Science.gov

Sample records for amaurosis fugax

  1. Amaurosis fugax associated with congenital vascular defect

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, John W; Thomas, Edward R; Rundell, William K

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old female with no significant past medical history presented with loss of vision in the lower half of her left eye that lasted <5 minutes. No abnormalities were found on ocular or physical exam. Computed tomography angiography and carotid ultrasound were performed, which confirmed the diagnosis as amaurosis fugax with two abnormalities leading to the transient retinal vessel occlusion. First, it was found that the patient has a congenital vascular anomaly, which consisted most notably of a right-sided aortic arch. This vascular anomaly also consisted of abnormal branching of the left subclavian and common carotid arteries, predisposing the patient to turbulent blood flow and increased risk of the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque at the origin of the common carotid artery. This is an abnormal location for a plaque leading to amaurosis fugax compared to the most common location at the carotid bifurcation. Endarterectomy was not performed because of the difficult location of the plaque and tortuosity of the vessel. Rather, medical intervention with antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy was initiated to lower the risk of future retinal or cerebral thromboembolic events. PMID:27445507

  2. Amaurosis fugax

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure. If you have diabetes, heart disease, or hardening of the arteries, your LDL "bad" cholesterol should ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 14. Read More Diabetes Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  3. Amaurosis fugax

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision loss may be followed by more serious nervous system symptoms. These symptoms can be similar to those ... Tests include a complete eye and nervous system exam. The doctor ... to listen to the carotid arteries in your neck. In some cases, ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  5. Female sex pheromones of two Japanese saturniid species, Rhodinia fugax and Loepa sakaei: identification, synthesis, and field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Kanegae, Akiko; Miyachi, Takashi; Naka, Hideshi; Tatsuta, Haruki; Ando, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    While 11 species in the family Saturniidae are found in Japan, no sex pheromones of the native species had been investigated previously. We collected larvae of Rhodinia fugax in Nagano and Tottori Prefecture, and of Loepa sakaei in Okinawa Prefecture, and extracted sex pheromones of these two species from virgin female moths. In gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) analyses, male antennae of each species responded to one component in the respective pheromone extracts of conspecific females. Chemical analyses of the extracts by GC/mass spectrometry revealed that the EAD-active compounds of R. fugax and L. sakaei were a hexadecadienal and a tetradecadienyl acetate, respectively. The two species belong to the subfamily Saturniinae, and the mass spectra of both were similar to that of the 6,11-hexadecadienyl acetate identified from Antheraea polyphemus, classified in the same subfamily, suggesting the same 6,11-dienyl structure for the C16 aldehyde and a 4,9-dienyl structure for the C14 acetate. Based on this assumption, four geometrical isomers of each dienyl compound were stereoselectively synthesized via acetylene intermediates, compared to the natural products, and tested in the field. Male catches confirmed the pheromone structures of the two Japanese saturniid species as (6E,11Z)-6,11-hexadecadienal for R. fugax and (4E,9Z)-4,9-tetradecadienyl acetate for L. sakaei. The compounds have a characteristic 1,6-dienyl motif common to the pheromones of Saturniinae species. PMID:25533776

  6. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  7. Leber Congenital Amaurosis: Genotypes and Retinal Structure Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Huang, Wei Chieh; Sumaroka, Alexander; Nam, Hyun Ju; Sheplock, Rebecca; Schwartz, Sharon B

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) patients of 10 known genotypes (n = 24; age range, 3-25 years) were studied clinically and by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Comparisons were made between OCT results across the horizontal meridian (central 60(o)) of the patients. Three patterns were identified. First, there were LCA genotypes with unusual and readily identifiable patterns, such as near normal outer nuclear layer (ONL) across the central retina or severely dysplastic retina. Second, there were genotypes with well-formed foveal architecture but only residual central islands of normal or reduced ONL thickness. Third, some genotypes showed central ONL losses or dysmorphology suggesting early macular disease or foveal maldevelopment. Objective in vivo morphological features could complement other phenotypic characteristics and help guide genetic testing of LCA patients or at least permit a differential diagnosis of genotypes to be made in the clinic. PMID:26427408

  8. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD+ synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. PMID:26018082

  9. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-07-10

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD(+) synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. PMID:26018082

  10. Leber's congenital amaurosis: is there an autistic component?

    PubMed

    Fazzi, E; Rossi, M; Signorini, S; Rossi, G; Bianchi, P E; Lanzi, G

    2007-07-01

    There is much evidence in the literature suggesting that children with congenital blindness can also present autistic like features. The aetiopathogenetic and clinical significance of this association is still unclear. Given the central role played by vision in development, we set out to establish the significance of autistic-like behaviours in children with early-onset severe visual impairment. Our sample comprised 24 children (13 males, 11 females; mean age 5y 2mo; range 2-11y) affected by Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). The results of our administration of a modified Childhood Autism Rating Scale--excluding item VII (Visual Responsiveness)--showed that only four of the children gave an overall score indicating the presence of autism (moreover, of mild/moderate degree). Hardly any of the children in our LCA sample presented major dysfunctions in their relationships with other people or in their social and emotional responsiveness, thus allowing us to exclude a genuine comorbidity with a picture of autism. Indeed, the risk facing the visually impaired child seems to concern their early interactive experiences, which may be affected by their inability to connect with others, and may be prevented through the development of specific strategies of intervention. PMID:17593121

  11. [First North African observation of Leber congenital amaurosis secondary to CEP290 gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Aboussair, N; Berahou, A; Perrault, I; Elalaoui, S Chafai; Megzari, A; Rozet, J M; Kaplan, J; Sefiani, A

    2010-02-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a the earliest and most severe form of retinal dystrophy responsible for congenital blindness. LCA has genetic heterogeneity and the study of this disease is elucidating the genetics and molecular interactions involved in the development of the retina. To date, 11 LCA genes have been mapped, ten of which have been identified. The CEP290 gene has been shown to account for Joubert and Senior-Loken syndromes and to be a frequent cause of nonsyndromic LCA. We report here the first Arab patient, born to consanguineous parents, with Leber congenital amaurosis attributable to mutation of the CEP290 gene. PMID:20056295

  12. Analysis of recoverin mutations in a Leber`s congenital amaurosis pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Freud, C.L.; Sunness, J.; Goldberg, M.; Valle, D.

    1994-09-01

    Recoverin is a calcium binding protein abundantly and specifically expressed in photoreceptors. There are four EF hand Ca2+ binding domains but only two, the second and third, are thought to be functional. We have analyzed the structural gene for recoverin in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and Leber`s congenital amaurosis. We found one patient with Leber`s congenital amaurosis who is a genetic compound for mutations at the recoverin locus. The patient is a 17-year-old product of a nonconsanguineous union who was blind from birth but is otherwise normal. Her ocular fundi are pale with {open_quotes}punched out{close_quotes} maculae, and her ERG is extinguished. One of the recoverin mutations, G113S, changes the third EF hand, which is the only one of the four in recoverin that binds calcium in the crystal structure. The location of this substitution suggests a possible disruption of the calcium binding properties of the mutant protein. We did not find the G113S mutation in 60 controls, or 67 other Leber`s congenital amaurosis patients. The second mutation, -374 G{yields}A, is in the putative promoter region of the recoverin gene, approximately 370 base pairs 5{prime} of the transcriptional start site. We did not find this mutation in 150 normal controls, or in 67 other Leber`s congenital amaurosis patients. Analysis of the possible consequences of -374 G{yields}A on promoter function is under investigation.

  13. A syndrome of congenital retinal dystrophy and saccade palsy--a subset of Leber's amaurosis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A. T.; Taylor, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Three children who presented in infancy with a severe visual defect and absent or barely recordable electroretinograms, with relatively well preserved visually evoked cortical potentials, were subsequently found to have vertical and horizontal saccade palsies with head thrusts but relatively good visual acuity. These children, who were clearly different from other infants with congenital retinal dystrophy, were also developmentally delayed and had systemic motor and speech defects, but their visual prognosis was relatively good. The recognition of their saccade palsy was delayed because their poor visual attention in infancy was ascribed purely to the tapetoretinal degeneration. We consider these patients represent a clear subset of those patients who are diagnosed as having congenital retinal dystrophy or Leber's amaurosis. Images PMID:6722075

  14. Mouse Models of NMNAT1-Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA9) Recapitulate Key Features of the Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Scott H; Charette, Jeremy R; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Shi, Lan Ying; Brown, Steve D M; Stone, Lisa; Liu, Qin; Hicks, Wanda L; Collin, Gayle B; Bowl, Michael R; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    The nicotinamide nucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) enzyme is essential for regenerating the nuclear pool of NAD(+) in all nucleated cells in the body, and mounting evidence also suggests that it has a separate role in neuroprotection. Recently, mutations in the NMNAT1 gene were associated with Leber congenital amaurosis, a severe retinal degenerative disease that causes blindness during infancy. Availability of a reliable mammalian model of NMNAT1-Leber congenital amaurosis would assist in determining the mechanisms through which disruptions in NMNAT1 lead to retinal cell degeneration and would provide a resource for testing treatment options. To this end, we identified two separate N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-generated mouse lines that harbor either a p.V9M or a p.D243G mutation. Both mouse models recapitulate key aspects of the human disease and confirm the pathogenicity of mutant NMNAT1. Homozygous Nmnat1 mutant mice develop a rapidly progressing chorioretinal disease that begins with photoreceptor degeneration and includes attenuation of the retinal vasculature, optic atrophy, and retinal pigment epithelium loss. Retinal function deteriorates in both mouse lines, and, in the more rapidly progressing homozygous Nmnat1(V9M) mutant mice, the electroretinogram becomes undetectable and the pupillary light response weakens. These mouse models offer an opportunity for investigating the cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis, evaluating potential therapies for NMNAT1-Leber congenital amaurosis, and conducting in situ studies on NMNAT1 function and NAD(+) metabolism. PMID:27207593

  15. Pupillometric analysis for assessment of gene therapy in Leber Congenital Amaurosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Objective techniques to assess the amelioration of vision in patients with impaired visual function are needed to standardize efficacy assessment in gene therapy trials for ocular diseases. Pupillometry has been investigated in several diseases in order to provide objective information about the visual reflex pathway and has been adopted to quantify visual impairment in patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA). In this paper, we describe detailed methods of pupillometric analysis and a case study on three Italian patients affected by Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) involved in a gene therapy clinical trial at two follow-up time-points: 1 year and 3 years after therapy administration. Methods Pupillary light reflexes (PLR) were measured in patients who had received a unilateral subretinal injection in a clinical gene therapy trial. Pupil images were recorded simultaneously in both eyes with a commercial pupillometer and related software. A program was generated with MATLAB software in order to enable enhanced pupil detection with revision of the acquired images (correcting aberrations due to the inability of these severely visually impaired patients to fixate), and computation of the pupillometric parameters for each stimulus. Pupil detection was performed through Hough Transform and a non-parametric paired statistical test was adopted for comparison. Results The developed program provided correct pupil detection also for frames in which the pupil is not totally visible. Moreover, it provided an automatic computation of the pupillometric parameters for each stimulus and enabled semi-automatic revision of computerized detection, eliminating the need for the user to manually check frame by frame. With reference to the case study, the amplitude of pupillary constriction and the constriction velocity were increased in the right (treated eye) compared to the left (untreated) eye at both follow-up time-points, showing stability of the improved PLR in the

  16. Differential Proteomics and Functional Research following Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qinxiang; Ren, Yueping; Tzekov, Radouil; Zhang, Yuanping; Chen, Bo; Hou, Jiangping; Zhao, Chunhui; Zhu, Jiali; Zhang, Ying; Dai, Xufeng; Ma, Shan; Li, Jia; Pang, Jijing; Qu, Jia; Li, Wensheng

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe forms of inherited retinal degeneration and can be caused by mutations in at least 15 different genes. To clarify the proteomic differences in LCA eyes, a cohort of retinal degeneration 12 (rd12) mice, an LCA2 model caused by a mutation in the RPE65 gene, were injected subretinally with an AAV vector (scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65) in one eye, while the contralateral eye served as a control. Proteomics were compared between untreated rd12 and normal control retinas on P14 and P21, and among treated and untreated rd12 retinas and control retinas on P42. Gene therapy in rd12 mice restored retinal function in treated eyes, which was demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG). Proteomic analysis successfully identified 39 proteins expressed differently among the 3 groups. The expression of 3 proteins involved in regulation of apoptosis and neuroptotection (alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6) were investigated further. Immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time PCR confirmed the quantitative changes in their expression. Furthermore, cell culture studies suggested that peroxiredoxin 6 could act in an antioxidant role in rd12 mice. Our findings support the feasibility of gene therapy in LCA2 patients and support a role for alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6 in the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in LCA2 disease process. PMID:22953002

  17. Differential proteomics and functional research following gene therapy in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinxiang; Ren, Yueping; Tzekov, Radouil; Zhang, Yuanping; Chen, Bo; Hou, Jiangping; Zhao, Chunhui; Zhu, Jiali; Zhang, Ying; Dai, Xufeng; Ma, Shan; Li, Jia; Pang, Jijing; Qu, Jia; Li, Wensheng

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe forms of inherited retinal degeneration and can be caused by mutations in at least 15 different genes. To clarify the proteomic differences in LCA eyes, a cohort of retinal degeneration 12 (rd12) mice, an LCA2 model caused by a mutation in the RPE65 gene, were injected subretinally with an AAV vector (scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65) in one eye, while the contralateral eye served as a control. Proteomics were compared between untreated rd12 and normal control retinas on P14 and P21, and among treated and untreated rd12 retinas and control retinas on P42. Gene therapy in rd12 mice restored retinal function in treated eyes, which was demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG). Proteomic analysis successfully identified 39 proteins expressed differently among the 3 groups. The expression of 3 proteins involved in regulation of apoptosis and neuroptotection (alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6) were investigated further. Immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time PCR confirmed the quantitative changes in their expression. Furthermore, cell culture studies suggested that peroxiredoxin 6 could act in an antioxidant role in rd12 mice. Our findings support the feasibility of gene therapy in LCA2 patients and support a role for alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6 in the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in LCA2 disease process. PMID:22953002

  18. Review and update on the molecular basis of Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are uncommon pathologies and one of the most harmful causes of childhood and adult blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe kind of these diseases accounting for approximately 5% of the whole retinal dystrophies and 20% of the children that study on blind schools. Clinical ophthalmologic findings including severe vision loss, nystagmus and ERG abnormalities should be suspected through the first year of life in this group of patients. Phenotypic variability is found when LCA patients have a full ophthalmologic examination. However, a correct diagnosis may be carried out; the determination of ophthalmologic clues as light sensibility, night blindness, fundus pigmentation, among other, join with electroretinographics findings, optical coherence tomography, and new technologies as molecular gene testing may help to reach to a precise diagnosis. Several retinal clinical features in LCA may suggest a genetic or gene particular defect; thus genetic-molecular tools could directly corroborate the clinical diagnosis. Currently, approximately 20 genes have been associated to LCA. In this review, historical perspective, clinical ophthalmological findings, new molecular-genetics technologies, possible phenotype-genotypes correlations, and gene therapy for some LCA genes are described. PMID:25685757

  19. Novel GUCY2D Gene Mutations in Japanese Male Twins with Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Hosono, Katsuhiro; Harada, Yuko; Kurata, Kentaro; Hikoya, Akiko; Sato, Miho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease, is the earliest onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and is the most severe of hereditary retinal dystrophies. This study was conducted to investigate genetic and clinical features of LCA in a set of Japanese male twins with LCA. Methods. To identify causative mutations, 74 genes known to cause RP or LCA were examined by targeted-next generation sequencing (NGS). Targeted-NGS was performed using a custom designed Agilent HaloPlex target enrichment kit with Illumina Miseq sequencer. Identified potential pathogenic mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Clinical analyses were based on ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and electroretinography (ERG). Results. Compound heterozygous GUCY2D mutations of novel splicing mutation c.2113+2_2113+3insT and novel missense mutation p.L905P were detected in both twins. Their father and mother were heterozygous for c.2113+2_2113+3insT and p.L905P, respectively. The twins had phenotypic features similar to those previously reported in patients with GUCY2D mutations. This included early childhood onset of visual loss, nystagmus, unrecordable ERG, photophobia, and hyperopia. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of genetic and clinical features of Japanese LCA twins with GUCY2D mutation, which were detected using targeted-NGS. PMID:26097748

  20. [The case of Maria Theresia Paradis (1759-1824). On the treatment of (hysterical?) amaurosis in a musician with music and suggestion].

    PubMed

    Evers, S

    1991-08-01

    The musician and composer Maria Theresia Paradis (1759-1824) blind since her earliest childhood was treated in 1777 by the physician Dr. Franz-Anton Mesmer (1734-1815). The treatment he used was the so-called "magnetic therapy". This was a suggestive psychotherapeutical method by which, as he thought, the amaurosis could be cured. The most essential agency of this "magnetic therapy" was music. However, the resistance of both his colleagues and the patient's family forced him to break off the therapy. Maria Theresia Paradis remained blind till the end of her life. The genesis of the amaurosis, the problem of a real therapeutical influence by Mesmer and, especially, the relationship between the music as a therapeutical medium and the musical personality of the patient are discussed in detail. The whole care cannot be cleared up definitively. There are many indications that Mesmer succeeded in improving temporarily a hysterical amaurosis of Maria Theresia Paradis. PMID:1960933

  1. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  2. Early noninvasive prenatal detection of a fetal CRB1 mutation causing Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Vallespin, Elena; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria Jose; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Diego-Alvarez, Dan; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Ayuso, Carmen; Ramos, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe inherited retinal dystrophies with the earliest age of onset. Mutations in the Crumbs homologue 1 (CRB1; OMIM 600105) gene explain 10%–24% of cases with LCA depending on the population. The aim of the present work was to study a fetal mutation associated to LCA in maternal plasma by a new methodology in the noninvasive prenatal diagnosis field: the denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC). Methods This study presents the case of a compound heterozygous fetus for two mutations in CRB1 (1q3.1-q32.2). dHPLC and automated DNA sequencing were used to detect the paternally inherited fetal mutation in a maternal plasma sample collected at the 12th week of gestation. To test the detection limit of dHPLC, we made serial dilutions of paternal DNA in control DNA. Results We were able to detect the presence of the paternally inherited fetal CRB1 mutation in maternal plasma by dHPLC. Moreover, by comparing chromatograms of serial dilutions to the plasma sample, we could ascertain that the percentage of fetal DNA in maternal plasma was at least 2%. However, the detection of the fetal mutation was not possible by automated DNA sequencing. Conclusions dHPLC seems to be sensitive enough to detect small amounts of fetal DNA in maternal plasma samples. It could be a useful tool for the noninvasive prenatal detection of paternally inherited point mutations associated with retinopathies. PMID:18682814

  3. Comprehensive Molecular Diagnosis of a Large Chinese Leber Congenital Amaurosis Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Xia; Zou, Xuan; Xu, Shan; Li, Hui; Soens, Zachry Tore; Wang, Keqing; Li, Yumei; Dong, Fangtian; Chen, Rui; Sui, Ruifang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal disease that causes early-onset severe visual impairment. To evaluate the mutation spectrum in the Chinese population, we performed a mutation screen in 145 Chinese LCA families. Methods. First, we performed direct Sanger sequencing of 7 LCA disease genes in 81 LCA families. Next, we developed a capture panel that enriches the entire coding exons and splicing sites of 163 known retinal disease genes and other candidate retinal disease genes. The capture panel allowed us to quickly identify disease-causing mutations in a large number of genes at a relatively low cost. Thus, this method was applied to the 53 LCA families that were unsolved by direct Sanger sequencing of 7 LCA disease genes and an additional 64 LCA families. Systematic next-generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis, Sanger sequencing validation, and segregation analysis were used to identify pathogenic mutations. Results. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations were identified in 107 families, heterozygous autosomal dominant mutations were identified in 3 families and an X-linked mutation was found in 1 family, for a combined solving rate of 76.6%. In total, 136 novel pathogenic mutations were found in this study. In combination with two previous studies carried out in Chinese LCA patients, we concluded that the mutation spectrum in the Chinese population is distinct compared to that in the European population. After revisiting, we also refined the clinical diagnosis of 10 families based on their molecular diagnosis. Conclusions. Our results highlight the importance of a molecular diagnosis as an integral part of the clinical diagnotic process. PMID:26047050

  4. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J; Olivares, Melani B; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komáromy, András M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-02-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not known. We evaluated the consequences of gene therapy on retinal degeneration in patients with RPE65-LCA and its canine model. In untreated RPE65-LCA patients, there was dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors, even at the earliest ages. Examined serially over years, the outer photoreceptor nuclear layer showed progressive thinning. Treated RPE65-LCA showed substantial visual improvement in the short term and no detectable decline from this new level over the long term. However, retinal degeneration continued to progress unabated. In RPE65-mutant dogs, the first one-quarter of their lifespan showed only dysfunction, and there was normal outer photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness retina-wide. Dogs treated during the earlier dysfunction-only stage showed improved visual function and dramatic protection of treated photoreceptors from degeneration when measured 5-11 y later. Dogs treated later during the combined dysfunction and degeneration stage also showed visual function improvement, but photoreceptor loss continued unabated, the same as in human RPE65-LCA. The results suggest that, in RPE65 disease treatment, protection from visual function deterioration cannot be assumed to imply protection from degeneration. The effects of gene augmentation therapy are complex and suggest a need for a combinatorial strategy in RPE65-LCA to not only improve function in the short term but also slow retinal degeneration in the long term. PMID:23341635

  5. AON-mediated Exon Skipping Restores Ciliation in Fibroblasts Harboring the Common Leber Congenital Amaurosis CEP290 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Bigot, Karine; Defoort-Delhemmes, Sabine; Rio, Marlèene; Munnich, Arnold; Scherman, Daniel; Kaplan, Josseline; Kichler, Antoine; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for congenital or early-onset blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (>10%) is located deep in intron 26 of the CEP290 gene (c.2991+1655A>G). It creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. In the present study, we show that the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) allow an efficient skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients. These data support the feasibility of an AON-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. PMID:23344081

  6. Mutations in NMNAT1 cause Leber congenital amaurosis and identify a new disease pathway for retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koenekoop, Robert K; Wang, Hui; Majewski, Jacek; Wang, Xia; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Fishman, Gerald A; Genead, Mohammed; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Solanki, Naimesh; Traboulsi, Elias I; Cheng, Jingliang; Logan, Clare V; McKibbin, Martin; Hayward, Bruce E; Parry, David A; Johnson, Colin A; Nageeb, Mohammed; Poulter, James A; Mohamed, Moin D; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R; Keser, Vafa; Mardon, Graeme; Xu, Huidan; Inglehearn, Chris F; Fu, Qing; Toomes, Carmel; Chen, Rui

    2012-09-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a blinding retinal disease that presents within the first year after birth. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase gene NMNAT1 encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 in eight families with LCA, including the family in which LCA was originally linked to the LCA9 locus. Notably, all individuals with NMNAT1 mutations also have macular colobomas, which are severe degenerative entities of the central retina (fovea) devoid of tissue and photoreceptors. Functional assays of the proteins encoded by the mutant alleles identified in our study showed that the mutations reduce the enzymatic activity of NMNAT1 in NAD biosynthesis and affect protein folding. Of note, recent characterization of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wld(s)) mouse model, in which prolonged axonal survival after injury is observed, identified NMNAT1 as a neuroprotective protein when ectopically expressed. Our findings identify a new disease mechanism underlying LCA and provide the first link between endogenous NMNAT1 dysfunction and a human nervous system disorder. PMID:22842230

  7. Mutations in NMNAT1 cause Leber congenital amaurosis and identify a new disease pathway for retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koenekoop, Robert K.; Wang, Hui; Majewski, Jacek; Wang, Xia; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Fishman, Gerald A.; Genead, Mohammed; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Solanki, Naimesh; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Cheng, Jingliang; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Hayward, Bruce E.; Parry, David A.; Johnson, Colin A.; Nageeb, Mohammed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Keser, Vafa; Mardon, Graeme; Xu, Huidan; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Fu, Qing; Toomes, Carmel; Chen, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a blinding retinal disease that presents within the first year after birth. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase gene NMNAT1 encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 in eight families with LCA, including the family in which LCA was originally linked to the LCA9 locus. Notably, all individuals with NMNAT1 mutations also have macular colobomas, which are severe degenerative entities of the central retina (fovea) devoid of tissue and photoreceptors. Functional assays of the proteins encoded by the mutant alleles identified in our study showed that the mutations reduce the enzymatic activity of NMNAT1 in NAD biosynthesis and affect protein folding. Of note, recent characterization of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) mouse model, in which prolonged axonal survival after injury is observed, identified NMNAT1 as a neuroprotective protein when ectopically expressed. Our findings identify a new disease mechanism underlying LCA and provide the first link between endogenous NMNAT1 dysfunction and a human nervous system disorder. PMID:22842230

  8. Comprehensive genotyping reveals RPE65 as the most frequently mutated gene in Leber congenital amaurosis in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Galuh D N; Bertelsen, Mette; Preising, Markus N; Ajmal, Muhammad; Lorenz, Birgit; Faradz, Sultana M H; Qamar, Raheel; Collin, Rob W J; Rosenberg, Thomas; Cremers, Frans P M

    2016-07-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) represents the most severe form of inherited retinal dystrophies with an onset during the first year of life. Currently, 21 genes are known to be associated with LCA and recurrent mutations have been observed in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1 and GUCY2D. In addition, sequence analysis of LRAT and RPE65 may be important in view of treatments that are emerging for patients carrying variants in these genes. Screening of the aforementioned variants and genes was performed in 64 Danish LCA probands. Upon the identification of heterozygous variants, Sanger sequencing was performed of the relevant genes to identify the second allele. In combination with prior arrayed primer extension analysis, this led to the identification of two variants in 42 of 86 cases (49%). Remarkably, biallelic RPE65 variants were identified in 16% of the cases, and one novel variant, p.(D110G), was found in seven RPE65 alleles. We also collected all previously published RPE65 variants, identified in 914 alleles of 539 patients with LCA or early-onset retinitis pigmentosa, and deposited them in the RPE65 Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). The in silico pathogenicity assessment of the missense and noncanonical splice site variants, as well as an analysis of their frequency in ~60 000 control individuals, rendered 864 of the alleles to affect function or probably affect function. This comprehensive database can now be used to select patients eligible for gene augmentation or retinoid supplementation therapies. PMID:26626312

  9. Comprehensive molecular diagnosis of 179 Leber congenital amaurosis and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa patients by targeted next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Hui; Sun, Vincent; Tuan, Han-Fang; Keser, Vafa; Wang, Keqing; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Zaneveld, Jacques E; Siddiqui, Sorath; Bowles, Stephanie; Khan, Ayesha; Salvo, Jason; Jacobson, Samuel G; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Wang, Feng; Birch, David; Heckenlively, John R; Fishman, Gerald A; Traboulsi, Elias I; Li, Yumei; Wheaton, Dianna; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are inherited retinal diseases that cause early onset severe visual impairment. An accurate molecular diagnosis can refine the clinical diagnosis and allow gene specific treatments. Methods We developed a capture panel that enriches the exonic DNA of 163 known retinal disease genes. Using this panel, we performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) for a large cohort of 179 unrelated and prescreened patients with the clinical diagnosis of LCA or juvenile RP. Systematic NGS data analysis, Sanger sequencing validation, and segregation analysis were utilised to identify the pathogenic mutations. Patients were revisited to examine the potential phenotypic ambiguity at the time of initial diagnosis. Results Pathogenic mutations for 72 patients (40%) were identified, including 45 novel mutations. Of these 72 patients, 58 carried mutations in known LCA or juvenile RP genes and exhibited corresponding phenotypes, while 14 carried mutations in retinal disease genes that were not consistent with their initial clinical diagnosis. We revisited patients in the latter case and found that homozygous mutations in PRPH2 can cause LCA/juvenile RP. Guided by the molecular diagnosis, we reclassified the clinical diagnosis in two patients. Conclusions We have identified a novel gene and a large number of novel mutations that are associated with LCA/juvenile RP. Our results highlight the importance of molecular diagnosis as an integral part of clinical diagnosis. PMID:23847139

  10. Genetic deletion of S-opsin prevents rapid cone degeneration in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily; Watt, Carl B; Pugh, Edward N; Fu, Yingbin

    2015-03-15

    Mutations in RPE65 or lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) disrupt 11-cis-retinal synthesis and cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe hereditary blindness occurring in early childhood. The pathology is attributed to a combination of 11-cis-retinal deficiency and photoreceptor degeneration. The mistrafficking of cone membrane-associated proteins including cone opsins (M- and S-opsins), cone transducin (Gαt2), G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and guanylate cyclase 1 (GC1) has been suggested to play a role in cone degeneration. However, their precise role in cone degeneration is unclear. Here we investigated the role of S-opsin (Opn1sw) in cone degeneration in Lrat(-) (/-), a murine model for LCA, by genetic ablation of S-opsin. We show that deletion of just one allele of S-opsin from Lrat(-) (/-) mice is sufficient to prevent the rapid cone degeneration for at least 1 month. Deletion of both alleles of S-opsin prevents cone degeneration for an extended period (at least 12 months). This genetic prevention is accompanied by a reduction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in Lrat(-) (/-) photoreceptors. Despite cone survival in Opn1sw(-/-)Lrat(-) (/-) mice, cone membrane-associated proteins (e.g. Gαt2, GRK1 and GC1) continue to have trafficking problems. Our results suggest that cone opsins are the 'culprit' linking 11-cis-retinal deficiency to cone degeneration in LCA. This result has important implications for the current gene therapy strategy that emphasizes the need for a combinatorial therapy to both improve vision and slow photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:25416279

  11. Unexpected CEP290 mRNA Splicing in a Humanized Knock-In Mouse Model for Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Garanto, Alejandro; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Peters, Theo A.; Roepman, Ronald; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Collin, Rob W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of retinal dystrophy with an onset in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA, accounting for up to 15% of all LCA cases in Europe and North-America, is a mutation (c.2991+1655AG) in intron 26 of CEP290. This mutation generates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of an aberrant exon (exon X) containing a premature stop codon to CEP290 mRNA. In order to study the pathophysiology of the intronic CEP290 mutation, we generated two humanized knock-in mouse models each carrying ~6.3 kb of the human CEP290 gene, either with or without the intronic mutation. Transcriptional characterization of these mouse models revealed an unexpected splice pattern of CEP290 mRNA, especially in the retina. In both models, a new cryptic exon (coined exon Y) was identified in ~5 to 12% of all Cep290 transcripts. This exon Y was expressed in all murine tissues analyzed but not detected in human retina or fibroblasts of LCA patients. In addition, exon x that is characteristic of LCA in humans, was expressed at only very low levels in the retina of the LCA mouse model. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses did not reveal any differences between the two transgenic models and wild-type mice. Together, our results show clear differences in the recognition of splice sites between mice and humans, and emphasize that care is warranted when generating animal models for human genetic diseases caused by splice mutations. PMID:24223178

  12. Safety in nonhuman primates of ocular AAV2-RPE65, a candidate treatment for blindness in Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Boye, Sanford L; Aleman, Tomas S; Conlon, Thomas J; Zeiss, Caroline J; Roman, Alejandro J; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komaromy, Andras M; Doobrajh, Michelle; Cheung, Andy Y; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Kaushal, Shalesh; Maguire, Albert M; Flotte, Terence R; Hauswirth, William W

    2006-08-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease group that leads to blindness. LCA caused by RPE65 mutations has been studied in animal models and vision has been restored by subretinal delivery of AAV-RPE65 vector. Human ocular gene transfer trials are being considered. Our safety studies of subretinal AAV-2/2.RPE65 in RPE65-mutant dogs showed evidence of modest photoreceptor loss in the injection region in some animals at higher vector doses. We now test the hypothesis that there can be vectorrelated toxicity to the normal monkey, with its human-like retina. Good Laboratory Practice safety studies following single intraocular injections of AAV-2/2.RPE65 in normal cynomolgus monkeys were performed for 1-week and 3-month durations. Systemic toxicity was not identified. Ocular-specific studies included clinical examinations, electroretinography, and retinal histopathology. Signs of ocular inflammation postinjection had almost disappeared by 1 week. At 3 months, electroretinography in vector-injected eyes was no different than in vehicle-injected control eyes or compared with presurgical recordings. Healed sites of retinal perforation from subretinal injections were noted clinically and by histopathology. Foveal architecture in subretinally injected eyes, vector or vehicle, could be abnormal. Morphometry of central retina showed no photoreceptor layer thickness abnormalities occurring in a dose-dependent manner. Vector sequences were present in the injected retina, vitreous, and optic nerve at 1 week but not consistently in the brain. At 3 months, there were no vector sequences in optic nerve and brain. The results allow for consideration of an upper range for no observed adverse effect level in future human trials of subretinal AAV-2/2.RPE65. The potential value of foveal treatment for LCA and other retinal degenerations warrants further research into how to achieve gene transfer without retinal injury from surgical detachment of the retina

  13. Full-Field Pupillary Light Responses, Luminance Thresholds, and Light Discomfort Thresholds in CEP290 Leber Congenital Amaurosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Frederick T.; Park, Jason C.; Fishman, Gerald A.; McAnany, J. Jason; Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate visual function in patients with CEP290 Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA-CEP290), using three full-field tests that can be performed by patients with poor fixation. Methods Six patients (age range, 9–39 years) with LCA-CEP290 participated in the study. Stimuli for all three tests (full-field stimulus test [FST], pupillometry, and light discomfort threshold [LDT] testing) were generated by the Diagnosys ColorDome ganzfeld, by using achromatic stimuli as well as long- and short-wavelength stimuli to target rod and cone photoreceptors with all three tests and, in the latter two tests, melanopsin photoreceptors. Results Dark-adapted FST thresholds in LCA-CEP290 patients were cone mediated and elevated between 4.8 and 6.2 log units above the normal achromatic threshold. The FST threshold was not measurable in one patient. The rod-mediated transient pupillary light reflex (PLR) was absent in all but the youngest patient, where unreliable responses precluded PLR quantification. Cone-mediated transient PLRs were subnormal in five patients, and absent in another. Sustained melanopsin-mediated PLRs were measurable in all patients. Full-field LDT thresholds were elevated compared to normal controls, and were lower for short-wavelengh than for long-wavelength stimuli. Conclusions The FST thresholds and transient PLRs were cone mediated in our cohort LCA-CEP290 patients. Rod-mediated PLRs were undetectable, whereas melanopsin-mediated sustained responses were detected in all patients, suggesting a relative preservation of inner-retina function. The LDT elevations for the patients are somewhat paradoxical, given their subjective perception of photoaversion. Relative aversion to short-wavelength light suggests influence from melanopsin on LDTs in these patients. PMID:26529047

  14. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs. PMID:27010695

  15. Gucy2f zebrafish knockdown – a model for Gucy2d-related leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Rainy, Nir; Vatine, Gad; Nisgav, Yael; Tovar, Anna; Gothilf, Yoav; Bach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in retinal-specific guanylate cyclase (Gucy2d) are associated with Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). Zebrafish offer unique advantages relative to rodents, including their excellent color vision, precocious retinal development, robust visual testing strategies, low cost, relatively easy transgenesis and shortened experimental times. In this study we will demonstrate the feasibility of using gene-targeting in the zebrafish as a model for the photoreceptor-specific GUCY2D-related LCA1, by reporting the visual phenotype and retinal histology resulting from Gucy2f knockdown. Gucy2f zebrafish LCA-orthologous cDNA was identified and isolated by PCR amplification. Its expression pattern was determined by whole-mount in-situ hybridization and its function was studied by gene knockdown using two different morpholino-modified oligos (MO), one that blocks translation of Gucy2f and one that blocks splicing of Gucy2f. Visual function was assessed with an optomotor assay on 6-days-post-fertilization larvae, and by analyzing changes in retinal histology. Gucy2f knockdown resulted in significantly lower vision as measured by the optomotor response compared with uninjected and control MO-injected zebrafish larvae. Histological changes in the Gucy2f-knockdown larvae included loss and shortening of cone and rod outer segments. A zebrafish model of Gucy2f-related LCA1 displays early visual dysfunction and photoreceptor layer dystrophy. This study serves as proof of concept for the use of zebrafish as a simple, inexpensive model with excellent vision on which further study of LCA-related genes is possible. PMID:22378290

  16. [Coxitis fugax. The role of diagnostic imaging].

    PubMed

    de Pellegrin, M; Fracassetti, D; Ciampi, P

    1997-10-01

    Between 1990 and 1996, 129 children (mean age 4.8 years) with hip pain were examined consecutively. In group I (n = 100, mean age 4.14 +/- 2.2), transient synovitis of the hip was diagnosed; group II (n = 29, mean age 7.3 +/- 2.1) showed the following diagnoses: Perthes' disease (n = 12), early slipped capital femoral epiphysis (n = 5), Meyer's dysplasia (n = 2), septic arthritis of the hip (n = 2), osteomyelitis of the acetabulum (n = 1), abscess of the psoas (n = 1), chondromatosis of the hip joint (n = 1), Ewing's sarcoma of the os pubis (n = 1), hip dysplasia (n = 1). Three patients who had synovitis developed Perthes' disease and were assigned to group II. The efficiency of ultrasound, scintigraphy and MRI as diagnostic tools was tested in the examination of painful hip. A capsular distension was present in 73 cases and showed a significant statistical difference (t-test, P < 0.001) in group I between affected and unaffected hips. There were no differences in the measurements of the epiphyseal and metaphyseal width in group I between the affected and the nonaffected side (t-test, P = 0.91, P = 0.57) and between the first sonographic evaluation at presentation and at the follow-up (t-test, P = 0.053, P = 0.75). MRI was performed, because of persistent joint effusion, in 10 cases in group I, and Perthes' disease was excluded. In group II the use of an MRI allowed the diagnosis in 89% of the cases. Sonographic examination, together with X-ray examination and serological testing, represent the first choices in the evaluation of a painful hip at presentation and in the follow-up of transient synovitis. MRI should always be performed when abnormalities are present at the clinical and sonographic examination, and when the X-ray does not allow a clear diagnosis. PMID:9446093

  17. A Novel Mutation in the RPE65 Gene Causing Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Its Transcriptional Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Guoyan; Ding, Qin; Chen, Zhongshan; Li, Yunbo; Yan, Ming; Bu, Lijing; Song, Yanping; Yin, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa protein is an isomerase encoded by the RPE65 gene (MIM 180069) that is responsible for an essential enzymatic step required for the function of the visual cycle. Mutations in the RPE65 gene cause not only subtype II of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) but also early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (EOSRD). This study aims to investigate a Chinese case diagnosed as EOSRD and to characterize the polymorphisms of the RPE65 gene. A seven-year-old girl with clinical symptoms of EOSRD and her parents were recruited into this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp, Optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fundus examination with dilated pupils, were performed to determine the clinical characteristics of the whole family. We amplified and sequenced the entire coding region and adjacent intronic sequences of the coding regions of the RPE65 gene for the whole family to explore the possible mutation. Our results demonstrate that the patient exhibited the typical clinically features of EOSRD. Her bilateral decimal visual acuity was 0.3 and 0.4 in the left and right eyes, respectively. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess the retinal stratification for the whole family. All together, we identified four mutations within the RPE65 gene (c.1056G>A, c.1243+2T>A, c.1338+20A>C and c.1590C>A) in the patient. Among the four mutations, c.1056G>A and c.1338+20A>C had been reported previously and another two were found for the first time in this study. Her mother also carried the novel mutation (c.1243+2T>A). Either a single or a compound heterozygous or a homozygous one mutation is expected to cause EOSRD because mutations of RPE65 gene usually cause an autosomal recessive disease. Therefore, we speculate that the c.1590C>A mutation together with the c.1243+2T>A mutation may cause the patient’s phenotype. PMID:25383945

  18. A novel mutation in the RPE65 gene causing Leber congenital amaurosis and its transcriptional expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mo, Guoyan; Ding, Qin; Chen, Zhongshan; Li, Yunbo; Yan, Ming; Bu, Lijing; Song, Yanping; Yin, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa protein is an isomerase encoded by the RPE65 gene (MIM 180069) that is responsible for an essential enzymatic step required for the function of the visual cycle. Mutations in the RPE65 gene cause not only subtype II of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) but also early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (EOSRD). This study aims to investigate a Chinese case diagnosed as EOSRD and to characterize the polymorphisms of the RPE65 gene. A seven-year-old girl with clinical symptoms of EOSRD and her parents were recruited into this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp, Optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fundus examination with dilated pupils, were performed to determine the clinical characteristics of the whole family. We amplified and sequenced the entire coding region and adjacent intronic sequences of the coding regions of the RPE65 gene for the whole family to explore the possible mutation. Our results demonstrate that the patient exhibited the typical clinically features of EOSRD. Her bilateral decimal visual acuity was 0.3 and 0.4 in the left and right eyes, respectively. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess the retinal stratification for the whole family. All together, we identified four mutations within the RPE65 gene (c.1056G>A, c.1243+2T>A, c.1338+20A>C and c.1590C>A) in the patient. Among the four mutations, c.1056G>A and c.1338+20A>C had been reported previously and another two were found for the first time in this study. Her mother also carried the novel mutation (c.1243+2T>A). Either a single or a compound heterozygous or a homozygous one mutation is expected to cause EOSRD because mutations of RPE65 gene usually cause an autosomal recessive disease. Therefore, we speculate that the c.1590C>A mutation together with the c.1243+2T>A mutation may cause the patient's phenotype. PMID:25383945

  19. Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Institute Resources & Support Resources & Support Living with Vision Loss Newly Diagnosed FFB in Your Area Stories of Hope Videos Resources Low Vision Specialists Retinal Physicians My Retina Tracker Registry Genetic ...

  20. Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign to End Blindness Other Ways to Fight Blindness Corporate Support Volunteer Take Action Honor a Loved ... taking place nationwide. Join Us We Are Ending Blindness The urgent mission of the Foundation Fighting Blindness ...

  1. Centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 mutations result in blindness with unexpected sparing of photoreceptors and visual brain: implications for therapy of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Jacobson, Samuel G; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; He, Shirley; Chang, Bo; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-11-01

    Mutations in the centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 are associated with Joubert syndrome and are the most common cause of the childhood recessive blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). An in-frame deletion in Cep290 shows rapid degeneration in the rod-rich mouse retina. To explore the mechanisms of the human retinal disease, we studied CEP290-LCA in patients of different ages (7-48 years) and compared results to Cep290-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, blind CEP290-mutant human retinas retained photoreceptor and inner laminar architecture in the cone-rich central retina, independent of severity of visual loss. Surrounding the cone-rich island was photoreceptor loss and distorted retina, suggesting neural-glial remodeling. The mutant mouse retina at 4-6 weeks of age showed similar features of retinal remodeling, with altered neural and synaptic laminae and Muller glial activation. The visual brain pathways in CEP290-LCA were anatomically intact. Our findings of preserved foveal cones and visual brain anatomy in LCA with CEP290 mutations, despite severe blindness and rapid rod cell death, suggest an opportunity for visual restoration of central vision in this common form of inherited blindness. PMID:17554762

  2. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy in the Guanylate Cyclase (RetGC1/RetGC2) Double Knockout Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Min, Seok Hong; McDoom, Issam; Kay, Christine N.; Liu, Xuan; Dyka, Frank M.; Foster, Thomas C.; Umino, Yumiko; Karan, Sukanya; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Dizhoor, Alexander; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are associated with recessive Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes photoreceptor-specific, retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1). Reports of retinal degeneration in LCA1 are conflicting; some describe no obvious degeneration and others report loss of both rods and cones. Proof of concept studies in models representing the spectrum of phenotypes is warranted. We have previously demonstrated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RetGC1 is therapeutic in GC1ko mice, a model exhibiting loss of cones only. The purpose of this study was to characterize AAV-mediated gene therapy in the RetGC1/RetGC2 double knockout (GCdko) mouse, a model lacking rod and cone function and exhibiting progressive loss of both photoreceptor subclasses. Use of this model also allowed for the evaluation of the functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 isozyme. Subretinal delivery of AAV8(Y733F) vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter driving murine Gucy2e was performed in GCdko mice at various postnatal time points. Treatment resulted in restoration of rod and cone function at all treatment ages and preservation of retinal structure in GCdko mice treated as late as 7 weeks of age. Functional gains and structural preservation were stable for at least 1 year. Treatment also conferred cortical- and subcortical-based visually-guided behavior. Functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 was indistinguishable from that of endogenous isozyme in congenic wild-type (WT) mice. This study clearly demonstrates AAV-mediated RetGC1 expression restores function to and preserves structure of rod and cone photoreceptors in a degenerative model of retinal guanylate cyclase deficiency, further supporting development of an AAV-based vector for treatment of LCA1. PMID:23210611

  3. Gene Therapy Rescues Cone Structure and Function in the 3-Month-Old rd12 Mouse: A Model for Midcourse RPE65 Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William. W.; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Methods. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin–specific antibodies. Results. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin–positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin–positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. Conclusions. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials. PMID:21169527

  4. Natural History of Cone Disease in the Murine Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis Due to CEP290 Mutation: Determining the Timing and Expectation of Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Shannon E.; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Boye, Sanford L.; Ryals, Renee C.; Olivares, Melani B.; Ruan, Qing; Tucker, Budd A.; Stone, Edwin M.; Swaroop, Anand; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the CEP290 (cilia-centrosomal protein 290 kDa) gene in Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) cause early onset visual loss but retained cone photoreceptors in the fovea, which is the potential therapeutic target. A cone-only mouse model carrying a Cep290 gene mutation, rd16;Nrl−/−, was engineered to mimic the human disease. In the current study, we determined the natural history of retinal structure and function in this murine model to permit design of pre-clinical proof-of-concept studies and allow progress to be made toward human therapy. Analyses of retinal structure and visual function in CEP290-LCA patients were also performed for comparison with the results in the model. Methods Rd16;Nrl−/− mice were studied in the first 90 days of life with optical coherence tomography (OCT), electroretinography (ERG), retinal histopathology and immunocytochemistry. Structure and function data from a cohort of patients with CEP290-LCA (n = 15; ages 7–48) were compared with those of the model. Results CEP290-LCA patients retain a central island of photoreceptors with normal thickness at the fovea (despite severe visual loss); the extent of this island declined slowly with age. The rd16;Nrl−/− model also showed a relatively slow photoreceptor layer decline in thickness with ∼80% remaining at 3 months. The number of pseudorosettes also became reduced. By comparison to single mutant Nrl−/− mice, UV- and M-cone ERGs of rd16;Nrl−/− were at least 1 log unit reduced at 1 month of age and declined further over the 3 months of monitoring. Expression of GNAT2 and S-opsin also decreased with age. Conclusions The natural history of early loss of photoreceptor function with retained cone cell nuclei is common to both CEP290-LCA patients and the rd16;Nrl−/− murine model. Pre-clinical proof-of-concept studies for uniocular therapies would seem most appropriate to begin with intervention at P35–40 and re-study after one month by assaying

  5. Three Year Follow-Up after Unilateral Subretinal Delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus in Patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Francesco; Maguire, Albert M; Rossi, Settimio; Pierce, Eric A; Melillo, Paolo; Marshall, Kathleen; Banfi, Sandro; Surace, Enrico M.; Sun, Junwei; Acerra, Carmela; Wright, J. Fraser; Wellman, Jennifer; High, Katherine A; Auricchio, Alberto; Bennett, Jean; Simonelli, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study is to show the clinical data of long-term (3 year) follow-up of five patients affected by Leber Congenital Amaurosis type 2 (LCA2) treated with a single unilateral injection of AAV2-hRPE65v2. Design clinical trial Participants five LCA2 patients with RPE65 gene mutations Methods After informed consent and confirmation of trial eligibility criteria, the eye with worse visual function was selected for subretinal delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV2-hRPE65v2). Subjects were evaluated before and after surgery at designated follow-up visits (1, 2, 3, 14, 30, 60, 90, 180, 270, 365 days, 1.5 years and 3 years) by complete ophthalmic examination. Efficacy for each subject was monitored with best corrected visual acuity, kinetic visual field, nystagmus testing and pupillary light reflex. Main Outcome Measures best corrected visual acuity, kinetic visual field, nystagmus testing and pupillary light reflex. Results The data showed a statistically significant improvement of best corrected visual acuity between baseline and 3 years after treatment in the treated eye (p<0.001). In all patients we observed an enlargement of the areas of visual field, which remained stable till 3 years post injection (average values: baseline 1058 deg2 vs 3 years post treatment: 4630 deg2) and a reduction of the nystagmus frequency compared to baseline at the 3 year time-point. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was observed in the pupillary constriction of the treated eye (p<0.05) compared to the untreated eye in three patients at 1 and 3-year time-points. No patients suffered serious adverse events related to the vector in the 3 year post-injection period. Conclusions The long-term follow-up data (3 years) on the 5-patient Italian cohort involved in the LCA2 gene therapy clinical trial clearly showed a stability of improvement in visual and retinal function that had been achieved a few months after treatment. Longitudinal data analysis

  6. Leber congenital amaurosis: from darkness to spotlight.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Josseline

    2008-09-01

    Almost 150 years ago, Theodor Leber described a severe form of vision loss at or near birth which was later given his name. During the century that followed this description, ophthalmologists dedicated efforts to give an accurate definition of the disease but patients were neglected because of the inability of physicians to provide them with treatment. In the 90s, at the time of the Golden Age of Linkage, the first LCA locus was mapped to a human chromosome and shortly after identified as the gene for guanylate cyclase. This discovery was the spark that made the disease emerge from the shadows as illustrated by the flood of LCA genes identified in the following ten-year period. During the same time period, the clinical variability of the disease was rediscovered and an unexpected physiopathological heterogeneity demonstrated. In the beginning of the third millennium, LCA came out definitively from the tunnel to shine under the bright spotlights with the RPE65 gene therapy trial that succeeded to restore vision in a dog model and opened the door to gene therapy trials in humans. PMID:18766987

  7. Visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Ellenberger, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This chapter can guide the use of imaging in the evaluation of common visual syndromes: transient visual disturbance, including migraine and amaurosis fugax; acute optic neuropathy complicating multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, and Susac syndrome; papilledema and pseudotumor cerebri syndrome; cerebral disturbances of vision, including posterior cerebral arterial occlusion, posterior reversible encephalopathy, hemianopia after anterior temporal lobe resection, posterior cortical atrophy, and conversion blindness. Finally, practical efforts in visual rehabilitation by sensory substitution for blind patients can improve their lives and disclose new information about the brain. PMID:27430448

  8. [Immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of patients presenting with pathological tortuosity of internal carotid arteries and accompanying ocular ischaemic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Kuklin, A V; Kisileva, T N; Abramian, A V; Omarzhanova, I I

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the data concerning the efficacy of reconstructive operations and conservative treatment in patients presenting with pathological tortuosity of internal carotid arteries. The study included a total of 63 patients. The diagnostic algorithm was as follows: studying the haemodynamics of the internal carotid arteries, assessing the neurological status, and the methods of examining the eye. The patients were subdivided into two groups: Group One consisted of operated on patients (n=37) and Group Two comprising patients treated conservatively (n=26). The patients according to the neurological status were subdivided as follows: an asymptomatic course in 25 (39.7%) patients, transitory ischaemic attacks in 18 (28.6%) patients, dyscirculatory encephalopathy in 12 (19 %) patients, and stroke in 8 (12.7%) patients. Ophthalmological symptomatology was predominantly manifested by fits of amaurosis fugax in 19 (30.2%) patients and processes of maculodystrophy in 49 (77.8 %) patients. We assessed the immediate (day 30) and remote (1 year) results of conservative and surgical treatment. Group One patients demonstrated cessation of the amaurosis fugax attacks, improvement of the acuity of vision by 0.1 and more, enlargement of the borders of the field of vision, disappearance of scotomas, as well as arrest of the processes of maculodystrophy. Patients with transitory ischaemic attacks and dyscirculatory encephalopathy changed to the category of asymptomatic patients. In Group Two patients the dynamics of the neurological status was negative and the patients continued to experience fits of amaurosis fugas. The dynamics of the opthalmological symptomatology was weakly pronounced. PMID:24429568

  9. Leber's Congenital Amaurosis: Is There an Autistic Component?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazzi, E.; Rossi, M.; Signorini, S.; Rossi, G.; Bianchi, P. E.; Lanzi, G.

    2007-01-01

    There is much evidence in the literature suggesting that children with congenital blindness can also present autistic like features. The aetiopathogenetic and clinical significance of this association is still unclear. Given the central role played by vision in development, we set out to establish the significance of autistic-like behaviours in…

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Schatz, N.J.

    1986-08-01

    Four patients with radiation-induced optic neuropathies were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. They had received radiation therapy for treatment of pituitary tumors, reticulum cell sarcoma, and meningioma. Two presented with amaurosis fugax before the onset of unilateral visual loss and began hyperbaria within 72 hours after development of unilateral optic neuropathy. Both had return of visual function to baseline levels. The others initiated treatment two to six weeks after visual loss occurred in the second eye and had no significant improvement of vision. Treatment consisted of daily administration of 100% oxygen under 2.8 atmospheres of pressure for 14-28 days. There were no medical complications of hyperbaria. While hyperbaric oxygen is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy, it must be instituted within several days of deterioration in vision for restoration of baseline function.

  11. Post-traumatic amaurosis secondary to paraophthalmic internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm treated with pipeline embolization device.

    PubMed

    Kim, James D; Barber, Sean M; Diaz, Orlando M; Li, Helen K; Jackson, Robert E; Hall, Drew; Lee, Andrew G

    2013-12-01

    During evaluation for monocular visual loss, a 48-year-old woman was found to have a posttraumatic paraophthalmic internal carotid artery (ICA) pseudoaneurysm. She underwent reconstruction of the ophthalmic segment of the right ICA with a Pipeline embolization device but her vision did not return. PMID:24169369

  12. Computerized texture analysis of carotid plaque ultrasonic images can identify unstable plaques associated with ipsilateral neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kakkos, Stavros K; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Sabetai, Michael M; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Geroulakos, George; Griffin, Maura B; Thomas, Dafydd

    2011-05-01

    We estimated the value of objective, computerized texture analysis of ultrasonic images in distinguishing carotid plaques associated with neurological ipsilateral symptoms (amaurosis fugax [AmF; n = 30], transient ischemic attack [TIA; n = 52], and stroke [n = 55]) from asymptomatic plaques (n = 51). We performed 3 case-control studies (1/symptom with asymptomatic plaques as control). On logistic regression, AmF was independently associated with severity of stenosis, percentage of pixels with gray levels 0 to 10 (PPCS1; measure of echolucency), and spatial gray level dependence matrices (SGLDM) information measure of correlation (IMC-1; texture); TIAs with PPCS1 (echolucency), SGLDM correlation, and skewness (both texture); and stroke with PPCS1, SGLDM correlation, and percentage of pixels with gray levels 11 to 20 (PPCS2; echolucency). The area under the curve of the regression-derived predicted probability for AmF, TIA, and stroke was 0.92, 0.82, and 0.85, respectively (all P < .001). Texture analysis can identify carotid plaques associated with a neurological event, improving the diagnostic value of echolucency measures. Texture analyses could be applied to natural history studies. PMID:21474467

  13. Spontaneous internal carotid dissection in a 38-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abed, Kareem; Misra, Amit; Vankawala, Viren

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a patient found to have amaurosis fugax as a result of non-traumatic internal carotid dissection. Monocular blindness can be due to multiple causes including keratitis, acute glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage, uveitis, retinal vascular occlusion, retinal detachment, optic neuropathy, trauma, or vascular malformations. In the setting of headache, neck pain, and an otherwise normal ophthalmic examination, this case report highlights the importance of recognizing transient ischemic attack and carotid artery dissection in the differential diagnosis. To further clarify the diagnosis, carotid ultrasound may aid diagnosis as was seen in this case, where decreased internal carotid artery velocities were found and subsequent CT angiography of the neck confirmed a diagnosis of carotid dissection. If a dissection is present, progression of symptoms may indicate impending cerebral infarction and warrant immediate attention. Antiplatelet therapy is the first-line treatment with anticoagulation, thrombolysis, and surgery reserved for cases of recurrent, progressive symptomatic episodes. Surgical options include endovascular repair such as angioplasty, stent placement, embolization, surgical revascularization, and bypass. PMID:26486115

  14. Venous Thromboembolism and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S.; Makol, Ashima; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Saitta, Antonino; Salvarani, Carlo; Matteson, Eric L.; Warrington, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cerebrovascular events in a community-based incidence cohort of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to the general population. Methods A population-based inception cohort of patients with incident GCA between January 1, 1950 and December 31, 2009 in Olmsted County, Minnesota and a cohort of non-GCA subjects from the same population were assembled and followed until December 31, 2013. Confirmed VTE and cerebrovascular events were identified through direct medical record review. Results The study population included 244 patients with GCA with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 76.2 ± 8.2 years (79% women) and an average length of follow-up of 10.2 ± 6.8 years. Compared to non-GCA subjects of similar age and sex, patients diagnosed with GCA had a higher incidence (%) of amaurosis fugax (cumulative incidence ± SE: 2.1 ± 0.9 versus 0, respectively; p = 0.014) but similar rates of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and VTE. Among patients with GCA, neither baseline characteristics nor laboratory parameters at diagnosis reliably predicted risk of VTE or cerebrovascular events. Conclusion In this population-based study, the incidence of VTE, stroke and TIA was similar in patients with GCA compared to non-GCA subjects. PMID:26901431

  15. [Hypercoagulable workup in ophthalmology. When and what].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Negrete, F J; Casas-Lleras, P; Pérez-López, M; Rebolleda, G

    2009-07-01

    Most ophthalmologic disorders secondary to hypercoagulabe state are due to the confluence of congenital and adquired factors. A systematic workup is mandatory. Most of congenital coagulation disorders cause venous trombosis and are inherited autosomal dominantly. In order of frequency these are factor V Leiden mutation (activated protein C resistance), G20210A mutation of the prothrombin gen and protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiencies. Sickle cell anemia can determine arerial and venous thrombosis. In relation with arterial occlusion, the markers most frequently involved are homcysteine fasting levels and the markers of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Both of them can also determine venous thrombosis. Several acquired factors can lead to hypoercoagulable state, especially hyperhomocysteinemia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hepatic disease, alcohol and tobacco intake, oral contraceptives, immobilization, surgeries and malignancies. In central venous occlusion is only necessary to rule out hyperhomocysteinemia and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in young patients without known risk factors. In central artery occlusion, hypercoagulable workup is only recommended for patients less than 50 years-old with unknown emboli source. In this cases protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiencies, homocystein, sickle cell disease and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome will ruled out. In non arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy hypercoagulable work up is not necessary. In amaurosis fugax without known emboli source, it is recommended to rule out etiologies of arterial occlusion, especially antithrombin III deficiencies, homocystein, sickle cell disease and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. PMID:19658050

  16. Noninvasive evaluation of the extracranial carotid arteries in patients with cerebrovascular events and atrial fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, J; Rothlauf, E; Materese, E; Halperin, J

    1988-08-01

    Noninvasive carotid artery testing was performed in 73 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were referred because of symptoms or signs of cerebrovascular disease. Thromboembolism related to atrial fibrillation without valvular heart disease was the probable source of cerebral ischemia in 25 (80%) of 31 patients with stroke and coexisting atherosclerotic disease at the carotid artery bifurcation in six (20%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was the probable source of symptoms in nine (70%) of 13 of patients with transient cerebral ischemia, while coexisting carotid artery disease was present in four (30%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation accounted for the symptoms in four of five patients with amaurosis fugax, with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease present in one. The remaining 24 patients had nonhemispheric symptoms of cerebrovascular disease, including vertebrobasilar insufficiency, dizziness, and syncope, and only one had a carotid lesion. A significantly higher proportion of patients with focal hemispheric symptoms had coexisting carotid disease than patients with nonfocal symptoms had, suggesting that atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease contributes to stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Noninvasive carotid artery testing may be helpful in identifying atherosclerotic lesions at the carotid artery bifurcation in patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease, because different therapeutic modalities may be appropriate when two potential sources of cerebral ischemia are present. PMID:3041939

  17. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  18. The risk of stroke with occlusion of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G E; Keushkerian, S M; Hermreck, A S; Iliopoulos, J I; Thomas, J H

    1989-01-01

    Reports of all cervicocephalic arteriograms (n = 1836) performed at one institution during a 10-year period were reviewed and the patients were classified into three groups according to the indication for arteriography. Group I included all patients with symptoms or findings compatible with occlusive disease of the carotid or vertebral artery (n = 806). Group II included patients with cerebrovascular symptoms unrelated to carotid or vertebral disease (e.g., patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage) (n = 367). Group III consisted of patients with no evidence of cerebrovascular disease (e.g., patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors) (n = 663). One hundred ten atherosclerotic occlusions of the internal carotid artery (ICA) were found in 106 patients in group I. Fifty-one percent of these patients had a history of stroke before arteriography, 24% had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or amaurosis fugax (AF), and 12% had nonhemispheric symptoms. Only 13% (1.7% of group I patients) were without symptoms. Ninety-one percent of the strokes and 75% of the TIAs or AF were ipsilateral to the ICA occlusion. Seventy-six percent of patients with stroke and 80% with ipsilateral TIAs or AF vs only 29% of patients without symptoms had contralateral stenosis of 60% diameter reduction or greater (p less than 0.003). No occlusions of the ICA occurred in groups II or III. Three hundred forty-six patients in groups II and III were more than 60 years of age. Assuming either Poisson or binomial distributions, the incidence of silent ICA occlusion in the population at large older than 60 years was estimated at less than 1% (p less than 0.03). PMID:2911144

  19. Nature and nurture: a case of transcending haematological pre-malignancies in a pair of monozygotic twins adding possible clues on the pathogenesis of B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marcus C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Roug, Anne S; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Villesen, Palle; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive molecular analysis of a pair of monozygotic twins, who came to our attention when one experienced amaurosis fugax and was diagnosed with JAK2+ polycythaemia vera. He (Twin A) was also found to have an asymptomatic B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Although JAK2-, Twin B was subsequently shown to have a benign monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Flow cytometric and molecular analyses of the B-cell compartments revealed different immunoglobulin light and heavy chain usage in each twin. We hypothesized that whole exome sequencing could help delineating the pattern of germline B-cell disorder susceptibility and reveal somatic mutations potentially contributing to the differential patterns of pre-malignancy. Comparing bone marrow cells and T cells and employing in-house engineered integrative analysis, we found aberrations in Twin A consistent with a myeloid neoplasm, i.e. in TET2, RUNX1, PLCB1 and ELF4. Employing the method for detecting high-ranking variants by extensive annotation and relevance scoring, we also identified shared germline variants in genes of proteins interacting with B-cell receptor signalling mediators and the WNT-pathway, including IRF8, PTPRO, BCL9L, SIT1 and SIRPB1, all with possible implications in B-cell proliferation. Similar patterns of IGHV-gene usage to those demonstrated here have been observed in inherited acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Collectively, these findings may help in facilitating identification of putative master gene(s) involved in B-cell proliferations in general and MBL and B-CLL in particular. PMID:25752595

  20. Diagnostic ramifications of ocular vascular occlusion as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene heterozygosity

    PubMed Central

    Schockman, Samantha; Glueck, Charles J; Hutchins, Robert K; Patel, Jaykumar; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to assess the diagnostic ramifications of vascular occlusion of the ocular vein and artery as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden (FVL) and/or prothrombin gene (PTG) heterozygosity. Methods Patients with ocular vein (n=191) and artery (n=74) occlusion, free of cardioembolic etiologies, were sequentially referred from vitreoretinal specialists for measurement of thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and compared to 110 healthy normal controls. Results Of the 265 patients, 29 (11%; 17 women, 12 men) of all referred ocular vascular occlusion (OVO) cases were found to be heterozygous for FVL and/or PTG, including 16 with FVL, 12 with PTG, and 1 with both. Of the 29 cases, 16 had central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), 2 branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), 5 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-AION), 3 retinal artery occlusion (RAO), 2 amaurosis fugax (AF), and 1 had both CRVO and RAO. Of the 16 FVL cases, 15 (94%) had OVO as a first thrombotic event without prior deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE); 6 (38%) also had other thrombotic events, including recurrent miscarriage, osteonecrosis, ischemic stroke, and/or ischemic colitis; and 5 (31%) had immediate family members with previous venous thromboembolism (VTE). Of the 12 PTG cases, 9 (75%) had OVO as a first thrombotic event, 5 (42%) experienced VTE other than DVT or PE, and 6 (50%) had immediate family members with VTE. In one patient with both FVL and PTG, DVT occurred before BRVO. Of the 17 women with FVL and/or PTG mutations, 7 (41%) experienced ≥1 miscarriage, 6 (35%) were on estrogen therapy, and 1 (6%) was on clomiphene. Conclusion Of the 265 patients with OVO, 29 (11%) had FVL and/or PTG, and 83% of these 29 cases presented with OVO as their first thrombotic event. By diagnosing thrombophilia as an etiology for OVO, the ophthalmologist opens a window to family screening and preventive therapy. PMID:25897198

  1. Hemodynamic and metabolic effects of cerebral revascularization.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R; Tyler, J L; Mohr, G; Meyer, E; Diksic, M; Yamamoto, L; Taylor, L; Gauthier, S; Hakim, A

    1987-04-01

    Pre- and postoperative positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in six patients undergoing extracranial to intracranial bypass procedures for the treatment of symptomatic extracranial carotid occlusion. The six patients were all men, aged 52 to 68 years. Their symptoms included transient ischemic attacks (five cases), amaurosis fugax (two cases), and completed stroke with good recovery (one case). Positron emission tomography was performed within 4 weeks prior to surgery and between 3 to 6 months postoperatively, using oxygen-15-labeled CO, O2, and CO2 and fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen and glucose (CMRO2 and CMRGlu), and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured in both hemispheres. Preoperatively, compared to five elderly control subjects, patients had increased CBV, a decreased CBF/CBV ratio, and decreased CMRO2, indicating reduced cerebral perfusion pressure and depressed oxygen metabolism. The CBF was decreased in only one patient who had bilateral carotid occlusions; the OEF, CMRGlu, and CMRO2/CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratios were not significantly different from control measurements. All bypasses were patent and all patients were asymptomatic following surgery. Postoperative PET revealed decreased CBV and an increased CBF/CBV ratio, indicating improved hemodynamic function and oxygen hypometabolism. This was associated with increased CMRO2 in two patients in whom the postoperative OEF was also increased. The CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratio were increased in five patients. Changes in CBF and the CMRO2/CMRGlu ratio were variable. One patient with preoperative progressive mental deterioration, documented by serial neuropsychological testing and decreasing CBF and CMRO2, had improved postoperative CBF and CMRO2 concomitant with improved neuropsychological functioning. It is concluded that symptomatic carotid occlusion is associated with altered

  2. Transient isolated brainstem symptoms preceding posterior circulation stroke: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Nicola LM; Simoni, Michela; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Transient isolated brainstem symptoms (eg, isolated vertigo, dysarthria, diplopia) are not consistently classified as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and data for prognosis are limited. If some of these transient neurological attacks (TNAs) are due to vertebrobasilar ischaemia, then they should be common during the days and weeks preceding posterior circulation strokes. We aimed to assess the frequency of TNAs before vertebrobasilar ischaemic stroke. Methods We studied all potential ischaemic events during the 90 days preceding an ischaemic stroke in patients ascertained within a prospective, population-based incidence study in Oxfordshire, UK (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002–2010) and compared rates of TNA preceding vertebrobasilar stroke versus carotid stroke. We classified the brainstem symptoms isolated vertigo, vertigo with non-focal symptoms, isolated double vision, transient generalised weakness, and binocular visual disturbance as TNAs in the vertebrobasilar territory; atypical amaurosis fugax and limb-shaking as TNAs in the carotid territory; and isolated slurred speech, migraine variants, transient confusion, and hemisensory tingling symptoms as TNAs in uncertain territory. Findings Of the 1141 patients with ischaemic stroke, vascular territory was categorisable in 1034 (91%) cases, with 275 vertebrobasilar strokes and 759 carotid strokes. Isolated brainstem TNAs were more frequent before a vertebrobasilar stroke (45 of 275 events) than before a carotid stroke (10 of 759; OR 14·7, 95% CI 7·3–29·5, p<0·0001), particularly during the preceding 2 days (22 of 252 before a vertebrobasilar stroke vs two of 751 before a carotid stroke, OR 35·8, 8·4–153·5, p<0·0001). Of all 59 TNAs preceding (median 4 days, IQR 1–30) vertebrobasilar stroke, only five (8%) fulfilled the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) criteria for TIA. The other 54 cases were isolated vertigo (n=23), non-NINDS binocular visual

  3. A Possible Effect of Concentrated Oolong Tea Causing Transient Ischemic Attack-Like Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Layher, John W.; Poling, Jon S.; Ishihara, Mayumi; Azadi, Parastoo; Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; Puett, David

    2014-01-01

    Aims Tea (green, oolong, and black) is the second most widely consumed beverage worldwide, second only to water. Aside from a few reported adverse effects, tea, particularly green tea, appears to be beneficial for human health. In the case described herein, a male experienced several transient ischemic attack-like symptoms immediately following the consumption of a cup of high quality oolong tea. A thorough medical evaluation uncovered no evidence of such an attack and leads to the suggestion of a heretofore unreported response to oolong tea. Presentation of Case A 72-year old male with hypertension and atrial fibrillation, who takes valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide to control hypertension and warfarin to reduce the risk of thrombosis and thromboembolism, presented at the emergency room of a local hospital describing several transient ischemic attack-like symptoms immediately after consuming a cup of oolong tea. His symptoms included presyncope, disequilibrium, bilateral hand parathesias, mild dysphasia, and visual problems (but apparently not presbyopia or amaurosis fugax), all of which had disappeared in approximately two hours after drinking the tea. (Mild presyncope was previously noted by the patient when ingesting a strong green tea.) No unusual features emerged from his physical examination, and his blood work was unremarkable except for elevation of his partial thromboplastin time (39 sec) and prothrombin time (22.5 sec), giving an international reference of 2.0, all consistent with the effects of warfarin. A battery of tests by the emergency room physician, a cardiologist, and a neurologist, e.g. electrocardiogram, brain computerized tomography, 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram, brain magnetic resonance imaging, with and without 20 ml Gadolinium, and a magnetic resonance angiogram, confirmed the earlier diagnosis of atrial fibrillation but disclosed no additional malfunction in his heart. His brain showed no evidence of a prior hemorrhage, and his

  4. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Brajesh K.; Beach, Kirk W.; Roubin, Gary S.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Moore, Wesley S.; Malas, Mahmoud B.; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Burke, J. Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R.; Weaver, Fred A.; Narins, Craig R.; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Meschia, James F.; Bergelin, Robert O.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Methods Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. Findings 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63–1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25–2

  5. Stroke risk in the early period after carotid related symptoms: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tsantilas, P; Kühnl, A; Kallmayer, M; Knappich, C; Schmid, S; Kuetchou, A; Zimmermann, A; Eckstein, H H

    2015-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend performing carotid endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid disease as soon as possible after the neurological index event. However, early stroke risk has not been well documented for this patient group. We therefore conducted a systematic analysis of the current literature on the recurrent risk of ischemic events in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Systematic review was performed by searching the MEDLINE® database from 1950 until June 8, 2015 (key words: cerebral ischemia, transient ischemic attack, amaurosis fugax, stroke, symptomatic carotid stenosis, recurrent risk, outcome, prognosis, follow-up, cohort and natural history). All studies reporting stroke risks in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis after neurologic index events within a period of 7 days were included. Cumulative stroke risks with 95% confidence intervals after a neurologic index event were recalculated at 2-3, 7, 14 and 30 days and a meta-analysis including an analysis of heterogeneity were performed using the statistical package R and Excel for Mac 2003. Ten studies with a total number of 2634 patients were included. Results of an overall stroke risk were as follows: 2.0-17.2% at 2-3 days, 0-22.1% at 7 days, 0-29.6% at 14 days and 0-11.1% at 30 days in patients with a symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis. The pooled stroke risk in the six studies with active follow-up was 6.0% (95% CI 2.4-14.4) at 2-3 days, 10.9% (6.1-18.7) at 7 days and 17.6% (9.7-29.9) at 14 days. Pooled stroke risk in the three studies with uncensored populations was even higher with 6.4% (1.5-23.8%) at 2-3 days, 19.5% (12.7-28.7) at 7 days and 26.1% (20.6-32.5%) at 14 days. Significant heterogeneity (P<0.001) could be explained by the different inclusion criteria and the study's design. Retrospective studies with passive follow-up had the lowest stroke risk whereas prospective studies with active follow-up and without bias through early intervention by carotid

  6. Prevalent misconceptions about acute retinal vascular occlusive disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2005-07-01

    occlusion; (xix) branch retinal vein occlusion can cause neovascular glaucoma; (xx) in eyes with CRAO, the artery is usually not completely occluded; (xxi) CRAO is always either embolic or thrombotic in origin; (xxii) amaurosis fugax is always due to retinal ischemia secondary to transient retinal arterial embolism; (xxiii) asymptomatic plaque(s) in retinal arteries do not require a detailed evaluation; (xxiv) retinal function can improve even when acute retinal ischemia due to CRAO has lasted for 20h or more; (xxv) CRAO, like ischemic CRVO, can result in development of ocular neovascularization; (xxvi) panretinal photocoagulation is needed for "disc neovascularization" in CRAO; (xxvii) fibrinolytic agents are the treatment of choice in CRAO; (xxviii) there is no chance of an eye with retinal arterial occlusion having spontaneous visual improvement; (xxix) absence of any abnormality on Doppler evaluation of the carotid artery or echography of the heart always rules out those sites as the source of embolism; and (xxx) absence of an embolus in the retinal artery means the occlusion was not caused by an embolus. The major cause of all these misconceptions is the lack of a proper understanding of basic scientific facts related to the various diseases. The objective of this paper is to discuss these misconceptions, based on these scientific facts, to clarify the understanding of these blinding disorders, and to place their management on a rational, scientific basis. PMID:15845346

  7. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Funding Division of Extramural Activities Division of Extramural Science Programs Funding Opportunity Announcements Funding Mechanisms Supported by ... Amaurosis Low Vision Refractive Errors Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI ...

  8. Glaucoma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Funding Division of Extramural Activities Division of Extramural Science Programs Funding Opportunity Announcements Funding Mechanisms Supported by ... Amaurosis Low Vision Refractive Errors Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Glaucoma NEI ...

  9. Common Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.; Umar, Sarah B.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal disorders result in many visits to healthcare specialists. These disorders include benign conditions such as hemorrhoids to more serious conditions such as malignancy; thus, it is important for the clinician to be familiar with these disorders as well as know how to conduct an appropriate history and physical examination. This article reviews the most common anorectal disorders, including hemorrhoids, anal fissures, fecal incontinence, proctalgia fugax, excessive perineal descent, and pruritus ani, and provides guidelines on comprehensive evaluation and management. PMID:24987313

  10. Behavioral Treatment of Sleep Problems in a Child with a Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Hoevenaars, Evelien; Maas, Anneke

    2003-01-01

    In this study, treatment focused on parenting practices for a 4 1/2-year-old girl with a visual impairment caused by Leber's congenital amaurosis and problems initiating and maintaining sleep. The sleep problem was effectively treated with a behavioral intervention consisting of parental support and the use of a graduated extinction procedure.…

  11. [The psychosomatic factors in ophthalmology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weinstein, P; Dobossy, M

    1975-04-01

    The importance of the psychosomatic factors is gradually increasing in the ophthalmological practice. In cases with hysterical symptoms they cause amaurosis and changes of refraction. Emotional factors lead to strabism and photophoby. Anxiety conditions and stress effect lead to glaucoma. In a short review the principles of psychosomatic treatment are dealt with. PMID:1206927

  12. Joubert's syndrome with retinal dysplasia: neonatal tachypnoea as the clue to a genetic brain-eye malformation.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Dudgeon, J; Stephenson, J B

    1984-01-01

    Five children with features of Joubert's syndrome and Leber's amaurosis are described. The presenting symptoms were panting tachypnoea in the newborn, prolonged apnoeic attacks in the neonatal period (in both of identical twins), global developmental delay, and failure to develop vision. Three children had multiple hemifacial spasms, such as have been seen in Joubert's syndrome, and the same three had cystic dysplasia of the kidneys. Necropsy confirmed the retinal and renal pathology, together with agenesis of the vermis and brainstem dysgenesis in the identical twins. It is concluded that a gene for Leber's amaurosis may commonly manifest itself as the specific hind brain malformation underlying Joubert's syndrome. In infants with respiratory irregularities (especially rapid panting), hemifacial spasms, or developmental delay, absence of the cerebellar vermis should be specifically sought by ultrasound and computed tomography, and the electroretinogram measured, whether or not impaired vision is clinically evident. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6476867

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  14. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field. PMID:26390089

  15. Gas gangrene infection of the eyes and orbits.

    PubMed Central

    Crock, G W; Heriot, W J; Janakiraman, P; Weiner, J M

    1985-01-01

    The literature on Clostridium perfringens infections is reviewed up to 1983. An additional case is reported with bilateral clostridial infections of the eye and orbit. One eye followed the classical course of relentless panophthalmitis, amaurosis, and orbital cellulitis ending in enucleation. The second eye contained intracameral mud and gas bubbles that were removed by vitrectomy instrumentation. Subsequent removal of the toxic cataract resulted in a final aided visual acuity of 6/18, N8. This is the third report of a retained globe, and we believe the only known case where the patient was left with useful vision. Images PMID:3967002

  16. A new family linked to the RP13 locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on distal 17p.

    PubMed

    Tarttelin, E E; Plant, C; Weissenbach, J; Bird, A C; Bhattacharya, S S; Inglehearn, C F

    1996-06-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mapping to chromosome 17p has been reported in a single large South African family. We now report a new family with severe early onset ADRP which maps to 17p. Linkage and haplotype analysis in this family places the ADRP locus in the 5 cM interval between markers AFMc024za5 and D17S1845, confirming the data obtained in the South African family. The discovery of a second 17p linked family may imply that this is one of the more common loci for dominant RP. In addition, the confirmation of an RP diagnosis at this locus is of interest since loci for a dominant cone dystrophy and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA1) have recently been linked to the same markers. While the cone dystrophy locus may be allelic with RP, our data and that of Goliath et al show that distinct genes are responsible for dominant RP and Leber's congenital amaurosis on chromosome 17p. PMID:8782056

  17. What was Glaucoma Called Before the 20th Century?

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Giliberti, Francesca M.; Young, Matthew T.; Bermudez, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma involves a characteristic optic neuropathy, often with elevated intraocular pressure. Before 1850, poor vision with a normal eye appearance, as occurs in primary open-angle glaucoma, was termed amaurosis, gutta serena, or black cataract. Few observers noted palpable hardness of the eye in amaurosis. On the other hand, angle-closure glaucoma can produce a green or gray pupil, and therefore was called, variously, glaucoma (derived from the Greek for glaucous, a nonspecific term connoting blue, green, or light gray) and viriditate oculi. Angle closure, with palpable hardness of the eye, mydriasis, and anterior prominence of the lens, was described in greater detail in the 18th and 19th centuries. The introduction of the ophthalmoscope in 1850 permitted the visualization of the excavated optic neuropathy in eyes with a normal or with a dilated greenish-gray pupil. Physicians developed a better appreciation of the role of intraocular pressure in both conditions, which became subsumed under the rubric “glaucoma”. PMID:26483611

  18. [Differential diagnosis of pediatric hip pain in MR tomography].

    PubMed

    Glas, K; Obletter, N; Staudt, F; Scheuerer, K

    1991-01-01

    The efficiency of spin echo tomography in the differential diagnosis of hip joint pain in children in comparison with other imaging methods was tested in 115 spin echo tomography examinations of 68 patients. By means of the different modes available it was possible to determine joint effusion, necrosed areas and the formation of abscesses with great accuracy. In the case of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease the MRT is especially in the early diagnosis superior to the other Methods, already in the early stage a classification in the four Catterall groups was possible. Furthermore the "head at risk" signs, except the gage-sign, were better to describe by BRI than by conventional x-rays. The MRT allows an exacter staging and a better observation of the course of disease, especially the beginning of the revitalisation of the femora epiphysis in earlier and clearer visible than in other imaging methods. Further diseases like epiphysial dysplasie, specific and unspecific coxitis and slipped capital femora epiphysis were also investigated. We regard spin echo examination in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in children indicated by the following criteria: 1. with over six weeks uncertain differential diagnosis of coxitis fugax and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease 2. with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease in the early stage for therapy option 3. with TBC- and non-TBC-coxitis as a therapy attend and diagnostic measure. PMID:1829298

  19. Digital cameras with designs inspired by the arthropod eye.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Xiao, Jianliang; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2013-05-01

    In arthropods, evolution has created a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging systems, with a wide-angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and an infinite depth of field. A challenge in building digital cameras with the hemispherical, compound apposition layouts of arthropod eyes is that essential design requirements cannot be met with existing planar sensor technologies or conventional optics. Here we present materials, mechanics and integration schemes that afford scalable pathways to working, arthropod-inspired cameras with nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees). Their surfaces are densely populated by imaging elements (artificial ommatidia), which are comparable in number (180) to those of the eyes of fire ants (Solenopsis fugax) and bark beetles (Hylastes nigrinus). The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. Our imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes). PMID:23636401

  20. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129839

  1. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients. PMID:23120768

  2. Inherited retinal disorders in South Africa and the clinical impact of evolving technologies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L; Goliath, R; Rebello, G; Bardien, S; September, A V; Bartmann, L; Loubser, F; Greenberg, L J; Ramesar, R S

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative disorders (RDDs) encompass a group of inherited diseases characterised by vision loss. The genetic and clinical complexity poses a challenge in unravelling the molecular genetic aetiology of this group of disorders. Furthermore, the population diversity in South Africa (SA) presents researchers with a particularly complicated task. Rapid advances in the development of cutting-edge technological platforms over the past two decades, however, have assisted in overcoming some of the challenges. The RDD research team has utilised these escalating technologies, which has facilitated a corresponding increase in molecular diagnoses. A biorepository has been established and comprises ~3 200 patient DNA samples archived with many forms of RDD (including retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophies, Stargardt disease, Leber congenital amaurosis, Usher syndrome and Bardet Biedl syndrome). A comprehensive review is presented of the SA journey spanning 25 years, into elucidating the molecular genetic basis of various forms of RDD in SA. PMID:27245521

  3. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2015-01-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25636626

  4. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2016-03-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25653229

  5. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond. PMID:26684444

  6. Using Stem Cells to Model Diseases of the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yvon, Camille; Ramsden, Conor M.; Lane, Amelia; Powner, Michael B.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J.; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration arises from the loss of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide with limited effective treatment options. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (IPSC)-derived retinal cells and tissues from individuals with retinal degeneration is a rapidly evolving technology that holds a great potential for its use in disease modelling. IPSCs provide an ideal platform to investigate normal and pathological retinogenesis, but also deliver a valuable source of retinal cell types for drug screening and cell therapy. In this review, we will provide some examples of the ways in which IPSCs have been used to model diseases of the outer retina including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Usher syndrome (USH), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), gyrate atrophy (GA), juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and age related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:26106463

  7. Mutations in PNPLA6 are linked to photoreceptor degeneration and various forms of childhood blindness

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, S.; Majewski, J.; Ramamurthy, V.; Cao, S.; Fahiminiya, S.; Ren, H.; MacDonald, I.M.; Lopez, I.; Sun, V.; Keser, V.; Khan, A.; Stránecký, V.; Hartmannová, H.; Přistoupilová, A.; Hodaňová, K.; Piherová, L.; Kuchař, L.; Baxová, A.; Chen, R.; Barsottini, O.G.P.; Pyle, A.; Griffin, H.; Splitt, M.; Sallum, J.; Tolmie, J.L.; Sampson, J.R.; Chinnery, P.; Canada, Care4Rare; Banin, E.; Sharon, D.; Dutta, S.; Grebler, R.; Helfrich-Foerster, C.; Pedroso, J.L.; Kretzschmar, D.; Cayouette, M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness due to retinal degeneration affects millions of people worldwide, but many disease-causing mutations remain unknown. PNPLA6 encodes the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing protein 6, also known as neuropathy target esterase (NTE), which is the target of toxic organophosphates that induce human paralysis due to severe axonopathy of large neurons. Mutations in PNPLA6 also cause human spastic paraplegia characterized by motor neuron degeneration. Here we identify PNPLA6 mutations in childhood blindness in seven families with retinal degeneration, including Leber congenital amaurosis and Oliver McFarlane syndrome. PNPLA6 localizes mostly at the inner segment plasma membrane in photo-receptors and mutations in Drosophila PNPLA6 lead to photoreceptor cell death. We also report that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid levels are elevated in mutant Drosophila. These findings show a role for PNPLA6 in photoreceptor survival and identify phospholipid metabolism as a potential therapeutic target for some forms of blindness. PMID:25574898

  8. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment. PMID:19303164

  9. Gene-Based Therapies for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. Hype or Hope?

    PubMed

    Mackey, David A; Kearns, Lisa S; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy has now joined Leber congenital amaurosis in the list of genetic eye diseases undergoing gene therapy clinical trials. Although a dramatic response to treatment would be welcome, a minor improvement in vision is a major challenge in efficacy assessment, given this may occur spontaneously as part of the natural history of minor recovery in some patients. Thus, we must await the outcome of adequately powered clinical trials to know if the treatment is effective, particularly given the likely high cost of such therapeutic interventions in the future. We need global cooperation to ensure that the most suitable patients are enrolled in these trials and that support is provided for participants who need to travel from the Asia-Pacific region to Europe or North America if there are no local arms of these trials. PMID:27488066

  10. Improvement and decline in vision with gene therapy in childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Roman, Alejandro J; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Heon, Elise; Hauswirth, William W

    2015-05-14

    Retinal gene therapy for Leber's congenital amaurosis, an autosomal recessive childhood blindness, has been widely considered to be safe and efficacious. Three years after therapy, improvement in vision was maintained, but the rate of loss of photoreceptors in the treated retina was the same as that in the untreated retina. Here we describe long-term follow-up data from three treated patients. Topographic maps of visual sensitivity in treated regions, nearly 6 years after therapy for two of the patients and 4.5 years after therapy for the third patient, indicate progressive diminution of the areas of improved vision. (Funded by the National Eye Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00481546.). PMID:25936984

  11. Gene Therapy Delivery Systems for Enhancing Viral and Nonviral Vectors for Cardiac Diseases: Current Concepts and Future Applications

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Williams, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy is one of the most promising fields for developing new treatments for the advanced stages of ischemic and monogenetic, particularly autosomal or X-linked recessive, cardiomyopathies. The remarkable ongoing efforts in advancing various targets have largely been inspired by the results that have been achieved in several notable gene therapy trials, such as the hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Rate-limiting problems preventing successful clinical application in the cardiac disease area, however, are primarily attributable to inefficient gene transfer, host responses, and the lack of sustainable therapeutic transgene expression. It is arguable that these problems are directly correlated with the choice of vector, dose level, and associated cardiac delivery approach as a whole treatment system. Essentially, a delicate balance exists in maximizing gene transfer required for efficacy while remaining within safety limits. Therefore, the development of safe, effective, and clinically applicable gene delivery techniques for selected nonviral and viral vectors will certainly be invaluable in obtaining future regulatory approvals. The choice of gene transfer vector, dose level, and the delivery system are likely to be critical determinants of therapeutic efficacy. It is here that the interactions between vector uptake and trafficking, delivery route means, and the host's physical limits must be considered synergistically for a successful treatment course. PMID:24164239

  12. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy. PMID:26325627

  13. The retinal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, N A; Awadein, Ahmed; Toma, Hassanain S

    2007-09-01

    While the functions of many of the proteins located in or associated with the photoreceptor cilia are poorly understood, disruption of the function of these proteins may result in a wide variety of phenotypes ranging from isolated retinal degeneration to more pleiotropic phenotypes. Systemic findings include neurosensory hearing loss, developmental delay, situs-inversus, infertility, disorders of limb and digit development, obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, and respiratory disease. The concept of "retinal ciliopathies" brings to attention the importance of further molecular analysis of this organelle as well as provides a potential common target for therapies for these disorders. The retinal ciliopathies include retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, cone-dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as retinal degenerations associated with Usher syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Laurence-Moon syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, and Biemond syndrome. Mutations for these disorders have been found in retinitis pigmentosa-1 (RP1), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein (RPGR-IP), as well as the Usher, Bardet-Biedl, and nephronophthisis genes. Other systemic disorders associated with retinal degenerations that may also involve ciliary abnormalities include: Alstrom, Edwards-Sethi, Ellis-van Creveld, Jeune, Meckel-Gruber, Orofaciodigital Type 9, and Gurrieri syndromes. Understanding these conditions as ciliopathies may help the ophthalmologist to recognize associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and have a high degree of suspicion that a systemic finding may be present. PMID:17896309

  14. A gene for autosomal dominant progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) maps to chromosome 17p12-p13

    SciTech Connect

    Balciuniene, J.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K.

    1995-11-20

    Inherited retinal dystrophy is a common cause of visual impairment. Cone dystrophy affects the cone function and is manifested as progressive loss of the central vision, defective color vision, and photophobia. Linkage was demonstrated between progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) and genetic markers on chromosome 17p12-p13 in a five-generation family. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum lod score of 7.72 at the marker D17S938. Recombinant haplotypes in the family suggest that the cone dystrophy locus is located in a 25-cM interval between the markers D17S926/D17S849 and D17S804/D17S945. Furthermore, one recombination was detected between the disease locus and a microsatellite marker in the candidate gene RCV1, encoding the retinal protein recoverin. Two additional candidate genes encoding retinal guanylate cyclase (GUC2D) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) are located at 17p13.1. Moreover, loci for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis have been mapped to the same region. Identification of the cone dystrophy locus may be of importance not only for identifying functional genes in the cone system, but also for identifying genes for other retinal disorders. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Homozygous missense variant in the human CNGA3 channel causes cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rehan S; Reuter, Peggy; Sisk, Robert A; Kausar, Tasleem; Shahzad, Mohsin; Maqsood, Muhammad I; Yousif, Ateeq; Ali, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Wissinger, Bernd; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-01-01

    We assessed a large consanguineous Pakistani family (PKAB157) segregating early onset low vision problems. Funduscopic and electroretinographic evaluation of affected individuals revealed juvenile cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) with maculopathy. Other clinical symptoms included loss of color discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing, segregation and haplotype analyses demonstrated that a transition variant (c.955T>C; p.(Cys319Arg)) in CNGA3 co-segregated with the CRD phenotype in family PKAB157. The ability of CNGA3 channel to influx calcium in response to agonist, when expressed either alone or together with the wild-type CNGB3 subunit in HEK293 cells, was completely abolished due to p.Cys319Arg variant. Western blotting and immunolocalization studies suggest that a decreased channel density in the HEK293 cell membrane due to impaired folding and/or trafficking of the CNGA3 protein is the main pathogenic effect of the p.Cys319Arg variant. Mutant alleles of the human cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA3) are frequently associated with achromatopsia. In rare cases, variants in CNGA3 are also associated with cone dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis and oligo cone trichromacy. The identification of predicted p.(Cys319Arg) missense variant in CNGA3 expands the repertoire of the known genetic causes of CRD and phenotypic spectrum of CNGA3 alleles. PMID:25052312

  16. Homozygous missense variant in the human CNGA3 channel causes cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rehan S; Reuter, Peggy; Sisk, Robert A; Kausar, Tasleem; Shahzad, Mohsin; Maqsood, Muhammad I; Yousif, Ateeq; Ali, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Wissinger, Bernd; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-04-01

    We assessed a large consanguineous Pakistani family (PKAB157) segregating early onset low vision problems. Funduscopic and electroretinographic evaluation of affected individuals revealed juvenile cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) with maculopathy. Other clinical symptoms included loss of color discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing, segregation and haplotype analyses demonstrated that a transition variant (c.955T>C; p.(Cys319Arg)) in CNGA3 co-segregated with the CRD phenotype in family PKAB157. The ability of CNGA3 channel to influx calcium in response to agonist, when expressed either alone or together with the wild-type CNGB3 subunit in HEK293 cells, was completely abolished due to p.Cys319Arg variant. Western blotting and immunolocalization studies suggest that a decreased channel density in the HEK293 cell membrane due to impaired folding and/or trafficking of the CNGA3 protein is the main pathogenic effect of the p.Cys319Arg variant. Mutant alleles of the human cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA3) are frequently associated with achromatopsia. In rare cases, variants in CNGA3 are also associated with cone dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis and oligo cone trichromacy. The identification of predicted p.(Cys319Arg) missense variant in CNGA3 expands the repertoire of the known genetic causes of CRD and phenotypic spectrum of CNGA3 alleles. PMID:25052312

  17. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Joseph C; Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Songstad, Allison E; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-02-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance: Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person's cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed. PMID:26683869

  18. Changes in gene expression associated with retinal degeneration in the rd3 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christiana L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify and characterize changes in gene expression associated with photoreceptor degeneration in the rd3 mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) type 12. Methods Global genome expression profiling using microarray technology was performed on total RNA extracts from rd3 and wild-type control mouse retinas at postnatal day 21. Quantitative PCR analysis of selected transcripts was performed to validate the microarray results. Results Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes in the rd3 mouse defined key canonical pathways, including phototransduction, glycerophospholipid metabolism, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling, and endothelin signaling. Overall, 1,140 of approximately 55,800 transcripts were differentially represented. In particular, a large percentage of the upregulated transcripts encode proteins involved in the immune response; whereas the downregulated transcripts encode proteins involved in phototransduction and lipid metabolism. Conclusions This analysis has elucidated several candidate genes and pathways, thus providing insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the photoreceptor degeneration in the rd3 mouse retina and indicating directions for future studies. PMID:23687432

  19. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in TULP1 Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Glenn P.; Au, Adrian; Kiser, Philip D.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal disorders (IRDs) result in severe visual impairments in children and adults. A challenge in the field of retinal degenerations is identifying mechanisms of photoreceptor cell death related to specific genetic mutations. Mutations in the gene TULP1 have been associated with two forms of IRDs, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). TULP1 is a cytoplasmic, membrane-associated protein shown to be involved in transportation of newly synthesized proteins destined for the outer segment compartment of photoreceptor cells; however, how mutant TULP1 causes cell death is not understood. In this study, we provide evidence that common missense mutations in TULP1 express as misfolded protein products that accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing prolonged ER stress. In an effort to maintain protein homeostasis, photoreceptor cells then activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) complex. Our results indicate that the two major apoptotic arms of the UPR pathway, PERK and IRE1, are activated. Additionally, we show that retinas expressing mutant TULP1 significantly upregulate the expression of CHOP, a UPR signaling protein promoting apoptosis, and undergo photoreceptor cell death. Our study demonstrates that the ER-UPR, a known mechanism of apoptosis secondary to an overwhelming accumulation of misfolded protein, is involved in photoreceptor degeneration caused by missense mutations in TULP1. These observations suggest that modulating the UPR pathways might be a strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26987071

  20. Subretinal Injection of Gene Therapy Vectors and Stem Cells in the Perinatal Mouse Eye

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Davis, Richard J.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of sight affects approximately 3.4 million people in the United States and is expected to increase in the upcoming years.1 Recently, gene therapy and stem cell transplantations have become key therapeutic tools for treating blindness resulting from retinal degenerative diseases. Several forms of autologous transplantation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), such as iris pigment epithelial cell transplantation, have generated encouraging results, and human clinical trials have begun for other forms of gene and stem cell therapies.2 These include RPE65 gene replacement therapy in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis and an RPE cell transplantation using human embryonic stem (ES) cells in Stargardt's disease.3-4 Now that there are gene therapy vectors and stem cells available for treating patients with retinal diseases, it is important to verify these potential therapies in animal models before applying them in human studies. The mouse has become an important scientific model for testing the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy vectors and stem cell transplantation in the eye.5-8 In this video article, we present a technique to inject gene therapy vectors or stem cells into the subretinal space of the mouse eye while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. PMID:23207897

  1. Identification and Correction of Mechanisms Underlying Inherited Blindness in Human iPSC-Derived Optic Cups.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, David A; Lane, Amelia; Ramsden, Conor M; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F; Munro, Peter M; Jovanovic, Katarina; Schwarz, Nele; Kanuga, Naheed; Muthiah, Manickam N; Hull, Sarah; Gallo, Jean-Marc; da Cruz, Lyndon; Moore, Anthony T; Hardcastle, Alison J; Coffey, Peter J; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal dystrophy that causes childhood blindness. Photoreceptors are especially sensitive to an intronic mutation in the cilia-related gene CEP290, which causes missplicing and premature termination, but the basis of this sensitivity is unclear. Here, we generated differentiated photoreceptors in three-dimensional optic cups and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from iPSCs with this common CEP290 mutation to investigate disease mechanisms and evaluate candidate therapies. iPSCs differentiated normally into RPE and optic cups, despite abnormal CEP290 splicing and cilia defects. The highest levels of aberrant splicing and cilia defects were observed in optic cups, explaining the retinal-specific manifestation of this CEP290 mutation. Treating optic cups with an antisense morpholino effectively blocked aberrant splicing and restored expression of full-length CEP290, restoring normal cilia-based protein trafficking. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of the retina-specific phenotypes in CEP290 LCA patients and potential strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27151457

  2. Pleiotropic Effects of CEP290 (NPHP6) Mutations Extend to Meckel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baala, Lekbir ; Audollent, Sophie ; Martinovic, Jéléna ; Ozilou, Catherine ; Babron, Marie-Claude ; Sivanandamoorthy, Sivanthiny ; Saunier, Sophie ; Salomon, Rémi ; Gonzales, Marie ; Rattenberry, Eleanor ; Esculpavit, Chantal ; Toutain, Annick ; Moraine, Claude ; Parent, Philippe ; Marcorelles, Pascale ; Dauge, Marie-Christine ; Roume, Joëlle ; Merrer, Martine Le ; Meiner, Vardiella ; Meir, Karen ; Menez, Françoise ; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie ; Francannet, Christine ; Tantau, Julia ; Sinico, Martine ; Dumez, Yves ; MacDonald, Fiona ; Munnich, Arnold ; Lyonnet, Stanislas ; Gubler, Marie-Claire ; Génin, Emmanuelle ; Johnson, Colin A. ; Vekemans, Michel ; Encha-Razavi, Férechté ; Attié-Bitach, Tania 

    2007-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by central nervous system malformations, polydactyly, multicystic kidney dysplasia, and ductal changes of the liver. Three loci have been mapped (MKS1–MKS3), and two genes have been identified (MKS1/FLJ20345 and MKS3/TMEM67), whereas the gene at the MKS2 locus remains unknown. To identify new MKS loci, a genomewide linkage scan was performed using 10-cM–resolution microsatellite markers in eight families. The highest heterogeneity LOD score was obtained for chromosome 12, in an interval containing CEP290, a gene recently identified as causative of Joubert syndrome (JS) and isolated Leber congenital amaurosis. In view of our recent findings of allelism, at the MKS3 locus, between these two disorders, CEP290 was considered a candidate, and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations were identified in four families. Sequencing of additional cases identified CEP290 mutations in two fetuses with MKS and in four families presenting a cerebro-reno-digital syndrome, with a phenotype overlapping MKS and JS, further demonstrating that MKS and JS can be variable expressions of the same ciliopathy. These data identify a fourth locus for MKS (MKS4) and the CEP290 gene as responsible for MKS. PMID:17564974

  3. Genetic Screening of LCA in Belgium: Predominance of CEP290 and Identification of Potential Modifier Alleles in AHI1 of CEP290-related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Frauke; Casteels, Ingele; Meire, Françoise; De Jaegere, Sarah; Hooghe, Sally; van Regemorter, Nicole; Van Esch, Hilde; Matulevičienė, Aušra; Nunes, Luis; Meersschaut, Valérie; Walraedt, Sophie; Standaert, Lieve; Coucke, Paul; Hoeben, Heidi; Kroes, Hester Y; Vande Walle, Johan; de Ravel, Thomy; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride

    2010-01-01

    Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), the most severe inherited retinal dystrophy, is genetically heterogeneous, with 14 genes accounting for 70% of patients. Here, 91 LCA probands underwent LCA chip analysis and subsequent sequencing of 6 genes (CEP290, CRB1, RPE65, GUCY2D, AIPL1and CRX), revealing mutations in 69% of the cohort, with major involvement of CEP290 (30%). In addition, 11 patients with early-onset retinal dystrophy (EORD) and 13 patients with Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS), LCA-Joubert syndrome (LCA-JS) or cerebello-oculo-renal syndrome (CORS) were included. Exhaustive re-inspection of the overall phenotypes in our LCA cohort revealed novel insights mainly regarding the CEP290-related phenotype. The AHI1 gene was screened as a candidate modifier gene in three patients with the same CEP290 genotype but different neurological involvement. Interestingly, a heterozygous novel AHI1 mutation, p.Asn811Lys, was found in the most severely affected patient. Moreover, AHI1 screening in five other patients with CEP290-related disease and neurological involvement revealed a second novel missense variant, p.His758Pro, in one LCA patient with mild mental retardation and autism. These two AHI1 mutations might thus represent neurological modifiers of CEP290-related disease. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20683928

  4. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats: Challenges in Treating Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chrenek, Micah A; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmic researchers and clinicians arguably have led the way for safe, effective gene therapy, most notably with adeno-associated viral gene supplementation in the treatment for patients with Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 with mutations in the RPE65 gene. These successes notwithstanding, most other genetic retinal disease will be refractory to supplementation. The ideal gene therapy approach would correct gene mutations to restore normal function in the affected cells. Gene editing in which a mutant allele is inactivated or converted to sequence that restores normal function is hypothetically one such approach. Such editing involves site-specific digestion of mutant genomic DNA followed by repair. Previous experimental approaches were hampered by inaccurate and high rates of off-site lesioning and by overall low digestion rates. A new tool, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats coupled with the nuclease Cas9, may address both shortcomings. Some of the many challenges that must be addressed in moving clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats coupled with the nuclease Cas9 therapies to the ophthalmic clinic are discussed here. PMID:27488072

  5. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Joseph C.; Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; Songstad, Allison E.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person’s cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed. PMID:26683869

  6. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 4 mediates unique and exclusive long-term transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat, dog, and nonhuman primate after subretinal delivery.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michel; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Provost, Nathalie; Conrath, Hervé; Folliot, Sébastien; Briot, Delphine; Chérel, Yan; Chenuaud, Pierre; Samulski, Jude; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2003-06-01

    We previously described chimeric recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors 2/4 and 2/5 as the most efficient vectors in rat retina. We now characterize these two vectors carrying the CMV.gfp genome following subretinal injection in the Wistar rat, beagle dog, and cynomolgus macaque. Both serotypes displayed stable GFP expression for the duration of the experiment (6 months) in all three animal models. Similar to the AAV-2 serotype, AAV-2/5 transduced both RPE and photoreceptor cells, with higher level of transduction in photoreceptors, whereas rAAV-2/4 transduction was unambiguously restricted to RPE cells. This unique specificity found conserved among all three species makes AAV-2/4-derived vectors attractive for retinal diseases originating in RPE such as Leber congenital amaurosis (RPE65) or retinitis pigmentosa due to a mutated mertk gene. To provide further important preclinical data, vector shedding was monitored by PCR in various biological fluids for 2 months post-rAAV administration. Following rAAV-2/4 and -5 subretinal delivery in dogs (n = 6) and in nonhuman primates (n = 2), vector genome was found in lacrymal and nasal fluids for up to 3-4 days and in the serum for up to 15-20 days. Overall, these findings will have a practical impact on the development of future gene therapy trials of retinal diseases. PMID:12788651

  8. Mutation of POC1B in a severe syndromic retinal ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Bodo B.; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Bartram, Malte P.; Wegner, Jeremy; Thoenes, Michaela; Pannes, Andrea; Sampson, Josephina; Heller, Raoul; Göbel, Heike; Koerber, Friederike; Neugebauer, Antje; Hedergott, Andrea; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Staubach, Simon; Boycott, Kym M.; Valente, Enza Maria; Janecke, Andreas R.; Eisenberger, Tobias; Bergmann, Carsten; Tebbe, Lars; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yundong; Fry, Andrew M.; Westerfield, Monte; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a consanguineous Iraqi family with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and polycystic kidney disease. Targeted NGS for excluding mutations in known LCA and JBTS genes, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant, c.317G>C (p.Arg106Pro), in POC1B, a gene essential for ciliogenesis, basal body and centrosome integrity. In silico modeling suggested a requirement of p.Arg106 for formation of the third WD40 repeat and a protein interaction interface. In human and mouse retina, POC1B localized to the basal body and centriole adjacent to the connecting cilium of photoreceptors and in synapses of the outer plexiform layer. Knockdown of Poc1b in zebrafish caused cystic kidneys and retinal degeneration with shortened and reduced photoreceptor connecting cilia, compatible with the human syndromic ciliopathy. A recent study describes homozygosity for p.Arg106ProPOC1B in a family with non-syndromic cone-rod dystrophy. The phenotype associated with homozygous p.Arg106ProPOC1B may thus be highly variable, analogous to homozygous p.Leu710Ser in WDR19 causing either isolated retinitis pigmentosa or Jeune syndrome. Our study indicates that POC1B is required for retinal integrity, and we propose POC1B mutations as a probable cause for JBTS with severe polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25044745

  9. Mutations in human IFT140 cause non-syndromic retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Yang, Lizhu; Wang, Feng; Li, Huajin; Wang, Xia; Wang, Weichen; Ge, Zhongqi; Wang, Keqing; Zhao, Li; Li, Hui; Li, Yumei; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui

    2015-10-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are two genetically heterogeneous retinal degenerative disorders. Despite the identification of a number of genes involved in LCA and RP, the genetic etiology remains unknown in many patients. In this study, we aimed to identify novel disease-causing genes of LCA and RP. Retinal capture sequencing was initially performed to screen mutations in known disease-causing genes in different cohorts of LCA and RP patients. For patients with negative results, we performed whole exome sequencing and applied a series of variant filtering strategies. Sanger sequencing was done to validate candidate causative IFT140 variants. Exome sequencing data analysis led to the identification of IFT140 variants in multiple unrelated non-syndromic LCA and RP cases. All the variants are extremely rare and predicted to be damaging. All the variants passed Sanger validation and segregation tests provided that the family members' DNA was available. The results expand the phenotype spectrum of IFT140 mutations to non-syndromic retinal degeneration, thus extending our understanding of intraflagellar transport and primary cilia biology in the retina. This work also improves the molecular diagnosis of retinal degenerative disease. PMID:26216056

  10. Safety and efficacy of subretinal readministration of a viral vector in large animals to treat congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Amado, Defne; Mingozzi, Federico; Hui, Daniel; Bennicelli, Jeannette L; Wei, Zhangyong; Chen, Yifeng; Bote, Erin; Grant, Rebecca L; Golden, Jeffrey A; Narfstrom, Kristina; Syed, Nasreen A; Orlin, Stephen E; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2010-03-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a group of severe inherited retinal degenerations that are symptomatic in infancy and lead to total blindness in adulthood. Recent clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) successfully reversed blindness in patients with LCA caused by RPE65 mutations after one subretinal injection. However, it was unclear whether treatment of the second eye in the same manner would be safe and efficacious, given the potential for a complicating immune response after the first injection. Here, we evaluated the immunological and functional consequences of readministration of rAAV2-hRPE65v2 to the contralateral eye using large animal models. Neither RPE65-mutant (affected; RPE65(-/-)) nor unaffected animals developed antibodies against the transgene product, but all developed neutralizing antibodies against the AAV2 capsid in sera and intraocular fluid after subretinal injection. Cell-mediated immune responses were benign, with only 1 of 10 animals in the study developing a persistent T cell immune response to AAV2, a response that was mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Sequential bilateral injection caused minimal inflammation and improved visual function in affected animals. Thus, subretinal readministration of rAAV2 in animals is safe and effective, even in the setting of preexisting immunity to the vector, a parameter that has been used to exclude patients from gene therapy trials. PMID:20374996

  11. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients. PMID:27067258

  12. Homozygosity Mapping and Targeted Sanger Sequencing Reveal Genetic Defects Underlying Inherited Retinal Disease in Families from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Mustafa, Bilal; Ayub, Humaira; Ali, Liaqat; Ahmad, Shakeel; Micheal, Shazia; Hussain, Alamdar; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Ahmed, Waqas; Khan, Yar Muhammad; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W. J.; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Qamar, Raheel; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD). Methods We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families. Results Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:25775262

  13. S/MAR-containing DNA nanoparticles promote persistent RPE gene expression and improvement in RPE65-associated LCA

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Adarsha; Makkia, Rasha S.; Conley, Shannon M.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in genes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cause or contribute to debilitating ocular diseases, including Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Genetic therapies, particularly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), are a popular choice for monogenic diseases; however, the limited payload capacity of AAVs combined with the large number of retinal disease genes exceeding that capacity make the development of alternative delivery methods critical. Here, we test the ability of compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs) containing a plasmid with a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) and vitelliform macular dystrophy 2 (VMD2) promoter to target the RPE, drive long-term, tissue-specific gene expression and mediate proof-of-principle rescue in the rpe65−/− model of LCA. We show that the S/MAR-containing plasmid exhibited reporter gene expression levels several fold higher than plasmid or NPs without S/MARs. Importantly, this expression was highly persistent, lasting up to 2 years (last timepoint studied). We therefore selected this plasmid for testing in the rpe65−/− mouse model and observe that NP or plasmid VMD2-hRPE65-S/MAR led to structural and functional improvements in the LCA disease phenotype. These results indicate that the non-viral delivery of hRPE65 vectors can result in persistent, therapeutically efficacious gene expression in the RPE. PMID:23335596

  14. Directed evolution of novel adeno-associated viruses for therapeutic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Bartel, M A; Weinstein, J R; Schaffer, D V

    2012-06-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently in clinical trials for numerous disease targets, such as muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, Parkinson's disease, Leber's congenital amaurosis and macular degeneration. Despite its considerable promise and emerging clinical success, several challenges impede the broader implementation of AAV gene therapy, including the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in the human population, low transduction of a number of therapeutically relevant cell and tissue types, an inability to overcome physical and cellular barriers in vivo and a relatively limited carrying capacity. These challenges arise as the demands we place on AAV vectors are often different from or even at odds with the properties nature bestowed on their parent viruses. Viral-directed evolution-the iterative generation of large, diverse libraries of viral mutants and selection for variants with specific properties of interest-offers an approach to address these problems. Here we outline progress in creating novel classes of AAV variant libraries and highlight the successful isolation of variants with novel and advantageous in vitro and in vivo gene delivery properties. PMID:22402323

  15. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients. PMID:27067258

  16. Vitamin A Derivatives as Treatment Options for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65) known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients. PMID:23857173

  17. Novel Mutations in Two Saudi Patients with Congenital Retinal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Safieh, Leen Abu; Al-Otaibi, Humoud M.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    To report novel mutations in two Saudi children with clinical features of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and Alström syndrome. Case reports. Case 1 was a child with phenotypic features of LCA including oculodigital sign, bilateral enophthalmos, nystagmus, pale disc, and retinal changes. Direct sequencing of the coding sequence of GUCY2D revealed a missense mutation affecting highly conserved position (c. 743C > T; p.S248 L). Case 2 describes a girl with marked nystagmus, photophobia, and retinal changes in both eyes with short and stubby fingers tapering at the distal phalanges. The electroretinograms were nonrecordable in each eye. She had a hearing aid in the left ear, mid-facial hypoplasia, bilateral enophthalmos, and insulin dependent diabetes. Mutation screening of candidates genes revealed a pathogenic mutation in ALMS1 gene (c. 8441C > A, p.S2814*). Two novel mutations causing phenotypic LCA and Alström syndrome in Saudi patients from consanguineous families expand the genotypic spectrum of congenital retinal dystrophies PMID:26957854

  18. Crystal structure of native RPE65, the retinoid isomerase of the visual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, Philip D.; Golczak, Marcin; Lodowski, David T.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrate vision is maintained by the retinoid (visual) cycle, a complex enzymatic pathway that operates in the retina to regenerate the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal. A key enzyme in this pathway is the microsomal membrane protein RPE65. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of all-trans-retinyl esters to 11-cis-retinol in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mutations in RPE65 are known to be responsible for a subset of cases of the most common form of childhood blindness, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Although retinoid isomerase activity has been attributed to RPE65, its catalytic mechanism remains a matter of debate. Also, the manner in which RPE65 binds to membranes and extracts retinoid substrates is unclear. To gain insight into these questions, we determined the crystal structure of native bovine RPE65 at 2.14-{angstrom} resolution. The structural, biophysical, and biochemical data presented here provide the framework needed for an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of catalytic isomerization and membrane association, in addition to the role mutations that cause LCA have in disrupting protein function.

  19. Recommended names for pleomorphic genera in Dothideomycetes.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Amy Y; Crous, Pedro W; Hyde, Kevin D; Hawksworth, David L; Aptroot, André; Bezerra, Jose L; Bhat, Jayarama D; Boehm, Eric; Braun, Uwe; Boonmee, Saranyaphat; Camporesi, Erio; Chomnunti, Putarak; Dai, Dong-Qin; D'souza, Melvina J; Dissanayake, Asha; Gareth Jones, E B; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Hernández-Restrepo, Margarita; Hongsanan, Sinang; Jaklitsch, Walter M; Jayawardena, Ruvishika; Jing, Li Wen; Kirk, Paul M; Lawrey, James D; Mapook, Ausana; McKenzie, Eric H C; Monkai, Jutamart; Phillips, Alan J L; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Raja, Huzefa A; Seifert, Keith A; Senanayake, Indunil; Slippers, Bernard; Suetrong, Satinee; Taylor, Joanne E; Thambugala, Kasun M; Tian, Qing; Tibpromma, Saowaluck; Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N; Wijayawardene, Nalin N; Wikee, Saowanee; Woudenberg, Joyce H C; Wu, Hai-Xia; Yan, Jiye; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Ying

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides recommendations of one name for use among pleomorphic genera in Dothideomycetes by the Working Group on Dothideomycetes established under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). A number of these generic names are proposed for protection because they do not have priority and/or the generic name selected for use is asexually typified. These include: Acrogenospora over Farlowiella; Alternaria over Allewia, Lewia, and Crivellia; Botryosphaeria over Fusicoccum; Camarosporula over Anthracostroma; Capnodium over Polychaeton; Cladosporium over Davidiella; Corynespora over Corynesporasca; Curvularia over Pseudocochliobolus; Elsinoë over Sphaceloma; Excipulariopsis over Kentingia; Exosporiella over Anomalemma; Exserohilum over Setosphaeria; Gemmamyces over Megaloseptoria; Kellermania over Planistromella; Kirschsteiniothelia over Dendryphiopsis; Lecanosticta over Eruptio; Paranectriella over Araneomyces; Phaeosphaeria over Phaeoseptoria; Phyllosticta over Guignardia; Podonectria over Tetracrium; Polythrincium over Cymadothea; Prosthemium over Pleomassaria; Ramularia over Mycosphaerella; Sphaerellopsis over Eudarluca; Sphaeropsis over Phaeobotryosphaeria; Stemphylium over Pleospora; Teratosphaeria over Kirramyces and Colletogloeopsis; Tetraploa over Tetraplosphaeria; Venturia over Fusicladium and Pollaccia; and Zeloasperisporium over Neomicrothyrium. Twenty new combinations are made: Acrogenospora carmichaeliana (Berk.) Rossman & Crous, Alternaria scrophulariae (Desm.) Rossman & Crous, Pyrenophora catenaria (Drechsler) Rossman & K.D. Hyde, P. dematioidea (Bubák & Wróbl.) Rossman & K.D. Hyde, P. fugax (Wallr.) Rossman & K.D. Hyde, P. nobleae (McKenzie & D. Matthews) Rossman & K.D. Hyde, P. triseptata (Drechsler) Rossman & K.D. Hyde, Schizothyrium cryptogamum (Batzer & Crous) Crous & Batzer, S. cylindricum (G.Y. Sun et al.) Crous & Batzer, S. emperorae (G.Y. Sun & L. Gao) Crous & Batzer, S. inaequale (G.Y. Sun & L

  20. Using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to interrogate the pathogenicity of a novel retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa cryptic splice site mutation and confirm eligibility for enrollment into a clinical gene augmentation trial.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Budd A; Cranston, Cathryn M; Anfinson, Kristin A; Shrestha, Suruchi; Streb, Luan M; Leon, Alejandro; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M

    2015-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa (RPE65)-associated Leber congenital amaurosis is an autosomal recessive disease that results in reduced visual acuity and night blindness beginning at birth. It is one of the few retinal degenerative disorders for which promising clinical gene transfer trials are currently underway. However, the ability to enroll patients in a gene augmentation trial is dependent on the identification of 2 bona fide disease-causing mutations, and there are some patients with the phenotype of RPE65-associated disease who might benefit from gene transfer but are ineligible because 2 disease-causing genetic variations have not yet been identified. Some such patients have novel mutations in RPE65 for which pathogenicity is difficult to confirm. The goal of this study was to determine if an intronic mutation identified in a 2-year-old patient with presumed RPE65-associated disease was truly pathogenic and grounds for inclusion in a clinical gene augmentation trial. Sequencing of the RPE65 gene revealed 2 mutations: (1) a previously identified disease-causing exonic leucine-to-proline mutation (L408P) and (2) a novel single point mutation in intron 3 (IVS3-11) resulting in an A>G change. RT-PCR analysis using RNA extracted from control human donor eye-derived primary RPE, control iPSC-RPE cells, and proband iPSC-RPE cells revealed that the identified IVS3-11 variation caused a splicing defect that resulted in a frameshift and insertion of a premature stop codon. In this study, we demonstrate how patient-specific iPSCs can be used to confirm pathogenicity of unknown mutations, which can enable positive clinical outcomes. PMID:26364624

  1. AIPL1 implicated in the pathogenesis of two cases of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Jin, Chongfei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Bushra, Tahmina; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Butt, Nadeem H.; Husnain, Tayyab; Sieving, Paul A.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To localize and identify the gene and mutations causing autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Consanguineous families from Pakistan were ascertained to be affected with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. All affected individuals underwent thorough ophthalmologic examinations. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNA was extracted using a salting out procedure. Genotyping was performed using microsatellite markers spaced at approximately 10 cM intervals. Two-point linkage analysis was performed with the lod score method. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified genomic DNA was performed for mutation screening of candidate genes. Results Genome-wide linkage scans yielded a lod score of 3.05 at θ=0 for D17S1832 and 3.82 at θ=0 for D17S938, localizing the disease gene to a 12.22 cM (6.64 Mb) region flanked by D17S1828 and D17S1852 for family 61032 and family 61227, which contains aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1), a gene previously implicated in recessive Leber congenital amaurosis and autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy. Sequencing of AIPL1 showed a homozygous c.773G>C (p.Arg258Pro) sequence change in all affected individuals of family 61032 and a homozygous c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) change in all affected members of family 61227. Conclusions The results strongly suggest that the c.773G>C (p.R258P) and c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) mutations in AIPL1 cause autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in these consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:24426771

  2. Noninvasive Imaging Reveals Stable Transgene Expression in Mouse Airways After Delivery of a Nonintegrating Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vector.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Dragana; Gijsbers, Rik; Jimenez, Ana Quiles; Dooley, James; Van den Haute, Chris; Van der Perren, Anke; Liston, Adrian; Baekelandt, Veerle; Debyser, Zeger; Carlon, Marianne Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise to cure a wide range of genetic and acquired diseases. Recent successes in recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV)-based gene therapy in the clinic for hereditary disorders such as Leber's congenital amaurosis and hemophilia B encouraged us to reexplore an rAAV approach for pulmonary gene transfer. Only limited clinical successes have been achieved for airway gene transfer so far, underscoring the need for further preclinical development of rAAV-based gene therapy for pulmonary disorders. We sought to determine the preclinical potential of an airway-tropic serotype, rAAV2/5, encoding reporter genes when delivered to mouse airways. Although several groups have assessed the stability of gene transfer using a nonintegrating rAAV in mouse airways, long-term stability for more than a year has not been reported. Additionally, an extensive quantitative analysis of the specific cell types targeted by rAAV2/5 using cell-specific markers is lacking. We obtained sustained gene expression in upper and lower airways up to 15 months after vector administration, a substantial proportion of the lifespan of a laboratory mouse. In addition, we demonstrated that readministration of rAAV2/5 to the airways is feasible and increases gene expression 14 months after primary vector administration, despite the presence of circulating neutralizing antibodies. Finally, identification of transduced cell types revealed different subpopulations being targeted by rAAV2/5, with 64% of β-galactosidase-positive cells being ciliated cells, 34% club cells in the conducting airways, and 75% alveolar type II cells in the alveoli at 1 month postinjection. This underscores the therapeutic potential of a nonintegrating rAAV vector to develop a gene therapeutic drug for a variety of pulmonary disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and surfactant deficiencies. PMID:26567984

  3. Bicarbonate and Ca2+ Sensing Modulators Activate Photoreceptor ROS-GC1 Synergistically

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Pertzev, Alexandre; Makino, Clint L.; Sharma, Rameshwar K.

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor ROS-GC1, a prototype subfamily member of the membrane guanylate cyclase family, is a central component of phototransduction. It is a single transmembrane-spanning protein, composed of modular blocks. In rods, guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) 1 and 2 bind to its juxtamembrane domain (JMD) and the C-terminal extension, respectively, to accelerate cyclic GMP synthesis when Ca2+ levels are low. In cones, the additional expression of the Ca2+-dependent guanylate cyclase activating protein (CD-GCAP) S100B which binds to its C-terminal extension, supports acceleration of cyclic GMP synthesis at high Ca2+ levels. Independent of Ca2+, ROS-GC1 activity is also stimulated directly by bicarbonate binding to the core catalytic domain (CCD). Several enticing molecular features of this transduction system are revealed in the present study. In combination, bicarbonate and Ca2+-dependent modulators raised maximal ROS-GC activity to levels that exceeded the sum of their individual effects. The F514S mutation in ROS-GC1 that causes blindness in type 1 Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA) severely reduced basal ROS-GC1 activity. GCAP2 and S100B Ca2+ signaling modes remained functional, while the GCAP1-modulated mode was diminished. Bicarbonate nearly restored basal activity as well as GCAP2- and S100B-stimulated activities of the F514S mutant to normal levels but could not resurrect GCAP1 stimulation. We conclude that GCAP1 and GCAP2 forge distinct pathways through domain-specific modules of ROS-GC1 whereas the S100B and GCAP2 pathways may overlap. The synergistic interlinking of bicarbonate to GCAPs- and S100B-modulated pathways intensifies and tunes the dependence of cyclic GMP synthesis on intracellular Ca2+. Our study challenges the recently proposed GCAP1 and GCAP2 “overlapping” phototransduction model (Peshenko et al., 2015b). PMID:26858600

  4. Chromosomal localization and genomic organization of genes encoding guanylyl cyclase receptors expressed in olfactory sensory neurons and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ruey-Bing; Fuelle, H.J.; Garbers, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    We recently cloned three membrane guanylyl cyclases, designated GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F, from rat olfactory tissue and eye. Amino acid sequence homology suggests that they may compose a new gene subfamily of guanylyl cyclase receptors specifically expressed in sensory tissues. Their chromosomal localization was determined by mouse interspecific backcross analysis. The GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F genes (Gucy2d, Gucy2e, and Gucy2f) are dispersed through the mouse genome in that they map to chromosomes 7, 11, and X, respectively. Close proximity of the mouse GC-D gene to Omp (olfactory marker protein) and Hbb (hemoglobin {beta}-chain complex) suggests that the human homolog gene maps to 11p15.4 or 11q13.4-q14.1. The human GC-F gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome Xq22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The genomic organization of the mouse GC-E, and GC-F genomic clones contain identical exon-intron boundaries within their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains, demonstrating the conservation of the gene structures. With respect to human genetic diseases, GC-E mapped to mouse chromosome 11 within a syntenic region on human chromosome 17p13 that has been linked with loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis. No apparent disease loci have been yet linked to the locations of the GC-D or GC-F genes. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Outer Segment Thickness Predicts Visual Field Response to QLT091001 in Patients with RPE65 or LRAT Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Birch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the degree of change in Goldmann visual fields (GVFs) following oral administration of QLT091001 was related to baseline measures of retinal structure. Methods Oral QLT091001 was administered once daily for 7 days in all study patients. Comprehensive ophthalmic testing, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), was conducted in 14 patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and 18 patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) at seven international sites. Average thickness of the outer segment (OS) layer was calculated over central 20°. Both eyes of each subject were evaluated separately. Results Nineteen of 28 eyes (68%) with LCA and 13 of 36 eyes (36%) with RP responded to QLT091001. Among these responders, the average baseline thickness of the OS layer (central 20°) was 13.5 μm in the LCA cohort and 11.7 μm in the RP cohort. Nonresponders had average baseline OS thickness of less than 4.6 μm in both cohorts. The OS thickness in the central 20° was significantly shorter in nonresponders than responders in the LCA cohort (P = 0.01, t-test) and in the RP cohort (P = 0.02, Wilcoxon rank sum test). The OS thickness in the central 20° did not change significantly from baseline during the first 2 months (P = 0.09, t-test, paired). Conclusions The present findings suggest that there is a close parallel between the thickness of the photoreceptor layer and the potential for functional improvement in these patients. Translational Relevance SD-OCT thickness in the central retina may be useful for predicting the visual field response in the peripheral retina to QLT091001. (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01014052 number, NCT01014052) PMID:26448901

  6. Focus on Kir7.1: physiology and channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohit; Pattnaik, Bikash R

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have linked alterations in Kir7.1 channel to diverse pathologies. We summarize functional relevance of Kir7.1 channel in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), regulation of channel function by various cytoplasmic metabolites, and mutations that cause channelopathies. At the apical membrane of RPE, K+ channels contribute to subretinal K+ homeostasis and support Na+/K+ pump and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter function by providing a pathway for K+ secretion. Electrophysiological studies have established that barium- and cesium-sensitive inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir) channels make up a major component of the RPE apical membrane K+ conductance. Native human RPE expresses transcripts for Kir1.1, Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir3.1, Kir3.4, Kir4.2, and Kir6.1, albeit at levels at least 50-fold lower than Kir7.1. Kir7.1 is structurally similar to other Kir channels, consisting of 2 trans-membrane domains, a pore-forming loop that contains the selectivity filter, and 2 cytoplasmic polar tails. Within the cytoplasmic structure, clusters of amino acid sequences form regulatory domains that interact with cellular metabolites and control the opening and closing of the channel. Recent evidence indicated that intrinsic sequence motifs present in Kir7.1 control surface expression. Mutant Kir7.1 channels are associated with inherited eye pathologies such as Snowflake Vitreoretinal Degeneration (SVD) and Lebers Congenital Amaurosis (LCA16). Based on the current evidence, mutations implicated in channelopathies have the potential to be used for genetic testing to diagnose blindness due to Kir7.1. PMID:25558901

  7. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa with Early Macular Affectation Caused by Premature Truncation in PROM1

    PubMed Central

    Permanyer, Jon; Navarro, Rafael; Friedman, James; Pomares, Esther; Castro-Navarro, Joaquín; Marfany, Gemma; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the genetic basis of a large consanguineous Spanish pedigree affected with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) with premature macular atrophy and myopia. Methods. After a high-throughput cosegregation gene chip was used to exclude all known RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) candidates, genome-wide screening and linkage analysis were performed. Direct mutational screening identified the pathogenic mutation, and primers were designed to obtain the RT-PCR products for isoform characterization. Results. Mutational analysis detected a novel homozygous PROM1 mutation, c.869delG in exon 8 cosegregating with the disease. This variant causes a frameshift that introduces a premature stop codon, producing truncation of approximately two-thirds of the protein. Analysis of PROM1 expression in the lymphocytes of patients, carriers, and control subjects revealed an aberrant transcript that is degraded by the nonsense-mediated decay pathway, suggesting that the disease is caused by the absence of the PROM1 protein. Three (s2, s11 and s12) of the seven alternatively spliced isoforms reported in humans, accounted for 98% of the transcripts in the retina. Given that these three contained exon 8, no PROM1 isoform is expected in the affected retinas. Conclusions. A remarkable clinical finding in the affected family is early macular atrophy with concentric spared areas. The authors propose that the hallmark of PROM1 truncating mutations is early and severe progressive degeneration of both rods and cones and highlight this gene as a candidate of choice to prioritize in the molecular genetic study of patients with noncanonical clinical peripheral and macular affectation. PMID:20042663

  8. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, ZANEVELD; Feng, WANG; Xia, WANG; Rui, CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients’ genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt’s disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23393028

  9. High frequency of CRB1 mutations as cause of Early-Onset Retinal Dystrophies in the Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CRB1 mutations are reported as cause of severe congenital and early-onset retinal dystrophies (EORD) with different phenotypic manifestations, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and cone-rod dystrophies. Comprehensive mutational scanning of the whole gene has been only performed in few cohorts, mainly in LCA patients. Here, we aimed investigating the real prevalence of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish population by extensive screening of CRB1 mutations in a large cohort of LCA and EORP cases. Methods This report integrates data from previous studies on CRB1 defects in our Spanish cohort of LCA and early-onset RP (EORP) with new findings from a comprehensive mutational screening of the whole gene. The molecular tools used include mutation genotyping arrays, whole-genome homozygosity mapping, an optimized high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and Sanger sequencing. Results A large clinically well-characterized cohort of 404 Spanish cases was studied, 114 of which suffered from LCA and 290 from EORP. This study reveals that 11% of Spanish patients carried mutations in CRB1, ranging from 9% of EORP to 14% of LCA cases. More than three quarters of the mutations identified herein have been first described in this Spanish cohort, 13 of them are unreported new variants and 13 had been previously reported in our previous studies. Conclusions This work provides a wide spectrum of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish EORD patients and evidences the major role of CRB1 as causal gene in the Spanish EORP patients. It is noteworthy that a high rate of private mutations only described in our cohort has been found so far. To our knowledge, this study represents the most complete mutational screening of CRB1 in a Spanish LCA and EORP cohort, allowing us to establish gene-specific frequencies and to provide a wide spectrum of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish population. PMID:23379534

  10. Deep intronic mutation in OFD1, identified by targeted genomic next-generation sequencing, causes a severe form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP23).

    PubMed

    Webb, Tom R; Parfitt, David A; Gardner, Jessica C; Martinez, Ariadna; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Davidson, Alice E; Zito, Ilaria; Thiselton, Dawn L; Ressa, Jacob H C; Apergi, Marina; Schwarz, Nele; Kanuga, Naheed; Michaelides, Michel; Cheetham, Michael E; Gorin, Michael B; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2012-08-15

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is genetically heterogeneous with two causative genes identified, RPGR and RP2. We previously mapped a locus for a severe form of XLRP, RP23, to a 10.71 Mb interval on Xp22.31-22.13 containing 62 genes. Candidate gene screening failed to identify a causative mutation, so we adopted targeted genomic next-generation sequencing of the disease interval to determine the molecular cause of RP23. No coding variants or variants within or near splice sites were identified. In contrast, a variant deep within intron 9 of OFD1 increased the splice site prediction score 4 bp upstream of the variant. Mutations in OFD1 cause the syndromic ciliopathies orofaciodigital syndrome-1, which is male lethal, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 and Joubert syndrome. We tested the effect of the IVS9+706A>G variant on OFD1 splicing in vivo. In RP23 patient-derived RNA, we detected an OFD1 transcript with the insertion of a cryptic exon spliced between exons 9 and 10 causing a frameshift, p.N313fs.X330. Correctly spliced OFD1 was also detected in patient-derived RNA, although at reduced levels (39%), hence the mutation is not male lethal. Our data suggest that photoreceptors are uniquely susceptible to reduced expression of OFD1 and that an alternative disease mechanism can cause XLRP. This disease mechanism of reduced expression for a syndromic ciliopathy gene causing isolated retinal degeneration is reminiscent of CEP290 intronic mutations that cause Leber congenital amaurosis, and we speculate that reduced dosage of correctly spliced ciliopathy genes may be a common disease mechanism in retinal degenerations. PMID:22619378

  11. Human gene therapy for RPE65 isomerase deficiency activates the retinoid cycle of vision but with slow rod kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Boye, Sanford L.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Pang, Ji-jing; Sumaroka, Alexander; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Heon, Elise; Stone, Edwin M.; Byrne, Barry J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Hauswirth, William W.

    2008-01-01

    The RPE65 gene encodes the isomerase of the retinoid cycle, the enzymatic pathway that underlies mammalian vision. Mutations in RPE65 disrupt the retinoid cycle and cause a congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). We used adeno-associated virus-2-based RPE65 gene replacement therapy to treat three young adults with RPE65-LCA and measured their vision before and up to 90 days after the intervention. All three patients showed a statistically significant increase in visual sensitivity at 30 days after treatment localized to retinal areas that had received the vector. There were no changes in the effect between 30 and 90 days. Both cone- and rod-photoreceptor-based vision could be demonstrated in treated areas. For cones, there were increases of up to 1.7 log units (i.e., 50 fold); and for rods, there were gains of up to 4.8 log units (i.e., 63,000 fold). To assess what fraction of full vision potential was restored by gene therapy, we related the degree of light sensitivity to the level of remaining photoreceptors within the treatment area. We found that the intervention could overcome nearly all of the loss of light sensitivity resulting from the biochemical blockade. However, this reconstituted retinoid cycle was not completely normal. Resensitization kinetics of the newly treated rods were remarkably slow and required 8 h or more for the attainment of full sensitivity, compared with <1 h in normal eyes. Cone-sensitivity recovery time was rapid. These results demonstrate dramatic, albeit imperfect, recovery of rod- and cone-photoreceptor-based vision after RPE65 gene therapy. PMID:18809924

  12. Bicarbonate and Ca(2+) Sensing Modulators Activate Photoreceptor ROS-GC1 Synergistically.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Pertzev, Alexandre; Makino, Clint L; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor ROS-GC1, a prototype subfamily member of the membrane guanylate cyclase family, is a central component of phototransduction. It is a single transmembrane-spanning protein, composed of modular blocks. In rods, guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) 1 and 2 bind to its juxtamembrane domain (JMD) and the C-terminal extension, respectively, to accelerate cyclic GMP synthesis when Ca(2+) levels are low. In cones, the additional expression of the Ca(2+)-dependent guanylate cyclase activating protein (CD-GCAP) S100B which binds to its C-terminal extension, supports acceleration of cyclic GMP synthesis at high Ca(2+) levels. Independent of Ca(2+), ROS-GC1 activity is also stimulated directly by bicarbonate binding to the core catalytic domain (CCD). Several enticing molecular features of this transduction system are revealed in the present study. In combination, bicarbonate and Ca(2+)-dependent modulators raised maximal ROS-GC activity to levels that exceeded the sum of their individual effects. The F(514)S mutation in ROS-GC1 that causes blindness in type 1 Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) severely reduced basal ROS-GC1 activity. GCAP2 and S100B Ca(2+) signaling modes remained functional, while the GCAP1-modulated mode was diminished. Bicarbonate nearly restored basal activity as well as GCAP2- and S100B-stimulated activities of the F(514)S mutant to normal levels but could not resurrect GCAP1 stimulation. We conclude that GCAP1 and GCAP2 forge distinct pathways through domain-specific modules of ROS-GC1 whereas the S100B and GCAP2 pathways may overlap. The synergistic interlinking of bicarbonate to GCAPs- and S100B-modulated pathways intensifies and tunes the dependence of cyclic GMP synthesis on intracellular Ca(2+). Our study challenges the recently proposed GCAP1 and GCAP2 "overlapping" phototransduction model (Peshenko et al., 2015b). PMID:26858600

  13. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. PMID:23566848

  14. Progress and challenges in viral vector manufacturing.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Johannes C M; Wright, J Fraser

    2016-04-15

    Promising results in several clinical studies have emphasized the potential of gene therapy to address important medical needs and initiated a surge of investments in drug development and commercialization. This enthusiasm is driven by positive data in clinical trials including gene replacement for Hemophilia B, X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, Leber's Congenital Amaurosis Type 2 and in cancer immunotherapy trials for hematological malignancies using chimeric antigen receptor T cells. These results build on the recent licensure of the European gene therapy product Glybera for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. The progress from clinical development towards product licensure of several programs presents challenges to gene therapy product manufacturing. These include challenges in viral vector-manufacturing capacity, where an estimated 1-2 orders of magnitude increase will likely be needed to support eventual commercial supply requirements for many of the promising disease indications. In addition, the expanding potential commercial product pipeline and the continuously advancing development of recombinant viral vectors for gene therapy require that products are well characterized and consistently manufactured to rigorous tolerances of purity, potency and safety. Finally, there is an increase in regulatory scrutiny that affects manufacturers of investigational drugs for early-phase clinical trials engaged in industry partnerships. Along with the recent increase in biopharmaceutical funding in gene therapy, industry partners are requiring their academic counterparts to meet higher levels of GMP compliance at earlier stages of clinical development. This chapter provides a brief overview of current progress in the field and discusses challenges in vector manufacturing. PMID:26519140

  15. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red–green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable. PMID:24227970

  16. The susceptibility of the retina to photochemical damage from visible light

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer J; Morgan, Jessica I W; Merigan, William H; Sliney, David H; Sparrow, Janet R; Williams, David R

    2011-01-01

    The photoreceptor/RPE complex must maintain a delicate balance between maximizing the absorption of photons for vision and retinal image quality while simultaneously minimizing the risk of photodamage when exposed to bright light. We review the recent discovery of two new effects of light exposure on the photoreceptor/RPE complex in the context of current thinking about the causes of retinal phototoxicity. These effects are autofluorescence photobleaching in which exposure to bright light reduces lipofuscin autofluorescence and, at higher light levels, RPE disruption in which the pattern of autofluorescence is permanently altered following light exposure. Both effects occur following exposure to visible light at irradiances that were previously thought to be safe. Photopigment, retinoids involved in the visual cycle, and bisretinoids in lipofuscin have been implicated as possible photosensitizers for photochemical damage. The mechanism of RPE disruption may follow either of these paths. On the other hand, autofluorescence photobleaching is likely an indicator of photooxidation of lipofuscin. The permanent changes inherent in RPE disruption might require modification of the light safety standards. AF photobleaching recovers after several hours although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet clear. Understanding the mechanisms of phototoxicity is all the more important given the potential for increased susceptibility in the presence of ocular diseases that affect either the visual cycle and/or lipofuscin accumulation. In addition, knowledge of photochemical mechanisms can improve our understanding of some disease processes that may be influenced by light exposure, such as some forms of Leber’s congenital amaurosis, and aid in the development of new therapies. Such treatment prior to intentional light exposures, as in ophthalmic examinations or surgeries, could provide an effective preventative strategy. PMID:22085795

  17. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Boloc, Daniel; Castillo-Lara, Sergio; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Abril, Josep F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA). The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies. Methodology We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet) by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space. Conclusions In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates. PMID:26267445

  18. Persistence of non-viral vector mediated RPE65 expression: case for viability as a gene transfer therapy for RPE-based diseases.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Adarsha; Conley, Shannon M; Makkia, Rasha; Liu, Zhao; Cooper, Mark J; Sparrow, Janet R; Naash, Muna I

    2013-12-28

    Mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) gene RPE65 are associated with multiple blinding diseases including Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA). Our goal has been to develop persistent, effective non-viral genetic therapies to treat this condition. Using precisely engineered DNA vectors and high capacity compacted DNA nanoparticles (NP), we previously demonstrated that both plasmid and NP forms of VMD2-hRPE65-S/MAR improved the disease phenotypes in an rpe65(-/-) model of LCA up to 6 months post-injection (PI), however the duration of this treatment efficacy was not established. Here, we test the ability of these vectors to sustain gene expression and phenotypic improvement for the life of the animal. NPs or naked DNA were subretinally injected in rpe65(-/-) mice at postnatal day (P) 16 and evaluated at 15 months PI. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescence were performed at PI-15 months and demonstrated appreciable expression of transferred RPE65 (levels were 32% of wild-type [WT] for NPs and 44% of WT for naked DNA). No reduction in expression at the message level was observed from PI-6 month data. Spectral electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated significant improvement in cone ERG amplitudes in treated versus uninjected animals. Most importantly, we also observed reduced fundus autofluorescence in the eyes injected with NP and naked DNA compared to uninjected counterparts. Consistent with these observations, biochemical studies showed a reduction in the accumulation of toxic retinyl esters in treated mice, suggesting that the transferred hRPE65 was functional. These critical results indicate that both NP and uncompacted plasmid VMD2-hRPE65-S/MAR can mediate persistent, long-term improvement in an RPE-associated disease phenotype, and suggest that DNA NPs, which are non-toxic and have a large payload capacity, expand the treatment repertoire available for ocular gene therapy. PMID:24035979

  19. Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase: A Key Enzyme Involved in the Retinoid (visual) Cycle.

    PubMed

    Sears, Avery E; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) catalyzes the acyl transfer from the sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine (PC) to all-trans-retinol, creating fatty acid retinyl esters (palmitoyl, stearoyl, and some unsaturated derivatives). In the eye, these retinyl esters are substrates for the 65 kDa retinoid isomerase (RPE65). LRAT is well characterized biochemically, and recent structural data from closely related family members of the NlpC/P60 superfamily and a chimeric protein have established its catalytic mechanism. Mutations in the LRAT gene are responsible for approximately 1% of reported cases of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Lack of functional LRAT, expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), results in loss of the visual chromophore and photoreceptor degeneration. LCA is a rare hereditary retinal dystrophy with an early onset associated with mutations in one of 21 known genes. Protocols have been devised to identify therapeutics that compensate for mutations in RPE65, also associated with LCA. The same protocols can be adapted to combat dystrophies associated with LRAT. Improvement in the visual function of clinical recipients of therapy with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors incorporating the RPE65 gene provides a proof of concept for LRAT, which functions in the same cell type and metabolic pathway as RPE65. In parallel, a clinical trial that employs oral 9-cis-retinyl acetate to replace the missing chromophore in RPE65 and LRAT causative disease has proven to be effective and free of adverse effects. This article summarizes the biochemistry of LRAT and examines chromophore replacement as a treatment for LCA caused by LRAT mutations. PMID:27183166

  20. Combining Cep290 and Mkks ciliopathy alleles in mice rescues sensory defects and restores ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rachel, Rivka A.; May-Simera, Helen L.; Veleri, Shobi; Gotoh, Norimoto; Choi, Byung Yoon; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Marek, Jonah; Lopez, Irma; Hackett, Alice N.; Brooks, Matthew; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Beales, Philip L.; Li, Tiansen; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Sood, Raman; Martens, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Paul; Friedman, Thomas B.; Khanna, Hemant; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Kelley, Matthew W.; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are highly specialized microtubule-based organelles that have pivotal roles in numerous biological processes, including transducing sensory signals. Defects in cilia biogenesis and transport cause pleiotropic human ciliopathies. Mutations in over 30 different genes can lead to cilia defects, and complex interactions exist among ciliopathy-associated proteins. Mutations of the centrosomal protein 290 kDa (CEP290) lead to distinct clinical manifestations, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a hereditary cause of blindness due to photoreceptor degeneration. Mice homozygous for a mutant Cep290 allele (Cep290rd16 mice) exhibit LCA-like early-onset retinal degeneration that is caused by an in-frame deletion in the CEP290 protein. Here, we show that the domain deleted in the protein encoded by the Cep290rd16 allele directly interacts with another ciliopathy protein, MKKS. MKKS mutations identified in patients with the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome disrupted this interaction. In zebrafish embryos, combined subminimal knockdown of mkks and cep290 produced sensory defects in the eye and inner ear. Intriguingly, combinations of Cep290rd16 and Mkksko alleles in mice led to improved ciliogenesis and sensory functions compared with those of either mutant alone. We propose that altered association of CEP290 and MKKS affects the integrity of multiprotein complexes at the cilia transition zone and basal body. Amelioration of the sensory phenotypes caused by specific mutations in one protein by removal of an interacting domain/protein suggests a possible novel approach for treating human ciliopathies. PMID:22446187

  1. Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1−/− dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Sargan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1−/− dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1−/− MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10−13) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ∼11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1−/− alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD. PMID:22193413

  2. Impact of set-aside management on soil mesofauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Silvia; d'Errico, Giada; Mazza, Giuseppe; Mocali, Stefano; Bazzoffi, Paolo; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2014-05-01

    (MI) resulted significantly higher in set-aside managements than in conventional crops in Fagna and Metaponto sites. In contrast, Caorle was characterized by a significant soil degradation (prevalence of extreme colonizers) and any increase of MI values in the set-aside have been not detected. About microarthropods, the taxa richness was significantly higher in set-aside managements than conventional crops in all the sites sampled. QBS index showed the same trend, but the differences were not significant. Caorle site was characterized by a lack of balance in the relative abundance among soil microarthropods taxa. In particular, set-aside managements showed a strong prevalence of an aggressive ants Solenopsis fugax (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). In conclusion, the best results were observed in Fagna and Metaponto sites, where MI and QBS values increased under set-aside management as compared to the conventional. Further analyses will be carried out over a long period to better understand the possible correlation between the enhancement of the organic matter observed in the soils less degraded and the biological quality improvement.

  3. Phenotypic variation and genotype-phenotype discordance in canine cone-rod dystrophy with an RPGRIP1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kumiko; Aguirre-Hernández, Jesús; Tokuriki, Tsuyoshi; Morimoto, Kyohei; Busse, Claudia; Barnett, Keith; Holmes, Nigel; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Sargan, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Previously, a 44 bp insertion in exon 2 of retinitis pigmentosa GTPase interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1) was identified as the cause of cone-rod dystrophy 1 (cord1), a recessive form of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in the Miniature Longhaired Dachshund (MLHD), a dog model for Leber congenital amaurosis. The cord1 locus was mapped using MLHDs from an inbred colony with a homogeneous early onset disease phenotype. In this paper, the MLHD pet population was studied to investigate phenotypic variation and genotype-phenotype correlation. Further, the cord1 locus was fine-mapped using PRA cases from the MLHD pet population to narrow the critical region. Other dog breeds were also screened for the RGPRIP1 insertion. Methods This study examined phenotypic variation in an MLHD pet population that included 59 sporadic PRA cases and 18 members of an extended family with shared environment and having six PRA cases. Ophthalmologic evaluations included behavioral abnormalities, responses to menace and light, fundoscopy, and electroretinography (ERG). The RPGRIP1 insertion was screened for in all cases and 200 apparently normal control MLHDs and in 510 dogs from 66 other breed. To fine-map the cord1 locus in the MLHD, 74 PRA cases and 86 controls aged 4 years or more were genotyped for 24 polymorphic markers within the previously mapped cord1 critical region of 14.15 Mb. Results Among sporadic PRA cases from the MLHD pet population, the age of onset varied from 4 months to 15 years old; MLHDs from the extended family also showed variable onset and rate of progression. Screening for the insertion in RPGRIP1 identified substantial genotype-phenotype discordance: 16% of controls were homozygous for the insertion (RPGRIP1−/−), while 20% of PRA cases were not homozygous for it. Four other breeds were identified to carry the insertion including English Springer Spaniels and Beagles with insertion homozygotes. The former breed included both controls and PRA cases, yet in

  4. Orbital complications in children: differential diagnosis of a challenging disease.

    PubMed

    Welkoborsky, Hans-J; Graß, Sylvia; Deichmüller, Cordula; Bertram, Oliver; Hinni, Michael L

    2015-05-01

    Orbital swelling in children presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Most are associated with acute sinusitis with complicating factors possibly including: amaurosis, meningitis, intracranial abscess or even cavernous sinus thrombosis. However not all acute orbital swelling is associated with acute sinusitis. A careful evaluation is critical prior to initiating therapy. Clinical records of 49 children (27 girls, 22 boys, with an average age of 11.8 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Historical data evaluated included all available information from parents and previous treating physicians. All patients underwent intensive pediatric, ophthalmologic, and otorhinolaryngologic examinations. Computed tomography (CT scans) were additionally performed in 40 % of children. The results of any examinations were also evaluated. Eighteen of the 49 patients had an orbital complication due to acute sinusitis. All 18 had elevated body temperature, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) values and white blood cell counts. Endoscopy of the nose revealed pus in the middle meatus in each case. According to Chandlers' classification, ten children presented with a preseptal, and eight children had a postseptal orbital cellulitis. All patients were admitted to the hospital and treated with intravenous antibiotics. CT scans further demonstrated signs of subperiostal abscess in four children. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was required in six children, including all patients with subperiostal abscess. Twenty children experienced orbital swelling unrelated to acute sinusitis, i.e. atheroma, inflammed insect stings, dental related abscess, conjunctivitis, and Herpes simplex associated superinfection. In three children, acute orbital swelling was caused by an orbital tumor. Orbital complications of an acute sinusitis occur often in the pediatric patient group, and most of these patients can be treated conservative with intravenous antibiotics. Indications for FESS include failure to

  5. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2-mediated gene delivery into the Rpe65-/- knockout mouse eye results in limited rescue

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chooi-May; Yu, Meaghan JT; Brankov, Meliha; Barnett, Nigel L; Zhou, Xiaohuai; Redmond, T Michael; Narfstrom, Kristina; Rakoczy, P Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Background Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe form of retinal dystrophy. Mutations in the RPE65 gene, which is abundantly expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, account for approximately 10–15% of LCA cases. In this study we used the high turnover, and rapid breeding and maturation time of the Rpe65-/- knockout mice to assess the efficacy of using rAAV-mediated gene therapy to replace the disrupted RPE65 gene. The potential for rAAV-mediated gene treatment of LCA was then analyzed by determining the pattern of RPE65 expression, the physiological and histological effects that it produced, and any improvement in visual function. Methods rAAV.RPE65 was injected into the subretinal space of Rpe65-/- knockout mice and control mice. Histological and immunohistological analyses were performed to evaluate any rescue of photoreceptors and to determine longevity and pattern of transgene expression. Electron microscopy was used to examine ultrastructural changes, and electroretinography was used to measure changes in visual function following rAAV.RPE65 injection. Results rAAV-mediated RPE65 expression was detected for up to 18 months post injection. The delivery of rAAV.RPE65 to Rpe65-/- mouse retinas resulted in a transient improvement in the maximum b-wave amplitude under both scotopic and photopic conditions (76% and 59% increase above uninjected controls, respectively) but no changes were observed in a-wave amplitude. However, this increase in b-wave amplitude was not accompanied by any slow down in photoreceptor degeneration or apoptotic cell death. Delivery of rAAV.RPE65 also resulted in a decrease in retinyl ester lipid droplets and an increase in short wavelength cone opsin-positive cells, suggesting that the recovery of RPE65 expression has long-term benefits for retinal health. Conclusion This work demonstrated the potential benefits of using the Rpe65-/- mice to study the effects and mechanism of rAAV.RPE65-mediated gene delivery into

  6. Union Makes Strength: A Worldwide Collaborative Genetic and Clinical Study to Provide a Comprehensive Survey of RD3 Mutations and Delineate the Associated Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Isabelle; Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Lopez, Irma; Kohl, Susanne; Li, Shiqiang; Testa, Francesco; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate; Wang, Xia; Pomares, Esther; Andorf, Jean; Aboussair, Nisrine; Banfi, Sandro; Delphin, Nathalie; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Edelson, Catherine; Florijn, Ralph; Jean-Pierre, Marc; Leowski, Corinne; Megarbane, Andre; Villanueva, Cristina; Flores, Blanca; Munnich, Arnold; Ren, Huanan; Zobor, Ditta; Bergen, Arthur; Chen, Rui; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Gonzalez-Duarte, Roser; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Simonelli, Francesca; Stone, Edwin; Wissinger, Bernd; Zhang, Qingjiong; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe retinal degeneration (RD), and the most common cause of incurable blindness diagnosed in children. It is occasionally the presenting symptom of multisystemic ciliopathies which diagnosis will require a specific care of patients. Nineteen LCA genes are currently identified and three of them account for both non-syndromic and syndromic forms of the disease. RD3 (LCA12) was implicated as a LCA gene based on the identification of homozygous truncating mutations in two LCA families despite the screening of large cohorts of patients. Here we provide a comprehensive survey of RD3 mutations and of their clinical expression through the screening of a cohort of 852 patients originating worldwide affected with LCA or early-onset and severe RD. We identified three RD3 mutations in seven unrelated consanguineous LCA families - i.e., a 2 bp deletion and two nonsense mutations – predicted to cause complete loss of function. Five families originating from the Southern Shores of the Mediterranean segregated a similar mutation (c.112C>T, p.R38*) suggesting that this change may have resulted from an ancient founder effect. Considering the low frequency of RD3 carriers, the recurrence risk for LCA in non-consanguineous unions is negligible for both heterozygote and homozygote RD3 individuals. The LCA12 phenotype in our patients is highly similar to those of patients with mutant photoreceptor-specific guanylate cyclase (GUCY2D/LCA1). This observation is consistent with the report of the role of RD3 in trafficking of GUCYs and gives further support to a common mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration in LCA12 and LCA1, i.e., inability to increase cytoplasmic cGMP concentration in outer segments and thus to recover the dark-state. Similar to LCA1, LCA12 patients have no extraocular symptoms despite complete inactivation of both RD3 alleles, supporting the view that extraocular investigations in LCA infants with RD3

  7. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies CRB1 Defect in an Unusual Maculopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Burke, Tomas; Oll, Maris; Yzer, Suzanne; Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Allikmets, Rando

    2014-01-01

    mutation has not been described before and the p.P1381L variant has been described in 1 patient with Leber congenital amaurosis. Conclusions This report illustrates a novel presentation of a macular dystrophy caused by CRB1 mutations. Both affected siblings exhibited a relatively well-developed retinal structure and preservation of generalized retinal function. An unusual 5-year progression of macular atrophy alone was observed that has not been described in any other CRB1-associated phenotypes. PMID:24811962

  8. Vitritis in Pediatric Genetic Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stunkel, Maria; Bhattarai, Sajag; Kemerley, Andrew; Stone, Edwin M.; Wang, Kai; Mullins, Robert F.; Drack, Arlene V.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose To determine which types of pediatric retinal degeneration are associated with inflammatory cells in the anterior vitreous (AV). Design Retrospective, observational study in humans. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric patients with suspected retinal degeneration presenting to a single examiner from 2008–2013. Age, visual acuity (VA), slit lamp examination of AV (SLAV), clinical and molecular genetic diagnoses were documented. Anterior vitreous cells were graded clinically with SLAV from rare cells (1–4) to 1+ (5–9), 2+ (10–30), or 3+ (more than 30). Cells were also counted in magnified slit beam photographs masked to molecular diagnosis when obtainable. Main outcome measures Cell counts in SLAV, best corrected VA, molecular and clinical diagnoses. Results One hundred and five charts were evaluated, 68 of which (64.8%) included SLAV data. Numerous (1+ or greater) cells were present in 22/68 (32.4%) patients, whereas 4/68 (5.9%) had rare cells and 42/68 (61.8%) had no cells. The average age between patients with cells, no-cells, and rare cells did not differ significantly (p=0.25). VA averaged 20/124 in patients with cells, 20/143 in patients with no-cells, and 20/68 in patients with rare cells (p= 0.70). The most frequent diagnoses with cells included Bardet Biedl syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), and retinitis pigmentosa. The most frequent diagnoses without cells included congenital stationary night blindness, LCA, Stargardt disease, and blue cone monochromacy. Discussion A non-random subset of pediatric retinal degenerations exhibit vitritis. Cells were present in 5/5 BBS patients (a progressive degeneration) whereas cells were not detected in any of the 12 patients with CSNB (a stable dysfunction). Conclusion Studying vitritis in pediatric retinal degenerations may reveal whether inflammation accompanies progressive vision loss in certain sub-types. Potentially, inflammation could be treated

  9. Union makes strength: a worldwide collaborative genetic and clinical study to provide a comprehensive survey of RD3 mutations and delineate the associated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Isabelle; Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Lopez, Irma; Kohl, Susanne; Li, Shiqiang; Testa, Francesco; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate; Wang, Xia; Pomares, Esther; Andorf, Jean; Aboussair, Nisrine; Banfi, Sandro; Delphin, Nathalie; den Hollander, Anneke I; Edelson, Catherine; Florijn, Ralph; Jean-Pierre, Marc; Leowski, Corinne; Megarbane, Andre; Villanueva, Cristina; Flores, Blanca; Munnich, Arnold; Ren, Huanan; Zobor, Ditta; Bergen, Arthur; Chen, Rui; Cremers, Frans P M; Gonzalez-Duarte, Roser; Koenekoop, Robert K; Simonelli, Francesca; Stone, Edwin; Wissinger, Bernd; Zhang, Qingjiong; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe retinal degeneration (RD), and the most common cause of incurable blindness diagnosed in children. It is occasionally the presenting symptom of multisystemic ciliopathies which diagnosis will require a specific care of patients. Nineteen LCA genes are currently identified and three of them account for both non-syndromic and syndromic forms of the disease. RD3 (LCA12) was implicated as a LCA gene based on the identification of homozygous truncating mutations in two LCA families despite the screening of large cohorts of patients. Here we provide a comprehensive survey of RD3 mutations and of their clinical expression through the screening of a cohort of 852 patients originating worldwide affected with LCA or early-onset and severe RD. We identified three RD3 mutations in seven unrelated consanguineous LCA families - i.e., a 2 bp deletion and two nonsense mutations - predicted to cause complete loss of function. Five families originating from the Southern Shores of the Mediterranean segregated a similar mutation (c.112C>T, p.R38*) suggesting that this change may have resulted from an ancient founder effect. Considering the low frequency of RD3 carriers, the recurrence risk for LCA in non-consanguineous unions is negligible for both heterozygote and homozygote RD3 individuals. The LCA12 phenotype in our patients is highly similar to those of patients with mutant photoreceptor-specific guanylate cyclase (GUCY2D/LCA1). This observation is consistent with the report of the role of RD3 in trafficking of GUCYs and gives further support to a common mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration in LCA12 and LCA1, i.e., inability to increase cytoplasmic cGMP concentration in outer segments and thus to recover the dark-state. Similar to LCA1, LCA12 patients have no extraocular symptoms despite complete inactivation of both RD3 alleles, supporting the view that extraocular investigations in LCA infants with RD3 mutations

  10. [Anorexia with sinus bradycardia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-fang; Xu, Ling; Chen, Bao-xia; Cui, Ming; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-18

    As anorexia patients always go to the psychiatric clinic, little is concerned about the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in these patients for cardiologists and psychiatrists. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between anorexia and sinus bradycardia, and the feature analysis, differential diagnosis and therapeutic principles of this type of sinus bradycardia. We report a case of sinus bradycardia in an anorexia patient with the clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, auxiliary exams, therapeutic methods, and her prognosis, who was admitted to Peking University Third Hospital recently. The patient was a 19-year-old female, who had the manifestation of anorexia. She lost obvious weight in a short time (about 15 kg in 6 months), and her body mass index was 14.8 kg/m(2). The patient felt apparent palpitation, chest depression and short breath, without dizziness, amaurosis or unconsciousness. Vitals on presentation were notable for hypotension, and bradycardia. The initial exam was significant for emaciation, but without lethargy or lower extremity edema. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with her heart rate being 32 beats per minute. The laboratory work -up revealed her normal blood routine, electrolytes and liver function. But in her thyroid function test, the free thyroid (FT) hormones 3 was 0.91 ng/L (2.3-4.2 ng/L),and FT4 was 8.2 ng/L (8.9-18.0 ng/L), which were all lower; yet the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was normal 1.48 IU/mL (0.55-4.78 IU/mL). Ultrasound revealed her normal thyroid. Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by extremely low body weight, fear of gaining weight or distorted perception of body image, and amenorrhea. Anorexia patients who lose weight apparently in short time enhance the excitability of the parasympathetic nerve, and inhibit the sympathetic nerve which lead to the appearance of sinus bradycardia, and functional abnormalities of multiple systems such as hypothyroidism. But this kind of sinus

  11. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    ). Currently, rAAV vectors are being utilized in phase I/II clinical trials for cystic fibrosis, α-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Canavan's disease, Parkinson's disease, hemophilia, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, arthritis, Batten's disease, and Leber's congenital amaurosis (Flotte et al., 1996 , 2004 ; Kay et al., 2000 ; Aitken et al., 2001 ; Wagner et al., 2002 ; Manno et al., 2003 ; Snyder and Francis, 2005 ; Maguire et al., 2008 ; Cideciyan et al., 2009 ). In this study, we present preclinical data to support the viability of an rAAV-based gene transfer strategy for cure of ADA-SCID. We report efficient transduction of a variety of postmitotic target tissues in vivo, subsequent human ADA (hADA) expression, and enhanced hADA secretion in tissues and blood, with increasing peripheral lymphocyte populations over time. PMID:21142972

  12. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  13. Mthfr as a modifier of the retinal phenotype of Crb1(rd8/rd8) mice.

    PubMed

    Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Tawfik, Amany; Cui, Xuezhi; Rozen, Rima; Smith, Sylvia B

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in crumb homologue 1 (CRB1) in humans are associated with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation for human CRB1 mutations in RP and LCA. The high variability in clinical features observed in CRB1 mutations suggests that environmental factors or genetic modifiers influence severity of CRB1 related retinopathies. Retinal degeneration 8 (rd8) is a spontaneous mutation in the Crb1 gene (Crb1(rdr/rd8)). Crb1(rdr/rd8) mice present with focal disruption in the outer retina manifesting as white spots on fundus examination. Mild retinal dysfunction with decreased b-wave amplitude has been reported in Crb1(rdr/rd8) mice at 18 months. Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a crucial enzyme of homocysteine metabolism. MTHFR mutations are prevalent in humans and are linked to a broad spectrum of disorders including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. We recently reported the retinal phenotype in Mthfr-deficient (Mthfr(+/-)) heterozygous mice. At 24 weeks the mice showed decreased RGC function, thinner nerve fiber layer, focal areas of vascular leakage and 20% fewer cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Considering the variability in CRB1-related retinopathies and the high occurrence of human MTHFR mutations we evaluated whether Mthfr deficiency influences rd8 retinal phenotype. Mthfr heterozygous mice with rd8 mutations (Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8)) and Crb(rd8/rd8) mice (Mthfr(+/+rd8/rd8)) mice were subjected to comprehensive retinal evaluation using ERG, fundoscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), morphometric and retinal flat mount immunostaining analyses of isolectin-B4 at 8-54 wks. Assessment of retinal function revealed a significant decrease in the a-, b- and c-wave amplitudes in Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice at 52 wks. Fundoscopic evaluation demonstrated the presence of signature rd8 spots in Mthfr(+/+rd8/rd8) mice and an increase in the extent of these rd8 spots in Mthfr

  14. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15