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Sample records for am50 magnesium alloy

  1. Biocorrosion behavior of biodegradable nanocomposite fibers coated layer-by-layer on AM50 magnesium implant.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hasan, Anwarul; Kim, Yu-Kyoung; Yu-Kyoung; Lee, Min-Ho; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of hybrid nanofibers to improve the biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of AM50 magnesium alloy. Biodegradable hybrid membrane fiber layers containing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) particles and poly(lactide)(PLA) nanofibers were coated layer-by-layer (LbL) on AM50 coupons using a facile single-step air jet spinning (AJS) approach. The corrosion performance of coated and uncoated coupon samples was investigated by means of electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the AJS 3D membrane fiber layers, particularly the hybrid membrane layers containing a small amount of nHA (3 wt.%), induce a higher biocorrosion resistance and effectively decrease the initial degradation rate compared with the neat AM50 coupon samples. The adhesion strength improved highly due to the presence of nHA particles in the AJS layer. Furthermore, the long biodegradation rates of AM50 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were significantly controlled by the AJS-coatings. The results showed a higher cytocompatibility for AJS-coatings compared to that for neat Mg alloys. The nanostructured nHA embedded hybrid PLA nanofiber coating can therefore be a suitable coating material for Mg alloy as a potential material for biodegradable metallic orthopedic implants. PMID:26478426

  2. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  3. Influence of Electrolytic Plasma Oxidation Coating on Tensile Behavior of Die-Cast AM50 Alloy Subjected to Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lihong; Nie, Xueyuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Henry

    Three different thickness ceramic coatings were deposited on die-cast AM50 magnesium alloy in KOH and NaAlO2 solution using electrolytic plasma oxidation (EPO) technology for corrosion prevention. Immersion corrosion tests were carried out in 3.5% NaCl solution for 336 hours to investigate the effect of coating thicknesses on tensile and fracture behaviors of the coated AM50 alloys. The results show that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the coated AM50 alloy subjected to immersion corrosion increase with an increase in coating thicknesses. Further analyses on stress and strain curves indicate that the coating enhances the strain-hardening rates of the corroded alloy during its plastic deformation. SEM examination on the fractured surface manifests that the substrate AM50 alloys exhibit characteristics of ductile deformation with deep dimples. However, brittle features prevail on the fractured surface of the mixed layer of coating plus oxidation corrosion product. Micro cracks were observed between the mixed layer and the AM50 alloy substrate induced by corrosion and within the mixed layer induced by EPO process, which could be responsible for the brittle fracture.

  4. A ToF-SIMS investigation of the corrosion behavior of Mg alloy AM50 in atmospheric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaily, M.; Malmberg, P.; Shahabi-Navid, M.; Svensson, J. E.; Johansson, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    The redistribution of chloride and sodium ions after the NaCl-induced atmospheric corrosion of Mg alloy AM50 was investigated by means of Time-of-Flight Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). The samples were exposed at -4 and 22 °C in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. The results confirm the presence of less conductive electrolyte, and thus, less movement of ionic species (including sodium and chloride) in the electrolyte layer formed on the surface of samples exposed at the sub-zero temperature. Besides, ToF-SIMS analysis showed the presence of an Al-containing surface film formed on the alloy surface after exposure at high relative humidity.

  5. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  6. Upsettability and forming limit of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heung Sik; Kim, Si Pom; Park, Young Chul; Park, Joon Hong; Baek, Seung Gul

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have become a center of special interest in the automotive industry. Due to their high specific mechanical properties, they offer a significant weight saving potential in modern vehicle constructions. Most Mg alloys show very good machinability and processability, and even the most complicated die casting parts can be easily produced. In this study, Microstructure, Vickers hardness and tensile tests were examined and performed for each specimen to verify effects of forming conditions. Also to verify upsettability and forming limit of the specimen at room temperature and elevated temperature, upsetting experiments were performed. For comparison, experiments at elevated temperature were performed for various Mg alloy, such as AZ31, AZ91, and AM50. The experimental results were compared with those of CAE analysis to propose forming limit of Magnesium alloys.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms in High-Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadiri, Haitham; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Jordon, J. B.; Xue, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure-affected micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth operating near the limit plasticity regime were experimentally identified for the four main commercial high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys: AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44. These fatigue micromechanisms manifested by the concomitant effects of casting pores, interdendritic Al-rich solid solution layer, β-phase particles, Mn-rich inclusions, rare earth-rich intermetallics, dendrite cell size, and surface segregation phenomena. These concomitant mechanisms clearly delineated the fatigue durability observed for the AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44 Mg alloys in both the low- and high-cycle fatigue regimes.

  8. Lightweight magnesium-lithium alloys show promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. T.; Cataldo, C. E.

    1964-01-01

    Evaluation tests show that magnesium-lithium alloys are lighter and more ductile than other magnesium alloys. They are being used for packaging, housings, containers, where light weight is more important than strength.

  9. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-10-18

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/alumnum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  10. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  11. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  12. Corrosion in Magnesium and a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akavipat, Sanay

    Magnesium and a magnesium alloy (AZ91C) have been ion implanted over a range of ions energies (50 to 150 keV) and doses (1 x 10('16) to 2 x 10('17) ions/cm('2)) to modify the corrosion properties of the metals. The corrosion tests were done by anodic polarization in chloride -free and chloride-containing aqueous solutions of a borated -boric acid with a pH of 9.3. Anodic polarization measurements showed that some implantations could greatly reduce the corrosion current densities at all impressed voltages and also increased slightly the pitting potential, which indicated the onset of the chloride attack. These improvements in corrosion resistance were caused by boron implantations into both types of samples. However, iron implantations were found to improve only the magnesium alloy. To study the corrosion in more detail, Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectrometer (SAM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an X-ray Energy Spectrometry (XES) attachment, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements were used to analyze samples before, after, and at various corrosion stages. In both the unimplanted pure magnesium and AZ91C samples, anodic polarization results revealed that there were three active corrosion stages (Stages A, C, and E) and two passivating stages (Stages B and D). Examination of Stages A and B in both types of samples showed that only a mild, generalized corrosion had occurred. In Stage C of the TD samples, a pitting breakdown in the initial oxide film was observed. In Stage C of the AZ91C samples, galvanic and intergranular attack around the Mg(,17)Al(,12) intermetallic islands and along the matrix grain boundaries was observed. Stage D of both samples showed the formation of a thick, passivating oxygen containing, probably Mg(OH)(,2) film. In Stage E, this film was broken down by pits, which formed due to the presence of the chloride ions in both types of samples. Stages A through D of the unimplanted samples were not seen in the boron or iron

  13. Magnesium-lithium casting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latenko, V. P.; Silchenko, T. V.; Tikhonov, V. A.; Maltsev, V. P.; Korablin, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The strength properties of magnesium-lithium alloys at room, low, and high temperatures are investigated. It is found that the alloys may have practical application at ambient temperatures up to 100 C, that negative temperatures have a favorable influence on the alloy strength, and that cyclic temperature variations have practically no effect on the strength characteristics. The influence of chemical coatings on corrosion resistance of the MgLi alloys is examined. Several facilities based on pressure casting machines, low-pressure casting machines, and magnetodynamic pumps were designed for producing MgLi alloy castings. Results were obtained for MgLi alloys reinforced with fibers having a volumetric content of 15%.

  14. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  15. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  16. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  17. Magnesium-lithium alloys developed for low temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerley, F. J.; Leavenworth, H. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Three new magnesium-lithium alloys have been developed for application at cryogenic temperatures. These lightweight alloys have approximately doubled the tensile and yield strengths at room temperature of previously described magnesium-lithium alloys.

  18. Anticorrosive magnesium hydroxide coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanying; Wu, Guangming; Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Xing, Guangjian; Li, Donglin

    2009-09-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable biomaterials in orthopedic surgery. However, the rapid degradation rate has limited their application in biomedical field. A great deal of studies have been done to improve the resistance of magnesium alloys. In this article, An anticorrosive magnesium hydroxide coating with a thickness of approximately 100μm was formed on an AZ31 magnesium alloy by hydrothermal method. The morphology of the coatings were observed by an optical microscope and SEM. And the samples were soaked in hank's solution (37°C) to investigate the corrosion resistance. Magnesium alloy AZ31 with magnesium hydroxide coatings present superior corrosion resistance than untreated samples.

  19. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  20. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-22

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at -150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries. PMID:27463668

  1. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)–, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at –150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries.

  2. Simulating the dynamic response of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jeffrey; Becker, Richard

    Unlike several conventional metals, the mechanical response of magnesium is severely anisotropic for quasistatic and dynamic loading conditions. In this work we present a crystal-based strength model that is the same order of magnitude in computational cost as rate-dependent isotropic strength models, yet is able to capture essential features exhibited by textured magnesium polycrystals. The model demarcates plastic deformation into contributions from basal slip, extension twinning, and non-basal slip mechanisms. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experiments for two magnesium alloys with differing processing histories. The model is then used to explore and quantify the dependence of metallurgical and processing variations for several dynamic experiments that probe propensity for localization and failure under complex loading conditions.

  3. Method for removing magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys with engineered scavenger compound

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.D.; Jong, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    The invention relates to a method for removal and production of high purity magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys using an engineered scanvenger compound. In particular, the invention relates to a method for removal and production of high purity magnesium from aluminum-magnesium alloys using the engineered scanvenger compound (ESC) lithium titanate (Li2O3TiO2). The removal of magnesium from the aluminum-magnesium alloys is performed at about 600-750 C in a molten salt bath of KCl or KCl-MgCl2 using lithium titanate (Li2O3TiO2) as the engineered scavenger compound (ESC). Electrode deposition of magnesium from the loaded ESC onto a stainless steel electrode is accomplished in a second step, and provides a clean magnesium electrode deposit for recycling. The second step also prepares the ESC for reuse.

  4. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/ σ b or σ f/ σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  5. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-03-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/σ b or σ f/σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  6. Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S.; Stodolsky, F. |

    1996-06-01

    Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

  7. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Choi, H J; Kang, S W; Shin, S E; Choi, G S; Bae, D H

    2016-01-01

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C; the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design. PMID:26976372

  8. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms

    PubMed Central

    Kang, H.; Choi, H. J.; Kang, S. W.; Shin, S. E.; Choi, G. S.; Bae, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C; the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design. PMID:26976372

  9. Multi-functional magnesium alloys containing interstitial oxygen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Choi, H. J.; Kang, S. W.; Shin, S. E.; Choi, G. S.; Bae, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    A new class of magnesium alloys has been developed by dissolving large amounts of oxygen atoms into a magnesium lattice (Mg-O alloys). The oxygen atoms are supplied by decomposing titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a magnesium melt at 720 °C the titanium is then completely separated out from the magnesium melt after solidification. The dissolved oxygen atoms are located at the octahedral sites of magnesium, which expand the magnesium lattice. These alloys possess ionic and metallic bonding characteristics, providing outstanding mechanical and functional properties. A Mg-O-Al casting alloy made in this fashion shows superior mechanical performance, chemical resistance to corrosion, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a similar Mg-O-Zn wrought alloy shows high elongation to failure (>50%) at room temperature, because the alloy plastically deforms with only multiple slips in the sub-micrometer grains (<300 nm) surrounding the larger grains (~15 μm). The metal/non-metal interstitial alloys are expected to open a new paradigm in commercial alloy design.

  10. Bearing Tests of Magnesium-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W H; Moore, R L

    1943-01-01

    Bearing tests of AM-3S, AM-52S, and AM-C57S magnesium-alloy sheet in various thicknesses and tempers were made. Bearing yield and ultimate strengths were determined and compared for various edge distances and for various ratios of loading-pin diameter to sheet thickness. Tensile strengths were determined and ratios of average bearing yield and ultimate strength to tensile strength are given. The results of the tests indicated that ultimate bearing strengths increased with edge distances up to 1.5 to 2 times the diameter of the loading pin; that ultimate bearing strengths are a function of the ratio of pin diameter to sheet thickness; and that these properties are effected only slightly by increases in edge distance greater than 1.5 diameters.

  11. Blackening of magnesium alloy using femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haixia; Cui, Zeqin; Wang, Wenxian; Xu, Bingshe; Gong, Dianqing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium alloy, a potential structural and biodegradable material, has been increasingly attracting attention. In this paper, two structures with enhanced light absorption on an AZ31B magnesium surface are fabricated by femtosecond laser texturing. Laser power and the number of laser pulses are mainly investigated for darkening effect. After irradiation, surface characteristics are analyzed by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer and laser scanning confocal microscope. The darkening effect is investigated by a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Microgroove and stripe structures are obtained, which are covered with homogeneous nanoprotrusions and nanoparticles. The main surface chemical composition after laser ablation is MgO. The optimal light absorption in the visible range (wavelength of 400-800 nm) reaches about 98%, which is significantly improved compared with the untreated surface. The enhanced light absorption is mainly attributed to surface structure. Femtosecond laser surface texturing technology offers potential in the application of stealth technology, airborne devices, and biomedicine. PMID:26368903

  12. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  13. Column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M

    1942-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the column strength of extruded magnesium alloy AM-57S. Column specimens were tested with round ends and with flat ends. It was found that the compressive properties should be used in computations for column strengths rather than the tensile properties because the compressive yield strength was approximately one-half the tensile yield strength. A formula for the column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S is given.

  14. Al-TiH2 Composite Foams Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.; Oh, Y. S.; Ain, W. Q.; A, Azhari; Basri, S. N.; Kim, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    The work presented here in describes the synthesis of aluminum based titanium-hydride particulate composite by casting method and its foaming behavior of magnesium alloy. Results obtained indicate that the Al-10TiH2 composite can be synthesized successfully by casting method. Further, results also reveal that closed-cell magnesium alloy foam can be synthesized by using Al-10TiH2 composite as a foaming agent.

  15. Magnesium for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    VanFleteren, R.

    1996-05-01

    Die cast magnesium parts are rapidly replacing steel and aluminum structural components in automotive applications, as design engineers seek to reduce assembly costs, raise fuel efficiency, and improve safety. Dozens of automotive components are now die cast from magnesium alloys, including seat stanchions, valve covers, steering wheels, and a variety of steering column components. Because of their excellent castability, complex magnesium die castings can sometimes consolidate several components and eliminate assembly steps. Highly ductile magnesium alloys such as AM60B (6% aluminum) and AM50A (5% aluminum) are important in helping to meet automotive industry crash-energy requirements for car seating and steering components. AZ91D (9% aluminum, 1% zinc) alloys are making removable rear seats in new minivans much easier to handle.

  16. Electrodeposition of aluminium, aluminium/magnesium alloys, and magnesium from organometallic electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-01

    The electrodeposition of aluminum, magnesium, and the combination of these metals from nonaqueous media is discussed. Plating baths for depositing Al/Mg alloys or for plating essentially pure Mg were developed. These solutions contain alkali meal fluoride or quaternary ammonium halide/aluminium alkyl complexes and dialkyl magnesium dissolved in aromatic hydrocarbons. Alloy deposits over the whole composition range can be plated from these solutions by varying the relative quantities of the aluminium and magnesium alkyls and by changing the bath-operating parameters. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Formability Analysis of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Bulging Using FE Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Donald, B. J.; Hunt, D.; Yoshihara, S.; Manabe, K.

    2007-05-01

    There is currently much focus on the application of magnesium alloys to automotive structural components. This has arisen due to the positive environmental aspects associated with use of magnesium alloys such as weight reduction and recycling potential. In recent years many researchers have focused on the application of various forming processes to magnesium alloys. Magnesium alloys would seem highly suitable for sheet forming due to high N and r values, however, in application their formability has been inferior to, for example, aluminium alloys. It has thus been concluded that, when dealing with magnesium alloys, it is difficult to predict formability based on material properties. In order to improve formability and forming accuracy when using Mg alloys it is necessary to build a database and inference system which could decide the optimal forming parameters for complex automotive components. Currently not enough data is available to build such a database due to the limited number of studies available in literature. In this study an experimental analysis of hemispherical bulge forming at elevated temperature was undertaken in order to evaluate formability and hence build a database for forming process design. A finite element model based on the experiment has been built and validated against the experimental results. A ductile failure criterion has been integrated with the FE model and is used to predict the onset of failure. This paper discusses the development and validation of the finite element model with the ductile failure criterion and presents results from the experimental tests and FE simulations.

  18. Adherent protective coatings plated on magnesium-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Zinc is plated on a magnesium-lithium alloy by using a modification of the standard zinc-plate immersion bath. Further protection is given the alloy by applying a light plating of copper on the zinc plating. Other metals are plated on the copper by using conventional plating baths.

  19. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  20. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ertuerk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-17

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  1. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100

  2. Deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of wrought magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouren; Song, Linghui; Kang, Sukbong; Cho, Jaehyung; Wang, Yingzi

    2013-05-01

    There are many researches on the deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80, AZ91, and ZK60 magnesium alloys at different temperatures and strain rates, but few of them focuses on the deformation behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys, especially under the twin-roll casting (TRC) state. Meanwhile, the existing researches only focus on the grain refinement law of the magnesium alloys under deformation conditions, the deformation mechanism has not been revealed yet. The hot compression behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M magnesium alloys under the temperature and strain rate ranges of 250-400 °C and 0.001-1 s-1 are studied by thermal simulation methods using Gleeble 1500 machine and virtual simulation using finite element analysis software. Simulation results show that sine hyperbolic law is the most suitable flow stress model for wider deformation conditions. The most reasonable selected deformation conditions of ZK60M alloy is 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/1 s-1 for conventional casting (CC), while AZ41M alloy is 300 °C/0.01 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for CC. Deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanism of them are analyzed at the same deformation conditions. The microstructures of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys are observed at different deformed conditions by optical microscopy (OM) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and it reveals the flow behavior and deformation mechanism of them. Working harden and work soften contribute to the activation of basal, non-basal slip systems which promote DRX. The proposed research reveals the deformation behavior and mechanism of the AZ41M and ZK 60M magnesium alloys and concludes their optimized deformation parameters and processes and provides a theory basis for their manufacturing and application.

  3. In vivo decomposition study of coated magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Desiree; Piersma, Tyler; Lecronier, David; Cheng, Xingguo; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2010-04-01

    In the last decade, magnesium has resurged as an important biomaterial. Its mechanical properties are very similar to natural bone, and it degrades in vivo to non toxic substances. Unfortunately, corrosion of pure magnesium in vivo is rapid, thus coated alloys that decrease its corrosion could be used as implants in orthopedics. This presentation will describe the degradation results in cell cultures and in rats.

  4. In vitro decomposition study of coated magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersma, Tyler; White, Desiree; Cheng, Xinggou; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat; Lecronier, David

    2010-04-01

    In the last decade, magnesium has resurged as an important biomaterial. It's mechanical properties are very similar to natural bone, and it degrades in vivo to non toxic substances. Unfortunately, corrosion of pure magnesium in vivo is rapid, thus coated alloys that decrease it's corrosion could be used as implants in orthopedics. This presentation will describe the degradation results in a simulated body fluid (SBF).

  5. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250 deg. C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  6. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-01

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250° C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  7. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys: A Review of Material Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Persaud-Sharma, Dharam; McGoron, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium based alloys possess a natural ability to biodegrade due to corrosion when placed within aqueous substances, which is promising for cardiovascular and orthopedic medical device applications. These materials can serve as a temporary scaffold when placed in vivo, which is desirable for treatments when temporary supportive structures are required to assist in the wound healing process. The nature of these materials to degrade is attributed to the high oxidative corrosion rates of magnesium. In this review, a summary is presented for magnesium material development, biocorrosion characteristics, as well as a biological translation for these results. PMID:22408600

  8. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Berengere Julie Christine; Feyerabend, Frank; Jimbo, Ryo; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnesium (Mg). Materials and Methods The degradation parameters of magnesium-silver (Mg2Ag), magnesium-gadolinium (Mg10Gd) and magnesium-rare-earth (Mg4Y3RE) alloys were analysed after 1, 2, and 3 days of incubation in cell culture medium under cell culture condition. Changes in cell viability and cell adhesion were evaluated by culturing human umbilical cord perivascular cells on corroded Mg materials to examine how the degradation influences the cellular development. Results and Conclusions The pH and osmolality of the medium increased with increasing degradation rate and it was found to be most pronounced for Mg4Y3RE alloy. The biological observations showed that HUCPV exhibited a more homogeneous cell growth on Mg alloys compared to high-purity Mg, where they showed a clustered morphology. Moreover, cells exhibited a slightly higher density on Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in comparison to Mg4Y3RE, due to the lower alkalinisation and osmolality of the incubation medium. However, cells grown on Mg10Gd and Mg4Y3RE generated more developed and healthy cellular structures that allowed them to better adhere to the surface. This can be attributable to a more stable and homogeneous degradation of the outer surface with respect to the incubation time. PMID:26600388

  9. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo; Zhao, J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-03-15

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has three layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO{sub 2} with some Mg(OH){sub 2}. The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO{sub 2} and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 3}Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37{+-}1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased {beta}-Mg{sub 12}Al{sub 17} phase.

  10. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  11. Acoustic emission during unloading of elastically stressed magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A magnesium alloy was quasi-statically cycled elastically between zero load and tension. Both loading and unloading stress delays were found, and the unloading stress delay was further studied. An analytical expression was written for the unloading stress delay which is an elastic constitutive parameter. The potential use of these results for the acoustic emission monitoring of elastic stress states is discussed.

  12. Copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for latent heat storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-21

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. In conclusion, two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  13. Copper-Silicon-Magnesium Alloys for Latent Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Withey, E. A.; Coker, E. N.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Andraka, C. E.

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of microstructure, solidification characteristics, and heat of solidification with composition in copper-silicon-magnesium alloys for thermal energy storage is presented. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to relate the thermal characteristics to microstructural development in the investigated alloys and clarifies the location of one of the terminal three-phase eutectics. Repeated thermal cycling highlights the thermal storage stability of the transformation through multiple melting events. Two near-terminal eutectic alloys display high enthalpies of solidification, relatively narrow melting ranges, and stable transformation hysteresis behaviors suited to thermal energy storage.

  14. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings. PMID:25942897

  15. Recycling of Magnesium Alloy Employing Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter A.; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-04-01

    Pure magnesium was recycled from partially oxidized 50.5 wt pct Mg-Al scrap alloy and AZ91 Mg alloy (9 wt pct Al, 1 wt pct Zn). Refining experiments were performed using a eutectic mixture of MgF2-CaF2 molten salt (flux). During the experiments, potentiodynamic scans were performed to determine the electrorefining potentials for magnesium dissolution and magnesium bubble nucleation in the flux. The measured electrorefining potential for magnesium bubble nucleation increased over time as the magnesium content inside the magnesium alloy decreased. Potentiostatic holds and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to measure the electronic and ionic resistances of the flux. The electronic resistivity of the flux varied inversely with the magnesium solubility. Up to 100 pct of the magnesium was refined from the Mg-Al scrap alloy by dissolving magnesium and its oxide into the flux followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. Solid oxide membrane electrolysis was also employed in the system to enable additional magnesium recovery from magnesium oxide in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. In an experiment employing AZ91 Mg alloy, only the refining step was carried out. The calculated refining yield of magnesium from the AZ91 alloy was near 100 pct.

  16. Warm formability of aluminum-magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Henshall, G.A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-27

    Manufacturers have become increasingly interested in near-net-shape forming of aluminum alloys as a means to reduce production costs and the weight of aircraft and automotive structures. To achieve the ductilities required for this process, we have examined extended ductility of Al-Mg alloys in the warm forming, or Class I creep, regime. We have studied a high-purity, binary alloy of Al-2.8Mg and ternary alloys of Al-xMg-0.5Mn with Mg concentrations from 1.0 to 6.6 wt. %. Tensile tests, including strain rates-change tests, have been performed with these materials at temperatures of 300 and 400C over a range 10{sup {minus}4} to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A maximum tensile failure strain of 325% for the binary alloy and a maximum of 125% in the ternary alloys have been measured. The experimental results have been used to evaluate the effects of solute concentration, microstructure, temperature, and strain rate on flow stress ({sigma}), elongation to failure (e{sub f}), and strain-rate sensitivity (m) of these alloys.

  17. Study of Forming of Magnesium Alloy by Explosive Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Liqun; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Marumo, Yasuo; Yahiro, Ititoku

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium alloy is an attractive next generation material due to its high specific strength with low weight. However, magnesium alloys has few slip lines with close-packed hexagonal lattice, and generally poor ductility at room temperature, therefore it is difficult to form this material by cold forging. It is well known that the speed of deformation of metallic materials rapidly changes at the high strain rate. For some metallic materials, it is reported that the ductility also increases at the high strain rate with this speed effect. In this study, a series of high speed impulsive compressive tests were carried. By using explosives for shock wave loading, the velocity in this experiment reached 100 m/s that can't be easily obtained in normal experiment. In this paper, the possibility of forming the AZ31 extrusion magnesium alloy using explosive-impulsive pressure is investigated. And improved ductility by the effect of high-rate deformation is observed with this alloy.

  18. Properties and microstructures of carbon fiber reinforced magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Oettinger, O.; Gruber, M.; Grau, C.; Singer, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two types of carbon fibers (M40J, T300J) were incorporated into magnesium alloy matrices by a new gas pressure infiltration technique using infiltration pressures of about 10--50 MPa. Mechanical testing of the unidirectionally reinforced magnesium alloys shows excellent in-axis properties. Tensile strength of consistently more than 1000 MPa for 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} density has been obtained. However, the off-axis properties of these composites are rather poor. A promising approach to improve the fiber/matrix interface strength is by using magnesium alloys with carbide forming alloying elements such as aluminum or zirconium (AM20, AZ91, MSR-B) . The interface microstructure is observed to depend on the processing parameters, matrix content and the characteristics of the employed carbon fibers. Bending tests with varying beam length over thickness ratio are used to study the microstructure/interfacial strength relation, following an approach which is common for polymer composites. With optimized processing conditions and fiber/matrix selection interlaminar shear strength values nearly equal to polymer composites can be reached.

  19. Study of Forming of Magnesium Alloy by Explosive Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Liqun; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Marumo, Yasuo; Yahiro, Ititoku

    2011-05-04

    Magnesium alloy is an attractive next generation material due to its high specific strength with low weight. However, magnesium alloys has few slip lines with close-packed hexagonal lattice, and generally poor ductility at room temperature, therefore it is difficult to form this material by cold forging. It is well known that the speed of deformation of metallic materials rapidly changes at the high strain rate. For some metallic materials, it is reported that the ductility also increases at the high strain rate with this speed effect. In this study, a series of high speed impulsive compressive tests were carried. By using explosives for shock wave loading, the velocity in this experiment reached 100 m/s that can't be easily obtained in normal experiment. In this paper, the possibility of forming the AZ31 extrusion magnesium alloy using explosive-impulsive pressure is investigated. And improved ductility by the effect of high-rate deformation is observed with this alloy.

  20. The Corrosion of Magnesium and of the Magnesium Aluminum Alloys Containing Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, J A

    1927-01-01

    The extensive use of magnesium and its alloys in aircraft has been seriously handicapped by the uncertainties surrounding their resistance to corrosion. This problem has been given intense study by the American Magnesium Corporation and at the request of the Subcommittee on Materials for Aircraft of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics this report was prepared on the corrosion of magnesium. The tentative conclusions drawn from the experimental facts of this investigation are as follows: the overvoltage of pure magnesium is quite high. On immersion in salt water the metal corrodes with the liberation of hydrogen until the film of corrosion product lowers the potential to a critical value. When the potential reaches this value it no longer exceeds the theoretical hydrogen potential plus the overvoltage of the metal. Rapid corrosion consequently ceases. When aluminum is added, especially when in large amounts, the overvoltage is decreased and hydrogen plates out at a much lower potential than with pure magnesium. The addition of small amount of manganese raises the overvoltage back to practically that of pure metal, and the film is again negative.

  1. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  2. Potential applications of wrought magnesium alloys for passenger vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Stodolsky, F.; Wu, S.

    1995-12-31

    Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, which have very low density. Magnesium alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts; use is generally limited to die castings, such as housings. The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. This study identifies technical and economic barriers to this replacement and suggests R&D areas to enable economical large-volume use. Detailed results of the study will be published at a later date. Magnesium sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. Currently, Mg sheet has found limited use in the aerospace industry, where costs are not a major concern. The major barrier to greatly increased automotive use is high cost; two technical R&D areas are identified that could enable major reductions in costs. These are novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, possibly operating at lower temperatures and involving superplastic behavior.

  3. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  4. Semi-solid Twin-roll Casting Process of Magnesium Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, H.; Davey, K.; Rasgado, M. T. Alonso; Haga, T.; Koga, N.

    2004-06-01

    An experimental approach has been performed to ascertain the effectiveness of semi-solid strip casting using a horizontal twin roll caster. The demand for light-weight products with high strength has grown recently due to the rapid development of automobile and aircraft technology. One key to such development has been utilization of magnesium alloys, which can potentially reduce the total product weight. However, the problems of utilizing magnesium alloys are still mainly related to high manufacturing cost. One of the solutions to this problem is to develop magnesium casting-rolling technology in order to produce magnesium sheet products at competitive cost for commercial applications. In this experiment, magnesium alloy AZ31B was used to ascertain the effectiveness of semi-solid roll strip casting for producing magnesium alloy sheets. The temperature of the molten magnesium, and the roll speeds of the upper and lower rolls, (which could be changed independently), were varied to find an appropriate manufacturing condition. Rolling and heat treatment conditions were changed to examine which condition would be appropriate for producing wrought magnesium alloys with good formability. Microscopic observation of the crystals of the manufactured wrought magnesium alloys was performed. It has been found that a limiting drawing ratio of 2.7 was possible in a warm deep drawing test of the cast magnesium alloy sheets after being hot rolled.

  5. Endothelial responses of magnesium and other alloying elements in magnesium-based stent materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable tailored magnesium (Mg) alloys are some of the most promising scaffolds for cardiovascular stents. During the course of degradation after implantation, all the alloying elements in the scaffold will be released to the surrounding vascular tissues. However, fundamental questions regarding the toxicity of alloying elements towards vascular cells, the maximum amount of each element that could be used in alloy design, or how each of the alloying elements affects vascular cellular activity and gene expression, are still not fully answered. This work systematically addressed these questions by revealing how application of different alloying elements commonly used in Mg stent materials influences several indices of human endothelial cell health, i.e., viability, proliferations, cytoskeletal reorganizations, migration, and the gene expression profile. The overall cell viability and proliferation showed a decreasing trend with increasing concentrations of the ions, and the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) for each element were determined. When applied at a low concentration of around 10 mM, Mg had no adverse effects but improved cell proliferation and migration instead. Mg ions also altered endothelial gene expression significantly in a dose dependent manner. Most of the changed genes are related to angiogenesis and the cell adhesion signaling pathways. Findings from this work provide useful information on maximum safe doses of these ions for endothelial cells, endothelial responses towards these metal ions, and some guidance for future Mg stent design. PMID:25363018

  6. Strength and ductility with {10͞11} - {10͞12} double twinning in a magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Lentz, M; Risse, M; Schaefer, N; Reimers, W; Beyerlein, I J

    2016-01-01

    Based on their high specific strength and stiffness, magnesium alloys are attractive for lightweight applications in aerospace and transportation, where weight saving is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, the ductility of magnesium alloys is usually limited. It is thought that one reason for the lack of ductility is that the development of - double twins (DTW) cause premature failure of magnesium alloys. Here we show with a magnesium alloy containing 4 wt% lithium, that the same impressively large compression failure strains can be achieved with DTWs as without. The DTWs form stably across the microstructure and continuously throughout straining, forming three-dimensional intra-granular networks, a potential strengthening mechanism. We rationalize that relatively easier slip characteristic of this alloy plastically relaxed the localized stress concentrations that DTWs can generate. This result may provide key insight and an alternative perspective towards designing formable and strong magnesium alloys. PMID:27040648

  7. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  8. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  9. Finite element shape optimization for biodegradable magnesium alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Petrini, L; Gastaldi, D; Villa, T; Vedani, M; Lesma, E; Previtali, B; Migliavacca, F

    2010-09-01

    Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) are a promising solution for long-term adverse events caused by interactions between vessels and permanent stent platforms of drug eluting stents. However, the existing MAS showed severe lumen loss after a few months: too short degradation time may be the main reason for this drawback. In this study, a new design concept of MAS was proposed and a shape optimization method with finite element analysis was applied on two-dimensional (2D) stent models considering four different magnesium alloys: AZ80, AZ31, ZM21, and WE43. A morphing procedure was utilized to facilitate the optimization. Two experiments were carried out for a preliminary validation of the 2D models with good results. The optimized designs were compared to an existing MAS by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis. The results showed that the final optimized design with alloy WE43, compared to the existing MAS, has an increased strut width by approximately 48%, improved safety properties (decreased the maximum principal stress after recoil with tissue by 29%, and decreased the maximum principal strain during expansion by 14%) and improved scaffolding ability (increased by 24%). Accordingly, the degradation time can be expected to extend. The used methodology provides a convenient and practical way to develop novel MAS designs. PMID:20446037

  10. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  11. Corrosion behavior of rapidly solidified magnesium-aluminium-zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daloz, D.; Michot, G.; Steinmetz, P.

    1997-12-01

    Rapidly solidified magnesium alloys with 8 at%, 15 at%, and 20 at% Al and 1 at% and 3 at% Zn were fabricated by centrifugal atomization followed by hot extrusion. Microstructure of the alloys was composed of a fine-grain magnesium matrix (0.5 {micro}m) with {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} precipitates. Electrochemical and weight-loss tests were performed in borate and ASTM D 1384 solution (chloride, carbonate, and sulfate). In both media, corrosion current f the alloys decreased with increases in aluminum or zinc content. In borate solution, a passivating plateau was observed from the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) to E{sub corr} + 1,200 mV. Current density decreased with aluminum and zinc concentrations. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized matrix and precipitates was characterized. Zinc increased E{sub corr} of the two phases, with a corresponding decrease of corrosion current. The same trend was noticed for aluminum but with a less dramatic effect. The corrosion mechanism was suggested result from galvanic coupling of the matrix and the second phase. The galvanic corrosion, however, was reduced strongly by passivation of the matrix as a result of the surrounding precipitates. The positive influence of rapid solidification (corrosion rate decreased 1 order of magnitude) was the creation of a fine, highly homogeneous microstructure through this fabrication process.

  12. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  13. Modelling of Superplastic Forming of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, G.

    2011-01-17

    In this study the constitutive equation of the superplastic AZ31 magnesium-based alloy is modelled by the power law relationship between the stress, the strain and the strain-rate and an accurate procedure for determining the constants of the material is presented. Moreover, the problem of optimizing the pressure-time load curve of a free forming process is investigated and resolved by means of a pressure jump forming process. The experimental tests, carried out to support the finite-element modelling, have shown good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data.

  14. Laser Surface Engineering of Magnesium Alloys: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are well known for their high specific strength and low density. However, widespread applications of Mg alloys in structural components are impeded by their insufficient wear and corrosion resistance. Various surface engineering approaches, including electrochemical processes (plating, conversion coatings, hydriding, and anodizing), gas-phase deposition (thermal spray, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, diamond-like coatings, diffusion coatings, and ion implantation), and organic polymer coatings (painting and powder coating), have been used to improve the surface properties of Mg and its alloys. Recently, laser surface engineering approaches are attracting significant attention because of the wide range of possibilities in achieving the desired microstructural and compositional modifications through a range of laser-material interactions (surface melting, shock peening, and ablation). This article presents a review of various laser surface engineering approaches such as laser surface melting, laser surface alloying, laser surface cladding, laser composite surfacing, and laser shock peening used for surface modification of Mg alloys. The laser-material interactions, microstructural/compositional changes, and properties development (mostly corrosion and wear resistance) accompanied with each of these approaches are reviewed.

  15. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-02-01

    Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  16. Study of Forming Limit for Rotational Incremental Sheet Forming of Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jingee; Kim, Jeounghan; Park, Nhokwang; Kim, Youngsuk

    2010-01-01

    As a lightweight material, magnesium is being increasingly used for automotive parts. However, due to a hexagonal-closed-packed (hcp) crystal structure, in which only the basal plane can move, magnesium alloy sheets exhibit a low ductility and formability at room temperature. Press forming of magnesium alloy sheets is conventionally performed at elevated temperatures of 200 °C to 250 °C and thus is known as energy consumed forming. Therefore, in view of an energy saving forming technology, we study magnesium alloy sheet forming by a rotational incremental sheet forming (RISF) at room temperature, where the rotational tool generates local heat of specimen enough to accelerate plastic deformation. The flow curves of the magnesium alloy sheet are obtained and calculated at elevated temperatures, while the yield loci of the magnesium alloy sheet are measured at room temperature. Using RISF, a square cup of 80-mm width, 80-mm length, and 25-mm height is then formed from a magnesium alloy sheet at room temperature. In addition, the strain distribution is obtained and compared with the forming limit curve (FLC) by considering the effect of the tool radius and is found to effectively predict the forming limit of a magnesium alloy sheet in RISF.

  17. Microstructure and texture studies on magnesium sheet alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohsen

    The AZ3, the most common Mg sheet alloy, is currently produced by hot rolling of the DC cast ingot. Mg wrought alloys, in general have limited formability due to hexagonal close-packed structure and preferred orientation (texture). In order to improve magnesium sheet formability, a good understanding of microstructure and texture evolution in twin-roll casting is necessary. The objectives of this research are to study the microstructural and texture evolution in twin-roll cast AZ31 Mg sheet alloy and to develop/modify alloy compositions with improved mechanical properties (weakened texture). In the first part of study, the influence of cooling rate (CR) on the casting structure of AZ31 magnesium alloy has been investigated, as a background to understand microstructural development in TRC AZ31, using different moulds to obtain slow to moderate cooling rates. It was found that grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) reduces as the cooling rate increases. Moreover, it was observed that with an increase in cooling rate the fraction of second phase particles increases and the second phase particles become finer. The second part focused on the microstructure and texture study of the twin-roll cast (TRC) AZ31 (Mg-3wt.%Al-1wt.%Zn) sheet. The results indicate that TRC AZ31 exhibits a dendritic microstructure with columnar and equiaxed grains. It was noted that the amount of these second phases in the TRC alloy is greater than the conventionally cast AZ31. Recrystallization at 420 °C leads to a bimodal grain-size distribution, while a fine-grain structure is obtained after rolling and annealing. The TRC AZ31 sheet exhibits basal textures in the (i) as-received, (ii) rolled and (iii) rolled-annealed conditions. However, post-annealing of the TRC AZ31 at 420 °C produces a relatively random texture that has not been previously observed in the conventional AZ31 sheet. The texture randomization is attributed to the particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) of new grains

  18. Investigation of Deformation Dynamics in a Wrought Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Qiao, Hua; An, Ke; Wu, Peidong; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-11-01

    In the present research, the deformation dynamics and the effect of the deformation history on plastic deformation in a wrought magnesium alloy have been studied using real-time in-situ neutron diffraction measurements under a continuous loading condition and elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) polycrystal modeling. The experimental results reveal that the pre-deformation delayed the activation of the tensile twinning during subsequent compression, mainly resulting from the residual strain. No apparent detwinning occurred during unloading and even in the elastic region during reverse loading. It is believed that the grain rotation played an important role in the elastic region during reverse loading. The EVPSC model, which has been recently updated by implementing the twinning and detwinning model, was employed to characterize the deformation mechanism during the strain-path changes. The simulation result predicts well the experimental observation from the real-time in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The present study provides a deep insight of the nature of deformation mechanisms in a hexagonal close-packed structured polycrystalline wrought magnesium alloy, which might lead to a new era of deformation-mechanism research.

  19. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  20. Modeling the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys containing nanotwins

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been receiving much attention recently as potential lightweight alternatives to steel for automotive and other applications, but the poor formability of these alloys at low temperatures has limited their widespread adoption for automotive applications. Recent work with face centered cubic (FCC) materials has shown that introduction of twins at the nanometer scale in ultra-fine grained FCC polycrystals can provide significant increase in strength with a simultaneous improvement in ductility. This objective of this work is to explore the feasibility of extending this concept to hexagonal close packed (HCP) materials, with particular focus on using this approach to increase both strength and ductility of magnesium alloys. A crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) model is used to study the effect of varying the crystallographic texture and the spacing between the nanoscale twins on the strength and ductility of HCP polycrystals. Deformation of the material is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip, and in addition to the basal and prismatic slip systems, slip is also assumed to occur on the {1 0 -1 1} planes that are associated with compression twins in these materials. The slip system strength of the pyramidal systems containing the nanotwins is assumed to be much lower than the strength of the other systems, which is assumed to scale with the spacing between the nanotwins. The CPFE model is used to compute the stress-strain response for different microstrucrutral parameters, and a criterion based on a critical slip system shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to compute the limiting strength and ductility, with the ultimate goal of identifying the texture and nanotwin spacing that can lead to the optimum values for these parameters.

  1. The microstructure, mechanical and friction properties of protective diamond like carbon films on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y. S.; Wu, Y. F.; Yang, H.; Cang, K.; Song, G. H.; Li, Z. X.; Zhou, K.

    2011-12-01

    Protective hard coatings deposited on magnesium alloys are believed to be effective for overcoming their poor wear properties. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as hard protective films were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy by arc ion plating under negative pulse bias voltages ranging from 0 to -200 V. The microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the DLC films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The tribological behavior of uncoated and coated AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated using a ball-on-disk tribotester. The results show that the negative pulse bias voltage used for film deposition has a significant effect on the sp3 carbon content and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. A maximum sp3 content of 33.3% was obtained at -100 V, resulting in a high hardness of 28.6 GPa and elastic modulus of 300.0 GPa. The DLC films showed very good adhesion to the AZ91 magnesium alloy with no observable cracks and delamination even during friction testing. Compared with the uncoated AZ91 magnesium alloy, the magnesium alloy coated with DLC films exhibits a low friction coefficient and a narrow, shallow wear track. The wear resistance and surface hardness of AZ91 magnesium alloy can be significantly improved by coating a layer of DLC protective film due to its high hardness and low friction coefficient.

  2. Effect of Al-3Nb-1B Master Alloy on the Grain Refinement of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Penghe; Zhou, Quan

    2016-06-01

    An Al-3Nb-1B master alloy has been prepared using a melt reaction method. The microstructure of the master alloy and its refinement performance on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated. Experimental results showed that the Al-3Nb-1B master alloy was mainly composed of α-Al and NbB2 phases. With the increase of the addition amount of Al-3Nb-1B master alloy, the primary α-Mg grains of AZ91D magnesium alloy were further refined. Upon adding 0.5 wt pct Al-3Nb-1B master alloy, the average grain size of the primary α-Mg decreased from 240 to 52 μm. The present results indicated that NbB2 can act as effective heterogeneous nucleus of the primary α-Mg, which accounted for the good grain refining performance on AZ91D magnesium alloy. Compared with the unrefined alloy, the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation of AZ91D magnesium alloy refined by 0.5 wt pct Al-3Nb-1B master alloy were increased by 18.4, 15.7, and 27.3 pct, respectively due to the grain refinement effect.

  3. Minimum quantity lubrication machining of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining, i.e. drilling and tapping of aluminum and magnesium alloys using very low quantities of cutting fluids was studied and the MQL machining performance was compared to dry and conventional flooded conditions. An experimental drilling station with an MQL system was built to measure torque and thrust force responses. Uncoated and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated HSS drills were tested against 319 Al and AZ91 alloys using 10--50 ml/h of distilled water (H 2O-MQL) and a fatty acid based MQL agent (FA-MQL). The results indicated that H2O-MQL used in conjunction with non-hydrogenated DLC (NH-DLC) coatings reduced the average torque and thrust-force compared to dry cutting and achieved a performance comparable with conventional flooded drilling. At least 103 holes could be drilled using NH-DLC in H2O-MQL and uncoated HSS in FA-MQL in drilling of both 319 Al and AZ91. MQL drilling and tapping provided a stable machining performance, which was evident from the uniform torque and force patterns and also resulted in desirable hole surface, thread quality and chip segments. The maximum temperature generated in the workpiece during MQL machining was lower than that observed in dry drilling and tapping, and comparable to flooded conditions. The mechanical properties of the material adjacent to drilled holes, as evaluated through plastic strain and hardness measurements, revealed a notable softening in case of dry drilling, with magnesium alloys exhibiting a recrystallized grain zone, but not for MQL drilling. Softened aluminum and magnesium promoted adhesion to the tools resulted built-up edge formation and consequently high torques and thrust-forces were generated. NH-DLC coatings' low COF in H 2O-MQL against 319 Al (0.10) and AZ91 (0.12) compared to uncoated HSS (0.63 and 0.65) limited the temperature increase during NH-DLC in H2 O-MQL drilling and hence both torques and thrust forces were effectively reduced.

  4. MUTLI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN WROUGHT MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural features that govern the mechanical properties of wrought magnesium alloys include grain size, crystallographic texture, and twinning. Several processes based on shear deformation have been developed that promote grain refinement, weakening of the basal texture, as well as the shift of the peak intensity away from the center of the basal pole figure - features that promote room temperature ductility in Mg alloys. At ORNL, we are currently exploring the concept of introducing nano-twins within sub-micron grains as a possible mechanism for simultaneously improving strength and ductility by exploiting a potential dislocation glide along the twin-matrix interface a mechanism that was originally proposed for face-centered cubic materials. Specifically, we have developed an integrated modeling and optimization framework in order to identify the combinations of grain size, texture and twin spacing that can maximize strength-ductility combinations. A micromechanical model that relates microstructure to material strength is coupled with a failure model that relates ductility to a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress. The micro-mechanical model is combined with an optimization tool based on genetic algorithm. A multi-objective optimization technique is used to explore the strength-ductility space in a systematic fashion and identify optimum combinations of the microstructural parameters that will simultaneously maximize the strength-ductility in the alloy.

  5. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi; Xu, Qingli; Zhang, Jian; Niu, Jialing; Yuan, Guangyin; Jiang, Yao; He, Yaohua; Wang, Xinling

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C‑JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen Ⅱ (Col Ⅱ) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  6. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, YI; XU, QINGLI; ZHANG, JIAN; NIU, JIALING; YUAN, GUANGYIN; JIANG, YAO; HE, YAOHUA; WANG, XINLING

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C-JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen II (Col II) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  7. The initial stage of surface modification of magnesium alloys by high intensity pulse ions beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.

    2016-06-01

    The initial stage of high intensity pulsed ion beam irradiated magnesium alloys was studied by MD simulation. Specimens containing Mg17Al12 precipitation were modeled to investigate the evolution of magnesium alloys during several picoseconds after a high-energy ion impacting. It was found that the Mg17Al12 precipitation has little effects on the kinetic energy evolution in the heat zone, but considerable effects on strength of kinetic energy peak moving to the deep matrix and on the surface morphology of the magnesium alloy at thermal equilibrium state. The thickness of the heat zone is independent on the temperature of surface region.

  8. Magnesium Alloy Precursor Thin Films for Efficient, Practical Fabrication of Nanoporous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Briot, Nicolas J.; Swartzentruber, Phillip D.; Balk, T. John

    2014-01-01

    An improved approach to fabrication of nanoporous (np) metals is demonstrated for several metallic systems that were successfully created by dealloying magnesium-based precursor alloys (also containing iridium, nickel, gold, or osmium-ruthenium). A significant advantage is that magnesium alloys can be dealloyed effectively using water or, if needed, dilute acetic acid. The crystal structures of magnesium-based precursor films were significantly different from those of alloys commonly used as precursors. This approach should be generally applicable to np metal synthesis.

  9. Binary Magnesium Alloys: Searching for Novel Compounds by Computational Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hart, Gus

    2011-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are among the lightest structural materials and are of considerable technical interest. We use the high-throughput framework AFLOW to make T = 0 K ground state predictions by scanning a large set of known candidate structures for thermodynamic minima. The study presented here encompasses 34 Mg-X systems of interest (X=Al, Au, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ge, Hg, Ir, K, La, Pb, Pd, Pt, Mo, Na, Nb, Os, Rb, Re, Rh, Ru, Sc, Si, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tc, Ti, V, W, Y, Zn, Zr). Avenues for further investigation revealed by this study include stable phases found in addition to experimental phases and compound forming systems thought to be either immiscible or non-compound forming. The existence of potentially novel ordered phases presents new opportunities for materials design.

  10. Deformation twinning in a polycrystalline magnesium alloy during dynamic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustedt, Caleb; Lloyd, Jeffrey; Lambert, Paul; Kannan, Vignesh; Casem, Daniel; Ramesh, K. T.; Sinclair, Nicholas; Becker, Richard; Hufnagel, Todd

    We report the results of combined in situ x-ray diffraction studies and crystal plasticity modeling of deformation twinning in polycrystalline magnesium during dynamic compression. Diffraction experiments were conducted at the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) of the Advanced Photon Source, on magnesium alloy (AZ31B) specimens (with various crystallographic textures) loaded at strain rates of ~1000 s-1 in a compression Kolsky bar. The diffraction patterns, recorded with temporal resolution of 5-10 microseconds, provide information about the evolution of crystallographic texture during deformation, which we interpret in terms of the twinning mechanism (so-called ``extension'' or ``tensile'' twinning). We compare our observations quantitatively with predictions of the evolution of crystallographic texture from an efficient reduced crystal plasticity model. This model explicitly accounts for basal slip and extension twinning on a rate-independent basis, but treats other mechanisms (pyramidal and prismatic slip) as isotropic, rate-dependent functions. This combination yields substantial improvements in efficiency over full crystal-plasticity models while retaining key aspects of the most important deformation mechanisms.

  11. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility study of phytic acid modified WE43 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, C. H.; Zheng, Y. F.; Wang, S. Q.; Xi, T. F.; Li, Y. D.

    2012-02-01

    Phytic acid (PA) conversion coating on WE43 magnesium alloy was prepared by the method of immersion. The influences of phytic acid solution with different pH on the microstructure, properties of the conversion coating and the corrosion resistance were investigated by SEM, FTIR and potentiodynamic polarization method. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of different pH phytic acid solution modified WE43 magnesium alloys was evaluated by MTT and hemolysis test. The results show that PA can enhance the corrosion resistance of WE43 magnesium especially when the pH value of modified solution is 5 and the cytotoxicity of the PA coated WE43 magnesium alloy is much better than that of the bare WE43 magnesium alloy. Moreover, all the hemolysis rates of the PA coated WE43 Mg alloy were lower than 5%, indicating that the modified Mg alloy met the hemolysis standard of biomaterials. Therefore, PA coating is a good candidate to improve the biocompatibility of WE43 magnesium alloy.

  12. Surface modification of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are being paid much attention recently as temporary implants, such as orthopedic implants and cardiovascular stents. However, the rapid degradation of them in physiological environment is a major obstacle preventing their wide applications to date, which will result in rapid mechanical integrity loss or even collapse of magnesium-based implants before injured tissues heal. Moreover, rapid degradation of the magnesium-based implants will also cause some adverse effects to their surrounding environment, such as local gas cavity around the implant, local alkalization and magnesium ion enrichment, which will reduce the integration between implant and tissue. So, in order to obtain better performance of magnesium-based implants in clinical trials, special alloy designs and surface modifications are prerequisite. Actually, when a magnesium-based implant is inserted in vivo, corrosion firstly happens at the implant-tissue interface and the biological response to implant is also determined by the interaction at this interface. So the surface properties, such as corrosion resistance, hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility of the implant, are critical for their in vivo performance. Compared with alloy designs, surface modification is less costly, flexible to construct multi-functional surface and can prevent addition of toxic alloying elements. In this review, we would like to summarize the current investigations of surface modifications of magnesium and its alloys for biomedical application. The advantages/disadvantages of different surface modification methods are also discussed as a suggestion for their utilization. PMID:26816637

  13. Surface modification of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are being paid much attention recently as temporary implants, such as orthopedic implants and cardiovascular stents. However, the rapid degradation of them in physiological environment is a major obstacle preventing their wide applications to date, which will result in rapid mechanical integrity loss or even collapse of magnesium-based implants before injured tissues heal. Moreover, rapid degradation of the magnesium-based implants will also cause some adverse effects to their surrounding environment, such as local gas cavity around the implant, local alkalization and magnesium ion enrichment, which will reduce the integration between implant and tissue. So, in order to obtain better performance of magnesium-based implants in clinical trials, special alloy designs and surface modifications are prerequisite. Actually, when a magnesium-based implant is inserted in vivo, corrosion firstly happens at the implant-tissue interface and the biological response to implant is also determined by the interaction at this interface. So the surface properties, such as corrosion resistance, hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility of the implant, are critical for their in vivo performance. Compared with alloy designs, surface modification is less costly, flexible to construct multi-functional surface and can prevent addition of toxic alloying elements. In this review, we would like to summarize the current investigations of surface modifications of magnesium and its alloys for biomedical application. The advantages/disadvantages of different surface modification methods are also discussed as a suggestion for their utilization. PMID:26816637

  14. Oxide Film and Porosity Defects in Magnesium Alloy AZ91

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Rhee, Hongjoo; Felicelli, Sergio D.; Sabau, Adrian S; Berry, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Porosity is a major concern in the production of light metal parts. This work aims to identify some of the mechanisms of microporosity formation in magnesium alloy AZ91. Microstructure analysis was performed on several samples obtained from gravity-poured ingots in graphite plate molds. Temperature data during cooling was acquired with type K thermocouples at 60 Hz at three locations of each casting. The microstructure of samples extracted from the regions of measured temperature was then characterized with optical metallography. Tensile tests and conventional four point bend tests were also conducted on specimens cut from the cast plates. Scanning electron microscopy was then used to observe the microstructure on the fracture surface of the specimens. The results of this study revealed the existence of abundant oxide film defects, similar to those observed in aluminum alloys. Remnants of oxide films were detected on some pore surfaces, and folded oxides were observed in fracture surfaces indicating the presence of double oxides entrained during pouring.

  15. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  16. Effect of temperature on the dynamic compressive properties of magnesium alloy and its nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Shu, D. W.; Goh, Kok Swee

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are very attractive in applications such as automotive, railway and aerospace industries due to their low density in comparison with aluminum and steel alloys. Magnesium-based composites exhibit high specific properties compared to unreinforced magnesium alloys and they are found to be promising for mechanical applications under impact and high temperature conditions beyond those possible with magnesium alloys. In the present study, the effect of temperature variation has been investigated for both magnesium alloy AZ31B and the same alloy reinforced with silicon carbide nano-particles at high strain rates. The temperature is varied in the range from -30°C to 200°C at a high strain rate of 3300 s-1. Lower stresses and larger strains to peak compressive stresses are observed with increasing temperature. An analytic comparison between AZ31B alloy and AZ31B nanocomposite was also examined and results reveal that AZ31B nanocomposite displays superior strength properties with slightly weaker ductility than AZ31B alloy at all three temperature variations. The result of this is an improved energy absorption capability possessed by AZ31B nanocomposite.

  17. Magnesium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements are available? Magnesium is available in multivitamin-mineral supplements and other dietary supplements . Forms of magnesium ... higher intakes of magnesium have a higher bone mineral density , which is important in reducing the risk ...

  18. Kinetics of recrystallization for twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy during homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Li, Pei-Jie; He, Liang-Ju

    2011-10-01

    The kinetics of recrystallization for twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy with different thicknesses during homogenization was analyzed. It is shown that fine grains are first formed at the boundaries of deformed bands in the twin-roll casting slab. The recrystallized grains with no strain are gradually substituted for the deformed microstructure of twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy. The incubation temperature and time for the recrystallization of a twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy strip with a thickness of 3 mm are lower and shorter than those of the 6-mm thick strip, respectively. The 3-mm thick twin-roll casting magnesium alloy has finer grains than the 6-mm thick strip. The activation energies of recrystallization for twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy slabs with the thickness of 3 and 6 mm are 88 and 69 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics curves of recrystallization for twin-roll casting AZ31 magnesium alloy were obtained.

  19. Cyclic Plasticity Constitutive Model for Uniaxial Ratcheting Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Liu, Zheng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Min; Long, Zhi-Li

    2015-05-01

    Investigating the ratcheting behavior of magnesium alloys is significant for the structure's reliable design. The uniaxial ratcheting behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy is studied by the asymmetric cyclic stress-controlled experiments at room temperature. A modified kinematic hardening model is established to describe the uniaxial ratcheting behavior of the studied alloy. In the modified model, the material parameter m i is improved as an exponential function of the maximum equivalent stress. The modified model can be used to predict the ratcheting strain evolution of the studied alloy under the single-step and multi-step asymmetric stress-controlled cyclic loadings. Additionally, due to the significant effect of twinning on the plastic deformation of magnesium alloy, the relationship between the material parameter m i and the linear density of twins is discussed. It is found that there is a linear relationship between the material parameter m i and the linear density of twins induced by the cyclic loadings.

  20. The development and application of a thermodynamic database for magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Shunli; Zhang, Hui; Ganeshan, Swetha; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2008-12-01

    The available thermodynamic databases for magnesium alloys are discussed in this paper. Of particular interest are the features of a magnesium database developed by the authors with 19 elements: Mg-Al-Ca-Ce-Cu-Fe-KLa-Li-Mn-Na-Nd-Pr-Si-Sn-Sr-Y-Zn-Zr. Using this database, two applications are presented. One is the phase evolution in AZ61 magnesium alloy including the variations of phase fractions, alloying compositions, and partition coefficients of alloying elements as a function of temperature (or solid fraction). The other is to understand sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement in the Al-Mg alloy, which is ascribed to the formation of a liquid phase due to the presence of sodium traces.

  1. Investigation on the Explosive Welding of 1100 Aluminum Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengwan; Feng, Jianrui; Zhou, Qiang; An, Erfeng; Li, Jingbo; Yuan, Yuan; Ou, Sanli

    2016-07-01

    The undesirable properties of magnesium alloys include easy embrittlement, low oxidation resistance, and difficulty in welding with other materials. Their application in industry is, therefore, restricted. In this paper, plates of 1100 aluminum alloy and AZ31 magnesium alloy were successfully welded together using the explosive welding technique. The influences of the welding parameters on the weld quality were investigated. The surface morphology and microstructure near the weld interface were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy), and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results demonstrated the typical wavy bonding interface. In addition, elemental diffusion with a thickness of approximately 3 μm occurred near the bonding interface. The two plates were joined together well at the atomic scale. Nanograins with a size of approximately 5 nm were observed in the diffusion layer. The microhardness and shear strength were measured to evaluate the mechanical properties, which confirmed that a high quality of bonding was acquired.

  2. Investigation on the Explosive Welding of 1100 Aluminum Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengwan; Feng, Jianrui; Zhou, Qiang; An, Erfeng; Li, Jingbo; Yuan, Yuan; Ou, Sanli

    2016-06-01

    The undesirable properties of magnesium alloys include easy embrittlement, low oxidation resistance, and difficulty in welding with other materials. Their application in industry is, therefore, restricted. In this paper, plates of 1100 aluminum alloy and AZ31 magnesium alloy were successfully welded together using the explosive welding technique. The influences of the welding parameters on the weld quality were investigated. The surface morphology and microstructure near the weld interface were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy), and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results demonstrated the typical wavy bonding interface. In addition, elemental diffusion with a thickness of approximately 3 μm occurred near the bonding interface. The two plates were joined together well at the atomic scale. Nanograins with a size of approximately 5 nm were observed in the diffusion layer. The microhardness and shear strength were measured to evaluate the mechanical properties, which confirmed that a high quality of bonding was acquired.

  3. In Vitro Biocompatibility and Endothelialization of Novel Magnesium-Rare Earth Alloys for Improved Stent Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Watson, Nevija; Xu, Zhigang; Chen, Yongjun; Waterman, Jenora; Sankar, Jagannathan; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) based alloys are the most advanced cardiovascular stent materials. This new generation of stent scaffold is currently under clinical evaluation with encouraging outcomes. All these Mg alloys contain a certain amount of rare earth (RE) elements though the exact composition is not yet disclosed. RE alloying can usually enhance the mechanical strength of different metal alloys but their toxicity might be an issue for medical applications. It is still unclear how RE elements will affect the magnesium (Mg) alloys intended for stent materials as a whole. In this study, we evaluated MgZnCaY-1RE, MgZnCaY-2RE, MgYZr-1RE, and MgZnYZr-1RE alloys for cardiovascular stents applications regarding their mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, hemolysis, platelet adhesion/activation, and endothelial biocompatibility. The mechanical properties of all alloys were significantly improved. Potentiodynamic polarization showed that the corrosion resistance of four alloys was at least 3–10 times higher than that of pure Mg control. Hemolysis test revealed that all the materials were non-hemolytic while little to moderate platelet adhesion was found on all materials surface. No significant cytotoxicity was observed in human aorta endothelial cells cultured with magnesium alloy extract solution for up to seven days. Direct endothelialization test showed that all the alloys possess significantly better capability to sustain endothelial cell attachment and growth. The results demonstrated the promising potential of these alloys for stent material applications in the future. PMID:24921251

  4. Kinetics of the development of a nonchromate conversion coating for magnesium alloys and magnesium-based metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Nunez, M.A.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G.E.; Karimzadeh, H.

    1999-12-01

    Kinetics of the development of a conversion coating from a stannate bath on commercial purity magnesium (Mg{sup comm}), magnesium-based alloys ZC71 and WE43, and a metal matrix composite (MMC), comprising a ZC71 alloy matrix and 12 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) particles were studied using linear polarization resistance, potential-time, potentiodynamic polarization, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and microscopic examination. The coating, typically {approximately}3 {micro}m to 5 {micro}m thick, was composed largely of crystalline magnesium tin oxide (MgSnO{sub 3} {center{underscore}dot} 3H{sub 2}O), and developed by a nucleation and growth process through an initial corrosion film on the substrate. Nucleation probably occurred on regions where a critical concentration of magnesium ions was reached for coating crystals to form. Specific sites of nucleation, such as particles of eutectic phase and of reinforcement, were revealed in some cases, but frequently the precise sites of nucleation were not disclosed. A longer treatment time (at least 35 min) was suggested by polarization resistance data for improved coverage of the substrate than the previously recommended time of 20 min. The coating continuity on the substrates, after a particular time of treatment, depends upon ally composition increasing in order: Mg{sup comm}, 12% (SiC)p/ZC71 alloy MMC, ZC71 alloy, and WE43 alloy. Polarization resistance (R{sub p}) changed systematically with coating development, showing a decrease in R{sub p} in the early stages of the coating process, related to the initial corrosion.

  5. Superplastic Response of Continuously Cast AZ31B Magnesium Sheet Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boileau, J. M.; Friedman, P. A.; Houston, D. Q.; Luckey, S. G.

    2010-06-01

    Magnesium sheet is typically produced for commercial applications with the traditional DC-ingot casting method. As a result of the hexagonal close-packed crystallographic structure in magnesium, multiple rolling passes and annealing steps are required to reduce the thickness of the ingots. Thus, high fabrication costs characterize the creation of magnesium sheet suitable for common forming operations. Recently, continuous casting (CC) technology, where molten metal is solidified directly into sheet form, has been applied to magnesium alloys; this method has shown the potential to significantly reduce the cost of fabricating magnesium sheet alloys. In order to understand the viability of the CC process, a study was conducted to investigate the superplastic potential of alloys produced by this method. This study focused on AZ31B Mg that was continuously-cast on twin-roll casters from three different suppliers. These three materials were compared with a production DC-cast AZ31B alloy in terms of microstructure, elevated-temperature tensile properties, and superplastic forming response. The data from this study found that microstructural features such as grain size and segregation can significantly affect the forming response. Additionally, the CC alloys can have equivalent or superior SPF response compared to DC-cast alloys, as demonstrated in both elevated temperature tensile tests and superplastic forming trials using a rectangular pan die.

  6. The influence of surface microchemistry in protective film formation on multi-phase magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray-Munro, J. E.; Luan, B.; Huntington, L.

    2008-02-01

    The high strength:weight ratio of magnesium alloys makes them an ideal metal for automotive and aerospace applications where weight reduction is of significant concern. Unfortunately, magnesium alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion particularly in salt-spray conditions. This has limited their use in the automotive and aerospace industries, where exposure to harsh service conditions is unavoidable. The simplest way to avoid corrosion is to coat the magnesium-based substrate by a process such as electroless plating, which is a low-cost, non line of sight process. Magnesium is classified as a difficult to plate metal due to its high reactivity. This means that in the presence of air magnesium very quickly forms a passive oxide layer that must be removed prior to plating. Furthermore, high aluminium content alloys are especially difficult to plate due to the formation of intermetallic species at the grain boundaries, resulting in a non-uniform surface potential across the substrate and thereby further complicating the plating process. The objective of this study is to understand how the magnesium alloy microstructure influences the surface chemistry of the alloy during both pretreatment and immersion copper coating of the substrate. A combination of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning Auger microscopy has been used to study the surface chemistry at the various stages of the coating process. Our results indicate that the surface chemistry of the alloy is different on the aluminum rich β phase of the material compared to the magnesium matrix which leads to preferential deposition of the metal on the aluminum rich phase of the alloy.

  7. Biaxial Deformation of the Magnesium Alloy AZ80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, P.; Azizi-Alizamini, H.; Poole, W. J.; Sinclair, C. W.; Gharghouri, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The multiaxial deformation of magnesium alloys is important for developing reliable, robust models for both the forming of components and also analysis of in-service performance of structures, for example, in the case of crash worthiness. The current study presents a combination of unique biaxial experimental tests and biaxial crystal plasticity simulations using a visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) formulation conducted on a relatively weak AZ80 cast texture. The experiments were conducted on tubular samples which are loaded in axial tension or compression along the tube and with internal pressure to generate hoop stresses orthogonal to the axial direction. The results were analyzed in stress and strain space and also in terms of the evolution of crystallographic texture. In general, it was found that the VPSC simulations matched well with the experiments. However, some differences were observed for cases where basal slip and \\{ {10bar{1}2} \\} extension twinning were in close competition such as in the biaxial tension quadrant of the plastic potential. The evolution of texture measured experimentally and predicted from the VPSC simulations was qualitatively in good agreement. Finally, experiments and VPSC simulations were conducted on a second AZ80 material which had a stronger initial texture and a higher level of mechanical anisotropy. In the previous case, the agreement between experiments and simulations was good, but a larger difference was observed in the biaxial tension quadrant of the plastic potential.

  8. Warm Deep Drawing Of Rectangular Cups With Magnesium Alloy AZ31 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, L. M.; Palumbo, G.; Tricarico, L.; Zhang, S. H.

    2007-05-17

    Recently, magnesium alloys have been widely applied in automotive and electronic industries as the lightest weight structural and functional materials. Warm forming of magnesium alloys has attracted much attention due to the very poor formability of Mg alloys at room temperature. The formability of magnesium alloy sheet at elevated temperature is significantly affected by the processing parameters. Among them the forming temperature, the punch speed, the geometrical shape of the blank, the blank holder force and the lubrication are probably the most relevant. In this research, the deep drawing of rectangular cups with AZ31 sheets was conducted at elevated temperatures with different process parameters. The finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the process parameters on the formability of rectangular cup drawing and to predict the process defects during the process. The material yield condition was modeled using the isotropic Von Mises criterion. The flow stress data were obtained from tensile tests.

  9. Application of YAG Laser TIG Arc Hybrid Welding to Thin AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewon; Kim, Jongcheol; Hasegawa, Yu; Suga, Yasuo

    A magnesium alloy is said to be an ecological material with high ability of recycling and lightweight property. Especially, magnesium alloys are in great demand on account of outstanding material property as a structural material. Under these circumstances, research and development of welding process to join magnesium alloy plates are of great significance for wide industrial application of magnesium. In order to use it as a structure material, the welding technology is very important. TIG arc welding process is the most ordinary process to weld magnesium alloy plates. However, since the heat source by the arc welding process affects the magnesium alloy plates, HAZ of welded joint becomes wide and large distortion often occurs. On the other hand, a laser welding process that has small diameter of heat source seems to be one of the possible means to weld magnesium alloy in view of the qualitative improvement. However, the low boiling point of magnesium generates some weld defects, including porosity and solidification cracking. Furthermore, precise edge preparation is very important in butt-welding by the laser welding process, due to the small laser beam diameter. Laser/arc hybrid welding process that combines the laser beam and the arc is an effective welding process in which these two heat sources influence and assist each other. Using the hybrid welding, a synegistic effect is achievable and the disadvantages of the respective processes can be compensated. In this study, YAG laser/TIG arc hybrid welding of thin magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheets was investigated. First of all, the effect of the irradiation point and the focal position of laser beam on the quality of a weld were discussed in hybrid welding. Then, it was confirmed that a sound weld bead with sufficient penetration is obtained using appropriate welding conditions. Furthermore, it was made clear that the heat absorption efficiency is improved with the hybrid welding process. Finally, the tensile tests

  10. Effect of hot working on the damping capacity and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Kang, C.; Kim, K.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have received much attention for their lightweight and other excellent properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good castability, for use in several industrial and commercial applications. However, both magnesium and its alloys show limited room-temperature formability owing to the limited number of slip systems associated with their hexagonal close-packed crystal structure. It is well known that crystallographic texture plays an important role in both plastic deformation and macroscopic anisotropy of magnesium alloys. Many authors have concentrated on improving the room- temperature formability of Mg alloys. However, despite having a lot of excellent properties in magnesium alloy, the study for various properties of magnesium alloy have not been clarified enough yet. Mg alloys are known to have a good damping capacity compared to other known metals and their alloys. Also, the damping properties of metals are generally recognized to be dependent on microstructural factors such as grain size and texture. However, there are very few studies on the relationship between the damping capacity and texture of Magnesium alloys. Therefore, in this study, specimens of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, were processed by hot working, and their texture and damping property investigated. A 60 mm × 60 mm × 40 mm rectangular plate was cut out by machining an ingot of AZ31 magnesium alloy (Mg-3Al-1Zn in mass%), and rolling was carried out at 673 K to a rolling reduction of 30%. Then, heat treatment was carried out at temperatures in the range of 573-723 K for durations in the range of 30-180 min. The samples were immediately quenched in oil after heat treatment to prevent any change in the microstructure. Texture was evaluated on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel-filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were conducted to observe the spatial distribution of various orientations. Specimens

  11. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid.

  12. Strength and ductility with {10͞11} — {10͞12} double twinning in a magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, M.; Risse, M.; Schaefer, N.; Reimers, W.; Beyerlein, I. J.

    2016-04-01

    Based on their high specific strength and stiffness, magnesium alloys are attractive for lightweight applications in aerospace and transportation, where weight saving is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, the ductility of magnesium alloys is usually limited. It is thought that one reason for the lack of ductility is that the development of -- double twins (DTW) cause premature failure of magnesium alloys. Here we show with a magnesium alloy containing 4 wt% lithium, that the same impressively large compression failure strains can be achieved with DTWs as without. The DTWs form stably across the microstructure and continuously throughout straining, forming three-dimensional intra-granular networks, a potential strengthening mechanism. We rationalize that relatively easier slip characteristic of this alloy plastically relaxed the localized stress concentrations that DTWs can generate. This result may provide key insight and an alternative perspective towards designing formable and strong magnesium alloys.

  13. Effects of Alloying Elements on Microstructure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys for Tripling Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D. H.; Geng, Z. W.; Chen, L.; Wu, Z.; Diao, H. Y.; Song, M.; Zhou, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    In order to find good candidate materials for degradable fracturing ball applications, Mg-Al-Zn-Cu alloys with different contents of aluminum, zinc, and copper were prepared by ingot metallurgy. The effects of aluminum, zinc, and copper additions on the microstructure, compressive strength, and rapid decomposition properties of the alloys have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy, compressive tests, and immersion tests. The results show that the addition of high contents Al (15 to 20 wt pct) in pure magnesium promotes a large number of network-like β-Mg17All2 phases, which helps produce more micro-thermocouples to accelerate the corrosion process in 3 wt pct potassium chloride (KCl) at 366 K (93 °C). Adding different Zn contents improves the compressive properties of Mg-20Al alloys drastically. However, it decreases the decomposition rate in 3 wt pct KCl at 366 K (93 °C). Small amount of Cu will slightly reduce the compressive strength of Mg-20Al-5Zn alloy but dramatically increase its decomposition rate.

  14. An EBSP investigation of alternate microstructures for superplasticity in aluminum-magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McNelley, T.R.; McMahon, M.E.; Hales, S.J.

    1997-02-15

    This study proposes to provide insight into alternative grain boundary structures in two aluminum-magnesium alloys processed to achieve superplastic behavior. A commercially processes superplastic 5083 aluminum alloy, SKY5083, and a laboratory processed, non-commercial superplastic Al-10Mg-0.1Zr alloy have been selected for examination. Although alloy content, processing routes, and deformation conditions vary for each material, a comparison of results may provide evidence that alternate grain structures and boundary misorientation distributions may support superplasticity in the GBS regime, depending on the TMP processing and alloy system chosen.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myeong-Han; Oh, Soo-Ik; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Choi, Yi-Chun

    2007-05-17

    The development of light-weight vehicle is in great demand for enhancement of fuel efficiency and dynamic performance. The vehicle weight can be reduced effectively by using lightweight materials such as magnesium alloys. However, the use of magnesium alloys in sheet forming processes is still limited because of their low formability at room temperature and the lack of understanding of the forming process of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. In this study, uniaxial tensile tests of the magnesium alloy AZ31B-O at various temperatures were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of this alloy relevant for forming of magnesium sheets. To construct a FLD (forming limit diagram), a forming limit test were conducted at temperature of 100 and 200 deg. C. For the evaluation of the effects of the punch temperature on the formability of a rectangular cup drawing with AZ31B-O, numerical modelling was conducted. The experiment results indicate that the stresses and possible strains of AZ31B-O sheets largely depend on the temperature. The stress decreases with temperature increase. Also, the strain increase with temperature increase. The numerical modelling results indicate that formability increases with the decrease in the punch temperature at the constant temperature of the die and holder.

  16. Forming Analysis of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets by Means of a Multistep Inverse Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2009-04-01

    This paper applies a multi-step inverse approach to predict the forming of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. An in-house finite element code named “INAPH”, which implements the inverse approach formulation by Guo et al. (Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng., 30, 1385-1401), has been used for the forming analysis. This inverse approach uses the deformation theory of plasticity and assumes that the deformation is independent of the loading history. Failure during forming is predicted by a stress-based criterion or a forming limit diagram-based criterion. The INAPH predictions have been compared with experimental results of Takuda et al (Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 89-90:135-140) and incremental analysis using ABAQUS. The multi-step inverse analysis has been shown to very quickly and fairly accurately predict stress, plastic strain, thickness distributions and failure locations on deeply drawn parts made of AZ31 magnesium alloy. The capability of INAPH to predict the formability of magnesium alloys has also been demonstrated at various temperatures. As magnesium alloys possess very limited formability at room temperature, and their formability becomes better at higher temperatures (> 100oC), the inverse analysis constitutes an efficient and valuable tool to predict forming of magnesium alloy parts as a function of temperature. In addition, other processing and design parameters such as the initial dimensions, final desired shape, blank holder forces, and friction can be quickly adjusted to assess the forming feasibility.

  17. Characterization and Properties of Micro-arc Composite Ceramic Coatings on Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Jiang, Bailing; Ge, Yanfeng; Nyberg, Eric A.; Liu, Ming

    2013-05-21

    Magnesium alloys are of growing interest for many industrial applications due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio and excellent cast ability. However, one of the limiting factors in the use of magnesium on production vehicles is its poor corrosion resistance. Micro-arc Composite Ceramic (MCC) coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys were prepared in combination with Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) and electrophoresis technologies. The microstructure, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, stone impact resistance, thermal shock resistance and adhesion of MCC coating were studied, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphologies of MAO and MCC coating showed that the outer organic coating filled the holes on the surface of the MAO coating. It acted as a shelter on the MAO coating surface when the MCC coatings were exposed to corrosive environments. The corrosion resistance of the MCC coating was characterized by a copper-accelerated acetic acid salt spray test. The testing results showed that the creep back from scribe lines was less than 1mm and completely fit the evaluation standard. The composite structure of the MCC coating vastly improved the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. According to testing standards, the resistance to abrasion, stone impact resistance, thermal shock resistance and adhesion of MCC coatings completely met the evaluation standard requirements. The MCC coated AZ91D magnesium alloys possessed excellent properties; this is a promising corrosion and wear resistance surface treatment technology on magnesium alloys for production vehicles.

  18. Novel process for recycling magnesium alloy employing refining and solid oxide membrane electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei

    Magnesium is the least dense engineering metal, with an excellent stiffness-to-weight ratio. Magnesium recycling is important for both economic and environmental reasons. This project demonstrates feasibility of a new environmentally friendly process for recycling partially oxidized magnesium scrap to produce very pure magnesium at low cost. It combines refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) based oxide electrolysis in the same reactor. Magnesium and its oxide are dissolved in a molten flux. This is followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium, which is subsequently condensed in a separate condenser. The molten flux acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium collected has high purity. Potentiodynamic scans are performed to monitor the magnesium content change in the scrap as well as in solution in the flux. The SOM electrolysis is employed in the refining system to enable electrolysis of the magnesium oxide dissolved in the flux from the partially oxidized scrap. During the SOM electrolysis, oxygen anions are transported out of the flux through a yttria stabilized zirconia membrane to a liquid silver anode where they are oxidized. Simultaneously, magnesium cations are transported through the flux to a steel cathode where they are reduced. The combination of refining and SOM electrolysis yields close to 100% removal of magnesium metal from partially oxidized magnesium scrap. The magnesium recovered has a purity of 99.6w%. To produce pure oxygen it is critical to develop an inert anode current collector for use with the non-consumable liquid silver anode. In this work, an innovative inert anode current collector is successfully developed and used in SOM electrolysis experiments. The current collector employs a sintered strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO 3-delta or LSM) bar, an Inconel alloy 601 rod, and a liquid silver contact in between. SOM electrolysis experiments

  19. Impression Creep Behavior of a Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    The creep behavior of the cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by impression testing. The tests were carried out under constant punching stress in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to 0.007 ≤ σ imp/ G ≤ 0.044, at temperatures in the range 425 to 570 K. Assuming a power-law relationship between the impression velocity and stress, depending on the testing temperature, stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.0 were obtained. When the experimental creep rates were normalized to the grain size and effective diffusion coefficient, a stress exponent of approximately 5 was obtained, which is in complete agreement with stress exponents determined by the conventional creep testing of the same material reported in the literature. Calculation of the activation energy showed a slight decrease in the activation energy with increasing stress such that the creep-activation energy of 122.9 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.020 decreases to 94.0 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.040. Based on the obtained stress exponents and activation energy data, it is proposed that dislocation climb is the controlling creep mechanism. However, due to the decreasing trend of creep-activation energy with stress, it is suggested that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb are competing. To elucidate the contribution of each mechanism to the overall creep deformation, the creep rates were calculated based on the effective activation energy. This yielded a criterion that showed that, in the high-stress regimes, the experimental activation energies fall in the range in which the operative creep mechanism is dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion. In the low-stress regime, however, the lattice-diffusion dislocation climb is dominant.

  20. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Laipple, Daniel; Luthringer, Bérengère; Feyerabend, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys) is studied for up to 14 days. Several parameters such as composition of the degradation interface (directly beneath the cells) are analysed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray and focused ion beam. Furthermore, influence of the materials on cell metabolism is examined via different parameters like active mineralisation process. The results are highlighting the influences of the selected alloying element on the initial cells metabolic activity. PMID:27327435

  1. Numerical analysis of self-pierce riveting of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S. L.; Wu, Y. W.; Zeng, Q. L.; Gao, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Magnesium alloy sheet has a broad development prospect for lightweight metal in automotive industry. Selfpierce Riveting (SPR) process is a suitable joining technology to fasten materials of different nature. This paper is concerned with the development of numerical models of the SPR process of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet. Based on DEFORM-2D finite element software, a two-dimensional axisymmetric model has been built for the SPR process. Then the distribution of stress and strain, and the stroke-load curve are analyzed in the forming process of the riveting. After a 2D simulation of SPR process, the quality of riveted joint is evaluated in terms of joint cross-sectional shape. The results show a better understanding of mechanical properties of SPR joints of magnesium alloy sheets. As a sufficient interlock and bottom thickness leading to a reasonably good joint, the numerical simulation method plays a significant role to predict the final strength of the joint.

  2. Corrosion resistance of a composite polymeric coating applied on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zomorodian, A; Garcia, M P; Moura e Silva, T; Fernandes, J C S; Fernandes, M H; Montemor, M F

    2013-11-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium alloys is the main drawback to their widespread use, especially in biomedical applications. There is a need for developing new coatings that provide simultaneously corrosion resistance and enhanced biocompatibility. In this work, a composite coating containing polyether imide, with several diethylene triamine and hydroxyapatite contents, was applied on AZ31 magnesium alloys pre-treated with hydrofluoric acid by dip coating. The coated samples were immersed in Hank's solution and the coating performance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the behavior of MG63 osteoblastic cells on coated samples was investigated. The results confirmed that the new coatings not only slow down the corrosion rate of AZ31 magnesium alloys in Hank's solution, but also enhance the adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteoblastic cells, especially when hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were introduced in the coating formulation. PMID:23454214

  3. Corrosion Behavior of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy in Three Different Physiological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Juncen; Li, Qing; Zhang, Haixiao; Chen, Funan

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been considered as promising biomedical materials and were studied in different physiological environments. In this work, corrosion behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva, simulated body fluid (SBF), and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated using electrochemical techniques and a short-term immersion test. In contrast with other physiological environments, the amount of aggressive ions in artificial saliva is small. In addition, a protective film is formed on the surface of samples in artificial saliva. Experimental results suggest that corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva is better than that in c-SBF and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  4. Design of experiment (DOE) study of biodegradable magnesium alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying using fractional factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Emee Marina; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2014-06-01

    The biodegradable nature of magnesium (Mg) makes it a most highlighted and attractive to be used as implant materials. However, rapid corrosion rate of Mg alloys especially in electrolytic aqueous environment limits its performance. In this study, Mg alloy was mechanically milled by incorporating manganese (Mn) as alloying element. An attempt was made to study both effect of mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation processes on the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. 2k-2 factorial design was employed to determine the significant factors in producing Mg alloy which has properties closes to that of human bones. The design considered six factors (i.e. milling time, milling speed, weight percentage of Mn, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and sintering time). Density and hardness were chosen as the responses for assessing the most significant parameters that affected the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. The experimental variables were evaluated using ANOVA and regression model. The main parameter investigated was compaction pressure.

  5. Thermodynamic criteria for the removal of impurities from end-of-life magnesium alloys by evaporation and flux treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Takehito; Takeda, Osamu; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the possibility of removing impurities during magnesium recycling with pyrometallurgical techniques has been evaluated by using a thermodynamic analysis. For 25 different elements that are likely to be contained in industrial magnesium alloys, the equilibrium distribution ratios between the metal, slag and gas phases in the magnesium remelting process were calculated assuming binary systems of magnesium and an impurity element. It was found that calcium, gadolinium, lithium, ytterbium and yttrium can be removed from the remelted end-of-life (EoL) magnesium products by oxidization. Calcium, cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, lithium, plutonium, sodium, strontium and yttrium can be removed by chlorination with a salt flux. However, the other elements contained in magnesium alloy scrap are scarcely removed and this may contribute toward future contamination problems. The third technological option for the recycling of EoL magnesium products is magnesium recovery by a distillation process. Based on thermodynamic considerations, it is predicted that high-purity magnesium can be recovered through distillation because of its high vapor pressure, yet there is a limit on recoverability that depends on the equilibrium vapor pressure of the alloying elements and the large energy consumption. Therefore, the sustainable recycling of EoL magnesium products should be an important consideration in the design of advanced magnesium alloys or the development of new refining processes.

  6. Microstructure and wear resistance of Al-SiC composites coatings on ZE41 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, P.; Campo, M.; Torres, B.; Escalera, M. D.; Otero, E.; Rams, J.

    2009-08-01

    Al and Al-SiC composites coatings were prepared by oxyacetylene flame spraying on ZE41 magnesium alloy substrates. Coatings with controlled reinforcement rate of up to 23 vol.% were obtained by spraying mixtures containing aluminium powder with up to 50 vol.% SiC particles. The coatings were sprayed on the magnesium alloy with minor degradation of its microstructure or mechanical properties. The coatings were compacted to improve their microstructure and protective behaviour. The wear behaviour of these coatings has been tested using the pin-on-disk technique and the reinforced coatings provided 85% more wear resistance than uncoated ZE41 and 400% more than pure Al coatings.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Die-Cast Magnesium Alloy MRI 230D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, Eli; Moscovitch, Nir; Arnon, Amir

    2009-10-01

    MRI 230D was specially developed to overcome the high-temperature limitations of conventionally die-cast magnesium alloys. This innovative alloy was primarily developed for the automotive industry, mainly for power-train applications operating under high-temperature conditions. The present article aims at evaluating the die-casting characteristics of MRI 230D in comparison with conventional AZ91D Mg alloy. These characteristics are used to evaluate the applicability of this alloy for die-casting operations which are essential for mass production.

  8. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect

    Bichler, L.; Ravindran, C.

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  9. Influence of Cobalt on the Properties of Load-Sensitive Magnesium Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Mroz, Gregor; Reimche, Wilfried; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Kerber, Kai

    2013-01-01

    In this study, magnesium is alloyed with varying amounts of the ferromagnetic alloying element cobalt in order to obtain lightweight load-sensitive materials with sensory properties which allow an online-monitoring of mechanical forces applied to components made from Mg-Co alloys. An optimized casting process with the use of extruded Mg-Co powder rods is utilized which enables the production of magnetic magnesium alloys with a reproducible Co concentration. The efficiency of the casting process is confirmed by SEM analyses. Microstructures and Co-rich precipitations of various Mg-Co alloys are investigated by means of EDS and XRD analyses. The Mg-Co alloys' mechanical strengths are determined by tensile tests. Magnetic properties of the Mg-Co sensor alloys depending on the cobalt content and the acting mechanical load are measured utilizing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. Within the scope of this work, the influence of the element cobalt on magnesium is investigated in detail and an optimal cobalt concentration is defined based on the performed examinations. PMID:23344376

  10. Influence of cobalt on the properties of load-sensitive magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Mroz, Gregor; Reimche, Wilfried; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Kerber, Kai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, magnesium is alloyed with varying amounts of the ferromagnetic alloying element cobalt in order to obtain lightweight load-sensitive materials with sensory properties which allow an online-monitoring of mechanical forces applied to components made from Mg-Co alloys. An optimized casting process with the use of extruded Mg-Co powder rods is utilized which enables the production of magnetic magnesium alloys with a reproducible Co concentration. The efficiency of the casting process is confirmed by SEM analyses. Microstructures and Co-rich precipitations of various Mg-Co alloys are investigated by means of EDS and XRD analyses. The Mg-Co alloys' mechanical strengths are determined by tensile tests. Magnetic properties of the Mg-Co sensor alloys depending on the cobalt content and the acting mechanical load are measured utilizing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. Within the scope of this work, the influence of the element cobalt on magnesium is investigated in detail and an optimal cobalt concentration is defined based on the performed examinations. PMID:23344376

  11. Thermodynamic properties of calcium-magnesium alloys determined by emf measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Newhouse, JM; Poizeau, S; Kim, H; Spatocco, BL; Sadoway, DR

    2013-02-28

    The thermodynamic properties of calcium-magnesium alloys were determined by electromotive force (emf) measurements using a Ca(in Bi)vertical bar CaF2 vertical bar Ca(in Mg) cell over the temperature range 713-1048 K. The activity and partial molar Gibbs free energy of calcium in magnesium were calculated for nine Ca-Mg alloys, calcium mole fractions varying from x(ca) = 0.01 to 0.80. Thermodynamic properties of magnesium in calcium and the molar Gibbs free energy of mixing were estimated using the Gibbs-Duhem relationship. In the all-liquid region at 1010 K, the activity of calcium in magnesium was found to range between 8.8 x 10(-4) and 0.94 versus pure calcium. The molecular interaction volume model (MIVM) was used to model the activity coefficient of Ca and Mg in Ca-Mg liquid alloys. Based on this work, Ca-Mg alloys show promise as the negative electrode of a liquid metal battery in which calcium is the itinerant species: alloying with Mg results in both a decrease in operating temperature and suppression of Ca metal solubility in the molten salt electrolyte. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent advances on the development of magnesium alloys for biodegradable implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Zhigang; Smith, Christopher; Sankar, Jag

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made on the development of biodegradable magnesium alloys as "smart" implants in cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. Mg-based alloys as biodegradable implants have outstanding advantages over Fe-based and Zn-based ones. However, the extensive applications of Mg-based alloys are still inhibited mainly by their high degradation rates and consequent loss in mechanical integrity. Consequently, extensive studies have been conducted to develop Mg-based alloys with superior mechanical and corrosion performance. This review focuses on the following topics: (i) the design criteria of biodegradable materials; (ii) alloy development strategy; (iii) in vitro performances of currently developed Mg-based alloys; and (iv) in vivo performances of currently developed Mg-based implants, especially Mg-based alloys under clinical trials. PMID:25034646

  13. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed. PMID:18449935

  14. Study on the blood compatibility and biodegradation properties of magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Akira; Kaneda, Hideki

    2015-02-01

    Lately, several magnesium alloys have been investigated as a new class of biomaterials owing to their excellent biodegradability in living tissues. In this study, we considered AZ series of Mg alloy containing aluminum (3% to 9%) and zinc (1%) as a model magnesium alloy, and investigated their biodegradation in whole blood and blood compatibility in vitro. The results of the elution property of metal ions determined using chromogenic assay and the associated pH change show that the degradation resistance of the AZ series alloys in blood is improved by alloying aluminum. Furthermore, the blood compatibility of the alloys was investigated in terms of their hemolysis, factor Xa-like activity, using spectrophotometry and chromogenic assay, respectively, and coagulation time measurements (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time). The results indicated that the blood compatibility of the AZ series alloys is excellent, irrespective of the alloy composition. The excellent blood compatibility with the coagulation system could be attributed to the eluted Mg(2+) ion, which suppresses the activation of certain coagulation factors in the intrinsic and/or extrinsic coagulation pathways. In terms of the degradation resistance of the AZ series alloys in blood, the results of pH change in blood and the amount of the eluted metal ions indicate that the performance is markedly improved with an increase in aluminum content. PMID:25492190

  15. Influence of aggressive ions on the degradation behavior of biomedical magnesium alloy in physiological environment.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Huo, Kaifu; Tao, Hu; Tang, Guoyi; Chu, Paul K

    2008-11-01

    Various electrochemical approaches, including potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), are employed to investigate the degradation behavior of biomedical magnesium alloy under the influence of aggressive ions, such as chloride, phosphate, carbonate and sulfate, in a physiological environment. The synergetic effects and mutual influence of these ions on the degradation behavior of Mg are revealed. Our results demonstrate that chloride ions can induce porous pitting corrosion. In the presence of phosphates, the corrosion rate decreases and the formation of pitting corrosion is significantly delayed due to precipitation of magnesium phosphate. Hydrogen carbonate ions are observed to stimulate the corrosion of magnesium alloy during the early immersion stage but they can also induce rapid passivation on the surface. This surface passivation behavior mainly results from the fast precipitation of magnesium carbonate in the corrosion product layer that can subsequently inhibit pitting corrosion completely. Sulfate ions are also found to stimulate magnesium dissolution. These results improve our understanding on the degradation mechanism of surgical magnesium in the physiological environment. PMID:18571486

  16. Direct writing of polymeric coatings on magnesium alloy for tracheal stent applications.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jessica; Xu, Zhigang; Smith, Christopher; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N; Waterman, Jenora; Conklin, Dawn; Desai, Salil

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the direct-write inkjet method for depositing multi-layer coatings of biodegradable polymers on magnesium alloy surface. Immersion studies were conducted on Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ester urethane urea (PEUU) coatings to determine the corrosion behavior of different samples based on their varying degradation properties. Using the inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, a reduction in magnesium ion concentration was observed from the polymer-coated samples indicative of the lower corrosion rates as compared to the uncoated Mg substrate. Findings also showed correlation between the release of the magnesium ions and the health of fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells via evaluation of key biomarkers of inflammation and toxicity, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), respectively. The induction of COX-2 gene expression was proportional to the increase in magnesium exposure. In addition, the release of higher magnesium content from uncoated and PCL polymer coated samples resulted in lower LDH activity based on the favorable response of the NHBE cells. PEUU and PLGA polymer coatings provided good barrier layer corrosion protection. This research evaluates candidate polymer coatings as a source for therapeutic agents and barrier layer to control the corrosion of magnesium alloys for tracheal applications. PMID:25348845

  17. Fast neutron activation analysis of oxide inclusions in magnesium alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, C. D.; James, W. D.

    1999-06-01

    Magnesium will have an increasingly important role to play in the automotive industry's materials strategy. In addition to its obvious use as a lightweight alternative, magnesium offers advantages in areas such as component integration and NVH (noise, vibration and harshness). Although the metallic composition of magnesium alloys has been carefully defined, there is no uniform industry standard for non-metallic inclusions, such as oxides, which are believed to adversely impact the material's strength. A definitive test has been needed, preferably one that provides a highly sensitive, calibrated, nondestructive evaluation of the metal's bulk oxide content. In response to this need, fast neutron activation analysis (FNAA) has emerged as an important tool for providing highly accurate quantitative information on the oxygen content in magnesium alloys. Oxygen levels from less than 50 to several thousand ppm have been observed in these alloys, with the highest levels concentrated at the top center of the ingot. Several operational procedures have been developed to optimize the analysis, including: a new automated, blank-free procedure which pneumatically transports machined magnesium cylinders between the irradiation and counting facilities; the use of an oxygen standard prepared from polyethylene and titanium dioxide, machined to match the sample dimensions; and implementation of new background subtraction software.

  18. An in vitro study on the biocompatibility of WE magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shuping; Wang, Yi; Tian, Jie; Lei, Daoxi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys are being actively studied for intravascular stent applications because of their good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. To rule out the high allergenicity of nickel and neurotoxicity of aluminum element, four kinds of WE magnesium alloys (where "W" represents the metallic element Y and "E" represents mixed rare earth (RE) elements; Y: 2.5, 5.0, 6.5, and 7.5 wt %; Nd: 1.0, 2.6, 2.5, and 4.2 wt %; Zr: 0.8 wt %) were chosen for in vitro investigation of their biocompatibility using cell culture. The results showed that, with the increase of rare earth elements in WE magnesium alloys, fibrinogen adsorption decreased and coagulation function was improved. It was also found that WE magnesium alloys promoted the adhesion of endothelial cells. With the increase of adhesion time, adhered cell numbers increased gradually. With 25% extracts, all the WE alloys promoted cell migration, while 100% extracts were not conducive to cell migration. Based on the above results, WE magnesium alloys 5.0WE (5.0Y-2.6Nd-0.8Zr) and 6.5WE (6.5Y-2.5Nd-0.8Zr) have better biocompatibility as compared with that with 2.5WE (2.5Y-1.0Nd-0.8Zr) and 7.5WE (7.5Y-4.2Nd-0.8Zr), and could be as the promising candidate materials for medical stent applications. PMID:25939488

  19. Rapid coating of AZ31 magnesium alloy with calcium deficient hydroxyapatite using microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yufu; Zhou, Huan; Nabiyouni, Maryam; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-04-01

    Due to their unique biodegradability, magnesium alloys have been recognized as suitable metallic implant materials for degradable bone implants and bioresorbable cardiovascular stents. However, the extremely high degradation rate of magnesium alloys in physiological environment has restricted its practical application. This paper reports the use of a novel microwave assisted coating technology to improve the in vitro corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Mg alloy AZ31. Results indicate that a dense calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) layer was uniformly coated on a AZ31 substrate in less than 10min. Weight loss measurement and SEM were used to evaluate corrosion behaviors in vitro of coated samples and of non-coated samples. It was seen that CDHA coatings remarkably reduced the mass loss of AZ31 alloy after 7days of immersion in SBF. In addition, the prompt precipitation of bone-like apatite layer on the sample surface during immersion demonstrated a good bioactivity of the CDHA coatings. Proliferation of osteoblast cells was promoted in 5days of incubation, which indicated that the CDHA coatings could improve the cytocompatibility of the AZ31 alloy. All the results suggest that the CDHA coatings, serving as a protective layer, can enhance the corrosion resistance and biological response of magnesium alloys. Furthermore, this microwave assisted coating technology could be a promising method for rapid surface modification of biomedical materials. PMID:25686961

  20. The twin-roll casting of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. S.; Park, W.-J.; Kim, C. H.; You, B. S.; Kim, Nack J.

    2009-08-01

    Recently, technologies for twin-roll casting have been widely developed to efficiently fabricate the lightweight Mg alloy sheets that are quite attractive for numerous weight-sensitive applications. This paper reviews the recent progress in the twin-roll casting of Mg alloys, focusing on the processing aspects that have close relations to the solidification behavior of Mg alloy strips. In addition, recent attempts to develop new Mg alloys utilizing the metallurgical advantages attainable by this novel casting process are also presented.

  1. Laser beam welding of AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-09-29

    The laser beam weldability of AZ31B magnesium alloy was examined with high power CW CO{sub 2} and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The low viscosity and surface tension of the melt pool make magnesium more difficult to weld than steel. Welding parameters necessary to obtain good welds were determined for both CW CO{sub 2} and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The weldability of the magnesium alloy was significantly better with the Nd:YAG laser. The cause of this improvement was attributed to the higher absorption of the Nd:YAG beam. A lower threshold beam irradiance was required for welding, and a more stable weldpool was obtained.

  2. Formation of Ha-Containing Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Micro-Arc Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Li, Deyu; Chen, Xiuping; Wu, Chao; Wang, Fuping

    2013-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are potential biodegradable implant materials due to their attractive biological properties. But the use of magnesium is still hampered by its poor corrosion resistance in physiological fluids. In this study, a HA-containing coating was fabricated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The active plasma species of micro-discharge was studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The microstructure and composition were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion behavior and apatite-forming ability were studied by electrochemical tests and immersed samples in simulated body fluids (SBF). The results show that the microdischarge channel model is gas discharges and oxide layer discharges. The elements from the substrate and electrolyte take part in the formation of the coating. The MAO coating significantly improves the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy and enhances the apatite formation ability.

  3. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  4. Forming Prediction of Magnesium Alloy Sheets using a Continuum Damage Mechanics Multistep Inverse Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2008-06-30

    This paper applies multistep inverse approach using a new method to generate the intermediate configurations to analyze the press forming of magnesium alloys. The developed approach considers a final configuration to be formed from a flat blank sheet. It accounts for a series of intermediate configurations that are estimated based on the initial and final configurations as well as tooling conditions using optimization techniques. The approach is based on the concept of minimization of the surface area of the sheet metal subject to the constraints that the punch and die surfaces are not penetrated. Due to the limited formability of magnesium alloys, it is important to realistically estimate the intermediate configurations so that a damage mechanics approach can be explored to predict damage accumulations that can cause rupture of the sheet during forming. Elastic-plastic constitutive laws are used with the modified Hill’s criterion and deformation theory of plasticity to describe the behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys. Damage is captured by a damage variable that governs the equivalent stress. A damage-plasticity coupled approach is employed for the integration of the constitutive equations. The computed strain increment from two consecutive intermediate configurations is used to predict the resulting damage accumulations during forming. The continuum damage mechanics multistep inverse approach is applied to predict forming of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

  5. Applications of Computer Simulation Methods in Plastic Forming Technologies for Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. H.; Zheng, W. T.; Shang, Y. L.; Wu, X.; Palumbo, G.; Tricarico, L.

    2007-05-17

    Applications of computer simulation methods in plastic forming of magnesium alloy parts are discussed. As magnesium alloys possess very poor plastic formability at room temperature, various methods have been tried to improve the formability, for example, suitable rolling process and annealing procedures should be found to produce qualified magnesium alloy sheets, which have the reduced anisotropy and improved formability. The blank can be heated to a warm temperature or a hot temperature; a suitable temperature field is designed, tools should be heated or the punch should be cooled; suitable deformation speed should be found to ensure suitable strain rate range. Damage theory considering non-isothermal forming is established. Various modeling methods have been tried to consider above situations. The following situations for modeling the forming process of magnesium alloy sheets and tubes are dealt with: (1) modeling for predicting wrinkling and anisotropy of sheet warm forming; (2) damage theory used for predicting ruptures in sheet warm forming; (3) modeling for optimizing of blank shape and dimensions for sheet warm forming; (4) modeling in non-steady-state creep in hot metal gas forming of AZ31 tubes.

  6. Structure-property relations and modeling of small crack fatigue behavior of various magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jairus Daniel

    Lightweight structural components are important to the automotive and aerospace industries so that better fuel economy can be realized. Magnesium alloys in particular are being examined to fulfill this need due to their attractive stiffness- and strength-to-weight ratios when compared to other materials. However, when introducing a material into new roles, one needs to properly characterize its mechanical properties. Fatigue behavior is especially important considering aerospace and automotive component applications. Therefore, quantifying the structure-property relationships and accurately predicting the fatigue behavior for these materials are vital. This study has two purposes. The first is to quantify the structure-property relationships for the fatigue behavior in an AM30 magnesium alloy. The second is to use the microstructural-based MultiStage Fatigue (MSF) model in order to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of three magnesium alloys: AM30, Elektron 21, and AZ61. While some studies have previously quantified the MSF material constants for several magnesium alloys, detailed research into the fatigue regimes, notably the microstructurally small crack (MSC) region, is lacking. Hence, the contribution of this work is the first of its kind to experimentally quantify the fatigue crack incubation and MSC regimes that are used for the MultiStage Fatigue model. Using a multi-faceted experimental approach, these regimes were explored with a replica method that used a dual-stage silicone based compound along with previously published in situ fatigue tests. These observations were used in calibrating the MultiStage Fatigue model.

  7. Mechanical and corrosion properties of Al/Ti film on magnesium alloy AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Jiang, Ke; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Han, En-Hou

    2015-03-01

    Preparation of titanium film on magnesium substrate faces a challenge due to non-Fickian inter-diffusion between titanium and magnesium. Aluminum can build a bridge between titanium and magnesium. Al/Ti duplex coatings were deposited on magnesium alloy AZ31B using magnetron sputtering (MS). The low temperature diffusion bonding behavior of the Mg/Al/Ti coating was investigated through SEM and its affiliated EDS. The phase structure and critical load of the coatings were examined by means of XRD and scratch tests, respectively. The results demonstrated that the bonding strength was significantly improved after a post heat treatment (HT) at a temperature of 210°C. The diffusion mechanism of the interfaces of Mg/Al and Al/Ti in the coating was discussed based on the analysis of formation energy of vacancies and diffusion rates. The Al/Ti dual layer enhanced the corrosion resistance of the alloy. And the HT process further increased the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy. This result implies that a post HTat a lower temperature after MS is an effective approach to enhance the bonding strength and corrosion resistance of the Al/Ti film on Mg alloys.

  8. A brief review of calcium phosphate conversion coating on magnesium and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaludin, Mohd Amin Farhan; Jamal, Zul Azhar Zahid; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Derman, Mohd Nazree

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments have shown that magnesium is a promising candidate to be used as a biomaterial. Owing to its light weight, biocompatibility and compressive strength comparable with natural bones makes magnesium as an excellent choice for biomaterial. However, high reactivity and low corrosion resistance properties have restricted the application of magnesium as biomaterials. At the moment, several strategies have been developed to solve this problem. Surface modification of magnesium is one of the popular solutions to solve the problem. Among many techniques developed in the surface modification, conversion coating method is one of the simple and effective techniques. From various types of conversion coating, calcium phosphate-based conversion coating is the most suitable for biomedical fields. This paper reviews some studies on calcium phosphate coating on Mg and its alloys via chemical conversion method and discusses some factors determining the coating performance.

  9. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors and Anti-Projectile Capabilities of Extruded Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yafu; Zhao, Baorong

    Dynamic mechanical behaviors of Mg-Gd-Y series extruded magnesium alloy and its σ-ɛcurves are measured by using of Hopkinson pressure bar technique. According to the concept of efficiency of absorption energy, this thesis compares Mg-Gd-Y series extruded alloy with ZK60 extruded magnesium alloy. Being obtained similitude numbers by means of normalizing processing for governing equations of the continuum mechanics and according to the viewpoint of equal density of area, the comparative experiment of anti-projectile capabilities is elaborately designed between Mg-Gd-Y alloy and the 7A52 aluminum alloy. The result has validated that anti-projectile capability of Mg-Gd-Y alloy is better than those of 7A52 alloy under the condition of equal density of area. The relative technique approaches for improving anti-projectile capability of Mg-Gd-Y alloy are put forward making use of similitude numbers. Finally, the basic characters of effect of adiabatic shear are revealed by micro analysis.

  10. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  11. Cytocompatibility evaluation of different biodegradable magnesium alloys with human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Niederlaender, J; Walter, M; Krajewski, S; Schweizer, E; Post, M; Schille, Ch; Geis-Gerstorfer, J; Wendel, Hans Peter

    2014-03-01

    In the last few years, the use of biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys has evoked great interest in the orthopedic field due to great advantages over long-term implant materials associated with various side effects like allergy and sensitization and consequent implant removal surgeries. However, degradation of these Mg alloys results in ion release, which may cause severe cytotoxicity and undesirable complications after implantation. In this study, we investigated the cytological effects of various Mg alloys on cells that play an important role in bone repair. Eight different magnesium alloys containing varying amounts of Al, Zn, Nd and Y were either incubated directly or indirectly with the osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 or with uninduced and osteogenically-induced human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow specimens obtained from the femoral shaft of patients undergoing total hip replacement. Cell viability, cell attachment and the release of ions were investigated at different time points in vitro. During direct or indirect incubation different cytotoxic effects of the Mg alloys on Saos-2 cells and osteogenically-induced or uninduced MSCs were observed. Furthermore, the concentration of degradation products released from the Mg alloys differed. Overall, Mg alloys MgNd2, MgY4, MgAl9Zn1 and MgY4Nd2 exhibit good cytocompatibility. In conclusion, this study reveals the necessity of cytocompatibility evaluation of new biodegradable magnesium alloys with cells that will get in direct contact to the implant material. Furthermore, the use of standardized experimental in vitro assays is necessary in order to reliably and effectively characterize new Mg alloys before performing in vivo experiments. PMID:24327112

  12. Biomimetic hydrophobic surface fabricated by chemical etching method from hierarchically structured magnesium alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jijia; Wang, Yaming; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2013-09-01

    As one of the lightest metal materials, magnesium alloy plays an important role in industry such as automobile, airplane and electronic product. However, magnesium alloy is hindered due to its high chemical activity and easily corroded. Here, inspired by typical plant surfaces such as lotus leaves and petals of red rose with super-hydrophobic character, the new hydrophobic surface is fabricated on magnesium alloy to improve anti-corrosion by two-step methodology. The procedure is that the samples are processed by laser first and then immersed and etched in the aqueous AgNO3 solution concentrations of 0.1 mol/L, 0.3 mol/L and 0.5 mol/L for different times of 15 s, 40 s and 60 s, respectively, finally modified by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). The microstructure, chemical composition, wettability and anti-corrosion are characterized by means of SEM, XPS, water contact angle measurement and electrochemical method. The hydrophobic surfaces with microscale crater-like and nanoscale flower-like binary structure are obtained. The low-energy material is contained in surface after DTS treatment. The contact angles could reach up to 138.4 ± 2°, which hydrophobic property is both related to the micro-nano binary structure and chemical composition. The results of electrochemical measurements show that anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy is improved. Furthermore, our research is expected to create some ideas from natural enlightenment to improve anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy while this method can be easily extended to other metal materials.

  13. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-07-15

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B{sub 2} intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  14. Opportunities and challenges for the biodegradable magnesium alloys as next-generation biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, biodegradable magnesium alloys emerge as a new class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical devices. Deploying biodegradable magnesium-based materials not only avoids a second surgical intervention for implant removal but also circumvents the long-term foreign body effect of permanent implants. However, these materials are often subjected to an uncontrolled and fast degradation, acute toxic responses and rapid structural failure presumably due to a localized, too rapid corrosion process. The patented Mg–Nd–Zn–based alloys (JiaoDa BioMg [JDBM]) have been developed in Shanghai Jiao Tong University in recent years. The alloy series exhibit lower biodegradation rate and homogeneous nanophasic degradation patterns as compared with other biodegradable Mg alloys. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests using various types of cells indicate excellent biocompatibility of JDBM. Finally, bone implants using JDBM-1 alloy and cardiovascular stents using JDBM-2 alloy have been successfully fabricated and in vivo long-term assessment via implantation in animal model have been performed. The results confirmed the reduced degradation rate in vivo, excellent tissue compatibility and long-term structural and mechanical durability. Thus, this novel Mg-alloy series with highly uniform nanophasic biodegradation represent a major breakthrough in the field and a promising candidate for manufacturing the next generation biodegradable implants. PMID:27047673

  15. Opportunities and challenges for the biodegradable magnesium alloys as next-generation biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, biodegradable magnesium alloys emerge as a new class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical devices. Deploying biodegradable magnesium-based materials not only avoids a second surgical intervention for implant removal but also circumvents the long-term foreign body effect of permanent implants. However, these materials are often subjected to an uncontrolled and fast degradation, acute toxic responses and rapid structural failure presumably due to a localized, too rapid corrosion process. The patented Mg-Nd-Zn-based alloys (JiaoDa BioMg [JDBM]) have been developed in Shanghai Jiao Tong University in recent years. The alloy series exhibit lower biodegradation rate and homogeneous nanophasic degradation patterns as compared with other biodegradable Mg alloys. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests using various types of cells indicate excellent biocompatibility of JDBM. Finally, bone implants using JDBM-1 alloy and cardiovascular stents using JDBM-2 alloy have been successfully fabricated and in vivo long-term assessment via implantation in animal model have been performed. The results confirmed the reduced degradation rate in vivo, excellent tissue compatibility and long-term structural and mechanical durability. Thus, this novel Mg-alloy series with highly uniform nanophasic biodegradation represent a major breakthrough in the field and a promising candidate for manufacturing the next generation biodegradable implants. PMID:27047673

  16. The effect of the existing state of Y on high temperature oxidation properties of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Shen, Shijun; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Zhongtao; Yang, Hong; Pan, Fusheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the effect of the existing state of Y element on the high temperature oxidation resistance of magnesium alloys. Different levels of Al element were added into Mg-2.5Y alloy to obtain different existing state of Y. The oxidation rate of Mg-2.5Y-2.5Al alloy is the highest among Mg-2.5Y, Mg-2.5Y-2.5Al and Mg-2.5Y-4.2Al alloys at 500 °C. An effective and protective Y2O3/MgO composite oxide film was formed on the surface of Mg-2.5Y alloy after oxidized at 500 °C for 360 min. The results show that the dissolved Y element in the matrix was beneficial to improve the oxidation resistance of magnesium alloys. Once Y element transformed to the high temperature stable Al2Y compound, its ability in preventing oxidation would disappear. The formation of Al2Y compound severely deteriorated the oxidation resistance of Mg-2.5Y alloy. In addition, the dissolved Al can also cause the rise of oxidation resistance at a certain extent.

  17. Corrosion inhibition of rapidly solidified Mg-3% Zn-15% Al magnesium alloy with sodium carboxylates

    SciTech Connect

    Daloz, D.; Michot, G.; Rapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.

    1998-06-01

    The ability of sodium linear-saturated carboxylates to protect magnesium alloys against aqueous corrosion was characterized. Electrochemical measurements of polarization resistance and corrosion current showed the inhibition efficiency of these compounds is a function of their concentration and of the length of the aliphatic chain. In every case studied, the efficiency increased with immersion time. At pH 8, the best inhibiting behavior was observed with 0.05 M sodium undecanoate. The potential-pH diagram of magnesium in an aqueous solution containing undecanoate anions was generated based upon the solubility determined for magnesium undecanoate (Mg[CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 9}COO]{sub 2}). According to this diagram, the very low corrosion rate was suspected to result from formation of Mg(CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 9}COO){sub 2}. Infrared spectrometry carried out on both the synthesized magnesium carboxylate and the product from the magnesium alloy surface after inhibitive treatment confirmed this hypothesis.

  18. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-08-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  19. New insights into the fundamental chemical nature of ionic liquid film formation on magnesium alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Maria; Neil, Wayne C; Howlett, Patrick C; Macfarlane, Douglas R; Hinton, Bruce R W; Rocher, Nathalie; Kemp, Thomas F; Smith, Mark E

    2009-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) based on trihexyltetradecylphosphonium coupled with either diphenylphosphate or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide have been shown to react with magnesium alloy surfaces, leading to the formation a surface film that can improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The morphology and microstructure of the magnesium surface seems critical in determining the nature of the interphase, with grain boundary phases and intermetallics within the grain, rich in zirconium and zinc, showing almost no interaction with the IL and thereby resulting in a heterogeneous surface film. This has been explained, on the basis of solid-state NMR evidence, as being due to the extremely low reactivity of the native oxide films on the intermetallics (ZrO2 and ZnO) with the IL as compared with the magnesium-rich matrix where a magnesium hydroxide and/or carbonate inorganic surface is likely. Solid-state NMR characterization of the ZE41 alloy surface treated with the IL based on (Tf)2N(-) indicates that this anion reacts to form a metal fluoride rich surface in addition to an organic component. The diphenylphosphate anion also seems to undergo an additional chemical process on the metal surface, indicating that film formation on the metal is not a simple chemical interaction between the components of the IL and the substrate but may involve electrochemical processes. PMID:20355890

  20. Plastic Deformation Characteristics Of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets At Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jingee; Lee, Jongshin; You, Bongsun; Choi, Seogou; Kim, Youngsuk

    2007-05-01

    Using lightweight materials is the emerging need in order to reduce the vehicle's energy consumption and pollutant emissions. Being a lightweight material, magnesium alloys are increasingly employed in the fabrication of automotive and electronic parts. Presently, magnesium alloys used in automotive and electronic parts are mainly processed by die casting. The die casting technology allows the manufacturing of parts with complex geometry. However, the mechanical properties of these parts often do not meet the requirements concerning the mechanical properties (e.g. endurance strength and ductility). A promising alternative can be forming process. The parts manufactured by forming could have fine-grained structure without porosity and improved mechanical properties such as endurance strength and ductility. Because magnesium alloy has low formability resulted form its small slip system at room temperature it is usually formed at elevated temperature. Due to a rapid increase of usage of magnesium sheets in automotive and electronic industry it is necessary to assure database for sheet metal formability and plastic yielding properties in order to optimize its usage. Especially, plastic yielding criterion is a critical property to predict plastic deformation of sheet metal parts in optimizing process using CAE simulation. Von-Mises yield criterion generally well predicts plastic deformation of steel sheets and Hill'1979 yield criterion predicts plastic deformation of aluminum sheets. In this study, using biaxial tensile test machine yield loci of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet were obtained at elevated temperature. The yield loci ensured experimentally were compared with the theoretical predictions based on the Von-Mises, Hill, Logan-Hosford, and Barlat model.

  1. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  2. Eddy Current Defectoscope for Monitoring the Duralumin and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S.; Dmitrieva, L.; Malikov, V.; Sagalakov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The system developed is based on an eddy-current transducer of the transformer type, and is capable of inspecting plates made of duralumin and aluminum-magnesium alloys for defects. The measurement system supports absolute and differential control modes. The system was tested on a number of duralumin and aluminum-magnesium plates with internal flaws located as deep as 5 mm under the surface. The article provides data that demonstrates a link between the response time and the presence of defects in similar structures at a signal frequency of 1000 Hz.

  3. Finite Element Simulation Of Magnesium AZ31 Alloy Sheet In Warm Hydroforming

    SciTech Connect

    Steffensen, Mikkel; Danckert, Joachim

    2007-05-17

    Hydroforming of magnesium (Mg) alloy sheet metal offers the possibility to form geometrically complex sheet metal parts that are applicable within automotive and electronic industry etc. However, due to the limited formability of Mg alloy at ambient temperature hydroforming of Mg alloy sheet metal has to be conducted at elevated temperature. In the present study an experimental warm hydroforming process using a low melting point alloy as forming medium is presented and on the basis of this a 2D thermo-mechanical finite element model is setup in order to analyze the temperature distribution in the Mg alloy workpiece during forming. The results show that the temperature in the workpiece is nearly uniform and nearly identical to the temperature of the forming medium.

  4. In vitro interactions of blood, platelet, and fibroblast with biodegradable magnesium-zinc-strontium alloys.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Y; Cipriano, A F; Guan, Ren-Guo; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Liu, Huinan

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloy is an attractive class of metallic biomaterial for cardiovascular applications due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the degradation in blood, thrombogenicity, and cytocompatibility of Magnesium-Zinc-Strontium (Mg-Zn-Sr) alloys, specifically four Mg-4 wt % Zn-xSr (x = 0.15, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 wt %) alloys, together with pure Mg control and relevant reference materials for cardiovascular applications. Human whole blood and platelet rich plasma (PRP) were used as the incubation media to investigate the degradation behavior of the Mg-Zn-Sr alloys. The results showed that the PRP had a greater pH increase and greater concentration of Mg(2+) ions when compared with whole blood after 2 h of incubation with the same respective Mg alloys, suggesting that the Mg alloys degraded faster in PRP than in whole blood. The Mg alloy with 4 wt % Zn and 0.15 wt % Sr (named as ZSr41A) was identified as the most promising alloy for cardiovascular stent applications, because it showed slower degradation and less thrombogenicity, as indicated by the lower concentrations of Mg(2+) ions released and less deposition of platelets. Additionally, ZSr41 alloys were cytocompatible with fibroblasts in direct exposure culture in which the cells adhered and proliferated around the samples, with no statistical difference in cell adhesion density compared with the blank reference. Future studies on the ZSr41 alloys are necessary to investigate their direct interactions with other important cells in cardiovascular system, such as vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. PMID:25690931

  5. Effect of solute atoms on grain boundary sliding in magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somekawa, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Mukai, Toshiji

    2014-04-01

    The effect of solid-solution alloying on grain boundary sliding (GBS) was investigated using pure magnesium and six kinds of Mg-X (X = Ag, Al, Li, Pb, Y and Zn) dilute binary solid solutions with an average grain size of 10 µm. A sharp increase in damping capacity caused by GBS was observed above a certain temperature. The temperature at which a sharp increase in damping capacity occurred depended on the alloying element. The addition of Y and Ag markedly increased the onset temperature (more than 100 K) for a sharp increase in damping capacity, whereas the addition of Zn, Al and Li slightly increased the onset temperature (less than 50 K) as compared with that for pure magnesium. Tensile tests at a temperature of 423 K revealed that the higher the onset temperature, the lower the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress. It is suggested that the former elements (Y and Ag) are more effective in suppressing GBS in magnesium alloys than the latter ones (Zn, Al and Li). The suppression of GBS was associated with low grain boundary energy, and the extent to which the energy is reduced depended on the alloying element. It was suggested that the change in the lattice parameter (the so-called c/a ratio) affects the grain boundary energy, and thus, the occurrence of GBS.

  6. A Feasiblity Study on Spot Friction Welding of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu; Frederick, David Alan; Schwartz, William

    2007-01-01

    Spot friction welding (SFW) is a novel variant of the linear friction stir welding process with the potential to create strong joints between similar, as well as dissimilar sheet metals. It is particularly suitable for soft, low melting point metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and their alloys where resistance spot welding can cause defects such as voids, trapped gas and micro-cracks due to the intense heat requirement for joint formation. Up to now, spot friction welding has focused primarily on aluminum alloys. This paper presents a feasibility study on spot friction welding of AZ31, a wrought magnesium alloy available in sheet form. Lap joints of 1.58-mm-thick magnesium alloy AZ31B-O sheet were produced by spot friction welding. The spot welds were made in 2 sec with 15-mm-diameter pin tool rotating at 500-2,000 rpm. The tool was inserted into 2-sheet stack-ups to depths of either 2.4 or 2.8 mm relative to the top sheet surface. Tensile-shear testing showed that joint strengths up to 4.75 kN were obtained. The removal of surface oxides from the sheets prior to welding increased lap shear strengths about 50% at the 2.4-mm insertion depth and it promoted failure by nugget pull-out rather than by interface separation.

  7. Laser surface modification of Ti and TiC coatings on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. M.; Lee, S. G.; Park, J. S.; Kim, H. G.

    2014-12-01

    In order to enhance the surface properties of magnesium alloy, a highly intense laser surface melting process following plasma spraying of Ti or TiC on AZ31 alloy were employed. When laser surface melting was applied to Ti coated magnesium alloy, the formation of fine Ti particle dispersed surface layer on the substrate occurred. The corrosion potential of the AZ31 alloy with Ti dispersed surface was significantly increased in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution. Additionally, an improved hardness was observed for the laser treated specimens as compared to the untreated AZ31 alloy. Laser melting process following plasma thermal deposition was also applied for obtaining in situ TiC coating layer on AZ31 alloy. The TiC coating layer could be successfully formed via in situ reaction between pure titanium and carbon powders. Incomplete TiC formation was observed in the plasma sprayed specimen, while completely transformed TiC layer was found after post laser melting process. It was also confirmed that the laser post treatment induced enhanced adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate.

  8. Correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliu, S., Jr.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Coy, A. E.; Viejo, F.; Arrabal, R.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used in order to investigate the correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys exposed to 98% relative humidity at 50 °C. Commercially pure magnesium, used as the reference material, revealed MgO, Mg(OH) 2 and tracers of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film. For the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys, the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface reached similar values to those of MgO and Mg(OH) 2. A linear relation between the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface and the subsequent corrosion behaviour in the humid environment was found. The AZ80 alloy revealed the highest amount of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film and the highest atmospheric corrosion resistance, even higher than the AZ91D alloy, indicating that aluminium distribution in the alloy microstructure influenced the amount of magnesium carbonate formed.

  9. In vitro degradation and mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys in modified-simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Bobby; Raman, R K Singh

    2008-05-01

    The successful applications of magnesium-based alloys as degradable orthopaedic implants are mainly inhibited due to their high degradation rates in physiological environment and consequent loss in the mechanical integrity. This study examines the degradation behaviour and the mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys using electrochemical techniques and slow strain rate test (SSRT) method, respectively, in modified-simulated body fluid (m-SBF). Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results showed that calcium addition enhances the general and pitting corrosion resistances of magnesium alloys significantly. The corrosion current was significantly lower in AZ91Ca alloy than that in AZ91 alloy. Furthermore, AZ91Ca alloy exhibited a five-fold increase in the surface film resistance than AZ91 alloy. The SSRT results showed that the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to fracture of AZ91Ca alloy in m-SBF decreased only marginally (approximately 15% and 20%, respectively) in comparison with these properties in air. The fracture morphologies of the failed samples are discussed in the paper. The in vitro study suggests that calcium-containing magnesium alloys to be a promising candidate for their applications in degradable orthopaedic implants, and it is worthwhile to further investigate the in vivo corrosion behaviour of these alloys. PMID:18313746

  10. Chrome-free Samarium-based Protective Coatings for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Legan; Cui, Xiufang; Yang, Yuyun; Lin, Lili; Xiao, Qiang; Jin, Guo

    The microstructure of chrome-free samarium-based conversion coating on magnesium alloy was investigated and the corrosion resistance was evaluated as well. The micro-morphology, transverse section, crystal structure and composition of the coating were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X- ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results reveal that the morphology of samarium conversion coating is of crack-mud structure. Tiny cracks distribute in the compact coating deposited by samarium oxides. XRD, EDS and XPS results characterize that the coating is made of amorphous and trivalent-samarium oxides. The potentiodynamic polarization curve, EIS and OCP indicate that the samarium conversion coating can improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  11. Fatigue behaviour of friction stir processed AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; De Marco, P.P.

    2007-03-15

    The room temperature fatigue properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC) as cast, heat treated, friction stir processed (FSP) and FSP and heat treated were studied. The fatigue properties of the material were evaluated for the HPDC magnesium alloy in the as-received state and after a solution treatment at 415 deg. C for 2 h and an ageing treatment at 220 deg. C for 4 h. The heat treatment resulted in a significant increase in the fatigue properties of the HPDC material, while no significance influence of heat treatment was recorded in the FSP condition. The morphology of fracture surfaces was examined by employing a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM)

  12. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of phytic acid conversion coatings for magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Li, Qingfen; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui; Jin, Guo; Ding, Minghui

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a new innoxious and pollution-free chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, phytic acid conversion coating, was prepared. The conversion coatings are found to have high cover ratio and no cracks are found by atomic force microscopes (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main elements of the conversion coatings are Mg, Al, O, P and C by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The chemical state of the elements in the coatings was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AES depth profile analysis suggests that the thickness of the conversion coating is about 340 nm. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance for the conversion coated AZ91D magnesium alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution increases markedly. The mechanisms of corrosion resistance and coatings formation are also discussed.

  13. Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Analysis of Loading-Unloading Behaviour in Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloy sheets exhibit strong inelastic response during unloading. In this study crystal plasticity finite element analysis of loading-unloading behaviour during uniaxial tension in a rolled magnesium alloy sheet was carried out, and the mechanism of this inelastic response was examined in detail in terms of macroscopic and mesoscopic deformations. The unloading behaviour obtained by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment in terms of variation with stress of instantaneous tangent modulus during unloading. Variations of activities of each family of slip systems during the deformation showed that the activation of basal slip systems is the largest during unloading, and the slip direction during unloading is opposite from during loading. These results indicated that one of the factors of the inelastic behaviour during unloading is the fact that the basal slip systems are easily activated during unloading because of their low strengths.

  14. Secondary Cooling in the Direct-Chill Casting of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, E.; Wells, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Secondary cooling information is critical when modeling the direct-chill (DC) casting process of magnesium alloys. However, accurate data for the heat flux in the secondary cooling zone are scarce, and most reported research is concerned with the DC casting of aluminum alloys. Cooling experiments that simulated the secondary cooling of magnesium AZ31 were conducted in order to observe the influence of various parameters on the different boiling-water heat-transfer phenomena. The heat flux in each boiling regime was quantified as a function of the cooling-water flow rate, water temperature, and initial sample temperature. Equations developed from the cooling experiments could be combined to build “idealized” boiling curves for a given set of DC casting conditions.

  15. Study of Coating Growth Behavior During the Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of Magnesium Alloy ZK60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhaozhong; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Yushen; Qu, Yunfei; Wu, Xiaohong

    2015-04-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation technique was used to coat ZK60 magnesium alloy in a silicate-based electrolyte. Effects of oxidation time on the morphology, phase structure, and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The main components of the inner and the outer coating layers were MgO and Mg2SiO4, respectively. It was also found that the oxidation time has a significant impact on the corrosion resistance properties of the coatings. The coating obtained within the oxidation time of 360 s exhibited a corrosion current of 7.6 × 10-8 A/cm2 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, which decreased significantly when comparing with the pristine magnesium alloy.

  16. Development of Laser Surface Technologies for Anti-Corrosion on Magnesium Alloys: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rujian; Guan, Yingchun; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been increasingly used in industries and biomaterial fields due to low density, high specific strength and biodegradability. However, poor surface-related properties are major factors that limit their practical applications. This paper mainly focuses on laser-based anti-corrosion technologies for Mg alloys, beginning with a brief review of conventional methods, and then demonstrates the feasibility of laser surface technologies including laser surface melting (LSM), laser surface alloying (LSA), laser surface cladding (LSC) and laser shock peening (LSP) in achieving enhancement of corrosion resistance. The mechanism and capability of each technique in corrosion resistance is carefully discussed. Finally, an outlook of the development of laser surface technology for Mg alloy is further concluded, aiming to serve as a guide for further research both in industry applications and biomedical devices.

  17. Electrodeposition of high corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan; Cao, Fahe; Chang, Linrong; Zheng, JunJun; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chunan

    2011-08-01

    High corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coatings were electrodeposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy via suitable pretreatments, such as one-step acid pickling-activation, once zinc immersion and environment-friendly electroplated copper as the protective under-layer, which made Ni-P deposit on AZ91D Mg alloy in acid plating baths successfully. The pH value and current density for Ni-P electrodeposition were optimized to obtain high corrosion resistance. With increasing the phosphorous content of the Ni-P coatings, the deposits were found to gradually transform to amorphous structure and the corrosion resistance increased synchronously. The anticorrosion ability of AZ91D Mg alloy was greatly improved by the amorphous Ni-P deposits, which was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density ( Icorr) of the coated Mg alloy substrate is about two orders of magnitude less than that of the uncoated.

  18. Acoustic Emission as a Tool for Exploring Deformation Mechanisms in Magnesium and Its Alloys In Situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Alexei; Máthis, Kristian

    2016-06-01

    Structural performance of magnesium alloys depends strongly on specific deformation mechanisms operating during mechanical loading. Therefore, in situ monitoring of the acting mechanisms is a key to performance tailoring. We review the capacity of the advanced acoustic emission (AE) technique to understand the interplay between two primary deformation mechanisms—dislocation slip and twinning—in real time scale. Details of relative contributions of dislocation slip and deformation twinning to the mechanical response of pure Mg and Mg-Al alloy are discussed in view of AE results obtained with the aid of recently proposed spectral and signal categorization algorithms in conjunction with with neutron diffraction data.

  19. The influence of stepwise deformation of aluminum-magnesium alloy upon its electrical conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Gasanov, M. F.; Zheltov, M. A.; Greben'kov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of stepwise deformation upon the electrical conduction of the AlMg6 aluminum-magnesium alloy is investigated experimentally. It is found that the nucleation and development of single deformation bands causing stepwise deformation increase the specific electric resistance of the alloy on average by 2-3%. It is supposed that the main mechanism of an increase in the electric resistance in the deformation band is growth of the deformation vacancy concentration, which is connected with intensive dislocation multiplication in the deformation band front.

  20. Biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) coatings on magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Nicole J; Lee, Boeun; Roy, Abhijit; Ramanathan, Madhumati; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric film coatings were applied by dip coating on two magnesium alloy systems, AZ31 and Mg4Y, in an attempt to slow the degradation of these alloys under in vitro conditions. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymer in solution was explored at various concentrations, yielding coatings of varying thicknesses on the alloy substrates. Electrochemical corrosion studies indicate that the coatings initially provide some corrosion protection. Degradation studies showed reduced degradation over 3 days, but beyond this time point however, do not maintain a reduction in corrosion rate. Scanning electron microscopy indicates inhomogeneous coating durability, with gas pocket formation in the polymer coating, resulting in eventual detachment from the alloy surface. In vitro studies of cell viability utilizing mouse osteoblast cells showed improved biocompatibility of polymer coated substrates over the bare AZ31 and Mg4Y substrates. Results demonstrate that while challenges remain for long term degradation control, the developed polymeric coatings nevertheless provide short term corrosion protection and improved biocompatibility of magnesium alloys for possible use in orthopedic applications. PMID:23053803

  1. Textures, microstructures, anisotropy and formability of aluminum-manganese-magnesium and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiantao

    In this dissertation work, the microstructure and texture evolution of continuous cast (CC) and direct chill (DC) cast Al-Mn-Mg (AA 3105 and AA 3015) and Al-Mg (AA 5052) alloys during cold rolling and annealing are systematically investigated. Macrotexture analyses were based on three-dimensional orientation distribution functions (ODFs) calculated from incomplete pole figures from X-ray diffraction by using arbitrarily defined cell (ADC) and series expansion methods. A new technique, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), was adopted for microtexture and mesotexture investigation. The anisotropy and formability of Al-Mn-Mg and Al-Mg alloys are correlated to the texture results. For aluminum alloys studied in this work, a stronger Cube orientation is observed in DC hot band than in CC hot band after complete recrystallization. alpha and beta fibers become well developed beyond 50% cold rolling in both CC and DC aluminum alloys. The highest intensity along the beta fiber (skeleton line) is located between the Copper and the S orientations in both materials after high cold rolling reductions. In both CC and DC aluminum alloys, a cell structure develops with the indication of increasing CSL Sigma1 boundaries during the early stages of cold rolling. There is no evidence of the development of twin boundaries (Sigma3, Sigma9, Sigma27a & 27b) in either CC or DC aluminum alloys when the cold rolling reductions are less than 40%. The R and Cube textures are dominant recrystallization texture components in CC and DC AA 5052 alloys. The volume fraction of the Cube component is increased by increasing cold rolling reduction and annealing temperature but not by increasing annealing time while the volume fraction of the R component is only increased by increasing cold rolling reduction. Stronger Cube and R orientations are found at the surface layer than at half-thickness layer of cold rolled hot bands after annealing. The Cube and P textures are dominant recrystallization

  2. Yield Asymmetry Design of Magnesium Alloys by Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ahzi, Said

    2013-11-01

    Deformation asymmetry of magnesium alloys is an important factor on machine design in automobile industry. Represented by the ratio of compressive yield stress (CYS) against tensile yield stress (TYS), deformation asymmetry is strongly related to microstructure, characterized by texture and grain size. Modified intermediate phi-model, a polycrystalline viscoplasticity model, is used to predict the deformation behavior of magnesium alloys with different grain sizes. Validated with experimental results, integrated computational materials engineering is applied to find out the route in achieving desired asymmetry by thermomechanical processing. In some texture, for example, rolled texture, CYS/TYS is smaller than 1 under different loading directions. In some texture, for example, extruded texture, asymmetry is large along normal direction. Starting from rolled texture, the asymmetry will increased to close to 1 along rolling direction after compressed to a strain of 0.2. Our model shows that grain refinement increases CYS/TYS. Besides texture control, grain refinement can also optimize the yield asymmetry. After the grain size decreased to a critical value, CYS/TYS reaches to 1 since CYS increases much faster than TYS. By tailoring the microstructure using texture control and grain refinement, it is achievable to optimize yield asymmetry in wrought magnesium alloys.

  3. Surface modification of magnesium alloys developed for bioabsorbable orthopedic implants: a general review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Tang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yangde; Wang, Jue; Lai, Yuxiao; Qin, Ling

    2012-08-01

    As a bioabsorbable metal with mechanical properties close to bone, pure magnesium or its alloys have great potential to be developed as medical implants for clinical applications. However, great efforts should be made to avoid its fast degradation in vivo for orthopedic applications when used for fracture fixation. Therefore, how to decease degradation rate of pure magnesium or its alloys is one of the focuses in Research and Development (R&D) of medical implants. It has been recognized that surface modification is an effective method to prevent its initial degradation in vivo to maintain its desired mechanical strength. This article reviews the recent progress in surface modifications for prevention of fast degradation of magnesium or its alloys using in vitro testing model, a fast yet relevant model before moving towards time-consuming and expensive in vivo testing. Pros and cons of various surface modifications are also discussed for the goal to design available products to be applied in clinical trials. PMID:22566412

  4. Mechanical Behavior of a Magnesium Alloy Nanocomposite Under Conditions of Static Tension and Dynamic Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Godbole, C.; Quick, T.; Paramsothy, M.; Gupta, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, the intrinsic influence of nano-alumina particulate (Al2O3p) reinforcements on microstructure, microhardness, tensile properties, tensile fracture, cyclic stress-controlled fatigue, and final fracture behavior of a magnesium alloy is presented and discussed. The unreinforced magnesium alloy (AZ31) and the reinforced composite counterpart (AZ31/1.5 vol.% Al2O3) were manufactured by solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. The elastic modulus, yield strength, and tensile strength of the nanoparticle-reinforced magnesium alloy were noticeably higher than the unreinforced counterpart. The ductility, quantified by elongation-to-failure, of the composite was observably lower than the unreinforced monolithic counterpart (AZ31). The nanoparticle-reinforced composite revealed improved cyclic fatigue resistance over the entire range of maximum stress at both the tested load ratios. Under conditions of fully reversed loading ( R = -1) both materials showed observable degradation in behavior quantified in terms of cyclic fatigue life. The conjoint influence of reinforcement, processing, intrinsic microstructural features and loading condition on final fracture behavior is presented and discussed.

  5. Effect of alloying elements on electrochemical properties of magnesium-based sacrificial anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Koo, S.J.

    2000-04-01

    Effects of alloying elements on electrochemical properties of magnesium-based sacrificial anodes were evaluated. Potentiodynamic, galvanostatic, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to investigate the corrosion rate, efficiency, and surface characteristics of anodes. Polarization data indicated that alloying with manganese, aluminum, and zinc reduced the corrosion rates of magnesium anodes. All anodes did not undergo passivation but demonstrated only active behavior. Corrosion morphology was changed from localized to uniform attach by the alloying. Addition of manganese to magnesium anodes yielded increased driving potential and efficiency. The efficiency of Mg-Al anodes was improved up to {approximately}6% Al addition. The addition of zinc increased the efficiency of Mg-Al-Zn anodes compared to the efficiency of Mg-Al anodes, but the reversal of this behavior happened as the zinc content exceeded {approximately}3%. The increase in the efficiency of Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Zn anodes was accompanied by a decrease in the driving potential. The decrease of driving potential might have resulted form a somewhat resistive film on the surface, which hindered the transport of ions. The increased corrosion resistance generally improved anode efficiency.

  6. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. PMID:27524097

  7. Biocompatibility of fluoride-coated magnesium-calcium alloys with optimized degradation kinetics in a subcutaneous mouse model.

    PubMed

    Drynda, Andreas; Seibt, Juliane; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm; Peuster, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The principle of biodegradation has been considered for many years in the development of cardiovascular stents, especially for patients with congenital heart defects. A variety of materials have been examined with regard to their suitability for cardiovascular devices. Iron- and magnesium-based stents were investigated intensively during the last years. It has been shown, that iron, or iron based alloys have slow degradation kinetics whereas magnesium-based systems exhibit rapid degradation rates. Recently we have developed fluoride coated binary magnesium-calcium alloys with reduced degradation kinetics. These alloys exhibit good biocompatibility and no major adverse effects toward smooth muscle and endothelial cells in in vitro experiments. In this study, these alloys were investigated in a subcutaneous mouse model. Fluoride coated (fc) magnesium, as well as MgCa0.4%, MgCa0.6%, MgCa0.8%, MgCa1.0%, and a commercially available WE43 alloy were implanted in form of (fc) cylindrical plates into the subcutaneous tissue of NMRI mice. After a 3 and 6 months follow-up, the (fc) alloy plates were examined by histomorphometric techniques to assess their degradation rate in vivo. Our data indicate that all (fc) alloys showed a significant corrosion. For both time points the (fc) MgCa alloys showed a higher corrosion rate in comparison to the (fc) WE43 reference alloy. Significant adverse effects were not observed. Fluoride coating of magnesium-based alloys can be a suitable way to reduce degradation rates. However, the (fc) MgCa alloys did not exhibit decreased degradation kinetics in comparison to the (fc) WE43 alloy in a subcutaneous mouse model. PMID:22767427

  8. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the surface bioactivity of a calcium phosphate coated magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liping; Pan, Feng; Yu, Guoning; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2009-03-01

    Magnesium has shown potential application as a bio-absorbable biomaterial, such as for bone screws and plates. In order to improve the surface bioactivity, a calcium phosphate was coated on a magnesium alloy by a phosphating process (Ca-P coating). The surface characterization showed that a porous and netlike CaHPO(4).2H(2)O layer with small amounts of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) was formed on the surface of the Mg alloy. Cells L929 showed significantly good adherence and significantly high growth rate and proliferation characteristics on the Ca-P coated magnesium alloy (p<0.05) in in-vitro cell experiments, demonstrating that the surface cytocompatibility of magnesium was significantly improved by the Ca-P coating. In vivo implantations of the Ca-P coated and the naked alloy rods were carried out to investigate the bone response at the early stage. Both routine pathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the Ca-P coating provided magnesium with a significantly good surface bioactivity (p<0.05) and promoted early bone growth at the implant/bone interface. It was suggested that the Ca-P coating might be an effective method to improve the surface bioactivity of magnesium alloy. PMID:19111896

  10. IMPURITY AND TRACER DIFFUSION STUDIES IN MAGNESIUM AND ITS ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Sohn, Yong Ho; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Klimov, Mikhail; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) approach for optimizing processing routes for Mg-alloys requires reliable thermodynamic and diffusion databases. We are developing an impurity and tracer diffusion database using both stable and unstable isotopes for Mg and its alloys. In this study, Al impurity diffusion in pure polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) was examined using the thin film method. Approximately 500 nm thick Al films were deposited on in-situ RF plasma-cleaned polycrystalline Mg by DC magnetron sputtering from pure Al (99.9%) targets. Specimens were then diffusion annealed at 300, 350 and 400 C in quartz capsules that were evacuated to 10-8 Torr and backfilled with Ar-H2 mixtures. Concentration profile of Al diffusion profiles into single phase Mg was determined by depth-profiling technique using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The Al impurity diffusion coefficients were determined as a function of temperature

  11. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning. PMID:23719630

  12. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-05-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning.

  13. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Hovanski, Y.; Grant, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in a lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential: a 0.8 mm thick, electrogalvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5 mm thick hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel. These steels were joined to 2.33 mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and the process parameters were kept the same. The average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating present on the steel sheets, and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulted in the formation of a solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer.

  14. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  15. In vivo corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy in association with surrounding tissue response in rats.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chieko; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Imai, Yoshimichi; Mukai, Toshiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sano, Yuya; Ikeo, Naoko; Isozaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Toru; Oikawa, Miho; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachi, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys are the most promising candidates for osteosynthesis devices. However, their in vivo corrosion behaviour has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of the physiological environment surrounding Mg alloys on their corrosion behaviour. A Mg-1.0Al alloy with a fine-grained structure was formed into plates using titanium (Ti) as a control. These plates were implanted into the subperiosteum in the head, subcutaneous tissue of the back, and in the muscle of the femur of rats for 1, 2 and 4 weeks. The volumes of the remaining Mg alloy and of the insoluble salt deposition and gas cavities around the Mg alloy were determined by microtomography, and the volume losses were calculated. Then, the tissue response around the plates in each implantation site was examined histopathologically, and its relation to the respective volume loss was analyzed. These analyses determined that the Mg alloy was corroded fastest in the head, at an intermediate level in the back, and slowest in the femur. The insoluble salt deposition at the Mg alloy surface had no influence on the volume loss. Gas cavities formed around the Mg alloy at all implantation sites and decreased after 4 weeks. Histopathological examination revealed that the Mg alloy exhibited good biocompatibility, as was seen with Ti. In addition, vascularized fibrous capsules formed around the plates and became mature with time. Notably, the volume loss in the different anatomical locations correlated with capsule thickness. Together, our results suggest that, to facilitate the successful clinical application of Mg alloys, it will be necessary to further comprehend their interactions with specific in vivo environments. PMID:26947358

  16. Microstructural stability and creep properties of die casting Mg-4Al-4RE magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rzychon, Tomasz; Kielbus, Andrzej; Cwajna, Jan; Mizera, Jaroslaw

    2009-10-15

    The AE44 (Mg-4Al-4RE) alloy was prepared by a hot-chamber die casting method. The microstructure, microstructural stability and creep properties at 175 deg. C were investigated. The microstructure was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Rietveld method. The results show that die cast AE44 magnesium alloy consists of {alpha}-Mg, Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}RE and Al{sub 2.12}RE{sub 0.88} phases. The Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3} phase is thermally stable at 175 deg. C whereas the metastable Al{sub 2.12}RE{sub 0.88} phase undergoes a transition into the equilibrium Al{sub 2}RE phase. The alloy investigated is characterized by good creep properties at temperatures of 175 deg. C and 200 {sup o}C.

  17. Modeling dynamic strain aging of aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei

    This thesis presents atomistic studies and continuum modeling of solute clustering and solute diffusion in Al-Mg alloys, which are considered elements of the mechanism of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Solute clustering in Al-Mg binary alloys is first studied by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. In the undistorted lattice, Mg has a tendency to form a coherent phase. The binding energy of this structure is rather low and it dissolves at room temperature when only dynamic associations of doublets or triples of solute atoms are observed. In presence of dislocations and at room temperature, Mg clusters at cores forming the coherent phase observed in the undistorted lattice at lower temperatures. The size, shape and structure of the cluster cannot be predicted by elementary calculations based on the pressure field generated by the unclustered dislocation. Then diffusion for Mg in Al-Mg alloys is investigated by Molecular Statics and the Nudged Elastic Band method. The activation energy for diffusion of Mg in the bulk is evaluated in the dilute solution limit for the nearest neighbor and the ring mechanisms. It is concluded that bulk diffusion at low and moderate temperatures must be assisted by vacancies. Further, diffusion of Mg along the core of edge, 60° and screw dislocations is studied. The vacancy formation energy in the core and the migration energy for vacancy-assisted Mg is evaluated for a large number of diffusion paths in the core region. The analysis shows that pipe diffusion; which is currently considered as the leading mechanism responsible for dynamic strain aging in these alloys, is too slow in absence of excess vacancies. Finally, the time-dependent Mg solute clustering process is studied using a continuum model calibrated based on atomistic information. The solute atmosphere around an edge dislocation is evaluated in terms of a chemical potential gradient, which is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The solute clustering process is modeled by coupled

  18. Determination of the chemical mechanism of chromate conversion coating on magnesium alloys EV31A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommiers-Belin, Sébastien; Frayret, Jérôme; Uhart, Arnaud; Ledeuil, JeanBernard; Dupin, Jean-Charles; Castetbon, Alain; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2014-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys present several advantages such as a high strength/weight ratio and a low density. These properties allow them to be used for many aeronautical applications but they are very sensitive to corrosion. To solve this problem, conversion coatings are deposited on the surface before a protective top coat application. Several kinds of coatings exist but the best protective is chromium conversion coating (CCC). This process is now limited by several environmental laws due to the high toxicity of hexavalent chromium. However, in order to reduce hazardous impact onto the environment and to find alternative coatings, the chemical mechanisms of CCC deposition and protection on magnesium alloy are detailed for the first time in this work. The studied process includes 4 pre-treatments steps and a conversion immersion bath. The pre-treatment steps clean and prepare the surface for improving the coating deposition. The coating properties and its composition were characterized by voltammetry and XPS technics. A final layer of chromium(III) oxide and magnesium hydroxide composed the coating giving it its protective properties. Trapped orthorhombic potassium chromate has also been identified and gives to the coating its self healing property.

  19. Modifying AM60B Magnesium Alloy Die Cast Surfaces by Friction Stir Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Feng, Zhili; Degen, Cassandra; Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu

    2006-01-01

    These experiments were done to evaluate the feasibility of locally modifying the surface properties of magnesium alloys with friction-stir processing. The magnesium alloy used for the study was high-pressure die-cast AM60B, nominally Mg-6Al-0.13 Mn (wt. %). Friction-stir passes were made with a translation speed of 1.7 mm/s using tool-rotation speeds of 1,250 rpm or 2,500 rpm. Stir passes with good appearance were obtained under both conditions. In some cases up to five passes were overlapped on a single bar to produce stir zones with cross-sectional dimensions of about 1.5 mm x 10 mm. Metallographic examinations indicated that the stir zones were largely comprised of a magnesium solid solution with equiaxed grains on the order of 5-10 {micro}m in size. Hardness mapping showed that the stir zones experienced increases of 16-25% compared to the as-cast metal. Room-temperature testing showed that, compared to the cast metal, the stir zones had flow stresses nearly 20% higher with about twice the tensile elongation.

  20. One-step electrodeposition process to fabricate corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Chen, Dexin; Kang, Zhixin

    2015-01-28

    A simple, one-step method has been developed to construct a superhydrophobic surface by electrodepositing Mg-Mn-Ce magnesium plate in an ethanol solution containing cerium nitrate hexahydrate and myristic acid. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to characterize the surfaces. The shortest electrodeposition time to obtain a superhydrophobic surface was about 1 min, and the as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces had a maximum contact angle of 159.8° and a sliding angle of less than 2°. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that the superhydrophobic surface greatly improved the corrosion properties of magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt % aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, NaClO3, and NaNO3. Besides, the chemical stability and mechanical durability of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface were also examined. The presented method is rapid, low-cost, and environmentally friendly and thus should be of significant value for the industrial fabrication of anticorrosive superhydrophobic surfaces and should have a promising future in expanding the applications of magnesium alloys. PMID:25559356

  1. An Environmentally Friendly Process Involving Refining and Membrane-Based Electrolysis for Magnesium Recovery from Partially Oxidized Scrap Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium is recovered from partially oxidized scrap alloy by combining refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis. In this combined process, a molten salt eutectic flux (45 wt.% MgF2-55 wt.% CaF2) containing 10 wt.% MgO and 2 wt.% YF3 was used as the medium for magnesium recovery. During refining, magnesium and its oxide are dissolved from the scrap into the molten flux. Forming gas is bubbled through the flux and the dissolved magnesium is removed via the gas phase and condensed in a separate condenser at a lower temperature. The molten flux has a finite solubility for magnesium and acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium recovered has high purity. After refining, SOM electrolysis is performed in the same reactor to enable electrolysis of the dissolved magnesium oxide in the molten flux producing magnesium at the cathode and oxygen at the SOM anode. During SOM electrolysis, it is necessary to decrease the concentration of the dissolved magnesium in the flux to improve the faradaic current efficiency and prevent degradation of the SOM. Thus, for both refining and SOM electrolysis, it is very important to measure and control the magnesium solubility in the molten flux. High magnesium solubility facilitates refining whereas lower solubility benefits the SOM electrolysis process. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was employed to simulate the flow behavior of the flux stirred by the forming gas. Based on the modeling results, an optimized design of the stirring tubes and its placement in the flux are determined for efficiently removing the dissolved magnesium and also increasing the efficiency of the SOM electrolysis process.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Magnesium Alloys in the Temperature Range from -125 °C to 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Ham, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Su Yong; Kim, Sok Won; Suh, Chang Min

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely used in recent years as lightweight structural materials in the manufacturing of automobiles, airplanes, and portable computers. Magnesium alloys have extremely low density (as low as 1738 kg · m-3) and high rigidity, which makes them suitable for such applications. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two different magnesium alloys made by twin-roll casting was investigated using the laser-flash technique and differential scanning calorimetry for thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity measurements, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the magnesium alloys, AZ31 and AZ61, was measured over the temperature range from -125 °C to 400 °C. The alloys AZ31 and AZ61 are composed of magnesium, aluminum, and zinc. The thermal conductivity gradually increased with temperature. The densities of AZ31 and AZ61 were 1754 kg · m-3 and 1777 kg · m-3, respectively. The thermal conductivity of AZ31 was about 25 % higher than that of AZ61, and this is attributed to the amount of precipitation.

  3. Coating of biodegradable magnesium alloy bone implants using nanostructured diopside (CaMgSi2O6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Beni, Batoul Hashemi; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys with their biodegradable characteristic can be a very good candidate to be used in orthopedic implants. However, magnesium alloys may corrode and degrade too fast for applications in the bone healing procedure. In order to enhance the corrosion resistance and the in vitro bioactivity of a magnesium alloy, a nanostructured diopside (CaMgSi2O6) film was coated on AZ91 magnesium alloy through combined micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) methods. The crystalline structures, morphologies and compositions of the coated and uncoated substrates were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion test in simulated body fluid (SBF) were employed to evaluate the corrosion resistance and the in vitro bioactivity of the samples. The results of our investigation showed that the nanostructured diopside coating deposited on the MAO layer increases the corrosion resistance and improves the in vitro bioactivity of the biodegradable magnesium alloy.

  4. The Improvement of Tribological and Fatigue Properties of Casting Magnesium Alloy AZ91 Performed Diamond Like Carbon Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akebono, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hideto

    In recent years, magnesium alloy has been widely used because of its low weight and ease of recycling. However, because magnesium alloys provide inferior wear resistance, it is necessary to improve this property to use magnesium alloy for more machine parts. For this study, we produced a diamond like carbon (DLC) coating that has high hardness, low friction, and excellent wear resistance. With DLC coated onto a soft material such as magnesium alloy, the adhesion strength between the substrate and the coating poses an important problem. Therefore, in this study, to acquire high adhesion strength, the DLC coating process was performed using unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS). A tungsten-doped inter-layer was formed on the substrate. Onto the inter-layer, nano-order DLC coatings of two kinds were laminated. Wear tests and fatigue tests were carried out. The DLC-coated magnesium alloy exhibited excellent wear friction. Furthermore, DLC coatings raised its fatigue reliability over that of the substrate alone.

  5. Low-temperature plastic deformation of AZ31 magnesium alloy with different microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, Yu. Z.; Zabrodin, P. A.; Braude, I. S.; Grigorova, T. V.; Isaev, N. V.; Pustovalov, V. V.; Fomenko, V. S.; Shumilin, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    The plastic deformation of AZ31 magnesium alloy under tension at temperatures of 4.2-295K is studied as a function of its microstructure following squeeze casting (SC) and after severe plastic deformation (SPD) by hot rolling and equal-channel angular pressing. SPD reduces the average grain size and creates a texture that favors basal-plane dislocation glide. It is found that plastic deformation becomes unstable (serrated) at temperatures of 4.2-25K and more stress jerks occur in the SPD polycrystal than in the SC alloy. The temperature dependence of the yield stress of the alloy is typical of thermally activated unpinning of dislocations from short-range barriers. The ratio of the yield stresses for the SPD and SC alloys at a given temperature is explained by hardening owing to a reduction in grain size and softening owing to a favorable texture. As the grain size is reduced, the rate of strain hardening of the alloy falls off, but its ductility (strain to fracture) increases because of the texture. The strain rate sensitivity of the alloy for T ⩽100K is independent of microstructure and is determined by intersections with forest dislocations. As the temperature is raised over 150-295K the strain rate sensitivity becomes greater owing to activation of dynamic recovery and an enhanced contribution from diffusion processes during plastic deformation of micrograined materials.

  6. Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

    1984-04-23

    Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced.

  7. Elastic Properties and Internal Friction of Two Magnesium Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, M.; Liaw, P. K.; Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Radiovic, M.

    2011-06-01

    The elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied from 25 C to 450 C using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). The Young's moduli decrease with increasing temperature. At 200 C, a change in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants is observed. The internal friction increases significantly with increasing temperature above 200 C. The observed changes in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants and the internal friction are the result of anelastic relaxation by grain boundary sliding at elevated temperatures. Elastic properties govern the behavior of a materials subjected to stress over a region of strain where the material behaves elastically. The elastic properties, including the Young's modulus (E), shear modulus (G), bulk modulus (B), and Poisson's ratio (?), are of significant interest to many design and engineering applications. The choice of the most appropriate material for a particular application at elevated temperatures therefore requires knowledge of its elastic properties as a function of temperature. In addition, mechanical vibration can cause significant damage in the automotive, aerospace, and architectural industries and thus, the ability of a material to dissipate elastic strain energy in materials, known as damping or internal friction, is also important property. Internal friction can be the result of a wide range of physical mechanisms, and depends on the material, temperature, and frequency of the loading. When utilized effectively in engineering applications, the damping capacity of a material can remove undesirable noise and vibration as heat to the surroundings. The elastic properties of materials can be determined by static or dynamic methods. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), used in this study, is a unique and sophisticated non-destructive dynamic technique for determining the complete elastic tensor of a solid by measuring the resonant spectrum of mechanical resonance for a

  8. Research on Water Based Coating Containing Nano-Silica for Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zheng, Tianliang; Li, Di

    Due to magnesium's active chemical property, a novel environmental protective water based metallic coating was developed, which mainly contains metal flake, nano-silica, silicate and silane. The coating's properties were investigated by neutral salt spray test, micro-hardness testing, adhesion test and electrochemical technique etc. Meanwhile the coating surface and microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the effect of nano silica on the coating was also explored. Results showed that an excellent adhesive, heat-resisting, protective coating for AZ91D magnesium alloy could be achieved by this technique. It also indicated that nano silica could greatly improve the properties of coating. In the paper, mechanism of nano silica coating was also discussed.

  9. Corrosion Thermodynamics of Magnesium and Alloys from First Principles as a Function of Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Williams, Kristen; Andzelm, Jan

    Thermodynamics of corrosion processes occurring on magnesium surfaces, such as hydrogen evolution and water dissociation, have been examined with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate the effect of impurities and dilute alloying additions. The modeling of corrosion thermodynamics requires examination of species in a variety of chemical and electronic states in order to accurately represent the complex electrochemical corrosion process. In this study, DFT calculations for magnesium corrosion thermodynamics were performed with two DFT codes (VASP and DMol3), with multiple exchange-correlation functionals for chemical accuracy, as well as with various levels of implicit and explicit solvation for surfaces and solvated ions. The accuracy of the first principles calculations has been validated against Pourbaix diagrams constructed from solid, gas and solvated charged ion calculations. For aqueous corrosion, it is shown that a well parameterized implicit solvent is capable of accurately representing all but the first coordinating layer of explicit water for charged ions.

  10. Study of second phase in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys: Phase stability evaluation via Dmol{sup 3} calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huazhe; Liu, Chen; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke

    2013-11-01

    Thermodynamical stabilities of four conventional second phases as well as magnesium matrix in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys were investigated theoretically via computer calculation method. Model of individual phase and systems including phase and four water molecular (phase-4H{sub 2}O) were established to simulate the in vitro and in vivo environment. Local orbital density functional theory approach was applied to calculate the total energy for the individual phase and phase-4H{sub 2}O system. The results demonstrated that all the second phases possessed higher phase stability compared with magnesium matrix, but the phase stability was quite different for different types of second phases or second phase-4H{sub 2}O systems. Furthermore, a schematic process of inflammation reaction caused by magnesium alloy implants was proposed for the further evaluation on biocompatibility of different second phases.

  11. Evaluation of magnesium-yttrium alloy as an extraluminal tracheal stent.

    PubMed

    Luffy, Sarah A; Chou, Da-Tren; Waterman, Jenora; Wearden, Peter D; Kumta, Prashant N; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Tracheomalacia is a relatively rare problem, but can be challenging to treat, particularly in pediatric patients. Due to the presence of mechanically deficient cartilage, the trachea is unable to resist collapse under physiologic pressures of respiration, which can lead to acute death if left untreated. However, if treated, the outcome for patients with congenital tracheomalacia is quite good because the cartilage tends to spontaneously mature over a period of 12 to 18 months. The present study investigated the potential for the use of degradable magnesium-3% yttrium alloy (W3) to serve as an extraluminal tracheal stent in a canine model. The host response to the scaffold included the formation of a thin, vascularized capsule consisting of collagenous tissue and primarily mononuclear cells. The adjacent cartilage structure was not adversely affected as observed by bronchoscopic, gross, histologic, and mechanical analysis. The W3 stents showed reproducible spatial and temporal fracture patterns, but otherwise tended to corrode quite slowly, with a mix of Ca and P rich corrosion product formed on the surface and observed focal regions of pitting. The study showed that the approach to use degradable magnesium alloys as an extraluminal tracheal stent is promising, although further development of the alloys is required to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking and improve the ductility. PMID:23554285

  12. A cellular automaton model for microstructural simulation of friction stir welded AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Asadi, Parviz; Besharati Givi, MohammadKazem; Zolghadr, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    To predict the grain size and microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of AZ91 magnesium alloy, a finite element model (FEM) is developed based on the combination of a cellular automaton model and the Kocks  -  Mecking and Laasraoui-Jonas models. First, according to the flow stress curves and using the Kocks  -  Mecking model, the hardening and recovery parameters and the strain rate sensitivity were calculated. Next, an FEM model was established in Deform-3D software to simulate the FSW of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The results of the FEM model are used in microstructure evolution models to predict the grain size and microstructure of the weld zone. There is a good agreement between the simulated and experimental microstructures, and the proposed model can simulate the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process during FSW of AZ91 alloy. Moreover, microstructural properties of different points in the SZ as well as the effect of the w/v parameter on the grain size and microstructure are considered.

  13. Production Process of Biocompatible Magnesium Alloy Tubes Using Extrusion and Dieless Drawing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustra, Piotr; Milenin, Andrij; Płonka, Bartłomiej; Furushima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Development of technological production process of biocompatible magnesium tubes for medical applications is the subject of the present paper. The technology consists of two stages—extrusion and dieless drawing process, respectively. Mg alloys for medical applications such as MgCa0.8 are characterized by low technological plasticity during deformation that is why optimization of production parameters is necessary to obtain good quality product. Thus, authors developed yield stress and ductility model for the investigated Mg alloy and then used the numerical simulations to evaluate proper manufacturing conditions. Grid Extrusion3d software developed by authors was used to determine optimum process parameters for extrusion—billet temperature 400 °C and extrusion velocity 1 mm/s. Based on those parameters the tube with external diameter 5 mm without defects was manufactured. Then, commercial Abaqus software was used for modeling dieless drawing. It was shown that the reduction in the area of 60% can be realized for MgCa0.8 magnesium alloy. Tubes with the final diameter of 3 mm were selected as a case study, to present capabilities of proposed processes.

  14. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  15. Bioresorbable Drug-Eluting Magnesium-Alloy Scaffold for Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos M.; Muramatsu, Takashi; Iqbal, Javaid; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Haude, Michael; Lemos, Pedro A.; Warnack, Boris; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metallic drug-eluting stents has reduced the risk of restenosis and widened the indications of percutaneous coronary intervention in treatment of coronary artery disease. However, this medical device can induce hypersensitive reaction that interferes with the endothelialization and healing process resulting in late persistent or acquired malapposition of the permanent metallic implant. Delayed endotheliaization and malapposition may lead to late and very late stent thrombosis. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) have been introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Magnesium is an essential mineral needed for a variety of physiological functions in the human body and its bioresorbable alloy has the strength-to-weight ratio comparable with that of strong aluminum alloys and alloy steels. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in Magnesium BRS technology, to describe its clinical application and to discuss the future prospects of this innovative therapy. PMID:24351829

  16. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  17. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening.

  18. Production Process of Biocompatible Magnesium Alloy Tubes Using Extrusion and Dieless Drawing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustra, Piotr; Milenin, Andrij; Płonka, Bartłomiej; Furushima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Development of technological production process of biocompatible magnesium tubes for medical applications is the subject of the present paper. The technology consists of two stages—extrusion and dieless drawing process, respectively. Mg alloys for medical applications such as MgCa0.8 are characterized by low technological plasticity during deformation that is why optimization of production parameters is necessary to obtain good quality product. Thus, authors developed yield stress and ductility model for the investigated Mg alloy and then used the numerical simulations to evaluate proper manufacturing conditions. Grid Extrusion3d software developed by authors was used to determine optimum process parameters for extrusion—billet temperature 400 °C and extrusion velocity 1 mm/s. Based on those parameters the tube with external diameter 5 mm without defects was manufactured. Then, commercial Abaqus software was used for modeling dieless drawing. It was shown that the reduction in the area of 60% can be realized for MgCa0.8 magnesium alloy. Tubes with the final diameter of 3 mm were selected as a case study, to present capabilities of proposed processes.

  19. Material Behavior Based Hybrid Process for Sheet Draw-Forging Thin Walled Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z.Q.; Shivpuri, R.

    2005-08-05

    Magnesium alloys are conventionally formed at the elevated temperatures. The thermally improved formability is sensitive to the temperature and strain rate. Due to limitations in forming speeds, tooling strength and narrow processing windows, complex thin walled parts cannot be made by traditional warm drawing or hot forging processes. A hybrid process, which is based on the deformation mechanism of magnesium alloys at the elevated temperature, is proposed that combines warm drawing and hot forging modes to produce an aggressive geometry at acceptable forming speed. The process parameters, such as temperatures, forming speeds etc. are determined by the FEM modeling and simulation. Sensitivity analysis under the constraint of forming limits of Mg alloy sheet material and strength of tooling material is carried out. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a conical geometry with thin walls and with bottom features. Results show that designed geometry can be formed in about 8 seconds, this cannot be formed by conventional forging while around 1000s is required for warm drawing. This process is being further investigated through controlled experiments.

  20. Superplasticity and cavitation in an aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Donghyun

    2000-10-01

    Fundamental issues related to the forming performance of superplastic metals include the mechanisms of flow and cavitation occurring during the forming process. Cavitation beyond a critical amount is damaging to the mechanical behavior of fabricated parts. Therefore, the role of process parameters which influence cavitation must be precisely documented and understood. In this study, (1) the mechanism of deformation, (2) cavity formation and growth, and (3) the effect of forming parameters on cavitation are systematically investigated in a fine grain Al-4.7%Mg-0.8%Mn-0.4%Cu alloy. The mechanical flow response of the alloy is characterized by a new type of step strain-rate test which preserves the initial microstructure of the alloy. Under isostructural condition, sigmoidal log s vs. log 3˙ relationship is determined and then analyzed by using a grain-mantle based quantitative model1 for superplastic flow. The activation energies in both grain-mantle creep and core creep are analyzed, and the overall controlling mechanism is found to be dislocation glide and climb. Grain-mantle creep rate in the low strain-rate region is found to be enhanced many times due to a high concentration of vacancies near grain boundaries. Cavitation caused by superplastic straining under uniaxial tension is evaluated by the SEM (for < 0.5mum size) and the number and size of cavities are monitored by image analysis through optical microscopy. Growth of pre-existing cavities and nucleation and growth of new cavities at grain boundary particles are monitored with increasing strain. Cavity nucleation and growth occur in two stages: crack-like growth along the particle-matrix interface by a constrained growth process, and beyond complete debonding growth via plastic deformation of the matrix which is modeled here. Stresses and strain-rates near the void are intensified due to the perturbed flow field near the void, and not relaxed during the time frame associated with superplastic deformation

  1. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1, the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.

  2. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1,more » the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.« less

  3. Microstructural Aspects in FSW and TIG Welding of Cast ZE41A Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, magnesium ZE41A alloy plates were butt joined through friction stir welding (FSW) and Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Process-induced microstructures were investigated by optical and SEM observations, EDX microanalysis and microhardness measurements. The effect of a post-welded T5 heat treatment on FSW joints was also assessed. Sound joints were produced by means of both techniques. Different elemental distributions and grain sizes were found, whereas microhardness profiles reflect microstructural changes. Post-welding heat treatment did not induce significant alterations in elemental distribution. The FSW-treated joint showed a more homogeneous hardness profile than the as-welded FSW joint.

  4. Microstructural Origin of Friction Stir Processed Zone in a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A.; Tewari, A.; Srinivasan, N.; Reddy, G. M.; Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, I.

    2015-08-01

    This study involved edge regions of a friction stir processed (FSP) magnesium alloy (AZ31). Interleaved structures of ultra-fine, of few 100 nm, and coarser grains, several microns, were noted. Very short thermal anneals coarsened the former: generating typical micron-sized FSP grains. A model of microstructural development through grain boundary sliding of the ultra-fine grains was proposed. This model explains weaker texture in such grains and the fact that Mg-FSP shear texture did not change by successive passes.

  5. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  6. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Martials Extruded 0-1HTA Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Niles, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of flat end H-section columns and from local instability tests of H-, Z-, and channel section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  7. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Horstemeyer, Mark R.; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  8. Influences of Welding Processes on Microstructure, Hardness, and Tensile Properties of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Sarin Sundar, J. K.

    2010-03-01

    This article reports the influences of welding processes such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), friction stir welding (FSW), and laser beam welding (LBW) on tensile properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy. The lowest hardness distribution profile (LHDP) is constructed across the weld section to identify the fracture path. From this investigation, it is found that LBW joints exhibited superior tensile properties compared to GTAW and FSW joints and this is mainly due to the formation of very fine grains in the fusion zone and absence of heat-affected zone (HAZ).

  9. Aqueous Corrosion Behavior of Micro Arc Oxidation (MAO)-Coated Magnesium Alloys: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Krishna, L.; Sundararajan, G.

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, in the current era of persistently growing engineering demands, have become the most promising materials finding widespread industrial applications. Numerous processes are available for surface protection of Mg and its alloys to potentially minimize corrosion damage. The micro arc oxidation (MAO), a fairly recent and eco-friendly coating process, emerged as a novel means to provide an adherent, hard, scratch-resistant, wear-resistant, and corrosion-resistant coatings on Mg alloys. However, the successful utilization of such coatings demands a thorough understanding of the influence of a relatively large number of process parameters such as electrolytic composition, presence of insoluble additives in the electrolyte, electrical parameters employed, and the composition of the Mg alloy substrate on the corrosion resistance. The detailed influence of all the above parameters on the corrosion behavior of Mg alloys is critically reviewed and presented in this article. In addition, this article also reviews the recent trends in terms of duplexing the MAO process using different techniques/processes such that the composite coatings are produced with enhanced corrosion resistance.

  10. Research on microstructures of sub-rapidly solidified AZ61 Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Haitao; Zhang Xiaoli; Zhang Zhongtao; Li Tingju; Cockcroft, Steve

    2009-06-15

    AZ61 magnesium alloy foils of 0.5-3.0 mm thick were successfully produced by using sub-rapid solidification technique. Microstructures of conventionally solidified (CS) and sub-rapidly solidified (sub-RS) alloys were examined by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the cellular grain of 1.8-13.5 {mu}m can be obtained during sub-rapid solidification process. Phase compositions and microdistribution of the alloying elements in the foils were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), respectively. The eutectic transformation L {yields} {alpha}-Mg + {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and microsegregation in conventionally solidified AZ61 alloy were remarkably suppressed in sub-rapid solidification process. As a consequence, the alloying elements Al, Zn, Mn showed much higher solid solubility and the sub-rapid solidification microstructures dominantly consisted of supersaturated {alpha}-Mg solid solution. Meanwhile, the {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases located in the {alpha}-Mg grain boundaries are largely decreased due to high solidification cooling rate.

  11. Microstructural characterization of ultrasonic impact treated aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim Ngoc Thi

    Aluminum 5456-H116 has high as-welded strength, is formable, and highly corrosion resistant, however, it can become sensitized when exposed to elevated temperatures for a prolonged time. Sensitization results in the formation of a continuous β phase at the grain boundaries that is anodic to the matrix. Thus the grain boundaries become susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion cracking (IGC). Cracking issues on aluminum superstructures have prompted the use of a severe plastic deformation processes, such as ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT), to improve SCC resistance. This study correlated the effects of UIT on the properties of 5456-H116 alloy to the microstructural evolution of the alloy and helped develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that cause the microstructural evolution. Ultrasonic impact treatment produces a deformed layer at the surface ˜ 10 to 18 µm thick that is characterized by micro-cracks, tears, and voids. Ultrasonic impact treatment results in grain refinement within the deformation layer and extending below the deformed layer. The microstructure exhibits weak crystallographic texture with larger fraction of high angle grain boundaries. Nanocrystalline grains within the deformation layer vary in size from 2 to 200 nm in diameter and exhibit curved or wavy grain boundaries. The nanocrystalline grains are thermally stable up to 300°C. Above 300°C, grain growth occurs with an activation energy of ˜ 32 kJ/mol. Below the deformation layer, the microstructure is characterized by submicron grains, complex structure of dislocations, sub-boundaries, and Moiré fringes depicting overlapping grains. The deformation layer does not exhibit the presence of a continuous β phase, however below the deformation layer; a continuous β phase along the grain boundaries is present. In general the highest hardness and yield strength is at the UIT surface which is attributed to the formation of nanocrystalline grains

  12. Corrosion resistant performances of alkanoic and phosphonic acids derived self-assembled monolayers on magnesium alloy AZ31 by vapor-phase method.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Okido, Masazumi; Masuda, Yoshitake; Saito, Naobumi; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-05-17

    Alkanoic and phosphonic acid derived self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were formed on magnesium alloy by the vapor phase method. AFM and XPS studies showed that SAMs were formed on Mg alloy. The chemical and anticorrosive properties of the SAMs prepared on magnesium alloys were characterized using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. Water contact angle measurements revealed that, although SA and ISA have the same headgroup to anchor to the magnesium alloy surface, the packing density on the magnesium alloy surface could be considerably different. The contact angle hysteresis of SAMs with a carboxylate headgroup is much larger than that of SAMs with a phosphonic acid group. The XPS O 1s peaks indicated more likely a mix of mono-, bi-, or tridentate binding of phosphonic acid SAM to the oxide or hydroxide surface of the Mg alloy. The electrochemical measurements showed that the phosphonic acid derived SAM had better corrosion resistance compared to alkanoic acid derived SAM. The chemical stability of SAMs modified magnesium alloy was investigated using water contact angle and XPS measurements. The water contact angle and XPS measurements revealed that the molecular density of OP and PFEP on magnesium alloy would be higher than those of SA and ISA on magnesium alloy. PMID:21504153

  13. Superplastic Formability of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets Produced by Twin Roll Casting and Sequential Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yandong; Lin, Kai; Jiang, Peng

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, superplastic tensile testing and gas bulging forming of AZ31 and AZ31 + Y + Sr magnesium alloys produced by twin roll casting (TRC) and sequential hot rolling were carried out. At 673 K, the superplastic formability of the TRC AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets added Y and Sr elements has improved significantly compared to the common TRC AZ31 sheets. Formations of cavities on the bulging part go through three stages of the nucleation, growth and aggregation, finally cavities merging lead to rupture at the top of the bulging part.

  14. Structure of magnesium alloy MA14 after multistep isothermal forging and subsequent isothermal rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugmanov, D. R.; Sitdikov, O. Sh.; Markushev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Optical metallography and electron microscopy have been used to analyze the structural changes in magnesium MA14 alloy subjected to processing that combines multistep isothermal forging and isothermal rolling. It has been found that forging of a bulk workpiece leads to the formation of a structure, 85-90% of which consists of recrystallized grains with an average size of less than 5 µm. Subsequent rolling results in a completely recrystallized structure with a grain size of 1-2 µm. It is shown that the resultant structural states are characterized by grain size nonuniformity inherited from the initial hot-pressed semi-finished product. The nature and features of crystallization processes that take place in the alloy during processing are discussed.

  15. On the surface properties of biodegrading magnesium and its alloys: a survey and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. L.; Kirkland, N. T.; Chen, X. B.; Lyndon, J. A.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-03-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys present exceptional promise as functional implants, as evidenced by the significant research effort associated with the topic in recent years. However, a salient point regarding the degradation of Mg and Mg-alloys—in any aqueous environment, including biological media—is the certain presence and accumulation of surface films, representing dissolution products. The corrosion of Mg does not require that bare metal surfaces be presented to the surrounding environment, it follows that any tissue or cells in the immediate vicinity of a Mg-based implant will therefore be in intimate contact with the dissolution products of Mg. To this end, the present work describes the typical Mg/Mg-alloy surface evolution during dissolution in biological media, and the associated factors which govern the morphology and control of surface films. This combines original research with review, finishing with prospects for further illumination.

  16. Endothelialization of Novel Magnesium-Rare Earth Alloys with Fluoride and Collagen Coating

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Workman, Benjamin; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are promising scaffolds for the next generation of cardiovascular stents because of their better biocompatibility and biodegradation compared to traditional metals. However, insufficient mechanical strength and high degradation rate are still the two main limitations for Mg materials. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment and collagen coating were used in this research to improve the endothelialization of two rare earth-based Mg alloys. Results demonstrated that a nanoporous film structure of fluoride with thickness of ~20 μm was formed on the Mg material surface, which improved the corrosion resistance. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) had much better attachment, spreading, growth and proliferation (the process of endothelialization) on HF-treated Mg materials compared to bare- or collagen-coated ones. PMID:24670478

  17. Effects of Microstructure and Processing Methods on Creep Behavior of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbeigi Roodposhti, Peiman; Sarkar, Apu; Murty, Korukonda L.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-07-01

    This review sheds light on the creep properties of AZ91 magnesium alloys with a major emphasis on the influence of microstructure on the creep resistance and underlying creep deformation mechanism based on stress exponent and activation energy. Effects of processing routes such as steel mold casting, die casting, and thixoforming are considered. Roles of a wide range of additional alloying elements such as Si, Sb, Bi, Ca, Sn, REs, and combined addition of them on the microstructure modification were investigated. The reaction between these elements and the Mg or Al in the matrix develops some thermally stable intermetallic phases which improves the creep resistance at elevated temperatures, however does not influence the creep mechanism.

  18. Characterization of damage evolution in an AM60 magnesium alloy by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A.; Green, R.E.; Martz, H.; Dolan, K.; Horstemeyer, M.; Derrill, R.

    1999-06-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Lab and Sandia National Laboratories, CA are collaborating on the development of new techniques to study damage evolution and growth in material specimens subjected to mechanical loading. These techniques include metallography, radiography, computed tomography (CT) and modeling. The material specimens being studied include cast magnesium and aluminum alloys, and forged stainless steel. The authors concentrate on characterizing monotonically loaded Mg alloy specimens using CT. Several notched tensile specimens were uniaxially loaded to different percentages of the failure load. Specimens were initially characterized by radiography and computed tomography to determine the preloaded state. Subsequent CT scans were performed after the samples were loaded to different percentages of the load failure. The CT volumetric data are being used to measure void size, distribution and orientation in all three dimensions nondestructively to determine the effect of void growth on the mechanical behavior of the materials.

  19. Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, H.; Bulian, W.; Bungardt, K.; Gürs, K.; Gürs, U.; Helling, W.; Kyri, H.; Laue, H. J.; Mahler, W.; Matting, A.; Meyer, F. R.; Mialki, W.; Ritter, F.; Ruge, J.; Saur, G.; Simon, W.; Strnat, K.; Weber, R.; Weigand, H. H.; Weik, H.; Ziesler, H.; Borchers, Heinz; Schmidt, Ernst

    Magnesium wird überwiegend durch Schmelzflußelektrolyse hergestellt. Das dabei anfallende Reinmagnesium hat einen Mg-Gehalt von etwa 99,9%. Hauptbeimengung ist das Eisen; Silizium und Aluminium sind nur in Spuren vorhanden. Der Anwendungsumfang des Reinmagnesiums ist gering; dagegen werden Magnesiumlegierungen zunehmend, insbesondere für den Druckguß verwendet. Neben den bis etwa zum Jahre 1950 allein gebräuchlichen Mg-Mn-, Mg-Al- und Mg-Al-Zn-Legierungen werden heute mehr und mehr die besonders warmfesten Legierungen mit Zusätzen von Zirkon, Thorium und Seltenen Erden hergestellt (siehe dazu auch Abschnitt Seltene Erden). Als Umhüllungsmaterial für Uranstäbe dient die Legierung Magnox A 12, die nach [H 3] neben 1 % Al noch geringe Mengen an Ca und Ba enthält. In den in Deutschland üblichen Kurzzeichen (DIN 1729) werden die chemischen Symbole und der ungefähre Gehalt der wichtigsten Legierungselemente angegeben. Gußlegierungen werden zusätzlich durch ein G (Sandguß oder Kokillenguß) oder ein D (Druckguß) gekennzeichnet (siehe Tab. 5).

  20. Wear Behavior Characterization for the Screening of Magnesium-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, Paul R.

    This research is focused on the development of a systematic approach to evaluate the selection of materials for Mg-based alloys under wear conditions for biomedical applications. A pilot study was carried out in order to establish an accurate and reliable wear testing technique for magnesium and its alloys. This pilot study was conducted on aluminum (Al) and pure Mg, and showed that aluminum has a lower wear rate compared to Mg. The technique displayed good repeatability and high precision. For the main study, an ERC Mg-based alloy was to be compared with pure Mg. The same technique, when applied to pure Mg from a different vendor, produced up to 90% scatter in the data. Microstructure was studied to see if it had any correlation with the scatter. It was discovered that Mg ingot from the second vendor had outsized grains that contributed to the disproportional scatter in the wear data. Increasing the stroke length during wear testing was required so that the wear data would be averaged over multiple grains and reduces the variation in computed wear rates. In the main study, wear behavior and friction properties were analyzed using microtribometery, mechanical stylus profilometry, and microindentation. Surface morphology and microstructure were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. For the main study, pure Mg and the ERC alloy as-cast and extruded conditions were compared. Pure Mg and MZCR alloys were extruded at 350°C and 400°C, respectively. Mg and MZCR alloy were cast at 350°C and heat treated at 510°C. The extruded specimens were divided into two sections, cross-section and longitudinal section. Wear tests were carried out under the applied normal load 0.5 N - 2.5 N in 0.5 N increments sliding at a rate of 0.2 Hz for 240 passes. The results show that the alloying and extrusion processes increase the hardness of the MZCR alloy significantly up to 80%. The as-cast MZCR has a lower resistance to wear

  1. Constitutive Equations and Flow Behavior of an As-Extruded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Under Large Strain Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Cunsheng; Lu, Xing; Wang, Cuixue; Zhao, Guoqun

    2016-06-01

    A reasonable constitutive model is the key to achieving the accurate numerical simulation of magnesium alloy extrusion process. Based on the hot compression tests of the as-extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy, the strain-compensated Arrhenius equation, the constitutive equation taking into account dynamic recovery (DRV) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX), and the modified Fields-Backofen equation (FB) are established to describe the deformation behavior of this alloy under large strain condition (strain level greater than 1.0) and wide strain rate range (0.01 to 10 s-1), respectively. Then material parameters in each constitutive model are determined by linear fitting method. The comparison of these three kinds of equations shows that the strain-compensated Arrhenius model provides the best prediction of flow stress, and the calculated value of correlation coefficient ( R) is the highest as 0.9945 and the average absolute relative error (AARE) is the lowest as 3.11%. The constitutive equation with DRV + DRX can also predict flow stress accurately, and its values of R and AARE are 0.9920 and 4.41%, respectively. However, compared to the other two constitutive equations, the modified FB equation does not give good description of hot deformation behavior for this magnesium alloy. Finally, the advantages and drawbacks of these three kinds of constitutive models are discussed and compared. Therefore, this work could provide theoretical guidelines for investigating hot deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys and determining the appropriate extrusion process parameters under large strain condition.

  2. Constitutive Equations and Flow Behavior of an As-Extruded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Under Large Strain Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Cunsheng; Lu, Xing; Wang, Cuixue; Zhao, Guoqun

    2016-05-01

    A reasonable constitutive model is the key to achieving the accurate numerical simulation of magnesium alloy extrusion process. Based on the hot compression tests of the as-extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy, the strain-compensated Arrhenius equation, the constitutive equation taking into account dynamic recovery (DRV) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX), and the modified Fields-Backofen equation (FB) are established to describe the deformation behavior of this alloy under large strain condition (strain level greater than 1.0) and wide strain rate range (0.01 to 10 s-1), respectively. Then material parameters in each constitutive model are determined by linear fitting method. The comparison of these three kinds of equations shows that the strain-compensated Arrhenius model provides the best prediction of flow stress, and the calculated value of correlation coefficient (R) is the highest as 0.9945 and the average absolute relative error (AARE) is the lowest as 3.11%. The constitutive equation with DRV + DRX can also predict flow stress accurately, and its values of R and AARE are 0.9920 and 4.41%, respectively. However, compared to the other two constitutive equations, the modified FB equation does not give good description of hot deformation behavior for this magnesium alloy. Finally, the advantages and drawbacks of these three kinds of constitutive models are discussed and compared. Therefore, this work could provide theoretical guidelines for investigating hot deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys and determining the appropriate extrusion process parameters under large strain condition.

  3. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloy under applied forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiyang; Cai, Shu; Xu, Guohua; Shen, Sibo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    In order to research the corrosion behavior of bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloys under applied forces, mesoporous 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic (45S5 MBGC) coatings were successfully prepared on AZ31 substrates using a sol-gel dip-coating technique followed by a heat treatment at the temperature of 400°C. In this work, corrosion behavior of the coated samples under applied forces was characterized by electrochemical tests and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. Results showed that the glass-ceramic coatings lost the protective effects to the magnesium substrate in a short time when the applied compressive stress was greater than 25MPa, and no crystallized apatite was formed on the surface due to the high Mg(2+) releasing and the peeling off of the coatings. Whereas, under low applied forces, apatite deposition and crystallization on the coating surface repaired cracks to some extent, thus improving the corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium during the long-term immersion period. PMID:26703229

  4. Chemical nature of phytic acid conversion coating on AZ61 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fusheng; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Dingfei

    2009-07-01

    Phytic acid (PA) conversion coating on AZ61 magnesium alloy was prepared by the method of deposition. The influences of pH, time and PA concentration on the formation process, microstructure and properties of the conversion coating were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the microstructure. The chemical nature of conversion coating was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The corrosion resistance was examined by means of potentiodynamic polarization method. The adhesive ability was tested by score experiments. The results showed that the growth and microstructure of the conversion coatings were all obviously affected by pH, time and PA concentration. In 0.5 mg/ml PA solution with a pH of 5, an optimization conversion coating formed after 20 min immersion time by deposition of PA on AZ61 magnesium alloy surface through chelating with Al 3+. It made the corrosion potential Ecorr of sample shifted positively about 171 mV than that of the untreated sample, and the adhesive ability reached to Grade 1 (in accordance with GB/T 9286).

  5. Identification of an advanced constitutive model of Magnesium alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. G.; Massoni, E.

    2011-05-04

    The main aim of this paper is to study the flow behavior of the AZ31B magnesium alloy by means of tensile tests performed in extended ranges of temperature and strain rates. The flow stress-strain curves analyzed by power law type constitutive equation can only fit well with experimental curves at the work-hardening stage. A new mathematical model is studied to describe the softening behavior of material based on tensile experiments. The relative parameters are obtained by fitting the equation with the experimental data. The genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the global optimal fitting parameters. The comparison between the fitted and experimental data proves the effectiveness of the model. The results indicate that this model leads to a better simulation of the flow stress during the softening stage than that of the power law equation. Based on this model, the deep drawing process has been simulated with the commercial finite element code FORGE registered. The punch load and thickness distribution of AZ31 sheet have been studied. The study of the results is helpful to the application of the stamping technology for the magnesium alloy sheet.

  6. Experimental investigation of anisotropy evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets under tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Tari, D. Ghaffari; Worswick, M. J.

    2011-05-04

    Increasing demand for lighter final products has created new opportunities for the application of new light weight materials. Due to high strength to density ratio and good magnetic resistance properties, magnesium alloys are good candidates to replace steel and aluminum for same application. However, limited numbers of active slip deformation mechanisms, result in a decreased formability at room temperature. Furthermore, wrought magnesium alloys have an initial crystallographic texture, remained from the prior rolling operations, which makes them highly anisotropic. In this paper, tensile tests are performed at room temperature and 200 deg. C at different strain rates and orientations relative to the rolling direction, including rolling, 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg. and transverse orientation. The strain rates adopted for these experiments varied from 0.001 to 1.0. The testing results show the effect of temperature on the strain rate sensitivity of AZ31 sheets. The extent of deformation is continuously recorded using two separate high temperature extensometers. The results of testing show an increase in the r-values with the plastic deformation. The strain rate sensitivity of AZ31 increased as the temperature was elevated. At higher strain rates the measured r-values are larger and the slope of its evolution with the plastic strain is steeper.

  7. Pulsed laser cleaning of aluminium-magnesium alloys: effect of surface modifications on adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autric, Michel; Oltra, Roland

    2008-05-01

    Surface cleaning is a key step in many industrial processes and especially in laser surface treatments. During laser cleaning of metallic alloys using pulsed lasers, surface modification can be induced due to transient thermal effect. In ambient atmospheric conditions, an oxidation of the cleaned surface can be detected. The aim of this work was to characterize this transient oxidation that can occur below the laser energy domain leading to any phase change (melting, ablation) of the cleaned substrate. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1.06 μm) with 10 ns pulse duration was used for this study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used for surface analysis of irradiated samples. Thermal oxidation took place on the aluminium-magnesium alloy (5000 series) during the irradiation in air (fluence range 0.6-1.4 Jcm-2). It has been demonstrated that this 10 ns laser thermal oxidation and the steady state thermal oxidation have the same mechanism. When the laser fluence reached 1 J cm -2 , the oxide formed by the thermal oxidation became in a large extent crystalline and its outer part was entirely covered by a continuous magnesium oxide layer.

  8. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  9. Crystal plasticity based finite element modelling of large strain deformation in AM30 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadbakhsh, Adel; Inal, Kaan; Mishra, Raja K.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the finite strain plastic deformation of AM30 magnesium alloy has been simulated using the crystal plasticity finite element method. The simulations have been carried out using a rate-dependent elastic-viscoplastic crystal plasticity constitutive model implemented in a user defined material subroutine (UMAT) in the commercial software LS-DYNA. The plastic deformation mechanisms accounted for in the model are the slip systems in the matrix (parent grain), extension twinning systems and the slip systems inside the extension twinned regions. The parameters of the constitutive model have been calibrated using the experimental data. The calibrated model has then been used to predict the deformation of AM30 magnesium alloy in bending and simple shear. For the bending strain path, the effects of texture on the strain accommodated by the deformation mechanisms and bending moment have been investigated. For simple shear, the effects of texture on the relative activity of deformation mechanisms, shear stress and texture evolution have been investigated. Also, the effect of twinning on shear stress and texture evolution has been studied. The numerical analyses predicted a more uniform strain distribution during bending and simple shear for rolled texture compared with extruded texture.

  10. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less