Science.gov

Sample records for amazon isolated communities

  1. Isolation of fungi from bats of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, W Y; Luizão, R C; Barreto da Silva, M do S

    1982-01-01

    A total of 2,886 bats captured in the Amazon Basin of Brazil were processed for the isolation of fungi. From the livers, spleens, and lungs of 155 bats (5.4%), 186 fungal isolates of the genera Candida (123 isolates), Trichosporon (26 isolates), Torulopsis (25 isolates), Kluyveromyces (11 isolates), and Geotrichum (1 isolate) were recovered. Seven known pathogenic species were present: Candida parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. albicans, C. stellatoidea, C. pseudotropicalis, Trichosporon beigelii, and Torulopsis glabrata. Twenty-three culture-positive bats showed identical fungal colonization in multiple organs or mixed colonization in a single organ. The fungal isolation rates for individual bat species varied from 1 fungus per 87 bats to 3 fungi per 13 bats, and the mycoflora diversity for members of an individual fungus-bearing bat species varied from 16 fungi per 40 bats to 7 fungi per 6 bats. Of the 38 fungal species isolated, 36 had not been previously described as in vivo bat isolates. Of the 27 culture-positive bat species, 21 had not been previously described as mammalian hosts for medically or nonmedically important fungi. PMID:6890326

  2. Community participation in health activities in an Amazon community of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tauil, M C; de Azevedo, A C

    1978-01-01

    This article describes community participation in a comprehensive eight-year health program at Porto Nacional, a town in Brazils Amazon region. The authors discuss various techniques employed to encourage community participation, indicate methods used to resolve low-key conflicts in a positive manner, describe the major contributions made by community participation in this program, and present a number of conclusions considered applicable to other communities in this part of Brazil. PMID:698459

  3. Healthcare Supported by Data Mule Networks in Remote Communities of the Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Mauro Margalho; Efrat, Alon; Richa, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using boats as data mule nodes, carrying medical ultrasound videos from remote and isolated communities in the Amazon region in Brazil, to the main city of that area. The videos will be used by physicians to perform remote analysis and follow-up routine of prenatal examinations of pregnant women. Two open source simulators (the ONE and NS-2) were used to evaluate the results obtained utilizing a CoDPON (continuous displacement plan oriented network). The simulations took into account the connection times between the network nodes (boats) and the number of nodes on each boat route.

  4. Isolation of a coronavirus from a green-cheeked Amazon parrot (Amazon viridigenalis Cassin).

    PubMed

    Gough, Richard E; Drury, Sally E; Culver, Francesca; Britton, Paul; Cavanagh, Dave

    2006-04-01

    A virus (AV71/99) was isolated from a green-cheeked Amazon parrot by propagation and passage in both primary embryo liver cells derived from blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna) embryos and chicken embryo liver cells. Electron microscopic examination of cytopathic agents derived from both types of cell cultures suggested that it was a coronavirus. This was confirmed using a pan-coronavirus reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that amplified part of gene 1 that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The deduced sequence of 66 amino acids had 66 to 74% amino acid identity with the corresponding sequence of coronaviruses in groups 1, 2 and 3. Several other oligonucleotide primer pairs that give PCR products corresponding to genes 3, 5, N and the 3'-untranslated region of infectious bronchitis virus, turkey coronavirus and pheasant coronavirus (all in group 3) failed to do so with RNA from the parrot coronavirus. This is the first demonstration of a coronavirus in a psittacine species. PMID:16595304

  5. Diazotrophic bacteria isolated from wild rice Oryza glumaepatula (Poaceae) in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Júnior, Paulo Ivan Fernandes; Pereira, Gilmara Maria Duarte; Perin, Liamara; da Silva, Luana Mesquita; Baraúna, Alexandre Cardoso; Alvess, Francilene Muniz; Passos, Samuel Ribeiro; Zilli, Jerri Edson

    2013-06-01

    -promoting ability was confirmed for at least five isolates. For these bacteria, the root and shoot growing results showed higher increases when compared to those observed in plants inoculated with the evaluated reference strains. These results indicate that O. glumaepatula is colonized by a high diverse diazotrophic community in the Brazilian Amazon. Further investigations are now being carried out to determine the taxonomic positions of these isolates and their growth promoting mechanisms. PMID:23885604

  6. A large-scale deforestation experiment: Effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferraz, G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Stouffer, P.C.; Bierregaard, R.O.; Lovejoy, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  7. The Isolated Appalachian Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper investigates the isolation of the local black community within the social/cultural perspective. A profile of the community is given in terms of data collected from personal and family interviews. Personal interviews assessed how the Appalachian black viewed his group. Among the 13 variables studied are: trustworthiness, religion, work…

  8. Food consumption as an indicator of the conservation of natural resources in riverine communities of the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Victoria J; Almeida, Morgana C; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Deus, Claudia P; Vale, Rozeilza; Klein, Gilmar; Begossi, Alpina

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed and compared the daily consumption of foods of animal origin in eleven communities of the Lower Amazon, Trombetas and Purus Rivers, representing three different management systems and levels of conservation in the Brazilian Amazon. All food items of animal origin were weighed by at least 10% of the families in the study communities during a week in each period of the flood cycle between 2006 and 2008. Fish was the most important food, and was consumed during six days of the week, with an average rate of 169 kg.person(-1).year(-1). Game was second in importance, with 37 kg.person(-1).year-(1). This yearly rate of fish consumption is one of the highest in the world and is almost double the minimum recommended by the World Health Organization. The dietary patterns reflect both the isolation of the communities from large urban centers and the better preservation of the local environments due to the existence of protected areas. Environmental degradation may thus have effects on the health and food security of local populations. The study emphasizes the need for the implementation of public policies and participative management initiatives. PMID:26628023

  9. Genetic diversity of Rhizobia isolates from Amazon soils using cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) as trap plant

    PubMed Central

    Silva, F.V.; Simões-Araújo, J.L.; Silva Júnior, J.P.; Xavier, G.R.; Rumjanek, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize rhizobia isolated from the root nodules of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) plants cultivated in Amazon soils samples by means of ARDRA (Amplified rDNA Restriction Analysis) and sequencing analysis, to know their phylogenetic relationships. The 16S rRNA gene of rhizobia was amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using universal primers Y1 and Y3. The amplification products were analyzed by the restriction enzymes HinfI, MspI and DdeI and also sequenced with Y1, Y3 and six intermediate primers. The clustering analysis based on ARDRA profiles separated the Amazon isolates in three subgroups, which formed a group apart from the reference isolates of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The clustering analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the fast-growing isolates had similarity with Enterobacter, Rhizobium, Klebsiella and Bradyrhizobium and all the slow-growing clustered close to Bradyrhizobium. PMID:24031880

  10. Diazotrophic Burkholderia species isolated from the Amazon region exhibit phenotypical, functional and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Krisle; Cassetari, Alice de Souza; Lima, Adriana Silva; De Brandt, Evie; Pinnock, Eleanor; Vandamme, Peter; Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza

    2012-06-01

    Forty-eight Burkholderia isolates from different land use systems in the Amazon region were compared to type strains of Burkholderia species for phenotypic and functional characteristics that can be used to promote plant growth. Most of these isolates (n=46) were obtained by using siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum - 44) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris - 2) as the trap plant species; two isolates were obtained from nodules collected in the field from Indigofera suffruticosa and Pithecellobium sp. The evaluated characteristics were the following: colony characterisation on "79" medium, assimilation of different carbon sources, enzymatic activities, solubilisation of phosphates, nitrogenase activity and antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. phaseoli. Whole cell protein profiles, 16S rRNA, gyrB, and recA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing were used to identify the isolates. The isolates showed different cultural and biochemical characteristics depending on the legume species from which they were obtained. Except for one isolate from I. suffruticosa, all isolates were able to solubilise calcium phosphate and present nitrogenase activity under free-living conditions. Only one isolate from common beans, showed antifungal activity. The forty four isolates from siratro nodules were identified as B. fungorum; isolates UFLA02-27 and UFLA02-28, obtained from common bean plants, were identified as B. contaminans; isolate INPA89A, isolated from Indigofera suffruticosa, was a close relative of B. caribensis but could not be assigned to an established species; isolate INPA42B, isolated from Pithecellobium sp., was identified as B. lata. This is the first report of nitrogenase activity in B. fungorum, B. lata and B. contaminans. PMID:22609342

  11. Amazonian dark Earth and plant species from the Amazon region contribute to shape rhizosphere bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Lima, Amanda; Cannavan, Fabiana Souza; Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-05-01

    Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) or Terra Preta de Índio formed in the past by pre-Columbian populations are highly sustained fertile soils supported by microbial communities that differ from those extant in adjacent soils. These soils are found in the Amazon region and are considered as a model soil when compared to the surrounding and background soils. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ADE and its surrounding soil on the rhizosphere bacterial communities of two leguminous plant species that frequently occur in the Amazon region in forest sites (Mimosa debilis) and open areas (Senna alata). Bacterial community structure was evaluated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and bacterial community composition by V4 16S rRNA gene region pyrosequencing. T-RFLP analysis showed effect of soil types and plant species on rhizosphere bacterial community structure. Differential abundance of bacterial phyla, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes, revealed that soil type contributes to shape the bacterial communities. Furthermore, bacterial phyla such as Firmicutes and Nitrospira were mostly influenced by plant species. Plant roots influenced several soil chemical properties, especially when plants were grown in ADE. These results showed that differences observed in rhizosphere bacterial community structure and composition can be influenced by plant species and soil fertility due to variation in soil attributes. PMID:25103911

  12. Characterization of active and total fungal communities in the atmosphere over the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, A. M.; Artaxo, P. E.; Ishida, F. Y.; Mueller, R. C.; Saleska, S. R.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Bohannan, B. J. M.; Green, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and may play an important role in atmospheric processes. We investigated the composition and diversity of fungal communities over the Amazon rainforest canopy and compared these communities to fungal communities found in terrestrial environments. We characterized the total fungal community and the metabolically active portion of the community using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing and compared these data to predictions generated by a mass-balance model. We found that the total community was primarily comprised of fungi from the phylum Basidiomycota. In contrast, the active community was primarily composed of members of the phylum Ascomycota and included a high relative abundance of lichen fungi, which were not detected in the total community. The relative abundance of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota in the total and active communities was consistent with our model predictions, suggesting that this result was driven by the relative size and number of spores produced by these groups. When compared to other environments, fungal communities in the atmosphere were most similar to communities found in tropical soils and leaf surfaces. Our results demonstrate that there are significant differences in the composition of the total and active fungal communities in the atmosphere, and that lichen fungi, which have been shown to be efficient ice nucleators, may be abundant members of active atmospheric fungal communities over the forest canopy.

  13. Conversion of the Amazon rainforest to agriculture results in biotic homogenization of soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Pellizari, Vivian H; Mueller, Rebecca; Baek, Kyunghwa; Jesus, Ederson da C; Paula, Fabiana S; Mirza, Babur; Hamaoui, George S; Tsai, Siu Mui; Feigl, Brigitte; Tiedje, James M; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2013-01-15

    The Amazon rainforest is the Earth's largest reservoir of plant and animal diversity, and it has been subjected to especially high rates of land use change, primarily to cattle pasture. This conversion has had a strongly negative effect on biological diversity, reducing the number of plant and animal species and homogenizing communities. We report here that microbial biodiversity also responds strongly to conversion of the Amazon rainforest, but in a manner different from plants and animals. Local taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity of soil bacteria increases after conversion, but communities become more similar across space. This homogenization is driven by the loss of forest soil bacteria with restricted ranges (endemics) and results in a net loss of diversity. This study shows homogenization of microbial communities in response to human activities. Given that soil microbes represent the majority of biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems and are intimately involved in ecosystem functions, we argue that microbial biodiversity loss should be taken into account when assessing the impact of land use change in tropical forests. PMID:23271810

  14. Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness.

    PubMed

    Albert, James S; Carvalho, Tiago P; Petry, Paulo; Holder, Meghan A; Maxime, Emmanuel L; Espino, Jessica; Corahua, Isabel; Quispe, Roberto; Rengifo, Blanca; Ortega, Hernan; Reis, Roberto E

    2011-01-01

    The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world's land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world's total liquid water supply. How have so many species come to co-exist in such a small amount of total habitat space? Here we report results of an aquatic faunal survey of the Fitzcarrald region in southeastern Peru, an area of low-elevation upland (200-500 m above sea level) rainforest in the Western Amazon, that straddles the headwaters of four large Amazonian tributaries; the Juruá (Yurúa), Ucayali, Purús, and Madre de Dios rivers. All measures of fish species diversity in this region are high; there is high alpha diversity with many species coexisting in the same locality, high beta diversity with high turnover between habitats, and high gamma diversity with high turnover between adjacent tributary basins. Current data show little species endemism, and no known examples of sympatric sister species, within the Fitzcarrald region, suggesting a lack of localized or recent adaptive divergences. These results support the hypothesis that the fish species of the Fitzcarrald region are relatively ancient, predating the Late Miocene-Pliocene (c. 4 Ma) uplift that isolated its several headwater basins. The results also suggest that habitat specialization (phylogenetic niche conservatism) and geographic isolation (dispersal limitation) have contributed to the maintenance of high species richness in this region of the Amazon Basin. PMID:26486313

  15. Framing community forestry challenges with a broader lens: case studies from the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Reem; McGrath, David G; Kozak, Robert A; Innes, John L

    2011-09-01

    Community forestry initiatives have been shown to reduce rural poverty while promoting the conservation and sustainable use of forests. However, a number of challenges face communities wanting to initiate or maintain formal, community-based forest management. Through a grounded theory approach, this paper uses three case studies of community forest management models in the eastern Amazon to create a framework showing challenges faced by communities at different phases of formal management. The framework shows that, in the development phase, four root problems (land ownership, knowledge acquisition, community organization, and adequate capital) need to be addressed to obtain legal management permission. With this permission in hand, further challenges to operationalization are presented (deterring illegal loggers, maintaining infrastructure, obtaining necessary managerial skills and accessing markets). The interrelatedness of these challenges emphasizes that all challenges need to be addressed in a holistic manner for communities to maintain a profitable and self-sufficient operation. This contradicts current development approaches that only address part of this framework. The framework proposed here can be used as a starting point for community forestry initiatives in other regions. PMID:21550165

  16. Full-genome sequences of hepatitis B virus subgenotype D3 isolates from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Natália; Mello, Francisco C A; Araujo, Natalia Motta

    2015-02-01

    The Brazilian Amazon Region is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, little is known regarding the genetic variability of the strains circulating in this geographical region. Here, we describe the first full-length genomes of HBV isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region; these genomes are also the first complete HBV subgenotype D3 genomes reported for Brazil. The genomes of the five Brazilian isolates were all 3,182 base pairs in length and the isolates were classified as belonging to subgenotype D3, subtypes ayw2 (n = 3) and ayw3 (n = 2). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Brazilian sequences are not likely to be closely related to European D3 sequences. Such results will contribute to further epidemiological and evolutionary studies of HBV. PMID:25742278

  17. [Prevalence of arterial hypertension in communities along the Madeira River, Western Brazilian Amazon].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Beatriz Fátima Alves de; Mourão, Dennys de Souza; Gomes, Núbia; Costa, Janaina Mara C; Souza, Andreia Vasconcelos de; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Fonseca, Marlon de Freitas; Mariani, Carolina Fiorillo; Abbad, Guilherme; Hacon, Sandra S

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of hypertension among adults (n = 841) in communities along the Madeira River in the Brazilian Amazon, prior to startup of the Santo Antônio Hydroelectric Plant. The study gathered information on sociodemographic conditions, history of diseases, habits, fish consumption, and anthropometric parameters. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and the respective confidence intervals. Among the riverine communities, 26% (95%CI: 23%-29%) of adults presented hypertension (29% in men [95%CI: 24%-33%] and 23% in women [95%CI: 19%-27%]). Factors associated with hypertension were age, BMI, and place of residence in men and age, triglycerides, and blood glucose in women. The findings can contribute to strategies for state and municipal health services to monitor and prevent cardiovascular events. PMID:24005927

  18. Sylvatic rabies and the perception of vampire bat activity in communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Romero-Sandoval, Natalia; Escobar, Natalia; Utzet, Mireia; Feijoo-Cid, Maria; Martin, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    An outbreak of sylvatic rabies was reported in indigenous communities located in the Ecuadorian Amazon in November 2011. The objective of this study was to analyze family dwelling characteristics and other sociodemographic factors associated with the perception of an increase in hematophagous bat bites in humans and domestic animals to assist the implementation of intervention policies in the region. A total of 381 households from communities covered by the outbreak response activities were surveyed. Despite being associated with poorer dwelling conditions, the possession of domestic animals is associated with the perception of an increase in bat bites among animals. Better dwelling conditions, use of protective measures, access to electricity, and no domestic animals are variables associated with the perception of a rise in attacks on humans. The analysis of perceptions of bite frequency is fundamental to improve the effectiveness of vaccination programs and strategies to promote the adoption of preventive measures against rabies among the population. PMID:24714956

  19. Isolated starches from yams (Dioscorea sp) grown at the Venezuelan Amazons: structure and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Elevina; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Dufour, Dominique; Guzmán, Romel; Tapia, María; Raymundez, Marìa; Ricci, Julien; Guilois, Sophie; Pontoire, Bruno; Reynes, Max; Gibert, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    This work aimed to characterize the molecular structure and functional properties of starches isolated from wild Dioscorea yams grown at the Amazons, using conventional and up-to-date methodologies. Among the high purity starches isolated (≥99%), the chain lengths were similar, whereas variations in gelatinization profile were observed. Starches have shown varied-shaped granules with monomodal distribution, and B-type crystallinity. Variations in amylose contents found by three analyses were hypothesized being related to intermediate material. Linear chain lengths were similar, and their amylopectins showed a dense, spherical conformation and similar molecular characteristics. The average molar mass and the radius of gyration of the chromatograms of the yam amylopectin, M¯W and R¯G were ranging between 174×10(6) g mol(-1) and 237×10(6) g mol(-1), and 201 nm and 233 nm, respectively. The white yams starches were more sensible to enzymes than the other two. All starches have shown a wide range of functional and nutritional properties. PMID:23987395

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Nostoc piscinale CENA21, Isolated from the Brazilian Amazon Floodplain

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Pedro Ivo; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Leão, Pedro Nuno; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence of Nostoc piscinale CENA21, a diazotrophic heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium isolated from the Solimões River, Amazon Basin, Brazil. It consists of one circular chromosome scaffold with 11 contigs and total size of 7,094,556 bp. Secondary metabolite annotations indicate a good source for the discovery of novel natural products. PMID:27034496

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Nostoc piscinale CENA21, Isolated from the Brazilian Amazon Floodplain.

    PubMed

    Leão, Tiago; Guimarães, Pedro Ivo; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Leão, Pedro Nuno; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence ofNostoc piscinaleCENA21, a diazotrophic heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium isolated from the Solimões River, Amazon Basin, Brazil. It consists of one circular chromosome scaffold with 11 contigs and total size of 7,094,556 bp. Secondary metabolite annotations indicate a good source for the discovery of novel natural products. PMID:27034496

  2. Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness

    PubMed Central

    Albert, James S.; Carvalho, Tiago P.; Petry, Paulo; Holder, Meghan A.; Maxime, Emmanuel L.; Espino, Jessica; Corahua, Isabel; Quispe, Roberto; Rengifo, Blanca; Ortega, Hernan; Reis, Roberto E.

    2011-01-01

    , predating the Late Miocene-Pliocene (c. 4 Ma) uplift that isolated its several headwater basins. The results also suggest that habitat specialization (phylogenetic niche conservatism) and geographic isolation (dispersal limitation) have contributed to the maintenance of high species richness in this region of the Amazon Basin. PMID:26486313

  3. Needs, Acceptability, and Value of Humanitarian Medical Assistance in Remote Peruvian Amazon Riverine Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Juan F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Bayer, Angela M.; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Quispe, Antonio M.; Maves, Ryan C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Sanders, John W.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1–4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel. PMID:25846293

  4. Needs, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance in remote Peruvian Amazon riverine communities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan F; Halsey, Eric S; Bayer, Angela M; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R; Velasquez, Daniel E; Cama, Vitaliano A; Graf, Paul C F; Quispe, Antonio M; Maves, Ryan C; Montgomery, Joel M; Sanders, John W; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-06-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1-4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel. PMID:25846293

  5. The effects of CO2 on phytoplankton community structure in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. L.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H. R.; McKee, K. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River Plume results from an enormous discharge of freshwater and organic matter into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a unique environment with a natural pCO2 gradient in the surface waters of the plume that range from 130-950 μatm. The response of coastal marine phytoplankton to increased anthropogenic CO2 emission is still unknown, hence the Amazon River Plume gradient can serve as a natural laboratory to examine the potential influence of atmospheric CO2 increases and ocean acidification on phytoplankton community composition. A two pronged study was undertaken: the first in which shipboard samples from a 2010 cruise to the Amazon River Plume were analyzed to examine the distribution of 3 major phytoplankton groups (diatoms, diatom-diazotroph associations [DDAs], and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp.) with respect to the natural pCO2 gradient; the second in which the growth response of Thalassiosira weisflogii, a representative diatom species, was examined under experimentally manipulated CO2 conditions. Cruise data analysis showed that diatoms were found with higher cell counts around 150 μatm; DDAs seemed to dominate waters within the narrow range of 350-400 μatm CO2; and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp. grew in a wide range of pCO2 conditions, but with higher cell counts at upwards of 500 μatm. Phytoplankton group distributions along the CO2 gradient may be due to differences in their carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCMs) efficiencies. The CO2 manipulation apparatus was assembled such that the cells were grown under three different CO2 environments. Differential growth of T. weisflogii was observed at 150, 400, and 800 ppm CO2 treatment. T. weisflogii grew at all three CO2 concentrations, reflecting diatoms' physiological flexibility and efficient CCMs. Absorption spectra analysis of pigments and Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer analysis indicate potential changes in photosynthetic machinery with different CO2 treatments. Future CO2 manipulation

  6. Epidemiologic confirmation that fruit consumption influences mercury exposure in riparian communities in the Brazilian Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa Passos, Carlos Jose Mergler, Donna; Fillion, Myriam; Lemire, Melanie; Mertens, Frederic; Guimaraes, Jean Remy Davee; Philibert, Aline

    2007-10-15

    Since deforestation has recently been associated with increased mercury load in the Amazon, the problem of mercury exposure is now much more widespread than initially thought. A previous exploratory study suggested that fruit consumption may reduce mercury exposure. The objectives of the study were to determine the effects of fruit consumption on the relation between fish consumption and bioindicators of mercury (Hg) exposure in Amazonian fish-eating communities. A cross-sectional dietary survey based on a 7-day recall of fish and fruit consumption frequency was conducted within 13 riparian communities from the Tapajos River, Brazilian Amazon. Hair samples were collected from 449 persons, and blood samples were collected from a subset of 225, for total and inorganic mercury determination by atomic absorption spectrometry. On average, participants consumed 6.6 fish meals/week and ate 11 fruits/week. The average blood Hg (BHg) was 57.1{+-}36.3 {mu}g/L (median: 55.1 {mu}g/L), and the average hair-Hg (HHg) was 16.8{+-}10.3 {mu}g/g (median: 15.7 {mu}g/g). There was a positive relation between fish consumption and BHg (r=0.48; P<0.0001), as well as HHg (r=0.34; P<0.0001). Both fish and fruit consumption entered significantly in multivariate models explaining BHg (fish: {beta}=5.6, P<0.0001; fruit: {beta}=-0.5, P=0.0011; adjusted model R{sup 2}=36.0%) and HHg levels (fish: {beta}=1.2, P<0.0001; fruit: {beta}=-0.2, P=0.0002; adjusted model R{sup 2}=21.0%). ANCOVA models showed that for the same number of fish meals, persons consuming fruits more frequently had significantly lower blood and HHg concentrations. For low fruit consumers, each fish meal contributed 9.8 {mu}g/L Hg increase in blood compared to only 3.3 {mu}g/L Hg increase for the high fruit consumers. In conclusion, fruit consumption may provide a protective effect for Hg exposure in Amazonian riparians. Prevention strategies that seek to maintain fish consumption while reducing Hg exposure in fish

  7. Land use change alters functional gene diversity, composition and abundance in Amazon forest soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Liyou; Mueller, Rebecca C; Mirza, Babur S; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Deng, Ye; Tiedje, James M; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2014-06-01

    Land use change in the Amazon rainforest alters the taxonomic structure of soil microbial communities, but whether it alters their functional gene composition is unknown. We used the highly parallel microarray technology GeoChip 4.0, which contains 83,992 probes specific for genes linked nutrient cycling and other processes, to evaluate how the diversity, abundance and similarity of the targeted genes responded to forest-to-pasture conversion. We also evaluated whether these parameters were reestablished with secondary forest growth. A spatially nested scheme was employed to sample a primary forest, two pastures (6 and 38 years old) and a secondary forest. Both pastures had significantly lower microbial functional genes richness and diversity when compared to the primary forest. Gene composition and turnover were also significantly modified with land use change. Edaphic traits associated with soil acidity, iron availability, soil texture and organic matter concentration were correlated with these gene changes. Although primary and secondary forests showed similar functional gene richness and diversity, there were differences in gene composition and turnover, suggesting that community recovery was not complete in the secondary forest. Gene association analysis revealed that response to ecosystem conversion varied significantly across functional gene groups, with genes linked to carbon and nitrogen cycling mostly altered. This study indicates that diversity and abundance of numerous environmentally important genes respond to forest-to-pasture conversion and hence have the potential to affect the related processes at an ecosystem scale. PMID:24806276

  8. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27304520

  9. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27334815

  10. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    PubMed Central

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied. PMID:27006640

  11. Culture and Community in Canada's Isolated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, John; Anderson, Kirk; Jamal, Samina

    This paper presents highlights from surveys of some of Canada's most isolated schools, located in northern Labrador, Nunavut, northern Saskatchewan, and northern and interior British Columbia. Most served Inuit or other First Nations communities. Although all schools had contact by phone and most had e-mail, few were accessible by road. Five Inuit…

  12. Modeling Amazon forest vegetation dynamics and community response to increased wind disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J. A.; Negron Juarez, R. I.; Chambers, J. Q.; Marra, D.; Rifai, S. W.; Knox, R. G.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.; McGroddy, M. E.; Urquiza-Muñoz, J. D.; Tello-Espinoza, R.; Ribeiro, G. H. P. M.; Higuchi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the drivers of tree mortality in Amazonia is a complex task, yet essential to reliable prediction of carbon storage in a warmer climate. Past studies have shown an east-west gradient of forest disturbance and rainfall amount across Amazonia. This study uses remote sensing and dynamic vegetation modeling to take a deeper look at drivers of tree mortality and community composition shifts associated with varying mortality rates. Our analysis, using 20 years of Landsat 5 images, showed that ever-wet Amazonia (located in north-west Amazonia, i.e. NWA) was more susceptible to windthrows than the Central Amazon (i.e. CA), which has a a well-defined dry season. The higher frequency of windthrows in NWA forest correlates with higher frequency and intensity of deep convection events in this region, observed using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. While a combination of factors including: soil characteristics (and by proxy rooting depth) and community composition exacerbate the regional gradient of disturbance, wind was the mechanistic agent of disturbance. Using an individual-based gap model for tropical forests populated with the most representative NWA tree species and increased mortality rates, we found a decrease of biomass in this region and a slight increase in NPP compared to a control simulation, a pattern that is similar to observations. The model predicted which species had the largest response in basal area change due to elevated disturbance, but there was a non-significant shift in community composition in the NWA forests. However, analysis found strong differences in community composition between the modeled NWA and CA regions, consistent with observed results. When CA forests were subject to higher mortality rate similar to the current NWA region, dissimilarity in community composition continued to persist. In addition the model identified species-specific maximum tree height and maximum diameter as the most influential predictors of

  13. Impacts of extreme events of drought and flood on local communities of Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borma, L. D.; Roballo, S.; Zauner, M.; Nascimento, V. F.

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of drought events of 1997/98, 2005 and 2010 in terms of discharge anomalies in the Amazon region confirmed previous findings, such as: a) the influence of the El Niño in more than one hydrological year; b) the increase of the influence of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation of 1998, 2005 and 2010 drought events; c) the low levels of discharge observed in the 2010 drought are attributed to the association of discharge anomalies of the northern and southern tributaries of the Amazon river, and d) the 2010 drought lasted around 1 month (August to November) more than the other drought events analized here. The riverine communities located along the river banks of Solimões/Amazonas suit their economic activities to the oscillation of the water level. In general, low water periods favor the access to important sources of food such as fish and livestock, still allowing crop cultivation on fertile agricultural areas of the floodplain. Conversely, periods of drought increases the difficulties of transport and drinking water supply. During the high water, access to the main food supply (described above) are greatly hampered. However, the floods are recognized as an importance process of natural fertilization. Thus, despite the political, social and economic shortcomings, the local community has, since the pre-colonial period, learned to get the best of each season, providing local, regional and national markets with varzea products. During periods of extreme weather, however, the advantages of each season appear to be reduced, and the drawbacks increased. In fact, during flooding extremes, the access to primary sources of food is hampered by a long period of time and families find themselves forced to leave their homes, eventually losing them. Analysis of flow data to the extreme flooding of 2009, indicate a period of about 6 months of positive anomalies discharge (occurring mainly during high water). At the same time, Civil Defense data points to a

  14. Isolation and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a virgin Brazilian Amazon region with potential to degrade atrazine.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; da Silva, Michelle Barbosa Partata; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-12-01

    The use of pesticides to increase agricultural production can result in the contamination of the environment, causing changes in the genetic structure of organisms and in the loss of biodiversity. This practice is also inducing changes in the rainforest ecosystem. In this work, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a preservation soil area of the Brazilian Amazon Forest, without usage of any pesticide, was evaluated for its potential to degrade atrazine. This isolate presented all responsible genes (atzA, atzB, atzC, atzD, atzE, and atzF) for atrazine mineralization and demonstrated capacity to use atrazine as a nitrogen source, having achieved a reduction of 44 % of the initial concentration of atrazine after 24 h. These results confirm gene dispersion and/or a possible contamination of the area with the herbicide, which reinforces global concern of the increase and intensive use of pesticides worldwide. PMID:25035056

  15. Microbial community composition and metagenomes across the river-to-ocean continuum of the Columbia and Amazon Rivers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, B. C.; Doherty, M.; Fortunato, C.; Simon, H. M.; Smit, M. W.; Krusche, A. V.; Brito, D.; Cunha, A.; Fernandes, M.; Zielinski, B.; Paul, J. H.; Ward, N. D.; Richey, J. E.; Satinsky, B. M.; Sharma, S.; Smith, C. B.; Moran, M.; Yager, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for land-to-ocean transfer of materials including terrestrial organic matter, nutrients and anthropogenic pollutants. Microbial communities in rivers, estuaries, and plumes regulate the nutrient concentrations and biogeochemistry of these riverborne materials and mediate their impact on carbon cycling. Despite their importance little is known about the composition and genetic capabilities of these organisms. Here we describe and compare the phylogeny and metagenomic profiles of microbial communities across the river-to-ocean gradients of two very large rivers: the tropical Amazon and temperate Columbia rivers. For the Amazon, samples were collected from the lower 600 km of the river and from surface waters across 1300 km of the plume in 2010 and 2011. For the Columbia, samples were collected along the gradient from river to deep ocean during 14 cruises between 2007 and 2010. Amplicon pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial communities were similar along the length of the lower Amazon River with variability caused by inputs from major tributaries. Freshwater taxa from both rivers were very rare in plume waters, but in the Columbia River estuary freshwater taxa mixed with marine communities. Communities in both rivers shifted with local seasons, likely due to changes in river environmental conditions including dissolved and particulate organic matter, river flow, and light availability. Seasonal variability was less pronounced in river plumes where spatial variability was greater than temporal variability. Bacterial community composition was very different between the two systems, and was most similar at the marine end of the gradient outside the plumes. Illumina-based metagenomic analyses of a subset of these samples showed similarity in the relative abundance of many annotated gene categories despite differences in phylogeny across salinity gradients. However, several categories of genes varied in relative

  16. Expansion of HIV and syphilis into the Peruvian Amazon: a survey of four communities of an indigenous Amazonian ethnic group

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Ellika C.; Zavaleta, Carol; Fernández, Connie; Razuri, Hugo; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Vermund, Sten H.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background In 2004, cases of HIV and syphilis were reported in an indigenous community in the Peruvian Amazon. This study sought to determine the prevalence of HIV and syphilis in four remote communities of the same indigenous ethnic group located further from an urban center than the original community, and to identify risk factors for HIV and syphilis transmission. Methods Rapid and confirmatory tests for HIV and syphilis were performed. A questionnaire elicited demographic information, risk factors for sexually transmitted infections, and knowledge/beliefs about HIV/AIDS. Results We collected 282 blood samples and conducted interviews with 281 (99.6%) participants. The confirmed syphilis prevalence rate was 3.2% (9/282; 3.7% (5/135) for men and 2.7% (4/147) for women). The confirmed HIV prevalence rate was 0.7% (2/282), with both infections in men who had sex with men (MSM). Self-reported MSM activity was 39.7%. There was poor knowledge about HIV infection, transmission, and prevention, and low acceptance of known prevention methods. Conclusions HIV and syphilis are now prevalent in remote Amazonian communities of an indigenous group in Peru. Expansion of the HIV epidemic into the Amazon requires an urgent public health response. PMID:18760648

  17. Isolation of endophytic bacteria from arboreal species of the Amazon and identification by sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, Mariza M; Ferreira-Nozawa, Monica S; Nozawa, Sérgio R; Santos, André L W

    2011-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria from three arboreal species native to the Amazon (Carapa guianenses, Ceiba pentandra, and Swietenia macrophylla), were isolated and identified, through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene. From these, 16 isolates were obtained, although, when compared to sequences deposited in GenBank, only seven had produced identifiable fragments. Bacillus, Pantoea and two non-culturable samples were identified. Results obtained through sequence analysis revealed low genetic diversity across the isolates, even when analyzing different species and plant structures. This is the first report concerning the isolation and identification of endophytic bacteria in these plant species. PMID:22215973

  18. Isolation of endophytic bacteria from arboreal species of the Amazon and identification by sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene

    PubMed Central

    Coêlho, Mariza M.; Ferreira-Nozawa, Monica S.; Nozawa, Sérgio R.; Santos, André L.W.

    2011-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria from three arboreal species native to the Amazon (Carapa guianenses, Ceiba pentandra, and Swietenia macrophylla), were isolated and identified, through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene. From these, 16 isolates were obtained, although, when compared to sequences deposited in GenBank, only seven had produced identifiable fragments. Bacillus, Pantoea and two non-culturable samples were identified. Results obtained through sequence analysis revealed low genetic diversity across the isolates, even when analyzing different species and plant structures. This is the first report concerning the isolation and identification of endophytic bacteria in these plant species. PMID:22215973

  19. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mouth of the Amazon River     View Larger Image ... over 6450 kilometers eastward across Brazil, the Amazon River originates in the Peruvian Andes as tiny mountain streams that eventually ...

  20. Parasite communities of the predatory fish, Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris, living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Maria Danielle Figueiredo Guimarães; Neves, Lígia Rigôr; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    This study investigated the parasite communities of wild Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris populations living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon. In these two hosts, a total of 12 parasite species e 1-9 parasite species were found per fish, and 10 of these species are metazoans. Eight species of parasites were common to both host species and four of them exhibited differences in abundance and/or prevalence. Parasite communities of the hosts were taxonomically similar (83%) and composed of both ectoparasites and endoparasites, and characterized by high prevalence and high abundance of endoparasites and an aggregated dispersion pattern. For A. falcirostris, the dominant parasite was Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, and for A. falcatus, it was Piscinoodinium pillulare. Shannon diversity and Berger-Parker dominance were similar for both hosts, while the parasites species richness and evenness showed differences influenced by the ectoparasites species. These two populations of hosts that inhabited the same geographical area had different sizes, but were exposed to the same infective stages, and acquired qualitatively and quantitatively similar endoparasites community, thus indicating that the amounts and types of prey congeneric that they were eating were similar. Therefore, the overlap in the same occurrence area play an important role in the parasite communities to these phylogenetically related hosts. PMID:27304523

  1. Parasite communities of the predatory fish, Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris, living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Maria Danielle Figueiredo Guimarães; Neves, Lígia Rigôr; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    This study investigated the parasite communities of wild Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris populations living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon. In these two hosts, a total of 12 parasite species e 1-9 parasite species were found per fish, and 10 of these species are metazoans. Eight species of parasites were common to both host species and four of them exhibited differences in abundance and/or prevalence. Parasite communities of the hosts were taxonomically similar (83%) and composed of both ectoparasites and endoparasites, and characterized by high prevalence and high abundance of endoparasites and an aggregated dispersion pattern. For A. falcirostris, the dominant parasite was Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, and for A. falcatus, it was Piscinoodinium pillulare. Shannon diversity and Berger-Parker dominance were similar for both hosts, while the parasites species richness and evenness showed differences influenced by the ectoparasites species. These two populations of hosts that inhabited the same geographical area had different sizes, but were exposed to the same infective stages, and acquired qualitatively and quantitatively similar endoparasites community, thus indicating that the amounts and types of prey congeneric that they were eating were similar. Therefore, the overlap in the same occurrence area play an important role in the parasite communities to these phylogenetically related hosts. PMID:27334822

  2. [Communities of Actynomicetes fungy in three vegetation types of the Colombian Amazon: abundance, morphotypes and the 16s rDNA gene].

    PubMed

    Cardona, Gladys Inés; Peña-Venegas, Clara Patricia; Ruiz-García, Manuel

    2009-12-01

    Among soil microorganisms, Actinomycetes play an important role in the sustainability of natural and agricultural systems: decomposition of organic matter; degradation of recalcitrant compounds like lignin; nitrogen fixation; degradation of agricultural chemicals and biological control in plants and animals. We evaluated their diversity in soils under three different vegetation covers (pasture, tropical primary forest and stubble) at two depths in the Southern Colombian Amazon border. We collected five replicates per vegetation type (in each, three samples at 0-20cm and three at 20-30cm; for a total of 30 samples). Abundance and phenotypic diversity were determined by plate counting. Genomic DNA was extracted from the isolates: the 16s rDNA gene was amplified with specific primers, and its genetic diversity was estimated by means of an amplified restriction analysis (ARDRA). Actynomicetes abundance varied with vegetation and depth, possibly reflecting presence of earthworms, macro-fauna and physico-chemical characteristics associated to fertility, as well as organic matter, total bases, and optimal capacity to cationic interchange. Primary forests had the highest diversity. Sixteen morpho-types (six genera) were identified; Streptomyces was the most abundant everywhere. The heterogeneity ofARDRA patterns prevented species identification because of the intra-species variability in sequences of 16s rDNA operons. This community is a biological indicator of landscape alteration and could include new bio-active compounds of pharmaceutical interest. PMID:20073339

  3. Statistical optimization of thermo-tolerant xylanase activity from Amazon isolated Bacillus circulans on solid-state cultivation.

    PubMed

    Heck, Júlio Xandro; Flôres, Simone Hickmann; Hertz, Plinho Francisco; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2006-10-01

    A 2(2) factorial design was performed to find the best conditions of pH and temperature for xylanolytic activity of Bacillus circulans BL53 isolated from the Amazon environment. Solid-state cultivation was carried out on an inexpensive, abundant agro-industrial soybean residue. The central composite design (CCD) used for the analysis of treatment combinations showed that a second-order polynomial regression model was in good agreement with experimental results, with R(2) = 0.9369 (P < 0.05). The maximum activity was obtained at a high temperature (80 degrees C) and over a large pH range (4.0-7.0). Enzymatic activity was maintained in heated extracts up to 50 degrees C, suggesting that the xylanases of B. circulans BL53 are thermo-tolerant biocatalysts, being of interest for industrial processes. The crude enzyme extract hydrolyzed rice straw, sugar cane bagasse and soybean fiber and its activity was stimulated by Co(2+), Fe(3+), and beta-mercaptoethanol but inhibited by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+) and by EDTA. PMID:16216495

  4. Are similar the parasite communities structure ofTrachelyopterus coriaceus and Trachelyopterus galeatus (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae) in the Amazon basin?

    PubMed

    Pantoja, Wanderson Michel de Farias; Silva, Lenise Vargas Flores; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the parasite communities in two sympatric host populations, Trachelyopterus coriaceus andTrachelyopterus galeatus, which were caught in tributary of the Amazon River in Brazil. All the specimens of T. galeatusand T. coriaceus were infected by one or more parasites, such as Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Tripartiella tetramerii, Trichodina nobilis,Cosmetocleithrum striatuli, Contracaecumsp., Cystidicoloides sp., Dadaytremoides parauchenipteri and Gorytocephalus spectabilis. Seven species were common to both host fish, and there were 1-5 parasite species per host. In both hosts, trichodinids were dominant. Aggregate dispersion of ectoparasites and endoparasites was observed, with greater aggregation among endoparasites. Only the ectoparasites species showed differences in intensity and/or abundance. However, the parasite communities of the two hosts were taxonomically similar (99%) and characterized by high prevalence and high abundance of ectoparasites, but with low diversity, prevalence and abundance of endoparasites. Trachelyopterus galeatus, the host with the larger body size, presented greater variation of Brillouin diversity and evenness, while T. coriaceus had higher Berger-Parker dominance values and total numbers of parasites. This first study on these parasites ofT. galeatus and T. coriaceus showed that the life mode, size of the hosts and the availability of infective forms of the parasites were the main factors that influenced the parasite communities structure. PMID:27007248

  5. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Muge, Gabriel R. S.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G. M.; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  6. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Muge, Gabriel R S; Veras, Adonney A O; de Sá, Pablo H C G; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G M; Guimarães, Luís C; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  7. Xiburema Virus, a Hitherto Undescribed Virus within the Family Rhabdoviridae Isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Lívia C.; Diniz Júnior, José Antonio P.; de Almeida Medeiros, Daniele Barbosa; Cardoso, Jedson F.; da Silva, Daisy E. A.; de Oliveira, Layanna F.; de Vasconcelos, Janaina M.; Vianez Júnior, João Lídio da S. G.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the first complete open reading frame (ORF) genome sequence of Xiburema virus (XIBV), that of strain BE AR362159, isolated from mosquitoes (Sabethes intermedius) in Sena Madureira, Acre state, northern Brazil. All genes showed similarities with those belonging to members of the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:24948755

  8. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals. PMID:20408416

  9. Genetic Diversity of MSP1 Block 2 of Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Manaus (Central Brazilian Amazon)

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Janaína; Orlandi, Patricia Puccinelli; Almeida, Maria Edilene; de Sousa, Luciana Pereira; Chaves, Yury; Barbosa-Filho, Roberto; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Mariuba, Luis André

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of MSP1 in both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax is presumed be associated to parasite immune evasion. In this study, we assessed genetic diversity of the most variable domain of vaccine candidate N-terminal PvMSP1 (Block 2) in field isolates of Manaus. Forty-seven blood samples the polymorphism of PvMSP1 Block 2 generates four fragment sizes. In twenty-eight of them, sequencing indicated seven haplotypes of PvMSP1 Block 2 circulating among field isolates. Evidence of striking exchanges was observed with two stretches flanking the repeat region and two predicted recombination sites were described. Single nucleotide polymorphisms determined with concurrent infections per patient indicated that nonsynonymous substitutions occurred preferentially in the repeat-rich regions which also were predicted as B-cell epitopes. The comprehensive understanding of the genetic diversity of the promising Block 2 associated with clinical immunity and a reduced risk of infection by Plasmodium vivax would be important for the rationale of malaria vaccine designs. PMID:24741614

  10. Links between plant and fungal communities across a deforestation chronosequence in the Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Paula, Fabiana S; Mirza, Babur S; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the interactions among microbial communities, plant communities and soil properties following deforestation could provide insights into the long-term effects of land-use change on ecosystem functions, and may help identify approaches that promote the recovery of degraded sites. We combined high-throughput sequencing of fungal rDNA and molecular barcoding of plant roots to estimate fungal and plant community composition in soil sampled across a chronosequence of deforestation. We found significant effects of land-use change on fungal community composition, which was more closely correlated to plant community composition than to changes in soil properties or geographic distance, providing evidence for strong links between above- and below-ground communities in tropical forests. PMID:24451208

  11. Functional, balance and health determinants of falls in a free living community Amazon riparian elderly.

    PubMed

    Maia Ribeiro, Ednéa Aguiar; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; Viegas, Karin; Teixeira, Fernanda; dos Santos Montagner, Greice Franciele Feyh; Mota, Kennya Márcia; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; de Paz, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate socio-economic, clinical, anthropometric, balance and functional fitness factors present in Amazon riparian older persons that can be associated with a risk of falling. A cross sectional study was performed with 637 riverine elderly residents (≥60 years old) in Maués city Amazonas, Brazil. The elderly were grouped in two categories with and without a history of falls in the past six months. The following variables were compared between these groups: self-reported social and health conditions; biochemical and physiological variables related to the control of metabolic diseases; body composition; hand grip strength; functional fitness evaluation using the Senior Fitness Test (SFT) battery, and balance condition using the Berg Balance Test (BBT). The prevalence of at least one fall in the past six months was 24.6% (n=157) and was similar between the sexes. The mean age between males and females with and without a history of falls was also similar (males with falls=72.67 ± 8.86; males with no falls=73.26 ± 7.58) female falls=71.78 ± 8.18, female with no falls=71.48 ± 8.17). A history of falls was associated with hospitalization in the last year and to self-health perception to both sexes and presence of chronic morbidity and percentage of body fat (BF) to women. However, the other variables including balance and functional fitness, did not present differences between elderly with and without a history of falls. These results suggest that falls experienced by the riparian elderly are strongly associated to accidents due to environmental conditions related to daily life. PMID:22995340

  12. Health, Healthcare Access, and Use of Traditional Versus Modern Medicine in Remote Peruvian Amazon Communities: A Descriptive Study of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making. PMID:25688165

  13. Health, healthcare access, and use of traditional versus modern medicine in remote Peruvian Amazon communities: a descriptive study of knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jonathan; Ramirez, Ronald; Wingfield, Tom

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need for healthcare research, funding, and infrastructure in the Peruvian Amazon. We performed a descriptive study of health, health knowledge and practice, and healthcare access of 13 remote communities of the Manatí and Amazon Rivers in northeastern Peru. Eighty-five adults attending a medical boat service were interviewed to collect data on socioeconomic position, health, diagnosed illnesses, pain, healthcare access, and traditional versus modern medicine use. In this setting, poverty and gender inequality were prevalent, and healthcare access was limited by long distances to the health post and long waiting times. There was a high burden of reported pain (mainly head and musculoskeletal) and chronic non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension (19%). Nearly all participants felt that they did not completely understand their diagnosed illnesses and wanted to know more. Participants preferred modern over traditional medicine, predominantly because of mistrust or lack of belief in traditional medicine. Our findings provide novel evidence concerning transitional health beliefs, hidden pain, and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence in marginalized communities of the Peruvian Amazon. Healthcare provision was limited by a breach between health education, knowledge, and access. Additional participatory research with similar rural populations is required to inform regional healthcare policy and decision-making. PMID:25688165

  14. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... the Rio Solimoes and the Rio Negro converge to form the Amazon River. This image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... date:  Jul 23, 2000 Images:  Amazon River location:  South America thumbnail:  ...

  15. Human rabies transmitted by vampire bats: antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from the Amazon region (Brazil and Ecuador).

    PubMed

    Castilho, Juliana Galera; Carnieli, Pedro; Durymanova, Ekaterina A; Fahl, Willian de Oliveira; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Macedo, Carla Isabel; da Rosa, Elizabeth Salbe Travassos; Mantilla, Anibal; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    Since 2004, the main transmitter of human rabies in Latin America has been the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). Based on the nucleoprotein of the rabies virus (RV), we analyzed antigenic and genetic profiles of isolates from 29 samples taken from humans living in different areas of the Amazon region. Two isolates were from Ecuador and 27 from the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil, which were obtained during outbreaks in various municipalities in the states of Pará and Maranhão in the years 2004 and 2005. The partial N gene (nt 104-1477) of the 29 isolates was sequenced, and the sequences were used to build a neighbor-joining tree with the Kimura-2 parameter model. All 29 human RV isolates were identified as belonging to antigenic variant 3 (AgV3) and were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster, which was divided into two subclusters (A and B), subcluster A in turn being divided into four genetic groups (A1, A2, A3 and A4). Genetic and molecular markers characterizing these genetic lineages were also identified. The results of this study show that the isolates belong to the same rabies cycle as that of the vampire bat D. rotundus. However, the division of clusters within the lineage associated with D. rotundus shows that different genetic sublineages of the virus were circulating in the Amazon region during the study period. Our findings suggest that there are phylogeographic differences between isolates obtained over a short period. PMID:20637811

  16. Mapping the geographic distribution of canopy species communities in lowland Amazon rainforest with CAO-AToMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feret, J.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping regional canopy diversity will greatly advance our understanding as well as the conservation of tropical rainforests. Changes in species composition across space and time are particularly important to understand the influence of climate, human activity and environmental factors on these ecosystems, but to date such monitoring is extremely challenging and is facing a scale gap between small-scale, highly detailed field studies and large-scale, low-resolution satellite observations. Advances were recently made in the field of spectroscopic imagery for the estimation of canopy alpha-diversity, and an original approach based on the segmentation of the spectral space proved its ability to estimate Shannon diversity index with unprecedented accuracy. We adapted this method in order to estimate spectral dissimilarity across landscape as a proxy for changes in species composition. We applied this approach and mapped species composition over four sites located in lowland rainforest of Peruvian Amazon. This study was based on spectroscopic imagery acquired using the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (AToMS), operating a unique sensor combining the fine spectral and spatial resolution required for such task. We obtained accurate estimation of Bray-Curtis distance between pairs of plots, which is the most commonly used metric to estimate dissimilarity in species composition (n=497 pairs, r=0.63). The maps of species composition were then compared to topo-hydrographic properties. Our results indicated a strong shift in species composition and community diversity between floodplain and terra firme terrain conditions as well as a significantly higher diversity of species communities within Amazonian floodplains. These results pave the way for global mapping of tropical canopy diversity at fine geographic resolution.

  17. The Role of Competition in Structuring Primate Communities under Different Productivity Regimes in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Monteiro de Almeida; Pinto, Míriam Plaza; Boubli, Jean Philippe; Grelle, Carlos Eduardo Viveiros

    2015-01-01

    The factors responsible for the formation of Amazonian primate communities are not well understood. Here we investigated the influence of interspecific competition in the assembly of these communities, specifically whether they follow an assembly rule known as "favored states". According to this rule, interspecific competition influences final species composition, resulting in functional groups that are equally represented in the community. We compiled presence-absence data for primate species at 39 Amazonian sites in Brazil, contrasting two regions with distinct productivity regimes: the eutrophic Juruá River basin and the oligotrophic Negro River basin. We tested two hypotheses: that interspecific competition is a mechanism that influences the structure of Amazonian primate communities, and that competition has had a greater influence on the structure of primate communities in regions with low productivity, where resources are more limited. We used null models to test the statistical significance of the results, and found a non-random pattern compatible with the favored states rule in the two regions. Our findings suggest that interspecific competition is an important force driving primate community assembly regardless of productivity regimes. PMID:26696089

  18. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  19. Mercury Speciation in Hair of Children in Three Communities of the Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Jamile Salim; Lima, Marcelo Oliveira; Santos, Elisabeth Conceição de Oliveira; de Jesus, Iracina Maura; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição N.; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Muller, Regina Celi Sarkis

    2014-01-01

    Children from riverside communities located downstream of gold mining areas may be chronically exposed to relatively high levels of MeHg through the consumption of fish of this region. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare levels of THg and MeHg in hair of children less than 12 years in communities near mines in the municipality of Itaituba and in communities far from prospecting areas in the city of Abaetetuba. The communities of Itaituba (Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós) had THg mean levels of 5.64 ± 5.55 μg·g−1 (0.43–27.82) and 11.41 ± 7.16 μg.g−1 (1.08–28.17), respectively, and an average count of MeHg relative to THg of 92.20% and 90.27%, respectively. In the Maranhão community, the THg average concentrations results were 2.27 ± 2.11 μg·g−1 (0.13–9.54) and the average values were 93.17% for MeHg. Children of Itaituba had average levels of mercury above the limit established by the World Health Organization (10 μg·g−1) and the strong correlation coefficient between the communities (R = 0.968 and P = 0.0001) suggests the hair as an excellent biomarker of human exposure to organic mercury in riverside populations of the Tapajós, which has the intake of fish daily as main source of protein dietary. PMID:24734253

  20. Molecular epidemiology of rabies virus isolated from different sources during a bat-transmitted human outbreak occurring in Augusto Correa municipality, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Taciana Fernandes Souza; Medeiros, Daniele Barbosa de Almeida; Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth Salbe; Casseb, Lívia Medeiros Neves; Medeiros, Rita; Pereira, Armando de Souza; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Begot, Alberto Lopes; Lima, Reynaldo José da Silva; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Nunes, Márcio RobertoTeixeira

    2008-01-20

    We genetically characterize rabies virus (RABV) strains isolated from human cases, domestic and wild animals during a human outbreak of bat-transmitted rabies in Augusto Correa municipality, Pará state, Brazilian Amazon in 2005. Partial nucleotide sequences of the N gene (491 bp) were obtained for all strains, and phylogenetic analysis grouped these into two major clades (Pará and Central-Southeast) and identified them as bat-related viruses genotype I, Desmodus rotundus antigenic variant 3 (AgV3). A molecular clock was used to estimate the time of emergence for each RABV isolate. The molecular data from this study suggest the association of vampire bats with human and domestic animal cases reported in the outbreak, the circulation of at least two predominant lineages in the Pará state, and also a geographic association to lineages dispersion. PMID:17996263

  1. Genetic and Symbiotic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Isolated from Agricultural Soils in the Western Amazon by Using Cowpea as the Trap Plant

    PubMed Central

    Azarias Guimarães, Amanda; Duque Jaramillo, Paula Marcela; Simão Abrahão Nóbrega, Rafaela; Florentino, Ligiane Aparecida; Barroso Silva, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Cowpea is a legume of great agronomic importance that establishes symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. However, little is known about the genetic and symbiotic diversity of these bacteria in distinct ecosystems. Our study evaluated the genetic diversity and symbiotic efficiencies of 119 bacterial strains isolated from agriculture soils in the western Amazon using cowpea as a trap plant. These strains were clustered into 11 cultural groups according to growth rate and pH. The 57 nonnodulating strains were predominantly fast growing and acidifying, indicating a high incidence of endophytic strains in the nodules. The other 62 strains, authenticated as nodulating bacteria, exhibited various symbiotic efficiencies, with 68% of strains promoting a significant increase in shoot dry matter of cowpea compared with the control with no inoculation and low levels of mineral nitrogen. Fifty genotypes with 70% similarity and 21 genotypes with 30% similarity were obtained through repetitive DNA sequence (BOX element)-based PCR (BOX-PCR) clustering. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing of strains representative of BOX-PCR clusters showed a predominance of bacteria from the genus Bradyrhizobium but with high species diversity. Rhizobium, Burkholderia, and Achromobacter species were also identified. These results support observations of cowpea promiscuity and demonstrate the high symbiotic and genetic diversity of rhizobia species in areas under cultivation in the western Amazon. PMID:22798370

  2. Semiconductor Sequencing Reveals the Diversity of Bacterial Communities in an Amazon Reservoir Considered as a Methane Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Sá, P. G.; Baraúna, R. A.; Schneider, M. C.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazon region has enormous hydro potential which is used for power generation. In fact, there are several hydroelectric power stations (HPS) already installed and many under construction or designed. It's in the Amazon which the HPS of Tucuruí, fifth largest in the world, is located. The construction of this hydroelectric dam flooded an area of 2,400 km2 of forest that decomposing, releasing greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4). Methane is the most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere and the second most important greenhouse gas. In this study, we use semicondutor sequencing to assess the bacterial diversity along a water column of 70 meters deep in the Tucuruí reservoir. One liter of water was collected every 10 meters along the water column for total DNA extraction. A fragment of approximately 150 base pairs of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using universal primers. These fragments were then paralleled sequenced in Ion Torrent® platform using barcodes on the 316 chip. After the quality filters, about 237 thousands reads were obtained, representing more than 300 Mbp. For bacterial diversity analysis, we used only reads longer than 100 base pairs. The taxonomic diversity was obtained from the Ribosomal Database Project Classifier and alpha diversity analysis (diversity indices and rarefaction) was performed using the RDP pyrosequencing pipeline. Although it is recommended for data pyrosequencing, that pipeline is able to process data obtained from semiconductor sequencing once all of them are fasta files. Over 75% of the sequences were not classified in any phylum, which leads us to believe that there is a huge diversity in the bacterial environment whose function is still unclear. Among the sequences that could be classified, there is a predominance of proteobacteria in all layers, but in higher concentrations at the lower layers. Cyanobacteria accounted for about 3% in the layers of 0m and 10m, leading us to conclude that

  3. Community-randomized trial of lambdacyhalothrin-treated hammock nets for malaria control in Yanomami communities in the Amazon region of Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Magris, M; Rubio-Palis, Y; Alexander, N; Ruiz, B; Galván, N; Frias, D; Blanco, M; Lines, J

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a community-randomized controlled trial in an area of moderate malaria transmission in the Amazon region, southern Venezuela, home of the Yanomami indigenous ethnic group. The aim was to compare the malaria incidence rate in villages with lambdacyhalothrin-treated hammock nets (ITHN) or with placebo-treated hammock nets (PTHN). In both arms of the study, intensive surveillance for early case detection was maintained and prompt malaria treatment was administered. Baseline data were collected before the intervention and a population of around 924 Yanomami was followed for 2 years. Despite the recent introduction of nets in the Yanomami villages and the adverse natural conditions in the area, the nets were accepted enthusiastically by the study population, used conscientiously and looked after carefully. The malaria incidence rate per thousand person-years at risk was 114.6 in the IHTN group and 186.8 in the PTHN group. The adjusted rate ratios indicated that ITHN prevent 56% [IRR: 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI): 52-59%] of new malaria cases. ITHN reduced the prevalence of parasitaemia by 83% [relative risks (RR): 0.17, 95% CI: 47-100%], according to a cross-sectional survey carried out during the high transmission season. The prevalence of splenomegaly and anaemia was too low to detect any possible reduction as a result of ITHN. The main conclusion of the present study is that ITHN can reduce malaria incidence in the area and it is the most feasible method for malaria control in a forested area where indigenous villages are scattered over a large territory. This is the first community-level epidemiological trial to show that ITHN are highly effective against malaria transmitted by Anopheles darlingi. PMID:17313511

  4. Seasonal variation in the copepod community structure from a tropical Amazon estuary, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, André; Leite, Natália da R; Silva, João G S; Pereira, Luci C C; Costa, Rauquírio M da

    2009-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of copepod community structure during the months of July, September and November 2003 (dry season) and January, March and May 2004 (rainy season) in the Curuçá estuary, northern Brazil. Samples were collected during neap tides via gentle 200microm mesh net tows from a small powerboat. Measurements of surface water conductivity were accomplished in situ using an electronic conductivimeter and salinity was later obtained through the transformation of the conductivity values. Salinity varied seasonally from 7.2 +/- 0.1 to 39.2 +/- 1.8 (mean +/- standard deviation) and was influenced mainly by differences in the amount of rainfall between the studied sampling seasons. In total, 30 Copepoda taxa were identified and Acartia tonsa comprised the most representative species throughout the entire studied period followed by Acartia lilljeborgii, Subeucalanus pileatus and Paracalanus quasimodo. In the present study, the density values, ecological indexes and copepod species dominance presented a clear seasonal pattern, showing that the studied area may be considered seasonally heterogeneous in relation to the investigated parameters. PMID:19488623

  5. Rabies: Knowledge and Practices Regarding Rabies in Rural Communities of the Brazilian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Lanna Jamile Corrêa; Fernandes, Marcus Emanuel Barroncas

    2016-01-01

    Background The occurrence of outbreaks of human rabies transmitted by Desmodus rotundus in Brazil in 2004 and 2005 reinforced the need for further research into this zoonosis. Studies of knowledge and practices related to the disease will help to define strategies for the avoidance of new cases, through the identification of gaps that may affect the preventive practices. Methodology/Principal findings A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to 681 residents of twelve communities of northeastern Pará state involved in the 2004 and 2005 outbreaks mentioned above. The objective was to evaluate the local knowledge and practices related to the disease. We found a highly significant difference (p<0.0001) in the knowledge of rabies among education levels, indicating that education is a primary determinant of knowledge on this disease. More than half of the respondents (63%) recognized the seriousness of the zoonosis, and 50% were aware of the importance of bats for its transmission, although few individuals (11%) were familiar with the symptoms, and only 40% knew methods of prevention. Even so, 70% of pet owners maintained their animals vaccinated, and 52% of the respondents bitten by bats had received post-exposure vaccination. Most of the respondents (57%) reported being familiarized with rabies through informal discussions, and only a few (23%) mentioned public health agents as the source of their information. Conclusion/Significance We identified many gaps in the knowledge and practices of the respondents regarding rabies. This may be the result of the reduced participation of public health agents in the transfer of details about the disease. The lack of knowledge may be a direct determinant in the occurrence of new outbreaks. Given these findings, there is a clear need for specific educational initiatives involving the local population and the public health entities, with the primary aim of contributing to the prevention of rabies. PMID:26927503

  6. Satellite Lessons: Vocational Education and Training for Isolated Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twyford, Kylie; Crump, Stephen; Anderson, Alan

    2009-01-01

    At the Western Institute of Technical and Further Education (WITAFE) in New South Wales (NSW), vocational education and training (VET) courses are being delivered to students in isolated homesteads and remote Aboriginal communities by Interactive Distance eLearning (IDL). IDL provides satellite-supported two-way broadband voice, one-way video and…

  7. Global Economic Integration and Local Community Resilience: Road Paving and Rural Demographic Change in the Southwestern Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perz, Stephen G.; Cabrera, Liliana; Carvalho, Lucas Araujo; Castillo, Jorge; Barnes, Grenville

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an expansion in international investment in large-scale infrastructure projects with the goal of achieving global economic integration. We focus on one such project, the Inter-Oceanic Highway in the "MAP" region, a trinational frontier where Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru meet in the southwestern Amazon. We adopt a…

  8. Dung Beetle Community and Functions along a Habitat-Disturbance Gradient in the Amazon: A Rapid Assessment of Ecological Functions Associated to Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Rodrigo F.; Korasaki, Vanesca; Andresen, Ellen; Louzada, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the effects of habitat disturbance on community attributes and the potential consequences for ecosystem functioning, objective approaches linking biodiversity loss to functional loss are uncommon. The objectives of this study were to implement simultaneous assessment of community attributes (richness, abundance and biomass, each calculated for total-beetle assemblages as well as small- and large-beetle assemblages) and three ecological functions of dung beetles (dung removal, soil perturbation and secondary seed dispersal), to compare the effects of habitat disturbance on both sets of response variables, and their relations. We studied dung beetle community attributes and functions in five land-use systems representing a disturbance gradient in the Brazilian Amazon: primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. All response variables were affected negatively by the intensification of habitat disturbance regimes, but community attributes and ecological functions did not follow the same pattern of decline. A hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that, although all community attributes had a significant effect on the three ecological functions (except the abundance of small beetles on all three ecological functions and the biomass of small beetles on secondary dispersal of large seed mimics), species richness and abundance of large beetles were the community attributes with the highest explanatory value. Our results show the importance of measuring ecological function empirically instead of deducing it from community metrics. PMID:23460906

  9. Dung beetle community and functions along a habitat-disturbance gradient in the Amazon: a rapid assessment of ecological functions associated to biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rodrigo F; Korasaki, Vanesca; Andresen, Ellen; Louzada, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the effects of habitat disturbance on community attributes and the potential consequences for ecosystem functioning, objective approaches linking biodiversity loss to functional loss are uncommon. The objectives of this study were to implement simultaneous assessment of community attributes (richness, abundance and biomass, each calculated for total-beetle assemblages as well as small- and large-beetle assemblages) and three ecological functions of dung beetles (dung removal, soil perturbation and secondary seed dispersal), to compare the effects of habitat disturbance on both sets of response variables, and their relations. We studied dung beetle community attributes and functions in five land-use systems representing a disturbance gradient in the Brazilian Amazon: primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. All response variables were affected negatively by the intensification of habitat disturbance regimes, but community attributes and ecological functions did not follow the same pattern of decline. A hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that, although all community attributes had a significant effect on the three ecological functions (except the abundance of small beetles on all three ecological functions and the biomass of small beetles on secondary dispersal of large seed mimics), species richness and abundance of large beetles were the community attributes with the highest explanatory value. Our results show the importance of measuring ecological function empirically instead of deducing it from community metrics. PMID:23460906

  10. In vitro susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum Welch field isolates to infusions prepared from Artemisia annua L. cultivated in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luiz Francisco Rocha e; Magalhães, Pedro Melillo de; Costa, Mônica Regina Farias; Alecrim, Maria das Graças Costa; Chaves, Francisco Célio Maia; Hidalgo, Ari de Freitas; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Vieira, Pedro Paulo Ribeiro

    2012-11-01

    Artemisinin is the active antimalarial compound obtained from the leaves of Artemisia annua L. Artemisinin, and its semi-synthetic derivatives, are the main drugs used to treat multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum (one of the human malaria parasite species). The in vitro susceptibility of P. falciparum K1 and 3d7 strains and field isolates from the state of Amazonas, Brazil, to A. annua infusions (5 g dry leaves in 1 L of boiling water) and the drug standards chloroquine, quinine and artemisinin were evaluated. The A. annua used was cultivated in three Amazon ecosystems (várzea, terra preta de índio and terra firme) and in the city of Paulínia, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Artemisinin levels in the A. annua leaves used were 0.90-1.13% (m/m). The concentration of artemisinin in the infusions was 40-46 mg/L. Field P. falciparum isolates were resistant to chloroquine and sensitive to quinine and artemisinin. The average 50% inhibition concentration values for A. annua infusions against field isolates were 0.11-0.14 μL/mL (these infusions exhibited artemisinin concentrations of 4.7-5.6 ng/mL) and were active in vitro against P. falciparum due to their artemisinin concentration. No synergistic effect was observed for artemisinin in the infusions. PMID:23147140

  11. Isolation and molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium spp. from faeces of the blue-fronted Amazon parrot in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, L; Revolledo, L; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Chacón, J L; Martins, L M; Seixas, G H F; Ferreira, A J P

    2014-12-01

    In Brazil, the blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) is a common pet. The faecal microbiota of these birds include a wide variety of bacterial species, the majority of which belong to the Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) clade. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the diversity and abundance of LAB and Bifidobacterium spp. in the cloacae between wild and captive birds and to select, identify and characterise LAB for consideration as a parrot probiotic. Cloacal swabs were collected from 26 wild and 26 captive birds. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified. The numbers of PCR-positive Enterococcus, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus species isolated from wild and captive birds were significantly different (P<0.05). Enterococcus was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium. Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus coryniformis, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most frequently isolated species from all birds. This study increases our understanding of the faecal microbiota, and may help to improve the nutrition and habitat management of captive and wild parrots. The bacterial population identified in the faecal microbiota of clinically healthy wild and captive parrots can serve as a database to analyse variations in the gut microbiota of pathogen-infected parrots and to develop probiotics specific to these genera. PMID:25062609

  12. Calodium hepaticum: Household Clustering Transmission and the Finding of a Source of Human Spurious Infection in a Community of the Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Alessandra Queiroga; Ascaso, Carlos; Santos, Ivanildes; Serra, Paula Taquita; Julião, Genimar Rebouças; Orlandi, Patricia Puccinelli

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica) is a worldwide helminth parasite of which several aspects of transmission still remain unclear. In the Amazon region, the mechanism of transmission based on the ingestion of eggs present in the liver of wild mammals has been suggested as the cause of the spurious infections described. We performed an epidemiological investigation to determine the incidence, risk of spurious infection and the dynamics of transmission of C. hepaticum in a community of the Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings: Stool samples of 135 individuals, two dog feces and liver tissue from a peccary (captured and eaten by the residents) were analyzed by conventional microscopy. Dog feces were collected from the gardens of households presenting human cases of spurious C. hepaticum infections. Community practices and feeding habits related to the transmission of the parasite were investigated. The individual incidence of spurious infection was 6.7% (95% CI: 2.08–11.24). Cases of spurious infection were observed in 7.5% of the families and the household incidence was from 50% to 83.3%. The risk of spurious infection was 10-fold greater in persons consuming the liver of wild mammals (p = 0.02). The liver tissue of a peccary and one feces sample of a dog presented eggs of C. hepaticum. The consumption of the infected liver was the cause of the spurious infections reported in one household. Conclusions/Significance: This is the first identification of a source of spurious infection by C. hepaticum in humans and we describe a high rate of incidence in household clusters related to game liver alimentary habits. The finding of a dog feces contaminating peridomiciliary ground suggests the risk of new infections. We conclude that the mechanism of transmission based on the ingestion of liver is important for the dynamics of transmission of C. hepaticum in the studied area. PMID:23285301

  13. Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventions

    PubMed Central

    Casapia, Martin; Joseph, Serene A; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2007-01-01

    Background Communities of extreme poverty suffer disproportionately from a wide range of adverse outcomes, but are often neglected or underserved by organized services and research attention. In order to target the first Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty, thereby reducing health inequalities, participatory research in these communities is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the priority problems and respective potential cost-effective interventions in Belen, a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon, using a multidisciplinary and participatory focus. Methods Two multidisciplinary and participatory workshops were conducted with important stakeholders from government, non-government and community organizations, national institutes and academic institutions. In Workshop 1, participants prioritized the main health and health-related problems in the community of Belen. Problem trees were developed to show perceived causes and effects for the top six problems. In Workshop 2, following presentations describing data from recently completed field research in school and household populations of Belen, participants listed potential interventions for the priority problems, including associated barriers, enabling factors, costs and benefits. Results The top ten priority problems in Belen were identified as: 1) infant malnutrition; 2) adolescent pregnancy; 3) diarrhoea; 4) anaemia; 5) parasites; 6) lack of basic sanitation; 7) low level of education; 8) sexually transmitted diseases; 9) domestic violence; and 10) delayed school entry. Causes and effects for the top six problems, proposed interventions, and factors relating to the implementation of interventions were multidisciplinary in nature and included health, nutrition, education, social and environmental issues. Conclusion The two workshops provided valuable insight into the main health and health-related problems facing the community of Belen. The

  14. Phenotypic and Molecular Aspects of Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from Hospitalized Patients and Beef in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Fabio A; Vargas, Taise F; Galvão, Newton N; Nogueira, Paulo A; Orlandi, Patrícia P

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare Staphylococcus spp. isolated from hospitalized patients and beef marketed in the city of Porto Velho-RO, Brazil. The isolates were subjected to antibiogram tests, adherence capacity tests, detection of the mecA gene, and epidemiological investigation by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, using the primers M13 and H12. Among the 123 Staphylococcus spp. isolates, 50 were identified as S. aureus and 73 as coagulase-negative Staphylococcus; among the latter, 7 species were identified. It was observed that the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates showed greater adhesion ability than S. aureus. The profile of antimicrobial susceptibility was different among isolates, all of which were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid, and had high penicillin resistance rates, varying according to the bacterial class and the source. In this study, all strains were negative for mecA gene detection; however, 36% of S. aureus and 17% of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were resistant to oxacillin. The genetic relationship of these bacteria, analyzed by RAPD, was able to discriminate the species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus strains of S. aureus along its origin. It was concluded that the isolates of Staphylococcus spp. derived from beef and human infections differ genetically. Thus, it is suggested that isolates from beef, which were grouped within hospital isolates, were probably carried via contact with beef in hospital professionals or patients. PMID:26824600

  15. Soil-transmitted helminth prevalence and infection intensity among geographically and economically distinct Shuar communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Cepon-Robins, Tara J; Liebert, Melissa A; Gildner, Theresa E; Urlacher, Samuel S; Colehour, Alese M; Snodgrass, J Josh; Madimenos, Felicia C; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2014-10-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections can result in a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g., diarrhea, nutritional deficiencies). Market integration (MI; participation in market-based economies) has been suggested to alter levels of STH exposure due to associated changes in diet, sanitation, and behavior, but the effects are complicated and not well understood. Some effects of economic development result in decreased exposure to certain pathogens, and other factors can lead to higher pathogen exposure. With geographic location used as a proxy, the present study investigates the effects of economic development on parasite load among an indigenous population at multiple points along the spectrum of MI. This research has many implications for public health, including an increased understanding of how social and economic changes alter disease risk around the world and how changing parasite load affects other health outcomes (i.e., allergy, autoimmunity). Specifically, this study examines the prevalence of intestinal helminths among the Shuar, an indigenous group in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, from 2 geographically/economically separated areas, with the following objectives: (1) report STH infection prevalence and intensity among Shuar; (2) explore STH infection prevalence and intensity as it relates to age distribution in the Shuar population; (3) compare STH infection patterns in geographically and economically separated Shuar communities at different levels of MI. Kato-Katz thick smears were made from fresh stool samples and examined to determine STH presence/intensity. Results indicate that 65% of the 211 participants were infected with at least 1 STH. Twenty-five percent of the sample had coinfections with at least 2 species of helminth. Infection was more common among juveniles (<15 yr) than adults. Infection prevalence and intensity was highest among more isolated communities with less market access. This study documents preliminary

  16. Delimiting species by reproductive isolation: the genetic structure of epigean and hypogean Trichomycterus spp. (Teleostei, Siluriformes) in the restricted area of Torotoro (Upper Amazon, Bolivia).

    PubMed

    Renno, Jean-François; Gazel, Claude; Miranda, Guido; Pouilly, Marc; Berrebi, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Genetic variability of Trichomycterus from the region of Torotoro (Bolivia, Upper Amazon), distributed in the same watershed where the habitat is structured by waterfalls, canyons and a cave, was studied by allozyme (twelve putative loci) and RFLP-mtDNA (DLoop and cytochrome b) analyses. Alloenzymatic variation studied by Correspondence Analysis and Maximum Likelihood Analysis revealed a four-group structure, which was largely congruent with the distribution of the 14 mtDNA haplotypes. Two of these four clusters (I and II) were differentiated by two diagnostic loci (IDH and G3PDH), two semi-diagnostic loci (PGM and 6PGDH) and consequently a very high F(st )value (estimator theta = 0.77). Therefore, clusters I and II are reproductively isolated. The distribution limit of these two (sibling) species does not correspond to those of the morphological species of Trichomycterus identified in this region: the epigean T. cf. barbouri and the hypogean T. chaberti. However, hypogean fish exhibited two mtDNA haplotypes, a private one and another shared with the epigean Trichomycterus from upstream reaches. PMID:17957496

  17. Comparison of bacterial communities in the Solimões and Negro River tributaries of the Amazon River based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, J C C; Leomil, L; Souza, J V; Peixoto, F B S; Astolfi-Filho, S

    2011-01-01

    The microbiota of the Amazon River basin has been little studied. We compared the structure of bacterial communities of the Solimões and Negro Rivers, the main Amazon River tributaries, based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Water was sampled with a 3-L Van Dorn collection bottle; samples were collected at nine different points/depths totaling 27 L of water from each river. Total DNA was extracted from biomass retained by a 0.22-μm filter after sequential filtration of the water through 0.8- and 0.22-μm filters. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced, and the sequences were analyzed with the PHYLIP and DOTUR programs to obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and to calculate the diversity and richness indices using the SPADE program. Taxonomic affiliation was determined using the naive Bayesian rRNA Classifier of the RDP II (Ribosomal Database Project). We recovered 158 sequences from the Solimões River grouped into 103 OTUs, and 197 sequences from the Negro River library grouped into 90 OTUs by the DOTUR program. The Solimões River was found to have a greater diversity of bacterial genera, and greater estimated richness of 446 OTUs, compared with 242 OTUs from the Negro River, as calculated by ACE estimator. The Negro River has less bacterial diversity, but more 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the bacterial genus Polynucleobacter were detected; 56 sequences from this genus were found (about 30% of the total sequences). We suggest that a more in-depth investigation be made to elucidate the role played by these bacteria in the river environment. These differences in bacterial diversity between Solimões and Negro Rivers could be explained by differences in organic matter content and pH of the rivers. PMID:22183948

  18. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Curionopolis Virus, a Culicoides-Related Rhabdovirus Isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Diniz Júnior, José Antonio P.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Daisy Elaine Andrade; de Oliveira, Layanna F.; é Vasconcelos, Janaina M.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Dias, Amarilis Aragão; Vianez Júnior, João Lídio da S. G.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the first nearly complete genome sequence related to curionopolis virus (CURV), that of strain AR440009, isolated from a pool of Culicoides sp. midges in Serra Norte, Pará State, northern Brazil. All genes showed similarities to those belonging to members of the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:25395636

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain GFB01, Isolated from a Freshwater Lagoon in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Tiago Ferreira; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of the cyanobacterium strain Synechococcus sp. GFB01, the first genome sequencing of this genus isolated from South America. This draft genome consists of 125 contigs with a total size of 2,339,812 bp. Automatic annotation identified several genes involved with heavy metal resistance and natural transformation. PMID:26272565

  20. Changuinola Virus Serogroup, New Genomes within the Genus Orbivirus (Family Reoviridae) Isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Dilcher, Meik; Weidmann, Manfred; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Casseb, Alexandre R.; Silva, Eliana V. P.; Nunes, Keley N. B.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Martins, Lívia C.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of a Changuinola virus (CGLV) serotype Irituia virus (BE AN 28873) isolated from a wild rodent (Oryzomys goeldi) in the municipality of Ipixuna, State of Pará, northern Brazil. All genome segments showed similarity with those belonging to members of the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae. PMID:24285662

  1. Biological characterization of the Amazon coral Micrurus spixii snake venom: Isolation of a new neurotoxic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Terra, Angelo L C; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Monteiro, José Roniele N; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia; Barros, Neuza B; Nicolete, Roberto; Teles, Carolina B G; Medeiros, Patrícia S M; Zanchi, Fernando B; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M

    2015-09-01

    The Micrurus genus is the American representative of Elapidae family. Micrurus spixii is endemic of South America and northern states of Brazil. Elapidic venoms contain neurotoxins that promote curare-mimetic neuromuscular blockage. In this study, biochemical and functional characterizations of M. spixii crude venom were performed and a new neurotoxic phospholipase A2 called MsPLA2-I was isolated. M. spixii crude venom caused severe swelling in the legs of tested mice and significant release of creatine kinase (CK) showing its myotoxic activity. Leishmanicidal activity against Leishmania amazonensis (IC50 1.24 μg/mL) was also observed, along with antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum, which are unprecedented for Micrurus venoms. MsPLA2-I with a Mr 12,809.4 Da was isolated from the crude venom of M. spixii. The N-terminal sequencing of a fragment of 60 amino acids showed 80% similarity with another PLA2 from Micrurus altirostris. This toxin and the crude venom showed phospholipase activity. In a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation, M. spixii venom and MsPLA2-I induced the blockage of both direct and indirect twitches. While the venom presented a pronounced myotoxic activity, MsPLA2-I expressed a summation of neurotoxic activity. The results of this study make M. spixii crude venom promising compounds in the exploration of molecules with microbicidal potential. PMID:26095535

  2. Determinants of Caregivers' Use and Adoption of Household Water Chlorination: A Qualitative Study with Peri-urban Communities in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Jessica D.; Leontsini, Elli; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Surkan, Pamela J.; Kosek, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the efficacy and the effectiveness of household water treatment in reducing diarrhea-related morbidity indicates the need for a better understanding of the determinants of long-term behavior change. To explore the barriers to drinking water chlorination in the Peruvian Amazon, where diarrhea is endemic among under-5 children, we conducted qualitative research with 23 caregivers from peri-urban communities of Iquitos, Peru. Our inquiry drew on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and the Integrated Behavioral Model for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene to identify the most relevant contextual, psychosocial, and technological determinants of initial action and long-term adoption of chlorination. Our findings suggest that the decision to try out this practice resulted from the combined effect of knowledge of chlorination benefits and product availability and affordability. Progress from action to adoption was influenced by caretakers' understanding of dosage, the packaging of chlorine products, knowledge and skills for multipurpose laundry bleach, the taste of treated water, and reinforcement. This analysis suggests that a focus on these determinants and the household domain may help to improve the sustainability of future intervention efforts. PMID:26175028

  3. Determinants of Caregivers' Use and Adoption of Household Water Chlorination: A Qualitative Study with Peri-Urban Communities in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Jessica D; Leontsini, Elli; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Surkan, Pamela J; Kosek, Margaret

    2015-09-01

    The gap between the efficacy and the effectiveness of household water treatment in reducing diarrhea-related morbidity indicates the need for a better understanding of the determinants of long-term behavior change. To explore the barriers to drinking water chlorination in the Peruvian Amazon, where diarrhea is endemic among under-5 children, we conducted qualitative research with 23 caregivers from peri-urban communities of Iquitos, Peru. Our inquiry drew on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and the Integrated Behavioral Model for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene to identify the most relevant contextual, psychosocial, and technological determinants of initial action and long-term adoption of chlorination. Our findings suggest that the decision to try out this practice resulted from the combined effect of knowledge of chlorination benefits and product availability and affordability. Progress from action to adoption was influenced by caretakers' understanding of dosage, the packaging of chlorine products, knowledge and skills for multipurpose laundry bleach, the taste of treated water, and reinforcement. This analysis suggests that a focus on these determinants and the household domain may help to improve the sustainability of future intervention efforts. PMID:26175028

  4. Modeling hydraulic redistribution and ecosystem response to droughts over the Amazon basin using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binyan; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2014-11-01

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of soil water transport through the low-resistance pathway provided by plant roots. It has been observed in field studies and proposed to be one of the processes that enable the Amazon rainforest to resist periodical dry spells without experiencing water limitations. How and to what extent hydraulic redistribution may increase vegetation resistance to longer or more severe droughts than seasonal dryness have not been investigated yet, which is the focus of this study. The artificially prolonged drought produced by the rainfall exclusion experiment is used as an example of long drought, and the 2005 drought is used as a severe drought. The parameterization of hydraulic redistribution proposed by Ryel et al. (2002) was incorporated into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). Three paired numerical experiments were conducted, one set using the default model (CTL) and the other using the model with considerations of hydraulic redistribution (HR). Results show that the vegetation response (including evapotranspiration, biomass, and leaf area index (LAI)) to dryness of all the three types is better captured with hydraulic redistribution incorporated. Plants are more resistant to dryness when hydraulic redistribution increases plant water availability and thus facilitates their growth. When a drought is long lasting, the vegetation response is delayed by hydraulic redistribution. Therefore, if a drought ends earlier than permanent damage is made, the magnitude of vegetation response will be lowered by this mechanism, i.e., the vegetation will be more resistant to dryness.

  5. Tasmania's Rural and Isolated Young People: Issues, Solutions and Strategies. Report of a Community Consultation with Young People, Government, Youth and Organisations, in Rural and Isolated Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Office of Youth Affairs, Hobart (Australia).

    The Tasmanian (Australia) Office of Youth Affairs and Family conducted consultations concerning issues impacting young people living in rural and isolated areas. Eight workshops specifically for youth were attended by 123 young people. Five community forums were attended by 25-30 participants each. The difficulties of living in isolated situations…

  6. Research into Mercury Exposure and Health Education in Subsistence Fish-Eating Communities of the Amazon Basin: Potential Effects on Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Dórea, José G.

    2010-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of fish-methylmercury (meHg) consumed regularly are considered hazardous to fetuses and newborn infants; as a result fish consumption advisories are an important asset to control meHg exposure in affluent societies. These concerns are now part of health promotion programs for Amazon subsistence villagers. While urban dwellers in affluent societies can choose an alternative nutritious diet, traditional and subsistence communities are caught up in controversial issues and lifestyle changes with unintended health consequences. Traditional fish-eating populations of industrialized and non-industrialized regions may be exposed to different neurotoxic substances: man-made pollutants and environmentally occurring meHg. Additionally, in non-industrialized countries, pregnant women and infants are still being immunized with thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) which degrade to ethylmercury (etHg). Therefore, the complexity involving fish-meHg associated with wild-fish choices and Hg exposure derived from TCVs is difficult to disentangle and evaluate: are villagers able to distinguish exposure to differently hazardous chemical forms of Hg (inorganic, fish-meHg, and injected etHg)? Is it possible that instead of helping to prevent a plausible (unperceived) fish-meHg associated neurocognitive delay we may inadvertently arouse panic surrounding Hg exposure and disrupt subsistence fish-eating habits (necessary for survival) and life-saving vaccination programs (required by public health authorities)? These questions characterize the incompleteness of information related on the various chemical forms of Hg exposure and the need to convey messages that do not disrupt nutritional balance and disease prevention policies directed at Amazonian subsistence communities. PMID:20948936

  7. Principal methods for isolation and identification of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Stefanis, Christos; Alexopoulos, Athanasios; Voidarou, Chrissa; Vavias, Stavros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbial populations play crucial role in soil properties and influence below-ground ecosystem processes. Microbial composition and functioning changes the soil quality through decomposition of organic matter, recycling of nutrients, and biological control of parasites of plants. Moreover, the discovery that soil microbes may translate into benefits for biotechnology, management of agricultural, forest, and natural ecosystems, biodegradation of pollutants, and waste treatment systems maximized the need of scientists for the isolation and their characterization. Operations such as the production of antibiotics and enzymic activities from microorganisms of soil constitute objectives of industry in her effort to cope with the increase of population of earth and disturbance of environment and may ameliorate the effects of global climate change. In the past decades, new biochemical and molecular techniques have been developed in our effort to identify and classify soil bacteria. The goal of measuring the soil microbial diversity is difficult because of the limited knowledge about bacteria species and classification through families and orders. Molecular techniques extend our knowledge about microbial diversity and help the taxonomy of species. Measuring and monitoring soil microbial communities can lead us to better understanding of their composition and function in many ecosystem processes. PMID:22791233

  8. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13–53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1–0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age—mercury-exposed and non-exposed—the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts

  9. [Malocclusions in children and adolescents from villages and native communities in the Ucayali Amazon region in Peru].

    PubMed

    Aliaga-Del Castillo, Arón; Mattos-Vela, Manuel Antonio; Aliaga-Del Castillo, Rosalinda; Del Castillo-Mendoza, Claudia

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to assess the prevalence of malocclusions in children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years of villages and native communities of the Ucayali jungle of Peru. We assessed the presence of malocclusions using Angle's classification and orthodontic changes. We evaluated 201 individuals, 106 (52.7%) were women, most of them (54.7%) had between 6 and 12 years. The prevalence of malocclusions was 85.6%, the most prevalent according to Angle's classification was class I (59.6%). Orthodontic alterations were present in 67.2% of cases. The most frequent were dental crowding (28.4%), anterior crossbite (17.4%), exaggerated overjet (8.5%), excessive overbite (5.0%) and anterior open bite (5.0%). We found a high prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic changes in the evaluated native communities, highlighting the need to implement preventive programs to improve the oral health of these neglected populations. PMID:21537775

  10. Male ancestry structure and interethnic admixture in African-descent communities from the Amazon as revealed by Y-chromosome Strs.

    PubMed

    Palha, Teresinha de Jesus Brabo Ferreira; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea; Guerreiro, João Farias; de Moura, Luciene Soraya Souza; Santos, Sidney

    2011-03-01

    Some genetic markers on both the Y chromosome and mtDNA are highly polymorphic and population-specific in humans, representing useful tools for reconstructing the past history of populations with poor historical records. Such lack of information is usually true in the case of recent African-descent populations of the New World founded by fugitive slaves throughout the slavery period in the Americas, particularly in Brazil, where those communities are known as quilombos. Aiming to recover male-derived ethnic structure of nine quilombos from the Brazilian Amazon, a total of 300 individuals, belonging to Mazagão Velho (N = 24), Curiaú (N = 48), Mazagão (N = 36), Trombetas (N = 20), Itacoã (N = 22), Saracura (N = 46), Marajó (N = 58), Pitimandeua (N = 26), and Pontal (N = 20), were investigated for nine Y-STRs (DYS393, DYS19, DYS390, DYS389 I, DYS389 II, DYS392, DYS391, DYS385 I/II). From the 169 distinct haplotypes obtained, 120 were singletons. The results suggest the West African coast as the main origin of slaves brought to Brazil (54% of male contribution); the European contribution was high (41%), while the Amerindian's was low (5%). Those results contrast with previous mtDNA data that showed high Amerindian female contribution (46.6%) in African-descent populations. AMOVA suggests that the genetic differentiation among the quilombos is mainly influenced by admixture with European. However, when restricting AMOVA to African-specific haplotypes, low differentiation was detected, suggesting great genetic homogeneity of the African founding populations and/or a later homogenization by intense slave trade inside Brazil. PMID:21302273

  11. Wood-fired fuel cells in an isolated community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlveen-Wright, D.; Guiney, D. J.

    Fuel cells have the potential for generating electricity very efficiently, and because of their modular construction, retain the same efficiency at any scale. Biomass is one of the renewable energy sources which is not intermittent, location-dependent or very difficult to store. If grown sustainably, biomass can be considered CO 2 neutral. A combined heat and power (CHP) system consisting of a fuel cell integrated with wood gasification (FCIWG) may offer a combination for delivering heat and electricity cleanly and efficiently, even at small-scales. The "isolated community" (IC) could be an island, or simply where grid-supplied electricity is weak or non-existent. The IC was taken to consist of 200 people and three retail outlets. Heat and electricity use profiles for this IC were produced and the FCIWG system was scaled to the power demand. The FCIWG system was modelled for two different types of fuel cell, the molten carbonate and the phosphoric acid. In each case, an oxygen-fired gasification system is proposed, in order to eliminate the need for a methane reformer. Technical, environmental and economic analyses of each version were made, using the ECLIPSE process simulation package. Since fuel cell lifetimes are not yet precisely known, economics for a range of fuel cell lifetimes have been produced. The wood-fired phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was found to be suitable where high heat/electricity values were required, but had low electrical efficiency. The wood-fired molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system was found to be quite efficient and suitable for small-scale electricity generation purposes. The expected capital costs of both systems would currently make them uncompetitive for general use, but the specific features of an IC with regard to the high cost of importing other fuel, and/or lack of grid electricity, could still make these systems attractive options.

  12. Microbial community composition explains soil respiration responses to changing carbon inputs along an Andes-to-Amazon elevation gradient

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas; Nottingham, Andrew T; Ccahuana, Adan; Salinas, Norma; Bardgett, Richard D; Meir, Patrick; McNamara, Niall P; Austin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    1. The Andes are predicted to warm by 3–5 °C this century with the potential to alter the processes regulating carbon (C) cycling in these tropical forest soils. This rapid warming is expected to stimulate soil microbial respiration and change plant species distributions, thereby affecting the quantity and quality of C inputs to the soil and influencing the quantity of soil-derived CO2 released to the atmosphere. 2. We studied tropical lowland, premontane and montane forest soils taken from along a 3200-m elevation gradient located in south-east Andean Peru. We determined how soil microbial communities and abiotic soil properties differed with elevation. We then examined how these differences in microbial composition and soil abiotic properties affected soil C-cycling processes, by amending soils with C substrates varying in complexity and measuring soil heterotrophic respiration (RH). 3. Our results show that there were consistent patterns of change in soil biotic and abiotic properties with elevation. Microbial biomass and the abundance of fungi relative to bacteria increased significantly with elevation, and these differences in microbial community composition were strongly correlated with greater soil C content and C:N (nitrogen) ratios. We also found that RH increased with added C substrate quality and quantity and was positively related to microbial biomass and fungal abundance. 4. Statistical modelling revealed that RH responses to changing C inputs were best predicted by soil pH and microbial community composition, with the abundance of fungi relative to bacteria, and abundance of gram-positive relative to gram-negative bacteria explaining much of the model variance. 5. Synthesis. Our results show that the relative abundance of microbial functional groups is an important determinant of RH responses to changing C inputs along an extensive tropical elevation gradient in Andean Peru. Although we do not make an experimental test of the effects of climate

  13. The socio-cultural importance of Mauritia flexuosa palm swamps (aguajales) and implications for multi-use management in two Maijuna communities of the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fruit from the palm Mauritia flexuosa (aguaje) is harvested throughout the Peruvian Amazon for subsistence and commercial purposes. Recent estimates suggest that residents of Iquitos, the largest city in the region, consume approximately 148.8 metric tons of aguaje fruit per month, the vast majority of which is harvested by felling and killing adult female trees. In this study, we sought to better understand and document the importance of M. flexuosa palm swamps (aguajales) in two Maijuna indigenous communities to inform the sustainable management of this habitat and species. Methods Semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and household surveys were carried out to assess the significance of aguajales and their associated plant and animal resources as well as to determine how the relationship that the Maijuna have with aguajales has changed over time. Results Aguajales and their associated resources are culturally significant and useful to the Maijuna in a wide variety of ways. In addition to M. flexuosa, the Maijuna use over 60 different species of plants from aguajales. When M. flexuosa is in fruit, aguajales are important hunting areas with a total of 20 different animal species hunted. The Maijuna also have traditional beliefs about aguajales, believing that malevolent supernatural beings reside in them. Notably, the relationship that the Maijuna have with aguajales has changed considerably over the years as aguaje fruit went from a subsistence item collected opportunistically from the ground to a market good destructively harvested beginning in the early 1990s. The Maijuna are concerned not only about how this has affected the future commercial harvest of aguaje but also about its effects on game animals given the importance of hunting to Maijuna cultural identity, subsistence, and income generation. Conclusions In order to meet the multiple socio-cultural and economic needs of the Maijuna, sustainable management efforts must be expanded to not

  14. Recovery of Arapaima sp. populations by community-based management in floodplains of the Purus River, Amazon.

    PubMed

    Petersen, T A; Brum, S M; Rossoni, F; Silveira, G F V; Castello, L

    2016-07-01

    In the present study a unique dataset on population abundance in various community-based management (CBM) and non-CBM areas is analysed to address the question of whether CBM can recover overexploited populations of Arapaima sp. in river-floodplain ecosystems. All non-CBM areas possessed depleted Arapaima sp. populations with a mean density of 0·01 individuals ha(-1) . Arapaima sp. population densities in all CBM areas changed over time from depleted to overexploited or well managed status, with a mean rate of increase of 77% year(-1) . Rates of Arapaima sp. population recovery in CBM areas differed, probably reflecting differences in ecosystem productivity and compliance with management regulations. These results indicate that CBM schemes can be effective tools for the recovery and conservation of fish populations with non-migratory life cycles in tropical river-floodplain ecosystems. PMID:27094974

  15. Relationships between copepod community structure, rainfall regimes, and hydrological variables in a tropical mangrove estuary (Amazon coast, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, André; Pereira, Luci Cajueiro Carneiro; da Costa, Rauquírio Marinho

    2015-03-01

    The influence of rainfall and hydrological variables on the abundance and diversity of the copepod community was investigated on a monthly basis over an annual cycle in the Taperaçu mangrove estuary. In general, the results show that there were no clear spatial or tidal patterns in any biological variables during the study period, which was related to the reduced horizontal gradient in abiotic parameters, determined mainly by the morphological and morphodynamic features of the estuary. Nevertheless, seasonal and monthly trends were recorded in both the hydrological data and the abundance of the dominant copepod species. In particular, Pseudodiaptomus marshi (6,004.6 ± 22,231.6 ind m-3; F = 5.0, p < 0.05) and Acartia tonsa (905.6 ± 2,400.9 ind m-3; F = 14.6, p < 0.001) predominated during the rainy season, whereas Acartia lilljeborgii (750.8 ± 808.3 ind m-3; U = 413.0, p < 0.01) was the most abundant species in the dry season. A distinct process of succession was observed in the relative abundance of these species, driven by the shift in the rainfall regime, which affected hydrological, in particular salinity, and consequently the abundance of copepod species. We suggest that this may be a general pattern governing the dynamics of copepod populations in the estuaries of the Brazilian Amazonian region.

  16. Clustered local transmission and asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria infections in a recently emerged, hypoendemic Peruvian Amazon community

    PubMed Central

    Branch, OraLee; Casapia, W Martin; Gamboa, Dionicia V; Hernandez, Jean N; Alava, Freddy F; Roncal, Norma; Alvarez, Eugenia; Perez, Enrique J; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a low incidence of malaria in Iquitos, Peru, suburbs detected by passive case-detection. This low incidence might be attributable to infections clustered in some households/regions and/or undetected asymptomatic infections. Methods Passive case-detection (PCD) during the malaria season (February-July) and an active case-detection (ACD) community-wide survey (March) surveyed 1,907 persons. Each month, April-July, 100-metre at-risk zones were defined by location of Plasmodium falciparum infections in the previous month. Longitudinal ACD and PCD (ACP+PCD) occurred within at-risk zones, where 137 houses (573 persons) were randomly selected as sentinels, each with one month of weekly active sampling. Entomological captures were conducted in the sentinel houses. Results The PCD incidence was 0.03 P. falciparum and 0.22 Plasmodium vivax infections/person/malaria-season. However, the ACD+PCD prevalence was 0.13 and 0.39, respectively. One explanation for this 4.33 and 1.77-fold increase, respectively, was infection clustering within at-risk zones and contiguous households. Clustering makes PCD, generalized to the entire population, artificially low. Another attributable-factor was that only 41% and 24% of the P. falciparum and P. vivax infections were associated with fever and 80% of the asymptomatic infections had low-density or absent parasitaemias the following week. After accounting for asymptomatic infections, a 2.6-fold increase in ACD+PCD versus PCD was attributable to clustered transmission in at-risk zones. Conclusion Even in low transmission, there are frequent highly-clustered asymptomatic infections, making PCD an inadequate measure of incidence. These findings support a strategy of concentrating ACD and insecticide campaigns in houses adjacent to houses were malaria was detected one month prior. PMID:15975146

  17. Extratropical Respones to Amazon Deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, A.; Dirmeyer, P.

    2014-12-01

    Land-use change (LUC) is known to impact local climate conditions through modifications of land-atmosphere interactions. Large-scale LUC, such as Amazon deforestation, could have a significant effect on the local and regional climates. The question remains as to what the global impact of large-scale LUC could be, as previous modeling studies have shown non-local responses due to Amazon deforestation. A common shortcoming in many previous modeling studies is the use of prescribed ocean conditions, which can act as a boundary condition to dampen the global response with respect to changes in the mean and variability. Using fully coupled modeling simulations with the Community Earth System Model version 1.2.0, the Amazon rainforest has been replaced with a distribution of representative tropical crops. Through the modifications of local land-atmosphere interactions, a significant change in the region, both at the surface and throughout the atmosphere, can be quantified. Accompanying these local changes are significant changes to the atmospheric circulation across all scales, thus modifying regional climates in other locales. Notable impacts include significant changes in precipitation, surface fluxes, basin-wide sea surface temperatures and ENSO behavior.

  18. Reexaming the Development of African American English: Evidence from Isolated Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfram, Walt

    2003-01-01

    Examines several longstanding, isolated biracial sociolinguistic situations in the coastal and Appalachian regions of North Carolina: a core community of African Americans and two case studies of isolated speakers. Compares diagnostic phonological and morphosyntactic variables for speakers representing different generations of African American and…

  19. Perceptions of environmental change and use of traditional knowledge to plan riparian forest restoration with relocated communities in Alcântara, Eastern Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . Conclusions Slash-and-burn agriculture is the main source of livelihood but also the main driver of forest degradation. Effective restoration approaches must transform problems into solutions by empowering local people. Successional agroforestry combining annual crops and trees may be a suitable transitional phase for restoration. The model must be designed collectively and include species of ecological, cultural, and socioeconomic value. In deprived communities of the Amazon, forest restoration must be a process that combines environmental and social gains. PMID:24468421

  20. Disrespect and Isolation: Elder Abuse in Chinese Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Sandra; Neysmith, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study of home care workers, this paper aims to understand elder abuse of Chinese Canadians. The findings show disrespect is the key form elder abuse takes in the Chinese community. As a culturally specific form of abuse, disrespect remains invisible under categories of elder abuse derived from a Western cultural perspective.…

  1. Bread on the Water: Education in an Isolated Mountain Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Michael T.

    1983-01-01

    Details the history of Big Laurel, West Virginia from 1918-1941, 1941-1965, and 1965-1983, noting the effects on education of events in all three periods. Describes the opening, closing, consolidation, and reopening of community schools, and the construction, development, philosophy, and curriculum of the new Big Laurel School. (SB)

  2. The Influence of Ecological Isolation on the Structural and Functional Stability of Complex Microbial Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, R. B.; Garland, J. L.; Mills, A. L.

    2005-01-01

    To help understand how the behavior of microorganisms and microbial communities in insular space habitats may differ from the behavior of these groups on Earth, long-term incubations (100+ days) were conducting using wastewater bioreactors (batch fed) designed to mimic "closed" and "open" ecological systems. The issue of immigration was considered, and the goal of the research was to determine whether the stability of microbial communities in space is reduced due to their prolonged isolation. Bioreactors were established by inoculating flasks of sterile synthetic wastewater with the microbial community obtained from a local treatment facility; each day, one-third of the medium in the flask was replaced with an equal volume of sterile artificial wastewater. Flasks were divided into two treatments: "closed" and "open" to recruitment of additional microorganisms. "Closed" flasks were maintained as described above, while the medium used to feed the "open" flasks was supplemented daily with a small amount of raw sewage (which provided a continuous source of new potential community members). Significant differences in microbial community structure and function developed in the two sets of communities, and the results suggest that the open community was more stable and better able to adjust to changing environmental conditions. Each community's resistance to environmental (temperature fluctuations) and biological stresses (starvation and invasion by an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was monitored. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether the effect of isolation changes depending on the microbial communities' initial diversity or composition; communities with a low(er) initial diversity were less stable. Overall, the results indicate that isolation will be an important factor influencing the activity of microbial communities on board spacecraft. A possible way of mitigating these effects would be to include communities with high initial

  3. Health beliefs and practices in an isolated polygamist community of southern Utah.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne Catherine; Karkazis, Katrina

    2013-06-01

    Short Creek is a largely closed and isolated community on the border between Utah and Arizona, made up of the sister towns of Hildale, Utah, and Colorado City, Arizona. Beginning from childhood, the 6,000 or so members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS) are brought up in a lifestyle of plural marriage, meaning a marriage among one man and more than one woman, and are surrounded by their peers in "the covenant." A lifestyle of plural marriage is likely to affect the health of community members, but its effects have not been studied because of the community's isolation and distrust of outsiders. This paper addresses several questions that arise in contemplating the health of the Short Creek community: What are the health beliefs in this community, and what are their historical bases? Where do families seek medical care, and for what or at what threshold of illness or injury? What is the attitude of care providers serving this community, and how are the providers viewed by the community? More broadly, this paper examines the ways in which polygamy configures health. In order to meet this objective, this paper aims first to provide a brief account of this community's history and demographic profile, followed by a discussion of health care in this community and how it is affected by the practice of plural marriage, with the data comprised of qualitative interviews with health care providers to the community. The goals of this project are to gain a rich, historically nuanced understanding of the health of community members, and to identify directions for further academic and policy research. Our findings indicate that health in this community is shaped by limited resources, an attitude of health fatalism, and a profound insularity and corresponding isolation from the outside world. PMID:22438183

  4. Researching and Respecting the Intricacies of Isolated Communities

    PubMed Central

    Blumling, Amy A.; Thomas, Tami L.; Stephens, Dionne P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conducting research in a rural area can be challenging for nurses for a variety of different reasons. The task at hand can be especially difficult when it involves discussing a sensitive topic, such as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. This study was conducted to describe parental perceptions of the HPV vaccine in rural areas, while simultaneously describing a method for engaging in successful nursing research in rural areas. Methods A team of nurse researchers completed a planned process to first understand rural culture in southeastern Georgia, and then more specifically, the families living in these three separate counties. This process initially involved developing a connection and working relationship with key community leaders, such as school principals. Following this, researchers worked on establishing rapport and trust with local parents and research participants themselves. Qualitative methods were then used to collect focus group and interview data on parental views of HPV, HPV vaccination, and HPV-related cancers. Findings Results indicated that parents had little knowledge of the HPV vaccine in rural Georgia, including misconceptions that the vaccine is for females only. In addition, many parents continually voiced the concern that the HPV vaccine would promote promiscuity in their children. Conclusions Providing consistent, timely, and open communication with the community members was crucial throughout the entire research process. This focused approach with respect to total community, culture, and religious value is essential in conducting research. Future studies conducted in rural areas should focus on specific intervention points that improve Parental HPV knowledge. PMID:24817833

  5. Teaching in an Isolated Northern Native Manitoba Community: A Teacher's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, William M.

    This master's research project investigated teaching practices in a Native community school in Manitoba in relation to the school's high dropout rate. The school was located on an isolated Native reserve in northern Manitoba, providing education through grades 9-10. In contrast to successful Native education programs elsewhere that are based in…

  6. 'Islands' and 'doctor's tool': the ethical significance of isolation and subordination in UK community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R J; Bissell, P; Wingfield, J

    2009-05-01

    Empirical ethics research is increasingly valued in offering insights into how ethical problems and decision-making occur in healthcare. In this article, the findings of a qualitative study of the ethical problems and decision-making of UK community pharmacists are presented, and it is argued that the identified themes of pharmacists' relative isolation from others and their subordination to doctors are ethically significant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 community pharmacists in England, UK. Analysis of interviews revealed that isolation involved separation of pharmacists from their peers, other healthcare professionals, patients and customers. Such isolation is argued to be inimical to ethical practice - impeding ethical discourse as understood by Habermas, resulting in a form of anomie that inhibits the transmission of professional values, leading to a lack of proximity between pharmacist and patient or customer that may impede ethical relationships and resulting, psychologically, in less ethical concern for those who are less close. Pharmacists' subordination to doctors not only precipitated some ethical problems but also allowed some pharmacists to shift ethical responsibility to a prescribing doctor, as in the case of emergency hormonal contraception. The emergence of atrocity stories further supports a culture of subordination that may cause ethical problems. The study has implications for community pharmacy practice in terms of supervision issues, developments such as prescribing responsibilities and how ethical values can be taught and communicated. The potential for isolation and subordination in other healthcare professions, and resultant ethical problems, may also need to be addressed and researched. PMID:19366838

  7. Evidence for isolated evolution of deep-sea ciliate communities through geological separation and environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are isolated habitats at the bottom of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which originate from the ancient dissolution of Messinian evaporites. The different basins have recruited their original biota from the same source, but their geological evolution eventually constituted sharp environmental barriers, restricting genetic exchange between the individual basins. Therefore, DHABs are unique model systems to assess the effect of geological events and environmental conditions on the evolution and diversification of protistan plankton. Here, we examine evidence for isolated evolution of unicellular eukaryote protistan plankton communities driven by geological separation and environmental selection. We specifically focused on ciliated protists as a major component of protistan DHAB plankton by pyrosequencing the hypervariable V4 fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA. Geospatial distributions and responses of marine ciliates to differential hydrochemistries suggest strong physical and chemical barriers to dispersal that influence the evolution of this plankton group. Results Ciliate communities in the brines of four investigated DHABs are distinctively different from ciliate communities in the interfaces (haloclines) immediately above the brines. While the interface ciliate communities from different sites are relatively similar to each other, the brine ciliate communities are significantly different between sites. We found no distance-decay relationship, and canonical correspondence analyses identified oxygen and sodium as most important hydrochemical parameters explaining the partitioning of diversity between interface and brine ciliate communities. However, none of the analyzed hydrochemical parameters explained the significant differences between brine ciliate communities in different basins. Conclusions Our data indicate a frequent genetic exchange in the deep-sea water above the brines. The “isolated island

  8. Alkalinity to calcium flux ratios for corals and coral reef communities: variances between isolated and community conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jokiel, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Calcification in reef corals and coral reefs is widely measured using the alkalinity depletion method which is based on the fact that two protons are produced for every mole of CaCO3 precipitated. This assumption was tested by measuring the total alkalinity (TA) flux and Ca2+ flux of isolated components (corals, alga, sediment and plankton) in reference to that of a mixed-community. Experiments were conducted in a flume under natural conditions of sunlight, nutrients, plankton and organic matter. A realistic hydrodynamic regime was provided. Groups of corals were run separately and in conjunction with the other reef components in a mixed-community. The TA flux to Ca2+ flux ratio (ΔTA: ΔCa2+) was consistently higher in the coral-only run (2.06 ± 0.19) than in the mixed-community run (1.60 ± 0.14, p-value = 0.011). The pH was higher and more stable in the mixed-community run (7.94 ± 0.03 vs. 7.52 ± 0.07, p-value = 3 × 10−5). Aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) was also higher in the mixed-community run (2.51 ± 0.2 vs. 1.12 ± 0.14, p-value = 2 × 10−6). The sediment-only run revealed that sediment is the source of TA that can account for the lower ΔTA: ΔCa2+ ratio in the mixed-community run. The macroalgae-only run showed that algae were responsible for the increased pH in the mixed-community run. Corals growing in a mixed-community will experience an environment that is more favorable to calcification (higher daytime pH due to algae photosynthesis, additional TA and inorganic carbon from sediments, higher Ωarag). A paradox is that the alkalinity depletion method will yield a lower net calcification for a mixed-community versus a coral-only community due to TA recycling, even though the corals may be calcifying at a higher rate due to a more optimal environment. PMID:24688834

  9. Using GRACE total water storage data to constrain the dynamics of surface flow in the Community Land Model in the Amazon and Orinoco basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Lo, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The surface water component is a major contributor to total water storage in the Amazon and Orinoco basins in South America. Global models that do not account for surface water routing often show poor agreement with the GRACE total water storage observations. In this study, we aim at constraining the spatial variations in surface flow simulated by the routing scheme of the CLM3.5. Two tests are performed corresponding to different choices for the surface-flow velocity value: a homogeneous-velocity model and a two-velocity model (with an upstream velocity that is larger than the downstream velocity in each river channel). The comparison with the GRACE observations is based on selected modes of a Principal Component Analysis of both data sets in order to take into account the spatio-temporal modes of the total water storage.

  10. The Amazon and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobre, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The climatologies of cloudiness and precipitation for the Amazon, are reviewed and the physical causes of some of the observed features and those which are not well known are explained. The atmospheric circulation over the Amazon is discussed on the large scale tropical circulations forced by deep diabatic heating sources. Weather deforestation which leads to a reduction in evapotranspiration into the atmosphere, and a reduction in precipitation and its implicated for the gobal climate is discussed. It is indicated that a large scale clearing of tropical rainforests there would be a reduction in rainfall which would have global effects on climate and weather both in the tropical and extratropical regions.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Fungal Endophyte Communities Isolated from Cultivated Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

    PubMed Central

    Ek-Ramos, María J.; Zhou, Wenqing; Valencia, César U.; Antwi, Josephine B.; Kalns, Lauren L.; Morgan, Gaylon D.; Kerns, David L.; Sword, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fungi in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivated in the United States have largely focused on monitoring and controlling plant pathogens. Given increasing interest in asymptomatic fungal endophytes as potential biological control agents, surveys are needed to better characterize their diversity, distribution patterns and possible applications in integrated pest management. We sampled multiple varieties of cotton in Texas, USA and tested for temporal and spatial variation in fungal endophyte diversity and community composition, as well as for differences associated with organic and conventional farming practices. Fungal isolates were identified by morphological and DNA identification methods. We found members of the genera Alternaria, Colletotrichum and Phomopsis, previously isolated as endophytes from other plant species. Other recovered species such as Drechslerella dactyloides (formerly Arthrobotrys dactyloides) and Exserohilum rostratum have not, to our knowledge, been previously reported as endophytes in cotton. We also isolated many latent pathogens, but some species such as Alternaria tennuissima, Epicoccum nigrum, Acremonium alternatum, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Chaetomium globosum and Paecilomyces sp., are known to be antagonists against plant pathogens, insects and nematode pests. We found no differences in endophyte species richness or diversity among different cotton varieties, but did detect differences over time and in different plant tissues. No consistent patterns of community similarity associated with variety, region, farming practice, time of the season or tissue type were observed regardless of the ecological community similarity measurements used. Results indicated that local fungal endophyte communities may be affected by both time of the year and plant tissue, but the specific community composition varies across sites. In addition to providing insights into fungal endophyte community structure, our survey provides

  12. Clinical Significance of Community- and Healthcare-Acquired Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Jyh-Jou; Lin, Yu-Hsiu; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chao, Chien-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the clinical significance, manifestations, microbiological characteristics and outcomes of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) isolates, and compare the clinical features of community- and healthcare-acquired CRE isolates. A total of 78 patients were identified to have CRE. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common pathogens (n = 42, 53.8%), followed by Enterobacter cloacae (n = 24, 30.8%), and Escherichia coli (n = 11, 14.1%). Most of the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings (n = 55, 70.5%), and other cases got CRE from community settings (n = 23, 29.5%). Nine cases (11.5%) were classified as CRE colonization. Among the remaining 69 cases of CRE infections, pneumonia (n = 28, 40.6%) was the most common type of infections, followed by urinary tract infection (n = 24, 34.8%), and intra-abdominal infection (n = 16, 23.2%). The patients acquired CRE from community settings were more likely to be elderly, female, and had more urinary tract infections than from healthcare settings. In contrast, the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings had more intra-abdominal infections, intra-abdominal surgery, and presence of indwelling device than from community settings. In conclusion, community-acquired CRE are not rare, and their associated clinical presentations are different from healthcare-acquired CRE. PMID:26999356

  13. Impacts of Adjacent Land Use and Isolation on Marsh Bird Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lyndsay A.; Chow-Fraser, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Over the next half century the human population is expected to grow rapidly, resulting in the conversion of rural areas into cities. Wetlands in these regions are therefore under threat, even though they have important ecosystem services and functions. Many obligate marsh-nesting birds in North America have shown declines over the past 40 years, and it is important to evaluate marsh bird community response to increased urbanization. We surveyed 20 coastal marshes in southern Ontario, Canada, and found that obligate marsh-nesting birds preferred rural over urban wetlands, generalist marsh-nesting birds showed no preference, while synanthropic species showed a trend towards increased richness and abundance in urban marshes. The Index of Marsh Bird Community Integrity (IMBCI) was calculated for each wetland and we found significantly higher scores in rural compared to urban wetlands. The presence of a forested buffer surrounding the marsh was not an important factor in predicting the distribution of generalists, obligates, synanthropic species, or the IMBCI. More isolated marshes had a lower species richness of obligate marsh-nesters and a lower IMBCI than less isolated marshes. Based on our results, we recommend that urban land use is not the dominant land use within 1000 m from any wetland, as it negatively affects the abundance and richness of obligate marsh-nesters, and the overall integrity of the avian community. We also recommend that all existing wetlands be conserved to mitigate against isolation effects and to preserve biodiversity.

  14. Linguistic isolation in the home and community: Protection or risk for young children?

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Jennifer E.; Walker, Laquitta; Luz, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Studies of immigrant adaptation in the United States emphasize the importance of duration of residence, language use, location of schooling and other factors related to the migration process in determining outcomes for immigrants. Research also points to the variability of socioeconomic mobility among immigrants and their descendants across receiving contexts encountered in the United States. This paper extends this model to young children and examines how the linguistic environment of the family and the community interact to produce differential developmental outcomes. The analyses rely on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) and 2000 US Census. Children’s cognitive scores vary considerably by mothers’ nativity and household linguistic isolation; a result that is largely influenced by the greater likelihood of living in poverty for children in linguistically isolated homes. The level of linguistic isolation in the community is also associated with cognitive scores but the greatest variation in scores across communities occurs among children of U.S. born mothers. PMID:23146603

  15. Characterization of the microbial community structure and nitrosamine-reducing isolates in drinking water biofilters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanfeng; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qingxiang; Huang, Yao; Zhu, Chunyou; Fan, Jing; Pan, Feng

    2015-07-15

    Two biofilters were constructed using biological activated carbon (BAC) and nitrosamine-containing water from two drinking water treatment plants. The microbiome of each biofilter was characterized by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing, and one nitrosamine-reducing bacterium was isolated. The results showed that nitrosamines changed the relative abundance at both the phylum and class levels, and the new genera were observed in the microbial communities of the two BAC filters after cultivation. As such, the genus Rhodococcus, which includes many nitrosamine-reducing strains reported in previous studies, was only detected in the BAC2 filter after cultivation. These findings indicate that nitrosamines can significantly affect the genus level in the microbial communities. Furthermore, the isolated bacterial culture Rhodococcus cercidiphylli A41 AS-1 exhibited the ability to reduce five nitrosamines (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine) with removal ratios that ranged from 38.1% to 85.4%. The isolate exhibited a better biodegradation ability with nitrosamine as the carbon source when compared with nitrosamine as the nitrogen source. This study increases our understanding of the microbial community in drinking water biofilters with trace quantities of nitrosamines, and provides information on the metabolism of nitrosamine-reducing bacteria. PMID:25841075

  16. Isolation and analysis of mRNA from environmental microbial communities.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Ken C; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Cheng, Chu Ting; Leo, Lesina; Alexa, Andrei; Schmidt, Susanne; Schenk, Peer M

    2008-10-01

    The advent of metagenomics has revealed that our planet harbors millions of previously undiscovered microbial species. However, functional insights into the activities of microbial communities cannot easily be obtained using metagenomics. Using transcriptional analyses to study microbial gene functions is currently problematic due to difficulties working with unstable microbial mRNA as a small fraction of total cellular RNA. Current techniques can be expensive and time consuming, and still result in significant levels of rRNA contamination. We have adapted techniques to rapidly isolate high high-quality RNA from environmental samples and developed a simple method for specific isolation of mRNA by size separation. This new technique was evaluated by constructing cDNA libraries directly from uncultured environmental microbial communities, including agricultural soil samples, aquatic flocculants, organic composts, mammalian oral and faecal samples, and wastewater sludge. The sequencing of a fraction of these cDNA clones revealed a high degree of novelty, demonstrating the potential of this approach to capture a large number of unique transcripts directly from the environment. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses gel electrophoresis to isolate mRNA from microbial communities. We conclude that this method could be used to provide insights into the microbial 'metatranscriptome' of entire microbial communities. Coupled with high-throughput sequencing or the construction of cDNA microarrays, this approach will provide a useful tool to study the transcriptional activities of microorganisms, including those of entire microbial communities and of non-culturable microorganisms. PMID:18582973

  17. Isolation and Stability of Distinct Subsurface Microbial Communities Associated with Two Hydrothermal Vent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opatkiewicz, A. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Subseafloor microbial communities may be important in global primary production and biogeochemical cycling. However, too little is known about the physiological and phylogenetic diversity and activity of these communities to assess this potential, and understanding the temporal and spatial variability in microbial community structure is critical. The microbial community structure of five geographically distinct hydrothermal vents located within the Axial Seamount caldera, and four geographically distinct vents within the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were examined over six years. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (tRFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were used to determine the bacterial and archaeal diversity, and the statistical software Primer was used to compare vent microbiology, temperature and fluid chemistry. Statistical analysis of vent fluid temperature and chemical composition shows that there are significant differences between vents in any year, and persistent differences in composition between one of the Axial vents compared to the rest of the vents. For the majority of vents, however, the fluid composition changed over time such that separate vents do not maintain a statistically distinct composition. In contrast, the subseafloor microbial communities associated with individual vents also changed from year to year but each location maintained a distinct community structure (based on tRFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses) that was significantly different and greater than 60-percent dissimilar from all other vents included in this study. At Axial, epsilon-proteobacterial microdiversity is shown to be important in distinguishing vent communities. The deeper, high-temperature archaeal communities have more overlap between sites. We propose that persistent venting at many diffuse sites over time creates the potential to isolate and stabilize diverse microbial community structures between vents. Variation in dilution

  18. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  19. Evidence of global-scale aeolian dispersal and endemism in isolated geothermal microbial communities of Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Herbold, Craig W; Lee, Charles K; McDonald, Ian R; Cary, S Craig

    2014-01-01

    New evidence in aerobiology challenges the assumption that geographical isolation is an effective barrier to microbial transport. However, given the uncertainty with which aerobiological organisms are recruited into existing communities, the ultimate impact of microbial dispersal is difficult to assess. Here we use molecular genetic approaches to examine microbial communities inhabiting fumarolic soils on Mount Erebus, the southernmost geothermal site on Earth, to evaluate the ecological significance of global-scale microbial dispersal. There, hot, fumarolic soils provide an effective environmental filter to test the viability of organisms that have been distributed via aeolian transport over geological time. We find that cosmopolitan thermophiles dominate the surface, whereas endemic Archaea and members of poorly understood Bacterial candidate divisions dominate the immediate subsurface. These results imply that aeolian processes readily disperse viable organisms globally, where they are incorporated into pre-existing complex communities of endemic and cosmopolitan taxa. PMID:24846491

  20. Global evolutionary isolation measures can capture key local conservation species in Nearctic and Neotropical bird communities

    PubMed Central

    Redding, David W.; Mooers, Arne O.; Şekercioğlu, Çağan H.; Collen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how to prioritize among the most deserving imperilled species has been a focus of biodiversity science for the past three decades. Though global metrics that integrate evolutionary history and likelihood of loss have been successfully implemented, conservation is typically carried out at sub-global scales on communities of species rather than among members of complete taxonomic assemblages. Whether and how global measures map to a local scale has received little scrutiny. At a local scale, conservation-relevant assemblages of species are likely to be made up of relatively few species spread across a large phylogenetic tree, and as a consequence there are potentially relatively large amounts of evolutionary history at stake. We ask to what extent global metrics of evolutionary history are useful for conservation priority setting at the community level by evaluating the extent to which three global measures of evolutionary isolation (evolutionary distinctiveness (ED), average pairwise distance (APD) and the pendant edge or unique phylogenetic diversity (PD) contribution) capture community-level phylogenetic and trait diversity for a large sample of Neotropical and Nearctic bird communities. We find that prioritizing the most ED species globally safeguards more than twice the total PD of local communities on average, but that this does not translate into increased local trait diversity. By contrast, global APD is strongly related to the APD of those same species at the community level, and prioritizing these species also safeguards local PD and trait diversity. The next step for biologists is to understand the variation in the concordance of global and local level scores and what this means for conservation priorities: we need more directed research on the use of different measures of evolutionary isolation to determine which might best capture desirable aspects of biodiversity. PMID:25561674

  1. Phylogenetic isolation of host trees affects assembly of local Heteroptera communities

    PubMed Central

    Vialatte, A.; Bailey, R. I.; Vasseur, C.; Matocq, A.; Gossner, M. M.; Everhart, D.; Vitrac, X.; Belhadj, A.; Ernoult, A.; Prinzing, A.

    2010-01-01

    A host may be physically isolated in space and then may correspond to a geographical island, but it may also be separated from its local neighbours by hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary history, and may form in this case an evolutionarily distinct island. We test how this affects the assembly processes of the host's colonizers, this question being until now only invoked at the scale of physically distinct islands or patches. We studied the assembly of true bugs in crowns of oaks surrounded by phylogenetically more or less closely related trees. Despite the short distances (less than 150 m) between phylogenetically isolated and non-isolated trees, we found major differences between their Heteroptera faunas. We show that phylogenetically isolated trees support smaller numbers and fewer species of Heteroptera, an increasing proportion of phytophages and a decreasing proportion of omnivores, and proportionally more non-host-specialists. These differences were not due to changes in the nutritional quality of the trees, i.e. species sorting, which we accounted for. Comparison with predictions from meta-community theories suggests that the assembly of local Heteroptera communities may be strongly driven by independent metapopulation processes at the level of the individual species. We conclude that the assembly of communities on hosts separated from their neighbours by long periods of evolutionary history is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that on hosts established surrounded by closely related trees. Potentially, the biotic selection pressure on a host might thus change with the evolutionary proximity of the surrounding hosts. PMID:20335208

  2. The detection of Vaccinia virus confirms the high circulation of Orthopoxvirus in buffaloes living in geographical isolation, Marajó Island, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Franco-Luiz, Ana Paula Moreira; Fagundes Pereira, Alexandre; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; de Souza Trindade, Giliane; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2016-06-01

    In Brazil, serologic evidence of Orthopoxvirus (OPV) circulation showed positivity around 20% in cattle, humans, monkeys and rodents. Although OPV seropositivity has been described in buffalo herds in southeastern Brazil, no Vaccinia virus (VACV) (member of genus OPV) outbreaks in buffalo herds have been described in this country. This study aimed to investigate the detection of anti-OPV antibodies and to study the OPV genome in Brazilian buffalo herds. Our results demonstrated a high OPV seropositivity in buffalo herds on Marajó Island and molecular data confirmed the circulation of VACV. The geographical isolation conditionmight be a sine qua non condition to explain our results. PMID:27260805

  3. Retrospective survey for sialidase activity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates from cases of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sialidase is a well-known virulence factor of other respiratory pathogens, but was only recently documented to occur in some species of Mycoplasma. The sialidase activity expressed can vary quantitatively among strains within a species of mycoplasma, from undetectable to amounts that correlate positively with strain virulence. Very few isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae had ever been examined for sialidase activity, so it was unknown whether sialidase may contribute to diseases involving this species. Findings No sialidase activity was detected by spectrofluorometric assay of 15 laboratory strains and 91 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae banked over many years from patients having radiologically-confirmed, uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. Conclusions The annotated genome of strain M129 (GenBank NC_000912, ATCC 29342), also isolated from a patient with pneumonia, accurately represents the absence of sialidase genes from strains of M. pneumoniae typically associated with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. A possible involvement of sialidase in neurologic or other extra-respiratory manifestations of M. pneumoniae mycoplasmosis remains to be investigated. PMID:21676241

  4. Groundwater Isolation Governs Chemistry and Microbial Community Structure along Hydrologic Flowpaths

    PubMed Central

    Ben Maamar, Sarah; Aquilina, Luc; Quaiser, Achim; Pauwels, Hélène; Michon-Coudouel, Sophie; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Labasque, Thierry; Roques, Clément; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of hydrodynamic functioning of hard-rock aquifers on microbial communities. In hard-rock aquifers, the heterogeneous hydrologic circulation strongly constrains groundwater residence time, hydrochemistry, and nutrient supply. Here, residence time and a wide range of environmental factors were used to test the influence of groundwater circulation on active microbial community composition, assessed by high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA. Groundwater of different ages was sampled along hydrogeologic paths or loops, in three contrasting hard-rock aquifers in Brittany (France). Microbial community composition was driven by groundwater residence time and hydrogeologic loop position. In recent groundwater, in the upper section of the aquifers or in their recharge zone, surface water inputs caused high nitrate concentration and the predominance of putative denitrifiers. Although denitrification does not seem to fully decrease nitrate concentrations due to low dissolved organic carbon concentrations, nitrate input has a major effect on microbial communities. The occurrence of taxa possibly associated with the application of organic fertilizers was also noticed. In ancient isolated groundwater, an ecosystem based on Fe(II)/Fe(III) and S/SO4 redox cycling was observed down to several 100 of meters below the surface. In this depth section, microbial communities were dominated by iron oxidizing bacteria belonging to Gallionellaceae. The latter were associated to old groundwater with high Fe concentrations mixed to a small but not null percentage of recent groundwater inducing oxygen concentrations below 2.5 mg/L. These two types of microbial community were observed in the three sites, independently of site geology and aquifer geometry, indicating hydrogeologic circulation exercises a major control on microbial communities. PMID:26733990

  5. Groundwater Isolation Governs Chemistry and Microbial Community Structure along Hydrologic Flowpaths.

    PubMed

    Ben Maamar, Sarah; Aquilina, Luc; Quaiser, Achim; Pauwels, Hélène; Michon-Coudouel, Sophie; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Labasque, Thierry; Roques, Clément; Abbott, Benjamin W; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of hydrodynamic functioning of hard-rock aquifers on microbial communities. In hard-rock aquifers, the heterogeneous hydrologic circulation strongly constrains groundwater residence time, hydrochemistry, and nutrient supply. Here, residence time and a wide range of environmental factors were used to test the influence of groundwater circulation on active microbial community composition, assessed by high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA. Groundwater of different ages was sampled along hydrogeologic paths or loops, in three contrasting hard-rock aquifers in Brittany (France). Microbial community composition was driven by groundwater residence time and hydrogeologic loop position. In recent groundwater, in the upper section of the aquifers or in their recharge zone, surface water inputs caused high nitrate concentration and the predominance of putative denitrifiers. Although denitrification does not seem to fully decrease nitrate concentrations due to low dissolved organic carbon concentrations, nitrate input has a major effect on microbial communities. The occurrence of taxa possibly associated with the application of organic fertilizers was also noticed. In ancient isolated groundwater, an ecosystem based on Fe(II)/Fe(III) and S/SO4 redox cycling was observed down to several 100 of meters below the surface. In this depth section, microbial communities were dominated by iron oxidizing bacteria belonging to Gallionellaceae. The latter were associated to old groundwater with high Fe concentrations mixed to a small but not null percentage of recent groundwater inducing oxygen concentrations below 2.5 mg/L. These two types of microbial community were observed in the three sites, independently of site geology and aquifer geometry, indicating hydrogeologic circulation exercises a major control on microbial communities. PMID:26733990

  6. Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation (PHAST) in a Remote and Isolated Community in Samar Province, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    ALMAZAN, J.U.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrheal disease is one of the leading causes of death in children under five years old, most people who die from this disease actually die from severe dehydration and fluid loss. Moreover, 88% of its global diarrheal disease is attributed to unsafe water supply, inadequate sanitation, and hygiene. This investigation was developed to determine the effect of Participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation (PHAST) program in an isolated community of Mabini,Samar Province, Philippines. Longitudinal research design was used in order to determine the effect of the program one year was implemented in the community. A purposive sampling was utilized in this investigation which accounts a total of 39 households in Mabini community, Basey, Samar, without toilet facilities. The instrument used was the modified questionnaire of Philippine Red Cross in water and sanitation before and after the program was implemented. Results showed that there was improvement of knowledge on water and sanitation, handwashing practice, household waste practices drinking practices, defecation practices. Thus, program reaching the most isolated and difficult area experiencing the most detrimental effects which improve poor hygiene and sanitation, improving health, equality and social justice. PMID:26793319

  7. The Amazon and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobre, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The climatologies of cloudiness and precipitation for the Amazon are reviewed. The physical causes of observed features are explained. The question whether deforestation leads to a reduction in evapotranspiration into the atmosphere is examined, as well as the reduction in precipitation and its implication for the global climate. There are indications that for large scale clearing of tropical rain forests there would indeed be a reduction in rainfall, which would have global effects in terms of climate and weather.

  8. Chain of commercialization of Podocnemis spp. turtles (Testudines: Podocnemididae) in the Purus River, Amazon basin, Brazil: current status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Consumption of turtles by natives and settlers in the Amazon and Orinoco has been widely studied in scientific communities. Accepted cultural customs and the local dietary and monetary needs need to be taken into account in conservation programs, and when implementing federal laws related to consumption and fishing methods. This study was conducted around the Purus River, a region known for the consumption and illegal trade of turtles. The objective of this study was to quantify the illegal turtle trade in Tapauá and to understand its effect on the local economy. Methods This study was conducted in the municipality of Tapauá in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. To estimate turtle consumption, interviews were conducted over 2 consecutive years (2006 and 2007) in urban areas and isolated communities. The experimental design was randomized with respect to type of household. To study the turtle fishery and trade chain, we used snowball sampling methodology. Results During our study period, 100% of respondents reported consuming at least three species of turtles (Podocnemis spp.). Our estimates indicate that about 34 tons of animals are consumed annually in Tapauá along the margins of a major fishing river in the Amazon. At least five components related to the chain of commercialization of turtles on the Purus River are identified: Indigenous Apurinã and (2) residents of bordering villages (communities); (3) of local smugglers buy and sell turtles to the community in exchange for manufactured goods, and (4) regional smugglers buy in Tapauá, Lábrea, and Beruri to sell in Manaus and Manacapuru; Finally, (5) there are professional fishermen. Conclusions We quantify the full impact of turtle consumption and advocate the conservation of the region’s turtle populations. The Brazilian government should initiate a new turtle consumption management program which involves the opinions of consumers. With these measures the conservation of freshwater turtles in the

  9. Antagonistic interactions between endophytic cultivable bacterial communities isolated from the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Maida, Isabel; Chiellini, Carolina; Mengoni, Alessio; Bosi, Emanuele; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fondi, Marco; Fani, Renato

    2016-09-01

    In this work we have studied the antagonistic interactions existing among cultivable bacteria isolated from three ecological niches (rhizospheric soil, roots and stem/leaves) of the traditional natural medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea. The three compartments harboured different taxonomic assemblages of strains, which were previously reported to display different antibiotic resistance patterns, suggesting the presence of differential selective pressure due to antagonistic molecules in the three compartments. Antagonistic interactions were assayed by the cross-streak method and interpreted using a network-based analysis. In particular 'within-niche inhibition' and 'cross-niche inhibition' were evaluated among isolates associated with each compartment as well as between isolates retrieved from the three different compartments respectively. Data obtained indicated that bacteria isolated from the stem/leaves compartment were much more sensitive to the antagonistic activity than bacteria from roots and rhizospheric soil. Moreover, both the taxonomical position and the ecological niche might influence the antagonistic ability/sensitivity of different strains. Antagonism could play a significant role in contributing to the differentiation and structuring of plant-associated bacterial communities. PMID:26013664

  10. Small Traditional Human Communities Sustain Genomic Diversity over Microgeographic Scales despite Linguistic Isolation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Murray P; Hudjashov, Georgi; Sim, Andre; Savina, Olga; Karafet, Tatiana M; Sudoyo, Herawati; Lansing, J Stephen

    2016-09-01

    At least since the Neolithic, humans have largely lived in networks of small, traditional communities. Often socially isolated, these groups evolved distinct languages and cultures over microgeographic scales of just tens of kilometers. Population genetic theory tells us that genetic drift should act quickly in such isolated groups, thus raising the question: do networks of small human communities maintain levels of genetic diversity over microgeographic scales? This question can no longer be asked in most parts of the world, which have been heavily impacted by historical events that make traditional society structures the exception. However, such studies remain possible in parts of Island Southeast Asia and Oceania, where traditional ways of life are still practiced. We captured genome-wide genetic data, together with linguistic records, for a case-study system-eight villages distributed across Sumba, a small, remote island in eastern Indonesia. More than 4,000 years after these communities were established during the Neolithic period, most speak different languages and can be distinguished genetically. Yet their nuclear diversity is not reduced, instead being comparable to other, even much larger, regional groups. Modeling reveals a separation of time scales: while languages and culture can evolve quickly, creating social barriers, sporadic migration averaged over many generations is sufficient to keep villages linked genetically. This loosely-connected network structure, once the global norm and still extant on Sumba today, provides a living proxy to explore fine-scale genome dynamics in the sort of small traditional communities within which the most recent episodes of human evolution occurred. PMID:27274003

  11. Small Traditional Human Communities Sustain Genomic Diversity over Microgeographic Scales despite Linguistic Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Murray P.; Hudjashov, Georgi; Sim, Andre; Savina, Olga; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Sudoyo, Herawati; Lansing, J. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    At least since the Neolithic, humans have largely lived in networks of small, traditional communities. Often socially isolated, these groups evolved distinct languages and cultures over microgeographic scales of just tens of kilometers. Population genetic theory tells us that genetic drift should act quickly in such isolated groups, thus raising the question: do networks of small human communities maintain levels of genetic diversity over microgeographic scales? This question can no longer be asked in most parts of the world, which have been heavily impacted by historical events that make traditional society structures the exception. However, such studies remain possible in parts of Island Southeast Asia and Oceania, where traditional ways of life are still practiced. We captured genome-wide genetic data, together with linguistic records, for a case–study system—eight villages distributed across Sumba, a small, remote island in eastern Indonesia. More than 4,000 years after these communities were established during the Neolithic period, most speak different languages and can be distinguished genetically. Yet their nuclear diversity is not reduced, instead being comparable to other, even much larger, regional groups. Modeling reveals a separation of time scales: while languages and culture can evolve quickly, creating social barriers, sporadic migration averaged over many generations is sufficient to keep villages linked genetically. This loosely-connected network structure, once the global norm and still extant on Sumba today, provides a living proxy to explore fine-scale genome dynamics in the sort of small traditional communities within which the most recent episodes of human evolution occurred. PMID:27274003

  12. Suppression of Bacterial Blight by a Bacterial Community Isolated from the Guttation Fluids of Anthuriums†

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, R.; Fukui, H.; Alvarez, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Growth and survival of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae in guttation fluids (xylem sap exuded from leaf margins) of anthuriums were suppressed by several bacterial strains indigenous to leaves of various anthurium cultivars. Inhibition of growth was not observed in filter-sterilized guttation fluids and was restored to original levels only by reintroducing specific mixtures of bacteria into filter-sterilized guttation fluids. The inhibitory effect was related to the species in the bacterial community rather than to the total numbers of bacteria in the guttation fluids. One very effective bacterial community consisted of five species isolated from inhibitory guttation fluids of two susceptible anthurium cultivars. The individual strains in this community had no effect on the pathogen, but the mixture was inhibitory to X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae in guttation fluids. The populations of the individual strains remained near the initial inoculum levels for at least 14 days. The effect of the five inhibitory strains on reducing disease in susceptible anthurium plants was tested by using a bioluminescent strain of X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae to monitor the progression of disease in leaves nondestructively. Invasion of the pathogen through hydathodes at leaf margins was reduced by applying the strain mixture to the leaves. When the strain mixture was applied directly to wounds created on the leaf margins, the pathogen failed to invade through the wounds. This bacterial community has potential for biological control of anthurium blight. PMID:10049858

  13. Microsatellite markers for Amazon pellona Pellona castelnaeana (Clupeiformes: Pristigasteridae).

    PubMed

    Ximenes, A M; Hernández-Ruz, E J; Machado, V N; Rodrigues, L R R; Ritter, G C S; Farias, I P

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon pellona is one of the few species of Pristigasteridae with recognized commercial value in the Amazon. We isolated 24 and characterized 8 microsatellite loci for this species. The number of alleles ranges from 2-8 per locus. Observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.052-0.823, while expected heterozygosities from 0.052-0.836. These 8 microsatellites are potentially valuable tools for characterizing the levels and distribution of genetic diversity, population structure, and gene flow. They may also be important parameters for the genetic conservation of this species, as well as for its sister taxon Pellona flavipinnis. PMID:26125704

  14. Isolation of Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix strains from iron bacteria communities in Tierra del Fuego wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bertram; Sánchez, Leandro A; Fretschner, Till; Kreps, Gastón; Ferrero, Marcela A; Siñeriz, Faustino; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Sheath-forming iron- and manganese-depositing bacteria belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group (SLG) are widespread in natural and artificial water systems. Known requirements for their growth include the presence of organic substrates and molecular oxygen. High concentrations of reduced iron or manganese, although not necessary for most species, make their growth a noticeable phenomenon. Such microbial communities have been studied mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we present descriptions of diverse ochre-depositing microbial communities in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, using a combined approach of microscopical examination, clone library construction and cultivation focused on SLG bacteria. To date, only few SLG type strains are available. The present work increases the number and diversity of cultivated SLG bacteria by obtaining isolates from biofilms and sediment samples of wetlands in Tierra del Fuego. Thirty isolates were selected based on morphological features such as sheath formation and iron/manganese deposition. Five operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were deduced. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that one OTU is identical to the Leptothrix mobilis Feox-1(T) -sequence while the four remaining OTUs show similarity values related to previously described type strains. Similarity values ranged from 96.5% to 98.8%, indicating possible new species and subspecies. PMID:25098830

  15. A Slippery Slope: Children's Perceptions of Their Role in Environmental Preservation in the Peruvian Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeano, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Despite international attention and attempts to preserve the environmental diversity of the Amazon, it is an accepted fact that those who inhabit the forest must be the ones who preserve it. This article presents an analysis of how children in small rural riverine communities along the Amazon understand the importance of environmental preservation…

  16. Multiplex PCR for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates suspected to represent community-acquired strains.

    PubMed

    Strommenger, B; Braulke, C; Pasemann, B; Schmidt, C; Witte, W

    2008-02-01

    The continuous spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (caMRSA) and the introduction of these highly virulent isolates into hospitals represent increasing threats. The timely recognition of caMRSA strains is crucial for infection control purposes. Thus, we developed a PCR-based assay for the easy and rapid determination of those caMRSA clones that currently are the most prevalent in Germany and Central Europe. This assay was able to correctly identify the majority of the isolates as caMRSA of sequence type 80 (ST80), clonal complex 1 (USA400), and ST8 (USA300). In combination with spa typing-BURP (based upon repeat pattern) analysis and resistance typing, it provides a means for the extensive characterization of suspicious isolates. Thus, this assay represents a reliable tool for monitoring the emergence and spread of different caMRSA clones. The resulting information, in combination with careful interpretation of the epidemiological records, might help to prevent the further spread of those highly virulent caMRSA clones. PMID:18032620

  17. Community interviews task report: Working draft: BWIP (Basalt Waste Isolation Project) Repository Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    The socioeconomic program for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) requires the collection of information about economic, social and cultural conditions, demographic, housing and settlement patterns, and the provision of public services and facilities in order to monitor and assess the impacts of the project on the study area. Much of the information needed by the socioeconomic program is compiled, maintained, and used by officials or staff members of local, regional, state, or tribal agencies or organizations. Because much of this information is prepared for internal use, the documents are often not published or advertised and it can be difficult for researchers to identify many obscure, yet useful, sources of information. In order to identify and gain access to this information, it is often most efficient to talk directly with officials and staff members of pertinent agencies or organizations who may have knowledge of these documents or who may have useful information themselves. Consequently, interviews in the study communities with persons knowledgeable about the socioeconomic or sociocultural characteristics of the area constitute an important source of data for the socioeconomic program. In addition to identifying various data sources, these interviews provide a mechanism for understanding and interpreting those data. Knowledge of specific local conditions is often necessary to correctly interpret quantitative data. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the objectives of the community interviews task and the general methods that will be used in conducting the community interviews. 3 refs.

  18. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc. PMID:20533947

  19. Viruses and bacteria in floodplain lakes along a major Amazon tributary respond to distance to the Amazon River

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rafael M.; Roland, Fábio; Cardoso, Simone J.; Farjalla, Vinícius F.; Bozelli, Reinaldo L.; Barros, Nathan O.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the massive volume of water along the Amazon River, the Amazon tributaries have their water backed up by 100s of kilometers upstream their mouth. This backwater effect is part of the complex hydrodynamics of Amazonian surface waters, which in turn drives the variation in concentrations of organic matter and nutrients, and also regulates planktonic communities such as viruses and bacteria. Viruses and bacteria are commonly tightly coupled to each other, and their ecological role in aquatic food webs has been increasingly recognized. Here, we surveyed viral and bacterial abundances (BAs) in 26 floodplain lakes along the Trombetas River, the largest clear-water tributary of the Amazon River’s north margin. We correlated viral and BAs with temperature, pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity, water transparency, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), phytoplankton abundance, and distance from the lake mouth until the confluence of the Trombetas with the Amazon River. We hypothesized that both bacterial and viral abundances (VAs) would change along a latitudinal gradient, as the backwater effect becomes more intense with increased proximity to the Amazon River; different flood duration and intensity among lakes and waters with contrasting sources would cause spatial variation. Our measurements were performed during the low water period, when floodplain lakes are in their most lake-like conditions. Viral and BAs, DOC, pCO2, and water transparency increased as distance to the Amazon River increased. Most viruses were bacteriophages, as viruses were strongly linked to bacteria, but not to phytoplankton. We suggest that BAs increase in response to DOC quantity and possibly quality, consequently leading to increased VAs. Our results highlight that hydrodynamics plays a key role in the regulation of planktonic viral and bacterial communities in Amazonian floodplain lakes. PMID:25788895

  20. Viruses and bacteria in floodplain lakes along a major Amazon tributary respond to distance to the Amazon River.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rafael M; Roland, Fábio; Cardoso, Simone J; Farjalla, Vinícius F; Bozelli, Reinaldo L; Barros, Nathan O

    2015-01-01

    In response to the massive volume of water along the Amazon River, the Amazon tributaries have their water backed up by 100s of kilometers upstream their mouth. This backwater effect is part of the complex hydrodynamics of Amazonian surface waters, which in turn drives the variation in concentrations of organic matter and nutrients, and also regulates planktonic communities such as viruses and bacteria. Viruses and bacteria are commonly tightly coupled to each other, and their ecological role in aquatic food webs has been increasingly recognized. Here, we surveyed viral and bacterial abundances (BAs) in 26 floodplain lakes along the Trombetas River, the largest clear-water tributary of the Amazon River's north margin. We correlated viral and BAs with temperature, pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity, water transparency, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), phytoplankton abundance, and distance from the lake mouth until the confluence of the Trombetas with the Amazon River. We hypothesized that both bacterial and viral abundances (VAs) would change along a latitudinal gradient, as the backwater effect becomes more intense with increased proximity to the Amazon River; different flood duration and intensity among lakes and waters with contrasting sources would cause spatial variation. Our measurements were performed during the low water period, when floodplain lakes are in their most lake-like conditions. Viral and BAs, DOC, pCO2, and water transparency increased as distance to the Amazon River increased. Most viruses were bacteriophages, as viruses were strongly linked to bacteria, but not to phytoplankton. We suggest that BAs increase in response to DOC quantity and possibly quality, consequently leading to increased VAs. Our results highlight that hydrodynamics plays a key role in the regulation of planktonic viral and bacterial communities in Amazonian floodplain lakes. PMID:25788895

  1. Problem of behavioral plasticity in slave-making Amazon-ant Polyergus rufescens Latr. and in its slave-ants Formica fusca L. and Formica cinerea Mayr.

    PubMed

    Dobrzańska, J

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the natural behavior, expressing adaptation to cohabitation in a community, were observed in the slave-making ants P. rufescens and the slave-species F. fusca and F. cinerea. After a few raids, the initially undirected arousal evoked in the slaves by the amazons' raids, begins to acquire attributes appropriate to the situation, but completely different in both studied slave-species. F. cinerea picks up the pupae abandoned on the nest by the slave-making ants and eventually begins to wrench them away from the amazons arriving with prey. F. fusca, whose nests have openings so narrow that it prevents the mass entry of amazons with prey, begin to enlarge those openings shortly after the amazons return. After a certain number of raids, F. fusca begin to enlarge the openings immediately after the departure of the amazons for the slave-raid. The amazons, on their side, adjust soon to the specific behavior of the given slave-species; in nests with F. fusca, they make use of enlarged openings, carrying their prey through them into the nest; when F. cinerea are the slaves, most of the amazons begin to drop the pupae on the nest, and later even surrender the prey to the slaves who meet them. It is supposed that in all three species, under the influence of specific conditions there occurs the process of learning of new forms of behavior. PMID:749551

  2. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  3. Detection of a novel recombinant strain of norovirus in an African-descendant community from the Amazon region of Brazil in 2008.

    PubMed

    Fumian, Tulio M; Aragão, Glicélia C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Kaiano, Jane H; Siqueira, Jones Anderson M; Soares, Luana S; Linhares, Alexandre C; Gabbay, Yvone B

    2012-12-01

    Noroviruses, a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, are constantly evolving. This ability is reflected in the speed and efficiency with which these viruses spread and remain in the human population. The present study reports the detection of a novel recombination event among norovirus genotypes in Brazil in 2008. A strain detected in a stool sample from a child with norovirus-associated gastroenteritis, residing in an African-descendant semi-closed community of Pará State, was characterized as a novel intergenotype recombinant, GII.7/GII.20, as determined by partial sequencing and SimPlot analysis. PMID:22872050

  4. Genetic survey of an isolated community in Bali, Indonesia. II. Haemoglobin types and red cell isozymes.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Ney, R; Kirk, R L; Blake, N M

    1982-01-01

    316 adults and children from an isolated community of Bali, Indonesia, have been tested for 18 red cell enzyme systems controlled by 24 loci, and haemoglobin. 13 loci were invariant. The other 11 loci showed variations similar to those found previously in Southeast Asian populations. Of special interest is the occurrence of lactate dehydrogenase Calcutta-1 variants, indicating Indian gene admixture, and PGM92, indicating a Melanesian genetic component. A few individuals were CA1 1-3Bali and this is possibly the same as other CA1 1-3 types found in the Philippines and Guam. Nearly 10% were glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient and 2% carried Hb E. A fast electrophoretic variant of G6PD was detected in 5 persons. Two sub-groups of the population were studied. Gene frequencies in the Isolate supported the view that inbreeding and genetic drift have made this sub-group genetically distinct from the non-inbred part of the population. PMID:7152535

  5. Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov., isolated from a human faecal sample from a traditional Peruvian coastal community.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha B; Tito, Raul Y; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; O'Neal, Lindsey; Trujillo-Villaroel, Omar; Marin-Reyes, Luis; Troncoso-Corzo, Luzmila; Guija-Poma, Emilio; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, coccus-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a faecal sample obtained from an individual in a traditional community located off the southern coast of Peru. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed the novel bacterium belonged to the genus Peptoniphilus but showed no particular relationship with any species, demonstrating less than 91 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with all members of the genus. The major cellular fatty acids of the novel isolate were determined to be C10 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 2ω6,9c/anteiso-C18 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 34.4 mol%. End-products of metabolism from peptone-yeast-glucose broth (PYG) were determined to be acetate and butyrate. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results, the organism represents a novel species of the genus Peptoniphilus, for which the name Peptoniphilus catoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M6.X2DT ( = DSM 29874T = CCUG 66798T). PMID:26907921

  6. Biodegradation of Free Phytol by Bacterial Communities Isolated from Marine Sediments under Aerobic and Denitrifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, Jean-François; Bonin, Patricia C.; Volkman, John K.

    1999-01-01

    Biodegradation of (E)-phytol [3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadec-2(E)-en-1-ol] by two bacterial communities isolated from recent marine sediments under aerobic and denitrifying conditions was studied at 20°C. This isoprenoid alcohol is metabolized efficiently by these two bacterial communities via 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one and (E)-phytenic acid. The first step in both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation of (E)-phytol involves the transient production of (E)-phytenal, which in turn can be abiotically converted to 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one. Most of the isoprenoid metabolites identified in vitro could be detected in a fresh sediment core collected at the same site as the sediments used for the incubations. Since (E)-phytenal is less sensitive to abiotic degradation at the temperature of the sediments (15°C), the major part of (E)-phytol appeared to be biodegraded in situ via (E)-phytenic acid. (Z)- and (E)-phytenic acids are present in particularly large quantities in the upper section of the core, and their concentrations quickly decrease with depth in the core. This degradation (which takes place without significant production of phytanic acid) is attributed to the involvement of alternating β-decarboxymethylation and β-oxidation reaction sequences induced by denitrifiers. Despite the low nitrate concentration of marine sediments, denitrifying bacteria seem to play a significant role in the mineralization of (E)-phytol. PMID:10584007

  7. The magnitude of behavioral isolation is affected by characteristics of the mating community

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Gene exchange between species occurs in areas of secondary contact, where two species have the opportunity to hybridize. If heterospecific males are more common than conspecific males, females will experience more encounters with males of other species. These encounters might increase the likelihood of heterospecific matings, and lead to the production of hybrid progeny. I studied the mating behavior of two pairs of sibling species endemic to Africa: Drosophila yakuba/Drosophila santomea and Drosophila simulans/Drosophila sechellia. Drosophila yakuba and D. simulans are cosmopolitan species widely distributed in the African continent, while D. santomea and D. sechellia are island endemics. These pairs of species hybridize in nature and have the potential to exchange genes in natural conditions. I used these two pairs of Drosophila species, and constructed mating communities of different size and different heterospecific:conspecific composition. I found that both the total number of potential mates and the relative frequency of conspecific versus heterospecific males affect female mating decisions in the cosmopolitan species but not in the island endemics. These results suggest that the population characteristics, in which mating occurs, may affect the magnitude of premating isolation. Community composition might thus facilitate, or impair, gene flow between species. PMID:25165530

  8. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  9. Analogical reasoning in amazons.

    PubMed

    Obozova, Tanya; Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Two juvenile orange-winged amazons (Amazona amazonica) were initially trained to match visual stimuli by color, shape, and number of items, but not by size. After learning these three identity matching-to-sample tasks, the parrots transferred discriminative responding to new stimuli from the same categories that had been used in training (other colors, shapes, and numbers of items) as well as to stimuli from a different category (stimuli varying in size). In the critical testing phase, both parrots exhibited reliable relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) behavior, suggesting that they perceived and compared the relationship between objects in the sample stimulus pair to the relationship between objects in the comparison stimulus pairs, even though no physical matches were possible between items in the sample and comparison pairs. The parrots spontaneously exhibited this higher-order relational responding without having ever before been trained on RMTS tasks, therefore joining apes and crows in displaying this abstract cognitive behavior. PMID:26084679

  10. Community of thermoacidophilic and arsenic resistant microorganisms isolated from a deep profile of mine heaps.

    PubMed

    Casas-Flores, S; Gómez-Rodríguez, E Y; García-Meza, J V

    2015-12-01

    Soluble arsenic (As) in acidic feed solution may inhibit the copper (Cu) bioleaching process within mine heaps. To clarify the effect of soluble arsenic on the live biomass and bioxidative activity in heaps, toxicological assays were performed using a synthetic feed solution given by a mine company. The microorganisms had previously been isolated from two heap samples at up to 66 m depth, and cultured using specific media for chemolithotrophic acidophiles (pH 1-2) and moderate thermophiles (48°C), for arsenic tolerance assay. The four media with the highest biomass were selected to assay As-resistance; one culture (Q63h) was chosen to assay biooxidative activity, using a heap sample that contained chalcopyrite and covellite. We found that 0.5 g/L of As does not affect living biomass or biooxidative activity on Cu sulfides, but it dissolves Cu, while As precipitates as arsenic acid (H3AsO4·½H2O). The arsenic tolerant community, as identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, was composed of three main metabolic groups: chemolithotrophs (Leptospirillum, Sulfobacillus); chemolithoheterotrophs and organoheterotrophs as Acidovorax temperans, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, P. mendocina and Sphingomonas spp. Leptospirillum spp. and S. thermosulfidooxidans were the dominant taxa in the Q63-66 cultures from the deepest sample of the oldest, highest-temperature heap. The results indicated arsenic resistance in the microbial community, therefore specific primers were used to amplify ars (arsenic resistance system), aio (arsenite oxidase), or arr (arsenate respiratory reduction) genes from total sample DNA. Presence of arsB genes in S. thermosulfidooxidans in the Q63-66 cultures permits H3AsO4-As(V) detoxification and strengthens the community's response to As. PMID:26283066

  11. Naturally acquired immune responses to malaria vaccine candidate antigens MSP3 and GLURP in Guahibo and Piaroa indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission in most of Latin America can be considered as controlled. In such a scenario, parameters of baseline immunity to malaria antigens are of specific interest with respect to future malaria eradication efforts. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two indigenous population groups in Amazonas/Venezuela. Data from the regional malaria documentation system were extracted and participants from the ethnic groups of the Guahibo (n = 180) and Piaroa (n = 295) were investigated for the presence of Plasmodium parasites and naturally acquired antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum antigens in serum. The GMZ2 vaccine candidate proteins MSP3 and GLURP were chosen as serological markers. Results The incidence of P. falciparum in both communities was found to be less than 2%, and none of the participants harboured P. falciparum at the time of the cross-sectional. Nearly a quarter of the participants (111/475; 23,4%) had positive antibody titres to at least one of the antigens. 53/475 participants (11.2%) were positive for MSP3, and 93/475 participants (19.6%) were positive for GLURP. High positive responses were detected in 36/475 participants (7.6%) and 61/475 participants (12.8%) for MSP3 and GLURP, respectively. Guahibo participants had significantly higher antibody titres than Piaroa participants. Conclusions Considering the low incidence of P. falciparum, submicroscopical infections may explain the comparatively high anti-P. falciparum antibody concentrations. PMID:22335967

  12. Oil Road Effects on the Anuran Community of a High Canopy Tank Bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina) in the Upper Amazon Basin, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Shawn F.; Forstner, Michael R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forest canopies are among the most species-rich terrestrial habitats on earth and one of the remaining relatively unexplored biotic frontiers. Epiphytic bromeliads provide microhabitat for a high diversity of organisms in tropical forest canopies and are considered a keystone resource. A number of amphibians inhabit these phytotelmata, yet their ecological role and status in forest canopies remains unknown. For this study, anurans were collected from an upper canopy tank bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina) at ∼20–45 m (x¯ = 33 m) above the forest floor. Bromeliads were sampled from trees located near trails in undisturbed primary rainforest and oil access roads in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of Amazonian Ecuador. We collected 95 anurans representing 10 species from 160 bromeliads in 32 trees. We used generalized linear mixed models to assess the effects of disturbance and habitat factors on the occupancy and abundance of anurans collected. Bromeliads in forest along oil roads had a lower occupancy and abundance of anurans than those in undisturbed forest, a somewhat unexpected result due to the intactness and quality of forest adjacent to the roads. Recorded habitat variables had no relationship with occupancy or abundance of anurans, and did not differ significantly between treatments. Our findings reveal that even the minimal footprint of natural resource extraction operations, primarily roads, in rainforest environments can have significant negative impacts on the unique upper canopy anuran community. Based on these results, we recommend that natural resource development treat rainforest habitat as an offshore system where roads are not used, employ industry best practice guidelines, and current access roads be protected from colonization and further deforestation. PMID:24416414

  13. Oil road effects on the anuran community of a high canopy tank bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina) in the upper Amazon basin, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Shawn F; Forstner, Michael R J

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forest canopies are among the most species-rich terrestrial habitats on earth and one of the remaining relatively unexplored biotic frontiers. Epiphytic bromeliads provide microhabitat for a high diversity of organisms in tropical forest canopies and are considered a keystone resource. A number of amphibians inhabit these phytotelmata, yet their ecological role and status in forest canopies remains unknown. For this study, anurans were collected from an upper canopy tank bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina) at ∼20-45 m (x¯ = 33 m) above the forest floor. Bromeliads were sampled from trees located near trails in undisturbed primary rainforest and oil access roads in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of Amazonian Ecuador. We collected 95 anurans representing 10 species from 160 bromeliads in 32 trees. We used generalized linear mixed models to assess the effects of disturbance and habitat factors on the occupancy and abundance of anurans collected. Bromeliads in forest along oil roads had a lower occupancy and abundance of anurans than those in undisturbed forest, a somewhat unexpected result due to the intactness and quality of forest adjacent to the roads. Recorded habitat variables had no relationship with occupancy or abundance of anurans, and did not differ significantly between treatments. Our findings reveal that even the minimal footprint of natural resource extraction operations, primarily roads, in rainforest environments can have significant negative impacts on the unique upper canopy anuran community. Based on these results, we recommend that natural resource development treat rainforest habitat as an offshore system where roads are not used, employ industry best practice guidelines, and current access roads be protected from colonization and further deforestation. PMID:24416414

  14. Variance in water chemistry parameters in isolated wetlands of Florida, USA, and relationships with macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighty small isolated wetlands throughout Florida were sampled in 2005 to explore within-site variability of water chemistry parameters and relate water chemistry to macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure. Three samples or measures of water were collected within each si...

  15. A Mouse Click Away: Internet Resources for Students in Crisis in Geographically Isolated or Self-Sequestered Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Juneau Mahan

    2010-01-01

    The impact, incidence, prevalence, and severity of violence and trauma adversely affect students academically, behaviorally, emotionally, and socially. For students residing in geographically isolated or self-sequestered communities, trauma may be exacerbated when school counselors may be unprepared to respond effectively and timely because…

  16. Genetic uniqueness of the Waorani tribe from the Ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, S; Alfonso-Sánchez, M A; Valverde, L; Sánchez, D; Zarrabeitia, M T; Odriozola, A; Martínez-Jarreta, B; de Pancorbo, M M

    2012-06-01

    South America and especially the Amazon basin is known to be home to some of the most isolated human groups in the world. Here, we report on a study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the Waorani from Ecuador, probably the most warlike human population known to date. Seeking to look in more depth at the characterization of the genetic diversity of this Native American tribe, molecular markers from the X and Y chromosomes were also analyzed. Only three different mtDNA haplotypes were detected among the Waorani sample. One of them, assigned to Native American haplogroup A2, accounted for more than 94% of the total diversity of the maternal gene pool. Our results for sex chromosome molecular markers failed to find close genetic kinship between individuals, further emphasizing the low genetic diversity of the mtDNA. Bearing in mind the results obtained for both the analysis of the mtDNA control region and complete mitochondrial genomes, we suggest the existence of a 'Waorani-specific' mtDNA lineage. According to current knowledge on the phylogeny of haplogroup A2, we propose that this lineage could be designated as subhaplogroup A2s. Its wide predominance among the Waorani people might have been conditioned by severe genetic drift episodes resulting from founding events, long-term isolation and a traditionally small population size most likely associated with the striking ethnography of this Amazonian community. In all, the Waorani constitute a fine example of how genetic imprint may mirror ethnopsychology and sociocultural features in human populations. PMID:22234246

  17. Genetic uniqueness of the Waorani tribe from the Ecuadorian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, S; Alfonso-Sánchez, M A; Valverde, L; Sánchez, D; Zarrabeitia, M T; Odriozola, A; Martínez-Jarreta, B; de Pancorbo, M M

    2012-01-01

    South America and especially the Amazon basin is known to be home to some of the most isolated human groups in the world. Here, we report on a study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the Waorani from Ecuador, probably the most warlike human population known to date. Seeking to look in more depth at the characterization of the genetic diversity of this Native American tribe, molecular markers from the X and Y chromosomes were also analyzed. Only three different mtDNA haplotypes were detected among the Waorani sample. One of them, assigned to Native American haplogroup A2, accounted for more than 94% of the total diversity of the maternal gene pool. Our results for sex chromosome molecular markers failed to find close genetic kinship between individuals, further emphasizing the low genetic diversity of the mtDNA. Bearing in mind the results obtained for both the analysis of the mtDNA control region and complete mitochondrial genomes, we suggest the existence of a ‘Waorani-specific' mtDNA lineage. According to current knowledge on the phylogeny of haplogroup A2, we propose that this lineage could be designated as subhaplogroup A2s. Its wide predominance among the Waorani people might have been conditioned by severe genetic drift episodes resulting from founding events, long-term isolation and a traditionally small population size most likely associated with the striking ethnography of this Amazonian community. In all, the Waorani constitute a fine example of how genetic imprint may mirror ethnopsychology and sociocultural features in human populations. PMID:22234246

  18. Rare earth elements in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, M.; Seyler, P.; Benedetti, M. F.; Alves, V. P.; Boaventura, G. R.; Sondag, F.

    2003-05-01

    The rare earth element (REE) concentrations of the dissolved and particulate fractions and bed sediment between Manaus and Santarém in the Amazon River, and in some major tributaries, were evaluated. A very important zone in the Amazon basin, the encontro das aguas area where the Rio Solimões and the Rio Negro meet, was especially sampled. Different size fractions were isolated by ultrafiltration. Water samples were collected at different stages of the mixing. Three groups of waters are distinguished: group I has a low pH (<5·5) and is represented by the Negro basin rivers; group II has alkalinity less than 0·2 meq l-1 and is represented by the Rios Tapajós and Trombetas; group III has high alkalinity (>0·2 meq l-1) and higher pH (>6·5) and is represented by the Madeira basin rivers, the Solimões and the Amazon. The highest dissolved REE concentration is in the Rio Negro and the lowest in the Rio Tapajós (dissolved REEs vary by more than a factor of ten). The solubility of REEs is pH dependent: in river waters with a pH < 6 the Ce concentration is twice that of La, whereas in rivers with a higher pH the concentrations of Ce and La are similar. Dissolved REE concentrations are positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon. Correlations between Fe, Al, and La suggest that La is associated with Al (Fe)-rich organic matter and/or related to dissolved Fe-rich inorganic material. Dissolved REEs normalized to North American shale composite show an enrichment in intermediate/heavy REEs (from Eu to Er), except for the shields rivers (such as Rio Negro and Rio Trombetas). Both of them are depleted in heavy REEs and show a relative Ce enrichment. In contrast, for the Andeans rivers (such as Rio Solimões), light REEs are slightly depleted and a negative Ce relative anomaly occurs. The pattern of the Amazon River at Óbidos confirms the major influence of the Rios Negro and Solimões with REE fractionation. For the Rio Negro, 60 to 70% of REEs are

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation of functional bacteria in a complex microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Berry, James P; Zhu, Di; Wang, Yun; Chen, Yin; Jiang, Bo; Huang, Shi; Langford, Harry; Li, Guanghe; Davison, Paul A; Xu, Jian; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2015-01-01

    Although uncultured microorganisms have important roles in ecosystems, their ecophysiology in situ remains elusive owing to the difficulty of obtaining live cells from their natural habitats. In this study, we employed a novel magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation (MMI) method to recover metabolically active cells of a group of previously uncultured phenol degraders, Burkholderiales spp., from coking plant wastewater biosludge; five other culturable phenol degraders—Rhodococcus sp., Chryseobacterium sp. and three different Pseudomonas spp.—were also isolated from the same biosludge using traditional methods. The kinetics of phenol degradation by MMI-recovered cells (MRCs) was similar to that of the original sludge. Stable isotope probing (SIP) and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA from the ‘heavy' DNA (13C-DNA) fractions indicated that Burkholderiales spp. were the key phenol degraders in situ in the biosludge, consistent with the results of MRCs. Single-cell Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to probe individual bacteria in the MRCs obtained from the SIP experiment and showed that 79% of them were fully 13C-labelled. Biolog assays on the MRCs revealed the impact of various carbon and nitrogen substrates on the efficiency of phenol degradation in the wastewater treatment plant biosludge. Specifically, hydroxylamine, a metabolite of ammonia oxidisation, but not nitrite, nitrate or ammonia, inhibited phenol degradation in the biosludge. Our results provided a novel insight into the occasional abrupt failure events that occur in the wastewater treatment plant. This study demonstrated that MMI is a powerful tool to recover live and functional cells in situ from a complex microbial community to enable further characterisation of their physiology. PMID:25191996

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation of functional bacteria in a complex microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Berry, James P; Zhu, Di; Wang, Yun; Chen, Yin; Jiang, Bo; Huang, Shi; Langford, Harry; Li, Guanghe; Davison, Paul A; Xu, Jian; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2015-03-01

    Although uncultured microorganisms have important roles in ecosystems, their ecophysiology in situ remains elusive owing to the difficulty of obtaining live cells from their natural habitats. In this study, we employed a novel magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation (MMI) method to recover metabolically active cells of a group of previously uncultured phenol degraders, Burkholderiales spp., from coking plant wastewater biosludge; five other culturable phenol degraders-Rhodococcus sp., Chryseobacterium sp. and three different Pseudomonas spp.-were also isolated from the same biosludge using traditional methods. The kinetics of phenol degradation by MMI-recovered cells (MRCs) was similar to that of the original sludge. Stable isotope probing (SIP) and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA from the 'heavy' DNA ((13)C-DNA) fractions indicated that Burkholderiales spp. were the key phenol degraders in situ in the biosludge, consistent with the results of MRCs. Single-cell Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to probe individual bacteria in the MRCs obtained from the SIP experiment and showed that 79% of them were fully (13)C-labelled. Biolog assays on the MRCs revealed the impact of various carbon and nitrogen substrates on the efficiency of phenol degradation in the wastewater treatment plant biosludge. Specifically, hydroxylamine, a metabolite of ammonia oxidisation, but not nitrite, nitrate or ammonia, inhibited phenol degradation in the biosludge. Our results provided a novel insight into the occasional abrupt failure events that occur in the wastewater treatment plant. This study demonstrated that MMI is a powerful tool to recover live and functional cells in situ from a complex microbial community to enable further characterisation of their physiology. PMID:25191996

  1. Interconnectivity vs. isolation of prokaryotic communities in European deep-sea mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachiadaki, M. G.; Kormas, K. A.

    2013-05-01

    During the past two decades, European cold seep ecosystems have attracted the scientific interest and to date there are several studies which have investigated the community structure and biodiversity of individual sites. In order to gain a better insight into the biology, biodiversity, and biogeography of seep-associated microbial communities along Europe's continental margins, a comparative approach was applied in the present work. By exploiting the publicly available data on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, Gulf of Cádiz and the eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes/pockmarks (Anaximander area and Nile Fan), we investigated the prokaryotic biological components connecting these geographically isolated systems. The construction of interaction networks for both archaeal and bacterial shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) among the different sites, revealed the presence of persistent OTUs, which can be considered as "key-players". One archaeal OTU (HQ588641) belonging to the ANME-3 group and one δ-Proteobacteria (HQ588562) were found in all five investigated areas. Other Archaea OTUs shared between four sites or less, belonged to the ANME-2c, -2a, MBG-D, -B and Thaumarchaeota. All other shared Bacteria belonged to the δ- and γ-Proteobacteria, with the exception of one JS1 affiliate OTU. The distribution of the majority of the shared OTUs seems to be restricted in cold seeps, mud volcanoes and other marine methane-rich environments. Although the investigated sites were connected through a small number of OTUs, these microorganisms hold central ecophysiological roles in these sediments, namely methane- and sulfur-mediated mineralization.

  2. Patents on periphery of the Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Emanoel G; Araújo, José R G; Monroe, Paulo H M; de O Nascimento, Ivaneide; Aguiar, Alana C F

    2009-06-01

    In the humid tropics, on the edges of the Amazon forest, the technological challenges to establishing and maintaining productive and sustainable agricultural systems have yet to be overcome. The groups involved in agriculture in the north of Brazil still engage in the practice of slash and burn in order to prepare and fertilize the soil. This produces negative effects for the local and global environment, without the counter-effect of providing social benefits to rural communities. Whether this process continues is of fundamental importance to many countries because it means that slash and burn agriculture is advancing on the Amazon rainforest, with a negative effect on every dimension of national policy. Beyond social political problems the biggest challenge for researchers in the field of tropical agriculture is to offer technological alternatives that can sustain agriculture in soils derived from sedimentary rocks that have been subjected to a high degree of weathering. In this article patented information is also discussed. Experiments undertaken in this region recommend taking advantage of the rapid growth of plants in the tropics. We aimed at proposing a suitable alternative system for a sustainable soil management in the particular conditions of humid tropics, named as "no-till in alley cropping using tree leguminous mulch." This system offers the advantages of: bringing together, in the same space and at the same time, the processes of cultivation and the regeneration of soil fertility. PMID:20653534

  3. Spatial isolation and environmental factors drive distinct bacterial and archaeal communities in different types of petroleum reservoirs in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Xie, Jinxia; Zeng, Bing; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of microbial communities and their drivers in petroleum reservoir environments, we performed pyrosequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA, derived from 20 geographically separated water-flooding reservoirs, and two reservoirs that had not been flooded, in China. The results indicated that distinct underground microbial communities inhabited the different reservoirs. Compared with the bacteria, archaeal alpha-diversity was not strongly correlated with the environmental variables. The variation of the bacterial and archaeal community compositions was affected synthetically, by the mining patterns, spatial isolation, reservoir temperature, salinity and pH of the formation brine. The environmental factors explained 64.22% and 78.26% of the total variance for the bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively. Despite the diverse community compositions, shared populations (48 bacterial and 18 archaeal genera) were found and were dominant in most of the oilfields. Potential indigenous microorganisms, including Carboxydibrachium, Thermosinus, and Neptunomonas, were only detected in a reservoir that had not been flooded with water. This study indicates that: 1) the environmental variation drives distinct microbial communities in different reservoirs; 2) compared with the archaea, the bacterial communities were highly heterogeneous within and among the reservoirs; and 3) despite the community variation, some microorganisms are dominant in multiple petroleum reservoirs. PMID:26838035

  4. Spatial isolation and environmental factors drive distinct bacterial and archaeal communities in different types of petroleum reservoirs in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Xie, Jinxia; Zeng, Bing; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of microbial communities and their drivers in petroleum reservoir environments, we performed pyrosequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA, derived from 20 geographically separated water-flooding reservoirs, and two reservoirs that had not been flooded, in China. The results indicated that distinct underground microbial communities inhabited the different reservoirs. Compared with the bacteria, archaeal alpha-diversity was not strongly correlated with the environmental variables. The variation of the bacterial and archaeal community compositions was affected synthetically, by the mining patterns, spatial isolation, reservoir temperature, salinity and pH of the formation brine. The environmental factors explained 64.22% and 78.26% of the total variance for the bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively. Despite the diverse community compositions, shared populations (48 bacterial and 18 archaeal genera) were found and were dominant in most of the oilfields. Potential indigenous microorganisms, including Carboxydibrachium, Thermosinus, and Neptunomonas, were only detected in a reservoir that had not been flooded with water. This study indicates that: 1) the environmental variation drives distinct microbial communities in different reservoirs; 2) compared with the archaea, the bacterial communities were highly heterogeneous within and among the reservoirs; and 3) despite the community variation, some microorganisms are dominant in multiple petroleum reservoirs.

  5. Projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. C. D.; Sorribas, M.; Melack, J. M.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Bravo, J. M.; Beighley, E.; Forsberg, B. R.; Costa, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and related effects on the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin can have major impacts on human and ecological communities, transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the regional hydrological model MGB-IPH coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model's capability to represent physical processes over the Amazon was demonstrated in previous validation against multi in situ and remotely sensed observations. Future climate projections for the 2070 to 2099 time period were obtained by selecting five climate models from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent Amazon climate. The climate projections present large uncertainty and results from different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes in total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, model projections generally show better agreement with wetter (drier) conditions over western (eastern) portions of the Amazon basin. Results indicate increased mean and maximum river discharge for large rivers draining the Andes in northwestern Amazon, with increased mean and maximum discharge and inundation extent over Peruvian floodplains and Solimões River in western and central Amazonia. Decreased river discharges (mainly in the dry season) are projected for eastern basins, and decreased inundation extent at low water period in the central and lower Amazon.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of prulifloxacin in comparison with other fluoroquinolones against community-acquired urinary and respiratory pathogens isolated in Greece.

    PubMed

    Karageorgopoulos, D E; Maraki, S; Vatopoulos, A C; Samonis, G; Schito, G C; Falagas, M E

    2013-11-01

    Prulifloxacin, the prodrug of ulifloxacin, is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone rather recently introduced in certain European countries. We compared the antimicrobial potency of ulifloxacin with that of other fluoroquinolones against common urinary and respiratory bacterial pathogens. The microbial isolates were prospectively collected between January 2007 and May 2008 from patients with community-acquired infections in Greece. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin (for respiratory isolates only), and ulifloxacin using the E-test method. The binary logarithms of the MICs [log2(MICs)] were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. A total of 409 isolates were studied. Ulifloxacin had the lowest geometric mean MIC for the 161 Escherichia coli, 59 Proteus mirabilis, and 22 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates, the second lowest geometric mean MIC for the 38 Streptococcus pyogenes respiratory isolates (after moxifloxacin), and the third lowest geometric mean MIC for the 114 Haemophilus influenzae and the 15 Moraxella catarrhalis respiratory isolates (after ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin). Compared with levofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against E. coli (p < 0.001), P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p < 0.001), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001). Compared with ciprofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p = 0.008), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001), but higher log2(MICs) against H. influenzae (p < 0.001) and M. catarrhalis (p = 0.001). In comparison with other clinically relevant fluoroquinolones, ulifloxacin had the most potent antimicrobial activity against the community-acquired urinary isolates studied and very good activity against the respiratory isolates. PMID:23686506

  7. Mixing in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2010-05-01

    The research area of this work is located at the estuary of the Amazon River (Brazil), near the river mouth. The results of air movement analysis on the surface atmospheric circulation over the Mouth of the Amazonas River, salinity and temperature measures as well as measurements of currents, carried out along a longitudinal section in the navigation canal region of the Northern Bar of the Amazon River (Barra Norte do Rio Amazonas) in June 2006, during the river flood season in the quadrature tide. The dynamics effects affect hydrodynamic,meteorological and hydrographical parameters at the river mouth. The conclusion drawn include that: a) the saline wedge-type stratification can be detected approximately 100km away from the mouth of the Amazon River during the end of the rainy season in the quadrature tide; b) probably, at the Amazon estuary the quadrature entrainment processes are dominant and they are the ones responsible for increased salinity detected in the surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is not so important. c) The large flow of fresh water from the Amazon River at the end of the rainy season implies the displacement of the saline front position over the internal Amazon continental platform, and d) The tidal wave shows a positive asymmetry in the canal, with floods lasting less than in the ebb tide. This asymmetry decreases towards the ocean, eventually becoming reversed in the presence of a saline wedge. The speeds, however, have a negative asymmetry, with more intense ebb tides, due to the river flow and is more evident by the existence of quadrature tides.

  8. The DURAMAZ indicator system: a cross-disciplinary comparative tool for assessing ecological and social changes in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Le Tourneau, François-Michel; Marchand, Guillaume; Greissing, Anna; Nasuti, Stéphanie; Droulers, Martine; Bursztyn, Marcel; Léna, Philippe; Dubreuil, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    During the last 20 years, the Amazon region has been at the same time a place of massive ecological and social change and a laboratory of experiments aimed at promoting sustainable development. Policies and project initiatives involving diverse social groups and environmental contexts have been implemented across the region. They have resulted in mixed outcomes and trade-offs between social and environmental dimensions, making their impact at the local level difficult to assess and their successes difficult to generalize. The objective of the DURAMAZ research project was to provide a better understanding of these impacts. It produced a multi-dimensional indicator system designed to allow a holistic view of sustainable development at local and subregional levels and a comparative perspective across 12 research sites, from an isolated indigenous village to smallholders and agribusiness areas in Mato Grosso. The results of the first observation campaign (2007–2009) show that despite the claim of promoting sustainable development, no project was able to untie the ‘Gordian knot’ of development in the Amazon. Communities continue to face the old dilemma of either enjoying a preserved ecosystem but enduring adverse life conditions, or enjoying better living at the expense of forest cover. Another finding is that the subregional context is very important in shaping the impacts of regional policies. Thus, the same policy will not always have the same effect, depending on in which context it is applied. Finally, we found that cultural factors and a sense of place play a more important role than economic factors when it comes to the way people evaluate their own situation. This research provides the basis for a second phase of the project (2012–2016) in which we will continue to expand our sample and to refine our methodologies with the goal of transforming the initiative into a network of observatories of sustainable development in the Amazon. PMID:23610180

  9. Keynote Address: Use of telecommunications to meet health needs of rural, remote and isolated communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Max

    1990-06-01

    Difficulties in delivering health and education services to isolated remote and underserviced areas have stimulated the application of telecommunications including satellite and ground-based systems to meet health care and education needs. Over a 12-year period Memorial University Telemedicine Centre has developed a number of telemedicine and distance education projects in the Province of Newfoundland in other Canadian provinces and internationally. Early experiences included a one-way television two-way voice system linking remote provincial sites to St. John''s by satellite. Following this emphasis was placed on the development of a major Province-wide terrestrially based dedicated 4-wire audio teleconference system which now has five separate divisions and an associated 30-port 2-wire teleconference bridge. The Teleconference System (TCS) is used by about 50 user groups in the fields of health education and community programming in 1989. Medical and educational data are transmitted using telewriters slow scan television and electroencephalograph and electrocardiograph transmission equipment. Research and development activities have included an offshore satellite telemedicine project several teleradiology experiments using slow scan and intercontinental X-ray transmission trials. International projects have included (1) satellite links to East Africa (Kenya and Canada/- European satellite trial using the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite Olympus (hybrid 14/12 and 20/30 Geighz) which was launched in July 1989 (2) the use of a low orbit packet radio satellite in cooperation with SatelLife (an international telemedicine organization) to link Memorial University in Newfoundland with and Uganda in order to support remote health care endeavours (3) a provincial teleradiology experiment using digital slow scan equipment. This presentation will also discuss guidelines followed in the development of a successful telemedicine project. 1.

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cerezer, Vinicius Godoy; Pasternak, Jacyr; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired. PMID:24818127

  11. Structure and dynamics of phytoplankton in an Amazon lake, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ise de Goreth; Moura, Ariadne do Nascimento; Dantas, Enio Wocyli; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria do Carmo

    2010-12-01

    Natural lake systems represent important reservoirs for residential water supply, fish production, recreational activities and enjoyment of their natural beauty. Nevertheless, human impacts may affect their health status resulting in degradation and loss of biodiversity. The aim of the present study was to obtain data on the health status of a natural lake located in an indigenous reservation in the Brazilian Amazon, using the phytoplankton community changes along the rainy (June) and dry (November) seasons of 2006. We collected water (temperature, pH, Secchi depth and conductivity) and phytoplankton samples from the subsurface, middle of the water column, and approximately 30 cm above the bottom, over 24-hour sampling periods, from a central station in the lake. Samples taken from biotic and abiotic variables were correlated using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Results showed that the lake exhibited high temperatures in both seasons, and showed thermal stratification only during the rainy season. Dissolved oxygen exhibited a clinograde pattern in the rainy season and high oxygen in the hypolimnion in the dry season. In the rainy season, the water near the bottom was acidic, turbid and had a greater concentration of phosphorus. Dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, nitrite, total phosphorus and total dissolved phosphorus exhibited diel variations in the rainy season, whereas water temperature, dissolved oxygen, total nitrogen and total dissolved phosphorus exhibited significant differences between hours of the day in the dry season. The phytoplankton was represented by 39 taxa, and Chlorophyta showed the greatest species richness, totaling 25 taxa. Among Chlorophyta, desmids were the most diverse, accounting 52%. Bacillariophyta (nine species) was the second most diverse group. Cyanophyta was represented by three species, including Merismopedia tenuissima, the most abundant taxon. Despite the occurrence of taxa that indicate organic pollution, their biomass

  12. Biodegradation of Triton X-100 and its primary metabolites by a bacterial community isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wyrwas, Bogdan; Dymaczewski, Zbysław; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Szymański, Andrzej; Frańska, Magdalena; Kruszelnicka, Izabela; Ginter-Kramarczyk, Dobrochna; Cyplik, Paweł; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2013-10-15

    A set of studies was carried using a continuous flow biodegradation unit in order to isolate a microbial community capable of efficient and complete utilization of octylphenol ethoxylates from activated sludge. Increasing concentrations of Triton X-100 (in the range of 1-1000 mg/l) were applied over a time period of 35 days in order to select microorganisms, which exhibit high tolerance towards this surfactant. The fate of the surfactant and its primary degradation products was assessed by HPLC/MS. It was observed that even small doses of the surfactant contributed to the disruption of the activated sludge, due to adsorption of primary Triton X-100 metabolites (octylphenol and short-chained ethoxylates) on the cells, although the long-chain octylphenol ethoxylates were efficiently degraded during the isolation process. The toxicity assessment of octylphenol as well as octylphenol di- and monoethoxylates towards activated sludge allowed for determination of EC50 values (8 and 55 mg/l, respectively). The identification of the residual microorganisms revealed the presence of Acinetobacter junii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Alcaligenes spp., Pseudomonas fluorescens and Sphingomonas capsulata. The isolated community exhibited a high resistance towards Triton X-100 and was capable of growth even at 10,000 mg/l, with the highest specific growth rate (0.47 h(-1)) observed at 4000 mg/l. Under aerobic conditions both octylphenol and the short-chained ethoxylates were completely degraded while no toxic effect towards the isolated bacterial community was observed. PMID:23770380

  13. Oil and Gas Projects in the Western Amazon: Threats to Wilderness, Biodiversity, and Indigenous Peoples

    PubMed Central

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Pimm, Stuart L.; Keane, Brian; Ross, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Background The western Amazon is the most biologically rich part of the Amazon basin and is home to a great diversity of indigenous ethnic groups, including some of the world's last uncontacted peoples living in voluntary isolation. Unlike the eastern Brazilian Amazon, it is still a largely intact ecosystem. Underlying this landscape are large reserves of oil and gas, many yet untapped. The growing global demand is leading to unprecedented exploration and development in the region. Methodology/Principal Findings We synthesized information from government sources to quantify the status of oil development in the western Amazon. National governments delimit specific geographic areas or “blocks” that are zoned for hydrocarbon activities, which they may lease to state and multinational energy companies for exploration and production. About 180 oil and gas blocks now cover ∼688,000 km2 of the western Amazon. These blocks overlap the most species-rich part of the Amazon. We also found that many of the blocks overlap indigenous territories, both titled lands and areas utilized by peoples in voluntary isolation. In Ecuador and Peru, oil and gas blocks now cover more than two-thirds of the Amazon. In Bolivia and western Brazil, major exploration activities are set to increase rapidly. Conclusions/Significance Without improved policies, the increasing scope and magnitude of planned extraction means that environmental and social impacts are likely to intensify. We review the most pressing oil- and gas-related conservation policy issues confronting the region. These include the need for regional Strategic Environmental Impact Assessments and the adoption of roadless extraction techniques. We also consider the conflicts where the blocks overlap indigenous peoples' territories. PMID:18716679

  14. Genetic variability in three Amazon parrot species.

    PubMed

    Lopes, I F; Del Lama, M A; Del Lama, S N

    2007-12-01

    Parrots of the genus Amazona are among the most threatened species of the Order Pscittaciformes. This work describes allozyme polymorphisms in three Amazon parrot species--the Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva), the Orange-winged Amazon (Amazona amazonica), and the Festive Amazon (Amazona festiva) -, and provides useful data for the evaluation of their genetic variability. We electrophoretically analyzed blood samples from 68 wild-caught individuals, maintained in captivity in three Brazilian zoos. Eight of the ten studied enzyme loci exhibited polymorphism. Glucosephosphate isomerase (Gpi) proved to be a diagnostic locus for the identification of these Amazon species. The expected average heterozygosity of the Blue-fronted Amazon (0.060) differed significantly from the expected heterozygosities of the Orange-winged Amazon and the Festive Amazon (0.040 and 0.039, respectively). This result was discussed as a consequence of hybridization between two geographic A. aestiva subspecies, and alternatively as a particular trait of this species. Genetic variability of the Blue-fronted Amazon compared to birds in general is not low on a species-wide level, despite the fact that this parrot is one of the most illegally traded species. Allozyme analysis proved to be an useful tool in monitoring the genetic variation within the genus Amazona and can be applied in the management program of other threatened species of this genus. PMID:18278355

  15. Prevalence of antibody to human T cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 among aboriginal groups inhabiting northern Argentina and the Amazon region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Medeot, S; Nates, S; Recalde, A; Gallego, S; Maturano, E; Giordano, M; Serra, H; Reategui, J; Cabezas, C

    1999-04-01

    We carried out a seroepidemiologic survey to define the prevalence of human T cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) infections among aboriginal populations from isolated regions of northern Argentina and the Amazon region of Peru. Antibodies against HTLV were measured with agglutination tests and confirmed with by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blotting. Five (6.94%) of 72 samples from the Tobas Indians in Argentina were positive by the IFA; two samples were typed as HTLV-1 (2.78%), two as HTLV-2 (2.78%), and one (1.39%) could not be typed because it had similar antibody titers against both viruses. No positive samples were found among 84 Andinos Puneños and 47 Matacos Wichis Indians. Seroprevalences of 2.50% (1 of 40) and 1.43% (1 of 70) for HTLV-1 were observed among Wayku and San Francisco communities in the Amazon region of Peru, and seroprevalences of 4.54% (1 of 22) and 2.38% (1 of 42) for HTLV-2 were observed among Boca Colorada and Galilea communities. No serologic evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found among the Indians tested. These results indicated the presence of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in the indigenous populations of Argentina and Peru. Moreover, the lack of HIV infection indicates that the virus has probably not yet been introduced into these populations. PMID:10348238

  16. Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance Among Community Derived Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Using Urine Sample: A Study From Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ayush; Kapil, Arti; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Misra, Puneet; Rai, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite world-wide evidence of increased antibiotic resistance, there is scarce data on antibiotic resistance in community settings. One of the reason being difficulty in collection of biological specimen (traditionally stool) in community from apparently healthy individuals. Hence, finding an alternative specimen that is easier to obtain in a community setting or in large scale surveys for the purpose, is crucial. We conducted this study to explore the feasibility of using urine samples for deriving community based estimates of antibiotic resistance and to estimate the magnitude of resistance among urinary isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia against multiple antibiotics in apparently healthy individuals residing in a rural community of Haryana, North India. Materials and Methods Eligible individuals were apparently healthy, aged 18 years or older. Using the health management information system (HMIS) of Ballabgarh Health Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), sampling frame was prepared. Potential individuals were identified using simple random sampling. Random urine sample was collected in a sterile container and transported to laboratory under ambient condition. Species identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing for Enterobacteriaceae was done using Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI) 2012 guidelines. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae, Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae, and Carbapenem producing Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) were identified from the urine samples. Results A total of 433 individuals participated in the study (non-response rate – 13.4%), out of which 58 (13.4%) were positive for Enterobacteriaceae, 8.1% for E. coli and 5.3% for K. pneumoniae. Resistance against penicillin (amoxicillin/ampicillin) for E. coli and K. pneumoniae was 62.8% and 100.0% respectively. Isolates resistant to co-trimoxazole were 5.7% and 0.0% respectively. None of the isolates

  17. Microbial communities in the saturated groundwater environment I: Methods of isolation and characterization of heterotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kölbel-Boelke, J; Tienken, B; Nehrkorn, A

    1988-07-01

    In this paper we present a method of isolation and morphological and physiological characterization of groundwater bacteria based on numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis, and using a miniaturized test system (microtiter plates). Bacteria were isolated randomly on P-agar, and each strain was characterized in regard to 155 features. The media for biochemical differentiation are listed as well as methods of morphological discrimination. 246 strains of heterotrophic and oligotrophic bacteria, isolated from five water samples from different depths of the saturated groundwater area, were used for optimizing media and test reactions. PMID:24201530

  18. Genetic survey of an isolated community in Bali, Indonesia. I. Blood groups, serum proteins and hepatitis B serology.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Ney, R; Grimm, W; Hope, S L; Kirk, R L; Blake, N M; Narendra, I B; Toha, A

    1982-01-01

    320 adults and children of an isolated community of Bali, Indonesia, have been tested for blood groups ABO, Rh, MNS, P, Lewis, Duffy, Kell, for haptoglobin and transferrin and for hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies. Phenotype distribution and gene frequencies are given for the total population tested and for two subgroups representative of the inbred population of the isolate and of the non-inbred part of the population. Significant differences between the two subgroups show a clear genetic drift in the inbred population. The study brings biological support to the ethnological hypothesis of population migrations in this area. Tests for hepatitis B surface antigen reveal a lower prevalence of the disease than in most other south-east Asian populations. PMID:7068159

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Escherichia coli isolates as agents of community-acquired urinary tract infection (2008–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Nisel; Ağuş, Neval; Bayram, Arzu; Şamlıoğlu, Pınar; Şirin, M. Cem; Derici, Yeşer Karaca; Hancı, Sevgi Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most frequently seen community-acquired infections worldwide. E. coli causes 90% of urinary system infections. To guide the empirical therapy, the resistance pattern of E. coli responsible for community-acquired UTI was evaluated throughout a seven-year period in this study. Material and methods The urine cultures of patients with urinary tract infections admitted to outpatient clinics between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2014 were analyzed. Presence of ≥105 colony-forming units/mL in urine culture media was considered as significant for UTI. Isolated bacteria were identified by standard laboratory techniques or automated system VITEK2 (BioMerieux, France) and BD PhoenixTM 100 (BD, USA), as required. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. Results A total of 13281 uropathogens were isolated. Overall E. coli accounted for 8975 (67%) of all isolates. Resistance rates of E. coli to antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: ampicillin 66.9%, cefazolin 30.9%, cefuroxime 30.9%, ceftazidime 14.9%, cefotaxime 28%, cefepime 12%, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid 36.9%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SXT) 20%, ciprofloxacin 49.9%, amikacin 0.3%, gentamycin 24%, nitrofurantoin 0.9%, and fosfomycin 4.3%. There was no resistance to imipenem nor meropenem. The frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli strains was 24%. Conclusion It is concluded that fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin are appropriate empirical therapy for community-acquired UTI empirical therapy, but the fluoroquinolones and the TMP-SXT shall not be used in the emprical treatment of UTI at this stage. In conclusion, as resistance rates show regional differences, it is necessary to regularly examine regional resistance rates to determine the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment and national antibiotic usage policies must be reorganized

  20. Isolation of genomic DNA suitable for community analysis from mature trees adapted to arid environment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Harish; Rai, Manoj Kumar; Phulwaria, Mahendra; Shekhawat, Narpat Singh

    2011-11-10

    Isolation of intact and pure genomic DNA (gDNA) is essential for many molecular biology applications. It is difficult to isolate pure DNA from mature trees of hot and dry desert regions because of the accumulation of high level of polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, tannins etc. We hereby report the standardized protocol for the isolation and purification of gDNA from seven ecologically and medically important tree species of Combretaceae viz. Anogeissus (Anogeissus sericea var. nummularia, Anogeissus pendula, and Anogeissus latifolia) and Terminalia (Terminalia arjuna, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia catappa and Terminalia chebula). This method involves (i) washing the sample twice with Triton buffer (2%) then (ii) isolation of gDNA by modified-CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) method employing a high concentration (4%) of PVP (Polyvinylpyrrolidone) and 50mM ascorbic acid, and (iii) purification of this CTAB-isolated gDNA by spin-column. gDNA isolated by modified CTAB or spin-column alone were not found suitable for PCR amplification. The Triton washing step is also critical. The quality of DNA was determined by the A(260)/A(280) absorbance ratio. gDNA was also observed for its intactness by running on 0.8% agarose gel. The suitability of extracted DNA for PCR was tested by amplification with RAPD primers, which was successful. Further, rbcLa (barcoding gene) was amplified and sequenced to check the quality of extracted gDNA for its downstream applications. PMID:21827837

  1. Crop damage of Eriotheca gracilipes (Bombacaceae) by the Blue-Fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva, Psittacidae), in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Ragusa-Netto, J

    2014-11-01

    Seed predation has major effects on the reproductive success of individuals, spatial patterns of populations, genetic variability, interspecific interactions and ultimately in the diversity of tree communities. At a Brazilian savanna, I evaluated the proportional crop loss of Eriotheca gracilipes due the Blue-Fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) during a fruiting period. Also, I analyzed the relationship between proportional crop loss to Amazons and both fruit crop size and the distance from the nearest damaged conspecific. Trees produced from 1 to 109 fruits, so that Amazons foraged more often on trees bearing larger fruit crop size, while seldom visited less productive trees. Moreover, the relationship between fruit crop sizes and the number of depredated fruits was significant. However, when only damaged trees were assessed, I found a negative and significant relation between fruit crop size and proportional crop loss to Blue-Fronted Amazons. Taking into account this as a measure more directly related to the probability of seed survival, a negative density dependent effect emerged. Also, Amazons similarly damaged the fruit crops of either close or distant neighboring damaged trees. Hence, in spite of Blue-Fronted Amazons searched for E. gracilipes bearing large fruit crops, they were swamped due to the presence of more fruits than they could eat. Moderate seed predation by Blue-Fronted Amazons either at trees with large fruit crops or in areas where fruiting trees were aggregated implies in an enhanced probability of E. gracilipes seed survival and consequent regeneration success. PMID:25627593

  2. Understory Bird Communities in Amazonian Rainforest Fragments: Species Turnover through 25 Years Post-Isolation in Recovering Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Philip C.; Johnson, Erik I.; Bierregaard, Richard O.; Lovejoy, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Inferences about species loss following habitat conversion are typically drawn from short-term surveys, which cannot reconstruct long-term temporal dynamics of extinction and colonization. A long-term view can be critical, however, to determine the stability of communities within fragments. Likewise, landscape dynamics must be considered, as second growth structure and overall forest cover contribute to processes in fragments. Here we examine bird communities in 11 Amazonian rainforest fragments of 1–100 ha, beginning before the fragments were isolated in the 1980s, and continuing through 2007. Using a method that accounts for imperfect detection, we estimated extinction and colonization based on standardized mist-net surveys within discreet time intervals (1–2 preisolation samples and 4–5 post-isolation samples). Between preisolation and 2007, all fragments lost species in an area-dependent fashion, with loss of as few as <10% of preisolation species from 100-ha fragments, but up to 70% in 1-ha fragments. Analysis of individual time intervals revealed that the 2007 result was not due to gradual species loss beginning at isolation; both extinction and colonization occurred in every time interval. In the last two samples, 2000 and 2007, extinction and colonization were approximately balanced. Further, 97 of 101 species netted before isolation were detected in at least one fragment in 2007. Although a small subset of species is extremely vulnerable to fragmentation, and predictably goes extinct in fragments, developing second growth in the matrix around fragments encourages recolonization in our landscapes. Species richness in these fragments now reflects local turnover, not long-term attrition of species. We expect that similar processes could be operating in other fragmented systems that show unexpectedly low extinction. PMID:21731616

  3. Characteristics of the community-genotype sequence type 72 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates that underlie their persistence in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ji-Young; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-06-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone ST72, known as a major community-associated MRSA in Korea, has emerged as an important pathogen in hospitals. To understand bacterial properties that underlie transformation of this clone into a nosocomial pathogen, we compared characteristics of the community-genotype ST72 MRSA isolates with those of ST5 and ST239 MRSA, which have been predominant nosocomial MRSA clones in Korea. Several genes associated with adhesion and virulence were absent or rarely found in ST72 isolates. Many ST72 isolates (70.1%) belonged to agr group I, but the agr group of other ST72 isolates could not be determined. As indicated by d-hemolysin production, ST72 isolates expressed fully functional agr, whereas agr dysfunction was observed in ST5 and ST239 isolates. In the biofilm formation assay, no upregulation of biofilm-forming activity of ST72 MRSA was detected. However, ST72 isolates demonstrated persistence under hypotonic and desiccating conditions (survival rates 72.3% and 33.9%, respectively), which was similar to characteristics of ST5 or ST239 isolates. ST72- MRSA isolates showed low virulence, but properties of their functional agr system could facilitate their spread in hospitals. In conclusion, tolerance to stressful environments, e.g., hypotonic and dry conditions, may also contribute to survival of the community-associated MRSA clones in healthcare facilities. PMID:27225462

  4. Development of a Community Commitment Scale with Cross-sectional Survey Validation for Preventing Social Isolation in Older Japanese People

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly social isolation could be prevented by facilitating communication or mutual helping at the neighborhood level. The helping of elderly neighbors by local volunteers may relate to their community commitment (CC), but ways to measure CC have not been identified. The aim of the present study was to develop a Community Commitment Scale (CCS) to measure psychological sense of belonging and socializing in the community among local volunteers, for research in prevention of elderly social isolation. We also tested the CCS in a general population of the elderly. Methods A pilot test of 266 Japanese urban residents was conducted to examine face validity for 24 identified items, of which 12 items were selected for the CCS, based on a 4-point Likert-type scale. The CCS was developed via self-report questionnaires to 859 local volunteers in two suburban cities and to 3484 randomly sampled general residents aged 55 years or older living in one of the cities. To assess concurrent validity, data were collected using the Brief Sense of Community Scale (Peterson; 2008) and two types of single questions on self-efficacy for helping elderly neighbors. Results Item analysis and factor analysis identified 8 items, which were classified between two datasets under the domains of “belonging” and “socializing” in the local volunteers and the general residents. Cronbach’s alpha (which conveyed the internal consistency of the CCS) was 0.75 in local volunteers and 0.78 in general residents. The correlation coefficients between the scores of the CCS and BSCS were 0.54 for local volunteers and 0.62 for general residents. ANOVA comparing the CCS between the confidence levels of the two types of single question of self-efficacy on helping elderly neighbors showed a strong relationship in the volunteers and residents. Conclusions These results demonstrate acceptable internal consistency and concurrent validity for the CCS, with the two dimensions “belonging” and

  5. Integrating Language Documentation, Language Preservation, and Linguistic Research: Working with the Kokamas from the Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the role of speech community members on a series of interconnected projects to document, study and maintain Kokama, a deeply endangered language from the Peruvian Amazon. The remaining fluent speakers of the language are mostly older than 60 years of age, are spread out across various small villages, and speak the language in…

  6. Bilingual Education and Language Use among the Shipibo of the Peruvian Amazon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tacelosky, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Investigates how language choice for education contributes to changes in the way a society views and uses language in the context of the Peruvian Amazon. Oral surveys were administered to Shipibo people in 13 communities along the Ucayali River of eastern Peru where a transition type bilingual education program was introduced several decades ago.…

  7. Prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance among community-associated staphylococcal isolates in central Serbia.

    PubMed

    Aleksandra, A D; Misic, M S; Mira, Z V; Violeta, N M; Dragana, I T; Zoran, B M; Dejan, V S; Milanko, S D; Dejan, B D

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to most antimicrobial agents in staphylococci indicates the need for new effective agents in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. Clindamycin is considered to be one safe, effective and less costly agent. We analysed 482 staphylococcal isolates. Detection of inducible clindamycin resistance was performed by the D-test, while the presence of methylases genes: erm (A), erm (B) and erm (C), as well as, macrolide efflux gene mef was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Inducible clindamycin resistance phenotype was significantly higher in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains then in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Among analysed S. aureus isolates, the predominance of the erm (C) gene, followed by the erm (A) gene were detected. These results indicate that the D-test should be routinely performed on each staphylococcal isolates. PMID:24399388

  8. HLA antigens in Bali (Indonesia) with a special reference to an isolated community.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Wolnizer, C M; Doran, T; Bashir, H; Jeannet, M; Benzonana, G; Ney, R; Adiputra, N; Scherz, R; Blake, N M

    1982-10-01

    One hundred eighty-two Balinese were typed for HLA-A and -B locus antigens. From these, 103 were also typed for HLA-C, 51 for HLA-DR, 172 for Bf and 173 for GLO. These results and the significant phenotypic associations are situated with respect to other South-East Asian populations. In addition to this first study, 175 individuals from an isolated Balinese village typed for HLA-A, -B, -DR, Bf and GLO are presented. The effect of isolation on haplotype (HLA-A/-B/Bf/-DR) variability is discussed. PMID:6815824

  9. Confluence of the Amazon and Topajos Rivers, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view shows the confluence of the Amazon and the Topajos Rivers at Santarem, Brazil (2.0S, 55.0W). The Am,azon flows from lower left to upper right of the photo. Below the river juncture of the Amazon and Tapajos, there is considerable deforestation activity along the Trans-Amazon Highway.

  10. A primary assessment of the endophytic bacterial community in a xerophilous moss (Grimmia montana) using molecular method and cultivated isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao Lei; Liu, Su Lin; Liu, Min; Kong, Bi He; Liu, Lei; Li, Yan Hong

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the endophytic bacterial community in special moss species is fundamental to understanding the microbial-plant interactions and discovering the bacteria with stresses tolerance. Thus, the community structure of endophytic bacteria in the xerophilous moss Grimmia montana were estimated using a 16S rDNA library and traditional cultivation methods. In total, 212 sequences derived from the 16S rDNA library were used to assess the bacterial diversity. Sequence alignment showed that the endophytes were assigned to 54 genera in 4 phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroids). Of them, the dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (45.9%) and Firmicutes (27.6%), the most abundant genera included Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Enterobacter, Leclercia, Microvirga, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Planococcus, Paenisporosarcina and Planomicrobium. In addition, a total of 14 species belonging to 8 genera in 3 phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) were isolated, Curtobacterium, Massilia, Pseudomonas and Sphingomonas were the dominant genera. Although some of the genera isolated were inconsistent with those detected by molecular method, both of two methods proved that many different endophytic bacteria coexist in G. montana. According to the potential functional analyses of these bacteria, some species are known to have possible beneficial effects on hosts, but whether this is the case in G. montana needs to be confirmed. PMID:24948927

  11. Endophytic bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of Amazon Paullinia cupana associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Ferreira, Almir José; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes colonize an ecological niche similar to that of phytopathogens, which make them candidate for disease suppression. Anthracnose is a disease caused by Colletotrichum spp., a phytopathogen that can infect guarana (Paullinia cupana), an important commercial crop in the Brazilian Amazon. We investigated the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose guarana plants. The PCR-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed differences in the structure of the evaluated communities. Detailed analysis of endophytic bacteria composition using culture-dependent and 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria phyla. Firmicutes comprised the majority of isolates in asymptomatic plants (2.40E(-4)). However, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed differences at the genus level for Neisseria (1.4E(-4)), Haemophilus (2.1E(-3)) and Arsenophonus (3.6E(-5)) in asymptomatic plants, Aquicella (3.5E(-3)) in symptomatic anthracnose plants, and Pseudomonas (1.1E(-3)), which was mainly identified in asymptomatic plants. In cross-comparisons of the endophytic bacterial communities as a whole, symptomatic anthracnose plants contained higher diversity, as reflected in the Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices estimation (P < 0.05). Similarly, comparisons using LIBSHUFF and heatmap analysis for the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed differences between endophytic bacterial communities. These data are in agreement with the NMSD and ANOSIM analysis of DGGE profiles. Our results suggest that anthracnose can restructure endophytic bacterial communities by selecting certain strains in the phyllosphere of P. cupana. The understanding of these interactions is important for the development of strategies of biocontrol for Colletotrichum. PMID:26090305

  12. River discharge and flood inundation over the Amazon based on IPCC AR5 scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Rodrigo; Sorribas, Mino; Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila; Melack, John; Bravo, Juan Martin; Beighley, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and related effects over the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin could have major impacts over human and ecological communities, including issues with transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined future changes in discharge and floodplain inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the hydrological model MGB-IPH (Modelo de Grandes Bacias - Instituto de Pesquisas Hidráulicas) coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model was forced using satellite based precipitation from the TRMM 3B42 dataset, and it had a good performance when validated against discharge and stage measurements as well as remotely sensed data, including radar altimetry-based water levels, gravity anomaly-based terrestrial water storage and flood inundation extent. Future scenarios of precipitation and other relevant climatic variables for the 2070 to 2100 time period were taken from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The climate models were chosen based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent (1970 to 2000) Amazon climate. A quantile-quantile bias removal procedure was applied to climate model precipitation to mitigate unreliable predictions. The hydrologic model was then forced using past observed climate data altered by delta change factors based on the past and future climate models aiming to estimate projected discharge and floodplain inundation in climate change scenario at several control points in the basin. The climate projections present large uncertainty, especially the precipitation rate, and predictions using different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes on total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, analyses of results at different regions indicate an increase

  13. Characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from Nicaraguan children in hospital, primary care and community settings.

    PubMed

    Vilchez, Samuel; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Amaya, Erick; Perez, Claudia; Paniagua, Margarita; Reyes, Daniel; Espinoza, Felix; Weintraub, Andrej

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhoea among young children in developing countries. ETEC vaccines offer promise in reducing the burden of ETEC disease, but the development of these vaccines relies on the characterization of ETEC isolates from a variety of settings. To best reflect the full spectrum of ETEC disease in León, Nicaragua, the aim of this study was to characterize ETEC strains isolated from children with diarrhoea attending different settings (hospital, primary care clinics and in the community) and children from different age groups. We characterized ETEC isolates in terms of their colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins, and determined whether these factors varied with setting and age group. Diarrhoeal stool samples were obtained from children under the age of 60 months from: (1) the regional public hospital, (2) four public primary care clinics, and (3) a population-based cohort. In total, 58 ETEC-positive isolates were analysed by multiplex-PCR assays for the identification of CFs (CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS7, CS8, CS12, CS13, CS14, CS15, CS17, CS18, CS19, CS20, CS21, CS22 and CFA/I), and enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable variants STh and STp]. The frequency of CFs and enterotoxins was compared among the three settings and for different age groups, using Fisher's exact test or a χ(2) test. At least one CF was detected among one-half of samples; CS19 was detected among all strains in which a CF was identified, either alone or in combination with another CF. Among all CFs detected, 91.7 % were identified as members of the class 5 fimbrial family. CFs were detected more commonly among samples from infants captured in the health facility setting compared with the community setting. Overall, LT was detected among 67.2 % of samples, STh was detected among 20.7 % and both enterotoxins were detected among 12.1 %. The enterotoxin STh was detected more commonly among cases

  14. Teaching for Diversity by Troubling Whiteness: Strategies for Classrooms in Isolated White Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Elizabeth; McAuley, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores strategies to help prepare pre-service teachers from a predominantly white, relatively isolated island in Atlantic Canada to teach for diversity. The paper proposes a modified framework for "teacher identity development" that pivots around three foci for enhancing teacher awareness and commitment to action: (1) relations of…

  15. Cancer of the mouth in an isolated community--the results of treatment.

    PubMed

    Williams, R G

    1984-02-01

    A survey is presented of all known cases of cancer of the mouth in a population of nearly half a million in a relatively isolated part of Yorkshire, with the results of treatment of squamous carcinoma, adeno-carcinoma, lympho-sarcoma, malignant tumours of odontogenic origin and sarcomas. PMID:6546393

  16. From Isolation to Symphonic Harmony: Building a Professional Development Community among Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadar, Linor; Brody, David

    2010-01-01

    Professional development among teacher educators requires a framework in which collaborative learning can support growth and change. This study describes a professional development project modeled on a professional development community focused on thinking education in a teachers college. Qualitative measures revealed a multilayered process…

  17. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the Amazon region of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Mario J; Escalante, Luis; Paredes, Rodrigo A; Costales, Jaime A; Padilla, Alberto; Rowland, Edwin C; Aguilar, H Marcelo; Racines, Jose

    2003-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the Ecuadorian Amazon region has recently been reported. A seroepidemiologic survey conducted in four provinces in this region indicates a seroprevalence rate of 2.4% among the 6,866 samples collected in 162 communities. Among children < OR = 10 years of age, 1.2% were seropositive. Risk factors for T. cruzi seropositivity were having been born and remaining in the Ecuadorian Amazon provinces, age, living in a house with a thatch roof and open or mixed wall construction, recognizing the vector insects, and reporting being bitten by a triatomine bug. These data suggest active transmission of Chagas' disease in the Ecuadorian Amazon region is associated with poor housing conditions, and highlight the need for further studies aimed at understanding the biology of the insect vectors, reservoir species, and the clinical impact of T. cruzi infection as the basis for future educational and control programs in this region. PMID:14640497

  18. Mycotoxins and cyanogenic glycosides in staple foods of three indigenous people of the Colombian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J; Krska, Rudolf; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the incidence and levels of mycotoxins in the main staple foods of three indigenous people of the Colombian Amazon. A total of 20 corn, 24 rice and 59 cassava samples were analysed by a multi-analyte liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method covering the major classes of mycotoxins. In addition, cassava samples were also analysed for cyanogenic glycosides. The indigenous Amazon communities tested are exposed to potentially carcinogenic mycotoxins (particularly aflatoxins), as well as other mycotoxins, mainly through the intake of locally grown corn. Citrinin content in this corn was unusually high and has not been reported elsewhere. Two cassava samples contained high levels of cyanogenic glycosides. It is strongly recommended not to grow corn in the Amazon but instead purchase it from vendors capable of guaranteeing mycotoxin levels below the maximum allowable concentration in Colombia. PMID:26391446

  19. Amazon deforestation and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, J.; Nobre, C.; Sellers, P. )

    1990-03-16

    A coupled numerical model of the global atmosphere and biosphere has been used to assess the effects of Amazon deforestation on the regional and global climate. When the tropical forests in the model were replaced by degraded grass (pasture), there was a significant increase in surface temperature and a decrease in evapotranspiration and precipitation over Amazonia. In the simulation, the length of the dry season also increased; such an increase could make reestablishment of the tropical forests after massive deforestation particularly difficult. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections. PMID:27226874

  1. Revisiting the hierarchy of urban areas in the Brazilian Amazon: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sandra; Brondízio, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The Legal Brazilian Amazon, while the largest rainforest in the world, is also a region where most residents are urban. Despite close linkages between rural and urban processes in the region, rural areas have been the predominant focus of Amazon-based population-environment scholarship. Offering a focus on urban areas within the Brazilian Amazon, this paper examines the emergence of urban hierarchies within the region. Using a combination of nationally representative data and community based surveys, applied to a multivariate cluster methodology (Grade of Membership), we observe the emergence of sub-regional urban networks characterized by economic and political inter-dependency, population movement, and provision of services. These networks link rural areas, small towns, and medium and large cities. We also identify the emergence of medium-size cities as important nodes at a sub-regional level. In all, the work provides insight on the proposed model of ‘disarticulated urbanization’ within the Amazon by calling attention to the increasing role of regional and sub-regional urban networks in shaping the future expansion of land use and population distribution in the Amazon. We conclude with a discussion of implications for increasing intra-regional connectivity and fragmentation of conservation areas and ecosystems in the region. PMID:23129877

  2. Comparison of different methods for the isolation and purification of total community DNA from soil.

    PubMed

    Krsek, M; Wellington, E M

    1999-12-01

    The efficiency and reproducibility of DNA extraction from soil was tested for variations in lytic and purification treatments and their effect on yield and purity of DNA. The extraction yield was improved by increasing the concentration of EDTA or monovalent ions in isolation buffers, by the introduction of mechanical lysis treatments, and by the use of ethanol precipitation in place of PEG precipitation. Purity was improved using buffers with decreasing concentration of EDTA or by reducing the ionic strength of the buffer, and by all mechanical treatments. No lytic treatment was efficient on its own, the highest purity was achieved using Crombach buffer and a combination of bead-beating with lysozyme and SDS lysis followed by potassium acetate and PEG precipitation, phenol/chloroform purification, isopropanol precipitation, and spermine-HCl precipitation. Sonication sheared the DNA more than bead-beating. Lysozyme and SDS lysis without any mechanical treatments allowed isolation of larger fragments (40-90 kb). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of DNA isolated using a range of lytic treatments revealed alterations in band patterns which might reflect differences in the efficiency of lytic treatments. PMID:10579502

  3. Patterns of Geographic Expansion of Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Barboza, José Luis; Morrison, Amy C.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the Peruvian Amazon, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is abundant in large urban centers such as Iquitos. In recent years, it has also been found in a number of neighboring rural communities with similar climatic and socioeconomic conditions. To better understand Ae. aegypti spread, we compared characteristics of communities, houses, and containers in infested and uninfested communities. Methods We conducted pupal-demographic surveys and deployed ovitraps in 34 communities surrounding the city of Iquitos. Communities surveyed were located along two transects: the Amazon River and a 95km highway. We calculated entomological indices, mapped Ae. aegypti presence, and developed univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to predict Ae. aegypti presence at the community, household, or container level. Results Large communities closer to Iquitos were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Within infested communities, houses with Ae. aegypti had more passively-filled containers and were more often infested with other mosquito genera than houses without Ae. aegypti. For containers, large water tanks/drums and containers with solar exposure were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Maps of Ae. aegypti presence revealed a linear pattern of infestation along the highway, and a scattered pattern along the Amazon River. We also identified the geographical limit of Ae. aegypti expansion along the highway at 19.3 km south of Iquitos. Conclusion In the Peruvian Amazon, Ae. aegypti geographic spread is driven by human transportation networks along rivers and highways. Our results suggest that urban development and oviposition site availability drive Ae. aegypti colonization along roads. Along rivers, boat traffic is likely to drive long-distance dispersal via unintentional transport of mosquitoes on boats. PMID:25101786

  4. Genetic differentiation and trade among populations of peach palm ( Bactris gasipaes Kunth) in the Peruvian Amazon-implications for genetic resource management.

    PubMed

    Adin, A; Weber, J C; Sotelo Montes, C; Vidaurre, H; Vosman, B; Smulders, M J M

    2004-05-01

    Peach palm ( Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is cultivated for fruit and 'heart of palm', and is an important component of agroforestry systems in the Peruvian Amazon. In this study, AFLP was used to compare genetic diversity among domesticated populations along the Paranapura and Cuiparillo rivers, which are managed by indigenous and colonist farming communities, respectively. Gene diversity was 0.2629 for the populations in indigenous communities and 0.2534 in colonist communities. Genetic differentiation among populations ( G(st)) was 0.0377-0.0416 ( P<0.01) among populations along both rivers. There was no relation between genetic differentiation and the geographical location of populations along the rivers. Since natural seed dispersal by birds and rodents is thought to occur only across relatively short distances (100-200 m), it is likely that exchange of material by farmers and commercial traders is responsible for most of the 'long-distance' (over more than 20 km) gene flow among populations along the two rivers studied. This exchange of material may be important to counteract the effects of selection as well as genetic drift in small groups of trees in farmers' fields, much as in a metapopulation, and may account for the weak genetic differentiation between the two rivers ( G(st)=0.0249, P<0.01). A comparison with samples from other landraces in Peru and Brazil showed the existence of an isolation-by-distance structure up to 3,000 km, consistent with gene flow on a regional scale, likely mediated by trade in the Amazon Basin. Results are discussed with regard to practical implications for the management of genetic resources with farming communities. PMID:14985969

  5. Recent Amazon climate as background for possible ongoing and future changes of Amazon humid forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, M.; Barichivich, J.; Ziv, G.; Brienen, R.; Schöngart, J.; Peylin, P.; Ladvocat Cintra, B. Barcante; Feldpausch, T.; Phillips, O.; Baker, J.

    2015-09-01

    Recent analyses of Amazon runoff and gridded precipitation data suggest an intensification of the hydrological cycle over the past few decades in the following sense: wet season precipitation and peak river runoff (since ˜1980) as well as annual mean precipitation (since ˜1990) have increased, while dry season precipitation and minimum runoff have slightly decreased. There has also been an increase in the frequency of anomalously severe floods and droughts. To provide context for the special issue on Amazonia and its forests in a warming climate we expand here on these analyses. The contrasting recent changes in wet and dry season precipitation have continued and are generally consistent with changes in catchment-level peak and minimum river runoff as well as a positive trend of water vapor inflow into the basin. Consistent with the river records, the increased vapor inflow is concentrated to the wet season. Temperature has been rising by 0.7°C since 1980 with more pronounced warming during dry months. Suggestions for the cause of the observed changes of the hydrological cycle come from patterns in tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Tropical and North Atlantic SSTs have increased rapidly and steadily since 1990, while Pacific SSTs have shifted during the 1990s from a positive Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) phase with warm eastern Pacific temperatures to a negative phase with cold eastern Pacific temperatures. These SST conditions have been shown to be associated with an increase in precipitation over most of the Amazon except the south and southwest. If ongoing changes continue, we expect forests to continue to thrive in those regions where there is an increase in precipitation with the exception of floodplain forests. An increase in flood pulse height and duration could lead to increased mortality at higher levels of the floodplain and, over the long term, to a lateral shift of the zonally stratified floodplain forest communities. Negative effects on

  6. New observations of sinuous channels on the Amazon Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    High-sinuosity submarine fan channels on the Amazon Fan were first observed using long-range (GLORIA) side-scan sonar in 1982 and mapped in greater detail using multibeam sonar in 1984. These data have provided important insights into the nature and evolution of submarine channel systems. Subsequent studies on the Amazon Fan have focused on avulsion patterns, sedimentation patterns, fan growth and the climate record contained in fan sediments, and there has been relatively little additional work on the details of sinuous channel morphology. Channels on the Amazon Fan have been imaged by multibeam sonar on several occasions since 1984 during focused studies, regional mapping and ship transit. These multibeam data are being compiled and studied to better characterize these iconic channels. One observation of particular interest is that, on the Amazon Fan, channel-wall slumps appear to be more common than previously thought. Drilling of a cut-off meander during ODP Leg 155 on the Amazon Fan showed the presence of slumped material deeper in the channel suggesting that failure of the channel wall was in part responsible for the abandonment and filling of that meander loop. The failure also apparently created a sandy debris flow with clasts of fine-grained levee material transported in a sandy matrix. This sandy debris flow may have been able to flow along the channel and deposit at the seaward end where similar sediments can be found. Disturbed zones now visible on the inner walls of channels at several other places along the channels suggest that these kinds of inner-wall slumps may play important roles in channel evolution and fan growth. Channel-blocking slumps can isolate channel loops which can then fill with sandy sediments, and avulsions are likely if this kind of slump fills the channel. The failure of channel walls can also lead to new channel segments that tend to straighten the channel. Dramatic changes to the shape of the channel can likely lead to large and

  7. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mathew L.; Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joe A.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada’s oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings–oil sands process water (OSPW)–are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni) were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb). Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment. PMID:26849649

  8. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mathew L; Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada's oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings-oil sands process water (OSPW)-are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni) were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb). Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment. PMID:26849649

  9. Population structure and characterization of viridans group streptococci (VGS) isolated from the upper respiratory tract of patients in the community

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takuya; Nakanishi, Shigeyuki; Mason, Charlene; Montgomery, Janice; Leggett, Paul; Matsuda, Motoo; Coulter, Wilson A.; Millar, B. Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin E.; Moore, John E.

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the population structure of viridans group streptococci (VGS) isolated the upper respiratory tract of adult and paediatric patients within the community. VGS are common commensal bacterial inhabitants of the upper respiratory tract and valuable sentinel reporters of underlying antibiotic resistance (AR). Laboratory examination of the colonising VGS species may provide a valuable ecological description of the species isolated from the upper respiratory tract and their antibiotic susceptibility, including an estimation of the AR reservoir in this population. Freshly obtained nasal and oropharyngeal swabs from 84 patients were examined by selective conventional culture on Mitis-Salivarius agar and yielded 363 isolates of VGS. Sequence analyses of the rpnB and 16–23S rRNA ITS genes identified these isolates to belong to 10 species of VGS and included S. anginosus, S. australis, S. constellatus, S. infantis, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. parasanguinis, S. salivarius, S. sanguinis and S. vestibularis. The most frequent VGS organisms isolated was S. salivarius (282/363; 78.0%), followed by S. sanguinis (23/363; 6.3%), S. parasanguinis (21/363; 5.8%), S. mitis (18/363; 5.0%), S. anginosus (5/363; 1.4%), S. vestibularis (5/363; 1.4%), S. australis (3/363; 0.8%), S. oralis (3/363; 0.8%), S. infantis (1/363; 0.3%) and S. constellatus (1/363; 0.3%). All patients examined carried at least one VGS organism, where there were 17 combination patterns of carriage of the 10 species of VGS species isolated, where 54.2%, 37.3%, 7.2% and 1.2% of patients harboured one, two, three and four different VGS species, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by standard disk diffusion assay testing against four classes of antibiotics, including the b-lactams [cefotaxime, cefuroxime], the tetracyclines [doxycycline], the fluoroquinolones [levofloxacin] and the macrolides [erythromycin]. Overall, there was no resistance to levofloxacin and cefuroxime

  10. The AmazonFACE research program: assessing the effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 on the ecology and resilience of the Amazon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapola, David; Quesada, Carlos; Norby, Richard; Araújo, Alessandro; Domingues, Tomas; Hartley, Iain; Kruijt, Bart; Lewin, Keith; Meir, Patrick; Ometto, Jean; Rammig, Anja

    2016-04-01

    The existence, magnitude and duration of a supposed "CO2 fertilization" effect in tropical forests remains largely undetermined, despite being suggested for nearly 20 years as a key knowledge gap for understanding the future resilience of Amazonian forests and its impact on the global carbon cycle. Reducing this uncertainty is critical for assessing the future of the Amazon region as well as its vulnerability to climate change. The AmazonFACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) research program is an integrated model-experiment initiative of unprecedented scope in an old-growth Amazon forest near Manaus, Brazil - the first of its kind in tropical forest. The experimental treatment will simulate an atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] of the future in order to address the question: "How will rising atmospheric CO2 affect the resilience of the Amazon forest, the biodiversity it harbors, and the ecosystem services it provides, in light of projected climatic changes?" AmazonFACE is divided into three phases: (I) pre-experimental ecological characterization of the research site; (II) pilot experiment comprised of two 30-m diameter plots, with one treatment plot maintained at elevated [CO2] (ambient +200 ppmv), and the other control plot at ambient [CO2]; and (III) a fully-replicated long-term experiment comprised of four pairs of control/treatment FACE plots maintained for 10 years. A team of scientists from Brazil, USA, Australia and Europe will employ state-of-the-art methods to study the forest inside these plots in terms of carbon metabolism and cycling, water use, nutrient cycling, forest community composition, and interactions with environmental stressors. All project phases also encompass ecosystem-modeling activities in a way such that models provide hypothesis to be verified in the experiment, which in turn will feed models to ultimately produce more accurate projections of the environment. Resulting datasets and analyses will be a valuable resource for a broad community

  11. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F isolates associated with rural community outbreaks in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Zulz, Tammy; Wenger, Jay D; Rudolph, Karen; Robinson, D Ashley; Rakov, Alexey V; Bruden, Dana; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Bruce, Michael G; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2013-05-01

    Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F were observed in two neighboring regions of rural Alaska in 2003 to 2006 and 2006 to 2008. IPD surveillance data from 1986 to 2009 and carriage survey data from 1998 to 2004 and 2008 to 2009 were reviewed to identify patterns of serotype 12F transmission. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed on all available isolates, and selected isolates were characterized by additional genetic subtyping methods. Serotype 12F IPD occurred in two waves in Alaska between 1986 and 2008. While cases of disease occurred nearly every year in Anchorage, in rural regions, 12F IPD occurred with rates 10- to 20-fold higher than those in Anchorage, often with many years between disease peaks and generally caused by a single predominant genetic clone. Carriage occurred predominantly in adults, except early in the rural outbreaks, when most carriage was in persons <18 years old. In rural regions, carriage of 12F disappeared completely after outbreaks. Different 12F clones appear to have been introduced episodically into rural populations, spread widely in young, immunologically naïve populations (leading to outbreaks of IPD lasting 1 to 3 years), and then disappeared rapidly from the population. Larger population centers might have been the reservoir for these clones. This epidemiologic pattern is consistent with a highly virulent, but immunogenic, form of pneumococcus. PMID:23408692

  12. Yeast succession in the Amazon fruit Parahancornia amapa as resource partitioning among Drosophila spp.

    PubMed Central

    Morais, P B; Martins, M B; Klaczko, L B; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N

    1995-01-01

    The succession of yeasts colonizing the fallen ripe amapa fruit, from Parahancornia amapa, was examined. The occupation of the substrate depended on both the competitive interactions of yeast species, such as the production of killer toxins, and the selective dispersion by the drosophilid guild of the amapa fruit. The yeast community associated with this Amazon fruit differed from those isolated from other fruits in the same forest. The physiological profile of these yeasts was mostly restricted to the assimilation of a few simple carbon sources, mainly L-sorbose, D-glycerol, DL-lactate, cellobiose, and salicin. Common fruit-associated yeasts of the genera Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora, Candida guilliermondii, and Candida krusei colonized fruits during the first three days after the fruit fell. These yeasts were dispersed and served as food for the invader Drosophila malerkotliana. The resident flies of the Drosophila willistoni group fed selectively on patches of yeasts colonizing fruits 3 to 10 days after the fruit fell. The killer toxin-producing yeasts Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri and Candida fructus were probably involved in the exclusion of some species during the intermediate stages of fruit deterioration. An increase in pH, inhibiting toxin activity and the depletion of simple sugars, may have promoted an increase in yeast diversity in the later stages of decomposition. The yeast succession provided a patchy environment for the drosophilids sharing this ephemeral substrate. PMID:8534092

  13. Establishment of ST30 as the predominant clonal type among community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Yang; Koh, Yin-Ling; Chlebicka, Nidhi Loomba; Tan, Thean-Yen; Krishnan, Prabha; Lin, Raymond Tzer-Pin; Tee, Nancy; Barkham, Timothy; Koh, Tse-Hsien

    2006-03-01

    The number of infections attributable to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in Singapore is progressively increasing. Most cases in the past 2 years were caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive isolates belonging to sequence type 30, according to multilocus sequence typing. This has clearly become the predominant sequence type among CA-MRSA isolates in Singapore. PMID:16517901

  14. [From isolated work to teamwork? Changes in Western German community nursing from 1950 to 1980].

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Mathilde

    2004-12-01

    Community nursing in Western Germany has received little attention from nurse historians. The period from 1950 to 1980 can be seen as a major shift from the single nurse's independent work to more teamwork. So far, changes during this period have not been analysed from the perspective of individual nurses. To illuminate this period of change, primary historical sources including archives and contemporaneous reports and journals were analysed. In addition an oral history approach was used to get an awareness of individual nurses' experiences. For this purpose interviews with five community nurses were conducted. Changes during the analysed period were perceived from different angles by the nurses. The analysis of the journal texts written by nurses and the interviews revealed the following categories: independence and freedom, working together, bureaucracy. Not all nurses were happy to lose the independence in their work. The new teamwork was not always welcomed although some nurses recognised the advantages of supporting each other. Increasing bureaucracy was a topic raised in the interviews but not in the journals. It can be concluded that the oral history approach is a suitable method to give individual nurses a voice. PMID:15648590

  15. Isolation independent methods of characterizing phage communities 2: characterizing a metagenome.

    PubMed

    Wommack, K Eric; Bench, Shellie R; Bhavsar, Jaysheel; Mead, David; Hanson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Current appreciation of the vast expanse of prokaryotic diversity has largely come through molecular phylogenetic exploration of sequence diversity within the universally conserved gene for small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rDNA). A plethora of methodologies for characterizing the diversity and composition of bacterial communities is based on sequence polymorphisms within this single gene. By comparison, no gene is universally shared among viruses or bacteriophages, which has prevented broad scale characterization of viral diversity within microbial ecosystems. With the reduction in DNA sequencing costs and wide availability of bioinformatics software, the tools of whole genome shotgun sequencing are now beginning to be applied to the characterization of genetic diversity within whole microbial communities. Such metagenomic approaches are ideally suited to the characterization of natural assemblages of viruses, because of the typically small, coding-dense nature of viral genomes. Data from a limited number of characterized viral metagenome libraries within a range of microbial ecosystems indicates that viral assemblages are comprised of between approximately 1,000 to a million different genotypes. Furthermore, viral assemblages typically contain a large proportion of completely novel genes and are likely to be the largest reservoir of unexplored genetic diversity on earth. Here, we present a conceptual framework for characterization of viral assemblages through metagenomic approaches. PMID:19082562

  16. Genome-directed isolation of the key nitrogen fixer Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum sp. nov. from an acidophilic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Gene W; Lo, Ian; Baker, Brett J; Allen, Eric E; Hugenholtz, Philip; Banfield, Jillian F

    2005-10-01

    Analysis of assembled random shotgun sequence data from a low-diversity, subsurface acid mine drainage (AMD) biofilm revealed a single nif operon. This was found on a genome fragment belonging to a member of Leptospirillum group III, a lineage in the Nitrospirae phylum with no cultivated representatives. Based on the prediction that this organism is solely responsible for nitrogen fixation in the community, we pursued a selective isolation strategy to obtain the organism in pure culture. An AMD biofilm sample naturally abundant in Leptospirillum group III cells was homogenized, filtered, and serially diluted into a nitrogen-free liquid medium. The resulting culture in the terminal dilution grew autotrophically to a maximum cell density of approximately 10(6) cells/ml, oxidizing ferrous iron as the sole energy source. 16S rRNA-internal transcribed spacer region clone library analysis confirmed that the isolate is a member of Leptospirillum group III and that the culture is axenic. We propose the name Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum sp. nov. for this iron-oxidizing, free-living diazotroph. This study highlights how environmental sequence data can provide insights for culturing previously uncultured microorganisms. PMID:16204553

  17. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery. PMID:26699752

  18. Ezakiella peruensis gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from human fecal sample from a coastal traditional community in Peru.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha B; Tito, Raul Y; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; O'Neal, Lindsey; Trujillo-Villaroel, Omar; Marin-Reyes, Luis; Troncoso-Corzo, Luzmila; Guija-Poma, Emilio; Hamada, Moriyuki; Uchino, Yoshihito; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, non-motile, non-sporeforming coccus-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a traditional Peruvian community. The organism was characterized using biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic methods. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic characteristics demonstrated that the organism was biochemically and phenotypically related, but distinct, from a group of organisms referred to as the Gram-stain positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC). The major cellular fatty acids of the novel isolate were determined to be C16:0 (18.3%), C18:1ω9c (39.8%), C18:2ω6,9c/C18:0 ANTE (13.2%). Fermentation end products from PYG are acetate and formate. Cell-wall peptidoglycan was found to be A4α (L-Lys-L-Ala-L-Glu) and the G + C content was determined to be 38.4 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic results, Ezakiella peruensis gen. nov., sp. nov., is now proposed. The type strain is M6.X2(T) (DSM 27367(T) = NBRC 109957 (T) = CCUG 64571(T)). PMID:25481562

  19. Ezakiella peruensis gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from human fecal sample from a coastal traditional community in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nisha B.; Tito, Raul Y.; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; O’Neal, Lindsey; Trujillo-Villaroel, Omar; Marin-Reyes, Luis; Troncoso-Corzo, Luzmila; Guija-Poma, Emilio; Hamada, Moriyuki; Uchino, Yoshihito; Lewis, Cecil M.; Lawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, non-motile, non-sporeforming coccus-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a traditional Peruvian community. The organism was characterized using biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic methods. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic characteristics demonstrated that the organism was biochemically and phenotypically related, but distinct, from a group of organisms referred to as the Gram-stain positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC). The major cellular fatty acids of the novel isolate were determined to be C16:0 (18.3%), C18:1ε9c (39.8%), C18:2ε6,9c/C18:0 ANTE (13.2%). Fermentation end products from PYG are acetate and formate. Cell-wall peptidoglycan was found to be A4∋ (L-Lys-L-Ala-L-Glu) and the G + C content was determined to be 38.4 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic results, Ezakiella peruensis gen. nov., sp. nov., is now proposed. The type strain is M6.X2T (DSM 27367T = NBRC 109957 T = CCUG 64571T). PMID:25481562

  20. [Italians in Western Australia: an isolated community in a period of aging].

    PubMed

    Gentilli, J

    1993-03-01

    Characteristics of the Italian-born population of Western Australia are examined in light of the state's large size and relative isolation. "After a brief review of the gold rush of the 1890s and the agricultural settlement that followed, the paper examines the evolution in the age composition of the population, the extraordinary rapid turnover of migrants, the predominance of young males among them. Brief comparisons are made with other migrant groups in 1986. The importance of education for the attainment of a good income is examined....[The author finds that] mixed marriages (some inevitable because of the much greater number of males among the Italian-born) enrich both sides culturally but speed up the assimilation process." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) PMID:12318049

  1. Pedigree structure and kinship measurements of a mid-Michigan community: a new North American population isolate identified.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Joseph D; Fisher, Rachel; Klein, James; Lu, Qing; Wilch, Ellen; Friderici, Karen H; Elfenbein, Jill L; Schutte, Debra L; Schutte, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies identified a cluster of individuals with an autosomal recessive form of deafness that reside in a small region of mid-Michigan. We hypothesized that affected members from this community descend from a defined founder population. Using public records and personal interviews, we constructed a genealogical database that includes the affected individuals and their extended families as descendants of 461 settlers who emigrated from the Eifel region of Germany between 1836 and 1875. The genealogical database represents a 13-generation pedigree that includes 27,747 descendants of these settlers. Among these descendants, 13,784 are presumed living. Many of the extant descendants reside in a 90-square-mile area, and 52% were born to parents who share at least one common ancestor. Among those born to related parents, the median kinship coefficient is 3.7 × 10(-3). While the pedigree contains 2,510 founders, 344 of the 461 settlers accounted for 67% of the genome in the extant population. These data suggest that we identified a new population isolate in North America and that, as demonstrated for congenital hearing loss, this rural mid-Michigan community is a new resource to discover heritable factors that contribute to common health-related conditions. PMID:25401987

  2. Comparison of Microbial Communities Isolated from Feces of Asymptomatic Salmonella-Shedding and Non-Salmonella Shedding Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Pettengill, James; Gorham, Sasha; Ottesen, Andrea; Karns, Jeffrey S; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S

    2016-01-01

    In the United States Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Kentucky and Cerro are frequently isolated from asymptomatic dairy cows. However, factors that contribute to colonization of the bovine gut by these two serotypes have not been identified. To investigate associations between Salmonella status and bacterial diversity, as well as the diversity of the microbial community in the dairy cow hindgut, the bacterial and archaeal communities of fecal samples from cows on a single dairy farm were determined by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Fecal grab samples were collected from two Salmonella-positive cows and two Salmonella-negative cows on five sampling dates (n = 20 cows), and 16S rRNA gene amplicons from these samples were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. A high level of alpha (within) and beta diversity (between) samples demonstrated that microbial profiles of dairy cow hindguts are quite diverse. To determine whether Salmonella presence, sampling year, or sampling date explained a significant amount of the variation in microbial diversity, we performed constrained ordination analyses (distance based RDA) on the unifrac distance matrix produced with QIIME. Results indicated that there was not a significant difference in the microbial diversity associated with Salmonella presence (P > 0.05), but there were significant differences between sampling dates and years (Pseudo-F = 2.157 to 4.385, P < 0.05). Based on these data, it appears that commensal Salmonella infections with serotypes Cerro and Kentucky in dairy cows have little or no association with changes in the abundance of major bacterial groups in the hindgut. Rather, our results indicated that temporal dynamics and other undescribed parameters associated with them were the most influential drivers of the differences in microbial diversity and community structure in the dairy cow hindgut. PMID:27313565

  3. Comparison of Microbial Communities Isolated from Feces of Asymptomatic Salmonella-Shedding and Non-Salmonella Shedding Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Bradd J.; Pettengill, James; Gorham, Sasha; Ottesen, Andrea; Karns, Jeffrey S.; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Kentucky and Cerro are frequently isolated from asymptomatic dairy cows. However, factors that contribute to colonization of the bovine gut by these two serotypes have not been identified. To investigate associations between Salmonella status and bacterial diversity, as well as the diversity of the microbial community in the dairy cow hindgut, the bacterial and archaeal communities of fecal samples from cows on a single dairy farm were determined by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Fecal grab samples were collected from two Salmonella-positive cows and two Salmonella-negative cows on five sampling dates (n = 20 cows), and 16S rRNA gene amplicons from these samples were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. A high level of alpha (within) and beta diversity (between) samples demonstrated that microbial profiles of dairy cow hindguts are quite diverse. To determine whether Salmonella presence, sampling year, or sampling date explained a significant amount of the variation in microbial diversity, we performed constrained ordination analyses (distance based RDA) on the unifrac distance matrix produced with QIIME. Results indicated that there was not a significant difference in the microbial diversity associated with Salmonella presence (P > 0.05), but there were significant differences between sampling dates and years (Pseudo-F = 2.157 to 4.385, P < 0.05). Based on these data, it appears that commensal Salmonella infections with serotypes Cerro and Kentucky in dairy cows have little or no association with changes in the abundance of major bacterial groups in the hindgut. Rather, our results indicated that temporal dynamics and other undescribed parameters associated with them were the most influential drivers of the differences in microbial diversity and community structure in the dairy cow hindgut. PMID:27313565

  4. Molecular characterization and clonal diversity of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the community in Spain: emergence of clone sequence type 72.

    PubMed

    Potel, C; Rey, S; Otero, S; Rubio, J; Álvarez, M

    2016-08-01

    Sequence type 72 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST72 MRSA) was recently detected in our hospital. Although in Europe this clone is rarely isolated, it is the leading cause of community-associated MRSA infections in Korea, spreading also into hospitals, where it has also emerged as the main MRSA clone recovered from raw meat. We studied MRSA isolated from outpatients in Spain during a nine-year period. More than 70% of the isolates belonged to predominant clones found in hospitals. There was a significant increase in the ST72 prevalence. It appears that boundaries of dominance among MRSA clones have become blurred, demanding continuous surveillance. PMID:27112049

  5. The dispersal of the Amazon's water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Richardson, Philip L.

    1988-01-01

    New information obtained with NASA's Coastal Zone Color Scanner and with drifting buoys reveals that the discharge of the Amazon is carried offshore around a retroflection of the North Brazil Current and into the North Equatorial Countercurrent towards Africa between June and January each year. From about February to May, the countercurrent and the retroflection weaken or vanish, and Amazon water flows northwestward toward the Caribbean Sea.

  6. Amazon Forest Responses to Drought and Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation and agricultural land uses provide a consistent source of ignitions along the Amazon frontier during the dry season. The risk of understory fires in Amazon forests is amplified by drought conditions, when fires at the forest edge may spread for weeks before rains begin. Fire activity also impacts the regional response of intact forests to drought through diffuse light effects and nutrient redistribution, highlighting the complexity of feedbacks in this coupled human and natural system. This talk will focus on recent advances in our understanding of fire-climate feedbacks in the Amazon, building on research themes initiated under NASA's Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). NASA's LBA program began in the wake of the 1997-1998 El Niño, a strong event that exposed the vulnerability of Amazon forests to drought and fire under current climate and projections of climate change. With forecasts of another strong El Niño event in 2015-2016, this talk will provide a multi-scale synthesis of Amazon forest responses to drought and fire based on field measurements, airborne lidar data, and satellite observations of fires, rainfall, and terrestrial water storage. These studies offer new insights into the mechanisms governing fire season severity in the southern Amazon and regional variability in carbon losses from understory fires. The contributions from remote sensing to our understanding of drought and fire in Amazon forests reflect the legacy of NASA's LBA program and the sustained commitment to interdisciplinary research across the Amazon region.

  7. Isolation of PCR quality microbial community DNA from heavily contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Chang, Simon; Jimenez, Abraham; Holland-Moritz, Daniel; Holland-Moritz, Hannah; La Val, Taylor P; Lund, Craig; Mullen, Madeline; Olsen, John; Sztain, Terra A; Yoo, Jennifer; Moss, John A; Baum, Marc M

    2014-07-01

    Asphalts, biochemically degraded oil, contain persistent, water-soluble compounds that pose a significant challenge to the isolation of PCR quality DNA. The adaptation of existing DNA purification protocols and commercial kits proved unsuccessful at overcoming this hurdle. Treatment of aqueous asphalt extracts with a polyamide resin afforded genomic microbial DNA templates that could readily be amplified by PCR. Physicochemically distinct asphalt samples from five natural oil seeps successfully generated the expected 291 bp amplicons targeting a region of the 16S rRNA gene, illustrating the robustness of the method. DNA recovery yields were in the 50-80% range depending on how the asphalt sample was seeded with exogenous DNA. The scope of the new method was expanded to include soil with high humic acid content. DNA from soil samples spiked with a range of humic acid concentrations was extracted with a commercial kit followed by treatment with the polyamide resin. The additional step significantly improved the purity of the DNA templates, especially at high humic acid concentrations, based on qPCR analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The new method has the advantages of being inexpensive, simple, and rapid and should provide a valuable addition to protocols in the field of petroleum and soil microbiology. PMID:24769406

  8. Life, survival, and behavioral health in small closed communities: 10 years of studying isolated Antarctic groups.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanna; Schmidt, Lacey; Lugg, Desmond; Ayton, Jeff; Phillips, Terry; Shepanek, Marc

    2005-06-01

    In the late 1980s the Australian Antarctic Division collaborated with NASA to use the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions' (ANARE) stations to pursue research of benefit to both programs. This article outlines the data collection efforts, the development of analyses, and selected results, and describes some of the benefits for the aerospace, health, and environmental psychology communities. The Behavior and Performance Laboratory at Johnson Space Center developed a questionnaire to sample broadly the many aspects of life in extreme environments analogous to space missions. Data were collected from volunteers involved in various ANAREs conducted from 1994 to 2003. Pool-timed series regression, hierarchical models, and content analysis have all enhanced the understanding of the kinds of psychosocial variables relevant in extreme environments, and how these variables relate to each other; examples are given. Observations gathered over the last 10 yr comprise a unique, comprehensive, and advanced representation of psychosocial factors in this extreme environment and provide a strong base for future research and application. PMID:15943201

  9. Molecular characterization and susceptibility of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates from hospitals and the community in Vladivostok, Russia.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, T; Zaraket, H; Shabana, I I; Nevzorova, V; Turcutyuicov, V; Suzuki, H

    2010-06-01

    A prospective study was conducted during an 8-month period, from August 2006 to April 2007, to describe the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus-associated infections. In addition, the molecular characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibilities and antibiotic resistance determinants were identified in S. aureus isolates from hospitals and the community in Vladivostok, Russia. Among the 63 S. aureus isolates eligible for this study, methicillin resistance was observed in 48% (n = 30). Hospital-acquired strains accounted for 93% (28/30) of all methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. The major MRSA clone (sequence type (ST) 239, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type III, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-negative, with two related staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) types (types 3 and 351)) represented 90% of all of the MRSA isolates. This clone was multidrug-resistant, and 41% of isolates showed resistance to rifampicin. Community-acquired MRSA isolates (n = 2) were categorized as ST30, SCCmecIV, spa type 19, and PVL-positive, and as ST8, SCCmecIV, of a novel spa type 826, and PVL-negative. Eight different STs were detected among methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates, of which 55% were PVL-positive. One MSSA clone, which was categorized as ST121, spa type 273, and PVL-positive, caused fatal community-acquired pneumonia infections. The strains predominantly isolated in hospitals in Russia belonged to the multidrug-resistant Brazilian/Hungarian ST239 MRSA clone; however, this clone has new antibiotic susceptibilities. Additionally, the emergence of PVL-positive MSSA strains with enhanced virulence was observed, warranting continued surveillance. PMID:19681959

  10. Organizing Environments to Enhance the Development of Persons and Communities in Isolated Regions of Colombia: A Challenge to the Development of Human Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango, Marta; Nimnicht, Glen

    Although self-actualization is often considered a need to be met after more basic needs are fulfilled, experience with a development project in four impoverished and isolated Colombian communities indicates that development of human potential can be an integral part of overall development. An environment that supports the development of human…

  11. Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Diversity of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Patients with Community-Onset Infections in 30 Chinese County Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Beiwen; Wei, Zeqing; Shen, Ping; Li, Sujuan; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-01-01

    The high frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli is a feature of clinical bacteriology in China, where the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of this resistance in county hospitals remain unclear. A total of 590 nonduplicate E. coli isolates from 30 county hospitals located across seven Chinese regions were examined for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and phylogenetic analysis of fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were used to determine their genetic relatedness. The ciprofloxacin resistance rate of community-onset E. coli was 51.2%, and at least one PMQR gene was carried by 220 (37.3%) isolates. These included qnr (3.7%), aac(6′)-Ib-cr (19.7%), qepA (14.4%), and oqxAB (3.8%). Two novel oqxB mutants were identified and named oqxB20 and oqxB29. From 60 sequence types (STs) isolated, 5 novel STs (ST4499 to ST4503) were identified. ST1193 (7.9%) was the second most abundant ST among fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates (ST131 was the most common, with 14.6%), and this is the first report of it in China. This is also the first report of ST2115 and ST3014 isolates from human samples. Ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates fell mainly into phylogroups B2 and D. The rates of fluoroquinolone resistance and the prevalence of PMQR genes in community-onset E. coli isolates from Chinese county hospitals were high. The wide-ranging molecular epidemiology of E. coli isolates from scattered locations across China indicates that fluoroquinolone resistance evolved from different sources. PMID:25520451

  12. Amazon forests maintain consistent canopy structure and greenness during the dry season.

    PubMed

    Morton, Douglas C; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D; Vermote, Eric F; Harding, David J; North, Peter R J

    2014-02-13

    The seasonality of sunlight and rainfall regulates net primary production in tropical forests. Previous studies have suggested that light is more limiting than water for tropical forest productivity, consistent with greening of Amazon forests during the dry season in satellite data. We evaluated four potential mechanisms for the seasonal green-up phenomenon, including increases in leaf area or leaf reflectance, using a sophisticated radiative transfer model and independent satellite observations from lidar and optical sensors. Here we show that the apparent green up of Amazon forests in optical remote sensing data resulted from seasonal changes in near-infrared reflectance, an artefact of variations in sun-sensor geometry. Correcting this bidirectional reflectance effect eliminated seasonal changes in surface reflectance, consistent with independent lidar observations and model simulations with unchanging canopy properties. The stability of Amazon forest structure and reflectance over seasonal timescales challenges the paradigm of light-limited net primary production in Amazon forests and enhanced forest growth during drought conditions. Correcting optical remote sensing data for artefacts of sun-sensor geometry is essential to isolate the response of global vegetation to seasonal and interannual climate variability. PMID:24499816

  13. Amazon Forests Maintain Consistent Canopy Structure and Greenness During the Dry Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The seasonality of sunlight and rainfall regulates net primary production in tropical forests. Previous studies have suggested that light is more limiting than water for tropical forest productivity, consistent with greening of Amazon forests during the dry season in satellite data.We evaluated four potential mechanisms for the seasonal green-up phenomenon, including increases in leaf area or leaf reflectance, using a sophisticated radiative transfer model and independent satellite observations from lidar and optical sensors. Here we show that the apparent green up of Amazon forests in optical remote sensing data resulted from seasonal changes in near-infrared reflectance, an artefact of variations in sun-sensor geometry. Correcting this bidirectional reflectance effect eliminated seasonal changes in surface reflectance, consistent with independent lidar observations and model simulations with unchanging canopy properties. The stability of Amazon forest structure and reflectance over seasonal timescales challenges the paradigm of light-limited net primary production in Amazon forests and enhanced forest growth during drought conditions. Correcting optical remote sensing data for artefacts of sun-sensor geometry is essential to isolate the response of global vegetation to seasonal and interannual climate variability.

  14. Business as Usual: Amazon.com and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ullen, Mary K.; Germain, Carol Anne

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Steve Coffman proposed that libraries form a single interlibrary loan based entity patterned after Amazon.com. This study examined the suitability of Amazon.com's Web interface and record enhancements for academic libraries. Amazon.com could not deliver circulating monographs in the University at Albany Libraries' collection quickly…

  15. Ecology and seasonal variation of parasites in wild Aequidens tetramerus, a Cichlidae from the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Dias, Marcos; Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Gonçalves, Raissa Alves; Silva, Luis Maurício Abdon

    2014-03-01

    This study is the first investigation on seasonal dynamics of parasites component community of the Aequidens tetramerus from an Amazon River tributary, in Northern Brazil. A total of 239,2407 parasites were recovered from 92 hosts examined from February to October 2011. Such parasites included Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Tripartiella tetramerii and Trichodina nobilis (Protozoa), Dolops longicauda (Argulidae), Gussevia alioides, Gussevia disparoides (Monogenoidea), Digenea metacercarie, Pseudoproleptus larvae, Anisakidae larvae (Nematoda), Proteocephalidea plerocercoid (Eucestoda) and Gorytocephalus spectabilis (Acanthocephala). Ciliates were the most dominant and abundant taxon, while cestodes were the least prevalent. The parasites showed seasonal variation in their infection dynamics associated with environmental changes during the Amazonian drainage season, except the infection with I. multifiliis. The parasites community in A. tetramerus was also characterized by higher diversity, species richness and uniformity during the drainage season when compared to Amazon flood season. With the exception of T. tetramerii, these parasite species are new records for A. tetramerus. PMID:24570063

  16. Modelling conservation in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo Silveira; Nepstad, Daniel Curtis; Curran, Lisa M.; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Garcia, Ricardo Alexandrino; Ramos, Claudia Azevedo; Voll, Eliane; McDonald, Alice; Lefebvre, Paul; Schlesinger, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Expansion of the cattle and soy industries in the Amazon basin has increased deforestation rates and will soon push all-weather highways into the region's core. In the face of this growing pressure, a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Amazon basin should protect its watersheds, the full range of species and ecosystem diversity, and the stability of regional climates. Here we report that protected areas in the Amazon basin-the central feature of prevailing conservation approaches-are an important but insufficient component of this strategy, based on policy-sensitive simulations of future deforestation. By 2050, current trends in agricultural expansion will eliminate a total of 40% of Amazon forests, including at least two-thirds of the forest cover of six major watersheds and 12 ecoregions, releasing 32 +/- 8Pg of carbon to the atmosphere. One-quarter of the 382 mammalian species examined will lose more than 40% of the forest within their Amazon ranges. Although an expanded and enforced network of protected areas could avoid as much as one-third of this projected forest loss, conservation on private lands is also essential. Expanding market pressures for sound land management and prevention of forest clearing on lands unsuitable for agriculture are critical ingredients of a strategy for comprehensive conservation.

  17. Modelling conservation in the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo Silveira; Nepstad, Daniel Curtis; Curran, Lisa M; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Garcia, Ricardo Alexandrino; Ramos, Claudia Azevedo; Voll, Eliane; McDonald, Alice; Lefebvre, Paul; Schlesinger, Peter

    2006-03-23

    Expansion of the cattle and soy industries in the Amazon basin has increased deforestation rates and will soon push all-weather highways into the region's core. In the face of this growing pressure, a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Amazon basin should protect its watersheds, the full range of species and ecosystem diversity, and the stability of regional climates. Here we report that protected areas in the Amazon basin--the central feature of prevailing conservation approaches--are an important but insufficient component of this strategy, based on policy-sensitive simulations of future deforestation. By 2050, current trends in agricultural expansion will eliminate a total of 40% of Amazon forests, including at least two-thirds of the forest cover of six major watersheds and 12 ecoregions, releasing 32 +/- 8 Pg of carbon to the atmosphere. One-quarter of the 382 mammalian species examined will lose more than 40% of the forest within their Amazon ranges. Although an expanded and enforced network of protected areas could avoid as much as one-third of this projected forest loss, conservation on private lands is also essential. Expanding market pressures for sound land management and prevention of forest clearing on lands unsuitable for agriculture are critical ingredients of a strategy for comprehensive conservation. PMID:16554817

  18. Impact of Amazon deforestation on climate simulations using the NCAR CCM2/BATS model

    SciTech Connect

    Hahmann, A.N.; Dickinson, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Model validation and results are briefly presented for a simulation of deforestation of the Amazon rainforest. This initial study is made using assumptions regarding deforestation similar to those in earlier studies with several versions of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) couples to the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). The model used is a revised version of the NCAR CCM Version 2 coupled to BATS Version 1e. This paper discusses the portion of validation dealing with the distribution of precipitation; the simulation displays very good agreement with observed rainfall rates for the austral summer. Preliminary results from an 8-year simulation of deforestation are similar to that of previous studies. Annual precipitation and evaporation are reduced, while surface air temperatures show a slight increase. A substantial bimodal pattern appears in the results, with the Amazon decrease of precipitation and temperature increase accompanied by changes in the opposite sign to the southeast of the Amazon. Similar patterns have occurred in other studies, but not always in exactly the same locations. Evidently, how much of the region of rainfall increase occurs in the deforested area over the Amazon strongly affects the inferred statistics. It is likely that this pattern depends on the model control climatology and possibly other features. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Occurrence and analysis of irp2 virulence gene in isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from microbiota and hospital and community-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; Rodrigues, Juliana Falcão; Cabral, Adriane Borges; da Silva, Maíra Espíndola; Leal, Nilma Cintra; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Morais Júnior, Marcos Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Eighty-five isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp., originating from hospital- and community-acquired infections and from oropharyngeal and faecal microbiota from patients in Recife-PE, Brazil, were analyzed regarding the presence of irp2 gene. This is a Yersinia typical gene involved in the synthesis of siderophore yersiniabactin. DNA sequencing confirmed the identity of irp2 gene in five K. pneumoniae, five Enterobacter aerogenes and one Enterobacter amnigenus isolates. To our knowledge in the current literature, this is the first report of the irp2 gene in E. amnigenus, a species considered an unusual human pathogen, and in K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes isolates from the normal microbiota and from community infections, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggest the irp2 genes derived from isolates used in this study are more closely related to that of Yersinia pestis P.CE882 than to that of Yersinia enterocolitica 8081. These data demonstrated that K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from normal microbiota and from community- and hospital-acquired infections possess virulence factors important for the establishment of extra-intestinal infections. PMID:27133266

  20. Isolation of Novel Extreme-Tolerant Cyanobacteria from a Rock-Dwelling Microbial Community by Using Exposure to Low Earth Orbit▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Olsson-Francis, Karen; de la Torre, Rosa; Cockell, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria are known to tolerate environmental extremes. Motivated by an interest in selecting cyanobacteria for applications in space, we launched rocks from a limestone cliff in Beer, Devon, United Kingdom, containing an epilithic and endolithic rock-dwelling community of cyanobacteria into low Earth orbit (LEO) at a height of approximately 300 kilometers. The community was exposed for 10 days to isolate cyanobacteria that can survive exposure to the extreme radiation and desiccating conditions associated with space. Culture-independent (16S rRNA) and culture-dependent methods showed that the cyanobacterial community was composed of Pleurocapsales, Oscillatoriales, and Chroococcales. A single cyanobacterium, a previously uncharacterized extremophile, was isolated after exposure to LEO. We were able to isolate the cyanobacterium from the limestone cliff after exposing the rock-dwelling community to desiccation and vacuum (0.7 × 10−3 kPa) in the laboratory. The ability of the organism to survive the conditions in space may be linked to the formation of dense colonies. These experiments show how extreme environmental conditions, including space, can be used to select for novel microorganisms. Furthermore, it improves our knowledge of environmental tolerances of extremophilic rock-dwelling cyanobacteria. PMID:20154120

  1. Isolation of novel extreme-tolerant cyanobacteria from a rock-dwelling microbial community by using exposure to low Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Olsson-Francis, Karen; de la Torre, Rosa; Cockell, Charles S

    2010-04-01

    Many cyanobacteria are known to tolerate environmental extremes. Motivated by an interest in selecting cyanobacteria for applications in space, we launched rocks from a limestone cliff in Beer, Devon, United Kingdom, containing an epilithic and endolithic rock-dwelling community of cyanobacteria into low Earth orbit (LEO) at a height of approximately 300 kilometers. The community was exposed for 10 days to isolate cyanobacteria that can survive exposure to the extreme radiation and desiccating conditions associated with space. Culture-independent (16S rRNA) and culture-dependent methods showed that the cyanobacterial community was composed of Pleurocapsales, Oscillatoriales, and Chroococcales. A single cyanobacterium, a previously uncharacterized extremophile, was isolated after exposure to LEO. We were able to isolate the cyanobacterium from the limestone cliff after exposing the rock-dwelling community to desiccation and vacuum (0.7 x 10(-3) kPa) in the laboratory. The ability of the organism to survive the conditions in space may be linked to the formation of dense colonies. These experiments show how extreme environmental conditions, including space, can be used to select for novel microorganisms. Furthermore, it improves our knowledge of environmental tolerances of extremophilic rock-dwelling cyanobacteria. PMID:20154120

  2. The Late Miocene paleogeography of the Amazon Basin and the evolution of the Amazon River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Cozzuol, Mario; da Silva-Caminha, Silane A. F.; Rigsby, Catherine A.; Absy, Maria Lucia; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    basin, and became instead an erosional area that contributed sediments to the Amazon fluvial system. At that time, the lowland fluvial systems of southwestern Amazonia (the Purus, Jurua and Javarí basins) become isolated from the Andes by the newly formed north-flowing Ucayali system and south-east flowing Madre de Dios System. It was during the early Pliocene that the Amazon fluvial system integrated regionally and acquired its present appearance, and also when it started to drain water and sediments on a large scale to the Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Pediatric Staphylococcus aureus Isolate Genotypes and Infections from the Dawn of the Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Epidemic Era in Chicago, 1994 to 1997

    PubMed Central

    Acree, Mary Ellen; Sieth, Julia J.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Dobbins, Ginette; Lynfield, Ruth; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread infections with community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have occurred in the United States with the dissemination of the USA300 strain beginning in 2000. We examined 105 isolates obtained from children treated at the University of Chicago from 1994 to 1997 (75 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] and 30 MRSA isolates) in order to investigate for possible evidence of USA300 during this period. Infections were defined epidemiologically based on medical record review. The isolates underwent multilocus sequence typing (MLST), as well as assays for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, the protein A gene (spa), and arcA and opp3, proxy markers for the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), characteristic of USA300 MRSA. MRSA isolates also underwent staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping. MSSA isolates belonged to 17 sequence type (ST) groups. The 12 epidemiologically defined CA-MRSA infection isolates were either ST1 (n = 4) or ST8 (n = 8). They belonged to 3 different PFGE types: USA100 (n = 1), USA400 (n = 5), and USA500 (n = 6). Among the CA-MRSA infection isolates, 8 (67%) were PVL+. None of the MRSA or MSSA isolates contained arcA or opp3. Only one MRSA isolate was USA300 by PFGE. This was a health care-associated (HA) MRSA isolate, negative for PVL, that carried SCCmec type II. USA300 with its characteristic features was not identified in the collection from the years 1994 to 1997. PMID:26019202

  4. Fungal communities in mycorrhizal roots of conifer seedlings in forest nurseries under different cultivation systems, assessed by morphotyping, direct sequencing and mycelial isolation.

    PubMed

    Menkis, Audrius; Vasiliauskas, Rimvydas; Taylor, Andrew F S; Stenlid, Jan; Finlay, Roger

    2005-12-01

    Fungi colonising root tips of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies grown under four different seedling cultivation systems were assessed by morphotyping, direct sequencing and isolation methods. Roots were morphotyped using two approaches: (1) 10% of the whole root system from 30 seedlings of each species and (2) 20 randomly selected tips per plant from 300 seedlings of each species. The first approach yielded 15 morphotypes, the second yielded 27, including 18 new morphotypes. The overall community consisted of 33 morphotypes. The level of mycorrhizal colonisation of roots determined by each approach was about 50%. The cultivation system had a marked effect on the level of mycorrhizal colonisation. In pine, the highest level of colonisation (48%) was observed in bare-root systems, while in spruce, colonisation was highest in polyethylene rolls (71%). Direct internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequencing and isolation detected a total of 93 fungal taxa, including 27 mycorrhizal. A total of 71 (76.3%) fungi were identified at least to a genus level. The overlap between the two methods was low. Only 13 (13.9%) of taxa were both sequenced and isolated, 47 (50.5%) were detected exclusively by sequencing and 33 (35.5%) exclusively by isolation. All isolated mycorrhizal fungi were also detected by direct sequencing. Characteristic mycorrhizas were Phialophora finlandia, Amphinema byssoides, Rhizopogon rubescens, Suillus luteus and Thelephora terrestris. There was a moderate similarity in mycorrhizal communities between pine and spruce and among different cultivation systems. PMID:16177926

  5. The Amazon, measuring a mighty river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1967-01-01

    The Amazon, the world's largest river, discharges enough water into the sea each day to provide fresh water to the City of New York for over 9 years. Its flow accounts for about 15 percent of all the fresh water discharged into the oceans by all the rivers of the world. By comparison, the Amazon's flow is over 4 times that of the Congo River, the world's second largest river. And it is 10 times that of the Mississippi, the largest river on the North American Continent.

  6. Molecular characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from outpatients with skin and soft tissue infections in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Jiansheng; Jiang, Yuanshan; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lihua; Zhou, Yanfei; Xu, Huiqiong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristics and virulence genes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) isolates with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Outpatients with SSTIs visiting five medical and health institutions were enrolled from 2011 to 2013. Available ITALIC! S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of PVL genes. For CA-MRSA isolates, we performed typing of staphylococcal cassette chromosome ITALIC! mec(SCC ITALIC! mec), multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and carriage of 27 virulence genes. A total of 203 ITALIC! S. aureusstrains were isolated from 1400 outpatients with SSTIs, and 21 (10.3%) were CA-MRSA isolates. The positive rate of PVL genes among ITALIC! S. aureus, CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible ITALIC! S. aureus(MSSA) isolates were 39.4%, 71.4% and 35.7%, respectively. CA-MRSA strains had greater sensitivity to non-β-lactam antimicrobial agents. All CA-MRSA isolates belonged to SCC ITALIC! mecIV and V, accounting for 47.6% and 52.4%, respectively. ST59 was the most common lineage accounting for 76.2%; ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIVa-PVL-positive clone was found to be the predominant clone, accounting for 38.1%. All CA-MRSA isolates were found to be positive for one or more virulence genes, 28.6% of isolates carried PVL, ITALIC! seb, ITALIC! sek, ITALIC! seq, ITALIC! hla, ITALIC! hlb, ITALIC! hldand ITALIC! hlg-2. CA-MRSA infections were relatively uncommon in outpatients with SSTIs, but they carried many virulence genes, ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIV a-PVL-positive clone was the predominant clone in Wuhan, China. PMID:27060098

  7. Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Asp, N. E.; Souza Filho, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal influence extends ~800 kilometers upstream of the Amazon River mouth, producing semidiurnal oscillations in water elevation and slowing or reversing the flow of the world's largest river. This tidally influenced reach, known as the tidal river, is flanked by an expansive intertidal floodplain, and includes confluences with two large tributaries, the Xingu and Tapajós. The relative magnitude of the seasonal and tidal signals changes along the length of the tidal river, yielding diverse floodplain environments that span a range of seasonal and tidal influence. Near the upstream limit of tides, natural levees isolate the river from the floodplain during low to moderate flows, while in the lower tidal river, natural levees are absent and river-floodplain exchange is dominated by the tides rather than seasonal variation in river stage. This difference between fluvial and tidal systems strongly affects the nature of sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain, including frequency, duration, and depth of inundation. Here we present data on the impact of this fluvial-tidal continuum on sedimentary processes in the floodplain and resultant depositional signatures. Changes in levee prominence, grain size, and sediment accumulation combine to produce the distinct morphologies of floodplain lakes, intertidal backswamps, and intertidal flats. In addition to sediment accumulation on the periodically exposed floodplain, Amazon River sediment accumulates within the drowned tributary confluences of the Xingu and Tapajós Rivers. Here seasonal and tidal changes in water temperature, discharge, and suspended-sediment concentration drive barotropic and baroclinic flows that transport Amazon River sediment into tributary basins. These findings help to constrain the fate of sediment within the ungauged Amazon tidal river, and will help in understanding the response of the lower Amazon River to changes in accommodation space associated with rising sea level, and changes

  8. Toxins and virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with strains isolated from indigenous children and international visitors to a rural community in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Torres, O R; González, W; Lemus, O; Pratdesaba, R A; Matute, J A; Wiklund, G; Sack, D A; Bourgeois, A L; Svennerholm, A-M

    2015-06-01

    Diarrhoea remains a common cause of illness in Guatemala, with children suffering most frequently from the disease. This study directly compared the frequency, enterotoxin, and colonization factor (CF) profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from children living in a rural community in Guatemala and from Western visitors to the same location during the same seasons, using similar detection methodologies. We found that ETEC accounted for 26% of severe cases of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization, 15% of diarrhoea in the community, and 29% of travellers' diarrhoea in visitors staying ⩾2 weeks. The toxin and CF patterns of the ETEC strains isolated from both groups differed significantly (P < 0·0005) as determined by χ 2 = 60·39 for CFs and χ 2 = 35 for toxins, while ETEC phenotypes found in Guatemalan children were comparable to those found in children from other areas of the world. PMID:25233938

  9. Subtype analysis of Blastocystis sp. isolates from human and canine hosts in an urban community in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Belleza, Maria Luz B; Reyes, John Carlo B; Tongol-Rivera, Pilarita N; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-06-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a common gut-dwelling protist of both humans and animals. A cross-sectional survey among humans and their dogs was conducted to determine the prevalence of Blastocystis infection and to characterize the subtype (ST) distribution in an urban community in the Philippines. Fecal specimens from 1,271 humans and 145 dogs were collected and inoculated in diphasic culture medium. Prevalence of Blastocystis by culture was 13.0% (95% CI=11.2-15.0) and 14.5% (95% CI=9.6-21.2) for humans and dogs, respectively. A total of 168 culture isolates were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with seven pairs of ST-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) primers. In humans, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 22.6% (95% CI=17.2-29.0), ST2 with 3.1% (95% CI=1.3-6.7), ST3 with 41.4% (95% CI=34.9-48.6), ST4 with 14.8% (95% CI=10.5-20.6), ST5 with 4.1% (95% CI=2.0-8.0), and unknown ST with 13.9% (95% CI=9.6-19.4). In dogs, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 4.3% (95% CI=0.0-29.0), ST2 with 8.7% (95% CI=1.3-28.0), ST3 with 17.4% (95% CI=6.4-37.7), ST4 with 13.0% (95% CI=3.7-33.0), ST5 with 13.0% (95% CI=3.7-33.0), and unknown ST with 47.8% (95% CI=29.2-67.0). This is the first study that reported Blastocystis ST4 in human and canine hosts in the Philippines. PMID:26902433

  10. Comparison of Photoacclimation in Twelve Freshwater Photoautotrophs (Chlorophyte, Bacillaryophyte, Cryptophyte and Cyanophyte) Isolated from a Natural Community

    PubMed Central

    Deblois, Charles P.; Marchand, Axelle; Juneau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Different representative of algae and cyanobacteria were isolated from a freshwater habitat and cultivated in laboratory to compare their photoacclimation capacity when exposed to a wide range of light intensity and to understand if this factor may modify natural community dominance. All species successfully acclimated to all light intensities and the response of phytoplankton to increased light intensity was similar and included a decrease of most photosynthetic pigments accompanied by an increase in photoprotective pigment content relative to Chl a. Most species also decreased their light absorption efficiency on a biovolume basis. This decrease not only resulted in a lower fraction of energy absorbed by the cell, but also to a lower transfer of energy to PSII and PSI. Furthermore, energy funnelled to PSII or PSI was also rearranged in favour of PSII. High light acclimated organisms also corresponded to high non-photochemical quenching and photosynthetic electron transport reduction state and to a low Φ'M. Thus photoacclimation processes work toward reducing the excitation pressure in high light environment through a reduction of light absorption efficiency, but also by lowering conversion efficiency. Interestingly, all species of our study followed that tendency despite being of different functional groups (colonial, flagellated, different sizes) and of different phylogeny demonstrating the great plasticity and adaptation ability of freshwater phytoplankton to their light environment. These adjustments may explain the decoupling between growth rate and photosynthesis observed above photosynthesis light saturation point for all species. Even if some species did reach higher growth rate in our conditions and thus, should dominate in natural environment with respect to light intensity, we cannot exclude that other environmental factors also influence the population dynamic and make the outcome harder to predict. PMID:23526934

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a γ-Hexachlorocyclohexane Degrader, Sphingobium sp. Strain TKS, Isolated from a γ-Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Michro; Ohhata, Satoshi; Kawasumi, Toru; Nikawadori, Yuki; Kishida, Kouhei; Sato, Takuya; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) degrader, Sphingobium sp. strain TKS, which was isolated from a γ-HCH-degrading microbial community. The genome of TKS consists of two chromosomes and nine plasmids. The lin genes for conversion of γ-HCH to β-ketoadipate are dispersed on chromosome 1 and three out of the nine plasmids. PMID:27056231

  12. The Influence of Changes in Lifestyle and Mercury Exposure in Riverine Populations of the Madeira River (Amazon Basin) near a Hydroelectric Project

    PubMed Central

    Hacon, Sandra S.; Dórea, José G.; Fonseca, Márlon de F.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.; Mourão, Dennys S.; Ruiz, Claudia M. V.; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A.; Mariani, Carolina F.; Bastos, Wanderley R.

    2014-01-01

    In the Amazon Basin, naturally occurring methylmercury bioaccumulates in fish, which is a key source of protein consumed by riverine populations. The hydroelectric power-plant project at Santo Antônio Falls allows us to compare the Hg exposure of riverine populations sparsely distributed on both sides of the Madeira river before the area is to be flooded. From 2009 to 2011, we concluded a population survey of the area (N = 2,008; representing circa 80% of community residents) that estimated fish consumption and mercury exposure of riverine populations with different degrees of lifestyle related to fish consumption. Fish samples from the Madeira river (N = 1,615) and 110 species were analyzed for Hg. Hair-Hg was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in less isolated communities near to the capital of Porto Velho (median 2.32 ppm) than in subsistence communities in the Cuniã Lake, 180 km from Porto Velho city (median 6.3 ppm). Fish Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.06 µg/g, depending on fish size and feeding behavior. Currently available fish in the Madeira river show a wide variability in Hg concentrations. Despite cultural similarities, riparians showed hair-Hg distribution patterns that reflect changes in fish-eating habits driven by subsistence characteristics. PMID:24577285

  13. The influence of changes in lifestyle and mercury exposure in riverine populations of the Madeira River (Amazon Basin) near a hydroelectric project.

    PubMed

    Hacon, Sandra S; Dórea, José G; Fonseca, Márlon de F; Oliveira, Beatriz A; Mourão, Dennys S; Ruiz, Claudia M V; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Mariani, Carolina F; Bastos, Wanderley R

    2014-03-01

    In the Amazon Basin, naturally occurring methylmercury bioaccumulates in fish, which is a key source of protein consumed by riverine populations. The hydroelectric power-plant project at Santo Antônio Falls allows us to compare the Hg exposure of riverine populations sparsely distributed on both sides of the Madeira river before the area is to be flooded. From 2009 to 2011, we concluded a population survey of the area (N = 2,008; representing circa 80% of community residents) that estimated fish consumption and mercury exposure of riverine populations with different degrees of lifestyle related to fish consumption. Fish samples from the Madeira river (N = 1,615) and 110 species were analyzed for Hg. Hair-Hg was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in less isolated communities near to the capital of Porto Velho (median 2.32 ppm) than in subsistence communities in the Cuniã Lake, 180 km from Porto Velho city (median 6.3 ppm). Fish Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.06 µg/g, depending on fish size and feeding behavior. Currently available fish in the Madeira river show a wide variability in Hg concentrations. Despite cultural similarities, riparians showed hair-Hg distribution patterns that reflect changes in fish-eating habits driven by subsistence characteristics. PMID:24577285

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infection patients in Shanghai City, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Zhou, Zhaoyan; Hu, Bijie; Yamamoto, Taro; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important causative pathogen of community-acquired respiratory infection in China. In this study we investigated 37 H. influenzae strains isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) in Shanghai city between Dec 2008 and Apr 2009. H. influenzae clinical isolates were identified, and b-lactamase production tests were conducted and minimal inhibitory concentrations(MIC) were measured. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis(PFGE) was introduced as an effective finger printing method. Two isolates (5.4%) were verified as serotype b strains, and 30 strains (81.1%) were nontypeable H. influenzae. Furthermore, 10 (27.0%) were b-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistance (BLPAR) (TEM-1 type)strains, 11 (29.8%) were low-b-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (Low-BLNAR) strains,and the rest were b-lactamase-negative ampicillin-susceptible(BLNAS) strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations(MIC90; lg/ml) were 2 for ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.05 force fotaxime, 16 for cefaclor, 2 for azithromycin, 0.12 for levofloxacin, and 4 for imipenem. Fingerprint typing by PFGE revealed 23 independent patterns for the isolates. Pattern A (defined in this study) was predominant in BLPAR strains, and a variety of other patterns were detected in Low-BLNAR and BLNAS strains. Although the incidence of ampicillin resistant H. influenzae is increasing in CARTI patients in China, current antimicrobial chemotherapy seems to be effective. PMID:22302696

  15. Hospital-based community outreach to medically isolated elders. The nurse gerontologist is a key link in this health care delivery system in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Haworth, M J

    1993-01-01

    The development of a hospital-based community outreach nursing program has been beneficial for St. Mary's Hospital in several ways. The outreach program has served a community need in that many elderly persons who were previously medically isolated have now been located and linked to the health care delivery system. The outreach program has reinforced the hospital's presence and leadership role in the community through its work with the elderly population. The hospital is seen as being committed to bringing health care services to its elderly neighbors. Through the establishment and coordination of health care services to previously isolated and unconnected elderly persons, there has been a broadened revenue base for hospital operations. The outreach program also supports the mission, philosophy, and objectives of the Daughters of Charity. The efforts of this outreach program have shown that high-quality, accessible, and coordinated care for the elderly population may be obtained using a nurse gerontologist. Efforts to expand the market share of elderly persons by the hospital has continued through the development of other innovative health programs, resources, and services. Hospital administrators need to develop programs and services that effectively utilize limited health care dollars and resources to improve the quality of health care within the community. PMID:8383077

  16. The turbidity behavior in an Amazon floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcântara, E.; Novo, E.; Stech, J.; Lorenzzetti, J.; Barbosa, C.; Assireu, A.; Souza, A.

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the turbidity behavior of an Amazon Floodplain Lake. Observations of turbidity provide quantitative information about water quality. However, the number of available in situ measurements for water quality determination is usually limited in time and space. Here, we present an analysis of the temporal and spatial variability using two approaches: (i) the first is based on wavelet analysis of a turbidity time series measured by an automatic monitoring system; (ii) the second is based on turbidity samples measured in different locations and then interpolated by an ordinary kriging algorithm. The space/time turbidity variability is clearly related to the Amazon River flood pulses in the floodplain. When the water level in the floodplain is rising or receding, the exchange between the Amazon River and the floodplain is the major driving force in turbidity variability. At high water level, the turbidity variability is controlled by the lake bathymetry. Finally, when the water level is low, the wind action and lake morphometry are the main causes of turbidity variability. The combined use of temporal and spatial data showed a great potential for understanding the turbidity behavior in a complex aquatic system, like the Amazon floodplain.

  17. Polycystic Echinococcosis in Pacas, Amazon Region, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Pedro; Baquedano, Laura E.; Sanchez, Elisabeth; Aramburu, Javier; Gomez-Puerta, Luis A.; Mamani, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    In the Peruvian Amazon, paca meat is consumed by humans. To determine human risk for polycystic echinococcosis, we examined wild pacas from 2 villages; 15 (11.7%) of 128 were infected with Echinococcus vogeli tapeworms. High E. vogeli prevalence among pacas indicates potential risk for humans living in E. vogeli–contaminated areas. PMID:25695937

  18. Principal Connection / Amazon and the Whole Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent controversy over Amazon's culture has strong implications for the whole child approach, and it offers powerful lessons for principals. A significant difference between the culture of so many businesses today and the culture at good schools is that in good schools, the welfare of the employees is very important. Student success is the…

  19. Amazon Flooded Forest. Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Todd

    This teacher's resource guide was created to accompany the Amazon Flooded Forest exhibit at the Oregon Zoo. The enclosed lessons and activities are designed to extend into several aspects of daily curriculum including science, math, reading, writing, speaking, and geography. The materials are intended for use in grades 3-6 although most activities…

  20. Stress-driven speciation in novel strains of Bacillus isolated from a microbial community in the Mojave Desert, a Mars-analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Lera, M.; Marcu, O.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial communities are composed of complex multispecies that coevolve within the constraints of the environment over time. In the harsh, desiccated regions of the Mojave Desert, a Mars-analog, the microbial community in the surface layer is exposed to daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature, humidity, nutrients, and UV index. Strategies of adaptation to physical factors in a microbial microenvironment determine the limits of adaptation and survival to sudden climate changes, with implications for planetary habitability. Here we show that novel strains of Bacillus niacini and B. thuringiensis isolated from the top soil of the Mojave Desert are differentially adapted to selective pressures imposed by caloric restriction and oxidative stress and show distinct social interactions. Metabolic profiling using Biolog plates for all isolates showed drastically different "metabolic fingerprints," with some only able to utilize very specific carbon sources in contrast to others that were able to breakdown most sources but for only a limited time. The stress response to hydrogen peroxide was also differential, with catalase activity levels of the Bacillus species from Mojave being much lower than the control species of soil Bacillus, suggesting that their survival may depend on other microbes from the same community for protection from oxidative damage. We also investigated the social communication and interaction of the four strains by spatial microenvironment assays, and uncovered unusual swarming and swimming abilities through motility assays. The cooperation and conflict in the microbial population reflect adaptations to oxidative stress and caloric restriction, which can be the driving forces for differences in phenotypes, interactions, metabolic ability, and ultimately, speciation. This study supports the theory of codependencies of organisms in a community for protection or access to "public goods" for survival in a harsh, fluctuating environment, and

  1. Road building, land use and climate change: prospects for environmental governance in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Perz, Stephen; Brilhante, Silvia; Brown, Foster; Caldas, Marcellus; Ikeda, Santos; Mendoza, Elsa; Overdevest, Christine; Reis, Vera; Reyes, Juan Fernando; Rojas, Daniel; Schmink, Marianne; Souza, Carlos; Walker, Robert

    2008-05-27

    Some coupled land-climate models predict a dieback of Amazon forest during the twenty-first century due to climate change, but human land use in the region has already reduced the forest cover. The causation behind land use is complex, and includes economic, institutional, political and demographic factors. Pre-eminent among these factors is road building, which facilitates human access to natural resources that beget forest fragmentation. While official government road projects have received considerable attention, unofficial road building by interest groups is expanding more rapidly, especially where official roads are being paved, yielding highly fragmented forest mosaics. Effective governance of natural resources in the Amazon requires a combination of state oversight and community participation in a 'hybrid' model of governance. The MAP Initiative in the southwestern Amazon provides an example of an innovative hybrid approach to environmental governance. It embodies a polycentric structure that includes government agencies, NGOs, universities and communities in a planning process that links scientific data to public deliberations in order to mitigate the effects of new infrastructure and climate change. PMID:18267915

  2. Migration Within the Frontier: The Second Generation Colonization in the Ecuadorian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David L.; Bilsborrow, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1970s, migration to the Amazon has led to a growing human presence and resulting dramatic changes in the physical landscape of the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon frontier, including considerable deforestation. Over time, a second demographic phenomenon has emerged with the children of the original migrants leaving settler farms to set out on their own. The vast majority have remained in the Amazon region, some contributing to further changes in land use via rural-rural migration to establish new farms and others to incipient urbanization. This paper uses longitudinal, multi-scale data on settler colonists between 1990 and 1999 to analyze rural-rural and rural-urban migration among second-generation colonists within the region. Following a description of migrants and settlers in terms of their individual, household and community characteristics, a multinomial discrete-time hazard model is used to estimate the determinants of out-migration of the second generation settlers to both urban and rural areas. We find significant differences in the determinants of migration to the two types of destinations in personal characteristics, human capital endowments, stage of farm and household lifecycles, migration networks, and access to community resources and infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy implications of migrants' choice of rural versus urban destinations. PMID:19657471

  3. Modelling basin-wide variations in Amazon forest photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Lina; Lloyd, Jon; Domingues, Tomas; Fyllas, Nikolaos; Patino, Sandra; Dolman, Han; Sitch, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    type parameter values are assigned and assumed invariant with environmental condition but also ii) these models use leaf N as a factor that limit photosynthesis. Instead, since leaf P may also limit photosynthesis of the tropical forest (Reich et al. 2009), we use a more specific description of photosynthetic capacity across the basin based on the model evaluation done in Mercado et al. (2009) in which canopy photosynthetic capacity is related to foliar P but also using the relationships derived between canopy photosynthesis and leaf nutrients (N and P) from measurements in tropical trees (Domingues et al.In review). A study of this kind can inform the global vegetation/climate community as to the need for variability in key model parameters in order to accurately simulate carbon fluxes across the Amazon basin. Baker, T. R., et al. 2004. Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences 359 (1443):353-365. Phillips, O. L. et al. 2004. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences 359 (1443):381-407. Malhi, Y. et al. 2004. The above-ground coarse wood productivity of 104 Neotropical forest plots. Global Change Biology 10 (5):563-591. Mercado, L.M. et al. 2009. Impact of changes in diffuse radiation on the global land carbon sink. Nature 458 (7241), 1014. Cox, P. M. et al. 1998. A canopy conductance and photosynthesis model for use in a GCM land surface scheme. Journal of Hydrology 213 (1-4):79-9 Sitch, S. et al. 2003. Evaluation of ecosystem dynamics, plant geography and terrestrial carbon cycling in the LPJ dynamic global vegetation model. Global Change Biology 9 (2):161-185. Reich B. R. et al. 2009. Leaf phosphorus influences the photosynhtesis-nitrogen relation: a cross-biome analysis of 314 species. Oecologia, doi 10.1007/s00442-009-1291-3. Domingues, T. et al. In review. Co-limitation of

  4. Plasmid-Mediated AmpC: Prevalence in Community-Acquired Isolates in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Risk Factors for Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Reuland, E. Ascelijn; Halaby, Teysir; Hays, John P.; de Jongh, Denise M. C.; Snetselaar, Henrieke D. R.; van Keulen, Marte; Elders, Petra J. M.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; al Naiemi, Nashwan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of pAmpC beta-lactamases in community-acquired Gram negative bacteria in the Netherlands, and to identify possible risk factors for carriage of these strains. Methods Fecal samples were obtained from community-dwelling volunteers. Participants also returned a questionnaire for analysis of risk factors. Screening for pAmpC was performed with selective enrichment broth and a selective screening agar. Confirmation of AmpC-production was performed with two double disc combination tests: cefotaxime and ceftazidime with either boronic acid or cloxacillin as inhibitor. Multiplex PCR was used as gold standard for detection of pAmpC. 16S rRNA PCR and AFLP were performed as required, plasmids were identified by PCR-based replicon typing. Questionnaire results were analyzed with SPSS, version 20.0. Results Fecal samples were obtained from 550 volunteers; mean age 51 years (range: 18–91), 61% were females. pAmpC was present in seven E. coli isolates (7/550, 1.3%, 0.6–2.7 95% CI): six CMY-2-like pAmpC and one DHA. ESBL-encoding genes were found in 52/550 (9.5%, 7.3–12.2 95% CI) isolates; these were predominantly blaCTX-M genes. Two isolates had both ESBL and pAmpC. Admission to a hospital in the previous year was the only risk factor we identified. Conclusions Our data indicate that the prevalence of pAmpC in the community seems still low. However, since pAmpC-producing isolates were not identified as ESBL producers by routine algorithms, there is consistent risk that further increase of their prevalence might go undetected. PMID:25587716

  5. Unofficial Road Building in the Brazilian Amazon: Dilemmas and Models for Road Governance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perz, Stephen G.; Overdevest, Christine; Caldas, Marcellus M.; Walker, Robert T.; Arima, Eugenio Y.

    2007-01-01

    Unofficial roads form dense networks in landscapes, generating a litany of negative ecological outcomes, but unofficial roads in frontier areas are also instrumental in local livelihoods and community development. This trade-off poses dilemmas for the governance of unofficial roads. Unofficial road building in frontier areas of the Brazilian Amazon illustrates the challenges of 'road governance.' Both state-based and community based governance models exhibit important liabilities for governing unofficial roads. Whereas state-based governance has experienced difficulties in adapting to specific local contexts and interacting effectively with local interest groups, community-based governance has a mixed record owing to social inequalities and conflicts among local interest groups. A state-community hybrid model may offer more effective governance of unofficial road building by combining the oversight capacity of the state with locally grounded community management via participatory decision-making.

  6. Predictive Modelling of Contagious Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabel M. D.; Purves, Drew; Souza, Carlos; Ewers, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forests are diminishing in extent due primarily to the rapid expansion of agriculture, but the future magnitude and geographical distribution of future tropical deforestation is uncertain. Here, we introduce a dynamic and spatially-explicit model of deforestation that predicts the potential magnitude and spatial pattern of Amazon deforestation. Our model differs from previous models in three ways: (1) it is probabilistic and quantifies uncertainty around predictions and parameters; (2) the overall deforestation rate emerges “bottom up”, as the sum of local-scale deforestation driven by local processes; and (3) deforestation is contagious, such that local deforestation rate increases through time if adjacent locations are deforested. For the scenarios evaluated–pre- and post-PPCDAM (“Plano de Ação para Proteção e Controle do Desmatamento na Amazônia”)–the parameter estimates confirmed that forests near roads and already deforested areas are significantly more likely to be deforested in the near future and less likely in protected areas. Validation tests showed that our model correctly predicted the magnitude and spatial pattern of deforestation that accumulates over time, but that there is very high uncertainty surrounding the exact sequence in which pixels are deforested. The model predicts that under pre-PPCDAM (assuming no change in parameter values due to, for example, changes in government policy), annual deforestation rates would halve between 2050 compared to 2002, although this partly reflects reliance on a static map of the road network. Consistent with other models, under the pre-PPCDAM scenario, states in the south and east of the Brazilian Amazon have a high predicted probability of losing nearly all forest outside of protected areas by 2050. This pattern is less strong in the post-PPCDAM scenario. Contagious spread along roads and through areas lacking formal protection could allow deforestation to reach the core, which is

  7. Predictive modelling of contagious deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabel M D; Purves, Drew; Souza, Carlos; Ewers, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forests are diminishing in extent due primarily to the rapid expansion of agriculture, but the future magnitude and geographical distribution of future tropical deforestation is uncertain. Here, we introduce a dynamic and spatially-explicit model of deforestation that predicts the potential magnitude and spatial pattern of Amazon deforestation. Our model differs from previous models in three ways: (1) it is probabilistic and quantifies uncertainty around predictions and parameters; (2) the overall deforestation rate emerges "bottom up", as the sum of local-scale deforestation driven by local processes; and (3) deforestation is contagious, such that local deforestation rate increases through time if adjacent locations are deforested. For the scenarios evaluated-pre- and post-PPCDAM ("Plano de Ação para Proteção e Controle do Desmatamento na Amazônia")-the parameter estimates confirmed that forests near roads and already deforested areas are significantly more likely to be deforested in the near future and less likely in protected areas. Validation tests showed that our model correctly predicted the magnitude and spatial pattern of deforestation that accumulates over time, but that there is very high uncertainty surrounding the exact sequence in which pixels are deforested. The model predicts that under pre-PPCDAM (assuming no change in parameter values due to, for example, changes in government policy), annual deforestation rates would halve between 2050 compared to 2002, although this partly reflects reliance on a static map of the road network. Consistent with other models, under the pre-PPCDAM scenario, states in the south and east of the Brazilian Amazon have a high predicted probability of losing nearly all forest outside of protected areas by 2050. This pattern is less strong in the post-PPCDAM scenario. Contagious spread along roads and through areas lacking formal protection could allow deforestation to reach the core, which is currently

  8. Soil bacterial and fungal community successions under the stress of chlorpyrifos application and molecular characterization of chlorpyrifos-degrading isolates using ERIC-PCR*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lie-zhong; Li, Yan-li; Yu, Yun-long

    2014-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used insecticide in recent years, and it will produce adverse effects on soil when applied on crops or mixed with soil. In this study, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were combined to explore the bacterial and fungal community successions in soil treated with 5 and 20 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos. Furthermore, isolates capable of efficiently decomposing chlorpyrifos were molecular-typed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR). Under the experimental conditions, degradation of chlorpyrifos in soil was interpreted with the first-order kinetics, and the half-lives of chlorpyrifos at 5 and 20 mg/kg doses were calculated to be 8.25 and 8.29 d, respectively. DGGE fingerprint and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the composition of the fungal community was obviously changed with the chlorpyrifos treatment, and that samples of chlorpyrifos treatment were significantly separated from those of the control from the beginning to the end. While for the bacterial community, chlorpyrifos-treated soil samples were apparently different in the first 30 d and recovered to a similar level of the control up until 60 d, and the distance in the PCA between the chlorpyrifos-treated samples and the control was getting shorter through time and was finally clustered into one group. Together, our results demonstrated that the application of chlorpyrifos could affect the fungal community structure in a quick and lasting way, while only affecting the bacterial community in a temporary way. Finally, nine typical ERIC types of chlorpyrifos-degrading isolates were screened. PMID:24711353

  9. Soil bacterial and fungal community successions under the stress of chlorpyrifos application and molecular characterization of chlorpyrifos-degrading isolates using ERIC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie-zhong; Li, Yan-li; Yu, Yun-long

    2014-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used insecticide in recent years, and it will produce adverse effects on soil when applied on crops or mixed with soil. In this study, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were combined to explore the bacterial and fungal community successions in soil treated with 5 and 20 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos. Furthermore, isolates capable of efficiently decomposing chlorpyrifos were molecular-typed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR). Under the experimental conditions, degradation of chlorpyrifos in soil was interpreted with the first-order kinetics, and the half-lives of chlorpyrifos at 5 and 20 mg/kg doses were calculated to be 8.25 and 8.29 d, respectively. DGGE fingerprint and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the composition of the fungal community was obviously changed with the chlorpyrifos treatment, and that samples of chlorpyrifos treatment were significantly separated from those of the control from the beginning to the end. While for the bacterial community, chlorpyrifos-treated soil samples were apparently different in the first 30 d and recovered to a similar level of the control up until 60 d, and the distance in the PCA between the chlorpyrifos-treated samples and the control was getting shorter through time and was finally clustered into one group. Together, our results demonstrated that the application of chlorpyrifos could affect the fungal community structure in a quick and lasting way, while only affecting the bacterial community in a temporary way. Finally, nine typical ERIC types of chlorpyrifos-degrading isolates were screened. PMID:24711353

  10. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from community-acquired urinary tract infections during 1998-2003 in Manisa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurutepe, Semra; Surucuoglu, Suheyla; Sezgin, Cenk; Gazi, Horu; Gulay, Mehmet; Ozbakkaloglu, Beril

    2005-06-01

    Urinary tract infections are among the most common infections with an increasing resistance to antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to determine the change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) for the years 1998 through 2003 and to suggest that the current empirical antibiotic therapy used for these patients is inappropriate. During the study period, 7,335 community urine samples of which 1,203 (16.4%) grew bacterial isolates were analyzed. Among the total of 1,203 isolates, 880 (73.2%) were E. coli. The range of resistance of E. coli to ampicillin was 47.8 to 64.6% and that to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 37.1 to 44.6% during the study period. The susceptibility pattern of E. coli to nitrofurantoin and cefuroxime did not vary significantly over the 6-year period. There was a significant increase in the susceptibility of E. coli to ciprofloxacin (11.3 - 26.7%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (18.4 - 29.2%) and gentamicin (7.0 - 25.6%) (P < 0.05). Empirical initial treatment with ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was thus inadequate in approximately half of UTI cases in our region. PMID:15973007

  11. Declining fertility on the frontier: the Ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Carr, David L; Pan, William K Y; Bilsborrow, Richard E

    2006-09-01

    This paper examines farm and household characteristics associated with a rapid fertility decline in a forest frontier of the Ecuadorian Amazon. The Amazon basin and other rainforests in the tropics are among the last frontiers in the ongoing global fertility transition. The pace of this transition along agricultural frontiers will likely have major implications for future forest transitions, rural development, and ultimately urbanization in frontier areas. The study here is based upon data from a probability sample of 172 women who lived on the same farm in 1990 and 1999. These data are from perhaps the first region-wide longitudinal survey of fertility in an agricultural frontier. Descriptive analyses indicate that fertility has plummeted in the region, which is surprising since it had remained high and unchanging among migrant colonists up to 1990. Thus only half of the women in our sample reported having a birth during the 1990-1999 time period, and most women report in 1999 that they do not want to have any more children. Analyses, controlling for women's age, corroborate hypotheses about land-fertility relations. For example, women from households with a legal land title had fewer than half as many children as those from households without a title. Large cattle (pasture) holdings and hiring laborers to work on the farm (which may replace household labor) are both related to socio-economic status that is traditionally associated with lower fertility. Similarly, distance to the nearest community center is positively related to fertility. Factors negatively related to fertility include increasing temporary out-migration of adult men or women from the household, asset accumulation, and access to electricity. PMID:19657468

  12. Climate Change Impacts in the Amazon. Review of scientific literature

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-15

    The Amazon's hydrological cycle is a key driver of global climate, and global climate is therefore sensitive to changes in the Amazon. Climate change threatens to substantially affect the Amazon region, which in turn is expected to alter global climate and increase the risk of biodiversity loss. In this literature review the following subjects can be distinguished: Observed Climatic Change and Variability, Predicted Climatic Change, Impacts, Forests, Freshwater, Agriculture, Health, and Sea Level Rise.

  13. Selective Logging in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Knapp, David E.; Broadbent, Eben N.; Oliveira, Paulo J. C.; Keller, Michael; Silva, Jose N.

    2005-10-01

    Amazon deforestation has been measured by remote sensing for three decades. In comparison, selective logging has been mostly invisible to satellites. We developed a large-scale, high-resolution, automated remote-sensing analysis of selective logging in the top five timber-producing states of the Brazilian Amazon. Logged areas ranged from 12,075 to 19,823 square kilometers per year (+/-14%) between 1999 and 2002, equivalent to 60 to 123% of previously reported deforestation area. Up to 1200 square kilometers per year of logging were observed on conservation lands. Each year, 27 million to 50 million cubic meters of wood were extracted, and a gross flux of ~0.1 billion metric tons of carbon was destined for release to the atmosphere by logging.

  14. Bacterial Community Analysis, New Exoelectrogen Isolation and Enhanced Performance of Microbial Electrochemical Systems Using Nano-Decorated Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shoutao

    Microbial electrochemical systems (MESs) have attracted much research attention in recent years due to their promising applications in renewable energy generation, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. In a MES, microorganisms interact with electrodes via electrons, catalyzing oxidation and reduction reactions at the anode and the cathode. The bacterial community of a high power mixed consortium MESs (maximum power density is 6.5W/m2) was analyzed by using denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S DNA clone library methods. The bacterial DGGE profiles were relatively complex (more than 10 bands) but only three brightly dominant bands in DGGE results. These results indicated there are three dominant bacterial species in mixed consortium MFCs. The 16S DNA clone library method results revealed that the predominant bacterial species in mixed culture is Geobacter sp (66%), Arcobacter sp and Citrobacter sp. These three bacterial species reached to 88% of total bacterial species. This result is consistent with the DGGE result which showed that three bright bands represented three dominant bacterial species. Exoelectrogenic bacterial strain SX-1 was isolated from a mediator-less microbial fuel cell by conventional plating techniques with ferric citrate as electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed that it was related to the members of Citrobacter genus with Citrobacter sp. sdy-48 being the most closely related species. The bacterial strain SX-1 produced electricity from citrate, acetate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol, and lactose in MFCs with the highest current density of 205 mA/m2 generated from citrate. Cyclic voltammetry analysis indicated that membrane associated proteins may play an important role in facilitating electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrode. This is the first study that demonstrates that Citrobacter species can transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors

  15. Bacterial Community Analysis, New Exoelectrogen Isolation and Enhanced Performance of Microbial Electrochemical Systems Using Nano-Decorated Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shoutao

    Microbial electrochemical systems (MESs) have attracted much research attention in recent years due to their promising applications in renewable energy generation, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. In a MES, microorganisms interact with electrodes via electrons, catalyzing oxidation and reduction reactions at the anode and the cathode. The bacterial community of a high power mixed consortium MESs (maximum power density is 6.5W/m2) was analyzed by using denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S DNA clone library methods. The bacterial DGGE profiles were relatively complex (more than 10 bands) but only three brightly dominant bands in DGGE results. These results indicated there are three dominant bacterial species in mixed consortium MFCs. The 16S DNA clone library method results revealed that the predominant bacterial species in mixed culture is Geobacter sp (66%), Arcobacter sp and Citrobacter sp. These three bacterial species reached to 88% of total bacterial species. This result is consistent with the DGGE result which showed that three bright bands represented three dominant bacterial species. Exoelectrogenic bacterial strain SX-1 was isolated from a mediator-less microbial fuel cell by conventional plating techniques with ferric citrate as electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed that it was related to the members of Citrobacter genus with Citrobacter sp. sdy-48 being the most closely related species. The bacterial strain SX-1 produced electricity from citrate, acetate, glucose, sucrose, glycerol, and lactose in MFCs with the highest current density of 205 mA/m2 generated from citrate. Cyclic voltammetry analysis indicated that membrane associated proteins may play an important role in facilitating electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrode. This is the first study that demonstrates that Citrobacter species can transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors

  16. Suspected Lead Poisoning in an Amazon Parrot

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    A double yellow headed Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala tresmariae) of unknown age and sex was examined for an acute onset of anorexia, listlessness, central nervous system signs and diarrhea. A tentative diagnosis of lead toxicosis was achieved based on radiographs, clinical pathology and response to therapy. Chelation therapy (Calcium EDTA) and supportive measures resulted in an uneventful recovery. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422638

  17. Spread of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates in Community and Nosocomial Environments in Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Nuno; Leitão, Joana; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Caniça, Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Of the 181 unduplicated Escherichia coli strains isolated in nine different hospitals in three Portuguese regions, 119 were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-CTX-M producers and were selected for phenotype and genotype characterization. CTX-M producer strains were prevalent among community-acquired infections (56%), urinary tract infections (76%), and patients ≥60 years old (76%). In MIC tests, all strains were resistant to cefotaxime, 92% were resistant to ceftazidime, 93% were resistant to quinolones, 89% were resistant to aminoglycoside, and 26% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; all strains were sensitive to carbapenems, and 92% of the strains had a multidrug resistance phenotype. Molecular methods identified 109 isolates harboring a blaCTX-M-15 gene, 1 harboring the blaCTX-M-32 gene (first identification in the country), and 9 harboring the blaCTX-M-14 gene. All isolates presented the ISEcp1 element upstream from the blaCTX-M genes; one presented the IS903 element (downstream of blaCTX-M-14 gene), and none had the IS26 element; 85% carried blaTEM-1B, and 84% also carried a blaOXA-30. Genetic relatedness analysis based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis defined five clusters and indicated that 76% of all isolates (from cluster IV) corresponded to a single epidemic strain. Of the 47 strains from one hospital, 41 belonged to cluster IV and were disseminated in three main wards. CTX-M-producing E. coli strains are currently a problem in Portugal, with CTX-M-15 particularly common. This study suggests that the horizontal transfer of blaCTX-M genes, mediated by plasmids and/or mobile elements, contributes to the dissemination of CTX-M enzymes to community and hospital environments. The use of extended-spectrum cephalosporins, quinolones, and aminoglycosides is compromised, leaving carbapenems as the therapeutic option for severe infections caused by ESBL producers. PMID:17371815

  18. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon. PMID:17308715

  19. Carbon isotopic composition of Amazon shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Showers, W.J.; Angle, D.G.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of carbon isotopes in Amazon shelf sediment is controlled by the same processes that are forming the modern subaqueous delta. The terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) isotopic carbon signal observed in surficial sediments near the river mouth extends over 400 km northwest along the shelf. Terrestrial carbon is associated with areas of rapid sediment accumulation (topset and foreset regions). A sharp boundary between terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) and marine (-23 to -22 per thousand) isotopic carbon values in surficial sediments is associated with a change in depositional conditions (foreset to bottomset regions) and a decrease in sediment accumulation rate. POC water-column isotopic values (-27 per thousand) near the river mouth are similar to the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values, but POC water-column samples collected 20 km off the river mouth have marine carbon isotopic values (-22 to -19 per thousand) and differ from the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values. These water column observations are related to variations in turbidity and productivity. Down-core isotopic variation is only observed in cores taken in areas of lower sediment accumulation rates. These observations indicate that the organic carbon in Amazon shelf sediment is dominantly terrestrial in composition, and the location of deposition of this carbon is controlled by modern processes of sediment accumulation. The modern Amazon shelf is similar to large clinoform shale deposits of the Cretaceous in North America. Thus, the stratigraphic setting may help predict the isotopic variations of carbon in ancient deposits.

  20. Petrobras eyes LNG project in Amazon region

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-07

    The Brazilian state oil company has proved gas reserves in the Rio Urucu area of the Amazon jungle totaling 1.84 tcf. That compares with 3.08 tcf contained in the offshore Campos basin, source of most of Brazil`s oil and gas production. The environmentally sensitive Urucu region is one of the most dense, remote jungles in the world. Because of environmental concerns about pipelines in the rain forest and a government emphasis on boosting the natural gas share of Brazil`s energy mix, a small liquefied natural gas project is shaping up as the best option for developing and marketing Urucu gas. The amazon campaign underscores a government initiative to boost Brazilian consumption of natural gas. In Brazil natural gas accounts for only 4% of primary energy consumption. Some years ago, the government set an official goal of boosting the gas share of the primary energy mix to 10% by 2000. The paper discusses current drilling activities, gas production and processing, the logistics of the upper Amazon, and gas markets.

  1. Amazon basin: a system in equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Salati, E.; Vose, P.B.

    1984-07-13

    Despite very active deforestation in the last decade, the Amazon Basin is still primarily covered with trees and is a system in equilibrium. The Andes form a barrier at the western end of the basin and, coupled with the prevailing easterly winds, ensure an almost unique precipitation and water-recycling regime. On average 50% of the precipitation is recycled, and in some areas even more. The soils are poor. Most of the nitrogen and phosphorus is found in the soil, and the remaining nutrient elements are found in the standing biomass. There is some nutrient recycling and little loss from the intact ecosystem, and the small input of nutrients from precipitation maintains a small positive nutrient balance. Continued large-scale deforestation is likely to lead to increased erosion and water runoff with initial flooding in the lower Amazon, together with reduced evapotranspiration and ultimately reduced precipitation. Reduced precipitation in the Amazon could increase the tendency toward continentality and adversely affect climate and the present agriculture in south-central Brazil. 83 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  2. Amazon basin: a system in equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Salati, E; Vose, P B

    1984-07-13

    Despite the very active deforestation of the last decade, the Amazon Basin is still primarily covered with trees and is a system in equilibrium. The Andes form a barrier at the western end of the basin and, coupled with the prevailing easterly winds, ensure an almost unique precipitation and water-recycling regime. On average 50 percent of the precipitation is recycled, and in some areas even more. The soils are poor. Most of the nitrogen and phosphorus is found in the soil, and the remaining nutrient elements are found in the standing biomass. There is some nutrient recycling and little loss from the intact ecosystem, and the small input of nutrients from precipitation maintains a small positive nutrient balance. Continued large-scale deforestation is likely to lead to increased erosion and water runoff with initial flooding in the lower Amazon, together with reduced evapotranspiration and ultimately reduced precipitation. Reduced precipitation in the Amazon could increase the tendency toward continentality and adversely affect climate and the present agriculture in south-central Brazil. PMID:17837908

  3. Biomarkers of Mercury Exposure in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Nathália Santos Serrão; Lima, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Mercury exposure in the Amazon has been studied since the 1980s decade and the assessment of human mercury exposure in the Amazon is difficult given that the natural occurrence of this metal is high and the concentration of mercury in biological samples of this population exceeds the standardized value of normality established by WHO. Few studies have focused on the discovery of mercury biomarkers in the region's population. In this way, some studies have used genetics as well as immunological and cytogenetic tools in order to find a molecular biomarker for assessing the toxicological effect of mercury in the Amazonian population. Most of those studies focused attention on the relation between mercury exposure and autoimmunity and, because of that, they will be discussed in more detail. Here we introduce the general aspects involved with each biomarker that was studied in the region in order to contextualize the reader and add information about the Amazonian life style and health that may be considered for future studies. We hope that, in the future, the toxicological studies in this field use high technological tools, such as the next generation sequencing and proteomics skills, in order to comprehend basic questions regarding the metabolic route of mercury in populations that are under constant exposure, such as in the Amazon. PMID:24895619

  4. Sustainable settlement in the Brazilian Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, A.L.O.; Campari, J.S.

    1996-02-01

    Presents and analyzes the largest and most complete data set ever produced on the economic variables that influence deforestation by small farmers in the Amazon. This landmark study presents the largest and most analytically complete data set ever produced on the economic variables that influence deforestation by small farmers in the Amazon. The authors examine the changing character of the Amazon frontier based on field surveys conducted during twenty years of settlement experience. By observing the economic behavior of small farmers from colonization during the 1970s until the chaotic aftermath of the early 1990s, the authors are able to pinpoint a central paradox: unsuccessful farmers tend to be unstable, moving on to new frontiers where they will again destroy forests. Successful farmers tend to increase deforestation in the places where they remain. The findings reveal that much of the Amazonian frontier land cleared by pioneers in the 1970s is becoming agriculturally unproductive. Small farmers should be rewarded for staying where they are and for pursuing sustainable farming. Good farming methods must be promoted, and deforestation must be penalized. The authors recommend the implementation of innovative economic policies and new forms of cooperation between environmental and economic agencies, including the World Bank, at both local and international levels. The aim of these policies should be to raise agricultural incomes and reduce environmental aggression.

  5. Microbial Community Analysis in the Roots of Aquatic Plants and Isolation of Novel Microbes Including an Organism of the Candidate Phylum OP10

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nigaya, Masahiro; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    A number of molecular ecological studies have revealed complex and unique microbial communities in various terrestrial plant roots; however, little is known about the microbial communities of aquatic plant roots in spite of their potential use for water quality improvement in aquatic environments (e.g. floating treatment wetland system). Here, we report the microbial communities inhabiting the roots of emerged plants, reed (Phragmites australis) and Japanese loosestrife (Lythrum anceps), collected from a floating treatment wetland in a pond by both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the microbial compositions between the two aquatic plant roots were clearly different (e.g. the predominant microbe was Betaproteobacteria for reed and Alphaproteobacteria for Japanese loosestrife). In comparisons of microbial communities between the plant roots and pond water taken from near the plants, the microbial diversity in the plant roots (e.g. 4.40–4.26 Shannon-Weiner index) were higher than that of pond water (e.g. 3.15 Shannon-Weiner index). Furthermore, the plant roots harbored 2.5–3.5 times more phylogenetically novel clone phylotypes than pond water. The culture-dependent approach also revealed differences in the microbial composition and diversity among the two plant roots and pond water. More importantly, compared to pond water, we succeeded in isolating approximately two times more novel isolate phylotypes, including a bacterium of candidate phylum OP10 (recently named Armatimonadetes) from the plant roots. These findings suggest that aquatic plants roots are significant sources for a variety of novel organisms. PMID:22791047

  6. Natural infection of Plasmodium brasilianum in humans: Man and monkey share quartan malaria parasites in the Venezuelan Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Lalremruata, Albert; Magris, Magda; Vivas-Martínez, Sarai; Koehler, Maike; Esen, Meral; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Perkins, Douglas Jay; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Metzger, Wolfram G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The quartan malaria parasite Plasmodium malariae is the widest spread and best adapted human malaria parasite. The simian Plasmodium brasilianum causes quartan fever in New World monkeys and resembles P. malariae morphologically. Since the genetics of the two parasites are nearly identical, differing only in a range of mutations expected within a species, it has long been speculated that the two are the same. However, no naturally acquired infection with parasites termed as P. brasilianum has been found in humans until now. Methods We investigated malaria cases from remote Yanomami indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon and analyzed the genes coding for the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the small subunit of ribosomes (18S) by species-specific PCR and capillary based-DNA sequencing. Findings Based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing, we identified 12 patients harboring malaria parasites which were 100% identical with P. brasilianum isolated from the monkey, Alouatta seniculus. Translated amino acid sequences of the CS protein gene showed identical immunodominant repeat units between quartan malaria parasites isolated from both humans and monkeys. Interpretation This study reports, for the first time, naturally acquired infections in humans with parasites termed as P. brasilianum. We conclude that quartan malaria parasites are easily exchanged between humans and monkeys in Latin America. We hypothesize a lack of host specificity in mammalian hosts and consider quartan malaria to be a true anthropozoonosis. Since the name P. brasilianum suggests a malaria species distinct from P. malariae, we propose that P. brasilianum should have a nomenclatorial revision in case further research confirms our findings. The expansive reservoir of mammalian hosts discriminates quartan malaria from other Plasmodium spp. and requires particular research efforts. PMID:26501116

  7. The legacy of cultural landscapes in the Brazilian Amazon: implications for biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Heckenberger, Michael J; Russell, J Christian; Toney, Joshua R; Schmidt, Morgan J

    2007-02-28

    For centuries Amazonia has held the Western scientific and popular imagination as a primordial forest, only minimally impacted by small, simple and dispersed groups that inhabit the region. Studies in historical ecology refute this view. Rather than pristine tropical forest, some areas are better viewed as constructed or 'domesticated' landscapes, dramatically altered by indigenous groups in the past. This paper reviews recent archaeological research in several areas along the Amazon River with evidence of large pre-European (ca 400-500 calendar years before the present) occupations and large-scale transformations of forest and wetland environments. Research from the southern margins of closed tropical forest, in the headwaters of the Xingu River, are highlighted as an example of constructed nature in the Amazon. In all cases, human influences dramatically altered the distribution, frequency and configurations of biological communities and ecological settings. Findings of historical change and cultural variability, including diverse small to medium-sized complex societies, have clear implications for questions of conservation and sustainability and, specifically, what constitutes 'hotspots' of bio-historical diversity in the Amazon region. PMID:17255029

  8. Climate change, biofuels and eco-social impacts in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Donald

    2008-05-27

    While global technical progress is relatively linear, there is wide variation in its environmental and social impacts at the local level, with cycles of expansion and retraction or boom and bust, of long or short duration. Analysis of previous open-ended stages of extraction and agro commodities in the Amazon indicates a general gravitational trend for technical progress to increase productivity and permit transformation of increasingly generic forms of material or energy, rather than relying on the specific physical or chemical properties provided by nature. While increased demand favours frontier expansion in the periphery when there is no other alternative, technical progress ultimately favours spatial reconcentration of production in central countries. The agroenergy stage now beginning involves rapid frontier expansion and offers various environmental and economic opportunities, but also generates a series of negative ecosystemic and socio-economic impacts, which are both direct and indirect, for tropical regions. The Amazon and the Cerrado are particularly vulnerable. Interacting with climate change and land use, the upcoming stage of cellulosic energy could result in a collapse of the new frontier into vast degraded pasture. The present and future impacts can be mitigated through crafting of appropriate policies, not limited to the Amazon, stressing intensified and more sustainable use of areas already cleared, minimizing new clearing and consolidation of alternatives for sustainable use of natural resources by local communities. Coping with these scenarios requires knowledge of complex causal relationships. PMID:18267903

  9. Impacts of Land Use Changes on Water Balance of the Amazon Basin Using Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, C. B.; Mohanty, B.

    2013-12-01

    Current problems related to increasing deforestation in Amazon Basin and its impact to climate change are among the major challenges faced by scientific community. This has led us to study the effects of landuse/cover change in Amazonian basin for protection and proper management of water resources. The use of remote sensing data over the amazon basin provides insight into understanding the water cycle and its impact on climate change. Data at different scales are used to evaluate this hypothesis. MODIS data with 1 km resolution is used to study the land use changes from 2001 to 2012. Change detection technique is applied to evaluate time series hydrological behavior of the basin. Data from point scale and regional scale such as MODIS products and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) and point scale data available from Experiment and Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), HidroWeb system, the National Water Agency (ANA) and by the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET), from Brazil are used. This work aims to contribute to the current challenge of sustainability of water resources in the Amazon region because of alterations of the landuse cover.

  10. Impact of Atmospheric Albedo on Amazon Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. V.; Thompson, S. E.; Dracup, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The vulnerability of the Amazon region to climate and anthropogenic driven disturbances has been the subject of extensive research efforts, given its importance in the global and regional climate and ecologic systems. The evaluation of such vulnerabilities requires the proper understanding of physical mechanisms controlling water and energy balances and how the disturbances change them. Among those mechanisms, the effects of atmospheric albedo on evapotranspiration have not been fully explored yet and are explored in this study. Evapotranspiration in the Amazon is sustained at high levels across all seasons and represents a large fraction of water and energy surface budgets. In this study, statistical analysis of data from four flux towers installed at Amazon primary forest sites was employed to quantify the impact of atmospheric albedo, mostly resulted from cloudiness, on evapotranspiration and to compare it to the effect of water limitation. Firstly, the difference in eddy-flux derived evapotranspiration at the flux towers under rainy and non-rainy antecedent conditions was tested for significance. Secondly, the same statistical comparison was performed under cloudy and clear sky conditions at hourly and daily time scales, using the reduction in incoming solar radiation as an indicator of cloudiness. Finally, the sensitivity of seasonal evapotranspiration totals to atmospheric albedo resulted from rainfall patterns is evaluated. That was done by sampling daily evapotranspiration estimates from empirical probability distribution functions conditioned to rainfall occurrence and then varying the number of dry days in each season. It was found that light limitation is much more important than water limitation in the Amazon, resulting in up to 43% reduction in daily evapotranspiration. Also, this effect varies by location and by season, the largest impact being in wet season, from December do January. Moreover, seasonal evapotranspiration totals were found to be

  11. Epidemiological Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Isolated from Patients of Small Communities Living in the South-East of Poland.

    PubMed

    Zaczek, Anna; Szwaja, Iwona; Skiba, Monika; Brzostek, Anna; Puchalski, Czesław; Lewandowska, Karolina; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, collected from a single hospital, was analyzed by ligation-mediated PCR techniques: FLiP and FLAP, and hybridization technique, IS6110-RFLP. The isolated strains were divided in terms of location (3 towns of Podkarpackie voivodeship differing in population size) and relationship (8 members of 4 families, each represented by 2 patients). Within each family identical DNA profiles, as well as drug resistance patterns were identified indicating a great chance of transmission of strains within the same family. Identical, or very similar patterns were also shared by strains isolated from unrelated patients living in a very small town (1 200 inhabitants) or hospitalized in the same place and time. PMID:26638538

  12. Introduction: Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Machado, L. A. T.; Manzi, A. O.; Souza, R. A. F.; Schumacher, C.; Wang, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Fan, J.; Fisch, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Guenther, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Pöschl, U.; Silva Dias, M. A.; Smith, J. N.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) Experiment was carried out in the environs of Manaus, Brazil, in the central region of the Amazon basin during two years from 1 January 2014 through 31 December 2015. The experiment focused on the complex interactions among vegetation, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol production on the one hand and their connections to aerosols, clouds, and precipitation on the other. The objective was to understand and quantify these linked processes, first under natural conditions to obtain a baseline and second when altered by the effects of human activities. To this end, the pollution plume from the Manaus metropolis, superimposed on the background conditions of the central Amazon basin, served as a natural laboratory. The present paper, as the Introduction to the GoAmazon2014/5 Special Issue, presents the context and motivation of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The nine research sites, including the characteristics and instrumentation of each site, are presented. The sites range from time point zero (T0) upwind of the pollution, to T1 in the midst of the pollution, to T2 just downwind of the pollution, to T3 furthest downwind of the pollution (70 km). In addition to the ground sites, a low-altitude G-159 Gulfstream I (G1) observed the atmospheric boundary layer and low clouds, and a high-altitude Gulfstream G550 (HALO) operated in the free troposphere. During the two-year experiment, two Intensive Operating Periods (IOP1 and IOP2) also took place that included additional specialized research instrumentation at the ground sites as well as flights of the two aircraft. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP1 was carried out from 1 February to 31 March 2014 in the wet season. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP2 was conducted from 15 August to 15 October 2014 in the dry season. The G1 aircraft flew during both IOP1 and IOP2, and the HALO aircraft flew during IOP2. In the context of the Amazon basin, the two IOPs also correspond to the clean

  13. Introduction: Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Machado, L. A. T.; Manzi, A. O.; Souza, R. A. F.; Schumacher, C.; Wang, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Fan, J.; Fisch, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Guenther, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Pöschl, U.; Silva Dias, M. A.; Smith, J. N.; Wendisch, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) Experiment was carried out in the environs of Manaus, Brazil, in the central region of the Amazon basin for 2 years from 1 January 2014 through 31 December 2015. The experiment focused on the complex interactions among vegetation, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol production on the one hand and their connections to aerosols, clouds, and precipitation on the other. The objective was to understand and quantify these linked processes, first under natural conditions to obtain a baseline and second when altered by the effects of human activities. To this end, the pollution plume from the Manaus metropolis, superimposed on the background conditions of the central Amazon basin, served as a natural laboratory. The present paper, as the introduction to the special issue of GoAmazon2014/5, presents the context and motivation of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The nine research sites, including the characteristics and instrumentation of each site, are presented. The sites range from time point zero (T0) upwind of the pollution, to T1 in the midst of the pollution, to T2 just downwind of the pollution, to T3 furthest downwind of the pollution (70 km). In addition to the ground sites, a low-altitude G-159 Gulfstream I (G-1) observed the atmospheric boundary layer and low clouds, and a high-altitude Gulfstream G550 (HALO) operated in the free troposphere. During the 2-year experiment, two Intensive Operating Periods (IOP1 and IOP2) also took place that included additional specialized research instrumentation at the ground sites as well as flights of the two aircraft. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP1 was carried out from 1 February to 31 March 2014 in the wet season. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP2 was conducted from 15 August to 15 October 2014 in the dry season. The G-1 aircraft flew during both IOP1 and IOP2, and the HALO aircraft flew during IOP2. In the context of the Amazon basin, the two IOPs also correspond to the clean and

  14. Multiangular Contributions for Discriminate Seasonal Structural Changes in the Amazon Rainforest Using MODIS MAIAC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Y. M.; Hilker, T.; Galvão, L. S.; Santos, J. R.; Lyapustin, A.; Sousa, C. H. R. D.; McAdam, E.

    2014-12-01

    The sensitivity of the Amazon rainforests to climate change has received great attention by the scientific community due to the important role that this vegetation plays in the global carbon, water and energy cycle. The spatial and temporal variability of tropical forests across Amazonia, and their phenological, ecological and edaphic cycles are still poorly understood. The objective of this work was to infer seasonal and spatial variability of forest structure in the Brazilian Amazon based on anisotropy of multi-angle satellite observations. We used observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS/Terra and Aqua) processed by a new Multi-Angle Implementation Atmospheric Correction Algorithm (MAIAC) to investigate how multi-angular spectral response from satellite imagery can be used to analyze structural variability of Amazon rainforests. We calculated differences acquired from forward and backscatter reflectance by modeling the bi-directional reflectance distribution function to infer seasonal and spatial changes in vegetation structure. Changes in anisotropy were larger during the dry season than during the wet season, suggesting intra-annual changes in vegetation structure and density. However, there were marked differences in timing and amplitude depending on forest type. For instance differences between reflectance hotspot and darkspot showed more anisotropy in the open Ombrophilous forest than in the dense Ombrophilous forest. Our results show that multi-angle data can be useful for analyzing structural differences in various forest types and for discriminating different seasonal effects within the Amazon basin. Also, multi-angle data could help solve uncertainties about sensitivity of different tropical forest types to light versus rainfall. In conclusion, multi-angular information, as expressed by the anisotropy of spectral reflectance, may complement conventional studies and provide significant improvements over approaches that

  15. Antibiotic and disinfectant susceptibility profiles of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolated from community wastewater in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) previously isolated from human wastewater effluents in a nonclinical semiclosed agri-food system in Texas were characterized for susceptibility to antibiotics and disinfectants. The 50 VRE were resistant to eight fluoroquinolones and to 10 of 17 Natio...

  16. Comparison of microbial communities isolated from feces of asymptomatic Salmonella-shedding and non-Salmonella shedding dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Kentucky and Cerro are frequently isolated from asymptomatic dairy cows. However, factors that contribute to colonization of the bovine gut by these two serotypes have not been identified. To investigate associations between Salmone...

  17. Mycobacterium marinum infection in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Hannon, David E; Bemis, David A; Garner, Michael M

    2012-12-01

    A blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) was presented with a granuloma involving the proximal rhinotheca and extending into the rostral sinuses. Mycobacterium marinum was diagnosed based on results of biopsy and culture. Treatment was initiated with clarithromycin, rifampin, and ethambutol, but the bird died 4 months after the onset of antimicrobial therapy. Additional granulomas were found in the left lung and liver on postmortem examination. Mycobacterial isolation on postmortem samples was unsuccessful. This is the first report of Mycobacterium marinum in a bird. PMID:23409436

  18. Penicillium excelsum sp. nov from the Brazil Nut Tree Ecosystem in the Amazon Basin'.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pitt, John I; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Massi, Fernanda P; Fungaro, Maria Helena P; Frisvad, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    A new Penicillium species, P. excelsum, is described here using morphological characters, extrolite and partial sequence data from the ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. It was isolated repeatedly using samples of nut shells and flowers from the brazil nut tree, Bertolletia excelsa, as well as bees and ants from the tree ecosystem in the Amazon rainforest. The species produces andrastin A, curvulic acid, penicillic acid and xanthoepocin, and has unique partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences. The holotype of P. excelsum is CCT 7772, while ITAL 7572 and IBT 31516 are cultures derived from the holotype. PMID:26717519

  19. Penicillium excelsum sp. nov from the Brazil Nut Tree Ecosystem in the Amazon Basin’

    PubMed Central

    Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Massi, Fernanda P.; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    A new Penicillium species, P. excelsum, is described here using morphological characters, extrolite and partial sequence data from the ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. It was isolated repeatedly using samples of nut shells and flowers from the brazil nut tree, Bertolletia excelsa, as well as bees and ants from the tree ecosystem in the Amazon rainforest. The species produces andrastin A, curvulic acid, penicillic acid and xanthoepocin, and has unique partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences. The holotype of P. excelsum is CCT 7772, while ITAL 7572 and IBT 31516 are cultures derived from the holotype. PMID:26717519

  20. Disruption of hydroecological equilibrium in southwest Amazon mediated by drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; Kim, Hyungjun; Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Famiglietti, James S.; Oki, Taikan

    2015-09-01

    The impacts of droughts on the Amazon ecosystem have been broadly discussed in recent years, but a comprehensive understanding of the consequences is still missing. In this study, we show evidence of a fragile hydrological equilibrium in the western Amazon. While drainage systems located near the equator and the western Amazon do not show water deficit in years with average climate conditions, this equilibrium can be broken during drought events. More importantly, we show that this effect is persistent, taking years until the normal hydrological patterns are reestablished. We show clear links between persistent changes in forest canopy structure and changes in hydrological patterns, revealing physical evidence of hydrological mechanisms that may lead to permanent changes in parts of the Amazon ecosystem. If prospects of increasing drought frequency are confirmed, a change in the current hydroecological patterns in the western Amazon could take place in less than a decade.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Recovered from Humans, Environmental Surfaces, and Companion Animals in Households of Children with Community-Onset Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, John J.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Sullivan, Melanie L.; Muenks, Carol E.; Wang, Jeffrey W.; Thompson, Ryley M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from 110 households of children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Cultures were obtained from household members, household objects, and dogs and cats, yielding 1,633 S. aureus isolates. The S. aureus isolates were heterogeneous, although more than half were methicillin resistant. The highest proportion of MRSA was found in bathrooms. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antibiotics prescribed in outpatient settings. PMID:26248385

  2. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  3. Comprehensive sampling of an isolated dune system demonstrates clear patterns in soil fungal communities across a successional gradient.

    PubMed

    Roy-Bolduc, Alice; Bell, Terrence H; Boudreau, Stéphane; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Coastal sand dunes are extremely dynamic ecosystems, characterized by stark ecological succession gradients. Dune stabilization is mainly attributed to plant growth, but the establishment and survival of dune-inhabiting vegetation is closely linked to soil microorganisms and to the ecological functions they fulfill. Fungi are particularly important in this context, as some interact intimately with plant roots, while others are critical to soil structure and nutrient availability. Our study aimed to describe wholly fungal diversity and community composition in a secluded coastal dune ecosystem at eight different stages of succession. We comprehensively sampled a relic foredune plain, which is part of an archipelago in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (Québec, Canada), by collecting soils from 80 sites and measuring soil characteristics. Soil fungal communities were characterized by pyrosequencing, followed by taxonomic classification and assignment of putative roles. Even though we did not observe clear patterns in diversity, we were able to detect distinct taxonomic and community composition signatures across succession stages, which seemed to translate into variations in fungal life strategies. Our results show that a taxonomically and functionally diverse fungal community exists at each dune succession stage, even in the barren foredunes. PMID:26109372

  4. Agency, Isolation, and the Coming of New Technologies: Exploring "Dependency" in Coastal Communities of Newfoundland Through Participatory Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene; Harris, Carol E.

    2005-01-01

    How does one effectively and ethically conduct research with community members who are steeped in histories of economic and social dependency, so that the people themselves take charge of their futures? This question is explored in a Canadian context as the authors study the potential of new technologies to bring hope to traditional coastal…

  5. Out of Isolation and into Collaboration: Sustaining the Work of Professional Learning Communities in a Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 21st century, increased school accountability has sharpened the focus of school and district leaders on improving instructional practice to raise student achievement. The implementation of professional leaning communities (PLCs) is one improvement effort in which schools establish collaborative cultures focused on increasing student…

  6. Meeting the Competitive Challenge: Encouraging the Use of Community College Library Facilities in Rural, Isolated, Northeastern Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothlisberg, Allen P.

    This paper describes the approaches taken to improve library service at Northland Pioneer College, a decentralized community college in rural Arizona with learning resource centers at 10 locations in Navaho and Apache counties. Three methods of providing instruction for research papers--class tours of learning resource facilities, presenting guest…

  7. Outbreak of herpangina in the Brazilian Amazon in 2009 caused by Enterovirus B.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, D B; Campos, R K; Soares, M S; Barros, R B; Batista, T C A; Ferreira, P C P; Bonjardim, C A; Trindade, G S; Abrahão, J S; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2014-05-01

    In October 2009, our laboratory was contacted by a Brazilian Public Health organization regarding a severe community outbreak of an acute exanthematic and febrile disease in the Brazilian Amazon that primarily affected children. A total of 44 patients with febrile disease were identified by the local public health system, 37 of whom were children between 1 and 9 years of age. Molecular virological and phylogenetic characterization revealed that enterovirus B was the etiological agent of this outbreak, which was characterized by a clinical presentation known as herpangina. PMID:24197788

  8. Proliferation of Hydroelectric Dams in the Andean Amazon and Implications for Andes-Amazon Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  9. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    PubMed

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  10. Evaluation of the Amazon River delta as a barrier to gene flow for the regional malaria vector, Anopheles aquasalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fairley, T L; Póvoa, M M; Conn, J E

    2002-11-01

    The Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles aquasalis Curry is distributed predominantly along the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts because of its tolerance for breeding in salt water. We tested the hypothesis that the freshwater Amazon River acts as a barrier to gene flow in northeastern Brazil, by examining variation at a 588-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Igene from five populations. We identified 15 haplotypes of which 5 were shared both (1) between sample localities and (2) across the Amazon River Delta. Sequence divergence ranged from 0.0017-0.0272 (average = 0.0137). Estimates of genetic subdivision based on the presence of the Amazon Riverwere greatest within localities (phi = 0.029) and among regions (phi = 0.018), followed by among localities (phi = 0.011), but none were significant. Parsimony, neighbor-joining, and Nested Clade Analyses were used to estimate relationships among populations and infer evolutionary processes. Two phylogenetically distinct clusters of populations were moderately supported by parsimony. Neighbor-joining trees were poorly resolved, thus providing no geographical resolution and no support for the Amazon River as a barrier to migration. Phylogeographic structure as detected by the Nested Clade Analysis was consistent with restricted gene flow coupled with isolation by distance. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the localities within this region of northeastern Brazil constitute a single large population of An. aquasalis that spans the Amazon Delta. PMID:12495184

  11. Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Clinical Isolate from a Patient with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Septicemia

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, K. E.; Chaitanya, T. A. K.; Shaw, Tushar; Bhat, H. Vinod; Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; Paul, Bobby; Mallya, Sandeep; Murali, T. S.; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei CM_Manipal, the causative agent of melioidosis isolated from a diabetic patient in Manipal, southern India. The draft genome consists of 107 contigs and is 7,209,157 bp long. A total of 5,600 coding sequences (CDSs), 60 tRNAs, 12 rRNAs, and one noncoding RNA (ncRNA) were predicted from this assembly. PMID:26294629

  12. Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Clinical Isolate from a Patient with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Septicemia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Vandana, K E; Chaitanya, T A K; Shaw, Tushar; Bhat, H Vinod; Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; Paul, Bobby; Mallya, Sandeep; Murali, T S; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei CM_Manipal, the causative agent of melioidosis isolated from a diabetic patient in Manipal, southern India. The draft genome consists of 107 contigs and is 7,209,157 bp long. A total of 5,600 coding sequences (CDSs), 60 tRNAs, 12 rRNAs, and one noncoding RNA (ncRNA) were predicted from this assembly. PMID:26294629

  13. Isoprene photochemistry over the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingjun; Brito, Joel; Dorris, Matthew R.; Rivera-Rios, Jean C.; Seco, Roger; Bates, Kelvin H.; Artaxo, Paulo; Duvoisin, Sergio; Keutsch, Frank N.; Kim, Saewung; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Watson, Thomas B.; McKinney, Karena A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-05-01

    Isoprene photooxidation is a major driver of atmospheric chemistry over forested regions. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and molecular oxygen to produce isoprene peroxy radicals (ISOPOO). These radicals can react with hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2) to dominantly produce hydroxyhydroperoxides (ISOPOOH). They can also react with nitric oxide (NO) to largely produce methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR). Unimolecular isomerization and bimolecular reactions with organic peroxy radicals are also possible. There is uncertainty about the relative importance of each of these pathways in the atmosphere and possible changes because of anthropogenic pollution. Herein, measurements of ISOPOOH and MVK + MACR concentrations are reported over the central region of the Amazon basin during the wet season. The research site, downwind of an urban region, intercepted both background and polluted air masses during the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. Under background conditions, the confidence interval for the ratio of the ISOPOOH concentration to that of MVK + MACR spanned 0.4–0.6. This result implies a ratio of the reaction rate of ISOPOO with HO2 to that with NO of approximately unity. A value of unity is significantly smaller than simulated at present by global chemical transport models for this important, nominally low-NO, forested region of Earth. Under polluted conditions, when the concentrations of reactive nitrogen compounds were high (>1 ppb), ISOPOOH concentrations dropped below the instrumental detection limit (<60 ppt). This abrupt shift in isoprene photooxidation, sparked by human activities, speaks to ongoing and possible future changes in the photochemistry active over the Amazon rainforest.

  14. Isoprene photochemistry over the Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjun; Brito, Joel; Dorris, Matthew R; Rivera-Rios, Jean C; Seco, Roger; Bates, Kelvin H; Artaxo, Paulo; Duvoisin, Sergio; Keutsch, Frank N; Kim, Saewung; Goldstein, Allen H; Guenther, Alex B; Manzi, Antonio O; Souza, Rodrigo A F; Springston, Stephen R; Watson, Thomas B; McKinney, Karena A; Martin, Scot T

    2016-05-31

    Isoprene photooxidation is a major driver of atmospheric chemistry over forested regions. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and molecular oxygen to produce isoprene peroxy radicals (ISOPOO). These radicals can react with hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2) to dominantly produce hydroxyhydroperoxides (ISOPOOH). They can also react with nitric oxide (NO) to largely produce methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR). Unimolecular isomerization and bimolecular reactions with organic peroxy radicals are also possible. There is uncertainty about the relative importance of each of these pathways in the atmosphere and possible changes because of anthropogenic pollution. Herein, measurements of ISOPOOH and MVK + MACR concentrations are reported over the central region of the Amazon basin during the wet season. The research site, downwind of an urban region, intercepted both background and polluted air masses during the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. Under background conditions, the confidence interval for the ratio of the ISOPOOH concentration to that of MVK + MACR spanned 0.4-0.6. This result implies a ratio of the reaction rate of ISOPOO with HO2 to that with NO of approximately unity. A value of unity is significantly smaller than simulated at present by global chemical transport models for this important, nominally low-NO, forested region of Earth. Under polluted conditions, when the concentrations of reactive nitrogen compounds were high (>1 ppb), ISOPOOH concentrations dropped below the instrumental detection limit (<60 ppt). This abrupt shift in isoprene photooxidation, sparked by human activities, speaks to ongoing and possible future changes in the photochemistry active over the Amazon rainforest. PMID:27185928

  15. Response of free-living nitrogen-fixing microorganisms to land use change in the Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Babur S; Potisap, Chotima; Nüsslein, Klaus; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Rodrigues, Jorge L M

    2014-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest, the largest equatorial forest in the world, is being cleared for pasture and agricultural use at alarming rates. Tropical deforestation is known to cause alterations in microbial communities at taxonomic and phylogenetic levels, but it is unclear whether microbial functional groups are altered. We asked whether free-living nitrogen-fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) respond to deforestation in the Amazon rainforest, using analysis of the marker gene nifH. Clone libraries were generated from soil samples collected from a primary forest, a 5-year-old pasture originally converted from primary forest, and a secondary forest established after pasture abandonment. Although diazotroph richness did not significantly change among the three plots, diazotroph community composition was altered with forest-to-pasture conversion, and phylogenetic similarity was higher among pasture communities than among those in forests. There was also 10-fold increase in nifH gene abundance following conversion from primary forest to pasture. Three environmental factors were associated with the observed changes: soil acidity, total N concentration, and C/N ratio. Our results suggest a partial restoration to initial levels of abundance and community structure of diazotrophs following pasture abandonment, with primary and secondary forests sharing similar communities. We postulate that the response of diazotrophs to land use change is a direct consequence of changes in plant communities, particularly the higher N demand of pasture plant communities for supporting aboveground plant growth. PMID:24162570

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infections in China: Results from the CARTIPS Antimicrobial Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, Feifei; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Zhanwei; Cao, Bin; Du, Yan; Feng, Xianju; Hu, Yunjian; Hu, Bijie; Ji, Ping; Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Yong; Liao, Wanzhen; Lu, Juan; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Zhongxin; Xu, Xiuli; Xu, Xuesong; Yang, Qing; Yu, Yunsong; Zhang, Rong; Zhuo, Chao

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates causing adult community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs) in China. A multicentre resistance surveillance study (CARTIPS) investigating 1046 clinical isolates from 19 hospitals in China was conducted from 2013 to 2014. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints of oral penicillin, the percentages of penicillin-resistant, penicillin-intermediate and penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae were 44.1%, 13.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The rates of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae ranged from 27.9% to 72.2% in different cities, with the highest rate in Nanchang. Macrolides, including azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin, showed the lowest activities against S. pneumoniae isolates, with resistance rates of 90.5%, 92.2% and 93.0%, respectively. However, 98% of these strains were susceptible to levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. For H. influenzae isolates, most of the antimicrobials agents exhibited good activities. However, ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole showed relatively lower activity against H. influenzae, with resistance rates of 35.0% and 54.4%, respectively. β-lactamase production rates amongst H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were 31.0% and 87.1%, respectively. In addition, a total of 15 β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) strains identified in this study were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefaclor and cefuroxime. Most of the antimicrobial agents showed excellent activity against M. catarrhalis, with susceptibility rates of >90%. The results from the current study confirmed the regional variations in antimicrobial susceptibility of major CARTI pathogens and provided some choices for the treatment of these organisms. Continuous national surveillance of the epidemiology of CARTIs is strongly warranted in China. PMID:27436464

  17. Novel diesel-oil-degrading bacteria and fungi from the Ecuadorian Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Maddela, N R; Masabanda, M; Leiva-Mora, M

    2015-01-01

    Isolating new diesel-oil-degrading microorganisms from crude-oil contaminated sites and evaluating their degradation capacities are vitally important in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and crude-oil exploitation. In this research, new hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and fungi were isolated from the crude-oil contaminated soil of the oil-fields in the Amazon rainforest of north-east Ecuador by using a soil enrichment technique. Degradation analysis was tracked by gas chromatography and a flame ionization detector. Under laboratory conditions, maximum degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 77.34 and 62.62 removal ratios after 30 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil by fungi (isolate-1) and bacteria (isolate-1), respectively. The 16S/18S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that the microorganisms were most closely (99-100%) related to Bacillus cereus (isolate-1), Bacillus thuringiensis (isolate-2), Geomyces pannorum (isolate-1), and Geomyces sp. (isolate-2). Therefore, these strains enable the degradation of hydrocarbons as the sole carbon source, and these findings will benefit these strains in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and oil exploitation. PMID:26442498

  18. [The Amazon Sanitation Plan (1940-1942)].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Rômulo de Paula; Hochman, Gilberto

    2007-12-01

    The article addresses the Amazon Sanitation Plan and the political context in which it was formulated between 1940 and 1941. It examines the role of Getúlio Vargas, the activities of the plan's main protagonists (such as Evandro Chagas, João de Barros Barreto, and Valério Konder), its key proposals, and its demise as of 1942 upon creation of the Special Public Health Service (Sesp), which grew out of cooperation agreements between Brazil and the US following both nations' involvement in World War II. A reproduction of the Plan as published in the Arquivos de Higiene in 1941 is included. PMID:18783151

  19. Impacts on regional climate of Amazon deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, R.E.; Kennedy, P. NCAR, Boulder, CO )

    1992-10-01

    A simulation of the climate response to Amazon deforestation has been carried out. Precipitation is decreased on the average by 25 percent or 1.4 mm/day, with ET and runoff both decreasing by 0.7 mm/day. Modifications of surface energy balance through change of albedo and roughness are complicated by cloud feedbacks. The initial decrease of the absorption of solar radiation by higher surface albedos is largely cancelled by a reduction in cloud cover, but consequent reduction in downward longwave has a substantial impact on surface energy balance. Smoke aerosols might have an effect comparable to deforestation during burning season. 8 refs.

  20. Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather E.; Crump, Byron C.; Kling, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Storm events can pulse nutrients and carbon from soils and provide an important subsidy to food webs in oligotrophic streams and lakes. Bacterial nutrient limitation and the potential response of stream aquatic bacteria to storm events was investigated in arctic tundra environments by manipulating both water temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations in short (up to 4 days) and long duration (up to 2 weeks) laboratory mesocosm experiments. Inorganic N and P additions increased bacterial production (14C-labeled leucine uptake) up to seven times over controls, and warmer incubation temperatures increased the speed of this response to added nutrients. Bacterial cell numbers also increased in response to temperature and nutrient additions with cell-specific carbon uptake initially increasing and then declining after 2 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC; determined by means of 16S denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) shifted rapidly in response to changes in incubation temperature and the addition of nutrients, within 2 days in some cases. While the bacteria in these habitats responded to nutrient additions with rapid changes in productivity and community composition, water temperature controlled the speed of the metabolic response and affected the resultant change in bacterial community structure, constraining the potential responses to pulsed nutrient subsidies associated with storm events. In all cases, at higher nutrient levels and temperatures the effect of initial BCC on bacterial activity was muted, suggesting a consistent, robust interaction of temperature, and nutrients controlling activity in these aquatic systems. PMID:25873916

  1. Keep your Sox on: Community genomics-directed isolation and microscopic characterization of the dominant subsurface sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in a sediment aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, S. W.; Wrighton, K. C.; Luef, B.; Wilkins, M. J.; Handley, K. M.; Williams, K. H.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Community genomics and proteomics (proteogenomics) can be used to predict the metabolic potential of complex microbial communities and provide insight into microbial activity and nutrient cycling in situ. Inferences regarding the physiology of specific organisms then can guide isolation efforts, which, if successful, can yield strains that can be metabolically and structurally characterized to further test metagenomic predictions. Here we used proteogenomic data from an acetate-stimulated, sulfidic sediment column deployed in a groundwater well in Rifle, CO to direct laboratory amendment experiments to isolate a bacterial strain potentially involved in sulfur oxidation for physiological and microscopic characterization (Handley et al, submitted 2012). Field strains of Sulfurovum (genome r9c2) were predicted to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reverse TCA cycle and sulfur oxidation (Sox and SQR) coupled to either nitrate reduction (Nap, Nir, Nos) in anaerobic environments or oxygen reduction in microaerobic (cbb3 and bd oxidases) environments; however, key genes for sulfur oxidation (soxXAB) were not identified. Sulfidic groundwater and sediment from the Rifle site were used to inoculate cultures that contained various sulfur species, with and without nitrate and oxygen. We isolated a bacterium, Sulfurovum sp. OBA, whose 16S rRNA gene shares 99.8 % identity to the gene of the dominant genomically characterized strain (genome r9c2) in the Rifle sediment column. The 16S rRNA gene of the isolate most closely matches (95 % sequence identity) the gene of Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, a genome-sequenced deep-sea sulfur oxidizer. Strain OBA grew via polysulfide, colloidal sulfur, and tetrathionate oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Strain OBA also grew heterotrophically, oxidizing glucose, fructose, mannose, and maltose with nitrate as an electron acceptor. Over the range of oxygen concentrations tested, strain OBA was not

  2. Use of GNSS Data for Hydrological Surveys in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stephane; Perosanz, Félix; Rotunno, Otto; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Santos, Andre

    2016-04-01

    leveling of remote gages without any specific field work but initial installation of GNSS stations on boats cruising the river network. The main results presented in this paper will show that the processing data of isolated GNSS receivers in kinematic PPP technique on-board boats are able to obtain altimetric information of water level of Amazon rivers with 3 centimetres of accuracy and this technique can be used to avoid errors of classical differential GNSS processing techniques in base lines larger than 28 km. This presentation also deals with methodologies to be used to remove water loading effects and other cautions that are necessary to achieve cm level of vertical accuracy in the specific case of the Amazon Basin.

  3. Patterns of diversification in the discus fishes (Symphysodon spp. Cichlidae) of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Farias, Izeni Pires; Hrbek, Tomas

    2008-10-01

    We carried out a phylogeograhic and population genetic analysis of fishes of the taxonomically contentious genus Symphysodon from the Amazon basin in order to test hypotheses of relationships among taxonomic units, and potential processes driving diversification within this genus. We sampled 334 individuals of the genus Symphysodon from 24 localities that span the complete geographic distribution of this genus. The sampling scheme included all known phenotypic groups, species and subspecies. Analyses were based on 474 bp of the mitochondrial control region and 1443 bp of the exon 3 of RAG1 gene. We observed 102 mtDNA haplotypes defined by 89 segregating sites, and 5 nuDNA alleles defined by three segregating sites. Maximum-likelihood, Bayesian-inference and statistical parsimony analyses revealed three well defined monophyletic groups. These clades corresponded to the 'green' and 'blue' groups of Symphysodon aequifasciatus, and to a previously morphologically unrecognized clade from the Xingu River drainage. These three clades were nested within a paraphyletic assemblage consisting of the 'brown' group of S. aequifasciatus and of both described subspecies of S. discus, the 'Heckel' and the 'abacaxi' discus. Nuclear allele sharing was observed among groups, but there were significant differences in frequencies. We inferred several processes including past fragmentation among groups, and restricted gene flow with isolation by distance within the paraphyletic 'brown+Heckel+abacaxi' groups, and suggest that differences among the 'blue', 'Heckel' and 'brown' groups are potentially maintained by differences in water chemistry preferences. We further inferred colonization of the western Amazon basin by an ancestor of the 'green' clade. The 'green' group was the only group with a pattern of haplotype distribution consistent of a demographic expansion, and the divergence of this clade from other groups of discus was consistent with recent geologic evidence on the breach of

  4. Unofficial Road Building in the Amazon: Socioeconomic and Biophysical Explanations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perz, Stephen G.; Caldas, Marcellus M.; Arima, Eugenio; Walker, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Roads have manifold social and environmental impacts, including regional development, social conflicts and habitat fragmentation. 'Road ecology' has emerged as an approach to evaluate the various ecological and hydrological impacts of roads. This article aims to complement road ecology by examining the socio-spatial processes of road building itself. Focusing on the Brazilian Amazon, a heavily-studied context due to forest fragmentation by roads, the authors consider non-state social actors who build 'unofficial roads' for the purpose of gaining access to natural resources to support livelihoods and community development. They examine four case studies of roads with distinct histories in order to explain the socio-spatial processes behind road building in terms of profit maximization, land tenure claims, co-operative and conflictive political ecologies, and constraints as well as opportunities afforded by the biophysical environment. The study cases illustrate the need for a multi-pronged theoretical approach to understanding road building, and call for more attention to the role of non-state actors in unofficial road construction.

  5. Decomposition of dissolved organic matter released by an isolate of Microcystis aeruginosa and morphological profile of the associated bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Moreira, I C; Bianchini Jr, I; Vieira, A A H

    2011-02-01

    This study concerns the kinetics of bacterial degradation of two fractions (molecular mass) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) released by Microcystis aeruginosa. Barra Bonita Reservoir (SP, Brazil) conditions were simulated in the laboratory using the associated local bacterial community. The extent of degradation was quantified as the amount of organic carbon transferred from each DOM fraction (< 3 kDa and 3-30 kDa) to bacteria. The variation of bacteria morphotypes associated with the decomposition of each fraction was observed. To find the degradation rate constants (kT), the time profiles of the total, dissolved and particulate organic carbon concentrations were fitted to a first-order kinetic model. These rate constants were higher for the 3-30 kDa fraction than for the lighter fraction. Only in the latter fraction the formation of refractory dissolved organic carbon (DOCR) compounds could be detected and its rate of mass loss was low. The higher bacterial density was reached at 24 and 48 hours for small and higher fractions, respectively. In the first 48 hours of decomposition of both fractions, there was an early predominance of bacillus, succeeded by coccobacillus, vibrios and coccus, and from day 5 to 27, the bacterial density declined and there was greater evenness among the morphotypes. Both fractions of DOM were consumed rapidly, corroborating the hypothesis that DOM is readily available in the environment. This also suggests that the bacterial community in the inocula readily uses the labile part of the DOM, until this community is able to metabolise efficiently the remaining of DOM not degraded in the first moment. Given that M. aeruginosa blooms recur throughout the year in some eutrophic reservoirs, there is a constant supply of the same DOM which could maintain a consortium of bacterial morphotypes adapted to consuming this substrate. PMID:21437399

  6. Precipitation recycling in the Amazon basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, E. A. B.; Bras, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of evaporation within a region to precipitation in that same region. The recycling rate is a diagnostic measure of the potential for interactions between land surface hydrology and regional climate. In this paper we present a model for describing the seasonal and spatial variability of the recycling process. The precipitation recycling ratio, rho, is the basic variable in describing the recycling process. Rho is the fraction of precipitation at a certain location and time which is contributed by evaporation within the region under study. The recycling model is applied in studyiing the hydrologic cycle in the Amazon basin. It is estimated that about 25% of all the rain that falls in the Amazon basin is contributed by evaporation within the basin. This estimate is based on analysis of a data set supplied by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The same analysis is repeated using a different data set from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Based on this data set, the recycling ratio is estimated to be 35%. The seasonal variability of the recycling ratio is small compared with the yearly average. The new estimates of the recycling ratio are compared with results of previous studies, and the differences are explained.

  7. How Pecten Brazil drilled the Amazon basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1983-09-01

    Pecten Brazil overcame numerous obstacles to drill two exploratory wells in the Amazon Basin last year. These included: The threat of low water in normally navigable rivers. Dense jungle growth at both locations. Lack of suitable roads for heavy hauling. Inconvenient distances from supply points. An unusual basalt formation responsible for unique drilling problems. Hundreds of helicopter lifts to move drilling rigs, supplies, and personnel. Pecten contracted with Petrobras, the Brazilian national oil company, to evaluate three blocks in the Amazon jungle, each about 68 miles (110 km) on a side, through seismic study and ultimate drilling. Planning for the drilling phase got started on March 17, 1981 with December 1 targeted as spud date for the first well. Actual spud date was November 25, 5 days ahead of schedule, in spite of all obstacles. Pecten has a mid-Amazonas block now under seismic investigation for possible exploratory drilling. Logistics problems in this one provide new difficulties, as the area is extremely wet. Most work is carried on by boat. The company is also looking offshore Bahia, testing the possible extension of the Renconcavo basin. Two wells have already provided good shows of a high pour point oil, with flow rates from 400 to 1,000 b/d. Another area of interest to Pecten is offshore Rio Grande do Norte.

  8. Size distribution of Amazon River bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-size analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Copepods and fishes in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Vernon E.

    1998-06-01

    The Amazon basin comprises the largest river ecosystem in the world (7 million km 2) with annual high and low water peaks and a constant temperature near 29°C. Some 2000 fish species and 40 species of free-living copepods are known to occur in Amazonia. The free-living forms serve as food for most larval fishes and some adults, but they also transmit several parasites including representatives of the nematode family Camallanidae. About three dozen species of parasitic copepods have been described from the Brazilian Amazon. Females of Amazonian parasitic copepods are found on skin, gill filaments, gill rakers or within the nasal fossae. Parasitic copepods are found on fishes that are from a few millimeters long up to those over 2 m in length and they are usually quite host specific. All have body pigmentation in different patterns and colors (frequently blues, such as cerulean, cobalt, spectrum, smalt or campanula). It is suggested that the coloration serves to attract specific host fish. Copepods have evolved adaptations for attachment and feeding, especially in the second antennae and endopods. Examples of progenesis, phoresis and commensalism are shown. Some species produce pathology such as a tourniquet effect, hyperplasia, blood loss and anemia, and can kill fishes by limiting their respiration.

  10. Delayed Fertility Transition among Indigenous Women: A Case Study in the Ecuadoran Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jason; Gray, Clark; Bilsborrow, Richard

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT Communities indigenous to the Amazon are among the few remaining worldwide still practicing near natural fertility, without the use of modern contraceptives. Given the large proportion of women desiring no more births, information on the challenges women there face in limiting fertility would be useful. METHODS Samples of women of reproductive age from five indigenous ethnic groups in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon were surveyed in 2001 and 2012. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses examined married women’s desire for another child at both times and modern contraceptive use in 2012, as well as determinants of a change in women’s desire to have more children and of the number of children born during the study period. RESULTS In 2001, 48% of married women desired another child, 2% used a modern contraceptive and 50% had an unmet need for limiting; in 2012, the proportions were 40%, 19% and 47%, respectively. The total fertility rate was 7.9 in 2001 and 7.0 in 2012. Characteristics associated with wanting another child in 2001 and 2012 included parity (odds ratios, 0.6 and 0.4, respectively) and experience of a child death (2.0 each); characteristics associated with contraceptive use in 2012 included desire for another child, experience of a child death and presence of a community health worker (0.3–0.5). Number of children born was positively associated, and the square of the term negatively associated, with no longer wanting more children in 2012 among women who wanted more in 2001 (odds ratios, 2.1 and 0.9, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Indigenous women in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon appear to be transitioning to lower fertility. Insufficient access to credible information about the safety and efficacy of modern contraceptives, however, may slow the transition. International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2015, 41(1):TK. PMID:25856232

  11. Early recruitment responses to interactions between frequent fires, nutrients, and herbivory in the southern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Massad, Tara Joy; Balch, Jennifer K; Mews, Cândida Lahís; Porto, Pábio; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur; Quintino, Raimundo Mota; Brando, P M; Vieira, Simone A; Trumbore, Susan E

    2015-07-01

    Understanding tropical forest diversity is a long-standing challenge in ecology. With global change, it has become increasingly important to understand how anthropogenic and natural factors interact to determine diversity. Anthropogenic increases in fire frequency are among the global change variables affecting forest diversity and functioning, and seasonally dry forest of the southern Amazon is among the ecosystems most affected by such pressures. Studying how fire will impact forests in this region is therefore important for understanding ecosystem functioning and for designing effective conservation action. We report the results of an experiment in which we manipulated fire, nutrient availability, and herbivory. We measured the effects of these interacting factors on the regenerative capacity of the ecotone between humid Amazon forest and Brazilian savanna. Regeneration density, diversity, and community composition were severely altered by fire. Additions of P and N + P reduced losses of density and richness in the first year post-fire. Herbivory was most important just after germination. Diversity was positively correlated with herbivory in unburned forest, likely because fire reduced the number of reproductive individuals. This contrasts with earlier results from the same study system in which herbivory was related to increased diversity after fire. We documented a significant effect of fire frequency; diversity in triennially burned forest was more similar to that in unburned than in annually burned forest, and the community composition of triennially burned forest was intermediate between unburned and annually burned areas. Preventing frequent fires will therefore help reduce losses in diversity in the southern Amazon's matrix of human-altered landscapes. PMID:25676107

  12. Isolation and characterization of novel lipases from a metagenomic library of the microbial community in the pitcher fluid of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes hybrida.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Oikawa, Manabu; Sato, Shoko; Kikuchi, Noriko; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2011-10-01

    Members of the genus Nepenthes are carnivorous plants that use the pitfall method of insect capture as a supplementary nutritional source. We extracted metagenomic DNA from the microbial community found in the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes and constructed a plasmid-based metagenomic library. An activity-based screening method enabled the isolation of two lipase genes, lip1 and lip2. Both Lip1 and Lip2 belong to a novel family or subfamily of lipases and show lipase activities in acidic conditions, such as those found in pitcher fluid. This study was conducted under the assumption that the secreted Lip1 and Lip2 were capable of enzymatic activity in the acidic pitcher fluid. PMID:21778111

  13. Spectrometry of pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the central Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  14. Spectrometry of Pasture Condition and Biogeochemistry in the Central Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  15. Amazon River investigations, reconnaissance measurements of July 1963

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltman, Roy Edwin; Sternberg, H. O'R.; Ames, F.C.; Davis, L.C.

    1964-01-01

    The first measurements of the flow of the Amazon River were made in July 1963 as a joint project of the University of Brazil, the Brazilian Navy, and the U.S. Geological Survey. The discharge of the Amazon River at Obidos was 7,640,000 cfs at an annual flood stage somewhat lower than the average. For comparison the maximum known discharge of the Mississippi River at Vicksburg is about 2,300,000 cfs. Dissolved-solids concentrations and sediment loads of the Amazon River and of several major tributaries were found to be low.

  16. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  17. Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In this view of the Amazon River Mouth (0.0, 51.0W), a large sediment plume can be seen expanding outward into the Atlantic Ocean. The sediment plume can be seen hugging the coast north of the delta as a result of the northwest flowing coastal Guyana Current. In recent years, the flow of the Amazon has become heavily laden with sediment as soil runoff from the denuded landscape of the interior enters the Amazon River (and other rivers) drainage system.

  18. Biological Mass Spectrometry and Shotgun Proteomics of Microbial Systems: Methods for studying microbial physiology from isolates to environmental communities

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, Brian; Young, Jacque C; Carey, Patricia A; Verberkmoes, Nathan C

    2010-01-01

    Microbial ecology is currently experiencing a renaissance spurred by the rapid development of molecular techniques and omics technologies in particular. As never before, these tools have allowed researchers in the field to produce a massive amount of information through in situ measurements and analysis of natural microbial communities, both vital approaches to the goal of unraveling the interactions of microbes with their environment and with one another. While genomics can provide information regarding the genetic potential of microbes, proteomics characterizes the primary end-stage product, proteins, thus conveying functional information concerning microbial activity. Advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies, along with bioinformatic approaches, have brought this analytic chemistry technique to relevance in the biological realm due to its powerful applications in proteomics. Mass spectrometry-enabled proteomics, including bottom-up and top-down approaches, is capable of supplying a wealth of biologically-relevant information, from simple protein cataloging of the proteome of a microbial community to identifying post-translational modifications of individual proteins.

  19. YERSINIA PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS, SEROGROUP O:1A, INFECTION IN TWO AMAZON PARROTS (AMAZONA AESTIVA AND AMAZONA ORATRIX) WITH HEPATIC HEMOSIDEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Livio; Farneti, Silvana; Rossi, Giacomo; Cork, Susan Catherine; Ferraro, Stefano; Magi, Gian Enrico; Petrini, Stefano; Valiani, Andrea; Cuteri, Vincenzo; Attili, Anna-Rita

    2015-09-01

    Necropsies were conducted on a female blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) and a female yellow-headed Amazon (Amazona oratrix) that died after depression, ruffled feathers, diarrhea, and biliverdin in the urine. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed multifocal necrosis in the liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, intestines, and heart caused by acute bacteremia. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, serogroup O:1a, was isolated by culturing from the visceral lesions in the liver, intestines, and spleen. Virulence gene analysis showed the presence of the inv gene and the complete pathogenicity island: IS100, psn, yptE, irp1, irp2 ybtP-ybtQ, ybtX-ybtS, and int asnT-Int. Histopathologic findings and chemical analysis also demonstrated hepatic hemosiderosis. As has been demonstrated in other species, hemosiderosis may predispose Amazona spp. to systemic infection with Y. pseudotuberculosis after enteric disease. PMID:26352966

  20. Antibacterial resistance, genes encoding toxins and genetic background among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections in France: a national prospective survey.

    PubMed

    Lamy, B; Laurent, F; Gallon, O; Doucet-Populaire, F; Etienne, J; Decousser, J-W

    2012-06-01

    The epidemiology of staphylococcal community-acquired skin and soft tissues infections (CA-SSTIs) has changed dramatically. We described prospectively the characteristics of the Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 71 non-teaching French hospitals and implicated in CA-SSTIs: antimicrobial susceptibility (mecA polymerase chain reaction [PCR], disk diffusion method), virulence factor gene (sea, tst, pvl) prevalence and genetic background (agr allele). During November 2006, 235 strains were collected (wound infection: 51%, abscess: 21%, whitlow: 8%, diabetic foot: 7%, furunculosis: 3%). sea, tst and pvl were identified in 22.1, 13.2 and 8.9% strains, respectively. agr allele 1 was the most frequently encountered genetic background, whatever the methicillin susceptibility. Among the 34 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 14.5% of all S. aureus), only one strain (2.9%) harboured pvl (belonging to the European ST80 clone), four (11.8%) tst (belonging to two endemic French clones) and 18 (52.9%) sea gene (mainly the Lyon clone). According to their in vitro activity, pristinamycin or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole could be considered as first-choice antibiotics. To date, the international pvl-positive MRSA clones have not spread in France. MRSA strains isolated from putative CA-SSTIs exhibited a genetic and phenotypic background of hospital-acquired (HA) clones. National survey should be continued, in order to monitor the emergence of virulent clones. PMID:21997773

  1. Amazon river flow regime and flood recessional agriculture: Flood stage reversals and risk of annual crop loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomes, Oliver T.; Lapointe, Michel; Templeton, Michael; List, Geneva

    2016-08-01

    The annual flood cycle is an important driver of ecosystem structure and function in large tropical rivers such as the Amazon. Riparian peasant communities rely on river fishing and annual floodplain agriculture, closely adapted to the recession phase of the flood pulse. This article reports on a poorly documented but important challenge facing farmers practicing flood recessional agriculture along the Amazon river: frequent, unpredictable stage reversals (repiquetes) which threaten to ruin crops growing on channel bars. We assess the severity of stage reversals for rice production on exposed river mud bars (barreales) near Iquitos, Peru. Crop loss risk is estimated based on a quantitative analysis of 45 years of daily Amazon stage data and field data from floodplain communities nearby in the Muyuy archipelago, upstream of Iquitos. Rice varieties selected, elevations of silt rich bars where rice is sown, as well as planting and harvest dates are analyzed in the light of the timing, frequencies and amplitudes of observed stage reversals that have the potential to destroy growing rice. We find that unpredictable stage reversals can produce substantial crop losses and shorten significantly the length of average growing seasons on lower elevation river bars. The data reveal that local famers extend planting down to lower bar elevations where the mean probabilities of re-submergence before rice maturity (due to reversals) approach 50%, below which they implicitly consider that the risk of crop loss outweighs the potential reward of planting.

  2. Some questions related to mechanisms of slave-raids in Amazon-ant Polyergus rufescens Latr.

    PubMed

    Dobrzański, J; Dobrzańska, J

    1978-01-01

    A new hypothesis concerning the mechanism of the P. rufescens' slave-raids, is proposed. (i) The so-called pseudo-scouting does not contribute to the slave-raids. (ii) The direction of the raid is determined by the random movement of the most easily aroused individuals - the so-called activists. (iii) Once the direction has been set the army marches straight ahead and returns by the same road orienting itself by visual stimuli; single individuals who lag behind can however follow the scent-trial which had been left by the army. (iv) The slave-capturing instinct of the amazons is not directed at the abduction of pupae alone but also and even perhaps primarily at the abduction of mature individuals belonging to the slave-species; that the amazons bring almost only pupae is caused by the fact that the mature individuals offer resistance and are consequently a more troublesome prey. PMID:747130

  3. Mercury pollution and childhood in Amazon riverside villages.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, M C N; Crespo-López, M E; Vieira, J L F; Oikawa, T; Guimarães, G A; Araújo, C C; Amoras, W W; Ribeiro, D R; Herculano, A M; do Nascimento, J L M; Silveira, L C L

    2007-01-01

    Mercury is a hazardous metal responsible for environmental contamination and human intoxication. Methylmercury, a very toxic organic compound, bio-accumulates through food chain, and is responsible for chronic mercury exposure of riverside Amazonian communities with a diet rich in fish. Uncertainties about the reference exposure dose that could have damaging consequences for nervous system development makes necessary the biomonitoring of these Amazonian populations, especially children. In this work, a comparative study was performed in exposed and non-exposed children living in the Amazon. A total of 168 children were analyzed to find possible correlations between gender, age, location, and hair mercury content. For each location, no statistically significant differences (P<0.05) were detected for gender and age versus mercury content. However, mean mercury levels in hair samples may indicate a tendency of boys to average higher hair concentrations. Also, in the community with highest levels of mercury, the limit of 10 micro g/g of mercury was surpassed by 65% of 2-6 years and 50% of 7-12 years children but only by 27% of 0-1 year babies, pointing to a lower bioaccumulation and/or the existence of a protection mechanism in babies. Log normal distributions of mercury concentrations for each location showed that children from populations under influence of gold mining activity contain the highest mercury levels in hair samples, though this intoxication may have decreased when compared to previous studies. Knowledge originated by this monitoring will better assist in the development of prevention strategies and government actions targeting the mercury contamination of Amazonian environment. PMID:16930706

  4. Antimicrobial activity of tigecycline against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from North American medical centers.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Deshpande, Lalitagauri; Jones, Ronald N

    2008-04-01

    A total of 1989 community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) were susceptibility tested by broth microdilution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, SCCmec type, and polymerase chain reaction for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were also performed. The overall tigecycline susceptibility rate was 98.2%. Glycopeptides, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, and chloramphenicol were also active against this collection (< or =0.7% resistant). The vast majority (70.8%) of the CA-MRSA was SCCmec type IV, from which 88.4% belonged to the USA300-0114 clone and 94.7% were PVL positive. Tigecycline showed in vitro activity comparable with other highly active parenteral agents and represents an option for treating complicated infections caused by CA-MRSA. PMID:18068326

  5. Physical Activity and Fitness of First Nations Youth in a Remote and Isolated Northern Ontario Community: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michelle; Hanning, Rhona; Gates, Allison; Stephen, Judy; Fehst, Andrew; Tsuji, Leonard

    2016-02-01

    Among a group of First Nations youth, this research aimed to obtain objective measures of anthropometry, physical activity (PA) and fitness; to identify any group-level differences by sex, body mass index, waist circumference and body fat categories; to assess the barriers and supports to PA. Youth participated in anthropometric measures (BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage), PA assessment (3 days of accelerometry) and fitness testing (guided by the Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Approach). Barriers and supports were assessed via environmental scan and focus groups. Descriptive statistics were compared to reference data. Group differences by sex, BMI status, waist circumference and body fat categories were tested using Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests (p ≤ 0.05). Qualitative data were assembled into one file and coded manually for categories and themes. Seventy-two youth (12.1 ± 1.1 years, 61.1% male) participated in at least one measure; 36 completed the accelerometry. Sixty-three percent were overweight or obese, 51% were abdominally obese and 21% had excess body fat. Most (86.1%) met Canada's PA guidelines. Boys were more active than girls (p = 0.025) and had greater cardiorespiratory endurance (p = 0.003). Overweight, obese, or abdominally obese youth had lower cardiorespiratory endurance than normal weight youth (p < 0.001). Barriers and supports fell under the main themes: motivation, role models, personnel and facilities, environment and programs. Based on this assessment, youth in this community are active, but not sufficiently physically fit, especially among those affected by obesity and abdominal obesity. The findings, in addition to the numerous barriers to PA, support the community's desire for school-based PA programming. PMID:26175076

  6. Performing Transformation in the Community University of the Rivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Dan Baron

    2015-01-01

    Dan Baron Cohen is a community-based art educator and cultural activist of Welsh-Quebecois origin, who lives and works in the Brazilian Amazon city of Maraba. After completing undergraduate and postgraduate studies in Oxford University, he developed collaborations with young people and their post-industrial communities at risk in northern England…

  7. Current Characterization at the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    At the estuary there are several mechanisms that cause turbulence: influence of solid contours (estuary bottom and shores), speed vertical shearing (fluid inside), wind shearing stress (free surface) and surface and internal gravity waves. Turbulence intensity controls vertical distribution of estuary water mass property concentration. As flow into the estuary takes place during the transition or turbulent regimen, produced by small space and time scale movements, entrainment, turbulent scattering and advection are the processes responsible for fresh water mixing up with the sea and for local salinity variation, as well as for concentration of natural properties and man-made ones. According to this focus, we shall describe general circulation, conveyance and mixing characteristics of the Amazon low estuary waters. Amazon estuary shows unusual characteristics: it is of vast length and enormous outflow. It is extremely wide - 150 Km - and its discharge into the Atlantic amounts to 180,000 m3s-1 (Otman, 1968, Figueiredo et al, 1991), which means 18% of all water discharged by rivers into oceans; this is the largest punctual source of fresh water for oceans (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Maximum outflow is 2.5 x 105 m3s-1, and it happens at the end of May. Minimum outflow is 1.2 x 105 m3 s-1, and it takes place in November. At Amazon River, the Mixing Zone occurs where the Coastal Zone usually is. The reason for that is the extension of fresh water plume moves Northeast for over 1000 Km (Gibbs, 1970; Muller-Karger et al 1988). This is the most extensive estuarine plume ever found in the ocean. During low fluvial discharge (June-November) plume reaches 300 Km; however, on high discharge (November-May) plume reaches 500 Km. Plume already is 3 to 10 m thick and 80 to 300 Km wide (Lentz and Limeburner, 1995). From June to January plume moves towards Africa, from whence 70% of it goes east carried by North Brazil Current retroflection and 30% goes towards the Caribbean. From

  8. Remote sensing in forestry: Application to the Amazon region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Tardin, A. T.; Dossantos, A.; Filho, P. H.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1981-01-01

    The utilization of satellite remote sensing in forestry is reviewed with emphasis on studies performed for the Brazilian Amazon Region. Timber identification, deforestation, and pasture degradation after deforestation are discussed.

  9. The JERS-1 Amazon Multi-Season Mapping Study (JAMMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Chapman, B.; Alves, M.

    1996-01-01

    Regional mapping of the Amazon basin using imaging radar is described. Two 60-day periods of radar mapping will be conducted, one in 1995, and one in 1996. One period will view the low-water season, and the other will view during the high-flood season. The main objective of the JAMMS project is to generate a regional map showing inundation throughout the Amazon Basin by comparing the two data sets.

  10. Antibiotic and disinfectant susceptibility profiles of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolated from community wastewater in Texas.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ross C; Duke, Sara E; Ziprin, Richard L; Harvey, Roger B; Hume, Michael E; Poole, Toni L; Scott, H Morgan; Highfield, Linda D; Alali, Walid Q; Andrews, Kathleen; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2008-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) from human wastewater effluents in a nonclinical semiclosed agri-food system in Texas were characterized for susceptibility to antibiotics and disinfectants. The 50 VRE were resistant to eight fluoroquinolones and 10 of 17 antimicrobials typically active against Gram-positive organisms. The VRE were susceptible to quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid. Lack of the insertion element IS1251 correlated with VRE susceptibility to streptomycin and gentamicin at p < 0.0001 and p = 0.033, respectively. An association was observed between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotypes Ic and II and susceptibility to streptomycin at p = 0.0006. VRE susceptibility for nine disinfectants and five disinfectant components is shown. Ninety-two percent of the isolates had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for triclosan > or =2 ppm. Triclosan MICs for many of the VRE were well over expected product application levels. No association was observed between antibiotic resistance and disinfectant susceptibility in these VRE. Enterococci multiply-resistant to vancomycin and aminoglycosides were found in a non-hospital environment where one would not expect to find them. PMID:18193143

  11. Taxonomical and functional microbial responses to agriculture management of Amazon forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramae, Eiko; Navarrete, Acácio; Mendes, Lucas; de Hollander, Mattias; van Veen, Johannes; Tsai, Siu

    2013-04-01

    Land-use change is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity worldwide, and one of the most devastating changes in the use of land, especially in the tropics, is the conversion of forest to crop lands. Southeast Amazon region is considered the largest agricultural frontier in the world, where native forests are converted into soybean crop fields, a fact that highlights the social and economic importance of this system to Brazil. This study firstly, focused on the impact of land-use changes and agriculture management of Amazon forest soils on the size and composition of the acidobacterial community. Taxon-specific quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene were applied to study the acidobacterial community in bulk soil samples from croplands, adjacent native forests and rhizosphere of soybean. Based on qPCR measurements, Acidobacteria accounted for 23%, 18% and 14% of the total bacterial signal in forest soils, cropland soils and soybean rhizosphere samples, respectively. From the sequences of Bacteria domain, the phylum Acidobacteria represented 28%, 16% and 17% of the sequences from forest soils, cropland soils and soybean rhizosphere samples, respectively. Acidobacteria subgroups 2-8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 18, 22 and 25 were detected with subgroup 1 as dominant among them. Subgroups 4, 6 and 7 were significantly higher in cropland soils than in forest soils, which subgroups respond to decrease of soil Aluminium. Subgroups 6 and 7 respond to high content of soil Ca, Mg, Zn, P, Fe, Mn and B. The results showed differential response of the Acidobacteria subgroups to abiotic soil factors, and indicated acidobacterial subgroups as potential early-warning bio-indicators of agricultural soil management effects in the Amazon area. Secondly, using 454 pyrosequencing, we investigated the metabolic diversity of microbial communities colonizing the rhizosphere and the bulk soil associated to soybean. The rhizosphere presented an overrepresentation of

  12. Virulence Genes and Neutral DNA Markers of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Different Ethnic Communities of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Simanti; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Balakrish Nair, G.; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Hembram, Jabaranjan; Berg, Douglas E.; Rani Saha, Dhira; Khan, Asis; Santra, Amal; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2003-01-01

    Virulence-associated genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori strains from the Santhal and Oroan ethnic minorities of West Bengal, India, were studied. These people have traditionally been quite separate from other Indians and differ culturally, genetically, and linguistically from mainstream Bengalis, whose H. pylori strains have been characterized previously. H. pylori was found in each of 49 study participants, although none had peptic ulcer disease, and was cultured from 31 of them. All strains carried the cag pathogenicity island and potentially toxigenic s1 alleles of vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) and were resistant to at least 8 μg of metronidazole per ml. DNA sequence motifs in vacA mid-region m1 alleles, cagA, and an informative insertion or deletion motif next to cagA from these strains were similar to those of strains from ethnic Bengalis. Three mobile elements, IS605, IS607, and ISHp608, were present in 29, 19, and 10%, respectively, of Santhal and Oroan strains, which is similar to their prevalence in Bengali H. pylori. Thus, there is no evidence that the gene pools of H. pylori of these ethnic minorities differ from those of Bengalis from the same region. This relatedness of strains from persons of different ethnicities bears on our understanding of H. pylori transmission between communities and genome evolution. PMID:12904384

  13. Virulence genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori isolates from different ethnic communities of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Datta, Simanti; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Balakrish Nair, G; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Hembram, Jabaranjan; Berg, Douglas E; Rani Saha, Dhira; Khan, Asis; Santra, Amal; Bhattacharya, S K; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2003-08-01

    Virulence-associated genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori strains from the Santhal and Oroan ethnic minorities of West Bengal, India, were studied. These people have traditionally been quite separate from other Indians and differ culturally, genetically, and linguistically from mainstream Bengalis, whose H. pylori strains have been characterized previously. H. pylori was found in each of 49 study participants, although none had peptic ulcer disease, and was cultured from 31 of them. All strains carried the cag pathogenicity island and potentially toxigenic s1 alleles of vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) and were resistant to at least 8 micro g of metronidazole per ml. DNA sequence motifs in vacA mid-region m1 alleles, cagA, and an informative insertion or deletion motif next to cagA from these strains were similar to those of strains from ethnic Bengalis. Three mobile elements, IS605, IS607, and ISHp608, were present in 29, 19, and 10%, respectively, of Santhal and Oroan strains, which is similar to their prevalence in Bengali H. pylori. Thus, there is no evidence that the gene pools of H. pylori of these ethnic minorities differ from those of Bengalis from the same region. This relatedness of strains from persons of different ethnicities bears on our understanding of H. pylori transmission between communities and genome evolution. PMID:12904384

  14. Fog and rain in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H

    2015-09-15

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents. PMID:26324902

  15. Fog and rain in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents. PMID:26324902

  16. Smoking rain clouds over the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Andreae, M O; Rosenfeld, D; Artaxo, P; Costa, A A; Frank, G P; Longo, K M; Silva-Dias, M A F

    2004-02-27

    Heavy smoke from forest fires in the Amazon was observed to reduce cloud droplet size and so delay the onset of precipitation from 1.5 kilometers above cloud base in pristine clouds to more than 5 kilometers in polluted clouds and more than 7 kilometers in pyro-clouds. Suppression of low-level rainout and aerosol washout allows transport of water and smoke to upper levels, where the clouds appear "smoking" as they detrain much of the pollution. Elevating the onset of precipitation allows invigoration of the updrafts, causing intense thunderstorms, large hail, and greater likelihood for overshooting cloud tops into the stratosphere. There, detrained pollutants and water vapor would have profound radiative impacts on the climate system. The invigorated storms release the latent heat higher in the atmosphere. This should substantially affect the regional and global circulation systems. Together, these processes affect the water cycle, the pollution burden of the atmosphere, and the dynamics of atmospheric circulation. PMID:14988556

  17. Monte-Carlo Opening Books for Amazons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloetzer, Julien

    Automatically creating opening books is a natural step towards the building of strong game-playing programs, especially when there is little available knowledge about the game. However, while recent popular Monte-Carlo Tree-Search programs showed strong results for various games, we show here that programs based on such methods cannot efficiently use opening books created using algorithms based on minimax. To overcome this issue, we propose to use an MCTS-based technique, Meta-MCTS, to create such opening books. This method, while requiring some tuning to arrive at the best opening book possible, shows promising results to create an opening book for the game of the Amazons, even if this is at the cost of removing its Monte-Carlo part.

  18. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally considered the dominant sources of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios lasting up to 8 h (up to 160 parts per trillion (ppt)) often occurred within the canopy and near the surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light- and temperature-dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks.

  19. Spatial and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis Deep in the Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coronato Nunes, Beatriz; Pavan, Márcio G.; Jaeger, Lauren H.; Monteiro, Kerla J. L.; Xavier, Samanta C. C.; Monteiro, Fernando A.; Bóia, Márcio N.; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current control policies for intestinal parasitosis focuses on soil-transmitted helminths, being ineffective against Giardia intestinalis, a highly prevalent protozoon that impacts children’s nutritional status in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore spatial and molecular epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis in children of Amerindian descent in the Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was performed in the Brazilian Amazon with 433 children aged 1 to 14 years. Fecal samples were processed through parasitological techniques and molecular characterization. Prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 16.9% (73/433), reaching 22.2% (35/158) among children aged 2–5 years, and a wide distribution throughout the city with some hot spots. Positivity-rate was similar among children living in distinct socioeconomic strata (48/280 [17.1%] and 19/116 [16.4%] below and above the poverty line, respectively). Sequencing of the β-giardin gene revealed 52.2% (n = 12) of assemblage A and 47.8% (n = 11) of assemblage B with high haplotype diversity for the latter. The isolates clustered into two well-supported G. intestinalis clades. A total of 38 haplotypes were obtained, with the following subassemblages distribution: 5.3% (n = 2) AII, 26.3% (n = 10) AIII, 7.9% (n = 3) BIII, and 60.5% (n = 23) new B genotypes not previously described. Conclusions/Significance Giardia intestinalis infection presents a high prevalence rate among Amerindian descended children living in Santa Isabel do Rio Negro/Amazon. The wide distribution observed in a small city suggests the presence of multiple sources of infection, which could be related to environmental contamination with feces, possibly of human and animal origin, highlighting the need of improving sanitation, safe water supply and access to diagnosis and adequate treatment of infections. PMID:27392098

  20. Population Genetics of Plasmodium vivax in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Ratto, Christopher; Gamboa, Dionicia; Soto-Calle, Veronica E.; Van den Eede, Peter; Torres, Eliana; Sánchez-Martínez, Luis; Contreras-Mancilla, Juan; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Rodriguez Ferrucci, Hugo; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Erhart, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterizing the parasite dynamics and population structure provides useful information to understand the dynamic of transmission and to better target control interventions. Despite considerable efforts for its control, vivax malaria remains a major health problem in Peru. In this study, we have explored the population genetics of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Iquitos, the main city in the Peruvian Amazon, and 25 neighbouring peri-urban as well as rural villages along the Iquitos-Nauta Road. Methodology/ Results From April to December 2008, 292 P. vivax isolates were collected and successfully genotyped using 14 neutral microsatellites. Analysis of the molecular data revealed a similar proportion of monoclonal and polyclonal infections in urban areas, while in rural areas monoclonal infections were predominant (p = 0.002). Multiplicity of infection was higher in urban (MOI = 1.5–2) compared to rural areas (MOI = 1) (p = 0.003). The level of genetic diversity was similar in all areas (He = 0.66–0.76, p = 0.32) though genetic differentiation between areas was substantial (PHIPT = 0.17, p<0.0001). Principal coordinate analysis showed a marked differentiation between parasites from urban and rural areas. Linkage disequilibrium was detected in all the areas (IAs = 0.08–0.49, for all p<0.0001). Gene flow among the areas was stablished through Bayesian analysis of migration models. Recent bottleneck events were detected in 4 areas and a recent parasite expansion in one of the isolated areas. In total, 87 unique haplotypes grouped in 2 or 3 genetic clusters described a sub-structured parasite population. Conclusion/Significance Our study shows a sub-structured parasite population with clonal propagation, with most of its components recently affected by bottleneck events. Iquitos city is the main source of parasite spreading for all the peripheral study areas. The routes of transmission and gene flow and the reduction of the parasite population described

  1. Activity of JNJ-Q2, a new fluoroquinolone, tested against contemporary pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Biedenbach, Douglas J; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Liverman, Lisa C; McIntyre, Gail; Jones, Ronald N

    2012-04-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens and is currently in clinical development for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections. This study determined the activity of JNJ-Q2 against a worldwide year 2010 collection (89 centres in 27 countries) of three common respiratory pathogens (3757 isolates) from patients with CABP. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were tested by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution method, and susceptibility rates for comparators were assessed using CLSI and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoint criteria. JNJ-Q2 had activity against all three species, with 96.9% of strains inhibited at ≤0.015 mg/L. JNJ-Q2 [minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% and 90% of the organisms, respectively (MIC(50/90))=0.008/0.015 mg/L] demonstrated a 16-fold greater potency compared with moxifloxacin (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25 mg/L) and at least 128-fold greater activity compared with levofloxacin (MIC(50/90)=1/ 1 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC(50/90)=1/2 mg/L) against S. pneumoniae. Haemophilus influenzae isolates were 21.9-23.3% resistant to ampicillin, but JNJ-Q2 (MIC(50/90)≤0.004/0.015 mg/L) was at least two-fold more active than moxifloxacin (MIC(50/90)=0.015/0.03 mg/L) as well as being potent against M. catarrhalis (MIC(90)=0.015/0.015 mg/L). In conclusion, JNJ-Q2 demonstrated increased potency compared with other marketed fluoroquinolones that have been used to treat CABP pathogens, thus favouring further clinical development. PMID:22306239

  2. Differential Response of Acidobacteria Subgroups to Forest-to-Pasture Conversion and Their Biogeographic Patterns in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Acacio A.; Venturini, Andressa M.; Meyer, Kyle M.; Klein, Ann M.; Tiedje, James M.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tsai, Siu M.; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the phylum Acidobacteria are among the most abundant soil bacteria on Earth, but little is known about their response to environmental changes. We asked how the relative abundance and biogeographic patterning of this phylum and its subgroups responded to forest-to-pasture conversion in soils of the western Brazilian Amazon. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was employed to assess the abundance and composition of the Acidobacteria community across 54 soil samples taken using a spatially nested sampling scheme at the landscape level. Numerically, Acidobacteria represented 20% of the total bacterial community in forest soils and 11% in pasture soils. Overall, 15 different Acidobacteria subgroups of the current 26 subgroups were detected, with Acidobacteria subgroups 1, 3, 5, and 6 accounting together for 87% of the total Acidobacteria community in forest soils and 75% in pasture soils. Concomitant with changes in soil chemistry after forest-to-pasture conversion—particularly an increase in properties linked to soil acidity and nutrient availability—we observed an increase in the relative abundances of Acidobacteria subgroups 4, 10, 17, and 18, and a decrease in the relative abundances of other Acidobacteria subgroups in pasture relative to forest soils. The composition of the total Acidobacteria community as well as the most abundant Acidobacteria subgroups (1, 3, 5, and 6) was significantly more similar in composition across space in pasture soils than in forest soils. These results suggest that preponderant responses of Acidobacteria subgroups, especially subgroups 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6, to forest-to-pasture conversion effects in soils could be used to define management-indicators of agricultural practices in the Amazon Basin. These acidobacterial responses are at least in part through alterations on acidity- and nutrient-related properties of the Amazon soils. PMID:26733981

  3. Differential Response of Acidobacteria Subgroups to Forest-to-Pasture Conversion and Their Biogeographic Patterns in the Western Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Acacio A; Venturini, Andressa M; Meyer, Kyle M; Klein, Ann M; Tiedje, James M; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tsai, Siu M; Rodrigues, Jorge L M

    2015-01-01

    Members of the phylum Acidobacteria are among the most abundant soil bacteria on Earth, but little is known about their response to environmental changes. We asked how the relative abundance and biogeographic patterning of this phylum and its subgroups responded to forest-to-pasture conversion in soils of the western Brazilian Amazon. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was employed to assess the abundance and composition of the Acidobacteria community across 54 soil samples taken using a spatially nested sampling scheme at the landscape level. Numerically, Acidobacteria represented 20% of the total bacterial community in forest soils and 11% in pasture soils. Overall, 15 different Acidobacteria subgroups of the current 26 subgroups were detected, with Acidobacteria subgroups 1, 3, 5, and 6 accounting together for 87% of the total Acidobacteria community in forest soils and 75% in pasture soils. Concomitant with changes in soil chemistry after forest-to-pasture conversion-particularly an increase in properties linked to soil acidity and nutrient availability-we observed an increase in the relative abundances of Acidobacteria subgroups 4, 10, 17, and 18, and a decrease in the relative abundances of other Acidobacteria subgroups in pasture relative to forest soils. The composition of the total Acidobacteria community as well as the most abundant Acidobacteria subgroups (1, 3, 5, and 6) was significantly more similar in composition across space in pasture soils than in forest soils. These results suggest that preponderant responses of Acidobacteria subgroups, especially subgroups 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6, to forest-to-pasture conversion effects in soils could be used to define management-indicators of agricultural practices in the Amazon Basin. These acidobacterial responses are at least in part through alterations on acidity- and nutrient-related properties of the Amazon soils. PMID:26733981

  4. Discharge Estimation Using Satellite Gravity During Flood Seasons at the Óbidos Gauge Station, Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable measurement of river discharge is important for management of water resource and understanding of hydrological cycles particularly associated with global and regional climate changes. Practically, to obtain continuous time series of river discharge, regression analysis of an empirical relationship between accumulated water level and discharge data is used. During wet season, however, the relationship includes more uncertainty due to the difficulty of accurate discharge measurement. This is particularly true for the Amazon River because significant amount of water flows outside river channel during flooding. For an alternative way to estimate river discharge, we use GRACE time-varying gravity measurement from January 2003 to December 2012. We first apply Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) for GRACE time-varying gravity fields in Amazon and successfully isolate gravity signal in the main stream. The EOF time series represents relative river discharge variations without larger uncertainty during flooding season compared to conventional in-situ discharge estimate. Estimates of Amazon River discharge based on GRACE data are very close to those from observed at gauge stations during dry seasons. However, our estimates are larger than in-situ data in high water seasons, and the difference is the maximum at the 2009 flooding. This is probably because in-situ observation underestimates river discharge during wet season due possibly to detoured water in river pathway developed during flooding while GRACE observes integrated water mass variations in river channels.

  5. Samba virus: a novel mimivirus from a giant rain forest, the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of novel giant viruses from the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses group and their virophages has increased in the last decade and has helped to shed light on viral evolution. This study describe the discovery, isolation and characterization of Samba virus (SMBV), a novel giant virus belonging to the Mimivirus genus, which was isolated from the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. We also report the isolation of an SMBV-associated virophage named Rio Negro (RNV), which is the first Mimivirus virophage to be isolated in the Americas. Methods/results Based on a phylogenetic analysis, SMBV belongs to group A of the putative Megavirales order, possibly a new virus related to Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV). SMBV is the largest virus isolated in Brazil, with an average particle diameter about 574 nm. The SMBV genome contains 938 ORFs, of which nine are ORFans. The 1,213.6 kb SMBV genome is one of the largest genome of any group A Mimivirus described to date. Electron microscopy showed RNV particle accumulation near SMBV and APMV factories resulting in the production of defective SMBV and APMV particles and decreasing the infectivity of these two viruses by several logs. Conclusion This discovery expands our knowledge of Mimiviridae evolution and ecology. PMID:24886672

  6. Relationship of Tooth Wear to Chronological Age among Indigenous Amazon Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Elma Pinto; Barbosa, Mayara Silva; Quintão, Cátia Cardoso Abdo; Normando, David

    2015-01-01

    In indigenous populations, age can be estimated based on family structure and physical examination. However, the accuracy of such methods is questionable. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate occlusal tooth wear related to estimated age in the remote indigenous populations of the Xingu River, Amazon. Two hundred and twenty three semi-isolated indigenous subjects with permanent dentition from the Arara (n = 117), Xicrin-Kayapó (n = 60) and Assurini (n = 46) villages were examined. The control group consisted of 40 non-indigenous individuals living in an urban area in the Amazon basin (Belem). A modified tooth wear index was applied and then associated with chronological age by linear regression analysis. A strong association was found between tooth wear and chronological age in the indigenous populations (p <0.001). Tooth wear measurements were able to explain 86% of the variation in the ages of the Arara sample, 70% of the Xicrin-Kaiapó sample and 65% of the Assurini sample. In the urban control sample, only 12% of ages could be determined by tooth wear. These findings suggest that tooth wear is a poor estimator of chronological age in the urban population; however, it has a strong association with age for the more remote indigenous populations. Consequently, these findings suggest that a simple tooth wear evaluation method, as described and applied in this study, can be used to provide a straightforward and efficient means to assist in age determination of newly contacted indigenous groups. PMID:25602501

  7. Relationship of tooth wear to chronological age among indigenous Amazon populations.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elma Pinto; Barbosa, Mayara Silva; Quintão, Cátia Cardoso Abdo; Normando, David

    2015-01-01

    In indigenous populations, age can be estimated based on family structure and physical examination. However, the accuracy of such methods is questionable. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate occlusal tooth wear related to estimated age in the remote indigenous populations of the Xingu River, Amazon. Two hundred and twenty three semi-isolated indigenous subjects with permanent dentition from the Arara (n = 117), Xicrin-Kayapó (n = 60) and Assurini (n = 46) villages were examined. The control group consisted of 40 non-indigenous individuals living in an urban area in the Amazon basin (Belem). A modified tooth wear index was applied and then associated with chronological age by linear regression analysis. A strong association was found between tooth wear and chronological age in the indigenous populations (p <0.001). Tooth wear measurements were able to explain 86% of the variation in the ages of the Arara sample, 70% of the Xicrin-Kaiapó sample and 65% of the Assurini sample. In the urban control sample, only 12% of ages could be determined by tooth wear. These findings suggest that tooth wear is a poor estimator of chronological age in the urban population; however, it has a strong association with age for the more remote indigenous populations. Consequently, these findings suggest that a simple tooth wear evaluation method, as described and applied in this study, can be used to provide a straightforward and efficient means to assist in age determination of newly contacted indigenous groups. PMID:25602501

  8. Canopy spectral and chemical diversity from lowland to tree line in the Western Amazon using CAO-VSWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Canopy chemistry and spectroscopy offer insight into community assembly and ecosystem processes in high-diversity tropical forests. Results from one lowland site in the Peruvian Amazon suggests both an environmental and an evolutionary component of canopy trait development however, the degree to which larger environmental differences influence diversity in canopy traits and their respective spectroscopic signatures across remains poorly understood. The spectranomics approach explicitly connects phylogenetic, chemical and spectral patterns in tropical canopies providing the basis for analysis, while high-fidelity, airborne remote sensing measurements extend plot-level data to landscape-scale, achieving a comprehensive view of the region. In 2011, the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) was used to sample a large region of the Western Amazon Basin in southeastern Peru, extending from lowlands to tree line in the Andean mountains. The CAO Visible-Shortwave Imaging Spectrometer (VSWIR) collected 480-band high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data of the forest canopy, while its high-resolution LiDAR captured information on canopy structure and the underlying terrain. The data were used to quantify relationships between environmental gradients and canopy chemical and spectral diversity. Results suggest strong environmental control with additional phylogenetic influence over canopy spectral and chemical properties, particularly those related to structure, defense and metabolic function. Data from CAO-VSWIR extends the large range in canopy chemical and spectral diversity related to environmental factors across the Western Amazon Basin.

  9. Granular cell tumor in an endangered Puerto Rican Amazon parrot (Amazon vittata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, C.F.; Latimer, K.S.; Goldade, S.L.; Rivera, A.; Dein, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    A 3 cm diameter mass from the metacarpus of a Puerto Rican Amazon parrot was diagnosed as a granular cell tumour based on light microscopy. The cytoplasmic granules were periodic-acid Schiff positive and diastase resistant. Ultrastructural characteristics of the cells included convoluted nuclei and the presence of numerous cytoplasmic tertiary lysosomes. This is only the second granular cell tumour reported in a bird. We speculate that most granular cell tumours are derived from cells that are engaged in some type of cellular degradative process, creating a similar morphologic appearance, but lacking a uniform histogenesis.

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.; Wicks, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

  11. Genetic structure and historical diversification of catfish Brachyplatystoma platynemum (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae) in the Amazon basin with implications for its conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Luz Eneida; Pereira, Luiz Henrique G; Costa-Silva, Guilherme Jose; Roxo, Fábio F; Batista, Jacqueline S; Formiga, Kyara; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Brachyplatystoma platynemum is a catfish species widely distributed in the Amazon basin. Despite being considered of little commercial interest, the decline in other fish populations has contributed to the increase in the catches of this species. The structure, population genetic variability, and evolutionary process that have driven the diversification of this species are presently unknown. Considering that, in order to better understand the genetic structure of this species, we analyzed individuals from seven locations of the Amazon basin using eight molecular markers: control region and cytochrome b mtDNA sequences, and a set of six nuclear microsatellite loci. The results show high levels of haplotype diversity and point to the occurrence of two structured populations (Amazon River and the Madeira River) with high values for FST. Divergence time estimates based on mtDNA indicated that these populations diverged about 1.0 Mya (0.2–2.5 Mya 95% HPD) using cytochrome b and 1.4 Mya (0.2–2.7 Mya 95% HPD) using control region. During that time, the influence of climate changes and hydrological events such as sea level oscillations and drainage isolation as a result of geological processes in the Pleistocene may have contributed to the current structure of B. platynemum populations, as well as of differences in water chemistry in Madeira River. The strong genetic structure and the time of genetic divergence estimated for the groups may indicate the existence of strong structure populations of B. platynemum in the Amazon basin. PMID:26045952

  12. Regional Impacts of Climate Change on the Amazon Rainforest: 2080-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. H.; Vizy, E. K.

    2006-12-01

    A regional climate model with resolution of 60 km is coupled with a potential vegetation model to simulate future climate over South America. The following steps are taken to effectively communicate the results across disciplines and to make them useful to the policy and impacts communities: the simulation is aimed at a particular time period (2081-2100), the climate change results are translated into changes in vegetation distribution, and the results are reported on regional space scales relative to political boundaries. In addition, the model validation in clearly presented to provide perspective on uncertainty for the prognosis. The model reproduces today's climate and vegetation over tropical and subtropical South America accurately. In simulations of the future, the model is forced by the IPCC's A2 scenario of future emissions, which assumes that CO2 emissions continue to grow at essentially today's rate throughout the 21st century, reaching 757 ppmv averaged over 2081-2100. The model is constrained on its lateral boundaries by atmospheric conditions simulated by a global climate model, applied as anomalies to present day conditions, and predicted changes in sea surface temperatures. The extent of the Amazon rainforest is reduced by about 70 per cent in the simulation, and the shrubland (caatinga) vegetation of Brazil's Nordeste region spreads westward and southward well into the continental interior. Bolivia, Paraguay, and Argentina lose all of their rainforest vegetation, and Brazil and Peru lose most of it. The surviving rain forest is concentrated near the equator. Columbia's rainforest survives largely intact and, along the northern coast, Venezuela and French Guiana suffer relatively small reductions. The loss in Guyana and Surinam is 30-50 per cent. Much of the rainforest in the central Amazon north of about 15S is replaced by savanna vegetation, but in southern Bolivia, northern Paraguay, and southern Brazil, grasslands take the place of the

  13. Acyclic Lipids in Amazon Shelf Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, V. O.; Cardoso, J. N.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    2000-02-01

    Acyclic lipids were analysed for dissolved (<1·2 μm) and particulate (>1·2 μm) material from surface water of the Amazon continental shelf to correlate the direct inputs with diagenetic processes of the organic matter and to assess the differences in compound distribution patterns of the samples. The dissolved samples contained n -alkanes with an unusual even-to-odd carbon number predominance Amazon River. Furthermore, the Pr/Ph ratios calculated for the dissolved samples indicate that the organic matter in the surface of the highly turbid waters passed through an anaerobic stage. The differences in the acyclic hydrocarbon profiles of the dissolved and particulate phases show that organic inputs are preserved differently in smaller and larger particles.

  14. Improving Terrestrial Carbon and Water Simulations with Dynamic Root Distribution over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Xie, Z.; Jia, B.

    2015-12-01

    Realistic representation of roots and their behavior are important in hydrological, ecological and climate modeling. However, land surface models currently prescribe rooting profiles as a function of only the plant functional types, with no consideration of the dynamic rooting strategies in response to the changing environments. In this study, a new dynamic rooting scheme which taking the controlling effects of soil water and nitrogen on rooting strategies into account was incorporated into the version 4.5 of the Community Land Model with carbon-nitrogen interactions (CLM4.5-CN). Two pairs of experiments were conducted to study the effects of dynamic root distribution on eco-hydrological modeling for the Tapajos National Forest km83 (BRSa3) site and the Amazon Basin. For site-level comparisons, the dynamic rooting scheme can improve the carbon and water cycle modeling by reducing the root-mean-square error (RMSE) in gross primary production (GPP) by 0.4 g C m-2 day-1, net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by 1.96 g C m-2 day-1, latent heat (LE) by 5.0 W m-2, soil moisture (SM) by 0.03 m3 m-3. In the Amazon basin, the vegetation responses (including GPP and LE) to seasonal drought and server 2005 drought are also better captured with dynamic root distribution incorporated.

  15. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download. PMID:26029379

  16. Environmental Controls on Space-Time Biodiversity Patterns in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, A. M.; Bonetti, S.; Feng, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon/Andes territory is characterized by the highest biodiversity on Earth and understanding how all these ecological niches and different species originated and developed is an open challenge. The niche perspective assumes that species have evolved and occupy deterministically different roles within its environment. This view differs from that of the neutral theories, which assume ecological equivalence between all species but incorporates stochastic demographic processes along with long-term migration and speciation rates. Both approaches have demonstrated tremendous power in predicting aspects species biodiversity. By combining tools from both approaches, we use modified birth and death processes to simulate plant species diversification in the Amazon/Andes and their space-time ecohydrological controls. By defining parameters related to births and deaths as functions of available resources, we incorporate the role of space-time resource variability on niche formation and community composition. We also explicitly include the role of a heterogeneous landscape and topography. The results are discussed in relation to transect datasets from neotropical forests.

  17. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C.; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download. PMID:26029379

  18. Carbon emissions from deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, C.; Klooster, S.; Genovese, V.

    2009-11-01

    A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation greenness from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado regions over the period 2000-2002. The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) model estimates of annual forest production were used for the first time as the basis to generate a prediction for the standing pool of carbon in above-ground biomass (AGB; g C m-2) for forested areas of the Brazilian Amazon region. Plot-level measurements of the residence time of carbon in wood in Amazon forest from Malhi et al. (2006) were interpolated by inverse distance weighting algorithms and used with CASA to generate a new regional map of AGB. Data from the Brazilian PRODES (Estimativa do Desflorestamento da Amazônia) project were used to map deforested areas. Results show that net primary production (NPP) sinks for carbon varied between 4.25 Pg C yr-1 (1 Pg{=}1015 g) and 4.34 Pg C for the region and were highest across the eastern and northern Amazon areas, whereas deforestation sources of CO2 flux from decomposition of residual woody debris were higher and less seasonal in the central Amazon than in the eastern and southern areas. Increased woody debris from past deforestation events was predicted to alter the net ecosystem carbon balance of the Amazon region to generate annual CO2 source fluxes at least two times higher than previously predicted by CASA modeling studies. Variations in climate, land cover, and forest burning were predicted to release carbon at rates of 0.5 to 1 Pg C yr-1 from the Brazilian Amazon. When direct deforestation emissions of CO2 from forest burning of between 0.2 and 0.6 Pg C yr-1 in the Legal Amazon are overlooked in regional budgets, the year-to-year variations in this net biome flux may appear to be large, whereas our model results implies net biome fluxes had actually been relatively consistent from

  19. Carbon Emissions from Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, C.; Klooster, S.; Genovese, V.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation greenness from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado regions over the period 2000-2002. The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) model estimates of annual forest production were used for the first time as the basis to generate a prediction for the standing pool of carbon in above-ground biomass (AGB; gC/sq m) for forested areas of the Brazilian Amazon region. Plot-level measurements of the residence time of carbon in wood in Amazon forest from Malhi et al. (2006) were interpolated by inverse distance weighting algorithms and used with CASA to generate a new regional map of AGB. Data from the Brazilian PRODES (Estimativa do Desflorestamento da Amazonia) project were used to map deforested areas. Results show that net primary production (NPP) sinks for carbon varied between 4.25 Pg C/yr (1 Pg=10(exp 15)g) and 4.34 Pg C for the region and were highest across the eastern and northern Amazon areas, whereas deforestation sources of CO2 flux from decomposition of residual woody debris were higher and less seasonal in the central Amazon than in the eastern and southern areas. Increased woody debris from past deforestation events was predicted to alter the net ecosystem carbon balance of the Amazon region to generate annual CO2 source fluxes at least two times higher than previously predicted by CASA modeling studies. Variations in climate, land cover, and forest burning were predicted to release carbon at rates of 0.5 to 1 Pg C/yr from the Brazilian Amazon. When direct deforestation emissions of CO2 from forest burning of between 0.2 and 0.6 Pg C/yr in the Legal Amazon are overlooked in regional budgets, the year-to-year variations in this net biome flux may appear to be large, whereas our model results implies net biome fluxes had actually been relatively consistent from

  20. The impact of Amazonian deforestation on Amazon basin rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Garcia-Carreras, L.

    2015-11-01

    We completed a meta-analysis of regional and global climate model simulations (n = 96) of the impact of Amazonian deforestation on Amazon basin rainfall. Across all simulations, mean (±1σ) change in annual mean Amazon basin rainfall was -12 ± 11%. Variability in simulated rainfall was not explained by differences in model resolution or surface parameters. Across all simulations we find a negative linear relationship between rainfall and deforestation extent, although individual studies often simulate a nonlinear response. Using the linear relationship, we estimate that deforestation in 2010 has reduced annual mean rainfall across the Amazon basin by 1.8 ± 0.3%, less than the interannual variability in observed rainfall. This may explain why a reduction in Amazon rainfall has not consistently been observed. We estimate that business-as-usual deforestation (based on deforestation rates prior to 2004) would lead to an 8.1 ± 1.4% reduction in annual mean Amazon basin rainfall by 2050, greater than natural variability.

  1. Spatiotemporal variability of methane over the Amazon from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Igor Oliveira; de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira; Andreoli, Rita Valéria; Kayano, Mary Toshie; Costa, Patrícia dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the atmosphere over the Amazon is studied using data from the space-borne measurements of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on board NASA's AQUA satellite for the period 2003-12. The results show a pronounced variability of this gas over the Amazon Basin lowlands region, where wetland areas occur. CH4 has a well-defined seasonal behavior, with a progressive increase of its concentration during the dry season, followed by a decrease during the wet season. Concerning this variability, the present study indicates the important role of ENSO in modulating the variability of CH4 emissions over the northern Amazon, where this association seems to be mostly linked to changes in flooded areas in response to ENSO-related precipitation changes. In this region, a CH4 decrease (increase) is due to the El Niño-related (La Niña-related) dryness (wetness). On the other hand, an increase (decrease) in the biomass burning over the southeastern Amazon during very dry (wet) years explains the increase (decrease) in CH4 emissions in this region. The present analysis identifies the two main areas of the Amazon, its northern and southeastern sectors, with remarkable interannual variations of CH4. This result might be useful for future monitoring of the variations in the concentration of CH4, the second-most important greenhouse gas, in this area.

  2. Methane emissions from floodplain trees of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangala, Sunitha; Bastviken, David; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Gauci, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands are the largest source of methane to the atmosphere, but emission estimates are highly uncertain leading to large discrepancies between emission inventories and much larger estimates of the Amazon methane source derived at larger scales. We examined methane emissions from all emission pathways including aquatic surfaces, emergent soils and herbaceous vegetation and more than 2000 trees from 13 locations across the central Amazon floodplain in 2014. Our data are the first measurements of stem emission from emergent portions of inundated trees in the Amazon and they demonstrate that regionally, tree stems are the dominant means of emissions for soil produced methane to the atmosphere. Emissions via the range of egress pathways varied substantially between sample locations and water-table exerted some control over emissions from ~2m below the soil surface upto 0.5-1m of inundation. Higher water (upto ~10m of inundation) exerted no further control over emissions. Applying our measurements to models of whole tree emission and scaling to the entire Amazon lowland basin demonstrates the significant contribution of trees to regional emissions that can close the Amazon basin methane budget.

  3. Rickettsial Disease in the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Claudine; Morrison, Amy C; Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Castillo, Roger M; Galvez, Hugo A; Astete, Helvio; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Ampuero, Julia S; Bausch, Daniel G; Halsey, Eric S; Cespedes, Manuel; Zevallos, Karine; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L

    2016-07-01

    Using a large, passive, clinic-based surveillance program in Iquitos, Peru, we characterized the prevalence of rickettsial infections among undifferentiated febrile cases and obtained evidence of pathogen transmission in potential domestic reservoir contacts and their ectoparasites. Blood specimens from humans and animals were assayed for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR) by ELISA and/or PCR; ectoparasites were screened by PCR. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between patient history, demographic characteristics of participants and symptoms, clinical findings and outcome of rickettsial infection. Of the 2,054 enrolled participants, almost 2% showed evidence of seroconversion or a 4-fold rise in antibody titers specific for rickettsiae between acute and convalescent blood samples. Of 190 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and 60 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) tested, 185 (97.4%) and 3 (5%), respectively, were positive for Rickettsia spp. Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified in 100% and 33% of the fleas and ticks tested, respectively. Collectively, our serologic data indicates that human pathogenic SFGR are present in the Peruvian Amazon and pose a significant risk of infection to individuals exposed to wild, domestic and peri-domestic animals and their ectoparasites. PMID:27416029

  4. Carbon Tetrachloride Emissions from the Amazon Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Chambers, J. Q.; Higuchi, N.; Jardine, A. B.; Martin, S. T.; Manzi, A. O.

    2014-12-01

    As a chemically inert greenhouse gas in the troposphere with lifetimes up to 50 years but active in ozone destruction in the stratosphere, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) plays a major role in the atmospheric chlorine budget and is widely considered strictly of anthropogenic origin deriving from numerous industrial processes and products. However, satellite remote sensing studies have shown higher concentrations at the Equator, and earlier work has suggested possible biogenic sources. Here we present highly vertically-resolved atmospheric gradients of CCl4 within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem from three towers in the Central Amazon. The observed buildup of CCl4 mixing ratios near the top of the main canopies provides new evidence for a potentially large biogenic source from the Basin. By demonstrating the need to represent tropical forests as biogenic sources of CCl4, our study may help narrow the gap between remote sensing observations of CCl4 and emission, chemistry, and transport models and therefore lead to improved predictions of its role in atmospheric chemistry and climate.

  5. Rickettsial Disease in the Peruvian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Claudine; Morrison, Amy C.; Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Castillo, Roger M.; Galvez, Hugo A.; Astete, Helvio; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Ampuero, Julia S.; Bausch, Daniel G.; Halsey, Eric S.; Cespedes, Manuel; Zevallos, Karine; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a large, passive, clinic-based surveillance program in Iquitos, Peru, we characterized the prevalence of rickettsial infections among undifferentiated febrile cases and obtained evidence of pathogen transmission in potential domestic reservoir contacts and their ectoparasites. Blood specimens from humans and animals were assayed for spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) and typhus group rickettsiae (TGR) by ELISA and/or PCR; ectoparasites were screened by PCR. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between patient history, demographic characteristics of participants and symptoms, clinical findings and outcome of rickettsial infection. Of the 2,054 enrolled participants, almost 2% showed evidence of seroconversion or a 4-fold rise in antibody titers specific for rickettsiae between acute and convalescent blood samples. Of 190 fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and 60 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) tested, 185 (97.4%) and 3 (5%), respectively, were positive for Rickettsia spp. Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified in 100% and 33% of the fleas and ticks tested, respectively. Collectively, our serologic data indicates that human pathogenic SFGR are present in the Peruvian Amazon and pose a significant risk of infection to individuals exposed to wild, domestic and peri-domestic animals and their ectoparasites. PMID:27416029

  6. Climate extremes in the amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, José; Mendes, David

    2010-05-01

    Changes in extreme weather and climate events have significant impacts and are among the most serious challenges to society in coping with a changing climate (CCSP, 2008). Indeed, according to IPCC AR4, confidence has increased that some extremes will become more frequent, more widespread and/or more intense during the 21st century . Until recently, there had been little published work on rainfall extremes in South America, and emphasis has been given to the La Plata Basin, where data coverage is much better. In this study, we use the indices of extremes derived by the WMO and used for the IPCC AR4 applied to 100 stations in Amazon Basin for the period from 1971 to 2005, with focus on rainfall extremes. The quality control involved carefully evaluating numerous detailed graphs of daily data to detect evidence of possible quality issues with the data as well as statistically identifying outliers. Each outlier or potential data problem was manually validated using metadata information of our climate data.

  7. Analysis of Chromobacterium sp. natural isolates from different Brazilian ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Bittencourt, Cláudia I; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Santos, Fabrício R; Nascimento, Andréa MA

    2007-01-01

    Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living bacterium able to survive under diverse environmental conditions. In this study we evaluate the genetic and physiological diversity of Chromobacterium sp. isolates from three Brazilian ecosystems: Brazilian Savannah (Cerrado), Atlantic Rain Forest and Amazon Rain Forest. We have analyzed the diversity with molecular approaches (16S rRNA gene sequences and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) and phenotypic surveys of antibiotic resistance and biochemistry profiles. Results In general, the clusters based on physiological profiles included isolates from two or more geographical locations indicating that they are not restricted to a single ecosystem. The isolates from Brazilian Savannah presented greater physiologic diversity and their biochemical profile was the most variable of all groupings. The isolates recovered from Amazon and Atlantic Rain Forests presented the most similar biochemical characteristics to the Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 strain. Clusters based on biochemical profiles were congruent with clusters obtained by the 16S rRNA gene tree. According to the phylogenetic analyses, isolates from the Amazon Rain Forest and Savannah displayed a closer relationship to the Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Furthermore, 16S rRNA gene tree revealed a good correlation between phylogenetic clustering and geographic origin. Conclusion The physiological analyses clearly demonstrate the high biochemical versatility found in the C. violaceum genome and molecular methods allowed to detect the intra and inter-population diversity of isolates from three Brazilian ecosystems. PMID:17584942

  8. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  9. Can MODIS EVI monitor ecosystem productivity in the Amazon rainforest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; Heiskanen, Janne; Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Rinne, Janne

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced vegetation index (EVI) obtained from satellite imagery has often been used as a proxy of vegetation functioning and productivity in the Amazon rainforest. However, recent studies indicate that EVI patterns are strongly affected by satellite data artifacts. Hence, it is unclear if EVI is sensitive to subtle seasonal variations in evergreen Amazon forest productivity. This study analyzes 12 years of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) EVI in order to evaluate its response to factors driving productivity in the Amazon. We show that, after removing cloud and aerosol contamination, and correcting bidirectional reflectance distribution function effects, radiation and rainfall extremes show no influence on EVI anomalies. However, EVI seasonal patterns are still evident after accounting for Sun-sensor geometry effects. This remaining pattern cannot be explained by solar radiation or rainfall, but it is significantly correlated to gross primary production (GPP). Nevertheless, we argue that the causality between GPP and EVI should be interpreted with caution.

  10. Lessons from forest FACE experiments provide guidance for Amazon-FACE science plan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Lapola, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments have provided novel insights into the ecological mechanisms controlling the cycling and storage of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems, and they provide a strong foundation for next-generation experiments in unexplored biomes. Specific lessons from FACE experiments include: (1) Carbon cycle responses are time-dependent because component processes have different rate constants: for example, net primary productivity is increased by elevated CO2, but the response may diminish with time as N cycling feedbacks become important. (2) Carbon partitioning patterns determine the fate of the extra C taken up by CO2-enriched plants, but partitioning responses remain an important challenge for ecosystem models. (3) The influence of N cycling on plant and ecosystem C cycling continues to be a critical uncertainty, and new experiments, especially in the tropics, must also consider P cycling. (4) Plant community structure can influence the ecosystem response to elevated CO2, but dynamic vegetation effects have not been adequately addressed. These experiences from FACE experiments in temperate forests are now guiding the development of a science plan for a FACE experiment in Amazonia. Models and small-scale experimental results agree that elevated CO2 will affect the metabolism of tropical ecosystems, but the qualitative and quantitative expression of the effects are largely unknown, representing a major source of uncertainty that limits our capacity to assess the vulnerability of the Amazon forest to climate change. Recognizing the high importance of the forests of the Amazon basin on global carbon, water, and energy cycles, biodiversity conservation, and the provision of essential services in Latin America, a consortium of Brazilian researchers and international collaborators have developed a science plan for Amazon-FACE. While the challenges presented both by infrastructure needs (roads, electricity, and provision of CO2) and biology (the

  11. Technical and institutional innovation in agroforestry for protected areas management in the Brazilian Amazon: opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Götz; da Mota, Maria do Socorro S

    2013-08-01

    Tropical forest countries are struggling with the partially conflicting policy objectives of socioeconomic development, forest conservation, and safeguarding the livelihoods of local forest-dependent people. We worked with communities in the lower Tapajós region of the central Brazilian Amazon for over 10 years to understand their traditional and present land use practices, the constraints, and decision making processes imposed by their biophysical, socioeconomic, and political environment, and to facilitate development trajectories to improve the livelihoods of forest communities while conserving the forest on the farms and in the larger landscape. The work focused on riverine communities initially in the Tapajós National Forest and then in the Tapajós-Arapiuns Extractive Reserve. These communities have a century-old tradition of planting rubber agroforests which despite their abandonment during the 1990s still widely characterize the vegetation of the river banks, especially in the two protected areas where they are safe from the recent expansion of mechanized rice and soybean agriculture. The project evolved from the capacity-building of communities in techniques to increase the productivity of the rubber agroforests without breaking their low-input and low-risk logic, to the establishment of a community enterprise that allowed reserve inhabitants to reforest their own land with tree species of their choice and sell reforestation (not carbon) credits to local timber companies while retaining the ownership of the trees. By making land use practices economically more viable and ecologically more appropriate for protected areas, the project shows ways to strengthen the system of extractive and sustainable development reserves that protects millions of hectares of Amazon forest with the consent of the communities that inhabit them. PMID:23636205

  12. Technical and Institutional Innovation in Agroforestry for Protected Areas Management in the Brazilian Amazon: Opportunities and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, Götz; da Mota, Maria do Socorro S.

    2013-08-01

    Tropical forest countries are struggling with the partially conflicting policy objectives of socioeconomic development, forest conservation, and safeguarding the livelihoods of local forest-dependent people. We worked with communities in the lower Tapajós region of the central Brazilian Amazon for over 10 years to understand their traditional and present land use practices, the constraints, and decision making processes imposed by their biophysical, socioeconomic, and political environment, and to facilitate development trajectories to improve the livelihoods of forest communities while conserving the forest on the farms and in the larger landscape. The work focused on riverine communities initially in the Tapajós National Forest and then in the Tapajós-Arapiuns Extractive Reserve. These communities have a century-old tradition of planting rubber agroforests which despite their abandonment during the 1990s still widely characterize the vegetation of the river banks, especially in the two protected areas where they are safe from the recent expansion of mechanized rice and soybean agriculture. The project evolved from the capacity-building of communities in techniques to increase the productivity of the rubber agroforests without breaking their low-input and low-risk logic, to the establishment of a community enterprise that allowed reserve inhabitants to reforest their own land with tree species of their choice and sell reforestation (not carbon) credits to local timber companies while retaining the ownership of the trees. By making land use practices economically more viable and ecologically more appropriate for protected areas, the project shows ways to strengthen the system of extractive and sustainable development reserves that protects millions of hectares of Amazon forest with the consent of the communities that inhabit them.

  13. Multi-model analysis of the Atlantic influence on Southern Amazon rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2015-12-07

    Amazon rainfall is subject to year-to-year fluctuation resulting in drought and flood in various intensities. A major climatic driver of the interannual variation of the Amazon rainfall is El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Also, the Sea Surface Temperature over the Atlantic Ocean is identified as an important climatic driver on the Amazon water cycle. Previously, observational datasets were used to support the Atlantic influence on Amazon rainfall. Furthermore, it is found that multiple global climate models do reproduce the Atlantic-Amazon link robustly. However, there exist differences in rainfall response, which primarily depends on the climatological rainfall amount.

  14. Future drying of the southern Amazon and central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Zeng, N.; Cook, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent climate modeling suggests that the Amazon rainforest could exhibit considerable dieback under future climate change, a prediction that has raised considerable interest as well as controversy. To determine the likelihood and causes of such changes, we analyzed the output of 15 models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC/AR4) and a dynamic vegetation model VEGAS driven by these climate output. Our results suggest that the core of the Amazon rainforest should remain largely stable. However, the periphery, notably the southern edge, is in danger of drying out, driven by two main processes. First, a decline in precipitation of 24% in the southern Amazon lengthens the dry season and reduces soil moisture, despite of an increase in precipitation during the wet season, due to the nonlinear response in hydrology and ecosystem dynamics. Two dynamical mechanisms may explain the lower dry season precipitation: (1) a stronger north-south tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature gradient; (2) a general subtropical drying under global warming when the dry season southern Amazon is under the control of the subtropical high pressure. Secondly, evaporation will increase due to the general warming, thus also reducing soil moisture. As a consequence, the median of the models projects a reduction of vegetation by 20%, and enhanced fire carbon flux by 10-15% in the southern Amazon, central Brazil, and parts of the Andean Mountains. Because the southern Amazon is also under intense human influence, the double pressure of deforestation and climate change may subject the region to dramatic changes in the 21st century.

  15. Assessing the Amazon Cloud Suitability for CLARREO's Computational Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldin, Daniel; Vakhnin, Andrei A.; Currey, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    In this document we compare the performance of the Amazon Web Services (AWS), also known as Amazon Cloud, with the CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory) cluster and assess its suitability for computational needs of the CLARREO mission. A benchmark executable to process one month and one year of PARASOL (Polarization and Anistropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) data was used. With the optimal AWS configuration, adequate data-processing times, comparable to the CLARREO cluster, were found. The assessment of alternatives to the CLARREO cluster continues and several options, such as a NASA-based cluster, are being considered.

  16. Osteoma in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, João Felipe Rito; Levy, Marcelo Guilherme Bezerra; Liparisi, Flavia; Romão, Mario Antonio Pinto

    2013-09-01

    Osteoma is an uncommon bone formation documented in avian species and other animals. A blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) with clinical respiratory symptoms was examined because of a hard mass present on the left nostril. Radiographs suggested a bone tumor, and the mass was surgically excised. Histopathologic examination revealed features of an osteoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an osteoma in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot. Osteoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with respiratory distress and swelling of the nostril. PMID:24344513

  17. Accelerating to Zero: Strategies to Eliminate Malaria in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Quispe, Antonio M.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rodriguez, Hugo; Clendenes, Martin; Cabezas, Cesar; Leon, Luis M.; Chuquiyauri, Raul; Moreno, Marta; Kaslow, David C.; Grogl, Max; Herrera, Sócrates; Magill, Alan J.; Kosek, Margaret; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Lescano, Andres G.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In February 2014, the Malaria Elimination Working Group, in partnership with the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH), hosted its first international conference on malaria elimination in Iquitos, Peru. The 2-day meeting gathered 85 malaria experts, including 18 international panelists, 23 stakeholders from different malaria-endemic regions of Peru, and 11 MoH authorities. The main outcome was consensus that implementing a malaria elimination project in the Amazon region is achievable, but would require: 1) a comprehensive strategic plan, 2) the altering of current programmatic guidelines from control toward elimination by including symptomatic as well as asymptomatic individuals for antimalarial therapy and transmission-blocking interventions, and 3) the prioritization of community-based active case detection with proper rapid diagnostic tests to interrupt transmission. Elimination efforts must involve key stakeholders and experts at every level of government and include integrated research activities to evaluate, implement, and tailor sustainable interventions appropriate to the region.

  18. Seroepidemiological Study of Chagas Disease in the Southern Amazon Region of Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Angel G.; Atherton, Richard D.; Wauters, Michael A.; Vicuña, Yosselin; Nelson, Marcos; Prado, Jose; Kato, Hirotomo; Calvopiña, Manuel H.; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    To determine the extent of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and/or transmission in the southern Amazon region of Ecuador, three indigenous communities in the provinces of Pastaza and Morona Santiago were serosurveyed. ChagatestTM, Immunocomb®II and immunofluorescent (IF) assays were used. Among the 385 inhabitants examined, nine (2.34%) were seropositive for T. cruzi infection. Of the nine positive sera, four (44.4%) fall in the 10–19, one each in the 20–29, 30–39 and 40–49, and two in the 50–59 age groups. These results suggested the possible existence of an autochthonous active T. cruzi transmission in the region and provide the first serological evidence for T. cruzi infection in the southern province of Morona Santiago bordering Peru. Further studies are needed in these Amazonian provinces to ascertain the spread of T. cruzi infection in the area. PMID:23532947

  19. Jotï ecogony, Venezuelan Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, Egleé L.

    2013-03-01

    The current environmental crisis permeates the discourse and concerns of people all over the world. Consideration of diverse environmental ethics showing the alternative ways in which people conceptualize and relate to nature and natural resources are critical for bringing about more sustainable human behaviors. After a brief review of Western historical notions of nature, this work explores the ecogony, or causal reasons, that trigger the behavior of the Jotï, an Amerindian people of the Venezuelan Amazon, with other entities and the forest that they inhabit. The analysis presented synthesizes 15 years of transdisciplinary ethno-ecological research comprising quantitative and qualitative methods (collection of herbarium voucher specimens, floristic inventories in forest plots, structured interviews focused on plot vegetation, semi-structured interviews of life-histories, participant observation, time allocation studies, food resource accounting, focal person following observations, garden crop inventories and censuses, mapping of wild resource harvest locations, among others). Jotï pragmatic and ideological tenets generate a distinctive environmental ethics based on ecogonic nodes. Notions of interdependence, humanity and person are articulated on a daily basis through several dynamics: (1) hyper-awareness of all living things’ dependence on each other and other elements of the biophysical environment at macroscales and microscales, (2) the construction of human spiritual, conscious, physical and agentive constituents from a variety of diverse botanical and zoological species and mineral components of their homeland, and (3) an understanding of the aggregate surroundings, including a significant portion of the biotic and abiotic components, as potential subjects with awareness, creativity and moral stances. This condition of interdependence confers rights and duties on all the parts. Jotï horizontal communications with and among life-forms sustain their

  20. Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.E.; Aller, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf is strongly controlled by dynamic physical sedimentation processes. Rapidly accumulating, physically reworked deltaic sediments characteristic of much of the shelf typically support what appear to be low rates of steady state anaerobic methane oxidation at depths of 5-8 m below the sediment-water interface. Methane oxidation in these cases is responsible for < {approximately}10% of the {Sigma}CO{sub 2} inventory in the oxidation zone and is limited largely by the steady-state diffusive flux of methane into the overlying sulfate reduction zone. In contrast, a large area of the shelf has been extensively eroded, reexposing once deeply buried (>10 m) methane-charged sediment directly to seawater. In this nonsteady-state situation, methane is a major source of recently produced {Sigma}CO{sub 2} and an important reductant for sulfate. These observations suggest that authigenic sedimentary carbonates derived from anaerobic methane oxidation may sometimes reflect physically enhanced nonsteady-state exposure of methane to sulfate in otherwise biogeochemically unreactive deposits. The concentration profiles of CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} in the eroded deposit were reproduced by a coupled reaction-transport model. This area of the shelf was reexposed to seawater approximately 5-10 years ago based on the model results and the assumption that the erosion of the deposit occurred as a single event that has now ceased. The necessary second order rate constant for anaerobic methane oxidation was {le}0.1 mM{sup -1} d{sup -1}.

  1. Biomedical cloud computing with Amazon Web Services.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Vincent A; Patil, Prasad; Gafni, Erik; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    In this overview to biomedical computing in the cloud, we discussed two primary ways to use the cloud (a single instance or cluster), provided a detailed example using NGS mapping, and highlighted the associated costs. While many users new to the cloud may assume that entry is as straightforward as uploading an application and selecting an instance type and storage options, we illustrated that there is substantial up-front effort required before an application can make full use of the cloud's vast resources. Our intention was to provide a set of best practices and to illustrate how those apply to a typical application pipeline for biomedical informatics, but also general enough for extrapolation to other types of computational problems. Our mapping example was intended to illustrate how to develop a scalable project and not to compare and contrast alignment algorithms for read mapping and genome assembly. Indeed, with a newer aligner such as Bowtie, it is possible to map the entire African genome using one m2.2xlarge instance in 48 hours for a total cost of approximately $48 in computation time. In our example, we were not concerned with data transfer rates, which are heavily influenced by the amount of available bandwidth, connection latency, and network availability. When transferring large amounts of data to the cloud, bandwidth limitations can be a major bottleneck, and in some cases it is more efficient to simply mail a storage device containing the data to AWS (http://aws.amazon.com/importexport/). More information about cloud computing, detailed cost analysis, and security can be found in references. PMID:21901085

  2. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within themore » 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63« less

  3. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  4. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. Results As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. Conclusions The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10–20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health

  5. Mimivirus circulation among wild and domestic mammals, Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Fábio P; Rodrigues, Felipe P; Boratto, Paulo V M; Silva, Lorena C F; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Trindade, Giliane S; Kroon, Erna G; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-03-01

    To investigate circulation of mimiviruses in the Amazon Region of Brazil, we surveyed 513 serum samples from domestic and wild mammals. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in 15 sample pools, and mimivirus DNA was detected in 9 pools of serum from capuchin monkeys and in 16 pools of serum from cattle. PMID:24564967

  6. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: A Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijman, Jan; Hill, A. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents a classroom project dealing with tropical deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Addresses environmental consequences and economic, social, and political causes. Involves both lectures and individual research and reports by student groups on deforestation causes. Includes a note-playing activity in which students make recommendations for…

  7. Kindling: The Amazon e-Reader as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brezicki, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The revolutionary electronic reading device, Amazon's Kindle, is already obsolete. Such is the breakneck speed of technology that the machine touted to spell the death of printed books is already heading for the scrap heap, replaced by e-readers like the iPad that access the Internet, make phone calls, download movies, and connect users with all…

  8. Organic carbon-14 in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I.; Ertel, J.R.; Quay, P.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Richey, J.E.; Devol, A.H.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.W.; Salati, E.

    1986-03-07

    Coarse and fine suspended particulate organic materials and dissolved humic and fulvic acids transported by the Amazon River all contain bomb-produced carbon-14, indicating relatively rapid turnover of the parent carbon pools. However, the carbon-14 contents of these coexisting carbon forms are measurably different and may reflect varying degrees of retention by soils in the drainage basin. 20 references, 1 table.

  9. Extreme Drought Events Revealed in Amazon Tree Ring Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, H. S.; Baker, P. A.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    The Amazon basin is a center of deep atmospheric convection and thus acts as a major engine for global hydrologic circulation. Yet despite its significance, a full understanding of Amazon rainfall variability remains elusive due to a poor historical record of climate. Temperate tree rings have been used extensively to reconstruct climate over the last thousand years, however less attention has been given to the application of dendrochronology in tropical regions, in large part due to a lower frequency of tree species known to produce annual rings. Here we present a tree ring record of drought extremes from the Madre de Dios region of southeastern Peru over the last 190 years. We confirm that tree ring growth in species Cedrela odorata is annual and show it to be well correlated with wet season precipitation. This correlation is used to identify extreme dry (and wet) events that have occurred in the past. We focus on drought events identified in the record as drought frequency is expected to increase over the Amazon in a warming climate. The Cedrela chronology records historic Amazon droughts of the 20th century previously identified in the literature and extends the record of drought for this region to the year 1816. Our analysis shows that there has been an increase in the frequency of extreme drought (mean recurrence interval = 5-6 years) since the turn of the 20th century and both Atlantic and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) forcing mechanisms are implicated.

  10. Following Saharan Dust Outbreak Toward The Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ami, Y.; Koren, I.; Rudich, Y.; Flores, M.

    2008-12-01

    The role of the Amazon rainforest on earth climatic system is well recognized. To keep forest wellbeing and the fragile balance between the rainforest and the atmosphere, the Amazon must contain a satisfactory amount of nutrients to support the plants. The extensive rain and floods wash most of the soluble nutrients from the rainforest soil, leaving behind acidic kaolinite clay or sandy soil, with limited minerals for plant growth. It was suggested that lack of mineral in the soil may be replenished by deposition of Saharan mineral dust. Using remote sensing data (from the A-train satellites constellation) following with in-situ measurements (as part of the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMZE) campaign), ground-based data (from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET)) and back trajectory calculations, we analyzed Saharan dust transport toward the Amazon basin during the AMZE period (Feb 7 to Mar 14, 2008). Dust mass, sink, vertical distribution and surface wind speeds were analyzed over the Bodele depression (located in Chad), where most of the dust is emitted, along the Atlantic Ocean and near the Brazilian coastline. Using an integrated data analysis approach we followed dust packages from their emission in the Sahara to their sink in the Amazon forest.

  11. Neogene origins and implied warmth tolerance of Amazon tree species

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Christopher W; Lewis, Simon L; Maslin, Mark; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-01-01

    Tropical rain forest has been a persistent feature in South America for at least 55 million years. The future of the contemporary Amazon forest is uncertain, however, as the region is entering conditions with no past analogue, combining rapidly increasing air temperatures, high atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, possible extreme droughts, and extensive removal and modification by humans. Given the long-term Cenozoic cooling trend, it is unknown whether Amazon forests can tolerate air temperature increases, with suggestions that lowland forests lack warm-adapted taxa, leading to inevitable species losses. In response to this uncertainty, we posit a simple hypothesis: the older the age of a species prior to the Pleistocene, the warmer the climate it has previously survived, with Pliocene (2.6–5 Ma) and late-Miocene (8–10 Ma) air temperature across Amazonia being similar to 2100 temperature projections under low and high carbon emission scenarios, respectively. Using comparative phylogeographic analyses, we show that 9 of 12 widespread Amazon tree species have Pliocene or earlier lineages (>2.6 Ma), with seven dating from the Miocene (>5.6 Ma) and three >8 Ma. The remarkably old age of these species suggest that Amazon forests passed through warmth similar to 2100 levels and that, in the absence of other major environmental changes, near-term high temperature-induced mass species extinction is unlikely. PMID:23404439

  12. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models. PMID:25788097

  13. Distribution and partition of trace metals in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Patrick T.; Boaventura, Geraldo R.

    2003-05-01

    The distribution of trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, U) was investigated in surface waters and associated particulates in the Amazon mainstream (Solimões and Amazon rivers). Dissolved V, Cu, As, Sr, Ba, U correlate with major ions and appear to be predominantly derived from soluble rocks occurring in the Amazon upper basin. These elements appear conservative in waters and are progressively diluted by less-concentrated waters coming from the lowland and shield areas. A monthly time series obtained at the Óbidos gauging station shows that temporal variability of trace element concentrations reflects the source, remobilization and/or biological processes occurring in the channel or in the surrounding floodplain lakes. The trace element concentrations in the particulate matter show a clear relationship with the location of the samples. V, Co, Cr, Mn, Sr, Cs and Ba concentrations are higher in the Solimões and the Rio Negro is enriched in Fe, Al and Zn. In the Rio Solimões, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Cs and Pb are almost entirely carried by the river particulate matter; Cu, Rb, Sr, Ba and U are transported mainly by the suspended particles, but a dissolved phase contributes to the transport. In the Rio Negro, the proportion of elements transported by the dissolved phase is higher for the whole set of elements. The implications of these results allow us to compute the fluxes from the Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Broadbent, Eben N.; Oliveira, Paulo J. C.; Keller, Michael; Knapp, David E.; Silva, José N. M.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term viability of a forest industry in the Amazon region of Brazil depends on the maintenance of adequate timber volume and growth in healthy forests. Using extensive high-resolution satellite analyses, we studied the forest damage caused by recent logging operations and the likelihood that logged forests would be cleared within 4 years after timber harvest. Across 2,030,637 km2 of the Brazilian Amazon from 1999 to 2004, at least 76% of all harvest practices resulted in high levels of canopy damage sufficient to leave forests susceptible to drought and fire. We found that 16 ± 1% of selectively logged areas were deforested within 1 year of logging, with a subsequent annual deforestation rate of 5.4% for 4 years after timber harvests. Nearly all logging occurred within 25 km of main roads, and within that area, the probability of deforestation for a logged forest was up to four times greater than for unlogged forests. In combination, our results show that logging in the Brazilian Amazon is dominated by highly damaging operations, often followed rapidly by deforestation decades before forests can recover sufficiently to produce timber for a second harvest. Under the management regimes in effect at the time of our study in the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging would not be sustained. PMID:16901980

  15. Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Broadbent, Eben N; Oliveira, Paulo J C; Keller, Michael; Knapp, David E; Silva, José N M

    2006-08-22

    The long-term viability of a forest industry in the Amazon region of Brazil depends on the maintenance of adequate timber volume and growth in healthy forests. Using extensive high-resolution satellite analyses, we studied the forest damage caused by recent logging operations and the likelihood that logged forests would be cleared within 4 years after timber harvest. Across 2,030,637 km2 of the Brazilian Amazon from 1999 to 2004, at least 76% of all harvest practices resulted in high levels of canopy damage sufficient to leave forests susceptible to drought and fire. We found that 16+/-1% of selectively logged areas were deforested within 1 year of logging, with a subsequent annual deforestation rate of 5.4% for 4 years after timber harvests. Nearly all logging occurred within 25 km of main roads, and within that area, the probability of deforestation for a logged forest was up to four times greater than for unlogged forests. In combination, our results show that logging in the Brazilian Amazon is dominated by highly damaging operations, often followed rapidly by deforestation decades before forests can recover sufficiently to produce timber for a second harvest. Under the management regimes in effect at the time of our study in the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging would not be sustained. PMID:16901980

  16. Spatial Distribution of Leprosy in the Amazon Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Wand-del-Rey de Oliveira, Maria L.

    2009-01-01

    To detect areas with increased case-detection rates, we used spatial scan statistics to identify 5 of 10 clusters of leprosy in the Amazon region of Brazil. Despite increasing economic development, population growth, and road infrastructure, leprosy is endemic to this region, which is a source of case exportation to other parts of Brazil. PMID:19331763

  17. Mouth of the Amazon River as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A near-nadir view of the mouth of the Amazon River, that shows all signs of being a relatively healthy system, breathing and exhaling. The well-developed cumulus field over the forested areas on both the north and south sides of the river (the view is slightly to the west) shows that good evapotranspiration is underway.

  18. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienen, R. J. W.; Phillips, O. L.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Gloor, E.; Baker, T. R.; Lloyd, J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A.; Malhi, Y.; Lewis, S. L.; Vásquez Martinez, R.; Alexiades, M.; Álvarez Dávila, E.; Alvarez-Loayza, P.; Andrade, A.; Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Araujo-Murakami, A.; Arets, E. J. M. M.; Arroyo, L.; Aymard C., G. A.; Bánki, O. S.; Baraloto, C.; Barroso, J.; Bonal, D.; Boot, R. G. A.; Camargo, J. L. C.; Castilho, C. V.; Chama, V.; Chao, K. J.; Chave, J.; Comiskey, J. A.; Cornejo Valverde, F.; da Costa, L.; de Oliveira, E. A.; di Fiore, A.; Erwin, T. L.; Fauset, S.; Forsthofer, M.; Galbraith, D. R.; Grahame, E. S.; Groot, N.; Hérault, B.; Higuchi, N.; Honorio Coronado, E. N.; Keeling, H.; Killeen, T. J.; Laurance, W. F.; Laurance, S.; Licona, J.; Magnussen, W. E.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Mendoza, C.; Neill, D. A.; Nogueira, E. M.; Núñez, P.; Pallqui Camacho, N. C.; Parada, A.; Pardo-Molina, G.; Peacock, J.; Peña-Claros, M.; Pickavance, G. C.; Pitman, N. C. A.; Poorter, L.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Ramírez, F.; Ramírez-Angulo, H.; Restrepo, Z.; Roopsind, A.; Rudas, A.; Salomão, R. P.; Schwarz, M.; Silva, N.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Silveira, M.; Stropp, J.; Talbot, J.; Ter Steege, H.; Teran-Aguilar, J.; Terborgh, J.; Thomas-Caesar, R.; Toledo, M.; Torello-Raventos, M.; Umetsu, R. K.; van der Heijden, G. M. F.; van der Hout, P.; Guimarães Vieira, I. C.; Vieira, S. A.; Vilanova, E.; Vos, V. A.; Zagt, R. J.

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models.

  19. Backwater effects in the Amazon River basin of Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.; Rayol, J.M.; Da Conceicao, S.C.; Natividade, J.R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Amazon River mainstem of Brazil is so regulated by differences in the timing of tributary inputs and by seasonal storage of water on floodplains that maximum discharges exceed minimum discharges by a factor of only 3. Large tributaries that drain the southern Amazon River basin reach their peak discharges two months earlier than does the mainstem. The resulting backwater in the lowermost 800 km of two large southern tributaries, the Madeira and Puru??s rivers, causes falling river stages to be as much as 2-3 m higher than rising stages at any given discharge. Large tributaries that drain the northernmost Amazon River basin reach their annual minimum discharges three to four months later than does the mainstem. In the lowermost 300-400 km of the Negro River, the largest northern tributary and the fifth largest river in the world, the lowest stages of the year correspond to those of the Amazon River mainstem rather than to those in the upstream reaches of the Negro River. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  20. Decentralizing Education: A Successful Experience in the Brazilian Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proenca, Marilene; Neneve, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the importance of education policies that aim at diminishing social disparities in poor countries, focusing on a program in higher education developed in the state of Rondonia in the Brazilian Amazon. Rondonia is a region in which people have suffered deeply from the consequences of social inequalities. Many…

  1. Future of oil and gas development in the western Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finer, Matt; Babbitt, Bruce; Novoa, Sidney; Ferrarese, Francesco; Eugenio Pappalardo, Salvatore; De Marchi, Massimo; Saucedo, Maria; Kumar, Anjali

    2015-02-01

    The western Amazon is one of the world’s last high-biodiversity wilderness areas, characterized by extraordinary species richness and large tracts of roadless humid tropical forest. It is also home to an active hydrocarbon (oil and gas) sector, characterized by operations in extremely remote areas that require new access routes. Here, we present the first integrated analysis of the hydrocarbon sector and its associated road-building in the western Amazon. Specifically, we document the (a) current panorama, including location and development status of all oil and gas discoveries, of the sector, and (b) current and future scenario of access (i.e. access road versus roadless access) to discoveries. We present an updated 2014 western Amazon hydrocarbon map illustrating that oil and gas blocks now cover 733 414 km2, an area much larger than the US state of Texas, and have been expanding since the last assessment in 2008. In terms of access, we documented 11 examples of the access road model and six examples of roadless access across the region. Finally, we documented 35 confirmed and/or suspected untapped hydrocarbon discoveries across the western Amazon. In the Discussion, we argue that if these reserves must be developed, use of the offshore inland model—a method that strategically avoids the construction of access roads—is crucial to minimizing ecological impacts in one of the most globally important conservation regions.

  2. Spatial pattern of standing timber value across the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sadia E; Ewers, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    The Amazon is a globally important system, providing a host of ecosystem services from climate regulation to food sources. It is also home to a quarter of all global diversity. Large swathes of forest are removed each year, and many models have attempted to predict the spatial patterns of this forest loss. The spatial patterns of deforestation are determined largely by the patterns of roads that open access to frontier areas and expansion of the road network in the Amazon is largely determined by profit seeking logging activities. Here we present predictions for the spatial distribution of standing value of timber across the Amazon. We show that the patterns of timber value reflect large-scale ecological gradients, determining the spatial distribution of functional traits of trees which are, in turn, correlated with timber values. We expect that understanding the spatial patterns of timber value across the Amazon will aid predictions of logging movements and thus predictions of potential future road developments. These predictions in turn will be of great use in estimating the spatial patterns of deforestation in this globally important biome. PMID:22590520

  3. Spatial Pattern of Standing Timber Value across the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sadia E.; Ewers, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The Amazon is a globally important system, providing a host of ecosystem services from climate regulation to food sources. It is also home to a quarter of all global diversity. Large swathes of forest are removed each year, and many models have attempted to predict the spatial patterns of this forest loss. The spatial patterns of deforestation are determined largely by the patterns of roads that open access to frontier areas and expansion of the road network in the Amazon is largely determined by profit seeking logging activities. Here we present predictions for the spatial distribution of standing value of timber across the Amazon. We show that the patterns of timber value reflect large-scale ecological gradients, determining the spatial distribution of functional traits of trees which are, in turn, correlated with timber values. We expect that understanding the spatial patterns of timber value across the Amazon will aid predictions of logging movements and thus predictions of potential future road developments. These predictions in turn will be of great use in estimating the spatial patterns of deforestation in this globally important biome. PMID:22590520

  4. Human Leptospirosis Caused by a New, Antigenically Unique Leptospira Associated with a Rattus Species Reservoir in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Cespedes, Manuel; Diaz, M. Monica; Galloway, Renee L.; Saito, Mayuko; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Patra, Kailash P.; Ore, Carlos Vidal; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Levett, Paul N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a prospective study of leptospirosis and biodiversity of Leptospira in the Peruvian Amazon, a new Leptospira species was isolated from humans with acute febrile illness. Field trapping identified this leptospire in peridomestic rats (Rattus norvegicus, six isolates; R. rattus, two isolates) obtained in urban, peri-urban, and rural areas of the Iquitos region. Novelty of this species was proven by serological typing, 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis. We have named this species “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal, and have determined that it is phylogenetically related to, but genetically distinct from, other intermediate Leptospira such as L. fainei and L. inadai. The type strain is serovar Varillal strain VAR 010T, which has been deposited into internationally accessible culture collections. By microscopic agglutination test, “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal was antigenically distinct from all known serogroups of Leptospira except for low level cross-reaction with rabbit anti–L. fainei serovar Hurstbridge at a titer of 1∶100. LipL32, although not detectable by PCR, was detectable in “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal by both Southern blot hybridization and Western immunoblot, although on immunoblot, the predicted protein was significantly smaller (27 kDa) than that of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri (32 kDa). Isolation was rare from humans (2/45 Leptospira isolates from 881 febrile patients sampled), but high titers of MAT antibodies against “Leptospira licerasiae” serovar Varillal were common (30%) among patients fulfilling serological criteria for acute leptospirosis in the Iquitos region, and uncommon (7%) elsewhere in Peru. This new leptospiral species reflects Amazonian biodiversity and has evolved to become an important cause of leptospirosis in the Peruvian Amazon. PMID:18382606

  5. Geochemistry of Amazon Basin supported by the ADCP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paca, Victor; Moreira, Daniel; Monteiro, Achiles; Roig, Henrique

    2014-05-01

    The Amazon River is the largest river in the world in volume of water. The basin has 6.915.000 Km2, but the last gauging station of Amazon River with regular and continuous measurements of discharge and sediment transport are Óbidos station with 4.670.000 Km2. Óbidos It is also the last stream gauge station with no or less tidal effect observed from Atlantic Ocean and registered. The Clim-Amazon Project has been done the first measurements with the purpose to acquire geochemical and hydrological informations downstream Óbidos station. The system studied has input data of sediments load after Óbidos, and the output of the system, at the Amazon River is at Macapá, close to the mouth of Amazon river. And flow the main tributaries along this way, between these two stations. To evaluate the geochemical source, the mass balance, and isotopic geochemistry is necessary the informations about the traces the main chemical elements, transported by the discharge from the main rivers of this area: Tapajos, Xingu, Paru, Jari, and the Amazon River at Monte Alegre and at Macapá. The ADCP - Acoustic Doppler Current Profile, equipment is used to get the stream discharge value at the moment of transect. But also get two more informations necessary for the geochemistry, and do the collecting points profiles. The place with most velocity at transect or the place with more backscatter. These informations are related with the sediment load of the river. Or which one can provide the better idea of how are transported the sediments at the measured transects. What was to observe was the main speed of the stream flow or the main backscatter sectional. The main purpose of the work is to show how works the correlation between the backscatter and speed data given by the ADCP, downstream Óbidos, and the main confluences of Amazon River, until Macapá. The ADCP measurements support the geochemical studies and the course of sediments load transported by the discharge of these rivers.

  6. Monitoring the Amazon plume northwestward transport along Lagrangian pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Severine; Gaultier, Lucile; Vandemark, Douglas; Lee, Tong; Gierach, Michelle

    2016-04-01

    Large rivers are important to marine air-sea interactions and local biogeochemistry. By modifying the local and regional sea surface salinity (SSS), the freshwater inputs associated with major river plumes cause the formation of a layer near the surface with salinity stratification but near-uniform temperature, known as the barrier layer (BL). The BL prevent exchanges between the warm mixed layer and the cold ocean interior, and thus affect the vertical mixing of heat between the mixed layer and the thermocline. This can have an important impact on air-sea interactions such as hurricanes intensification. Our study focuses on the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, respectively the first and fourth world's largest rivers in terms of discharge. Amazon-Orinoco waters are carried northwestward by the North Brazilian Current (NBC) during the first part of the year and then eastward along the North Equatorial Counter Current. The hurricane season in the tropical Atlantic extends from June through November, the period of Amazon-Orinoco plume maximum northwestward extension, on a hurricane route. Being able to monitor the spatial and temporal dispersal of the Amazon and Orinoco river plumes is therefore important to better understand their impact on barrier layer thickness and SST variation at seasonal to interannual time scales. Variations from year to year in spatial extent of the plume may result from several processes including changes in Amazon discharge, ocean advection, turbulent mixing, and wind field. Satellite remote sensing data provide several means to visualize the surface dispersal of the Amazon plume, with ocean color data being the first to track it in the tropical Atlantic ocean further than 1000 km from shore. With the launches of the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius/SAC-D missions, we are now able to use the SSS observations in combination with ocean color, altimetry and sea surface temperature observations to track surface plume

  7. Avian Influenza Virus (H11N9) in Migratory Shorebirds Wintering in the Amazon Region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Jansen; de Azevedo Júnior, Severino M.; Gaidet, Nicolas; Hurtado, Renata F.; Walker, David; Thomazelli, Luciano M.; Ometto, Tatiana; Seixas, Marina M. M.; Rodrigues, Roberta; Galindo, Daniele B.; da Silva, Adriana C. S.; Rodrigues, Arlinéa M. M.; Bomfim, Leonardo L.; Mota, Marcelo A.; Larrazábal, Maria E.; Branco, Joaquim O.; Serafini, Patricia; Neto, Isaac S.; Franks, John; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Durigon, Edison L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIV). Habitats in Brazil provide stopover and wintering sites for water birds that migrate between North and South America. The current study was conducted to elucidate the possibility of the transport of influenza A viruses by birds that migrate annually between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In total, 556 orotracheal/cloacal swab samples were collected for influenza A virus screening using real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). The influenza A virus-positive samples were subjected to viral isolation. Four samples were positive for the influenza A matrix gene by rRT-PCR. From these samples, three viruses were isolated, sequenced and characterized. All positive samples originated from a single bird species, the ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres), that was caught in the Amazon region at Caeté Bay, Northeast Pará, at Ilha de Canelas. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation of H11N9 in the ruddy turnstone in South America. PMID:25329399

  8. Inundation, Wetland Vegetation and Biogeochemical Processes in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Hess, L. L.; Hamilton, S. K.; Richey, J. E.; Novo, E. M.

    2001-12-01

    Remote sensing of the Amazon basin with passive and active microwave techniques were applied to determine the temporally varying extent of inundation and associated vegetation, and used in conjunction with field measurements to calculate regional rates of carbon dioxide emission from wetlands to the atmosphere. Monthly inundation areas were derived from analysis of the 37-GHz polarization difference observed by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (1979 to 1987) for the mainstem Amazon floodplain in Brazil, the Llanos de Moxos (Beni and Mamore rivers) in Bolivia, the Bananal Island (Araguaia River) and Roraima savannas. Maximum areas subject to inundation, including permanent open waters in rivers and lakes, were as follows (in km2): mainstem Amazon 97,400; Moxos 92,000; Bananal 58,500, and Roraima 16,500. Data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1, L-band synthetic aperture radar were used to determine inundation and wetland vegetation for a quadrat in the central Amazon basin (0o N to 8o S, 72o W to 54o W) at high water (May-June 1996) and low water (October 1995). Flooded area of rivers and floodplains (> 100 m in width) ranged from 79,000 km2 to 290,000 km2. When combined with estimates of inundation associated with streams not detected by the radar, a maximum area of 350,000 km2 (or 20% of the quadrat) was flooded. Combining the areal extent of flooding and measurements of free dissolved CO2 with an evasion model leads to outgassing of CO2 from inundated surfaces to the atmosphere in the central Amazon of 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 MgC ha-1 y-1. Extrapolated over the whole basin, the flux is 10 times the fluvial export of organic carbon to the ocean.

  9. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living Amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 dolphins from free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from Sustainable Development Reserve Mamirauá (...

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 dolphins from free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from Sustainable Development Reserve Mamirauá (...

  11. Ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Amazon basin. The main scenaries in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Coura, J R; Junqueira, A C V

    2015-11-01

    The ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region is directly interlinked with the parasite's extensive reservoir, composed of 33 species of wild mammals within the following orders: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primates; and of 16 species of wild triatomines, of which ten may be infected with T. cruzi. Four scenarios for the diversity of T. cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region are evident: (i) T. cruzi transmission between vectors and wild mammals, which is characterized as a wild enzooty encompassing the entire Amazon basin; (ii) accidental T. cruzi transmission from vectors and wild mammals to humans, when they invade the wild ecotope or when these vectors and wild mammals invade human homes; (iii) occupational Chagas disease among piassava (Leopoldinia piassaba) palm fiber gatherers, transmitted by the vector Rhodnius brethesi, for which these palm trees are the specific ecotope; (IV) oral T. cruzi transmission to humans through food contamination, particularly in juices from plants such as assai, which today is considered to be endemic in the Brazilian Amazon region, with more than 1500 cases notified. PMID:26254002

  12. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  13. Influence of age on the haemoglobin concentration of malaria-infected patients in a reference centre in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Andre M; Cavalcante, Janieldo A; Vítor-Silva, Shelia; Reyes-Lecca, Roberto C; Alencar, Aline C; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Alexandre, Márcia AA; Maria Paula G, Mourão; Guinovart, Caterina; Bassat, Quique; Alecrim, Maria das Graças C; Lacerda, Marcus VG

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia is amongst the major complications of malaria, a major public health problem in the Amazon Region in Latin America. We examined the haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations of malaria-infected patients and compared it to that of malaria-negative febrile patients and afebrile controls. The haematological parameters of febrile patients who had a thick-blood-smear performed at an infectious diseases reference centre of the Brazilian Amazon between December 2009-January 2012 were retrieved together with clinical data. An afebrile community control group was composed from a survey performed in a malaria-endemic area. Hb concentrations and anaemia prevalence were analysed according to clinical-epidemiological status and demographic characteristics. In total, 7,831 observations were included. Patients with Plasmodium falciparum infection had lower mean Hb concentrations (10.5 g/dL) followed by P. vivax-infected individuals (12.4 g/dL), community controls (12.8 g/dL) and malaria-negative febrile patients (13.1 g/dL) (p < 0.001). Age, gender and clinical-epidemiological status were strong independent predictors for both outcomes. Amongst malaria-infected individuals, women in the reproductive age had considerably lower Hb concentrations. In this moderate transmission intensity setting, both vivax and falciparum malaria are associated with reduced Hb concentrations and risk of anaemia throughout a wide age range. PMID:25141283

  14. Influence of age on the haemoglobin concentration of malaria-infected patients in a reference centre in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Andre M; Cavalcante, Janieldo A; Vítor-Silva, Shelia; Reyes-Lecca, Roberto C; Alencar, Aline C; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Alexandre, Márcia A A; Mourão, Maria Paula G; Guinovart, Caterina; Bassat, Quique; Alecrim, Maria das Graças C; Lacerda, Marcus V G

    2014-08-01

    Anaemia is amongst the major complications of malaria, a major public health problem in the Amazon Region in Latin America. We examined the haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations of malaria-infected patients and compared it to that of malaria-negative febrile patients and afebrile controls. The haematological parameters of febrile patients who had a thick-blood-smear performed at an infectious diseases reference centre of the Brazilian Amazon between December 2009-January 2012 were retrieved together with clinical data. An afebrile community control group was composed from a survey performed in a malaria-endemic area. Hb concentrations and anaemia prevalence were analysed according to clinical-epidemiological status and demographic characteristics. In total, 7,831 observations were included. Patients with Plasmodium falciparum infection had lower mean Hb concentrations (10.5 g/dL) followed by P. vivax-infected individuals (12.4 g/dL), community controls (12.8 g/dL) and malaria-negative febrile patients (13.1 g/dL) (p < 0.001). Age, gender and clinical-epidemiological status were strong independent predictors for both outcomes. Amongst malaria-infected individuals, women in the reproductive age had considerably lower Hb concentrations. In this moderate transmission intensity setting, both vivax and falciparum malaria are associated with reduced Hb concentrations and risk of anaemia throughout a wide age range. PMID:25141283

  15. New sediment budget calculations for the submarine Amazon Delta indicates enhanced modern sediment fluxes of the Amazon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Haberkern, J.; Mulitza, S.; Chiessi, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The submarine Amazon Delta is one major sink in the Amazon source-to-sink system. It is estimated, that the Amazon transports around 1200 Mt/yr. Around 50% of this river sediment load, namely 400 - 800 Mt/yr, is stored on the submarine delta, leading to sedimentation rates of decimeters per year (Nittrouer et al., 1995). The majority of the remaining sediments is deposited on the lower delta plain of the Amazon, but another significant portion is accumulated at the Amapa shoreline or is bypassed further northwestwards. These sediment budget calculations are mainly based on radioisotopic profiles measured at sediment cores in the frame of the AmasSeds project, which was carried out in the 1980ties and 1990ties (Nittrouer et al., 1995). Here we present another approach for calculating mass fluxes in the Amazon system. Within the Project AMADEUS, a cooperation between the MARUM, Bremen, Germany and the University Sao Paulo, Brazil, high-resolution seismic multichannel seismic data and sediment echosounder data (PARASOUND) were collected during Cruise MSM20/3 in February/March 2012. Main emphases of the surveying were set to the forset and bottomset of the delta, where most of the accretion occurs. A special outcome of the new data is the comparison with PARASOUND data collected in 1996 during Cruise M34/4. Due to several crossing points of both data sets it is now possible to carry out direct measurements of the accumulation during these 16 years. Another time horizon is a prominent unconformity spreading over the submarine delta, since the sedimentation on top of this unconformity had been dated to start roughly 100 yrs ago (Sommerfield et al., 1995). Mapping of this unconformity as well as the reflector representing the seafloor of 1996 gives the opportunity to calculate volumes and mass of the sediment stored within the survey area for two different time spans. First calculations show, that the sediment accumulation on the submarine delta since 1996 is

  16. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses circulating in the Western Amazon region, North Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) represent important public health problems in the Western Amazon region with reported cases of fulminant hepatitis. This cross sectional study describes HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods HBsAg positive individuals (n = 224) were recruited in Manaus/Amazonas State (130 blood donors from the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation from Amazonas/HEMOAM; 60 subjects from outpatient clinic) and in Eirunepe city (n = 34) from 2003–2009. Most participants (n = 153) lived in Manaus, 63 were from 20 remote isolated municipalities, 8 lived outside Amazonas State. Genotyping was based on PCR products: HBV genotype A-F specific primers, restricted length polymorphism for HDV. HDV isolates were directly sequenced (delta antigen 405 nucleotide fragment) and phylogenetic analysis performed (MEGA; neighbor-joining, Kimura’s two parameter). Results Most participants were young adult males and HBV mono-infection predominated (70.5%, 158/224). Among blood donors, outpatient subjects and individuals from Eirunepe, HBV/A prevailed followed by HBV/D and F (p > 0.05). HBV/A was more frequent in blood donors (p < 0.05). HBV-HDV coinfection rate was 8.5% in blood donors (11/130), 65.0% (39/60) in outpatient subjects and 47.0% (16/34) in individuals from Eirunepe. Compared to blood donors, coinfection was higher in outpatient subjects (65.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.0; CI 3.4-7.9; p < 0.0001) and in subjects from Eirunepe (47.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.5; CI 3.0-9.9; p < 0.0001). HBV-HDV coinfection rates were higher in patients from highly endemic remote cities. Only HDV genotype 3 was detected, HBV/F-HDV/3 predominated (20/38; 52.7%), followed by HBV/A-HDV/3 (31.6%; 12/38) and HBV/D-HDV/3 (15.8%; 6/38). Conclusions The description of HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the western Amazon can contribute to a better understanding of their relevance on the

  17. Complex Socio-Ecological Dynamics driven by extreme events in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    Several years with extreme floods or droughts in the past decade have caused human suffering in remote communities of the Brazilian Amazon. Despite documented local knowledge and practices for coping with the high seasonal variability characteristic of the region's hydrology (e.g. 10m change in river levels between dry and flood seasons), and despite 'civil Defense' interventions by various levels of government, the more extreme years seem to have exceeded the coping capacity of the community. In this paper, we explore whether there is a real increase in variability, whether the community perceives that recent extreme events are outside the experience which shapes their responses to 'normal' levels of variability, and what science-based policy could contribute to greater local resilience. Hydrological analyses suggest that variability is indeed increasing, in line with expectations from future climate change. However, current measures of hydrological regimes do not predict years with social hardship very well. Interviewees in two regions are able to express their strategies for dealing with 'normal' variability very well, but also identify ways in which abnormal years exceed their ability to cope. Current Civil Defense arrangements struggle to deliver emergency assistance in a sufficiently timely and locally appropriate fashion. Combining these insights in the context of social-ecological change, we suggest how better integration of science, policy and local knowledge could improve resilience to future trends, and identify some contributions science could make into such an arrangement.

  18. Mid-Late Pleistocene OSL chronology in western Amazonia and implications for the transcontinental Amazon pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Cohen, Marcelo C. L.; Tatumi, Sonia H.; Sawakuchi, André O.; Cremon, Édipo H.; Mittani, Juan C. R.; Bertani, Thiago C.; Munita, Casimiro J. A. S.; Tudela, Diego R. G.; Yee, Márcio; Moya, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the transcontinental Amazon drainage system remains unrevealed. Sedimentary deposits formed from the Neogene in the Amazonas and Solimões Basins constitute natural archives for reconstructing this event in space and time. However, paleoenvironmental and chronological analyses focusing on these deposits, or even their basic mapping, are still scarce to allow such investigation. In this context, primary interests are fluvial strata related to the lithostratigraphic Içá Formation, mapped over a widespread area in western Amazonian lowlands. Although long regarded as Plio-Pleistocene in age, this unit has not yet been dated and its overall depositional setting remains largely undescribed. The main goal of the present work is to contribute for improving facies analysis and chronology of these deposits, approaching an area in southwestern Amazonia and another in northern Amazonia, which are located more than 1000 km apart. Despite this great distance, the sedimentological and chronological characteristics of deposits from these two areas are analogous. Hence, facies analysis revealed paleoenvironments including active channel, abandoned channel, point bar, crevasse splay and floodplain, which are altogether compatible with meandering fluvial systems. Similarly, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating revealed thirty three ages ranging from 65.4 ± 16.9 to 219.6 ± 25.1 ky (in addition to three outliners of 54.0 ± 7.6, 337.3 ± 36.9 and 346.6 ± 48.6 ky), and nine 97.1 ± 9.9 to 254.8 ± 23.8 ky for the areas in southwestern and northern Amazonia, respectively. These data lead to establish that deposits mapped as Içá Formation over a vast area of western Brazilian Amazonia have a Mid-Late Pleistocene age, rather than the previously inferred Plio-Pleistocene age. It follows that if Plio-Pleistocene deposits exist in this region they remain to be dated and must be restricted to a narrow belt in western Amazonia, as well as isolated occurrences

  19. A comparison of dissolved humic substances from seawater with Amazon River counterparts by sup 13 C-NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I. ); Hatcher, P.G. ); Ertel, J.R. ); Meyers-Schulte, K.J. )

    1992-04-01

    Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater constitutes one of the major reservoirs of reduced carbon on earth, the biochemical and geographic origins of this material and its hydrophobic humic component remain unclear. Rivers have been suggested as a potentially important source of marine DOM, but this implication has not yet been systematically tested by direct comparisons of the bulk structural characteristics of DOM isolated from representative ocean reservoirs and their major river sources. The authors report here such a comparison and find that dissolved humic substances isolated from surface and deep seawater in the East Equatorial and north Central Pacific are enriched in nitrogen and {sup 13}C and depleted in unsaturated carbon with respect to counterparts from the Amazon River system. Based on these observations, riverine dissolved humic substances appear to comprise a small fraction of seawater humic substances and therefore must be efficiently and rapidly removed from the ocean.

  20. Highways and outposts: economic development and health threats in the central Brazilian Amazon region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Economic development is often evoked as a driving force that has the capacity to improve the social and health conditions of remote areas. However, development projects produce uneven impacts on local communities, according to their different positions within society. This study examines the spatial distribution of three major health threats in the Brazilian Amazon region that may undergo changes through highway construction. Homicide mortality, AIDS incidence and malaria prevalence rates were calculated for 70 municipalities located within the areas of influence of the Cuiabá-Santarém highway (BR-163), i.e. in the western part of the state of Pará state and the northern part of Mato Grosso. Results The municipalities were characterized using social and economic indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP), urban and indigenous populations, and recent migration. The municipalities' connections to the region's main transportation routes (BR-163 and Trans-Amazonian highways, along with the Amazon and Tapajós rivers) were identified by tagging the municipalities that have boundaries crossing these routes, using GIS overlay operations. Multiple regression was used to identify the major driving forces and constraints relating to the distribution of health threats. The main explanatory variables for higher malaria prevalence were: proximity to the Trans-Amazonian highway, high proportion of indigenous population and low proportion of migrants. High homicide rates were associated with high proportions of migrants, while connection to the Amazon River played a protective role. AIDS incidence was higher in municipalities with recent increases in GDP and high proportions of urban population. Conclusions Highways induce social and environmental changes and play different roles in spreading and maintaining diseases and health threats. The most remote areas are still protected against violence but are vulnerable to malaria. Rapid economic and demographic

  1. Patterns of Genetic Variability in Island Populations of the Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) from the Mouth of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Bessa-Silva, Adam Rick; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Sodré, Davidson; da Cunha, Divino Bruno; Hadad, Dante; Asp, Nils Edvin; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Sequeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Amazonian coast has several unique geological characteristics resulting from the interaction between drainage pattern of the Amazon River and the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the most extensive and sedimentologically dynamic regions of the world, with a large number of continental islands mostly formed less than 10,000 years ago. The natural distribution of the cane toad (Rhinella marina), one of the world's most successful invasive species, in this complex Amazonian system provides an intriguing model for the investigation of the effects of isolation or the combined effects of isolation and habitat dynamic changes on patterns of genetic variability and population differentiation. We used nine fast-evolving microsatellite loci to contrast patterns of genetic variability in six coastal (three mainlands and three islands) populations of the cane toad near the mouth of the Amazon River. Results from Bayesian multilocus clustering approach and Discriminant Analyses of Principal Component were congruent in showing that each island population was genetically differentiated from the mainland populations. All FST values obtained from all pairwise comparisons were significant, ranging from 0.048 to 0.186. Estimates of both recent and historical gene flow were not significantly different from zero across all population pairs, except the two mainland populations inhabiting continuous habitats. Patterns of population differentiation, with a high level of population substructure and absence/restricted gene flow, suggested that island populations of R. marina are likely isolated since the Holocene sea-level rise. However, considering the similar levels of genetic variability found in both island and mainland populations, it is reliable to assume that they were also isolated for longer periods. Given the genetic uniqueness of each cane toad population, together with the high natural vulnerability of the coastal regions and intense human pressures, we suggest that these

  2. Patterns of Genetic Variability in Island Populations of the Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) from the Mouth of the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Bessa-Silva, Adam Rick; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Sodré, Davidson; da Cunha, Divino Bruno; Hadad, Dante; Asp, Nils Edvin; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Sequeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Amazonian coast has several unique geological characteristics resulting from the interaction between drainage pattern of the Amazon River and the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the most extensive and sedimentologically dynamic regions of the world, with a large number of continental islands mostly formed less than 10,000 years ago. The natural distribution of the cane toad (Rhinella marina), one of the world’s most successful invasive species, in this complex Amazonian system provides an intriguing model for the investigation of the effects of isolation or the combined effects of isolation and habitat dynamic changes on patterns of genetic variability and population differentiation. We used nine fast-evolving microsatellite loci to contrast patterns of genetic variability in six coastal (three mainlands and three islands) populations of the cane toad near the mouth of the Amazon River. Results from Bayesian multilocus clustering approach and Discriminant Analyses of Principal Component were congruent in showing that each island population was genetically differentiated from the mainland populations. All FST values obtained from all pairwise comparisons were significant, ranging from 0.048 to 0.186. Estimates of both recent and historical gene flow were not significantly different from zero across all population pairs, except the two mainland populations inhabiting continuous habitats. Patterns of population differentiation, with a high level of population substructure and absence/restricted gene flow, suggested that island populations of R. marina are likely isolated since the Holocene sea-level rise. However, considering the similar levels of genetic variability found in both island and mainland populations, it is reliable to assume that they were also isolated for longer periods. Given the genetic uniqueness of each cane toad population, together with the high natural vulnerability of the coastal regions and intense human pressures, we suggest that these

  3. Simulating Amazon forest carbon cycling using an individual- and trait-based model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Baker, T. R.; Johnson, M. O.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.; Gloor, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon forest, a regional and global regulator of climate and store of enormous biodiversity, is an incredibly complex ecosystem. Just one ha of forest can contain 300 different species of tree, with an estimated 16,000 tree species present in the region. Different tree species, and even different individuals of a species, vary in their functional traits, influencing how they behave in response to the environment. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are commonly used to simulate the response of the Amazon forest to global environmental change. Yet, such DGVMs typically use a plant functional type (PFT) approach where variation between individuals and species are not represented, which inherently limits the range of outcomes for Amazonia under climate change. Here, we report on recent advances in an alternative approach to tropical forest modeling that represents the size structure and variation of traits within a community, which we term the Trait-based Forest Simulator (TFS). As originally proposed, TFS was strictly a steady-state model and here we present an extension of TFS which includes full forest dynamics, and has been evaluated with data collected from intensive carbon cycling inventory plots from the GEM (Global Ecosystems Monitoring) network. Specifically, we compare the model output to stand-level data on productivity and respiration of the canopy, stems and roots. The model development process has highlighted ecological tradeoffs that are necessary to integrate into trait-based models, such as a shorter leaf lifetime with a lower leaf mass per area. The adapted TFS model simulates carbon cycling in forest plots, including variation in productivity between sites. These results lend confidence to the ability of next-generation vegetation models to accurately simulate forest sensitivity to future changes.

  4. IAI Global Change Agenda and Support of Higher Education in the Andean Amazon Countries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarraga, R.; McClain, M.; Fierro, V.

    2007-05-01

    The Andean Amazon River Analysis and Management project, an IAI Collaborative Research Network operating during 1999-2004, examined the impacts of climate and land-use changes on the hydrobiogeochemistry of rivers draining the Amazon Andes of Ecuador, Peru, Colombia and Bolivia. The project also provided a means to strengthen scientific collaboration among these Andean countries and the USA. Research in these countries was carried out under the guidance of investigators with backgrounds in the relevant environmental fields, but the bulk of the research activities were carried out by undergraduate and graduate students who studied within these countries and overseas. Twenty graduate students and 15 undergraduates completed studies within the project, in topics related to monitoring hydrometeorological variables both in time and space. Student research and capacity building were focused in areas central to global environmental change, including modeling of precipitation and precipitation-runoff processes, basin-scale water quality characterization and biogeochemical cycling, and socioeconomic controls on the use and management of riverine resources. The analysis of human dimension aspects of climate change research was also featured, especially those aspects that linked the consequences of water quality degradation on human health. Most of undergraduate and graduate students that collaborated in the AARAM project have joined national environmental institutions and some have continued for higher scientific degrees in fields closely related to the IAI scientific agenda. Through this IAI initiative, the number of trained global change scientists in the Andean countries has grown and there is enhanced awareness of key global change science issues among the scientific community.

  5. An Analysis of Cloud Computing with Amazon Web Services for the Atmospheric Science Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, J. L.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA science and engineering efforts rely heavily on compute and data handling systems. The nature of NASA science data is such that it is not restricted to NASA users, instead it is widely shared across a globally distributed user community including scientists, educators, policy decision makers, and the public. Therefore NASA science computing is a candidate use case for cloud computing where compute resources are outsourced to an external vendor. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a commercial cloud computing service developed to use excess computing capacity at Amazon, and potentially provides an alternative to costly and potentially underutilized dedicated acquisitions whenever NASA scientists or engineers require additional data processing. AWS desires to provide a simplified avenue for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. AWS has been extensively used by JPL for a wide range of computing needs and was previously tested on a NASA Agency basis during the Nebula testing program. Its ability to support the Langley Science Directorate needs to be evaluated by integrating it with real world operational needs across NASA and the associated maturity that would come with that. The strengths and weaknesses of this architecture and its ability to support general science and engineering applications has been demonstrated during the previous testing. The Langley Office of the Chief Information Officer in partnership with the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has established a pilot business interface to utilize AWS cloud computing resources on a organization and project level pay per use model. This poster discusses an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the pilot business interface from a project level perspective by specifically using a processing scenario involving the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project.

  6. Adherence to 7-day primaquine treatment for the radical cure of P. vivax in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Grietens, Koen Peeters; Soto, Veronica; Erhart, Annette; Ribera, Joan Muela; Toomer, Elizabeth; Tenorio, Alex; Montalvo, Tanilu Grande; Rodriguez, Hugo; Cuentas, Alejandro Llanos; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Gamboa, Dionicia

    2010-06-01

    Despite being free of charge, treatment adherence to 7-day primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax was estimated at 62.2% among patients along the Iquitos-Nauta road in the Peruvian Amazon. The principal reason for non-adherence was the perceived adverse effects related to local humoral illness conceptions that hold that malaria produces a hot state of body, which is further aggravated by the characteristically hot medical treatment. Notably, patients were willing to adhere to the first 3 days of treatment during which symptoms are most apparent and include the characteristic chills. Nevertheless, as symptoms abate, the perceived aggravating characteristics of the medication outweigh the perceived advantages of treatment adherence. Improving community awareness about the role of primaquine to prevent further malaria transmission and fostering a realistic system of direct observed treatment intake, organized at community level, can be expected to improve adherence to the radical cure of P. vivax in this area. PMID:20519594

  7. Forest clearing in the Ecuadorian Amazon: A study of patterns over space and time

    PubMed Central

    Pan, William; Carr, David; Barbieri, Alisson; Bilsborrow, Richard; Suchindran, Chirayath

    2010-01-01

    This study tests four hypotheses related to forest clearing over time in Ecuador’s northern Amazon: (1) a larger increase in population over time on a farm (finca) leads to more deforestation; (2) rates of forest clearing surrounding four primary reference communities differ (spatial heterogeneity); (3) fincas farther from towns/communities experience lower rates of forest clearing over time; and (4) forest clearing differs by finca settlement cohort, viz., by year of establishment of the finca. In this paper, we examine the relationship between forest clearing and key variables over time, and compare three statistical models—OLS, random effects, and spatial regression—to test hypotheses. Descriptive analyses indicate that 7–15% of forest area was cleared on fincas between 1990 and 1999; that more recently established fincas experienced more rapid forest clearing; and that population size and forest clearing are both related to distance from a major community. Controlling for key variables, model results indicate that an increase in population size is significantly related to more forest clearing; rates of forest clearing around the four major communities are not significantly different; distances separating fincas and communities are not significantly related to deforestation; and deforestation rates are higher among more recently established fincas. Key policy implications include the importance of reducing population growth and momentum through measures such as improving information about and provision of family planning services; increasing the low level of girls education to delay and reduce fertility; and expanding credit and agricultural extension services to increase agricultural intensification. PMID:20703367

  8. Unintended pregnancy in the amazon basin of Ecuador: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that each year 80 million women in the world experience an unintended pregnancy. In Ecuador, recent research has revealed that 36.3% of total births are unintended; the research also details significant geographical, ethnic and socioeconomic variations. These studies focused on individual risk factors and were based on large national surveys where local samples, particularly from rural remote areas, were small. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of contextual and individual factors on unintended pregnancies in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador. Methods Women aged 15-44 were selected through an ongoing community-based cross-sectional survey conducted in the Orellana province between May and December 2006. Data were fitted using multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for both individual-level and community-level factors as fixed effects and allowing for heterogeneity between communities. Results The overall prevalence of unintended pregnancy was 62.7%. Two-thirds (73.7%) of indigenous women reported having had at least one unintended pregnancy. Being young, single, and indigenous were significant risk factors for unintended pregnancy, alongside having low access to education and having more than two children. No relationship was found between socioeconomic status and the use of contraceptives. All the variation between communities was explained by individual-level factors. Conclusions This study showed the significance of individual factors in increasing the risk of unintended pregnancy, while the role of community factors was found to be negligible. In order for all women to be able to realize their right to reproductive autonomy, there needs to be a diverse range of solutions, with particular attention paid to cultural issues. PMID:20525237

  9. Methane Evasion and Carbon Dynamics on the Amazon Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The fringing floodplain along the 2600 km reach of the Amazon River in Brazil inundates up to about 80,000 km squared of flooded forests, open water and floating macrophytes. These habitats outgas significant amount of carbon dioxide and methane as a result of autochthonous and allochthonous fixation and exchanges of carbon on the floodplain and with the neighboring uplands. Based on our measurements and those of others, we have assembled sufficient data to characterize the following fluxes and transformations in a representative central Amazon floodplain lake: inputs of litterfall, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rainfall, DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) in streams, DOC in groundwater seepage; exchanges of DOC and POC with the mainstem river; net primary productivity of floating macrophyes, periphyton and phytoplankton; sedimentation; carbon dioxide and methane evasion. These data are the basis for models of carbon processing and methane evasion.

  10. Land-use allocation protects the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paulo J C; Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Almeyda, Angélica; Galván-Gildemeister, Ricardo; Keene, Sam; Raybin, Rebecca F; Smith, Richard C

    2007-08-31

    Disturbance and deforestation have profound ecological and socioeconomic effects on tropical forests, but their diffuse patterns are difficult to detect and quantify at regional scales. We expanded the Carnegie forest damage detection system to show that, between 1999 and 2005, disturbance and deforestation rates throughout the Peruvian Amazon averaged 632 square kilometers per year and 645 square kilometers per year, respectively. However, only 1 to 2% occurred within natural protected areas, indigenous territories contained only 11% of the forest disturbances and 9% of the deforestation, and recent forest concessions effectively protected against clear-cutting. Although the region shows recent increases in disturbance and deforestation rates and leakage into forests surrounding concession areas, land-use policy and remoteness are serving to protect the Peruvian Amazon. PMID:17690260

  11. The Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment - Wet season 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Beck, S. M.; Bendura, R. J.; Drewry, J. W.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Matson, P. A.; Mcneal, R. J.; Navarro, R. L.; Rabine, V.; Snell, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the overall experimental design for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2B), which used data from aircraft, ground-based, and satellite platforms to characterize the chemistry and dynamics of the lower atmosphere over the Amazon Basin during wet season conditions in April-May 1987. The ABLE 2B focused on determining the spatial and temporal scales of variability in trace gases and aerosols in the lower and midtroposphere over the Amazonian rain forest during wet season conditions, and assessing the role of local-to-regional atmospheric scales of motion on determining the distribution of atmospheric chemical species and their photochemical environment. A summary of the results from the combined ABLE 2A and ABLE 2B are presented.

  12. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-06

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissions of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.

  13. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-01

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissions of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.

  14. Remote tropical and sub-tropical responses to Amazon deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Andrew M.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Replacing natural vegetation with realistic tropical crops over the Amazon region in a global Earth system model impacts vertical transport of heat and moisture, modifying the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free atmosphere. Vertical velocity is decreased over a majority of the Amazon region, shifting the ascending branch and modifying the seasonality of the Hadley circulation over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans. Using a simple model that relates circulation changes to heating anomalies and generalizing the upper-atmosphere temperature response to deforestation, agreement is found between the response in the fully-coupled model and the simple solution. These changes to the large-scale dynamics significantly impact precipitation in several remote regions, namely sub-Saharan Africa, Mexico, the southwestern United States and extratropical South America, suggesting non-local climate repercussions for large-scale land use changes in the tropics are possible.

  15. Methane emissions to the troposphere from the Amazon floodplain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devol, Allen H.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Wayne A.; King, Stagg L.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    1988-01-01

    The magnitudes of CH4 emissions to the troposphere from the Amazon River floodplain and the mechanism of these emissions were investigated using the data of 94 individual flux measurements made along a 1700-km stretch of the river during July/August 1985. The overall average rate of CH4 emission from wetlands was found to be 390 mg CH4/sq m per day, with the highest emissions (590 mg CH4/sq m per day) attributed to the water surfaces covered by aquatic macrophytes. Ebullition was the dominant mechanism of emission, accounting for 85 percent of the total. Surface-water CH4 concentrations were highly supersaturated, averaging 6.4 micromolar. The annual emission of CH4 from the Amazon Basin to the troposphere, estimated from the area and the known emission rate, is about 10 CH4 Tg/yr, indicating the importance of the area in the global atmospheric CH4 cycle.

  16. [Globalization and environmentalism: polyphonic ethnicities in the Amazon].

    PubMed

    Garnelo, Luiza; Sampaio, Sully

    2005-01-01

    The article examines the issue of globalization, along with its contradictions and the ways in which it guides and shapes specific situations within the Amazon's present-day reality, while simultaneously engendering the uniformization of economic production and the valorization of cultural differences. The discussion explores the nuances of implementing a massified, standardized productive base that paradoxically fosters the valorization of cultural differences and favors alliances between, on the one hand, ethno-political leaders from indigenous Amazon groups and, on the other, environmentalists and other transworld actors who wield strong decision-making power. The article analyzes the indigenous movement's network of alliances and highlights the polyphony of the different political agents that come to clash with each other within this post-modern geopolitical setting. PMID:17500133

  17. Role of Brazilian Amazon protected areas in climate change mitigation.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo; Moutinho, Paulo; Nepstad, Daniel; Anderson, Anthony; Rodrigues, Hermann; Garcia, Ricardo; Dietzsch, Laura; Merry, Frank; Bowman, Maria; Hissa, Letícia; Silvestrini, Rafaella; Maretti, Cláudio

    2010-06-15

    Protected areas (PAs) now shelter 54% of the remaining forests of the Brazilian Amazon and contain 56% of its forest carbon. However, the role of these PAs in reducing carbon fluxes to the atmosphere from deforestation and their associated costs are still uncertain. To fill this gap, we analyzed the effect of each of 595 Brazilian Amazon PAs on deforestation using a metric that accounts for differences in probability of deforestation in areas of pairwise comparison. We found that the three major categories of PA (indigenous land, strictly protected, and sustainable use) showed an inhibitory effect, on average, between 1997 and 2008. Of 206 PAs created after the year 1999, 115 showed increased effectiveness after their designation as protected. The recent expansion of PAs in the Brazilian Amazon was responsible for 37% of the region's total reduction in deforestation between 2004 and 2006 without provoking leakage. All PAs, if fully implemented, have the potential to avoid 8.0 +/- 2.8 Pg of carbon emissions by 2050. Effectively implementing PAs in zones under high current or future anthropogenic threat offers high payoffs for reducing carbon emissions, and as a result should receive special attention in planning investments for regional conservation. Nevertheless, this strategy demands prompt and predictable resource streams. The Amazon PA network represents a cost of US$147 +/- 53 billion (net present value) for Brazil in terms of forgone profits and investments needed for their consolidation. These costs could be partially compensated by an international climate accord that includes economic incentives for tropical countries that reduce their carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. PMID:20505122

  18. Reserves Protect against Deforestation Fires in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Adeney, J. Marion; Christensen, Norman L.; Pimm, Stuart L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Reserves are the principal means to conserve forests and biodiversity, but the question of whether reserves work is still debated. In the Amazon, fires are closely linked to deforestation, and thus can be used as a proxy for reserve effectiveness in protecting forest cover. We ask whether reserves in the Brazilian Amazon provide effective protection against deforestation and consequently fires, whether that protection is because of their location or their legal status, and whether some reserve types are more effective than others. Methodology/Principal Findings Previous work has shown that most Amazonian fires occur close to roads and are more frequent in El Niño years. We quantified these relationships for reserves and unprotected areas by examining satellite-detected hot pixels regressed against road distance across the entire Brazilian Amazon and for a decade with 2 El Niño-related droughts. Deforestation fires, as measured by hot pixels, declined exponentially with increasing distance from roads in all areas. Fewer deforestation fires occurred within protected areas than outside and the difference between protected and unprotected areas was greatest near roads. Thus, reserves were especially effective at preventing these fires where they are known to be most likely to burn; but they did not provide absolute protection. Even within reserves, at a given distance from roads, there were more deforestation fires in regions with high human impact than in those with low impact. The effect of El Niño on deforestation fires was greatest outside of reserves and near roads. Indigenous reserves, limited-use reserves, and fully protected reserves all had fewer fires than outside areas and did not appear to differ in their effectiveness. Conclusions/Significance Taking time, regional factors, and climate into account, our results show that reserves are an effective tool for curbing destructive burning in the Amazon. PMID:19352423

  19. Amazon river altimetry through satellite radar altimetry and GPS positionning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuth, P.; Cazenave, A.; Blitzkow, D.

    2003-04-01

    Due to extremely poor road infrastructure and resulting difficulties in direct topographic levelling, Amazon river basin lacks a consistent topographical referential. Space based altimetric techniques appear to be the only feasible alternative to establish such a referential. Extensive processing of Topex/Poseidon satellite radar altimeter data upon continental open water bodies of the Amazon Basin over 1993-2000 period has been realised. Due to relatively poor reliability of Topex/Poseidon data at river low stage, processing focussed on maximum annual water levels. Such maximum annual water levels have been determined for more than 150 intersections between satellite ground traces and rivers, accuracy being improved by correlation analysis with continuous water level time series at closest gauging station. Results have been translated to a geoidal referential using EGM96 geoid model. Annual upper enveloppes of rivers longitudinal water profiles have been interpolated, allowing to quantify maximum annual water levels at existing gauging stations. Confrontation between satellite determined and field measured maximum water levels at these stations allowed to quantify the geoidal altitude of more than 80 stations with a decimetric accuracy (<0.5m). This method has been checked and validated through internal consistency analysis, hydrological consistency analysis and confrontation with bi-frequency GPS positionning measurement results at 22 stations. Mean difference between geoidal altitudes determined by satellite radar altimetry and bi-frequency GPS positionning for these 22 stations is +0.29 m +/- 0.63 m, GPS positionning results being lower than satellite radar altimetry ones. Till now about 30 000 km of Amazon Basin rivers over Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador benefit from these altimetric references. This opens way for improved understanding of Amazon river dynamics and enlightens possible improvements in applying satellite radar altimetry techniques over

  20. Influence Deforestation on Hydrological Cycle at Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. C.; Beltrao, J.; Gandu, A. W.

    2007-05-01

    The last three decades, the Amazon Basin has been affected for the occupation with consequence large deforestation. The principal area deforested is located from Maranhao state to Rondonia state. This area is common called "Arc Deforestation", and representing the transition between two important Brazilian ecosystems, Amazon Forest and Savanna Region. Theses ecosystems have precious biodiversity, and it has population about 10.331.000. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of arc deforestation on the hydrological cycle at Amazon basin, using BRAMS (Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) including a model of dynamic vegetation, called GEMTM (General Energy and Mass Transport Model). In this study, numerical simulations were performed with a high spatial resolution regional model that allows capture some mesoscale aspects associated to the land used, topography, coastlines and large rivers. In order to predict the impact of the arc deforestation over the hydrological cycle, it was run two model simulations, conducted over a one-year period. In the first simulation, designated "control", it was used the scenarios derived from Soares Filho (2002), for the year 2002, in governance situation. In the second simulation called "deforestation", it was used the scenarios for the 2050, derived from results of Soares-Filho with governance, too. The higher-resolution regional modeling revealed important features of the deforestation process, displaying some associated mesoscale effects that are not typically represented in similar Global Circulation Model simulations. Near coastal zones and along large rivers, deforestation resulted in reduced precipitation. However, it was predicted increased precipitation over mountainous areas, especially on mountain slopes facing river valleys. Then, these higher-resolution simulations showed that, in general, orography, coastline profile and large river distribution play important roles in

  1. Role of Brazilian Amazon protected areas in climate change mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo; Moutinho, Paulo; Nepstad, Daniel; Anderson, Anthony; Rodrigues, Hermann; Garcia, Ricardo; Dietzsch, Laura; Merry, Frank; Bowman, Maria; Hissa, Letícia; Silvestrini, Rafaella; Maretti, Cláudio

    2010-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) now shelter 54% of the remaining forests of the Brazilian Amazon and contain 56% of its forest carbon. However, the role of these PAs in reducing carbon fluxes to the atmosphere from deforestation and their associated costs are still uncertain. To fill this gap, we analyzed the effect of each of 595 Brazilian Amazon PAs on deforestation using a metric that accounts for differences in probability of deforestation in areas of pairwise comparison. We found that the three major categories of PA (indigenous land, strictly protected, and sustainable use) showed an inhibitory effect, on average, between 1997 and 2008. Of 206 PAs created after the year 1999, 115 showed increased effectiveness after their designation as protected. The recent expansion of PAs in the Brazilian Amazon was responsible for 37% of the region's total reduction in deforestation between 2004 and 2006 without provoking leakage. All PAs, if fully implemented, have the potential to avoid 8.0 ± 2.8 Pg of carbon emissions by 2050. Effectively implementing PAs in zones under high current or future anthropogenic threat offers high payoffs for reducing carbon emissions, and as a result should receive special attention in planning investments for regional conservation. Nevertheless, this strategy demands prompt and predictable resource streams. The Amazon PA network represents a cost of US$147 ± 53 billion (net present value) for Brazil in terms of forgone profits and investments needed for their consolidation. These costs could be partially compensated by an international climate accord that includes economic incentives for tropical countries that reduce their carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. PMID:20505122

  2. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Brian L; Allen, Andrew E; Carpenter, Edward J; Coles, Victoria J; Crump, Byron C; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A; Goes, Joaquim I; Gomes, Helga R; Hood, Raleigh R; McCrow, John P; Montoya, Joseph P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B; Yager, Patricia L; Paul, John H

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon River has the largest discharge of all rivers on Earth, and its complex plume system fuels a wide array of biogeochemical processes, across a large area of the western tropical North Atlantic. The plume thus stimulates microbial processes affecting carbon sequestration and nutrient cycles at a global scale. Chromosomal gene expression patterns of the 2.0 to 156 μm size-fraction eukaryotic microbial community were investigated in the Amazon River Plume, generating a robust dataset (more than 100 million mRNA sequences) that depicts the metabolic capabilities and interactions among the eukaryotic microbes. Combining classical oceanographic field measurements with metatranscriptomics yielded characterization of the hydrographic conditions simultaneous with a quantification of transcriptional activity and identity of the community. We highlight the patterns of eukaryotic gene expression for 31 biogeochemically significant gene targets hypothesized to be valuable within forecasting models. An advantage to this targeted approach is that the database of reference sequences used to identify the target genes was selectively constructed and highly curated optimizing taxonomic coverage, throughput, and the accuracy of annotations. A coastal diatom bloom highly expressed nitrate transporters and carbonic anhydrase presumably to support high growth rates and enhance uptake of low levels of dissolved nitrate and CO2. Diatom-diazotroph association (DDA: diatoms with nitrogen fixing symbionts) blooms were common when surface salinity was mesohaline and dissolved nitrate concentrations were below detection, and hence did not show evidence of nitrate utilization, suggesting they relied on ammonium transporters to aquire recently fixed nitrogen. These DDA blooms in the outer plume had rapid turnover of the photosystem D1 protein presumably caused by photodegradation under increased light penetration in clearer waters, and increased expression of silicon transporters as

  3. North Tropical Atlantic influence on western Amazon fire season variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Katia; Baethgen, Walter; Bernardes, Sergio; DeFries, Ruth; DeWitt, David G.; Goddard, Lisa; Lavado, Waldo; Lee, Dong Eun; Padoch, Christine; Pinedo-Vasquez, Miguel; Uriarte, Maria

    2011-06-01

    The prevailing wet climate in the western Amazon is not favorable to the natural occurrence of fires. Nevertheless, the current process of clearing of humid forests for agriculture and cattle ranching has increased the vulnerability of the region to the spread of fires. Using meteorological stations precipitation and the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Active-Fires (AF) during 2000-2009, we show that fire anomalies vary closely with July-August-September (JAS) precipitation variability as measured by the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). The precipitation variability is, in turn, greatly determined by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the North Tropical Atlantic (NTA). We develop a linear regression model to relate local fire activity to an index of the NTA-SST. By using seasonal forecasts of SST from a coupled model, we are able to predict anomalous JAS fire activity as early as April. We applied the method to predict the severe 2010 JAS season, which indicated strongly positive seasonal fire anomalies within the 95% prediction confidence intervals in most western Amazon. The spatial distribution of predicted SPI was also in accordance with observed precipitation anomalies. This three months lead time precipitation and fire prediction product in the western Amazon could help local decision makers to establish an early warning systems or other appropriate course of action before the fire season begins.

  4. Ballast water: a threat to the Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Newton Narciso; Botter, Rui Carlos; Folena, Rafael Dompieri; Pereira, José Pinheiro Fragoso Neto; da Cunha, Alan Cavalcanti

    2014-07-15

    Ballast water exchange (BWE) is the most efficient measure to control the invasion of exotic species from ships. This procedure is being used for merchant ships in national and international voyages. The ballast water (BW) salinity is the main parameter to evaluate the efficacy of the mid-ocean ballast water exchange. The vessels must report to the Port State Control (PSC), via ballast water report (BWR), where and how the mid-ocean BWE was performed. This measure allows the PSC to analyze this information before the ship arrives at the port, and to decide whether or not it should berth. Ship BW reporting forms were collected from the Captaincy of Santana and some ships were visited near the Port of Santana, located in Macapá (Amazon River), to evaluate the BW quality onboard. We evaluated data submitted in these BWR forms and concluded that the BWE efficacy might be compromised, because data contained in these BWR indicate that some ships did not change their BW. We found mistakes in filling the BWR forms and lack of information. Moreover, these ships had discharged BW with high level of salinity, Escherichia coli and total coliforms into the Amazon River. We concluded that the authorities of the Amazon Region need to develop more efficient proceedings to evaluate the ballast water reporting forms and BW quality, as there is potential risk of future invasion of exotic species in Brazilian ports. PMID:24928458

  5. Deforestation, floodplain dynamics, and carbon biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.; Dunne, T.; Richey, J.; Melack, J.; Simonett, D. S.; Woodwell, G.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of the physical geographic environment of the Amazon Basin are considered: (1) deforestation and reforestation, (2) floodplain dynamics, and (3) fluvial geomorphology. Three independent projects are coupled in this experiment to improve the in-place research and to ensure that the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) experiment stands on a secure base of ongoing work. Major benefits to be obtained center on: (1) areal and locational information, (2) data from various depression angles, and (3) digital radar signatures. Analysis will be conducted for selected sites to define how well SIR-B data can be used for: (1) definition of extent and location of deforestation in a tropical moist forest, (2) definition and quantification of the nature of the vegetation and edaphic conditions on the (floodplain) of the Amazon River, and (3) quantification of the accuracy with which the geometry and channel shifting of the Amazon River may be mapped using SIR-B imagery in conjunction with other remote sensing data.

  6. Large-scale Modeling of Inundation in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Li, H. Y.; Getirana, A.; Leung, L. R.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Flood events have impacts on the exchange of energy, water and trace gases between land and atmosphere, hence potentially affecting the climate. The Amazon River basin is the world's largest river basin. Seasonal floods occur in the Amazon Basin each year. The basin being characterized by flat gradients, backwater effects are evident in the river dynamics. This factor, together with large uncertainties in river hydraulic geometry, surface topography and other datasets, contribute to difficulties in simulating flooding processes over this basin. We have developed a large-scale inundation scheme in the framework of the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART) river routing model. Both the kinematic wave and the diffusion wave routing methods are implemented in the model. A new process-based algorithm is designed to represent river channel - floodplain interactions. Uncertainties in the input datasets are partly addressed through model calibration. We will present the comparison of simulated results against satellite and in situ observations and analysis to understand factors that influence inundation processes in the Amazon Basin.

  7. Artisanal fisheries of the Xingu River basin in Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Isaac, V J; Almeida, M C; Cruz, R E A; Nunes, L G

    2015-08-01

    The present study characterises the commercial fisheries of the basin of the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon River, between the towns of Gurupá (at the mouth of the Amazon) and São Félix do Xingu. Between April, 2012, and March, 2014, a total of 23,939 fishing trips were recorded, yielding a total production of 1,484 tons of fish, harvested by almost three thousand fishers. The analysis of the catches emphasizes the small-scale and artisanal nature of the region's fisheries, with emphasis on the contribution of the motorised canoes powered by "long-tail" outboard motors. Larger motorboats operate only at the mouth of the Xingu and on the Amazon. Peacock bass (Cichla spp.), croakers (Plagioscion spp.), pacu (a group containing numerous serrasalmid species), aracu (various anostomids), and curimatã (Prochilodus nigricans) together contributed more than 60% of the total catch. Mean catch per unit effort was 18 kg/fisher-1.day-1, which varied among fishing methods (type of vessel and fishing equipment used), river sections, and time of the year. In most cases, yields varied little between years (2012 and 2013). The technical database provided by this study constitutes an important resource for the regulation of the region's fisheries, as well as for the evaluation of future changes resulting from the construction of the Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River. PMID:26691085

  8. An extensive reef system at the Amazon River mouth.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rodrigo L; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Moraes, Fernando C; Brasileiro, Poliana S; Salomon, Paulo S; Mahiques, Michel M; Bastos, Alex C; Almeida, Marcelo G; Silva, Jomar M; Araujo, Beatriz F; Brito, Frederico P; Rangel, Thiago P; Oliveira, Braulio C V; Bahia, Ricardo G; Paranhos, Rodolfo P; Dias, Rodolfo J S; Siegle, Eduardo; Figueiredo, Alberto G; Pereira, Renato C; Leal, Camille V; Hajdu, Eduardo; Asp, Nils E; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Neumann-Leitão, Sigrid; Yager, Patricia L; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Fróes, Adriana; Campeão, Mariana; Silva, Bruno S; Moreira, Ana P B; Oliveira, Louisi; Soares, Ana C; Araujo, Lais; Oliveira, Nara L; Teixeira, João B; Valle, Rogerio A B; Thompson, Cristiane C; Rezende, Carlos E; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2016-04-01

    Large rivers create major gaps in reef distribution along tropical shelves. The Amazon River represents 20% of the global riverine discharge to the ocean, generating up to a 1.3 × 10(6)-km(2) plume, and extensive muddy bottoms in the equatorial margin of South America. As a result, a wide area of the tropical North Atlantic is heavily affected in terms of salinity, pH, light penetration, and sedimentation. Such unfavorable conditions were thought to imprint a major gap in Western Atlantic reefs. We present an extensive carbonate system off the Amazon mouth, underneath the river plume. Significant carbonate sedimentation occurred during lowstand sea level, and still occurs in the outer shelf, resulting in complex hard-bottom topography. A permanent near-bottom wedge of ocean water, together with the seasonal nature of the plume's eastward retroflection, conditions the existence of this extensive (~9500 km(2)) hard-bottom mosaic. The Amazon reefs transition from accretive to erosional structures and encompass extensive rhodolith beds. Carbonate structures function as a connectivity corridor for wide depth-ranging reef-associated species, being heavily colonized by large sponges and other structure-forming filter feeders that dwell under low light and high levels of particulates. The oxycline between the plume and subplume is associated with chemoautotrophic and anaerobic microbial metabolisms. The system described here provides several insights about the responses of tropical reefs to suboptimal and marginal reef-building conditions, which are accelerating worldwide due to global changes. PMID:27152336

  9. Suspended sediments of the modern Amazon and Orinoco rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Amazon and Orinoco Rivers are massive transcontinental conveyance systems for suspended sediment. They derive about 90% of their sediment from the Andes that support their western headwaters, transport it for thousands of kilometers across the breadth of the continent and deposit it in the coastal zones of the Atlantic. At their points of maximum suspended-sediment discharge, the Amazon transports an average of 1100-1300 ?? 106 tons per year and the Orinoco transports about 150 ?? 106 tons per year. Relations of sediment discharge to water discharge are complicated by unusual patterns of seasonal storage and remobilization, increased storage and reduced transport of sediment in the middle Orinoco during periods of peak water discharge, and storage of suspended sediment in the lower Amazon during rising discharge and resuspension during falling discharge. Spatial distributions of suspended sediment in cross-sections of both rivers are typically heterogeneous, not only in the vertical sense but also in the lateral. The cross-channel mixing of tributary inputs into the mainstem waters is a slow process that requires several hundred kilometers of downriver transport to complete. Considerable fine-grained sediment is exchanged between rivers and floodplains by the combination of overbank deposition and bank erosion. ?? 1994.

  10. Cyclic sediment deposition within Amazon deep-sea fan

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, P.L.; Flood, R.D.

    1988-08-01

    The Upper and middle Amazon Fan has grown in a cyclic fashion. An individual deposition cycle consists of (1) a widespread basal, acoustically transparent seismic unit (interpreted as debris-flow deposits) that fills and levels preexisting topographic lows, and (2) a levee complex built of overlapping channel-levee systems. Two and possibly three cycles have been identified within the Amazon Fan. The levee complex beneath one debris flow originated from a different submarine canyon than did the levee complex above the debris flow, suggesting that these levee complexes formed during different sea level lowstands. Calculations based on present sediment discharge of the Amazon River suggest that an entire levee complex can form within the time span of a single glacial stage, such as the Wisconsin; however, the levee complex probably could not have formed during the relatively short time interval when sea level rose rapidly at the end of a glacial stage. The basal seismic units (debris-flow deposits) may have been deposited at any time during sea level fluctuations. Although seismic evidence suggests that this cyclic sedimentation pattern may be related to glacio-eustatic sea level variations, cyclic fan growth may be attributed to other processes as well. For example, a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) observed within the upper fan appears to be a gas hydrate. Migration of the hydrate phase boundary during sea level fluctuations and diapiric activity may be mechanisms for initiating widespread debris flows. 10 figs.

  11. Carbon monoxide over the Amazon basin during the wet season

    SciTech Connect

    Harriss, R.C. ); Sachse, G.W.; Hill, G.F.; Gregory, G.L. ); Wade, L.O. )

    1990-09-20

    Measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) were made over the Amazon Basin of Brazil during the 1987 wet season as part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2B). The distribution of CO over the altitude range sampled (0.15-4.5 km) was influenced by surface emissions from biological sources, long-range transport of pollutants from northern hemisphere sources, and by transport processes associated with local convective mixing. Surface sources are indicated by a qualitative interpretation of the typical pattern of decreasing concentrations with increasing altitude and increasing concentrations of CO at 0.15-km altitude during a transect from the Atlantic coast to the central basin. Atmospheric convective activity produced irregular patterns of variability at time scales of less than 1 hour over a localized area. The disruption of mixed layer growth and decay processes has a particularly important influence on CO concentrations in the daytime lower troposphere. Intrusions of northern hemisphere air into the central Amazon resulted in increased CO concentrations in the lower and midtroposphere. The correlation of CO with O{sub 3} was positive under conditions interpreted as being influenced by northern hemisphere air, and negative during all other meteorological conditions experienced in ABLE 2B.

  12. The structure and energetics of Amazon squall lines

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, H.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the Amazon Basin as a global center of action for deep convection is quantified in the context of the planet's heat balance. Mesoscale heat and moisture budgets are presented for three synoptic-scale coastal originating systems (COS) over the Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season. The budgets are obtained from volumetric analysis of mesoscale rawinsonde data from the April-May 1987 Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-2B). Classification of cloud and rainfall components is based on data from Portable Automated Mesonet (PAM) towers, GOES images, and radar. Satellite measurements of the total active cloud area, coupled with the mesoscale budge calculations, are used to determine the system-wide vertical transport of heat as a function of the COS life cycle. Maximum heat transport occurs in the COS mature stage when the system has its maximum spatial extent. The instantaneous heat transport for the 300-100 mb layer in a mature COS equals nearly 20% of the theoretical heat export requirements for the equatorial trough zone. A little more than half of the system-wide transport occurs in the dynamically active anvil cloud.

  13. Analysis of Amazon Extreme Drought in Two Reanalysis Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, D. O.; Herdies, D. L.; Berbery, E. H.

    2013-05-01

    Over the past 10 years the Amazon region experienced two major drought events, which had large impacts on vegetation and rivers, affecting directly the transport, fishing, agriculture and health. These events were characterized by large changes in precipitation patterns over the region in the dry wet season. Aiming to analyze and identify anomalies related to the 2005 and 2010 drought, as well as the effects of larger-scale disturbances such as El Niño, we used reanalysis datasets from CFSR/NCEP and MERRA/NASA. Overall the results show that the droughts don't show a very clear signal in datasets reanalyses. Only drought events related to El Niño are well identified in the data. For the 2005 event, the reanalysis move precipitation anomalies for the regions where they are not observed in observational data. The case os 2010 presents the same charateristic, with displacement of the anomalies, and underestimating the observed effects. In the general context of the results, it was observed that there is a direct relationship between the vertical motion in the Atlantic and the precipitation anomalies over the Amazon. The drop in rates of precipitation over the Amazon and the possible increase of the flow in low levels in cases of drought affected directly the precipitation over the La Plata Basin. Thus, even the drought events not being well represented in datasets of reanalysis, it was possible to observe their effects on local and remote almost all South America.

  14. New products made with lignocellulosic nanofibers from Brazilian amazon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, L.; Mendes, L. M.; Tonoli, G. H. D.; Rodrigues, A.; Fonseca, A.; Cunha, P. I.; Marconcini, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    The biodiversity of the Amazon forest is undoubtedly rich; hence there is considerable variety of plant fibers regarding their morphological, chemical and structural properties. The legal exploration of the Brazilian Amazon is based on sustainable management techniques, but the generation of a relevant amount of plant wastes still cant be avoided. The correct destination of such materials is a challenge that Brazilian companies have to face. In this context, the National Council of Science and Technology (CNPq) promoted the creation of investigation nets on sustainability of Brazilian agribusiness. The Brazilian Net on Lignocellulosic Composites and Nanocomposites was then created, with partnership between several national and international research institutions. Until the moment, the results showed that Amazon plant fibers that are discarded as residues have great potential to nanofiber production. Nanopapers with considerable high mechanical and physical strength, proper opacity and great crystalline index were produced by using a clean and simple mechanical method. Those materials are candidates to several uses such as packaging, substrates transparent conductive films, gas barrier films, solar cells and e-papers.

  15. Public policies and communication affecting forest cover in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami Savaget, E.; Batistella, M.; Aguiar, A. P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The research program Amazalert was based on information delivered by the IPCC through its 2007 report, which indicates forest degradation processes in the Amazonian region as a consequence of anthropogenic actions. Such processes affecting the structural and functional characteristics of ecosystems would harm environmental services that guarantee, for example, the regulation of climate and the provision of fresh water. A survey was organized, through a multidisciplinary perspective, on the main policies and programs that can affect forest cover in the Amazon. These rules and norms seek to regulate societal actions by defining a developmental model for the region. Although deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon have decreased significantly since 2004, some locations maintain high levels of deforestation. In 2013, for example, the municipalities of Monte Alegre, Óbidos, Alenquer, Oriximiná, Curuá and Almeirin, in the northern region of the state of Para, showed the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon. Managers and stakeholders within these areas are being interviewed to provide insights on how policies are interpreted and applied locally. There is an understanding delay between discourses normalized by federal governmental institutions and claims of local societies. The possible lack of clarity in official discourses added to the absence of a local communicative dynamics cause the phenomenon of incomplete information. Conflicts often occur in local institutional arenas resulting in violence and complex social and historical dissonances, enhanced by other public policies idealized in different temporal and spatial conditions.

  16. Contrasting Strategies of Tree Function in a Seasonal Amazon Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Oliveira, R.; Agee, E.; Brum, M., Jr.; Saleska, S. R.; Fatichi, S.; Ewing, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased frequency and severity of drought conditions in the Amazon Basin region have emphasized the question of rainforest vulnerability and resilience to heat and drought-induced stresses. However, what emerges from much research is that the impacts of droughts, essential controlling factors of the rainforest function, and variability of tree-scale strategies are yet to be fully understood. We present here a preliminary analysis of hydraulic relations of a seasonal Amazon rainforest using a set of ecohydrologic data collected through the GoAmazon project over dry and wet seasons. Expressions of different hydraulic strategies are identified that convey different implications for tree resilience during short- (diurnal) and longer-term (seasonal) stress periods. These hydraulic strategies appear to be inter-related with the tree growth and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics, contributing to the understanding of trait coordination at the whole-plant scale. Integration of individual responses is conducted over a range of wood density and exposure conditions. The results of this research thus shed light on the implication of variations in the rainforest function for future stresses, vital for predictive models of ecosystem dynamics of next generation.

  17. Application of the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Fingerprinting to Analyze Genetic Variation in Community Associated-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA) Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Davoodabadi, Fazollah; Khorvash, Farzin; Ataei, Behrooz; Daei-Naser, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply RAPD technique to analyze the genetic variability among the Iranian CA-MRSA isolates. The RAPD amplification was implemented on 25 strains isolated from the anterior nares of 410 healthy children using four randomly selected oligonucleotide primers from the stocks available in our laboratory, including the primers 1254, GE6, OLP6 and OLP13 from our stock. The amplified PCR products were detected on a 1.5% agarose gel and subjected to further analysis to establish the band profiles and genetic relationships using the Gel Compar® program. The Iranian CA-MRSA isolates produced distinct RAPD patterns which varied based on the primer used, however, the primer 1254 revealed highly polymorphic patterns consisting 5 discernable RAPD types (RT), “RT1” (12, 48%), “RT2” (8, 32%), “RT3” (3, 12%), and “RT4 and RT5”, (a single RAPD type each, 4%). Phylogenetic analysis based on RAPD profiles divided most of the CA-MRSA isolates into 2 distinct but related RAPD clusters, a small group and two single unrelated RAPD types. This study shows that the simple and cost-effective but rather difficult to optimize RAPD fingerprinting could be used to evaluate genetic and epidemiological relationships of CA-MRSA isolates on condition that the patterns are obtained from carefully optimized laboratory tests. PMID:27045409

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, P S; Albuquerque, G R; da Silva, V M F; Martin, A R; Marvulo, M F V; Souza, S L P; Ragozo, A M A; Nascimento, C C; Gennari, S M; Dubey, J P; Silva, J C R

    2011-12-29

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate the water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve (RDSM), Tefé, Amazonas, Central Amazon, Brazil were tested for T. gondii antibodies using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies (MAT ≥ 25) to T. gondii were found in 82 (86.3%) dolphins with titers of 1:25 in 24, 1:50 in 56, and 1:500 in 2. Results suggest a high level contamination of the aquatic environment of the home range of these animals. PMID:21764516

  19. Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ana; Pacheco-Ferreira, Heloisa; Sanches, Seisse Gabriela G.; Carvallo, Renata; Cardoso, Nathália; Perez, Maurício; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mercury poisoning causes hearing loss in humans and animals. Acute and long-term exposures produce irreversible peripheral and central auditory system damage, and mercury in its various forms of presentation in the environment is ototoxic. Objective We investigated the otoacoustic emissions responses in a riverside population exposed to environmental mercury by analyzing the inhibitory effect of the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) on transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). Methods The purpose of the research was to evaluate the entire community independently of variables of sex and age. All of the participants were born and lived in a riverside community. After otolaryngologic evaluation, participants were received tympanometry, evaluation of contralateral acoustic reflexes, pure tone audiometry, and recording of TEOAEs with nonlinear click stimulation. Hair samples were collect to measure mercury levels. Results There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory effect of the MOCS, age, and the level of mercury in the hair. Conclusions The pathophysiological effects of chronic exposure may be subtle and nonspecific and can have a long period of latency; therefore, it will be important to monitor the effects of mercury exposure in the central auditory system of the Amazon population over time. Longitudinal studies should be performed to determine whether the inhibitory effect of the MOCS on otoacoustic emissions can be an evaluation method and diagnostic tool in populations exposed to mercury. PMID:25992169

  20. Oil development and health in the Amazon basin of Ecuador: the popular epidemiology process.

    PubMed

    San Sebastián, Miguel; Hurtig, Anna Karin

    2005-02-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an increasing corporate access to and control over natural resources resulting in environmental degradation, inequalities and ill health. Since 1972, oil companies have extracted more than two billion barrels of crude oil from the Ecuadorian Amazon. During this process, millions of gallons of untreated toxic wastes, gas and oil have been released into the environment. Indigenous federations, peasant's movements and environmental groups have claimed that contamination has caused widespread damage to both people and the environment. This article tells the story of how the relationship between local organisations and research institutions developed around an epidemiological study constructed to address communities' concerns. Local organisations set the agenda of