kauwe, John S K

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex genetic disorder with no effective treatments. More than 20 common markers have been identified, which are associated with AD. Recently, several rare variants have been identified in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), Triggering Receptor Expressed On Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) and Unc-5 Netrin Receptor C (UNC5C) that affect risk for AD. Despite the many successes, the genetic architecture of AD remains unsolved. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to (1) estimate phenotypic variance explained by genetics; (2) calculate genetic variance explained by known AD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); and (3) identify the genomic locations of variation that explain the remaining unexplained genetic variance. In total, 53.24% of phenotypic variance is explained by genetics, but known AD SNPs only explain 30.62% of the genetic variance. Of the unexplained genetic variance, approximately 41% is explained by unknown SNPs in regions adjacent to known AD SNPs, and the remaining unexplained genetic variance outside these regions. PMID:27036079

  15. A comprehensive study of the genetic impact of rare variants in SORL1 in European early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Jan; Van den Bossche, Tobi; van der Zee, Julie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Gelpi, Ellen; Bettens, Karolien; Mateiu, Ligia; Dillen, Lubina; Cras, Patrick; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2016-08-01

    The sortilin-related receptor 1 (SORL1) gene has been associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare genetic variants in the SORL1 gene have also been implicated in autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD). Here we report a large-scale investigation of the contribution of genetic variability in SORL1 to EOAD in a European EOAD cohort. We performed massive parallel amplicon-based re-sequencing of the full coding region of SORL1 in 1255 EOAD patients and 1938 age- and origin-matched control individuals in the context of the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium, originating from Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Sweden, Germany, and Czech Republic. We identified six frameshift variants and two nonsense variants that were exclusively present in patients. These mutations are predicted to result in haploinsufficiency through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which could be confirmed experimentally for SORL1 p.Gly447Argfs*22 observed in a Belgian EOAD patient. We observed a 1.5-fold enrichment of rare non-synonymous variants in patients (carrier frequency 8.8 %; SkatOMeta p value 0.0001). Of the 84 non-synonymous rare variants detected in the full patient/control cohort, 36 were only detected in patients. Our findings underscore a role of rare SORL1 variants in EOAD, but also show a non-negligible frequency of these variants in healthy individuals, necessitating the need for pathogenicity assays. Premature stop codons due to frameshift and nonsense variants, have so far exclusively been found in patients, and their predicted mode of action corresponds with evidence from in vitro functional studies of SORL1 in AD. PMID:27026413

  16. R47H Variant of TREM2 Associated With Alzheimer Disease in a Large Late-Onset Family

    PubMed Central

    Korvatska, Olena; Leverenz, James B.; Jayadev, Suman; McMillan, Pamela; Kurtz, Irina; Guo, Xindi; Rumbaugh, Malia; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Dorschner, Michael O.; Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Yu, Chang-En; Brkanac, Zoran; Garden, Gwenn A.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The R47H variant in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 gene (TREM2), a modulator of the immune response of microglia, is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Objective To investigate a large family with late-onset AD (LOAD), in which R47H cosegregated with 75% of cases. Design, Setting, and Participants This study includes genetic and pathologic studies of families with LOAD from 1985 to 2014. A total of 131 families with LOAD (751 individuals) were included from the University of Washington Alzheimer Disease Research Center. To identify LOAD genes/risk factors in the LOAD123 family with 21 affected members and 12 autopsies, we sequenced 4 exomes. Candidate variants were tested for cosegregation with the disease. TREM2 R47H was genotyped in an additional 130 families with LOAD. We performed clinical and neuropathological assessments of patients with and without R47H and evaluated the variant's effect on brain pathology, cellular morphology, and expression of microglial markers. Main Outcomes and Measures We assessed the effect of TREM2 genotype on age at onset and disease duration. We compared Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores, presence of α-synuclein and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 aggregates, and additional vascular or Parkinson pathology in TREM2 R47H carriers vs noncarriers. Microglial activation was assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Results Twelve of 16 patients with AD in the LOAD123 family carried R47H. Eleven patients with dementia had apolipoprotein E 4 (ApoE4) and R47H genotypes. We also found a rare missense variant, D353N, in a nominated AD risk gene, unc-5 homolog C (UNC5C), in 5 affected individuals in the LOAD123 family. R47H carriers demonstrated a shortened disease duration (mean [SD], 6.7 [2.8] vs 11.1 [6.6] years; 2-tailed t test; P = .04) and more frequent α-synucleinopathy. The

  17. The onset of galactic winds in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Tucker, W.; David, L. P.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers report on a program using Einstein x ray observations of the x ray spectra and surface brightness profiles (or extents) of a large sample of early-type (elliptical and SO) galaxies for which the goal is to determine the critical optical luminosity for which galactic winds are important. For galaxies in which the x ray emission is dominated by hydrostatic coronae, the x ray spectra will be relatively soft (characterized by a temperature of approx. 10 to the 7th power K), while for galaxies with a galactic wind, the emission will be dominated by the spectrally harder discrete sources (since the x ray emission from the wind is essentially negligible). In this new sample of 180 galaxies, there are 28 early type galaxies with sufficient counts to obtain a spectrum with the Einstein Image Proportional Counter (IPC). This sample more than doubles the total number of early-type galaxies in earlier compilations (Forman, Jones, and Tucker 1985; Canizares et al. 1987). The new spectral observations will help determine the critical optical luminosity for the onset of galactic winds which is important for understanding the chemical evolution of galaxies and of the intergalactic medium. The implications of galactic winds for the heavy element enrichment and energy content of the intracluster medium are discussed.

  18. Genetics of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: Update from the Alzgene Database and Analysis of Shared Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Olgiati, Paolo; Politis, Antonis M.; Papadimitriou, George N.; De Ronchi, Diana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) has taken impressive steps forwards in the last few years. To date, more than six-hundred genes have been linked to the disorder. However, only a minority of them are supported by a sufficient level of evidence. This review focused on such genes and analyzed shared biological pathways. Genetic markers were selected from a web-based collection (Alzgene). For each SNP in the database, it was possible to perform a meta-analysis. The quality of studies was assessed using criteria such as size of research samples, heterogeneity across studies, and protection from publication bias. This produced a list of 15 top-rated genes: APOE, CLU, PICALM, EXOC3L2, BIN1, CR1, SORL1, TNK1, IL8, LDLR, CST3, CHRNB2, SORCS1, TNF, and CCR2. A systematic analysis of gene ontology terms associated with each marker showed that most genes were implicated in cholesterol metabolism, intracellular transport of beta-amyloid precursor, and autophagy of damaged organelles. Moreover, the impact of these genes on complement cascade and cytokine production highlights the role of inflammatory response in AD pathogenesis. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are prominent issues in AD genetics, but they are not specifically featured in the Alzgene database. PMID:22191060

  19. The Association Between Clusterin and APOE Polymorphisms and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a Turkish Cohort.

    PubMed

    Alaylıoğlu, Merve; Gezen-Ak, Duygu; Dursun, Erdinç; Bilgiç, Başar; Hanağası, Haşmet; Ertan, Turan; Gürvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat; Eker, Engin; Uysal, Ömer; Yılmazer, Selma

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that clusterin (CLU), which is also known as apolipoprotein J, is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the association between rs2279590, rs11136000, and rs9331888 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CLU and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes in a cohort of Turkish patients with late-onset AD (LOAD). There were 183 patients with LOAD and 154 healthy controls included in the study. The CLU and APOE polymorphisms were genotyped using the LightSNiP assay. The "GG" genotype of rs9331888 was significantly more frequent in patients with LOAD. The "CC" genotype of the SNP was significantly more frequent in controls. The rs9331888 "GG" genotype in patients and the "CC" genotype in controls were significantly higher in non-∊4 allele carriers of APOE The haplotype analysis showed the CLU "GCG" haplotype was a risk haplotype. Our findings indicate the rs9331888 SNP of CLU is associated with LOAD independent of APOE. PMID:27076484

  20. ZCWPW1 is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease in Han Chinese: a replication study and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Fu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified a novel variant (rs1476679) within ZCWPW1 showing strong association with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) in Caucasian. However, the effect of rs1476679 on other populations remains unclear. In order to explore whether rs1476679 is also associated with the LOAD risk in other ethnic groups, we recruited 2350 unrelated Northern Han Chinese subjects, which include 992 LOAD patients and 1358 healthy controls. Analysis of data from these subjects suggests that the rs1476679 polymorphism is significantly associated with the LOAD (genotype P = 0.017, allele P = 0.044). The logistic regression reveals the C allele at rs1476679 is a protective factor for LOAD in the dominant model (OR = 0.779, 95%CI = 0.659–0.921, Pc = 0.009) adjusting for gender, age and APOE ε4 status. Furthermore, rs1476679 can decrease the AD risk (Dominant: OR = 0.733, 95%CI = 0.607–0.884, Pc = 0.006; Additive: OR = 0.820, 95%CI = 0.708–0.950, Pc = 0.048) in APOE ε4 non-carriers after stratification. Furthermore, meta-analysis of 82525 individuals confirmed that rs1476679 within ZCWPW1 decreased the risk of LOAD (OR = 0.91, 95%CI = 0.89–0.94). To summarize, the rs1476679 polymorphism in ZCWPW1 is associated with LOAD in Northern Han Chinese population. PMID:26958812

  1. Lack of genetic association between TREM2 and late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Akinori; Wen, Yanan; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Matsubara, Etsuro; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Shoji, Mikio; Tomita, Naoki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Asada, Takashi; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Hanyu, Haruo; Higuchi, Susumu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Suga, Masaichi; Kawase, Yasuhiro; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Imagawa, Masaki; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Morihara, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Takao, Takeo; Nakata, Kenji; Sasaki, Ken; Watanabe, Ken; Nakashima, Kenji; Urakami, Katsuya; Ooya, Terumi; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Serikawa, Kayoko; Yoshimoto, Seishi; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Saito, Yuko; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Akazawa, Kohei; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Kuwano, Ryozo

    2014-01-01

    Rare non-synonymous variants of TREM2 have recently been shown to be associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Caucasians. We here conducted a replication study using a well-characterized Japanese sample set, comprising 2,190 late-onset AD (LOAD) cases and 2,498 controls. We genotyped 10 non-synonymous variants (Q33X, Y38C, R47H, T66M, N68K, D87N, T96K, R98W, H157Y, and L211P) of TREM2 reported by Guerreiro et al. (2013) by means of the TaqMan and dideoxy sequencing methods. Only three variants, R47H, H157Y, and L211P, were polymorphic (range of minor allele frequency [MAF], 0.0002-0.0059); however, no significant association with LOAD was observed in these variants. Considering low MAF of variants examined and our study sample size, further genetic analysis with a larger sample set is needed to firmly evaluate whether or not TREM2 is associated with LOAD in Japanese. PMID:24762945

  2. Priming deficits in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Burke, J; Knight, R G; Partridge, F M

    1994-11-01

    In a study that replicated the procedures used by Salmon et al. (1988), the effect on stem completion performance of two different semantic orientation tasks has been assessed in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Previously reported findings of impairment in repetition priming in Alzheimer patients were confirmed. Performance was not affected by the nature of the orientation task. No significant correlations were found between explicit and implicit memory tests. The results are discussed in the context of a hypothesized parallel decline in explicit and implicit memory systems. PMID:7892366

  3. APOE*E2 allele delays age of onset in PSEN1 E280A Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vélez, J I; Lopera, F; Sepulveda-Falla, D; Patel, H R; Johar, A S; Chuah, A; Tobón, C; Rivera, D; Villegas, A; Cai, Y; Peng, K; Arkell, R; Castellanos, F X; Andrews, S J; Silva Lara, M F; Creagh, P K; Easteal, S; de Leon, J; Wong, M L; Licinio, J; Mastronardi, C A; Arcos-Burgos, M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) age of onset (ADAOO) varies greatly between individuals, with unique causal mutations suggesting the role of modifying genetic and environmental interactions. We analyzed ~50 000 common and rare functional genomic variants from 71 individuals of the 'Paisa' pedigree, the world's largest pedigree segregating a severe form of early-onset AD, who were affected carriers of the fully penetrant E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene. Affected carriers with ages at the extremes of the ADAOO distribution (30s-70s age range), and linear mixed-effects models were used to build single-locus regression models outlining the ADAOO. We identified the rs7412 (APOE*E2 allele) as a whole exome-wide ADAOO modifier that delays ADAOO by ~12 years (β=11.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.07-15.41, P=6.31 × 10(-8), PFDR=2.48 × 10(-3)). Subsequently, to evaluate comprehensively the APOE (apolipoprotein E) haplotype variants (E1/E2/E3/E4), the markers rs7412 and rs429358 were genotyped in 93 AD affected carriers of the E280A mutation. We found that the APOE*E2 allele, and not APOE*E4, modifies ADAOO in carriers of the E280A mutation (β=8.24, 95% CI: 4.45-12.01, P=3.84 × 10(-5)). Exploratory linear mixed-effects multilocus analysis suggested that other functional variants harbored in genes involved in cell proliferation, protein degradation, apoptotic and immune dysregulation processes (i.e., GPR20, TRIM22, FCRL5, AOAH, PINLYP, IFI16, RC3H1 and DFNA5) might interact with the APOE*E2 allele. Interestingly, suggestive evidence as an ADAOO modifier was found for one of these variants (GPR20) in a set of patients with sporadic AD from the Paisa genetic isolate. This is the first study demonstrating that the APOE*E2 allele modifies the natural history of AD typified by the age of onset in E280A mutation carriers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest analyzed sample of patients with a unique mutation sharing uniform environment. Formal

  4. The age factor in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, and it is characterized by a decline in memory or other thinking skills. The greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease is advanced age. A recent genome-wide study identified a locus on chromosome 17 associated with the age at onset, and a specific variant in CCL11 is probably responsible for the association. The association of a protective haplotype with a 10-year delay in the onset of Alzheimer's disease and the identification of a CCL11 variant with possible functional roles in this association might allow the future development of immunomodulators with the potential to halve disease incidence. PMID:26482651

  5. Common pathological processes and transcriptional pathways in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allan; Kulozik, Philipp; Ostertag, Anke; Herzig, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies have established a strong connection between type 2 diabetes and the risk of the development of Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, several pathological features have been identified as common denominators of diabetic and Alzheimer's patients, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and inflammation, suggesting a close connection between the two disorders. Here we review common metabolic and inflammatory processes implicated in the pathogenesis of both disorders. In particular, the role of critical transcriptional checkpoints in the control of cellular metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation will be emphasized in this context. These transcriptional regulators hold great promise as new therapeutic targets in the potentially combined treatment of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease in the future. PMID:19387113

  6. Type 2 diabetes aggravates Alzheimer's disease-associated vascular alterations of the aorta in mice.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Carvalho, Cristina; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, diabetes mellitus is considered a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and both diseases are characterized by vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the effects of high-sucrose-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the aorta of wild type (WT) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were investigated. 3xTg-AD mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and an increase in postprandial glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular nitrotyrosine, superoxide anion (O2•-), receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels when compared to WT mice. High-sucrose intake caused a significant increase in body weight, postprandial glycemia, HbA1c, triglycerides, plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and vascular nitrotyrosine, O2•-, RAGE, and MCP-1 levels in both WT and 3xTg-AD mice when compared to the respective control group. Also, a significant decrease in nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation was observed in 3xTg-AD and sucrose-treated WT mice. In conclusion, AD and T2D promote similar vascular dysfunction of the aorta, this effect being associated with elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress and inflammation. Also, AD-associated vascular alterations are potentiated by T2D. These findings support the idea that metabolic alterations predispose to the onset and progression of dementia. PMID:25471187

  7. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  8. Performance Components in Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Motor Planning, Language, and Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Carolyn Manville; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of 133 control subjects and 141 with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) was designed to determine if language, motor planning, and memory were discrete components of performance. It found that patterns were highly individualized, which suggests that apraxia contributes significantly to dysfunction in some people with SDAT. (JOW)

  9. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca(2+) release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensivelys tudied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models.The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology.The expression of RyanR3 was also elevated in hippocampus of APPPS1 mice (Thy1-APPKM670/671NL, Thy1-PS1L166P).In young (≤ 3 mo) APPPS1 mice, the deletion of RyanR3 increased hippocampal neuronal network excitability and accelerated AD pathology, leading to mushroom spine loss and increased amyloid accumulation. In contrast, deletion of RyanR3 in older APPPS1 mice (≥ 6 mo) rescued network excitability and mushroom spine loss, reduced amyloid plaque load and reduced spontaneous seizure occurrence.Our data suggests a dual role for RyanR3 in AD pathology. In young AD neurons, RyanR3 protects AD neurons from synaptic and network dysfunction. In older AD neurons, increased RyanR3 activity contributes to pathology. These results imply that blockade of RyanR3 may be beneficial for those in the later stages of the disease, but RyanR activators may be beneficial when used prior to disease onset or in its initial stages. Caffeine is an activator of RyanRs and our results may help to explain a complex epidemiological connection between coffee consumption in mid-life and risk of AD development in old age. PMID:24476841

  10. Experimental Induction of Type 2 Diabetes in Aging-Accelerated Mice Triggered Alzheimer-Like Pathology and Memory Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C.; Chauhan, Neelima B.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD. PMID:24121970

  11. Common variants at MS4A4/MS4A6E, CD2AP, CD33 and EPHA1 are associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Naj, Adam C; Jun, Gyungah; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Li-San; Vardarajan, Badri Narayan; Buros, Jacqueline; Gallins, Paul J; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Jarvik, Gail P; Crane, Paul K; Larson, Eric B; Bird, Thomas D; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Younkin, Steven G; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S K; Nowotny, Petra; Kramer, Patricia; Hardy, John; Huentelman, Matthew J; Myers, Amanda J; Barmada, Michael M; Demirci, F Yesim; Baldwin, Clinton T; Green, Robert C; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Arnold, Steven E; Barber, Robert; Beach, Thomas; Bigio, Eileen H; Bowen, James D; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R; Cairns, Nigel J; Carlson, Chris S; Carney, Regina M; Carroll, Steven L; Chui, Helena C; Clark, David G; Corneveaux, Jason; Cotman, Carl W; Cummings, Jeffrey L; DeCarli, Charles; DeKosky, Steven T; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W; Ellis, William G; Faber, Kelley M; Fallon, Kenneth B; Farlow, Martin R; Ferris, Steven; Frosch, Matthew P; Galasko, Douglas R; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R; Gilman, Sid; Giordani, Bruno; Glass, Jonathan D; Growdon, John H; Hamilton, Ronald L; Harrell, Lindy E; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S; Hulette, Christine M; Hyman, Bradley T; Jicha, Gregory A; Jin, Lee-Way; Johnson, Nancy; Karlawish, Jason; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H; Kowall, Neil W; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Lieberman, Andrew P; Lopez, Oscar L; Mack, Wendy J; Marson, Daniel C; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C; Masliah, Eliezer; McCormick, Wayne C; McCurry, Susan M; McDavid, Andrew N; McKee, Ann C; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L; Miller, Carol A; Miller, Joshua W; Parisi, Joseph E; Perl, Daniel P; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C; Poon, Wayne W; Quinn, Joseph F; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A; Raskind, Murray; Reisberg, Barry; Ringman, John M; Roberson, Erik D; Rosenberg, Roger N; Sano, Mary; Schneider, Lon S; Seeley, William; Shelanski, Michael L; Slifer, Michael A; Smith, Charles D; Sonnen, Joshua A; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Trojanowski, John Q; Troncoso, Juan C; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Vinters, Harry V; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L; Cantwell, Laura B; Dombroski, Beth A; Beekly, Duane; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Martin, Eden R; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J; Reiman, Eric M; Bennett, David A; Morris, John C; Montine, Thomas J; Goate, Alison M; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A; Foroud, Tatiana M; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2011-05-01

    The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) performed a genome-wide association study of late-onset Alzheimer disease using a three-stage design consisting of a discovery stage (stage 1) and two replication stages (stages 2 and 3). Both joint analysis and meta-analysis approaches were used. We obtained genome-wide significant results at MS4A4A (rs4938933; stages 1 and 2, meta-analysis P (P(M)) = 1.7 × 10(-9), joint analysis P (P(J)) = 1.7 × 10(-9); stages 1, 2 and 3, P(M) = 8.2 × 10(-12)), CD2AP (rs9349407; stages 1, 2 and 3, P(M) = 8.6 × 10(-9)), EPHA1 (rs11767557; stages 1, 2 and 3, P(M) = 6.0 × 10(-10)) and CD33 (rs3865444; stages 1, 2 and 3, P(M) = 1.6 × 10(-9)). We also replicated previous associations at CR1 (rs6701713; P(M) = 4.6 × 10(-10), P(J) = 5.2 × 10(-11)), CLU (rs1532278; P(M) = 8.3 × 10(-8), P(J) = 1.9 × 10(-8)), BIN1 (rs7561528; P(M) = 4.0 × 10(-14), P(J) = 5.2 × 10(-14)) and PICALM (rs561655; P(M) = 7.0 × 10(-11), P(J) = 1.0 × 10(-10)), but not at EXOC3L2, to late-onset Alzheimer's disease susceptibility. PMID:21460841

  12. Strategies for managing behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type: a systematic overview.

    PubMed

    Forbes, D A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic overview was to summarize research findings on strategies for managing the behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type. A search of the published and unpublished literature resulted in 265 articles, 45 of which were judged to be relevant. Using validity criteria, 1 article was judged to be strong, 6 moderate, 20 weak, and 18 poor. Strategies such as planned walking, pet therapy, an attention-focusing program, functional skills training, music, and visual barriers demonstrated promising results in improving: (a) aggressive, agitated, and disruptive behaviours, (b) social interaction, (c) self-care ability, (d) day-night disturbances, or (e) wandering. The findings indicate that there is existing research, although in its infancy, to support the use of strategies for managing the behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type. PMID:9807289

  13. Reduction of arginine-vasopressin in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer type senile dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, K; Suga, H; Okamoto, K; Nakamura, S; Kameyama, M

    1987-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) concentrations in five cortical areas were measured post mortem in nine patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and compared with the control group of comparable ages. In SDAT patients, AVP was significantly reduced in Brodmann areas 4, 7 and 10 (p less than 0.05). In areas 17 and 22, the detectability and the mean concentrations of AVP were also lower than those of control patients, although not significantly. PMID:3625218

  14. Clinical and Molecular Studies Reveal a PSEN1 Mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian Family with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R.; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F.; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30 to 70% of familial early onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment was completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family. PMID:24495933

  15. Clinical and molecular studies reveal a PSEN1 mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian family with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B; Bird, Thomas D

    2014-03-20

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30-70% of familial early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment were completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family. PMID:24495933

  16. Contribution of polymorphic variation of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 3 (IP6K3) gene promoter to the susceptibility to late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Crocco, Paolina; Saiardi, Adolfo; Wilson, Miranda S; Maletta, Raffaele; Bruni, Amalia C; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of electric potential and synaptic transmission are energetically demanding tasks that neuronal metabolism must continually satisfy. Inability to fulfil these energy requirements leads to the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. A prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease is in fact neuronal glucose hypometabolism. Thus understanding the fine control of energetic metabolism might help to understand neurodegenerative disorders. Recent research has indicated that a novel class of signalling molecules, the inositol pyrophosphates, act as energy sensors. They are able to alter the balance between mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic flux, ultimately affecting the cellular level of ATP. The neuronal inositol pyrophosphate synthesis relies on the activity of the neuron enriched inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 3 (IP6K3) enzyme. To verify an involvement of inositol pyrophosphate signalling in neurodegenerative disorders, we performed tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the IP6K3 gene in patients with familial and sporadic late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Two SNPs in the 5'-flanking promoter region of the IP6K3 gene were found to be associated with sporadic LOAD. Characterizing the functionality of the two polymorphisms by luciferase assay revealed that one of them (rs28607030) affects IP6K3 promoter activity, with the G allele showing an increased activity. As the same allele has a beneficial effect on disease risk, this may be related to upregulation of IP6K3 expression, with a consequent increase in inositol pyrophosphate synthesis. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for a contribution of genetic variability in the IP6K3 gene to LOAD pathogenesis. PMID:27345265

  17. Is obsessive-compulsive symptomatology a risk factor for Alzheimer-type dementia?

    PubMed

    Dondu, Ayse; Sevincoka, Levent; Akyol, Ali; Tataroglu, Cengiz

    2015-02-28

    In the present study, we hypothesized that lifetime Obsessive-Compulsive (OC) symptomatology would be risk factors for the development of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). For this aim, first we compared 39 patients with AD and 30 age and gender matched control subjects. We have found that lifetime and current OC symptoms (OCs) and comorbid diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder in AD patients were significantly more prevalent than in control group. AD patients had more likely to have lifetime and current hoarding, and checking obsessions compared to controls. The rate of lifetime and current hoarding, and checking compulsions also appeared to be higher in AD patients in comparison to control subjects. Hoarding and checking obsessions, and compulsions seemed to proceed through the dementia in contrast to other OCs. The mean number of lifetime compulsions seemed to predict the diagnosis of AD. When we compared AD patients with and without OCs, we have found that OC symptomatology prior to AD did not cause an earlier onset of dementia and more severe cognitive impairment. Further longitudinal clinical, genetic and neuroimaging investigations are required to determine if lifetime presence of OCs would predispose to the development of later AD. PMID:25576369

  18. Elevations in Circulating Methylated and Unmethylated Preproinsulin DNA in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Marisa M; Watkins, Renecia A; Blum, Janice; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Chalasani, Naga; DiMeglio, Linda A; Mather, Kieren J; Tersey, Sarah A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G

    2015-11-01

    Elevated ratios of circulating unmethylated to methylated preproinsulin (INS) DNA have been suggested to reflect β-cell death in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We tested the hypothesis that absolute levels (rather than ratios) of unmethylated and methylated INS DNA differ between subjects with new-onset T1D and control subjects and assessed longitudinal changes in these parameters. We used droplet digital PCR to measure levels of unmethylated and methylated INS DNA in serum from subjects at T1D onset and at 8 weeks and 1 year post-onset. Compared with control subjects, levels of both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA were elevated at T1D onset. At 8 weeks post-onset, methylated INS DNA remained elevated, but unmethylated INS DNA fell. At 1 year postonset, both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA returned to control levels. Subjects with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and autoimmune hepatitis exhibited lower levels of unmethylated and methylated INS compared with subjects with T1D at onset and no differences compared with control subjects. Our study shows that elevations in both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA occurs in new-onset T1D and that levels of these DNA species change during T1D evolution. Our work emphasizes the need to consider absolute levels of differentially methylated DNA species as potential biomarkers of disease. PMID:26216854

  19. Distinguishing the early-onset/persistent and adolescence-onset antisocial behavior types: from birth to 16 years.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, B; Sroufe, L A; Egeland, B; Carlson, E

    2000-01-01

    Moffitt's theory regarding two types of adolescent antisocial behavior was investigated using a prospective, longitudinal study of normal and abnormal development in a primarily low socioeconomic status, ethnically diverse sample. Results supported the presence of an early-onset/persistent (EOP) group and an adolescence-onset (AO) group. Groups were most reliably and significantly distinguished by indices of socioemotional history within the first 3 years, but no significant differences were found on early measures of temperament or neuropsychological functioning. EOPs scored significantly lower than other groups on measures of neuropsychological functioning only during late childhood and adolescence, suggesting that the declines in verbal functioning that have been so reliably found in this and other samples of early-starting antisocial adolescents are progressive and consequent to adverse experience. In adolescence, AOs were significantly more likely to report high levels of internalizing symptoms and life stress, suggesting that AO antisocial behavior is not a benign phenomenon. Implications of these findings for etiologic theories of adolescent antisocial behavior are discussed. PMID:10847620

  20. Do adolescent drug users fare the worst? Onset type, juvenile delinquency, and criminal careers.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Angton, Alexia; Behnken, Monic P; Kusow, Abdi M

    2015-02-01

    Although substance abuse often accompanies delinquency and other forms of antisocial behavior, there is less scholarly agreement about the timing of substance use vis-à-vis an individual's antisocial trajectory. Similarly, although there is extraordinary evidence that onset is inversely related to the severity of the criminal career, there is surprisingly little research on the offense type of onset or the type of antisocial behavior that was displayed when an individual initiated his or her offending career. Drawing on data from a sample of serious adult criminal offenders (N = 500), the current study examined 12 forms of juvenile delinquency (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, auto theft, arson, weapons, sexual offense, drug sales, and drug use) in addition to age at arrest onset, age, sex, race to explore their association with chronicity (total arrests), extreme chronicity (1 SD above the mean which was equivalent to 90 career arrests), and lambda (offending per year). The only onset offense type that was significantly associated with all criminal career outcomes was juvenile drug use. Additional research on the offense type of delinquent onset is needed to understand launching points of serious antisocial careers. PMID:24071557

  1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell-converted induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an early onset Alzheimer's patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Kyu; Morin, Peter; Xia, Weiming

    2016-03-01

    Improvement in transduction efficiency makes it possible to convert blood cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In this study, we generated an iPSC line from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) donated by a patient who exhibited memory deficit at age 59; outcome of positron emission tomography scan is consistent with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Integration-free CytoTune-iPS Sendai Reprogramming factors which include Sendai virus particles of the four Yamanaka factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc were introduced to PBMC to convert them to iPSCs without retention of virus. Three germ layer differentiation was induced to demonstrate the pluripotency of these iPSCs. PMID:27345971

  2. Emotional recognition from face, voice, and music in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, Joanie; Gosselin, Nathalie; Gagnon, Lise; Peretz, Isabelle; Lorrain, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Persons with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) are impaired in recognizing emotions from face and voice. Yet clinical practitioners use these mediums to communicate with DAT patients. Music is also used in clinical practice, but little is known about emotional processing from music in DAT. This study aims to assess emotional recognition in mild DAT. Seven patients with DAT and 16 healthy elderly adults were given three tasks of emotional recognition for face, prosody, and music. DAT participants were only impaired in the emotional recognition from the face. These preliminary results suggest that dynamic auditory emotions are preserved in DAT. PMID:19673804

  3. Focal cerebral hypoperfusion and selective cognitive deficit in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed Central

    Celsis, P; Agniel, A; Puel, M; Rascol, A; Marc-Vergnes, J P

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was investigated using single photon emission computed tomography and xenon-133 intravenous injection in six patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) with atypical focal clinical presentation, and in 20 age-matched healthy volunteers. The patients had a progressive and preponderant cognitive deficit and a focal hypoperfusion that correlated with the neuropsychological findings, whereas the average flow did not significantly differ from that of controls. The assessment of concordant haemodynamic and neuropsychological focal abnormalities could be useful in the diagnosis of atypical cases of DAT. Images PMID:3501801

  4. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca2+ release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensively studied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models. The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology. PMID:24476841

  5. Divided attention and metabolic brain dysfunction in mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Nestor, P G; Parasuraman, R; Haxby, J V; Grady, C L

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between reaction time (RT) measures under single-task and dual-task conditions and resting levels of brain metabolism, as measured by positron emission tomography (PET), was examined in patients with mild dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and age- and educationally-matched controls. Slowing of RT in dual-task but not single-task conditions correlated with reductions in brain metabolism in right premotor and right parietal association areas only for the mild DAT patients. The results suggest a relation between divided attention deficits and metabolic dysfunction of right frontal and parietal lobes in mild DAT patients. PMID:1886681

  6. Line orientation judgment in normal elderly and subjects with dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Ska, B; Poissant, A; Joanette, Y

    1990-10-01

    Ninety-five normal controls divided into three subgroups (55-64 yrs, 65-74 yrs, and 75-84 yrs) and 11 subjects with early dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT) were given a line orientation judgment task (Benton, Varney, & Hamsher, 1978). No difference appeared between the three control subgroups in global score but the difference between controls and DAT subjects was significant. However, some DAT subjects had a global score overlapping the scores of controls. Error types were also analyzed. Results of this analysis showed that some errors appeared in all subjects, normal and DAT, while others were specific to DAT subjects. It was speculated that these error types were a manifestation of a deeper visuospatial deficit, revealing a major problem of the DAT in spatial organization. Thus, this study suggests that an analysis of the error types observed in the line orientation judgment task may be helpful in differentiating normal elderly from early DAT. PMID:2258431

  7. RNase L contributes to experimentally induced type I diabetes onset in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chun; Yi, Xin; Zipris, Danny; Liu, Hongli; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Qiaoyun; Krishnamurthy, Malathi; Jin, Ge; Zhou, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    The cause of type I diabetes continues to be a focus of investigation. Studies have revealed that interferon (IFN)-α in pancreatic islets after viral infection or treatment with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a mimic of viral infection, is associated with the onset of type I diabetes. However, how IFN-α contributes to the onset of type I diabetes is obscure. In this study, we found that 2-5A dependent RNase L (RNase L), an IFN-α-inducible enzyme that functions in the antiviral and antiproliferative activities of IFN, played an important role in dsRNA-induced onset of type I diabetes. By using RNase L deficient, rat insulin promoter (RIP)-B7.1 transgenic mice which are more vulnerable to environmental harmful factors such as viral infection, we demonstrated that deficiency of RNase L in mice resulted in a significant delay of diabetes onset induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a type of synthetic dsRNA, and streptozotocin (STZ), a drug which can artificially induce type I-like diabetes in experimental animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the population of infiltrated CD8+ T-cells was remarkably reduced in the islets of RNase L deficient mice, suggesting that RNase L may contribute to type I diabetes onset through regulating immune responses. Furthermore, RNase L was responsible for the expression of certain proinflammatory genes in the pancreas in induced conditions. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying β-cells destruction and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for treatment and prevention of the disease based on the selective regulation and inhibition of RNase L. PMID:25287058

  8. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens to ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain ...

  9. Glutaric aciduria type II: observations in seven patients with neonatal- and late-onset disease.

    PubMed

    al-Essa, M A; Rashed, M S; Bakheet, S M; Patay, Z J; Ozand, P T

    2000-03-01

    The clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic findings and clinical follow-up of seven patients with glutaric aciduria type II are reported. Three phenotypes of the disease are encountered: neonatal-onset form with congenital anomalies (two patients) or without congenital anomalies (three patients) and late-onset form (two patients). The neonatal-onset form presents as an overwhelming illness, with severe hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis leading to rapid death. Frequently it is associated with perinatal energy deprivation, a neonate with low birth weight and prematurity. The late-onset form presents with intermittent episodes of vomiting, hypoglycemia, and acidosis especially after meals rich in fat and/or proteins. All parents are consanguineous and have a first- or second-degree relationship. Initially, in the two phenotypes with neonatal onset and during crisis in the late-onset phenotype, routine laboratory evaluation showed severe metabolic acidosis, with an increased anion gap, hypoglycemia without ketonuria, and disturbed liver function tests. In the majority of patients with neonatal-onset forms, the kidneys, liver, and at times the spleen are enlarged with an increased echogenic pattern; however, no hepatic or renal cysts are detected. Cardiomegaly is observed in most patients. The diagnosis can be easily and rapidly reached through tandem mass spectrometry study of the blood and can further be confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the urine organic acids. In this report, the magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography brain studies showed brain atrophy, white matter disease, and in one patient, fluid-filled cavities in the periventricular area and putamina. Fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomographic (FDG PET) brain studies in two patients with late-onset disease showed slightly decreased activity in the cerebral cortex in one and in the caudate nuclei in the other. Brain FDG PET scan and

  10. Loss of serum IGF-I input to the brain as an early biomarker of disease onset in Alzheimer mice

    PubMed Central

    Trueba-Sáiz, A; Cavada, C; Fernandez, A M; Leon, T; González, D A; Fortea Ormaechea, J; Lleó, A; Del Ser, T; Nuñez, A; Torres-Aleman, I

    2013-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) enters the brain and promotes clearance of amyloid peptides known to accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Both patients and mouse models of AD show decreased level of circulating IGF-I enter the brain as evidenced by a lower ratio of cerebrospinal fluid/plasma IGF-I. Importantly, in presymptomatic AD mice this reduction is already manifested as a decreased brain input of serum IGF-I in response to environmental enrichment. To explore a potential diagnostic use of this early loss of IGF-I input, we monitored electrocorticogram (ECG) responses to systemic IGF-I in mice. Whereas control mice showed enhanced ECG activity after IGF-I, presymptomatic AD mice showed blunted ECG responses. Because nonhuman primates showed identically enhanced electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in response to systemic IGF-I, loss of the EEG signature of serum IGF-I may be exploited as a disease biomarker in AD patients. PMID:24301648

  11. Divided attention, as measured by dichotic speech performance, in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Grady, C L; Grimes, A M; Patronas, N; Sunderland, T; Foster, N L; Rapoport, S I

    1989-03-01

    To determine if impaired dichotic performance in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type is due to the inability to divide attention or the inability to perceive degraded auditory stimuli, we measured performance on tasks of both dichotic and degraded monotic speech materials. We also examined whether perception of degraded speech stimuli presented monaurally is related to abnormalities of temporal lobe anatomy and physiology, as we have shown for dichotic performance. Although the patients were impaired on both dichotic and monotic tests, significantly greater impairment was seen on the dichotic test. Our earlier finding of a significant relation between dichotic performance and measures of anterior temporal lobe atrophy and reduced glucose metabolism was replicated, but no significant relation was found between monotic tests and measures to temporal lobe integrity. We conclude that the inability to divide attention, rather than abnormal processing of degraded stimuli per se, is reflected in poor dichotic performance in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type, and that dichotic performance, unlike degraded monotic perception, depends directly on the integrity of temporal cortex in these patients. PMID:2919988

  12. Preparing for presymptomatic DNA testing for early onset Alzheimer's disease/cerebral haemorrhage and hereditary Pick disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tibben, A; Stevens, M; de Wert, G M; Niermeijer, M F; van Duijn, C M; van Swieten, J C

    1997-01-01

    The acceptability of presymptomatic testing in 21 people at 50% risk for the APP-692 mutation causing presenile Alzheimer's disease or cerebral haemorrhage resulting from cerebral amyloid angiopathy (FAD-CH), and in 43 people at 50% risk for hereditary Pick disease (HPD) was assessed. Neither group differed in demographic variables. Thirty-nine people (64%) in the whole group would request presymptomatic testing if it were clinically available, although two-thirds did not yet feel ready to take it. The most important reasons in the HPD and FAD-CH group for taking the test were: to further basic research (42% and 47%, respectively), informing children (47% and 50%, respectively), future planning (29% and 47%, respectively), and relieving uncertainty (46% and 27%, respectively). The most commonly cited effect of an unfavourable test result concerned increasing problems for spouses (75% and 76%, respectively) and children (61% and 57%, respectively). Most respondents denied that an unfavourable result would have adverse effects on personal mood or relationship. One-third of all respondents favoured prenatal testing where one of the parents had an increased risk for HPD or FAD-CH. Participants would encourage their offspring to have the test before starting a relationship (35%) and before family planning (44%). Thirty-seven percent of the respondents would encourage their children to opt for prenatal diagnosis. People at risk for HPD were significantly more preoccupied with the occurrence of potential symptoms in themselves, compared with those at risk for FAD-CH, reflecting the devastating impact that disinhibition in the affected patient has on the family. Our findings underline the need for adequate counselling and the availability of professional and community resources to deal with the impact of test results in subjects and their relatives. PMID:9032652

  13. Molecular Basis for Increased Risk for Late-onset Alzheimer Disease Due to the Naturally Occurring L28P Mutation in Apolipoprotein E4*

    PubMed Central

    Argyri, Letta; Dafnis, Ioannis; Theodossiou, Theodossis A.; Gantz, Donald; Stratikos, Efstratios; Chroni, Angeliki

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (apo) E4 isoform has consistently emerged as a susceptibility factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD), although the exact mechanism is not clear. A rare apoE4 mutant, apoE4[L28P] Pittsburgh, burdens carriers with an added risk for late-onset AD and may be a useful tool for gaining insights into the role of apoE4 in disease pathogenesis. Toward this end, we evaluated the effect of the L28P mutation on the structural and functional properties of apoE4. ApoE4[L28P] was found to have significantly perturbed thermodynamic properties, to have reduced helical content, and to expose a larger portion of the hydrophobic surface to the solvent. Furthermore, this mutant is thermodynamically destabilized and more prone to proteolysis. When interacting with lipids, apoE4[L28P] formed populations of lipoprotein particles with structural defects. The structural perturbations brought about by the mutation were accompanied by aberrant functions associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Specifically, apoE4[L28P] promoted the cellular uptake of extracellular amyloid β peptide 42 (Aβ42) by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells as well as by primary mouse neuronal cells and led to increased formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species that persisted for at least 24 h. Furthermore, lipoprotein particles containing apoE4[L28P] induced intracellular reactive oxygen species formation and reduced SK-N-SH cell viability. Overall, our findings suggest that the L28P mutation leads to significant structural and conformational perturbations in apoE4 and can induce functional defects associated with neuronal Aβ42 accumulation and oxidative stress. We propose that these structural and functional changes underlie the observed added risk for AD development in carriers of apoE4[L28P]. PMID:24644280

  14. Genetic risk factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, L; Morgan, K; Kalsheker, N

    1998-01-01

    Following a brief introduction and discussion of the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease, the main emphasis of this review article will be the genetic factors that have been implicated in this disease. These can be divided into two main categories. First, the three genes in which mutations are known to result in early onset autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease will be discussed. These are well characterised but account for only a small proportion of Alzheimer's disease cases. Late onset, sporadic Alzheimer's disease is more common and evidence suggests that there is a genetic component to this type of disease. A number of genetic risk factors have been implicated that might increase the risk of developing sporadic disease. Many of these are controversial and studies have shown conflicting results, which are discussed in this section. Finally, a brief discussion of some of the mechanisms suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is included. It is hoped that this will show why particular genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease and how they might be able to influence the development of the disease. PMID:10193509

  15. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  16. Behavioral stress fails to accelerate the onset and progression of plaque pathology in the brain of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiuju; Su, Huanxing; Chau, Wing Hin; Toa Ng, Cheung; Huang, Jian-Dong; Wu, Wutian; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting findings exist regarding the link between environmental factors and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a variety of transgenic mouse models of AD. In the present study, we investigated the effect of behavioral stress on the onset and progression of Aβ pathology in the brains of TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic mouse model of AD. One group of TgCRND8 mice was subjected to restraint stress starting at 1 month of age until they were 3 months old, while restraint stress in the second group started at 4 months of age until they were 6 months old. After 2 months of treatment, no differences in the soluble, formic acid extracted, or histologically detected Aβ deposition in the cortical and hippocampal levels were found between non-stressed and stressed mice. These results showed that restraint stress alone failed to aggravate amyloid pathology when initiated either before or after the age of amyloid plaque deposition in TgCRND8 mice, suggesting that if stress aggravated AD phenotype, it may not be via an amyloid-related mechanism in the TgCRND8 mice. These findings are indicative that plaque load per se may not be used as a significant criterion for evaluating the effect of stress on AD patients. PMID:23326437

  17. Association of the p22phox polymorphism C242T with the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a northern Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qingxi; Qi, Faying; Tian, Fengyun; Ma, Guozhao; Che, Fengyuan; Du, Yifeng; Gao, Naiyong

    2016-07-01

    The C242T polymorphism of the CYBA gene that encodes p22phox, a component of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, has been found to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Oxidative stress is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is manifested as increased availability of ROS because of an imbalanced redox state. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate potential associations of the p22phox C242T polymorphism with the risk of late-onset AD (LOAD) in a northern Han Chinese population. Patients with LOAD (n = 276) and 320 control subjects were recruited for the study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect the genotypes. No significant differences were found between LOAD and p22phox C242T polymorphism, but a significant association was obtained in the genotype and allele distributions of p22phox C242T between LOAD patients and controls in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ϵ4 carriers. These results suggested that p22phox C242T polymorphism has a possible role in changing the genetic susceptibility to LOAD in ApoE ϵ4 carriers of this northern Han Chinese population. PMID:26000926

  18. Association of SORL1 alleles with late-onset Alzheimer's disease. findings from the GIGAS_LOAD study and mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Paolo; Politis, Antonis; Albani, Diego; Rodilossi, Serena; Polito, Letizia; Ateri, Eleonora; Zisaki, Aikaterini; Piperi, Christina; Liappas, Ioannis; Stamouli, Evangelia; Mailis, Antonis; Atti, Anna R; Ferrari, Barbara; Morini, Valentina; Moretti, Francesca; Biella, Gloria; Forloni, Gianluigi; Papadimitriou, George N; Ronchi, Diana De; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Serretti, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is influenced by sorting-protein related receptor (sorLa) that is less expressed in AD patients. The gene encoding sorLa (SORL1) has been investigated as a susceptibility factor for late-onset AD (LOAD) with conflicting results. Our objectives were to confirm the association between SORL1 SNPs and LOAD in two independent South-European centers and to perform a mega-analysis of published samples. We analyzed three SORL1 SNPs (intron 6: rs668387; rs689021; rs641120) from the Greece-Italy Genetic Association Study on lateonset AD (GIGAS_LOAD). Greek sample included 96 patients with LOAD (DSM-IV) and 120 unrelated controls. In Italy, a community-based sample is ongoing. 47 LOAD patients and 165 controls were recruited until study endpoint. These samples and previously published ones (Alzgene) were pooled as in a single study. A test for trend was used to analyze genotype association. In the GIGAS_LOAD sample no association was detected between SORL1 genotypes and LOAD. Conversely all SNPs were associated with LOAD in mega-analysis based on ordinal classification of genotypes (Armitage's test: p < 0.001). Although our analysis of pooled samples has positive results for the association between SORL1 and AD, there is substantial heterogeneity across studies. Thus further examination into SORL1 SNPs and the population is necessary to determine the role of SORL1 in LOAD. PMID:22044026

  19. Evidence for Sub-Haplogroup H5 of Mitochondrial DNA as a Risk Factor for Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Aurelia; Balbi, Valentina; Balducci, Elisa; Pirazzini, Chiara; Rosini, Francesca; Tavano, Francesca; Achilli, Alessandro; Siviero, Paola; Minicuci, Nadia; Bellavista, Elena; Mishto, Michele; Salvioli, Stefano; Marchegiani, Francesca; Cardelli, Maurizio; Olivieri, Fabiola; Nacmias, Benedetta; Chiamenti, Andrea Maria; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Rose, Giuseppina; Gabelli, Carlo; Binetti, Giuliano; Sorbi, Sandro; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Passarino, Giuseppe; Torroni, Antonio; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia among senile subjects. It has been proposed that AD can be caused by defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Given the fundamental contribution of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) for the respiratory chain, there have been a number of studies investigating the association between mtDNA inherited variants and multifactorial diseases, however no general consensus has been reached yet on the correlation between mtDNA haplogroups and AD. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied for the first time a high resolution analysis (sequencing of displacement loop and restriction analysis of specific markers in the coding region of mtDNA) to investigate the possible association between mtDNA-inherited sequence variation and AD in 936 AD patients and 776 cognitively assessed normal controls from central and northern Italy. Among over 40 mtDNA sub-haplogroups analysed, we found that sub-haplogroup H5 is a risk factor for AD (OR = 1.85, 95% CI:1.04–3.23) in particular for females (OR = 2.19, 95% CI:1.06–4.51) and independently from the APOE genotype. Multivariate logistic regression revealed an interaction between H5 and age. When the whole sample is considered, the H5a subgroup of molecules, harboring the 4336 transition in the tRNAGln gene, already associated to AD in early studies, was about threefold more represented in AD patients than in controls (2.0% vs 0.8%; p = 0.031), and it might account for the increased frequency of H5 in AD patients (4.2% vs 2.3%). The complete re-sequencing of the 56 mtDNAs belonging to H5 revealed that AD patients showed a trend towards a higher number (p = 0.052) of sporadic mutations in tRNA and rRNA genes when compared with controls. Conclusions Our results indicate that high resolution analysis of inherited mtDNA sequence variation can help in identifying both ancient polymorphisms defining sub

  20. Predicting hospice appropriateness for patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Marsh, G W; Prochoda, K P; Pritchett, E; Vojir, C P

    2000-11-01

    The appropriateness of admitting individuals to hospice services is determined by assessing the individual's 6-month survival prognosis. Clinical parameters that guide clinicians in assessing prognosis, however, are not well defined in cases of dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) when compared to other illnesses. The Alzheimer's-Hospice Placement Evaluation Scale (AHOPE) was developed to assess the 6-month prognosis of individuals with late-stage DAT. The purposes of this study were to estimate the reliability and predictive validity of AHOPE and to test additional demographic and clinical indicators to determine their added contribution to predicting 6-month survival and hospice appropriateness. Data were collected on 112 long-term care residents with DAT at enrollment and 6 months following enrollment. Initial reliability and predictive validity of AHOPE were supported. Other demographic and clinical indicators were not predictors of 6-month survival. Although additional research is indicated, nurses can use AHOPE to enhance clinical observation and decision making for implementing appropriate care strategies for patients with end-stage DAT and their families. PMID:11078784

  1. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  2. A statistical study of solar type III bursts and auroral kilometric radiation onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-10-01

    Simultaneous occurrences of type III solar radio bursts and auroral kilometric radiation were observed by Calvert (1981) using ISEE 1 spectrograms. Calvert presented evidence suggesting that the incoming type III burst stimulates the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). This paper presents a statistical study of the correlation between type III bursts and auroral kilometric radiation. A superposed epoch analysis was performed on as many as 186 type III events. The type III bursts were detected by the ISEE 3 spacecraft on the sunward side of the earth. At the same time the IMP 8 spacecraft was used to detect onsets of kilometric radiation on the nightside of the earth. For each event the intensities measured by ISEE 3 (type III intensities) were subtracted from the intensities measured by IMP 8 (type III and possible AKR intensities). The resulting intensities for each event were then added to determine if kilometric radiation was preferentially observed following a type III burst. This analysis was performed at frequencies of 100, 178, and 500 kHz. The results of this study show that a statistically significant correlation exists between incoming type III bursts from the sun and kilometric radiation from the earth.

  3. A statistical study of solar Type-3 bursts and auroral kilometric radiation onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-03-01

    Simultaneous occurrences of Type-3 solar radio bursts and auroral kilometric radiation were observed by Calvert using ISEE-1 spectrograms. He presented evidence suggesting that the incoming Type-3 burst stimulates the onset of auroral kilometric radiation. This paper presents a statistical study of the correlation between Type-3 bursts and auroral kilometric radiation. A superposed epoch analysis was performed on as many as 186 Type-3 events. The Type-3 bursts were detected by the ISEE-3 spacecraft on the sunward side of the Earth. At the same time the IMP-8 spacecraft was used to detect onsets of kilometric radiation on the nightside of the Earth. For each event, the intensities measured by ISEE-3 (Type-3 intensities) were subtracted from the intensities measured by IMP-8 (Type 3 and possible AKR intensities). The resulting intensities for each event were then added to determine if kilometric radiation was preferentially observed following a Type-3 burst. This analysis was performed at frequencies of 100 kHz, 178 kHz and 500 kHz. The results of this study show that a statistically significant correlation exists between incoming Type-3 bursts from the Sun and kilometric radiation from the Earth.

  4. Spatial memory deficits in a mouse model of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are caused by zinc supplementation and correlate with amyloid-beta levels.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Jane M; Bozzelli, P Lorenzo; Adlard, Paul A; Railey, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research in Alzheimer's disease (AD) that uses mouse models focuses on the early-onset form of the disease, which accounts for less than 5% of cases. In contrast, this study used a late-onset AD model to examine the interaction between increased dietary zinc (Zn) and the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene. ApoE ε4 is overrepresented in late-onset AD and enhances Zn binding to amyloid-β (Aβ). This study sought to determine if elevated dietary Zn would impair spatial memory in CRND8 mice (CRND8), as well as mice who carry both the mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ApoE ε4 genes (CRND8/E4). Mice were provided with either lab tap water or water enhanced with 10 ppm Zn (ZnCO3) for 4 months. At 6 months of age, spatial memory was measured by the Barnes maze. CRND8 mice exhibited significant memory deficits compared to WT mice, as shown by an increased latency to reach the escape box. For the CRND8/E4, but not the CRND8 mice, those given Zn water made significantly more errors than those on lab water. During the probe trial for the WT group, those on Zn water spent significantly less time in the target quadrant than those on lab water. These data suggest that increased dietary Zn can significantly impair spatial memory in CRND8/E4. WT mice given Zn water were also impaired on the 24-h probe trial when compared to lab water WTs. Within the CRND8/E4 group only, levels of soluble Aβ were significantly correlated with average primary latencies. Within the Zn-treated CRND8/E4 group, there was a significant correlation between insoluble Aβ and average primary errors. Levels of the zinc transporter 3, ZnT3, were negatively correlated with soluble Aβ (p < 0.01). These findings are particularly relevant because increased intake of dietary supplements, such as Zn, are common in the elderly-a population already at risk for AD. Given the effects observed in the CRND8/E4 mice, ApoE status should be taken into consideration when evaluating the efficacy of

  5. KIR haplotypes are associated with late-onset type 1 diabetes in European–American families

    PubMed Central

    Traherne, J A; Jiang, W; Valdes, A M; Hollenbach, J A; Jayaraman, J; Lane, J A; Johnson, C; Trowsdale, J; Noble, J A

    2016-01-01

    Classical human leukocyte antigens (HLA) genes confer the strongest, but not the only, genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), on natural killer (NK) cells, bind ligands including class I HLA. We examined presence or absence, with copy number, of KIR loci in 1698 individuals, from 339 multiplex type 1 diabetes families, from the Human Biological Data Interchange, previously genotyped for HLA. Combining family data with KIR copy number information allowed assignment of haplotypes using identity by descent. This is the first disease study to use KIR copy number typing and unambiguously define haplotypes by gene transmission. KIR A1 haplotypes were positively associated with T1D in the subset of patients without the high T1D risk HLA genotype, DR3/DR4 (odds ratio=1.29, P=0.0096). The data point to a role for KIR in type 1 diabetes risk in late-onset patients. In the top quartile (age of onset>14), KIR A2 haplotype was overtransmitted (63.4%, odds ratio=1.73, P=0.024) and KIR B haplotypes were undertransmitted (41.1%, odds ratio=0.70, P=0.0052) to patients. The data suggest that inhibitory ‘A' haplotypes are predisposing and stimulatory ‘B' haplotypes confer protection in both DR3/DR4-negative and late-onset patient groups. PMID:26492518

  6. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  7. Alzheimer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Alzheimer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Alzheimer disease : Alzheimer's Association -- www.alz.org Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center -- www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers ...

  8. Type-1 interferon signaling mediates neuro-inflammatory events in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Juliet M; Minter, Myles R; Newman, Andrew G; Zhang, Moses; Adlard, Paul A; Crack, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    A neuro-inflammatory response has been implicated in human patients and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type-1 interferons are pleiotropic cytokines involved in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response; however, their role in AD is unknown. This study investigated the contribution of type-1 IFN signaling in the neuro-inflammatory response to amyloid-beta (Aβ) in vitro and in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed a 2-fold increase in IFNα in APP/PS1 brains compared with control brains. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction also identified increased IFNα and IFNβ expression in human pre-frontal cortex from AD patients. In vitro studies in primary neurons demonstrated Aβ-induced type-1 IFN expression preceded that of other classical pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1-β, and IL-6. Significantly, ablation of type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 expression in BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary neurons afforded protection against Aβ-induced toxicity. This study supports a role for type-1 interferons in the pro-inflammatory response and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests that blocking type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 maybe a therapeutic target to limit the disease progression. PMID:24262201

  9. Initiating Characteristics of Early-onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Xie, Li-Fang; Chen, Kang; Yang, Gang-Yi; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Hong, Tian-Pei; Shan, Zhong-Yan; Li, Hong-Mei; Chen, Bing; Tang, Xu-Lei; Qi, Ling; Yang, Jing; Fang, Yuan; Li, Ting; Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Liang, Xue; Yin, Ya-Qi; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has traditionally been considered to affect mainly the elderly; however, the age at diagnosis has gradually reduced in recent years. Although the incidence of young-onset T2DM is increasing, it is still not fully clear the onset characteristics and risk factors of early-onset T2DM. The aim of this study was to describe the initiating characteristics of early-onset T2DM in Chinese patients and evaluate the risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional controlled study was performed using a questionnaire survey method in outpatients of multiple centers in China. A total of 1545 patients with T2DM with an age at onset of <40 years were included, and the control group consisted of subjects aged <40 years with normal blood glucose level. Results: In patients with young-onset T2DM, the mean age and initial hemoglobin 1Ac at diagnosis were 32.96 ± 5.40 years and 9.59 ± 2.71%, respectively. Most of the patients were obese, followed irregular diet pattern and sedentary lifestyle, had life or work pressure, and had a family history of diabetes mellitus. Compared with subjects with normal blood glucose level, logistic regression analysis showed that waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio [OR] 446.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 42.37–4714.87), family history of diabetes mellitus (OR 23.46, CI 14.47–38.03), dyslipidemia (OR 2.65, CI 1.54–4.56), diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.02, CI 1.00–1.04), and body mass index (OR 0.95, CI 0.92–0.99) are independent factors for early-onset T2DM. Conclusions: We observed that abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes mellitus, and medical history of hypertension and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for early-onset T2DM. It is, therefore, necessary to apply early lifestyle intervention in young people with risk of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26996471

  10. Social Network Data Validity: The Example of the Social Network of Caregivers of Older Persons with Alzheimer-Type Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpentier, Normand

    2007-01-01

    This article offers reflection on the validity of relational data such as used in social network analysis. Ongoing research on the transformation of the support network of caregivers of persons with an Alzheimer-type disease provides the data to fuel the debate on the validity of participant report. More specifically, we sought to understand the…

  11. The pattern of reading deterioration in dementia of the Alzheimer type: observations and implications.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J L; Houlihan, J P; Hill, M A

    1986-11-01

    Thirteen patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) were tested for their ability to read aloud and to read with comprehension. Reading aloud was preserved in all but the most severely impaired cases and was found to be relatively independent of intellectual deterioration. Reading comprehension declined progressively with increasing dementia severity and correlated well with quantitative mental status assessments. The results suggest that the pattern of reading deterioration may aid in the clinical identification of DAT, that the disturbance of reading comprehension is a linguistic deficit rather than a product of visual-perceptual disturbances, and that the alexia is more consistent with an instrumental loss than a de-developmental model of dementia. PMID:3790984

  12. Auditory and Visual Cues for Topic Maintenance with Persons Who Exhibit Dementia of Alzheimer's Type

    PubMed Central

    Teten, Amy F.; Dagenais, Paul A.; Friehe, Mary J.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of auditory and visual redirections in facilitating topic coherence for persons with Dementia of Alzheimer's Type (DAT). Five persons with moderate stage DAT engaged in conversation with the first author. Three topics related to activities of daily living, recreational activities, food, and grooming, were broached. Each topic was presented three times to each participant: once as a baseline condition, once with auditory redirection to topic, and once with visual redirection to topic. Transcripts of the interactions were scored for overall coherence. Condition was a significant factor in that the DAT participants exhibited better topic maintenance under visual and auditory conditions as opposed to baseline. In general, the performance of the participants was not affected by the topic, except for significantly higher overall coherence ratings for the visually redirected interactions dealing with the topic of food. PMID:26171273

  13. Intervening with everyday memory problems in dementia of Alzheimer type: an errorless learning approach.

    PubMed

    Clare, L; Wilson, B A; Carter, G; Breen, K; Gosses, A; Hodges, J R

    2000-02-01

    Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DAT) is increasingly detected at an earlier stage of the disorder, when interventions to assist with everyday memory difficulties might be most valuable. Some learning is possible in DAT and a number of factors have been identified which may facilitate performance, although applications to everyday memory problems have been limited. The concept of errorless learning has not previously been directly examined in relation to DAT, but might provide a useful additional strategy. In the present study, 6 participants with early stage DAT (MMSE scores 21 - 26) received individually tailored interventions, based on errorless learning principles and targeted at a specific everyday memory problem. Five of the participants showed significant improvement on the target measures, and maintained this improvement up to 6 months later. The results suggest that it is feasible to intervene with everyday memory problems in the early stages PMID:10649552

  14. Shared Neuropathological Characteristics of Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease: Impacts on Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer M; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-09-01

    In the past few decades, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as older individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), has increased. While the consumption of diets high in fat (total and saturated) have been linked to increased risk of AD, diets rich in antioxidants, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3 fatty acids are associated with decreased risk. Additionally, AD patients are at increased risk for developing T2DM. Recent research suggests that there are stronger similarities between AD and T2DM than have previously been considered. Here we review the neurocognitive and inflammatory effects of high-fat diet consumption, its relationship to AD, and the treatment potential of dietary interventions that may decrease risk of cognitive decline and other associated neuropathological changes, such as insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:26340637

  15. A Deeper Look into Type 1 Diabetes – Imaging Immune Responses during Onset of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes execute the killing of insulin-producing beta cells during onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). The research community has come far in dissecting the major events in the development of this disease, but still the trigger and high-resolved information of the immunological events leading up to beta cell loss are missing. During the past decades, intravital imaging of immune responses has led to significant scientific breakthroughs in diverse models of disease, including T1D. Dynamic imaging of immune cells at the pancreatic islets during T1D onset has been made possible through the development of both advanced microscopes, and animal models that allow long-term immobilization of the pancreas. The use of these modalities has revealed a milling microenvironment at the pancreatic islets during disease onset with a plethora of active players. Clues to answering the remaining questions in this disease may lie in intravital imaging, including how key immune cells traffic to and from the pancreas, and how cells interact at this target tissue. This review highlights and discusses recent studies, models, and techniques focused to understand the immune responses during T1D onset through intravital imaging. PMID:27574523

  16. A Deeper Look into Type 1 Diabetes - Imaging Immune Responses during Onset of Disease.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; von Herrath, Matthias G

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes execute the killing of insulin-producing beta cells during onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). The research community has come far in dissecting the major events in the development of this disease, but still the trigger and high-resolved information of the immunological events leading up to beta cell loss are missing. During the past decades, intravital imaging of immune responses has led to significant scientific breakthroughs in diverse models of disease, including T1D. Dynamic imaging of immune cells at the pancreatic islets during T1D onset has been made possible through the development of both advanced microscopes, and animal models that allow long-term immobilization of the pancreas. The use of these modalities has revealed a milling microenvironment at the pancreatic islets during disease onset with a plethora of active players. Clues to answering the remaining questions in this disease may lie in intravital imaging, including how key immune cells traffic to and from the pancreas, and how cells interact at this target tissue. This review highlights and discusses recent studies, models, and techniques focused to understand the immune responses during T1D onset through intravital imaging. PMID:27574523

  17. Bacteriophage--a common divergent therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed S; Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad A; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Mirza, Zeenat

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most important neurodegenerative disorder, is an irreversible, age-dependent disease of the brain characterized by problems in progressive impairments in memory, language, reasoning, behavior and visuospatial skills. It is characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta peptide, forming compact fibrillar plaques and neurofibrillary tau tangles. Another major and much more prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in world is diabetes especially type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is caused by a combination of resistance to insulin action and an inadequate compensatory insulin secretory response. Chronic wounds caused by antibiotic resistant bacterial infections that fail to heal are a common complication of diabetes mellitus and the most frequent reason for nontraumatic lower limb amputation. Holistically, these two diseases are linked at molecular level but the exact mechanism is a topic of debate. Bacteriophages are viruses infecting bacteria and lack ability to infect mammalian cells. They are neither causative agent for Alzheimer's disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus nor involved in their pathogenicity but promises for a novel divergent therapeutic approach. The great versatility of the phage system has led to the development of improved phage delivery vectors, as well as immunomodulation of anti-amyloid beta peptide response. Phages could also constitute valuable prophylaxis against bacterial infections, especially in immunocompromised patients like in the case of diabetes. Patients having diabetes have a high risk of developing foot ulcers which are difficult to be treated by antibiotics alone due to ever increasing antibiotic resistance strains. Combination therapy based on multiple phage and broad spectrum antibiotics holds great promise. The potential therapeutic phage therapy arises from its lack of natural tropism for mammalian cells, resulting in no adverse effects. PMID:24059304

  18. Diabetes mellitus Type II and cognitive capacity in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Degen, Christina; Toro, Pablo; Schönknecht, Peter; Sattler, Christine; Schröder, Johannes

    2016-06-30

    While diabetes mellitus (DM) Type II has repeatedly been linked to Alzheimer´s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), longitudinal research is scarce and disease duration has not always been taken into account. In a birth cohort born between 1930 and 1932 we investigated the influence of DM Type II and disease duration on neuropsychological functioning (memory/learning, attention, verbal fluency, visuospatial thinking and abstract thinking) across 14 years. Subjects who developed MCI or AD performed significantly poorer on all neuropsychological tests applied. While significant main effects DM Type II did not arise, its presence led to a significant deterioration of performance in the digit symbol test and visuospatial thinking over time. Additionally, in visuospatial thinking this change was more pronounced for individuals suffering from MCI/AD. We found that, as a concomitant disease DM Type II does not affect memory functioning, which is typically compromised in MCI and early AD. Rather, it may lead to deficits in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial thinking. DM Type II can be considered a frequent comorbid condition which can aggravate the course of MCI and AD. In this respect it may serve as a model for other comorbid conditions in AD. PMID:27082868

  19. Relative risk of Alzheimer disease and age-at-onset distributions, based on APOE genotypes among elderly African Americans, caucasians, and hispanics in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M.X.; Liu, X.H.; Stern, Y.

    1996-03-01

    Apolipoprotein-E {epsilon}4 (APOE-{epsilon}4) has been consistently associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and may be responsible for an earlier age at onset. We have previously reported a diminished association between APOE-{epsilon}4 and AD in African Americans. Using a new method, which allows inclusion of censored information, we compared relative risks by APOE genotypes in an expanded collection of cases and controls from three ethnic groups in a New York community. The relative risk for AD associated with APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygosity was increased in all ethnic groups (African American relative risk [RR] = 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-5.9; Caucasian RR = 7.3, 95% CI = 2.5-21.6; and Hispanic RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1-5.7), compared with those with APOE-{epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotypes. The risk was also increased for APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygous Caucasians (RR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.7-5.1) and Hispanics (RR = 1.6,95% CI = 1.1-2.3), but not for African Americans (RR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-0.9). The age distribution of the proportion of Caucasians and Hispanics without AD was consistently lower for APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygous and APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygous individuals than for those with other APOE genotypes. In African Americans this relationship was observed only in APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygotes. These results confirm that APOE genotypes influence the RR of AD in Caucasians and Hispanics. Differences in risk among APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygote African Americans suggest that other genetic or environmental factors may modify the effect of APOE-{epsilon}4 in some populations. 58 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Relative risk of Alzheimer disease and age-at-onset distributions, based on APOE genotypes among elderly African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M. X.; Maestre, G.; Tsai, W. Y.; Liu, X. H.; Feng, L.; Chung, W. Y.; Chun, M.; Schofield, P.; Stern, Y.; Tycko, B.; Mayeux, R.

    1996-01-01

    Apolipoprotein-E epsilon 4 (APOE-epsilon 4) has been consistently associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and may be responsible for an earlier age at onset. We have previously reported a diminished association between APOE-epsilon 4 and AD in African Americans. Using a new method, which allows inclusion of censored information, we compared relative risks by APOE genotypes in an expanded collection of cases and controls from three ethnic groups in a New York community. The relative risk for AD associated with APOE-epsilon 4 homozygosity was increased in all ethnic groups (African American relative risk [RR]=3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.5-5.9; Caucasian RR=7.3, 95% CI=2.5-21.6; and Hispanic RR=2.5, 95% CI=1.1-5.7), compared with those with APOE-epsilon 3/epsilon 3 genotypes. The risk was also increased for APOE-epsilon 4 heterozygous Caucasians (RR=2.9, 95% CI=1.7-5.1) and Hispanics (RR=1.6, 95% CI=1.1-2.3), but not for African Americans (RR=0.6, 95% Ci=0.4-0.9). The age distribution of the proportion of Caucasians and Hispanics without AD was consistently lower for APOE-epsilon 4 homozygous and APOE-epsilon 4 heterozygous individuals than for those with other APOE genotypes. In African Americans this relationship was observed only in APOE-epsilon 4 homozygotes. These results confirm that APOE genotypes influence the RR of AD in Caucasians and Hispanics. Differences in risk among APOE-epsilon 4 heterozygote African Americans suggest that other genetic or environmental factors may modify the effect of APOE-epsilon 4 in some populations. PMID:8644717

  1. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  2. [Phase-specific function of denial in type 1 diabetic patients after disease onset].

    PubMed

    Spiess, K; Sachs, G; Frischenschlager, O; Moser, G; Prager, R

    1994-01-01

    In a longitudinal study we examined 43 patients with type 1 diabetes one week after onset as well as 8 and 24 month later in order to analyze the psychological role of denial processes in correlation to metabolic functions. Only depression decreased over the studied period while coping and denial remained stable. However, the adaptive function of denial after onset with low anxiety, good coping and few complaints became maladaptive over the first two years and the correlation of denial with a centripetal kinship behavior loosened. The destructive effect of denial was indicated only by delayed requests for assistance while no correlation could be shown for phase-specific internal restructuring of the psychological function of denial to compliance and metabolic control. PMID:8147141

  3. [A case of summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis with bronchoalveolar lavage performed 4 years before onset].

    PubMed

    Saijo, A; Sugiyama, Y; Sugama, Y; Kitamura, S

    1990-08-01

    A 51-year-old man with chief complaints of cough, fever, and dyspnea was admitted to our hospital. Based on a home provocation test, transbronchial lung biopsy specimens, and a serum antibody, we diagnosed summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In 1983 when the patient was 46 years old, thymectomy was performed for thymoma. Prior to surgery, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed. Total cell count and neutrophils had already increased in BALF. Furthermore, the increase in BALF cell neutrophil count was also seen at the time of admission and after the home provocation test. Because an increase of neutrophils in BALF cells was seen not only at onset but before onset, further studies are required to clarify the role of neutrophils and the factors that increase them in hypersensitivity pneumonitis. PMID:2243464

  4. Therapeutic effect of organoselenium dietary supplementation in a sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type model in rats.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Simone; Brüning, César A; Sartori Oliveira, Carla E; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that selenium (Se) might play different roles in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is a lack of evidence that proves whether supplementation with Se is beneficial or not for the treatment of AD. Thus, the aim of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of p,p'-methoxyl-diphenyl diselenide [(MeOPhSe)(2)], an organoselenium compound, against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) in rats. Male Wistar rats received STZ twice daily (1.0 mg/8 μl; 4 μl/ventricle) for 21 days. After 21 days of STZ injection, regular-diet-fed rats were supplemented with 10 ppm of (MeOPhSe)(2) during 30 days. At the end of this period, the rats were challenged in the Morris water maze and step-down passive avoidance tasks. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), deficit in cerebral energy metabolism (measurement of adenosine 5-triphosphate and adenosine 5-diphosphate levels), and oxidative and nitrosative stress were determined in the cortex and hippocampus of rats. The results demonstrated that (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation reverted STZ-induced memory impairment of rats in both cognitive tasks. The findings also indicated that (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation reverted oxidative stress in the STZ group (decreased reactive species and tyrosine nitration levels and enhanced nonprotein thiol levels). Moreover, (MeOPhSe)(2) dietary supplementation normalized AChE activity, which was enhanced by STZ injection, but did not revert the deficit in cerebral energy metabolism caused by STZ. The results of the present study indicated the therapeutic effect of the (MeOPhSe)(2)-supplemented diet in a rat model of SDAT. PMID:22959057

  5. Abundant type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the hippocampus of mouse Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    He, Xue Ying; Wen, Guang Yeong; Merz, George; Lin, Dawei; Yang, Ying Zi; Mehta, Penkaj; Schulz, Horst; Yang, Song Yu

    2002-02-28

    A full-length cDNA of mouse type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD10) was cloned from brain, representing the accurate nucleotide sequence information that rendered possible an accurate deduction of the amino acid sequence of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of sequences and three-dimensional models of this enzyme revealed that structures previously reported by other groups carry either a truncated or mutated amino-terminal sequence. Fusion of the first 11 residues of the wild-type enzyme to the green fluorescent protein directed the reporter protein into mitochondria. Thus, the N-terminus was identified as a mitochondrial targeting signal that accounts for the intracellular localization of the mouse enzyme. This enzyme is normally associated with mitochondria, not with the endoplasmic reticulum as suggested by its trivial name 'endoplasmic reticulum-associated amyloid-beta biding protein (ERAB)'. After its C-terminal region was used to raise rabbit anti-17 betaHSD10 antibodies, immunogold electron microscopy showed that an abundance of this enzyme could be found in hippocampal synaptic mitochondria of betaAPP transgenic mice, but not in normal controls. High levels of this enzyme may disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in synapses and contribute to synapse loss in the hippocampus of the mouse Alzheimer's disease model. PMID:11869808

  6. Cathepsin F mutations cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Canafoglia, Laura; Andermann, Eva; Damiano, John; Morbin, Michela; Bruni, Amalia C.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Cossette, Patrick; Saftig, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Schwake, Michael; Andermann, Frederick; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Mole, Sara E.; Franceschetti, Silvana; Alexander, Noreen A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Chapman, Harold A.; Carpenter, Stirling; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is challenging to diagnose and genetically heterogeneous. Mutations in CLN6 were recently identified in recessive Kufs disease presenting as progressive myoclonus epilepsy (Type A), whereas the molecular basis of cases presenting with dementia and motor features (Type B) is unknown. We performed genome-wide linkage mapping of two families with recessive Type B Kufs disease and identified a single region on chromosome 11 to which both families showed linkage. Exome sequencing of five samples from the two families identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense mutations in CTSF within this linkage region. We subsequently sequenced CTSF in 22 unrelated individuals with suspected recessive Kufs disease, and identified an additional patient with compound heterozygous mutations. CTSF encodes cathepsin F, a lysosomal cysteine protease, dysfunction of which is a highly plausible candidate mechanism for a storage disorder like ceroid lipofuscinosis. In silico modeling suggested the missense mutations would alter protein structure and function. Moreover, re-examination of a previously published mouse knockout of Ctsf shows that it recapitulates the light and electron-microscopic pathological features of Kufs disease. Although CTSF mutations account for a minority of cases of type B Kufs, CTSF screening should be considered in cases with early-onset dementia and may avoid the need for invasive biopsies. PMID:23297359

  7. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid cortisol and clinical disease progression in MCI and dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Popp, Julius; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Heuser, Isabella; Peters, Oliver; Hüll, Michael; Schröder, Johannes; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Lewczuk, Piotr; Schneider, Anja; Jahn, Holger; Luckhaus, Christian; Perneczky, Robert; Frölich, Lutz; Wagner, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Wiltfang, Jens; Kornhuber, Johannes; Jessen, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Increased peripheral and central nervous system cortisol levels have been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect dysfunction of cerebral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, brain exposure to high cortisol concentrations may also accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at early clinical stages of AD and whether plasma and CSF cortisol levels are associated with clinical disease progression. Morning plasma and CSF cortisol concentrations were obtained from the subjects with AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment of AD type (MCI-AD), MCI of other type (MCI-O), and controls with normal cognition included in a multicenter study from the German Dementia Competence Network. A clinical and neuropsychological follow-up was performed in a subgroup of participants with MCI-AD, MCI-O, and AD dementia. CSF cortisol concentrations were increased in the subjects with AD dementia or MCI-AD compared with subjects with MCI-O or normal cognition. After controlling for possible confounders including CSF measures of amyloid beta1-42 and total tau, higher baseline CSF cortisol levels were associated with faster clinical worsening and cognitive decline in MCI-AD. The findings suggest that HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at the MCI stage of AD and may accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline. PMID:25435336

  9. Regional cerebral metabolic alterations in dementia of the Alzheimer type: positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Ganz, E.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Koss, B.; Ober, B.A.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-08-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia in adults. Despite recent advances in our understanding of its anatomy and chemistry, we remain largely ignorant of its pathogenesis, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Dynamic positron emission tomography using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed on the Donner 280-crystal ring in 10 subjects with dementia of the Alzheimer type and six healthy age-matched controls. Ratios comparing mean counts per resolution element in frontal, temporoparietal, and entire cortex regions in brain sections 10 mm thick obtained 40-70 min following FDG injection showed relatively less FDG uptake in the temporoparietal cortex bilaterally in all the Alzheimer subjects (p less than 0.01). Left-right alterations were less prominent than the anteroposterior changes. This diminished uptake was due to lowered rates of FDG use and suggests that the metabolic effects of Alzheimer disease are most concentrated in the temporoparietal cortex. Positron emission tomography is a most powerful tool for the noninvasive in vivo assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia.

  10. Alzheimer's Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get involved Last Updated: Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ... Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  11. Candidate genes and late-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Susceptibility genes or common polymorphisms?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars

    2003-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the aetio-pathogenesis of the common form of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its intrinsically related features of impaired insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity (insulin resistance) includes a strong genetic component. At present, however, little is known about the nature of this genetic component although familial clustering of the disease has been described for decades. Major break-throughs in the genetic sciences of type 2 diabetes have been identifications of insulin receptor gene mutations in syndromes of severe insulin resistance and mutations in pancreatic beta-cell genes in the monogenic sub-group of type 2 diabetes: maturity-onset-diabetes-of-the-young, MODY. Pathophysiological models of insulin resistance in skeletal muscles and impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion in the beta-cells have formed a basis for selecting candidate genes with potential influence on the development of type 2 diabetes ("diabetogenes"). This process of selecting and analyzing genes for mutations that potentially associate with either type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance or impaired insulin secretion is often described as the "candidate gene approach". The studies reported in this thesis are excerpts from an extensive strategy of genetically dissecting (mutation analysis) in: 1) patients with the common form of late-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus the pathways that transduce the insulin signals from the plasma membrane to the activation of glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle, and in 2) patients with either late-onset type diabetes or MODY the pathways involved in normal beta-cell development and beta-cell function (insulin secretion). Twelve of the genes that encode proteins in the insulin-signalling pathway from the insulin receptor through the phosphatidylinositide-regulated kinases down to the complex of phosphatases that regulate glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle were analyzed. We could not confirm that a Val

  12. The TRIB3 Q84R Polymorphism and Risk of Early-Onset Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Sabrina; Scarpelli, Daniela; Chandalia, Manisha; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Morini, Eleonora; Del Guerra, Silvia; Perticone, Francesco; Li, Rong; Powers, Christine; Andreozzi, Francesco; Marchetti, Piero; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Abate, Nicola; Doria, Alessandro; Sesti, Giorgio; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), particularly among young adults, has been rising steadily during the past 2 decades. T2D, especially in its early-onset subtype, is under genetic control. TRIB3 inhibits insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and subsequent insulin action. A TRIB3 gain-of-function polymorphism, Q84R (rs2295490), impairs insulin signaling. Objective: The objective of the study was to verify the association of TRIB3 Q84R with: 1) T2D, either subtyped or not according to age at diagnosis (early-onset, <45 yr, or ≥ 45 yr); 2) insulin secretion and sensitivity in nondiabetic individuals; or 3) in vitro insulin secretion from isolated human islets. Design: Four different case-control samples comprising a total of 5469 whites were examined. Insulinogenic and insulin sensitivity indexes and their interplay (disposition index) were assessed in 645 nondiabetic individuals at oral glucose tolerance test, glucose (16.7 mmol/liter)-induced in vitro insulin secretion was assessed in islets isolated from 54 nondiabetic donors. Results: In the whole sample, the R84 variant was nominally associated with T2D (odds ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.36, P = 0.04). When stratifying according to age of diabetes onset, R84 carriers had an increased risk of early-onset T2D (odds ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.10–1.58, P = 0.002). Among 645 nondiabetic subjects, R84 carriers had higher glucose levels (P = 0.005) and lower insulinogenic (P = 0.03) and disposition index (P = 0.02) during the oral glucose tolerance test. R84 islets were more likely to display relatively low glucose-stimulated insulin release (P = 0.04). Conclusions: The TRIB3 R84 variant is associated with early-onset T2D in whites. Alteration in the insulin secretion/insulin sensitivity interplay appears to underlie this association. PMID:18984671

  13. The 5-Year Onset and Regression of Diabetic Retinopathy in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Peiyao; Peng, Jinjuan; Zou, Haidong; Wang, Weiwei; Fu, Jiong; Shen, Binjie; Bai, Xuelin; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) onset and regression in Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Methods This is a 5-year community-based prospective study. The demographic information, systemic examination results and ophthalmological test results of each participant were collected. The study outcomes were DR incidence, defined as the onset of DR in at least one eye, and DR regression, defined as full regression from existing DR to no retinopathy without invasive treatments. The associations between each potential risk factor and the outcomes were studied. Results In total, 778 participants were enrolled. There were 322 patients without DR at baseline, of which 151 participants developed DR during follow-up (DR incidence rate = 46.89%). Baseline hyperglycemia and high blood pressure were two independent risk factors associated with DR incidence. Among the 456 participants with existing DR at entry, 110 fully recovered after 5 years (DR regression rate = 24.12%). Low baseline glucose and low serum triglyceride were two independent factors associated with DR regression. Conclusions DR incidence occurred more frequently in patients with hyperglycemia and high blood pressure. DR regression occurred mostly in patients with lower glucose and lower serum triglyceride levels among Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:25402474

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset.

    PubMed

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling. PMID:25771509

  15. Dihydropteridine reductase activity in dried blood spots: effects of aging and senile dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed Central

    Jeeps, C M; Silcox, A; Lloyd, B; Clayton, B E

    1986-01-01

    Dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7) (DHPR) activity was measured in blood spots from 50 neonates, 52 healthy adults aged 30-62 years, and 21 elderly controls aged 67-97 years, as well as 32 demented patients of whom 25 had senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Enzyme activity was stable for seven days at 4 degrees C and for at least 14 days at -20 degrees C. No important difference was found between the DHPR activity of venous and capillary blood. DHPR activity was considerably lower in the healthy adult group compared with neonates and the elderly group, and there was no sex difference at any age. The erythrocyte DHPR activity of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type was similar to that of elderly controls. This result differs from that previously reported for leucocytes. PMID:3950042

  16. Morphometric Changes in Lateral Ventricles of Patients with Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Perry F.; Kim, Tae-Suk; Jung, Jiyoung J.; Choi, Yera; Kim, Binna N.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus can have effects on global and regional brain morphology. Ventricular enlargement reflecting cerebral atrophy has been reported particularly in elderly type 2 diabetes patients. However, little is known about its timing through the disease course and morphological variability. Using the combined volumetric and advanced three-dimensional morphological approach, we identified differences in size and shape of the lateral ventricles between recent-onset type 2 diabetes patients and healthy individuals. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained from 23 type 2 diabetes patients whose illness duration was less than 1 year and 23 carefully matched healthy individuals. By volume measurement, we found enlarged lateral and third ventricles in type 2 diabetes patients, relative to healthy individuals (F1,41 = 7.96, P = 0.007; F1,41 = 11.16, P = 0.002, respectively). Morphological analysis revealed that the expansion of lateral ventricles in the diabetic brain was prominent in the bilateral frontal horns. The current findings suggest that atrophic changes particularly of the anterior frontal lobe can occur as early as the first year after the clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23593231

  17. Antagonic-stress superiority versus meclofenoxate in gerontopsychiatry (alzheimer type dementia).

    PubMed

    Popa, R; Schneider, F; Mihalas, G; Stefaniga, P; Mihalas, I G; Maties, R; Mateescu, R

    1994-01-01

    A double blind, comparative, parallel and randomized clinical trial was used for evaluation of two nootropics with anti-aging actions: Meclofenoxate (MF) and Antagonic-Stress (AS). Sixty-three old persons divided into 2 groups (average age: 68.6 and 70.8 years, respectively) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), of mild to moderate intensity (criteria of DSM-III-R, APA, 1987; and ICD-10, WHO, 1990) were treated with one of these nootropica. Baseline and final psychogeriatric symptomatology after three months of treatments were multiply assessed: psychogeriatric by Sandoz Clinical Assessment-Geriatric scale, Self-Assessment Scale-Geriatric and their subscales; psychometric by Wechsler Memory Scale and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Prolonged treatments with MF and AS significantly decreased the psychogeriatric scores in scales and subscales, improved the cognitive performance (attention, concentration, memory, performance IQ, full IQ) and diminshed the deterioration index (ANOVA). Therapeutical effects of AS (a neurometabolic complex containing MF) were significantly superior against MF alone (ANCOVA). MF and AS actions are discussed in connection with the brain cholinergic system, lipid peroxidation and free radical scavengers, deceleration of the aging rate, brain and erythrocyte lipofuscinolysis, multiple anti-oxidant formula, multivitamin and multimineral supplementation and with the superiority of multitherapy versus monotherapy in senile dementia and for improving the IQ and the maladaptative behavior. PMID:18649860

  18. Musical structural determinants of emotional judgments in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Lise; Peretz, Isabelle; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2009-01-01

    People with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) may well be emotionally soothed by listening to music. However, very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the anecdotal evidence. DAT does damage certain cerebral structures that subsume emotional processing, and some studies have demonstrated deficits affecting emotional judgments of facial expression and prosody in DAT. Accordingly, this study addressed the question of whether DAT might leave musical emotional judgment intact. Twelve early DAT participants and 12 healthy elderly participants took part in this study. Emotional judgments were examined in relation to mode and tempo, two important structural properties that contribute to the happy-sad distinction in music. Their respective contributions were assessed in four different experimental conditions. The DAT participants' responses were similar to those of healthy elderly participants, showing spared ability to employ tempo and mode as cues for emotional interpretation. The DAT participants' performance was not correlated with their global cognitive functioning. These results constitute a preliminary empirical demonstration that, in early DAT, musical emotional judgments appear to be based on normal structural analysis of musical input. PMID:19210036

  19. Electrophysiological characterization of adult-onset Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Rosa; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Topa, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Lucia; Pisciotta, Chiara; Esposito, Marcello; Tozza, Stefano; Santoro, Lucio; Manganelli, Fiore

    2015-01-15

    In infantile and juvenile Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease electrophysiological studies have shown central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system abnormalities. However, an extensive electrophysiological evaluation of CNS and PNS in adult form of NPC is still lacking. The aim of the study is to assess in adult-onset NPC disease the involvement of CNS and PNS by a multimodal electrophysiological approach. Three patients affected by adult form of NPC disease underwent electrophysiological evaluation including nerve conduction study (NCS), magnetic motor (MEPs), visual (VEPs), somatosensory (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory (BAEPs) evoked potentials. NCS, MEPs, VEPs and upper limb SSEPs were normal. Lower limb SSEPs were abnormal in all patients and abnormalities were consistent with a length-dependent process affecting the central somatosensory pathway. BAEPs were abnormal in all patients with both peripheral and central impairment of auditory pathway. Our electrophysiological findings suggest that auditory and lower limb somatosensory pathways are constantly affected in adult-onset form of NPC disease. The involvement of PNS, pyramidal, visual and upper limb somatosensory pathways might occur later during the course of disease. PMID:25537619

  20. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) triggered by an overseas travel].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masayoshi; Shimada, Takuya; Hamaoka, Shima; Shibata, Masunari; Naito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with abnormal behavior and consciousness disturbance on the day after traveling abroad and was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory tests showed hyperammonemia and hypercitrullinemia. The electro-encephalogram showed frontal dominant bilateral slow δ burst. He had a peculiar taste for nuts. But he didn't take nuts during the overseas travel for 3 days. The family history revealed that his younger brother died of a status epilepticus of unknown cause at the age of 29. These findings were compatible with hepatic encephalopathy due to adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). Gene analysis provided a definite diagnosis of CTLN2. Diet and drug therapy have improved his condition. He is due to have liver transplantation which is the only established radical treatment for CTLN2 if his condition becomes worse. The present case shows that cessation of the habitual intake of nuts only for 3 days could lead to onset of CTLN2. PMID:25283831

  1. Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes-related alterations in brain mitochondria, autophagy and synaptic markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristina; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy in the brain of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. Isolated brain mitochondria and homogenates from cerebral cortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT), triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) and T2D mice were used to evaluate mitochondrial functional parameters and protein levels of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and synaptic integrity markers, respectively. A significant decrease in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and energy levels was observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Also, a significant decrease in the levels of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) and glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) was observed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Moreover, both brain regions of 3xTg-AD mice present lower levels of nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) 1 while the levels of NRF2 are lower in both brain regions of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. A decrease in mitochondrial encoded, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) was also observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice although only statistically significant in T2D cortex. Furthermore, a decrease in the levels of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) in the cerebral cortex of 3xTg-AD mice and in hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice and a decrease in the levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP 25) in the hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice were observed suggesting synaptic integrity loss. These results support the idea that alterations in mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy cause synaptic damage in AD and T2D. PMID:25960150

  2. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. The onset of chromospheric activity among the A- and F- type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore; Landsman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations of C II lambda1335 and C IV lambda1549 and ground-based observations of He I lambda5876 have previously discovered intense levels of chromospheric activity among early F type stars. Virtually all F dwarfs show stronger chromospheric and transition region emission than do the cooler and more deeply convective dwarf stars like the Sun. The IUE spectra and those of He lambda5876 place the onset of stellar activity along the main sequence near a color B - V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type FO and an effective temperature of 7300 K. However, existing X-ray observations of A and F stars suggest that coronal activity may reach a peak blueward of this high temperature boundary at B - V = 0.28 before vanishing among the early and mid A-type stars. Discussed are preliminary results of a new effort to refine the location of the high temperature boundary to chromospheric activity among A- and F- type stars, making use of low dispersion short-wavelength spectra from the IUE archives from which the strengths of C IV, C II, and Lyman alpha emission have been measured.

  4. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Shaheen, N; Kumashiro, R; Tanikawa, K; O'Brien, W E; Beaudet, A L; Saheki, T

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, we show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. We also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. PMID:8105687

  5. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  6. Early-Onset Mild Type Leukoencephalopathy Caused by a Homozygous EARS2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Birce Dilge; Karalok, Zeynep Selen; Gurkas, Esra; Aydin, Kursad; Aydogmus, Ummu; Ceylaner, Serdar; Karaer, Kadri; Yilmaz, Cahide; Pearl, Phillip Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    Childhood leukoencephalopathies are a broad class of diseases, which are extremely rare. The treatment and classification of these disorders are both challenging. Nearly half of children presenting with a leukoencephalopathy remain without a specific diagnosis. Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brain stem involvement and high lactate (LTBL) is a newly described childhood leukoencephalopathy caused by mutations in the gene encoding a mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase specific for glutamate, EARS2 Magnetic resonance images show a characteristic leukoencephalopathy with thalamic and brain stem involvement. Here, we report a different clinical course of LTBL supported by typical MRI features in a Turkish patient who presented with a history of failure to walk. The EARS2 gene mutation analysis identified a c.322C>T transition, predicting a p.R108W change. This is the first reported early-onset mild type LTBL caused by a homozygous EARS2 mutation case in the literature. PMID:26893310

  7. Breakout character of islet amyloid polypeptide hydrophobic mutations at the onset of type-2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.

    2014-11-01

    Toxic fibrillar aggregates of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) appear as the physical outcome of a peptidic phase transition signaling the onset of type-2 diabetes mellitus in different mammalian species. In particular, experimentally verified mutations on the amyloidogenic segment 20-29 in humans, cats, and rats are highly correlated with the molecular aggregation propensities. Through a microcanonical analysis of the aggregation of IAPP20 -29 isoforms, we show that a minimalist one-bead hydrophobic-polar continuum model for protein interactions properly quantifies those propensities from free-energy barriers. Our results highlight the central role of sequence-dependent hydrophobic mutations on hot spots for stabilization, and thus for the engineering, of such biological peptides.

  8. Breakout character of islet amyloid polypeptide hydrophobic mutations at the onset of type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frigori, Rafael B

    2014-11-01

    Toxic fibrillar aggregates of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) appear as the physical outcome of a peptidic phase transition signaling the onset of type-2 diabetes mellitus in different mammalian species. In particular, experimentally verified mutations on the amyloidogenic segment 20-29 in humans, cats, and rats are highly correlated with the molecular aggregation propensities. Through a microcanonical analysis of the aggregation of IAPP_{20-29} isoforms, we show that a minimalist one-bead hydrophobic-polar continuum model for protein interactions properly quantifies those propensities from free-energy barriers. Our results highlight the central role of sequence-dependent hydrophobic mutations on hot spots for stabilization, and thus for the engineering, of such biological peptides. PMID:25493825

  9. Assessment of type I error rate associated with dose-group switching in a longitudinal Alzheimer trial.

    PubMed

    Habteab Ghebretinsae, Aklilu; Molenberghs, Geert; Dmitrienko, Alex; Offen, Walt; Sethuraman, Gopalan

    2014-01-01

    In clinical trials, there always is the possibility to use data-driven adaptation at the end of a study. There prevails, however, concern on whether the type I error rate of the trial could be inflated with such design, thus, necessitating multiplicity adjustment. In this project, a simulation experiment was set up to assess type I error rate inflation associated with switching dose group as a function of dropout rate at the end of the study, where the primary analysis is in terms of a longitudinal outcome. This simulation is inspired by a clinical trial in Alzheimer's disease. The type I error rate was assessed under a number of scenarios, in terms of differing correlations between efficacy and tolerance, different missingness mechanisms, and different probabilities of switching. A collection of parameter values was used to assess sensitivity of the analysis. Results from ignorable likelihood analysis show that the type I error rate with and without switching was approximately the posited error rate for the various scenarios. Under last observation carried forward (LOCF), the type I error rate blew up both with and without switching. The type I error inflation is clearly connected to the criterion used for switching. While in general switching, in a way related to the primary endpoint, may impact the type I error, this was not the case for most scenarios in the longitudinal Alzheimer trial setting under consideration, where patients are expected to worsen over time. PMID:24697817

  10. PREDICTION OF SEROTONERGIC TREATMENT EFFICACY USING AGE OF ONSET AND TYPE A/B TYPOLOGIES OF ALCOHOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Roache, John D.; Wang, Yanmei; Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Johnson, Bankole A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previously, we reported that ondansetron was efficacious at treating early-onset (≤25 years old) but not late-onset (≥26 years old) alcoholics in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial (n = 321 enrolled patients, 271 of them randomized). Randomized participants underwent 11 weeks of treatment with ondansetron (1, 4, or 16 µg/kg twice daily; n = 67, 77, and 71, respectively) or identical placebo (n = 56), plus weekly standardized group cognitive behavioral therapy. Methods For this study, we reanalyzed the original sample to determine whether the Type A/B typological classification predicts ondansetron treatment response. In this comparative analysis, k-means clustering was applied to 19 baseline measures of drinking behavior, psychopathology, and social functioning, similar to those used by Babor in the original typological derivation. A two-factor solution described robustly two groups phenomenologically consistent with Type A/B classification. Subjects were subdivided into early- and late-onset alcoholics. Results Seventy-two percent of Type B subjects had early-onset alcoholism; 67% of Type A subjects had late-onset alcoholism. The A/B typology better discriminated two clusters based upon baseline severity of alcoholism. There was a significant effect (p < 0.05) for Type B alcoholics to respond to ondansetron (4 µg/kg); however, Type A alcoholics receiving ondansetron showed no beneficial effect. Early-vs. late-onset classification predicted ondansetron response substantially better than Type A/B classification, which did not add to the prediction of treatment outcome. Further analyses showed that ondansetron was effective in the 33% of Type A alcoholics with early-onset alcoholism but ineffective in the 28% of Type B alcoholics with late-onset alcoholism. Conclusions Type A/B classification best discriminates alcoholic subtypes based upon baseline severity. Early- vs. late-onset classification is, however, a better

  11. Pharmacological benefits of selective modulation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) in experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Shalini; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Bansal, Rani; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that pervasively affects the population across the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment available for this and existing drugs merely slow the progression of cognitive function decline. Thus, massive effort is required to find an intended therapeutic target to overcome this condition. The present study has been framed to investigate the ameliorative role of selective modulator of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), 1-phenylisatin in experimental AD condition. We have induced experimental AD in mice by using two induction models viz., intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of streptozotocin (STZ) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3)+d-galactose. Morris water maze (MWM) and attentional set shifting test (ASST) were used to assess learning and memory. Hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red staining were used to examine the structural variation in brain. Brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and glutathione), nitric oxide levels (nitrites/nitrates), acetyl cholinesterase activity, myeloperoxidase and calcium levels were also estimated. i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose have impaired spatial and reversal learning with executive functioning, increased brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, cholinergic activity, inflammation and calcium levels. Furthermore, these agents have also enhanced the burden of Aβ plaque in the brain. Treatment with 1-phenylisatin and donepezil attenuated i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose induced impairment of learning-memory, brain biochemistry and brain damage. Hence, this study concludes that CB2 receptor modulation can be a potential therapeutic target for the management of AD. PMID:26577751

  12. Differential alterations of cortical glutamatergic binding sites in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, D.T.; Dewar, D.; Graham, D.I.; Brooks, D.N.; McCulloch, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Involvement of cortical glutamatergic mechanisms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) has been investigated with quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography. The distribution and density of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake sites and glutamate receptor subtypes--kainate, quisqualate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate--were measured in adjacent sections of frontal cortex obtained postmortem from six patients with SDAT and six age-matched controls. The number of senile plaques was determined in the same brain region. Binding of D-(3H)aspartate to Na(+)-dependent uptake sites was reduced by approximately 40% throughout SDAT frontal cortex relative to controls, indicating a general loss of glutamatergic presynaptic terminals. (3H)Kainate receptor binding was significantly increased by approximately 70% in deep layers of SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls, whereas this binding was unaltered in superficial laminae. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.914) between kainate binding and senile plaque number in deep cortical layers. Quisqualate receptors, as assessed by 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-(3H)methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid binding, were unaltered in SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls. There was a small reduction (25%) in N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive (3H)glutamate binding only in superficial cortical layers of SDAT brains relative to control subjects. (3H)Glutamate binding in SDAT subjects was unrelated to senile plaque number in superficial cortical layers (r = 0.104). These results indicate that in the presence of cortical glutamatergic terminal loss in SDAT plastic alterations occur in some glutamate receptor subtypes but not in others.

  13. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about ... time Thoughts about death or suicide What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common type ...

  14. The relationship between naming and semantic knowledge for different categories in dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Lambon Ralph, M A; Patterson, K; Hodges, J R

    1997-09-01

    We studied the relationship between naming and semantic memory in a group of 10 patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type. In an extension to a previous cross-sectional study (Hodges, J. R. et al., Brain and Language, 1996, 54, 302-325), this relationship was investigated at two longitudinal points within each patient's cognitive decline. Two types of naming performance were compared: items that each patient named correctly at the first stage but failed to name at the second stage, as contrasted with items named correctly at both stages (thereby providing a control for cognitive decline in general). Semantic knowledge of the concepts represented by the pictures in the naming test was investigated at each stage using definitions to the spoken object name, scored particularly for the number of sensory and associative/functional features provided by the patient. At stage 2, an analysis of the definitions for named-->unnamed items as contrasted with named-->named objects revealed a significant loss of both sensory and associative information. A comparison between natural kinds (animals and birds) and artefacts (household objects, vehicles, etc.), however, demonstrated a striking interaction between category and type of information contained in the definitions. Specifically, stage 2 definitions of artefacts in the named-->unnamed set showed a disproportionate loss of associative/functional information, while definitions of animal names that patients failed to produce in response to the pictures were notably lacking in sensory features. This pattern supports the notion that successful naming relies on a subset of critical semantic features which vary somewhat across different categories of semantic knowledge. We suggest that these findings are best encompassed by a conception of semantic organization, Weighted Overlappingly Organized Features (WOOF), in which (i) knowledge about all objects is represented by a central, distributed network of features activated by both

  15. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  16. Effects of Attention on Dichotic Listening in Elderly and Patients with Dementia of the Alzheimer Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouma, Anke; Gootjes, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an overview of our studies in elderly and Alzheimer patients employing Kimura's dichotic digits paradigm as a measure for left hemispheric predominance for processing language stimuli. In addition to structural brain mechanisms, we demonstrated that attention modulates the direction and degree of ear asymmetry in dichotic…

  17. Averting Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type in Women: Can Counselors Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthit, Kathryn Z.

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in late life, taking its greatest toll on women over age 80. This article provides an overview of AD, including risk factors and counseling strategies targeting risk. Counseling strategies address stress, cardiovascular health, social integration, depression, and holistic wellness.

  18. Inadequate supply of vitamins and DHA in the elderly: implications for brain aging and Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, M Hasan; Troesch, Barbara; Weber, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent, severe, and disabling cause of dementia worldwide. To date, AD therapy is primarily targeted toward palliative treatment of symptoms rather than prevention of disease progression. So far, no pharmacologic interventions have changed the onset or progression of AD and their use is accompanied by side effects. The major obstacle in managing AD and designing therapeutic strategies is the difficulty in retarding neuronal loss in the diseased brain once the pathologic events leading to neuronal death have started. Therefore, a promising alternative strategy is to maintain a healthy neuronal population in the aging brain for as long as possible. One factor evidently important for neuronal health and function is the optimal supply of nutrients necessary for maintaining normal functioning of the brain. Mechanistic studies, epidemiologic analyses, and randomized controlled intervention trials provide insight to the positive effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and micronutrients such as the vitamin B family, and vitamins E, C, and D, in helping neurons to cope with aging. These nutrients are inexpensive in use, have virtually no side effects when used at recommended doses, are essential for life, have established modes of action, and are broadly accepted by the general public. This review provides some evidence that the use of vitamins and DHA for the aging population in general, and for individuals at risk in particular, is a viable alternative approach to delaying brain aging and for protecting against the onset of AD pathology. PMID:25592004

  19. Neuropsychological assessment and differential diagnosis in young-onset dementias.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Emilia J; Barczak, Anna; Harciarek, Michał

    2015-06-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, there are several conditions (ie, frontotemporal dementia or Huntington's disease) associated with a relatively earlier onset. This article provides arguments in favor of a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in the differential diagnosis of young-onset dementia, as episodic memory impairment is not observed early in the course of most types of young-onset dementia that predominantly affect the domains of behavior, executive, language, and/or motor function. PMID:25998115

  20. Statins accelerate the onset of collagen type II-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, or type II diabetes. Next to their cholesterol-lowering activity, statins have immunomodulatory properties. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that statin use may eventually lead to dysregulation of immune responses, possibly resulting in autoimmunity. We have recently shown in an observational study that statin use was associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Our objective was to investigate whether a causal relationship could be established for this finding. Methods The mouse collagen type II (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used, with immunization, challenge, and euthanasia at days 0, 21, and 42, respectively. Statins were given orally before (day -28 until day 21) or after (day 21 until day 42) CIA induction. Atorvastatin (0.2 mg/day) or pravastatin (0.8 mg/day) was administered. Arthritis was recorded three times a week. Serum anti-CII autoantibodies and cytokines in supernatants from Concanavalin-A-stimulated lymph node cells and CII-stimulated spleen cells were measured. Results Statin administration accelerated arthritis onset and resulted in 100% arthritic animals, whereas only seven out of 12 nonstatin control animals developed arthritis. Atorvastatin administration after CIA induction resulted in earlier onset than atorvastatin administration before induction, or than pravastatin administration before or after induction. The arthritic score of animals given pravastatin before CIA induction was similar to that of the nonstatin controls, whereas the other groups that received statins showed higher arthritic scores. Atorvastatin administration, especially before CIA induction, increased anti-CII autoantibody production. IL-2 and IL-17 production by lymph node and spleen cells was higher in CIA animals than in PBS

  1. Alzheimer's Project

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... As the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been ... Alzheimer's I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a ...

  2. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  3. Loss of anergic B cells in prediabetic and new-onset type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mia J; Packard, Thomas A; O'Neill, Shannon K; Henry Dunand, Carole J; Huang, Min; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Stowell, Daniel; Hinman, Rochelle M; Wilson, Patrick C; Gottlieb, Peter A; Cambier, John C

    2015-05-01

    Although dogma predicts that under normal circumstances, potentially offensive autoreactive cells are silenced by mechanisms of immune tolerance, islet antigen-reactive B lymphocytes are known to play a crucial role in the development of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Thus, participation of these cells in T1D may reflect escape from silencing mechanisms. Consistent with this concept, we found that in healthy subjects, high-affinity insulin-binding B cells occur exclusively in the anergic naive IgD(+), IgM(-) B-cell (BND) compartment. Antigen receptors expressed by these cells are polyreactive and have N-region additions, Vh usage, and charged complementarity-determining region 3 consistent with autoreactivity. Consistent with a potential early role in autoimmunity, these high-affinity insulin-binding B cells are absent from the anergic compartment of some first-degree relatives and all prediabetic and new-onset (<1 year) T1D patients tested, but return to normal levels in individuals diabetic for >1 year. Interestingly, these changes were correlated by transient loss of the entire BND compartment. These findings suggest that environmental events such as infection or injury may, by disrupting B-cell anergy, dispose individuals toward autoimmunity, the precise nature of which is specified by genetic risk factors, such as HLA alleles. PMID:25524915

  4. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. PMID:19002453

  5. Diabetes complications in childhood and adolescent onset type 2 diabetes-a review.

    PubMed

    Amutha, Anandakumar; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in children. Earlier, diabetes in children was almost exclusively type 1 diabetes. Recently, the scenario has changed and increasing numbers of children and adolescent T2DM are being diagnosed. As the epidemic of T2DM shifts to children and adolescents, there is an increased risk of development of micro and macrovascular complications. This could potentially affect the economy of the nation apart from posing a large burden to the individual and his or her family. Prevention and treatment are especially important, given the fact that onset at an early age increases the risk of developing micro and macrovascular complications due to increased duration of exposure to hyperglycemia and other metabolic abnormalities. Diagnosing children and adolescents with T2DM early and instituting good control of all risk factors could yield good results in the prevention of long term complications of diabetes. This review focuses on the prevalence of complications of diabetes among children and adolescents with T2DM. PMID:26970673

  6. Immunoproteomic Profiling of Antiviral Antibodies in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Using Protein Arrays.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wallstrom, Garrick; Davis, Amy; Wang, Jie; Park, Jin; Throop, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Yu, Xiaobo; Wasserfall, Clive; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The rapid rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) suggests the involvement of environmental factors including viral infections. We evaluated the association between viral infections and T1D by profiling antiviral antibodies using a high-throughput immunoproteomics approach in patients with new-onset T1D. We constructed a viral protein array comprising the complete proteomes of seven viruses associated with T1D and open reading frames from other common viruses. Antibody responses to 646 viral antigens were assessed in 42 patients with T1D and 42 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (mean age 12.7 years, 50% males). Prevalence of antiviral antibodies agreed with known infection rates for the corresponding virus based on epidemiological studies. Antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were significantly higher in case than control subjects (odds ratio 6.6; 95% CI 2.0-25.7), whereas the other viruses showed no differences. The EBV and T1D association was significant in both sex and age subgroups (≤12 and >12 years), and there was a trend toward early EBV infections among the case subjects. These results suggest a potential role for EBV in T1D development. We believe our innovative immunoproteomics platform is useful for understanding the role of viral infections in T1D and other disorders where associations between viral infection and disease are unclear. PMID:26450993

  7. Late onset pityriasis rubra pilaris type IV treated with low-dose acitretin.

    PubMed

    Mota, Fernando; Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Selores, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology and great clinical variability. It has been divided into six categories. Types III, IV, and V occur in childhood and are distinguished by their clinical presentation, age of onset, and course. We report a 19-year-old male patient with a 2-week history of pruritic, scaling dermatosis of the hands, feet, elbows, and knees. He had no family history of skin disease. On physical examination, we observed circumscribed, reddish-orange, scaling plaques affecting the elbows and knees and a waxy palmoplantar keratoderma. The skin biopsy showed acanthosis, alternating orthokeratosis, parakeratosis, and follicular plugging suggestive of pityriasis rubra pilaris. The patient started treatment with oral acitretin, 25 mg every other day. The treatment was tolerated well, and after 6 months the lesions had resolved completely. Pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic papulosquamous disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by reddish-orange scaly plaques, palmoplantar keratoderma, and keratotic follicular papules. There is still no consensus regarding the treatment, but therapeutic options include systemic retinoids, particularly acitretin in the recommended dose of 0.5 to 0.75 mg/kg/day. In our case, the patient was treated with a low-dose regimen of acitretin, which was effective and well tolerated. PMID:27014774

  8. Cell oxidant stress delivery and cell dysfunction onset in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Asma; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2012-09-01

    Most known pathways of diabetic complications involve oxidative stress. The mitochondria electron transport chain is a significant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in insulin secretory cells, insulin peripheral sensitive cells and endothelial cells. Elevated intracellular glucose level induces tricarboxylic acid cycle electron donor overproduction and mitochondrial proton gradient increase leading to an increase in electron transporter lifetime. Subsequently, the electrons leaked combine with respiratory oxygen (O(2)) resulting in superoxide anion ((•)O(2)(-)) production. Advanced glycation end products derive ROS via interaction with their receptors. Elevated diacylglycerol and ROS activate the protein kinase C pathway which, in turn, activates NADPH oxidases. A vicious circle of pathway derived ROS installs. Pathologic pathways induced ROS are activated and persistent though glycemia returns to normal due to hyperglycemia memory. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase may produce both superoxide anion ((•)O(2)(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) leading to peroxynitrite ((•)ONOO(-)) generation. Homocysteine is also implicated in oxidative stress pathogenesis. In this paper we have highlighted the pathologic mechanisms of ROS on atherosclerosis, renal dysfunction, retina dysfunction and nerve dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Cell oxidant stress delivery have pivotal role in cell dysfunction onset and progression of angiopathies but an early introduction of good glycemic control may protect cells more efficiently than antioxidants. PMID:22333037

  9. Geometric phase transition in the cellular network of the pancreatic islets may underlie the onset of type 1diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xujing

    Living systems are characterized by complexity in structure and emergent dynamic orders. In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles phase transition in a dynamic system: quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we investigate this idea in a real example, the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells and the onset of type 1 diabetes. Within each islet, the β-cells are electrically coupled to each other, and function as a network with synchronized actions. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity, and the critical point where the islet cellular network loses site percolation, is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold β-cell loss that causes islet functional failure. Numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β-cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after disease onset and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining a long time mystery in the clinical study of type 1 diabetes: the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesized that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network. We further discuss the potential applications in identifying disease-driving factors, and the critical parameters that are predictive of disease onset.

  10. Influence of apolipoprotein E genotype on senile dementia of the Alzheimer and Lewy body types. Significance for etiological theories of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, C. R.; Louwagie, J.; Rossau, R.; Vanmechelen, E.; Perry, R. H.; Perry, E. K.; Xuereb, J. H.; Roth, M.; Wischik, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an increased frequency of the apolipoprotein E type epsilon 4 allele. To address both the disease and the allele specificity of this association, we have examined the apolipoprotein E allele distribution in 255 elderly persons including those with autopsy-confirmed AD, senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease (PD) or Huntington's disease and in nondemented controls either with or without coronary complications. The epsilon 4 allele frequency was increased in SDLT (0.365) and AD (0.328) as compared with controls (0.147), PD (0.098), or Huntington's chorea (0.171). Coronary disease and vascular dementia were associated with marginally higher epsilon 4 allele frequencies than in controls. In PD, amyloid beta-protein accumulated to a greater extent in those cases possessing an epsilon 4 allele than in those without. Those PD cases with dementia were not distinguished from either controls or PD cases without dementia, whether tested biochemically or by apolipoprotein E genotype. It is the comparison of the results in AD and SDLT that yielded the most significant findings. There was a 1.8-fold excess of amyloid beta-protein in AD as compared with controls, and the levels in SDLT were intermediate between those in AD and controls. In contrast, AD was discriminated from both controls and SDLT by the substantial accumulation of paired helical filament tau and phosphorylated tau (both increased more than 20-fold as compared with controls). SDLT was nevertheless characterized by an increased epsilon 4 allele frequency in the absence of significant tau pathology (at least 10-fold less than that in AD). These findings indicate that tau processing is more specifically associated with AD than is amyloid beta-protein accumulation and that presence of the epsilon 4 allele is not an etiological factor that accounts for tau pathology. PMID:7992850

  11. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  12. Age-of-Onset or Behavioral Sub-Types? A Prospective Comparison of Two Approaches to Characterizing the Heterogeneity within Antisocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Donnellan, M. Brent; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    There are two common approaches to sub-typing the well-documented heterogeneity within antisocial behavior: age-of-onset (i.e., childhood-onset versus adolescence-onset; see "Moffitt" 1993) and behavioral (i.e., physical aggression versus non-aggressive rule-breaking). These approaches appear to be associated, such that aggression is more…

  13. Effect of Pioglitazone on the Course of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Kimberly Sue; Godil, Mushtaq Ahmed; Lane, Andrew Harry; Wilson, Thomas Allen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by insulin deficiency resulting from progressive destruction of β cells. The histological hallmark of the diabetic islet is mononuclear cell infiltration. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate PPARg and enhance the actions of insulin. Studies in non-obese diabetic and streptocotozin-treated mouse models demonstrated that pretreatment with TZDs prevented the development of T1DM. The purpose of this study was to examine whether pioglitazone, given with insulin, preserved β cell function in patients with new-onset T1DM. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study. Subjects received pioglitazone or placebo. Blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-peptide, and liver enzymes were measured at baseline. Boost© stimulated C-peptide responses were measured at baseline and at 24 weeks. Blood sugar, insulin dose, height, weight, and liver enzymes were monitored at each visit. HbA1c was performed every 12 weeks. Results: Of the 15 patients, 8 received pioglitazone, and 7 - placebo. There was no clinical improvement in HbA1c between or within groups at the completion of the study. Mean peak C-peptide values were similar between groups at baseline. Mean peak C-peptide level was slightly higher at 24 weeks in the pioglitazone group compared to the placebo (1.8 vs. 1.5 ng/mL) which was considered as clinically insignificant. The interaction of HbA1c and insulin dose (HbA1c* insulin/kg/day), which combines degree of diabetic control and dose of insulin required to achieve this control, showed transient improvement in the pioglitazone group at 12 weeks but was not sustained at 24 weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, pioglitazone did not preserve β cell function when compared to placebo. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379032

  14. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease.

  15. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal. PMID:26216853

  16. Potential Risk Factors for the Onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Edward A.; Mulder, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists in the acute and chronic pain teams are often involved in treating Complex Regional Pain Syndromes. Current literature about the risk factors for the onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS 1) remains sparse. This syndrome has a low prevalence, a highly variable presentation, and no gold standard for diagnosis. In the research setting, the pathogenesis of the syndrome continues to be elusive. There is a growing body of literature that addresses efficacy of a wide range of interventions as well as the likely mechanisms that contribute to the onset of CRPS 1. The objective for this systematic search of the literature focuses on determining the potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1. Eligible articles were analysed, dated 1996 to April 2014, and potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were identified from 10 prospective and 6 retrospective studies. Potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were found to include being female, particularly postmenopausal female, ankle dislocation or intra-articular fracture, immobilisation, and a report of higher than usual levels of pain in the early phases of trauma. It is not possible to draw definite conclusions as this evidence is heterogeneous and of mixed quality, relevance, and weighting strength against bias and has not been confirmed across multiple trials or in homogenous studies. PMID:25688265

  17. Comparison of executive and visuospatial memory function in Huntington's disease and dementia of Alzheimer type matched for degree of dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, K W; Sahakian, B J; Quinn, N P; Marsden, C D; Robbins, T W

    1995-01-01

    Groups of patients with Hungington's disease and probable dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) matched for level of dementia on the basis of mini mental state examination scores were compared in several tests of visual memory and tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction. Whereas recall of patients with DAT tended to be worse on the Kendrick object learning test, the two groups were equivalent on tests of sensorimotor ability and delayed matching to sample performance. By contrast, the patients with Huntington's disease were significantly worse on tests of pattern and spatial recognition, simultaneous matching to sample, visuospatial paired associates, and on three tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction--namely, the Tower of London test of planning, spatial working memory, and a visual discrimination learning and reversal paradigm. The impairments in these tests, however, did not always qualitatively resemble those seen in patients with frontal lobe damage and may be more characteristic of primary neostriatal deficit. In the visual discrimination paradigm the patients with Hungtington's disease were significantly worse than the patients with DAT at the simple reversal stage, where they displayed significant preservation to the previously rewarded alternative. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that patients with Huntington's disease exhibit deficits in tests sensitive to frontostriatal dysfunction and that this form of intellectual deterioration is qualitatively distinct from that seen in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:7745410

  18. Mitochondrial DNA does not appear to influence the congenital onset type of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Harley, H G; Dasmahapatra, J; Brown, G K; Potter, C G; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Neither the maternal inheritance pattern nor the early onset of congenital myotonic dystrophy are fully explained. One possible mechanism is that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations might interact with the DM gene product, producing an earlier onset than would otherwise occur. We have used Southern hybridisation to show that high levels of major rearrangements of mtDNA are not present in muscle of five and in blood of 35 patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy. We used sequence analysis to show that no one particular mtDNA morph appears to cosegregate with congenital onset. A minor degree of depletion of mtDNA compared with nuclear DNA was present in the muscle of five patients with congenital DM, but we propose that this is not the primary cause of the muscle pathology but secondary to it. We have not found evidence that mtDNA is involved in congenital myotonic dystrophy. PMID:8544195

  19. Prediction of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Durr, Alexandra; Rakowicz, Maria; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Charles, Perrine; Sulek, Anna; Mariotti, Caterina; Rola, Rafal; Schols, Ludger; Bauer, Peter; Dufaure-Garé, Isabelle; Jacobi, Heike; Forlani, Sylvie; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Filla, Alessandro; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Marelli, Cecila; Kang, Jun-Suk; Giunti, Paola; Cook, Arron; Baliko, Laszlo; Bela, Melegh; Boesch, Sylvia; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, José; Infante, Jon; Buerk, Katrin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Depondt, Chantal; Ratka, Susanne; Stevanin, Giovanni; Klockgether, Thomas; Brice, Alexis; Golmard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA)—SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6—are caused by (CAG)n repeat expansion. While the number of repeats of the coding (CAG)n expansions is correlated with the age at onset, there are no appropriate models that include both affected and preclinical carriers allowing for the prediction of age at onset. Methods We combined data from two major European cohorts of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6 mutation carriers: 1187 affected individuals from the EUROSCA registry and 123 preclinical individuals from the RISCA cohort. For each SCA genotype, a regression model was fitted using a log-normal distribution for age at onset with the repeat length of the alleles as covariates. From these models, we calculated expected age at onset from birth and conditionally that this age is greater than the current age. Results For SCA2 and SCA3 genotypes, the expanded allele was a significant predictor of age at onset (−0.105±0.005 and −0.056±0.003) while for SCA1 and SCA6 genotypes both the size of the expanded and normal alleles were significant (expanded: −0.049±0.002 and −0.090±0.009, respectively; normal: +0.013±0.005 and −0.029±0.010, respectively). According to the model, we indicated the median values (90% critical region) and the expectancy (SD) of the predicted age at onset for each SCA genotype according to the CAG repeat size and current age. Conclusions These estimations can be valuable in clinical and research. However, results need to be confirmed in other independent cohorts and in future longitudinal studies. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01037777 and NCT00136630 for the French patients. PMID:24780882

  20. Genetic Association between Presenilin 2 Polymorphisms and Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia of Lewy Body Type in a Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayako; Shibata, Nobuto; Kasanuki, Koji; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Ohnuma, Tohru; Takeshita, Yoshihide; Kawai, Eri; Takayama, Toshiki; Nishioka, Kenya; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Hisashi; Arai, Heii

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Common polymorphisms affect gene activity and increase the risk of AD. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms in the PSEN2 gene showed Lewy body dementia (LBD) phenotypes clinically. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether PSEN2 gene polymorphisms were associated with AD or LBD. Methods Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gene were analyzed using a case-control study design comprising 288 AD patients, 76 LBD patients, and 105 age-matched controls. Results Linkage disequilibrium (LD) examination showed strong LD from rs1295645 to rs8383 on the gene in our cases from Japan. There were no associations between the SNPs studied here and AD onset, and haplotypic analyses did not detect genetic associations between AD and the PSEN2 gene. Although the number of the cases was small, the SNPs studied did not modify the risk of developing LBD in a Japanese population. Conclusion The common SNPs of the PSEN2 gene did not affect the risk of AD or LBD in a Japanese population. Because genetic variability of the PSEN2 gene is associated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in AD and LBD, further detailed analyses considering BPSD of both diseases would be required. PMID:27065294

  1. Trimetazidine prevents oxidative changes induced in a rat model of sporadic type of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Amir; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Akbari, Mohammad; Ghaffarpour, Massoud; Takzare, Nasrin; Zahmatkesh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) of sporadic origin. The expression of DHCR24 (Seladin-1), marker for neuronal oxidative stress and degeneration, has been reported to be altered in the brains of AD patients. In the present study, we investigated the effect of trimetazidine (TMZ) on the hippocampal oxidative parameters and the expression of DHCR24 (Seladin-1) in an animal model of sporadic AD. Male rats were pre-treated with TMZ (25 mg/kg) after which injected with intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)/Saline. Following 2, 7 and 14 days, animals of different groups were sacrificed with their brain excised to detect the hippocampal lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activity, DHCR24 (Seladin-1) expression and possible histopathological changes. ICV-STZ administration induced significant oxidative changes in the hippocampus. Meanwhile, TMZ pre-treatment showed to ameliorate the oxidative stress, which was demonstrated by a significant rise in the hippocampal SOD and catalase activity, as well as a significant decrease in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level. TMZ administration also increased the expression of DHCR24 (Seladin-1) gene in the hippocampus. In conclusion, our findings indicated a neuroprotective effect of TMZ possibly related to its antioxidant activity resulting in the up-regulation of DHCR24 (Seladin-1). Such TMZ effects may be beneficial in minimizing oxidative stress in sporadic Alzheimer's disease and possible prevention of disease progression. PMID:25597600

  2. Specific binding and laterality of human extrastriatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors in late onset type 1 alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Kuikka, J T; Repo, E; Bergström, K A; Tupala, E; Tiihonen, J

    2000-09-29

    Late onset type 1 alcoholism has been suggested to be associated with decreased dopaminergic transmission. Our hypothesis was that late onset type 1 alcoholics have also abnormal extrastriatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor distribution. We performed binding, heterogeneity and laterality analysis of extrastriatal and striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors in nine late onset male alcoholics and in 12 age-matched healthy males. A radioligand, [(123)I]epidepride was used in high resolution single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Specific binding of epidepride in the left temporal pole was significantly (P<0.05) lower in type 1 alcoholics (0.74+/-0.14 ml/ml) than in controls (0.89+/-0.14 ml/ml). In alcoholics, there was no normal left-to-right asymmetry of the temporal cortical heterogeneity of epidepride distribution observed in control males (0.89+/-0.19 vs. 1.10+/-0.19; P<0.05). The results suggest that the specific binding of dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors in late type 1 alcoholics is decreased and its laterality in the temporal brain is altered from normal. PMID:10996449

  3. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  4. Genetic heterogeneity and Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Bird, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    In some early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) families, inheritance is autosomal dominant. (Early-onset AD is arbitarily defined as onset at {le} 60 years.) Two loci have been identified which are causative for early-onset familial AD (FAD). One is the amyloid precursor protein gene in which specific mutation have been identified. The second is a locus at 14q24.3 (AD3) which has been localized by linkage analysis; the gene and specific mutations have not been identified. Linkage studies place this locus between D14S61 and D14S63. These 2 loci, however, do not account for all early-onset FAD. The Volga German (VG) kindreds are descendants of families which emigrated from Germany to the Volga river region of Russia and subsequently to the US; AD in these families is hypothesized to be the result of a common genetic founder. The average age-at-onset in these families is 57 years. Linkage analysis for this group has been negative for the APP gene and for chromosome 14 markers. Thus, there is at least 1 other early-onset FAD locus. Recently, the {epsilon}4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) was identified as a risk-factor for late-onset AD. In a series of 53 late-onset kindreds, a strong genetic association was observed between the ApoE {epsilon}4 allele and AD. However, when linkage analysis was performed using a highly polymorphic locus at the ApoCII gene, which is within 30 kb of ApoE, significant evidence for co-segregation was not observed. This and other data suggests that while ApoE is an age-at-onset modifying locus, another gene(s), located elsewhere, contribute(s) to late-onset AD. Thus, there is probably at least 1 other late-onset locus. Once the VG locus is identified, it will be possible to determine whether an allelic variant of this locus is responsible for late-onset FAD.

  5. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  6. [Dementia of the Alzheimer type: non-drug and drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Kressig, Reto W

    2015-04-01

    The optimal management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves a close alliance with AD caregivers and requires early diagnosis, multimodal management, including non-drug and drug interventions, and multispecialty care. Non-pharmacological approaches such as cognitive stimulation programs mostly benefit behavior and psychiatric symptoms in dementia patients. Pharmacologic management of AD consists of eliminating therapeutic redundancies and potentially deleterious medications (Beers Criteria). A pharmacologic foundation of Ginkgo Biloba and combination therapy with a cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine reduces decline in cognition and function, decreases and/or delays the emergence and impact of neuropsychiatric symptoms, postpones institutionalization, and works best when appropriately instituted early and maintained. Despite an existing reimbursement limitation by the health-insurance system in Switzerland, the combination of cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine is possible within the admitted MMSE ranges. PMID:25791046

  7. Alzheimer's disease: new data highlight nonneuronal cell types and the necessity for presymptomatic prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Despite compelling genetic evidence indicating that cerebral amyloidosis can be, at least sometimes, the primary cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD), clinical trials for symptomatic AD with amyloid-reducing agents have succeeded at target engagement but failed to cause clinical benefit. In a landmark shift, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now proposes to approve prophylaxis that alters the trajectory of what is now believed to be typical AD biomarker evolution. The first prevention trials are now beginning in patients with genetic guarantees for or high genetic risks for AD. The expectation is that clues to their outcomes will begin to emerge from these trials in approximately 2018. In the meantime, new strategies point to nonneuronal cells and to system pathology. A review of the current state of the art of AD science follows herein. PMID:24373429

  8. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  9. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  10. Comparison between New-Onset and Old-Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes with Ketosis in Rural Regions of China.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichun; Yang, Xia; Shi, Degang; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) with ketosis was common because of late diagnosis and lacking adequate treatment in rural regions of China. This study aimed to provide the data of T2D with ketosis among inpatients in a south-west border city of China. Methods. Data of 371 patients of T2D with ketosis who were hospitalized between January 2011 and July 2015 in Baoshan People's Hospital, Yunnan, China, were analyzed. New-onset and old-diagnosed T2D patients presenting with ketosis were compared according to clinical characteristics, laboratory results, and chronic diabetic complications. Results. Overall, the blood glucose control was poor in our study subjects. Male predominated in both groups (male prevalence was 68% in new-onset and 64% in old-diagnosed groups). Overweight and obesity accounted for 50% in new-onset and 46% in old-diagnosed cases. Inducements of ketosis were 13.8% in new-onset and 38.7% in old-diagnosed patients. Infections were the first inducements in both groups. The prevalence of chronic complications of diabetes was common in both groups. Conclusions. More medical supports were needed for the early detection and adequate treatment of diabetes in rural areas of China. PMID:26966435

  11. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration123

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Lovisa; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a detailed phenotypic analysis of these mice has not yet been reported. Here, we characterize the onset of motor deficits in SCA684Q mice using a battery of behavioral assays to test for impairments in motor coordination, balance, and gait. We found that these mice performed normally on these assays up to and including at 6 months, but motor impairment was detected at 7 months with all motor coordination assays used, suggesting that motor deficits emerge rapidly during a narrow age window in SCA684Q mice. In contrast to what is seen in SCA6 patients, the decrease in motor coordination was observed without alterations in gait. No loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells or striatal neurons were observed at 7 months, the age at which motor deficits were first detected, but significant Purkinje cell loss was observed in 2-year-old SCA684Q mice, arguing that Purkinje cell death does not significantly contribute to the early stages of SCA6. PMID:26730403

  12. Potential contribution of the Alzheimer's disease risk locus BIN1 to episodic memory performance in cognitively normal Type 2 diabetes elderly.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Lior; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Lubitz, Irit; Schmeidler, James; Cooper, Itzik; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M; Heymann, Anthony; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several promising susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) were discovered, by implementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach. Recent GWAS meta-analysis has demonstrated the association of 19 loci (in addition to the APOE locus) with AD in the European ancestry population at genome-wide significance level. Since Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a substantial risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent the 19 AD loci were studied for association with performance in episodic memory, a primary cognitive domain affected by AD, in a sample of 848 cognitively normal elderly Israeli Jewish T2D patients. We found a suggestive association of SNP rs6733839, located near the bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) gene, with this phenotype. Controlling for demographic (age, sex, education, disease duration and ancestry) covariates, carriers of two copies of the AD risk allele T (TT genotype) performed significantly worse (p=0.00576; p=0.00127 among Ashkenazi origin sub-sample) in episodic memory compared to carriers of the C allele (CT+CC genotypes). When including additional potential covariates (clinical and APOE genotype), results remained significant (p=0.00769; p=0.00148 among Ashkenazi). Interestingly, as validated in multiple large studies, BIN1 is one of the most established AD risk loci, with a high odds ratio. Although preliminary and require further replications, our findings support a contribution of BIN1 to individual differences in episodic memory performance among T2D patients. PMID:26947052

  13. Long-term central pathology and cognitive impairment are exacerbated in a mixed model of Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Infante-Garcia, Carmen; Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan Jose; Galindo-Gonzalez, Lucia; Garcia-Alloza, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a well-characterized risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia. Since both, T2D and dementia are closely related to aging and they chronically coexist in elderly patients, it is of particular relevance to know whether long-term evolution of T2D and dementia interfere with each other years after the onset of the diseases. In order to elucidate this interaction, we have characterized a mixed model of T2D and AD, the APP/PS1xdb/db mouse, at 36 weeks of age, when both diseases have long coexisted and evolved. In aged APP/PS1xdb/db mice we observed dysfunctional metabolic control, when compared with diabetic mice alone, suggesting that AD may also contribute to T2D pathology in the long-term. Learning and memory were severely impaired in APP/PS1xdb/db mice, accompanied by reduced cortical size, neuronal branching simplification and reduction of dendritic spine density. Increased tau phosphorylation was also observed in old APP/PS1xdb/db mice. A shift in amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology was detected, and while insoluble Aβ was reduced, more toxic soluble species were favoured. Microglia burden was significantly increased in the proximity of senile plaques and an overall increase of spontaneous haemorrhages was also observed in APP/PS1xdb/db mice, suggesting a possible disruption of the blood brain barrier in the mixed model. It is therefore feasible that strict metabolic control may slow or delay central complications when T2D and dementia coexist in the long term. PMID:26708068

  14. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-04-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies. PMID:26961231

  15. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies. PMID:26961231

  16. The aging brain. Changes in the neuronal insulin/insulin receptor signal transduction cascade trigger late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (SAD). A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Siegfried

    2002-07-01

    Aging of the brain has been demonstrated to be the main risk factor for late-onset sporadic AD what is in contrast to early-onset familial AD in which mutations predominate the pathology. Aging of the brain was found to be associated with a multitude of aberrancies from normal in morphological, cellular and molecular terms. Recent findings provide clear evidence that the function of the neuronal insulin/insulin receptor signal transduction cascade is of pivotal significance to maintain normal cerebral blood flow and oxidative energy metabolism, work of the endoplasmatic reticulum/Golgi apparatus and the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons no longer in the cell cycle. It has become evident that normal metabolism of both amyloid precursor protein and tau-protein is part of interactive processes controlled by the neuronal I/IR signal transduction cascade. In normal brain aging, the function of this cascade starts to fail compared to normal resulting in adverse effects in CBF/oxidative energy metabolism, work of the endoplasmatic reticulum/Golgi apparatus and cell cycle. The aberrancies may not be drastic, but multifold and permanently existing, inclusive the metabolism of APP and tau-protein. The amount of intraneuronally formed betaA4 may increase, and tau-protein may become hyperphosphorylated. These processes as a whole may increase the vulnerability of the aging brain and may facilitate the generation of late-onset sporadic AD. PMID:12111436

  17. Understanding Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  18. MAPT H1 Haplotype is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Risk in APOEɛ4 Noncarriers: Results from the Dementia Genetics Spanish Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Pau; Moreno, Fermín; Clarimón, Jordi; Ruiz, Agustín; Combarros, Onofre; Calero, Miguel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Bullido, Maria J; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Carro, Eva; Antonell, Anna; Coto, Eliecer; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Hernandez, Isabel; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Lleó, Alberto; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Vázquez-Higuera, José Luis; Infante, Jon; Rábano, Alberto; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí, Meritxell; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Barandiarán, Myriam; Gorostidi, Ana; Frank-García, Ana; Sastre, Isabel; Lorenzo, Elena; Pastor, María A; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Lennarz, Martina; Maier, Wolfang; Rámirez, Alfredo; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Lee, Suzee E; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    The MAPT H1 haplotype has been linked to several disorders, but its relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. A rare variant in MAPT (p.A152T) has been linked with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD. We genotyped H1/H2 and p.A152T MAPT in 11,572 subjects from Spain (4,327 AD, 563 FTD, 648 Parkinson's disease (PD), 84 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 5,950 healthy controls). Additionally, we included 101 individuals from 21 families with genetic FTD. MAPT p.A152T was borderline significantly associated with FTD [odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; p = 0.063], but not with AD. MAPT H1 haplotype was associated with AD risk (OR = 1.12; p = 0.0005). Stratification analysis showed that this association was mainly driven by APOE ɛ4 noncarriers (OR = 1.14; p = 0.0025). MAPT H1 was also associated with risk for PD (OR = 1.30; p = 0.0003) and PSP (OR = 3.18; p = 8.59 × 10-8) but not FTD. Our results suggest that the MAPT H1 haplotype increases the risk of PD, PSP, and non-APOE ɛ4 AD. PMID:26444794

  19. Healthcare cost of type 1 diabetes mellitus in new-onset children in a hospital compared to an outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes is among the most prevalent chronic childhood diseases in the US. Initial type 1 diabetes management education and care can take place in different clinical settings. This study assessed metabolic outcomes (i.e. hemoglobin A1C), healthcare utilization and costs among new-onset type 1 diabetic children who received initial diabetes education and care in a hospital compared to those children in an outpatient pediatric endocrinology clinic. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the payer’s perspective. New-onset type 1 diabetic children, aged 1–18, presented at Baystate Children’s Hospital (Massachusetts) from 2008–2009 were included in the study if lab test confirmed diagnosis and there was one year of follow-up. Inpatients spent at least one night in the hospital during a 10-day diagnosis period and received all or part of diabetes education there. Outpatients were diagnosed and received all diabetes education in a pediatric endocrinology clinic. Metabolic outcomes were measured at diagnosis and at one year post-diagnosis. Healthcare charges and electronic medical records data were reviewed from 2008–2010. Healthcare costs components included diagnostic test, pediatric, endocrinology and hospitalists care, critical and emergency care, type 1 diabetes related supplies, prescription drugs, and IV products. Results Study sample included 84 patients (33 inpatient and 51 outpatients). No statistically significant differences in patient demographic characteristics were found between groups. There were no statistically significant differences in metabolic outcomes between groups. Total cost at one year post-diagnosis per new-onset type 1 diabetic child was $12,332 and $5,053 in the inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively. The average healthcare cost for pediatric endocrinology care was $4,080 and $3,904 per child in the inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively. Conclusion Provision of initial type 1

  20. Metabolic Profiling in Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) and Young Onset Type 2 Diabetes Fails to Detect Robust Urinary Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Malmodin, Daniel; Thanabalasingham, Gaya; Lam, Francis; Ueland, Per Magne; McCarthy, Mark I.; Owen, Katharine R.; Baunsgaard, Dorrit

    2012-01-01

    It is important to identify patients with Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) as a molecular diagnosis determines both treatment and prognosis. Genetic testing is currently expensive and many patients are therefore not assessed and are misclassified as having either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Biomarkers could facilitate the prioritisation of patients for genetic testing. We hypothesised that patients with different underlying genetic aetiologies for their diabetes could have distinct metabolic profiles which may uncover novel biomarkers. The aim of this study was to perform metabolic profiling in urine from patients with MODY due to mutations in the genes encoding glucokinase (GCK) or hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and normoglycaemic control subjects. Urinary metabolic profiling by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and ultra performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to Q-TOF mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was performed in a Discovery set of subjects with HNF1A-MODY (n = 14), GCK-MODY (n = 17), T2D (n = 14) and normoglycaemic controls (n = 34). Data were used to build a valid partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) model where HNF1A-MODY subjects could be separated from the other diabetes subtypes. No single metabolite contributed significantly to the separation of the patient groups. However, betaine, valine, glycine and glucose were elevated in the urine of HNF1A-MODY subjects compared to the other subgroups. Direct measurements of urinary amino acids and betaine in an extended dataset did not support differences between patients groups. Elevated urinary glucose in HNF1A-MODY is consistent with the previously reported low renal threshold for glucose in this genetic subtype. In conclusion, we report the first metabolic profiling study in monogenic diabetes and show that, despite the distinct biochemical pathways affected, there are unlikely to be robust urinary biomarkers which distinguish

  1. Effect of Gallic Acid on Dementia Type of Alzheimer Disease in Rats: Electrophysiological and Histological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hajipour, Somayeh; Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoob; Eidi, Akram; Mortazavi, Pejman; Valizadeh, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effect of gallic acid (GA) on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and histological changes in animal model of Alzheimer disease (AD) induced by beta-amyloid (Aβ). Methods: Sixty-four adult male Wistar rats (300±20 g) were divided into 8 groups: 1) Control (Cont); 2) AD; 3) Sham; 4–7) AD+GA (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg for 10 days, orally) or vehicle, 8) Cont+GA100, Aβ (1μg/μL in each site) was infused into hippocampus bilaterally. Changes of amplitude and slope of LTP induced in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) were evaluated by high frequency stimulation (HFS) of perforant path (PP). Results: Data showed that LTP amplitude and area under curve significantly impaired in AD rats (P<0.001), while significantly improved in AD rats treated with GA (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Current findings suggest that GA reduces neural damage and brain amyloid neuropathology and improves cognitive function via free radicals scavenging and inhibiting oligomerization of Aβ but with no effect on healthy rats. PMID:27303604

  2. Memantine inhibits and reverses the Alzheimer type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Sengupta, Amitabha; Haque, Niloufar; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2004-05-21

    Memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, reduces the clinical deterioration in moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease (AD) for which other treatments are not available. The activity of protein phosphatase (PP)-2A is compromised in AD brain and is believed to be a cause of the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and the consequent neurofibrillary degeneration. Here we show that memantine inhibits and reverses the PP-2A inhibition-induced abnormal hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of tau in organotypic culture of rat hippocampal slices. Such restorative effects of memantine were not detected either with 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid or with D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid, NMDA receptor antagonists active at the glycine binding site and at the glutamate binding site, respectively. These findings show (1) that memantine inhibits and reverses the PP-2A inhibition-induced abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau/neurofibrillary degeneration and (2) that this drug might be useful for the treatment of AD and related tauopathies. PMID:15147906

  3. The amnestic syndrome of hippocampal type in Alzheimer's disease: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Marie; Chauviré, Valérie; Gerardin, Emilie; Colliot, Olivier; Kinkingnéhun, Serge; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Hugonot-Diener, Laurence; Garnero, Line; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Chupin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) is a verbal episodic memory test used to identify patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study investigates the relationships between performance on FCSRT and grey matter atrophy assessed with structural MRI in patients with AD. Three complementary MRI-based analyses (VBM analysis, ROI-based analysis, and three-dimensional hippocampal surface-based shape analysis) were performed in 35 patients with AD to analyze correlations between regional atrophy and their scores for episodic memory using the FCSRT. With VBM analysis, the total score on the FCSRT was correlated with left medial temporal lobe atrophy including the left hippocampus but also the thalami. In addition, using ROI-based analysis, the total recall score on the FCSRT was correlated with the left hippocampal volume. With three-dimensional hippocampal surface-based shape analysis, both free recall and total recall scores were correlated with regions corresponding approximately to the CA1 field. No correlation was found with short term memory scores using any of these methods of analysis. In AD, the FCSRT may be considered as a useful clinical marker of memory disorders due to medial temporal damage, specially the CA1 field of the hippocampus. PMID:20847406

  4. The pericyte: a forgotten cell type with important implications for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2014-07-01

    Pericytes are cells in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that degenerate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early neurovascular dysfunction, elevation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), tau pathology and neuronal loss, leading to progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Pericytes are uniquely positioned within the neurovascular unit between endothelial cells of brain capillaries, astrocytes and neurons. Recent studies have shown that pericytes regulate key neurovascular functions including BBB formation and maintenance, vascular stability and angioarchitecture, regulation of capillary blood flow, and clearance of toxic cellular by-products necessary for normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we review the concept of the neurovascular unit and neurovascular functions of CNS pericytes. Next, we discuss vascular contributions to AD and review new roles of pericytes in the pathogenesis of AD such as vascular-mediated Aβ-independent neurodegeneration, regulation of Aβ clearance and contributions to tau pathology, neuronal loss and cognitive decline. We conclude that future studies should focus on molecular mechanisms and pathways underlying aberrant signal transduction between pericytes and its neighboring cells within the neurovascular unit, that is, endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, which could represent potential therapeutic targets to control pericyte degeneration in AD and the resulting secondary vascular and neuronal degeneration. PMID:24946075

  5. The "Alzheimer's type" profile of semantic clustering in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Paula M; Wright, Matthew J; Larocca, Michael; Nguyen, Peter T; Teng, Edmond; Apostolova, Liana G; Ringman, John M; Zhou, Yan; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Woo, Ellen

    2014-04-01

    Impairments in learning and recall have been well established in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However, a relative dearth of studies has examined the profiles of memory strategy use in persons with aMCI relative to those with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants with aMCI, nonamnestic MCI, AD, and healthy older adults were administered the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II). Measures of semantic clustering and recall were obtained across learning and delayed recall trials. In addition, we investigated whether deficits in semantic clustering were related to progression from healthy aging to aMCI and from aMCI to AD. The aMCI group displayed similar semantic clustering performance as the AD participants, whereas the AD group showed greater impairments on recall relative to the aMCI participants. Control participants who progressed to aMCI showed reduced semantic clustering at the short delay at baseline compared to individuals who remained diagnostically stable across follow-up visits. These findings show that the ability to engage in an effective memory strategy is compromised in aMCI, before AD has developed, suggesting that disruptions in semantic networks are an early marker of the disease. (JINS, 2014, 20, 1-11). PMID:24521694

  6. Common variant in PTK2B is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease: A replication study and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Qing; Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Zhan-Jie; Kong, Ling-Li; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-05-16

    Emerging evidence indicates that protein tyrosine kinase 2β (PTK2B) is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) confirmed that PTK2B was correlated with an increased risk of AD in Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between PTK2B polymorphism rs28834970 and the risk of LOAD in a Han Chinese population. A total of 984 sporadic LOAD patients and 1,354 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects from the Han Chinese population were included in this study. Our results showed no significant differences in the frequency of rs28834970 alleles and genotypes between AD cases and controls. However, meta-analysis of 82,513 individuals confirmed that rs2883490 within PTK2B increased the risk of LOAD (OR=1.09, 95%CI=1.07-1.12). Additionally, when these data were stratified by APOEε4 status, the difference of allele frequency was evident in APOEε4 carriers (P=0.027, OR=1.423, 95%CI=1.041-1.945), and positive associations were also observed under an additive model in APOEε4 carriers (P=0.041, OR=1.384, 95%CI=1.014-1891). In summary, our study provides that PTK2B polymorphism (rs28834970) could modify the risk of LOAD, and PTK2B polymorphism (rs28834970) and APOE may interact to increase LOAD risk in a Han Chinese population. PMID:27080426

  7. Association of tripartite motif family-like 2 (TRIML2) polymorphisms with late-onset Alzheimer's disease risk in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won Sub; Park, Jin Kyung; Kim, Young Jong; Cho, Ah Rang; Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Su Kang; Paik, Jong-Woo; Lee, Kang Joon; Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Young Youl; Lim, Hyun Kook; Jeong, Hyun-Ghang; Kim, Jong Woo

    2016-09-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), regulated in part by the activity of p53. As tripartite motif family-like 2 (TRIML2), a member of the TRIM family of proteins, has been implicated in the regulation of p53-mediated apoptosis, we hypothesized that TRIML2 polymorphisms may result in an increased AD susceptibility. Here, we investigated the association between coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs) in TRIML2 and AD in a Korean population. Two cSNPs (rs79698746 and rs2279551) were genotyped using the Sequenom iPLEX(®) Gold assay and direct sequencing in 162 AD patients and 191 controls. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine the odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and p-values. Significant associations were observed between AD and the allelic frequencies of two SNPs (rs79698746, p=0.007; rs2279551, p=0.01); genotype frequencies were also significantly different between the two groups [rs79698746: p=0.003 in the codominant 2 model (CC vs. TT), p=0.01 in the dominant model (TC/CC vs. TT), p=0.016 in the recessive model (CC vs. TT/TC), and p=0.0025 in the log-additive model (TC vs. CC vs. TT); rs2279551: p=0.003 in the codominant 2 model (CC vs. TT), p=0.011 in the dominant model (TC/CC vs. TT), p=0.019 in the recessive model (CC vs. TT/TC), and p=0.0028 in the log-additive model (TC vs. CC vs. TT)]. In the haplotype analyses, CC haplotypes containing two cSNPs were significantly associated with AD (p=0.013). Taken together, these findings indicate that the C allele of both SNPs was associated with an increased risk of AD. These results suggest that TRIML2 may contribute to AD susceptibility. PMID:27471163

  8. [A case of late-onset cobalamin C disease (methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria, cobalamin C type)].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mikie; Yasui, Kenichi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Kowa, Hisanori; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old Japanese woman with cobalamin (cbl) C disease. She was born between non- consanguineous parents, and had easy fatigability from a childhood. At 14 years old, she developed renal failure, and had repeated psychosis during 2 years. At 16 old, she developed her gait disturbance and her symptoms fluctuated, but the cause of gait disturbance was unclear. At 18 years old, she was admitted with worsening of gait disturbance. Physical examination revealed spastic paraparesis and bilateral peroneal nerve paralyses. Homocystinuria and methylmalonic aciduria were detected, although serum vitamin B12 was within normal range. Gene mutation analysis revealed Gly147Asp (440G>A) and Trp157Ser (470G>C) in the MMACHC gene as a compound heterozygous mutation. We diagnosed her as having late-onset cbl C disease, and her gait disturbance and renal failure improved after intramuscular hydroxocobalamin administration. Although late-onset cbl C disease is rare in Japan, it an important to consider this congenital disease because symptoms are expected to improve by medical intervention. PMID:25672861

  9. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D. PMID:26341315

  10. Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Consensus Report: Current Status, Challenges, and Priorities.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Kristen J; Anderson, Barbara J; Berg, Erika G; Chiang, Jane L; Chou, Hubert; Copeland, Kenneth C; Hannon, Tamara S; Huang, Terry T-K; Lynch, Jane L; Powell, Jeff; Sellers, Elizabeth; Tamborlane, William V; Zeitler, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant and increasing burden in adolescents and young adults. Clear strategies for research, prevention, and treatment of the disease in these vulnerable patients are needed. Evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes in children is different not only from type 1 but also from type 2 diabetes in adults. Understanding the unique pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in youth, as well as the risk of complications and the psychosocial impact, will enable industry, academia, funding agencies, advocacy groups, and regulators to collectively evaluate both current and future research, treatment, and prevention approaches. This Consensus Report characterizes type 2 diabetes in children, evaluates the fundamental differences between childhood and adult disease, describes the current therapeutic options, and discusses challenges to and approaches for developing new treatments. PMID:27486237