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Sample records for amazon river prawn

  1. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mouth of the Amazon River     View Larger Image ... over 6450 kilometers eastward across Brazil, the Amazon River originates in the Peruvian Andes as tiny mountain streams that eventually ...

  2. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... the Rio Solimoes and the Rio Negro converge to form the Amazon River. This image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... date:  Jul 23, 2000 Images:  Amazon River location:  South America thumbnail:  ...

  3. Toxicity of rotenone to giant river freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculturists have often suffered predation losses in the production of freshwater giant river prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii due to the presence of wild fish species in culture ponds. The piscicide rotenone is widely used to remove undesirable fish species from ponds. Although evidence in the t...

  4. Ecology of nonnative Siberian prawn (Palaemon modestus) in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erhardt, John M.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the abundance, distribution, and ecology of the nonnative Siberian prawn Palaemon modestus in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA. Analysis of prawn passage abundance at three Snake River dams showed that populations are growing at exponential rates, especially at Little Goose Dam where over 464,000 prawns were collected in 2015. Monthly beam trawling during 2011–2013 provided information on prawn abundance and distribution in Lower Granite and Little Goose Reservoirs. Zero-inflated regression predicted that the probability of prawn presence increased with decreasing water velocity and increasing depth. Negative binomial models predicted higher catch rates of prawns in deeper water and in closer proximity to dams. Temporally, prawn densities decreased slightly in the summer, likely due to the mortality of older individuals, and then increased in autumn and winter with the emergence and recruitment of young of the year. Seasonal length frequencies showed that distinct juvenile and adult size classes exist throughout the year, suggesting prawns live from 1 to 2 years and may be able to reproduce multiple times during their life. Most juvenile prawns become reproductive adults in 1 year, and peak reproduction occurs from late July through October. Mean fecundity (189 eggs) and reproductive output (11.9 %) are similar to that in their native range. The current use of deep habitats by prawns likely makes them unavailable to most predators in the reservoirs. The distribution and role of Siberian prawns in the lower Snake River food web will probably continue to change as the population grows and warrants continued monitoring and investigation.

  5. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A

    2015-08-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite's intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village's river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis. PMID:26195752

  6. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; D'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.                            

  7. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N’Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis. PMID:26195752

  8. The Amazon, measuring a mighty river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1967-01-01

    The Amazon, the world's largest river, discharges enough water into the sea each day to provide fresh water to the City of New York for over 9 years. Its flow accounts for about 15 percent of all the fresh water discharged into the oceans by all the rivers of the world. By comparison, the Amazon's flow is over 4 times that of the Congo River, the world's second largest river. And it is 10 times that of the Mississippi, the largest river on the North American Continent.

  9. Confluence of the Amazon and Topajos Rivers, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view shows the confluence of the Amazon and the Topajos Rivers at Santarem, Brazil (2.0S, 55.0W). The Am,azon flows from lower left to upper right of the photo. Below the river juncture of the Amazon and Tapajos, there is considerable deforestation activity along the Trans-Amazon Highway.

  10. Growth and antioxidant status of oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense fed with diets containing vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weihong; Wang, Zisheng; Yu, Yebing; Qi, Zhitao; Lü, Linlan; Zhang, Yuxia; Lü, Fu

    2015-11-01

    A feeding trial was carried out to investigate the dietary vitamin E requirement of the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (weight of 0.3-0.4 g) and its effect role on antioxidant activity. Prawns were fed with seven levels of vitamin E (0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg diet) for 60 days. The results show that dietary vitamin E supplementation could significantly increased the prawn weight (P<0.05). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hepatopancreas was significantly higher in prawns fed with diets supplemented with ≤75 mg/kg vitamin E than in those fed with diets supplemented with 100-400 mg/kg vitamin E (P<0.05). The activity of catalase (CAT) in the hepatopancreas decreased significantly as dietary vitamin E supplementation increased (P<0.05), and no significant difference was detected in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity between different dietary groups (P>0.05). The contents of vitamin E in the hepatopancreas and in the muscle increased with increasing dietary vitamin E. There was a linear correlation between the vitamin E level in diet and that in muscle, and between the vitamin E level in diet and that in the hepatopancreas. All the above results indicated that dietary vitamin E can be stored in the hepatopancreas and muscle and lower both the activities of SOD and CAT in the hepatopancreas, suggesting that it is a potential antioxidant in M. nipponense. Broken line analysis conducted on the weight gains of prawns in each diet group showed that the dietary vitamin E requirement for maximum growth is 94.10 mg/kg.

  11. Growth and antioxidant status of oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense fed with diets containing vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weihong; Wang, Zisheng; Yu, Yebing; Qi, Zhitao; Lü, Linlan; Zhang, Yuxia; Lü, Fu

    2016-05-01

    A feeding trial was carried out to investigate the dietary vitamin E requirement of the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (weight of 0.3-0.4 g) and its effect role on antioxidant activity. Prawns were fed with seven levels of vitamin E (0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg diet) for 60 days. The results show that dietary vitamin E supplementation could significantly increased the prawn weight ( P < 0.05). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hepatopancreas was significantly higher in prawns fed with diets supplemented with ≤75 mg/kg vitamin E than in those fed with diets supplemented with 100-400 mg/kg vitamin E ( P < 0.05). The activity of catalase (CAT) in the hepatopancreas decreased significantly as dietary vitamin E supplementation increased ( P < 0.05), and no significant difference was detected in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity between different dietary groups ( P >0.05). The contents of vitamin E in the hepatopancreas and in the muscle increased with increasing dietary vitamin E. There was a linear correlation between the vitamin E level in diet and that in muscle, and between the vitamin E level in diet and that in the hepatopancreas. All the above results indicated that dietary vitamin E can be stored in the hepatopancreas and muscle and lower both the activities of SOD and CAT in the hepatopancreas, suggesting that it is a potential antioxidant in M. nipponense. Broken line analysis conducted on the weight gains of prawns in each diet group showed that the dietary vitamin E requirement for maximum growth is 94.10 mg/kg.

  12. Population Structure and Historical Demography of the Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Shih, Chun-Han; Chu, Ta-Jen; Wang, Daryi; Lee, Ying-Chou; Tzeng, Tzong-Der

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is a non-obligatory amphidromous prawn, and it has a wide distribution covering almost the entire Taiwan. Mitochondrial DNA fragment sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA were combined and used to elucidate the population structure and historical demography of oriental river prawn in Taiwan. A total of 202 individuals from six reservoirs and three estuaries were separately collected. Nucleotide diversity (π) of all populations was 0.01217, with values ranging from 0.00188 (Shihmen Reservoir, SMR, northern Taiwan) to 0.01425 (Mingte Reservoir, MTR, west-central Taiwan). All 76 haplotypes were divided into 2 lineages: lineage A included individuals from all sampling areas except SMR, and lineage B included specimens from all sampling locations except Chengching Lake Reservoir (CLR) and Liyu Lake Reservoir (LLR). All FST values among nine populations were significantly different except the one between Jhonggang River Estuary (JGE, west-central Taiwan) and Kaoping River Estuary (KPE, southern Taiwan). UPGMA tree of nine populations showed two main groups: the first group included the SMR and Tamsui River Estuary (TSE) (both located northern Taiwan), and the second one included the other seven populations (west-central, southern and eastern Taiwan). Demographic analyses implied a population expansion occurred during the recent history of the species. The dispersal route of this species might be from China to west-central and west-southern Taiwan, and then the part individuals belonging to lineage A and B dispersed southerly and northerly, respectively. And then part individuals in west-central Taiwan fell back to and stay at estuaries as the sea level rose about 18,000 years ago. PMID:26716687

  13. Population Structure and Historical Demography of the Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ta-Jen; Wang, Daryi; Lee, Ying-Chou; Tzeng, Tzong-Der

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is a non-obligatory amphidromous prawn, and it has a wide distribution covering almost the entire Taiwan. Mitochondrial DNA fragment sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA were combined and used to elucidate the population structure and historical demography of oriental river prawn in Taiwan. A total of 202 individuals from six reservoirs and three estuaries were separately collected. Nucleotide diversity (π) of all populations was 0.01217, with values ranging from 0.00188 (Shihmen Reservoir, SMR, northern Taiwan) to 0.01425 (Mingte Reservoir, MTR, west-central Taiwan). All 76 haplotypes were divided into 2 lineages: lineage A included individuals from all sampling areas except SMR, and lineage B included specimens from all sampling locations except Chengching Lake Reservoir (CLR) and Liyu Lake Reservoir (LLR). All FST values among nine populations were significantly different except the one between Jhonggang River Estuary (JGE, west-central Taiwan) and Kaoping River Estuary (KPE, southern Taiwan). UPGMA tree of nine populations showed two main groups: the first group included the SMR and Tamsui River Estuary (TSE) (both located northern Taiwan), and the second one included the other seven populations (west-central, southern and eastern Taiwan). Demographic analyses implied a population expansion occurred during the recent history of the species. The dispersal route of this species might be from China to west-central and west-southern Taiwan, and then the part individuals belonging to lineage A and B dispersed southerly and northerly, respectively. And then part individuals in west-central Taiwan fell back to and stay at estuaries as the sea level rose about 18,000 years ago. PMID:26716687

  14. Size distribution of Amazon River bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-size analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Insights into Sexual Precocity of Female Oriental River Prawn Macrobrachium nipponense through Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongxia; Li, Xilian; Sun, Yuhang; Hou, Fujun; Zhang, Yufei; Li, Fei; Gu, Zhimin; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is the most prevalent aquaculture species in China. The sexual precocity in this species has received considerable attention in recent years because more and more individuals matured at a small size, which devalues the commercial production. In this study, we developed deep-coverage transcriptomic sequencing data for the ovaries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M. nipponense using next-generation RNA sequencing technology and attempted to provide the first insight into the molecular regulatory mechanism of sexual precocity in this species. Results A total of 63,336 unigenes were produced from the ovarian cDNA libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M. nipponense using Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Through BLASTX searches against the NR, STRING, Pfam, Swissprot and KEGG databases, 15,134 unigenes were annotated, accounting for 23.89% of the total unigenes. 5,195 and 3,227 matched unigenes were categorized by GO and COG analysis respectively. 15,908 unigenes were consequently mapped into 332 KEGG pathways, and many reproduction-related pathways and genes were identified. Moreover, 26,008 SSRs were identified from 18,133 unigenes. 80,529 and 80,516 SNPs were yielded from ovarian libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature prawn, respectively, and 29,851 potential SNPs between these two groups were also predicted. After comparing the ovarian libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature prawn, 549 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 9 key DEGs that may be related to sexual precocity of M. nipponense were identified. 20 DEGs were selected for validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) and 19 DEGs show consistent expression between QPCR and RNAseq-based differential expression analysis datasets. Conclusion This is the first report on the large-scale RNA sequencing of ovaries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M

  16. Effects of Host Phylogeny and Habitats on Gut Microbiomes of Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Tzong-Der; Pao, Yueh-Yang; Chen, Po-Cheng; Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Jean, Wen Dar; Wang, Daryi

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbial community is one of the richest and most complex ecosystems on earth, and the intestinal microbes play an important role in host development and health. Next generation sequencing approaches, which rapidly produce millions of short reads that enable the investigation on a culture independent basis, are now popular for exploring microbial community. Currently, the gut microbiome in fresh water shrimp is unexplored. To explore gut microbiomes of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) and investigate the effects of host genetics and habitats on the microbial composition, 454 pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene were performed. We collected six groups of samples, including M. nipponense shrimp from two populations, rivers and lakes, and one sister species (M. asperulum) as an out group. We found that Proteobacteria is the major phylum in oriental river prawn, followed by Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Compositional analysis showed microbial divergence between the two shrimp species is higher than that between the two populations of one shrimp species collected from river and lake. Hierarchical clustering also showed that host genetics had a greater impact on the divergence of gut microbiome than host habitats. This finding was also congruent with the functional prediction from the metagenomic data implying that the two shrimp species still shared the same type of biological functions, reflecting a similar metabolic profile in their gut environments. In conclusion, this study provides the first investigation of the gut microbiome of fresh water shrimp, and supports the hypothesis of host species-specific signatures of bacterial community composition. PMID:26168244

  17. Effects of Host Phylogeny and Habitats on Gut Microbiomes of Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Jean, Wen Dar; Wang, Daryi

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbial community is one of the richest and most complex ecosystems on earth, and the intestinal microbes play an important role in host development and health. Next generation sequencing approaches, which rapidly produce millions of short reads that enable the investigation on a culture independent basis, are now popular for exploring microbial community. Currently, the gut microbiome in fresh water shrimp is unexplored. To explore gut microbiomes of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) and investigate the effects of host genetics and habitats on the microbial composition, 454 pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene were performed. We collected six groups of samples, including M. nipponense shrimp from two populations, rivers and lakes, and one sister species (M. asperulum) as an out group. We found that Proteobacteria is the major phylum in oriental river prawn, followed by Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Compositional analysis showed microbial divergence between the two shrimp species is higher than that between the two populations of one shrimp species collected from river and lake. Hierarchical clustering also showed that host genetics had a greater impact on the divergence of gut microbiome than host habitats. This finding was also congruent with the functional prediction from the metagenomic data implying that the two shrimp species still shared the same type of biological functions, reflecting a similar metabolic profile in their gut environments. In conclusion, this study provides the first investigation of the gut microbiome of fresh water shrimp, and supports the hypothesis of host species-specific signatures of bacterial community composition. PMID:26168244

  18. Amazon River investigations, reconnaissance measurements of July 1963

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltman, Roy Edwin; Sternberg, H. O'R.; Ames, F.C.; Davis, L.C.

    1964-01-01

    The first measurements of the flow of the Amazon River were made in July 1963 as a joint project of the University of Brazil, the Brazilian Navy, and the U.S. Geological Survey. The discharge of the Amazon River at Obidos was 7,640,000 cfs at an annual flood stage somewhat lower than the average. For comparison the maximum known discharge of the Mississippi River at Vicksburg is about 2,300,000 cfs. Dissolved-solids concentrations and sediment loads of the Amazon River and of several major tributaries were found to be low.

  19. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  20. Molecular characterization of a novel ovary-specific gene fem-1 homolog from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Yi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Lin, Jing-Yun; Li, Jia-Le; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-10

    The feminization-1 (fem-1) gene is characterized by one of the most common protein-protein interaction motifs, ankyrin repeat motifs, displays many expression patterns in vertebrates and invertebrates, and plays an essential role in the sex-determination/differentiation pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, a fem-1 homolog, designated as Mnfem-1, was first cloned from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. The prawn Mnfem-1 gene consists of six exons and five introns. The full-length cDNA (2603bp) of Mnfem-1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 622 amino acids. The Mnfem-1 RNA and protein are exclusively expressed in the ovary in adult prawns as revealed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, respectively. In situ hybridization results showed that strong positive signals were concentrated at the edge of the previtellogenic and vitellogenic oocyte. During embryogenesis, Mnfem-1 is highly expressed in both unfertilized eggs and embryos at cleavage stage and thereafter dropped to a low level from blastula to zoea, indicating that the Mnfem-1 in early embryos is maternal. After hatching, the Mnfem-1 expression significantly increased in the larvae at length of 2cm, an important stage of sex differentiation. Yeast two hybridization results showed that the Mnfem-1 protein can be potentially interactive with cathepsin L and proteins containing the domains of insulinase, ankyrin or ubiquitin. Our results suggested that Mnfem-1 could have roles in prawn ovarian development and sex determination/differentiation. PMID:26367327

  1. Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In this view of the Amazon River Mouth (0.0, 51.0W), a large sediment plume can be seen expanding outward into the Atlantic Ocean. The sediment plume can be seen hugging the coast north of the delta as a result of the northwest flowing coastal Guyana Current. In recent years, the flow of the Amazon has become heavily laden with sediment as soil runoff from the denuded landscape of the interior enters the Amazon River (and other rivers) drainage system.

  2. Identification of differentially expressed genes in hepatopancreas of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense exposed to environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Ge, Xianping; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Shiyong

    2013-10-25

    Hypoxia represents a major physiological challenge for prawn culture, and the hepatopancreas plays an important role in these processes. Here, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect the gene expression profile of the hepatopancreas in M. nipponense in response to hypoxia for 3h and hypoxia for 24h. Gene expression profiling identified 1925 genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated by dissolved oxygen availability. Functional categorization of the differentially expressed genes revealed that oxygen transport, electron transport chain, reactive oxygen species generation/scavenging, and immune response were the differentially regulated processes occurring during environmental hypoxia. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using six genes independently verified the tag-mapped results. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed, for the first time, hemocyanin protein expression as significant hypoxia-specific signatures in prawns, which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of hypoxia exposure. The analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in oriental river prawn provides a preliminary basis for a better understanding of the molecular response to hypoxia exposures. PMID:24513331

  3. Backwater effects in the Amazon River basin of Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.; Rayol, J.M.; Da Conceicao, S.C.; Natividade, J.R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Amazon River mainstem of Brazil is so regulated by differences in the timing of tributary inputs and by seasonal storage of water on floodplains that maximum discharges exceed minimum discharges by a factor of only 3. Large tributaries that drain the southern Amazon River basin reach their peak discharges two months earlier than does the mainstem. The resulting backwater in the lowermost 800 km of two large southern tributaries, the Madeira and Puru??s rivers, causes falling river stages to be as much as 2-3 m higher than rising stages at any given discharge. Large tributaries that drain the northernmost Amazon River basin reach their annual minimum discharges three to four months later than does the mainstem. In the lowermost 300-400 km of the Negro River, the largest northern tributary and the fifth largest river in the world, the lowest stages of the year correspond to those of the Amazon River mainstem rather than to those in the upstream reaches of the Negro River. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  4. Mouth of the Amazon River as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A near-nadir view of the mouth of the Amazon River, that shows all signs of being a relatively healthy system, breathing and exhaling. The well-developed cumulus field over the forested areas on both the north and south sides of the river (the view is slightly to the west) shows that good evapotranspiration is underway.

  5. The Prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii in the Senegal River Basin: Towards Sustainable Restocking of All-Male Populations for Biological Control of Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Savaya Alkalay, Amit; Rosen, Ohad; Sokolow, Susanne H.; Faye, Yacinthe P. W.; Faye, Djibril S.; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Jouanard, Nicolas; Zilberg, Dina; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Sagi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Early malacological literature suggests that the outbreak of schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease transmitted by aquatic snails, in the Senegal River basin occurred due to ecological changes resulting from the construction of the Diama dam. The common treatment, the drug praziquantel, does not protect from the high risk of re-infection due to human contact with infested water on a daily basis. The construction of the dam interfered with the life cycle of the prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii by blocking its access to breeding grounds in the estuary. These prawns were demonstrated to be potential biological control agents, being effective predators of Schistosoma-susceptible snails. Here, we propose a responsible restocking strategy using all-male prawn populations which could provide sustainable disease control. Male prawns reach a larger size and have a lower tendency to migrate than females. We, therefore, expect that periodic restocking of all-male juveniles will decrease the prevalence of schistosomiasis and increase villagers' welfare. In this interdisciplinary study, we examined current prawn abundance along the river basin, complemented with a retrospective questionnaire completed by local fishermen. We revealed the current absence of prawns upriver and thus demonstrated the need for restocking. Since male prawns are suggested to be preferable for bio-control, we laid the molecular foundation for production of all-male M. vollenhovenii through a complete sequencing of the insulin-like androgenic gland-encoding gene (IAG), which is responsible for sexual differentiation in crustaceans. We also conducted bioinformatics and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate the similarity of this sequence to the IAG of another Macrobrachium species in which neo-females are produced and their progeny are 100% males. At least 100 million people at risk of schistosomiasis are residents of areas that experienced water management manipulations. Our suggested non

  6. Molecular and functional characterization of the vitellogenin receptor in oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongkun; Qiao, Hui; Li, Fajun; Fu, Hongtuo; Jiang, Sufei; Zhang, Wenyi; Yan, Yuedi; Xiong, Yiwei; Sun, Shengming; Jin, Shubo; Gong, Yongsheng; Wu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) that encodes the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, was cloned using expressed sequence tag analysis and a rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach. The coding region consists of 5920 base pairs (bp) that encode a 1902 amino acid protein, with a predicted molecular mass of 209 kDa. The coding region is flanked by a 45 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 166 bp 3'-UTR. The deduced amino acid sequence of the M. nipponense VgR cDNA had typically conserved domains, such as an extracellular, lipoprotein-binding domain, epidermal growth factor-like and O-glycosylation domains, a transmembrane domain and a short C-terminal, cytosolic tail. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) indicated that Mn-VgR is highly expressed in the female ovary. Expression analysis by qPCR demonstrated the larval and ovarian developmental stage-specific expression pattern. As the ovaries developed, the expression level of Mn-VgR gradually increased during the reproductive cycle (stage I), to reach a peak in stage III. Levels then dropped as a new development cycle was entered after reproduction molting. Eyestalk ablation led to a significant increase in the expression of Mn-VgR during the ovarian development stages (P<0.05), when compared with the eyestalk-intact group. The investigation revealed that eyestalk ablation initially affected Mn-VgR expression and then influenced vitellogenesis. In adult females, VgR RNA interference (RNAi) dramatically delayed the maturation of the ovary, in accordance with the gonad somatic index. In addition, Mn-VgR RNAi led to vitellin depletion in the oocytes and the accumulation of vitellin in the hepatopancreas. PMID:26773480

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of p53 from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Gu, Zhimin; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Ge, Xianping; Xuan, Fujun

    2016-07-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 plays a critical role in safeguarding the integrity of the genome in mammalian cells. It acts as a sequence-specific transcription factor. Once p53 is activated by a variety of cellular stresses, it transactivates downstream target genes and regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis. However, little is known about the functions of the p53 pathway in prawns in response to hypoxia. In this study, the cDNA of p53 from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, (Mnp53) was cloned using a combination of homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of Mnp53 has 2130 bp, including an open reading frame of 1125 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 374 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 41.9 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 6.9. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR assays revealed that Mnp53 was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues, but at high levels in the hepatopancreas. In addition, we studied respiratory bursts and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hepatopancreas of M. nipponense. Our results suggest that oxidative stress occurred in prawns in response to hypoxia and that apoptosis was associated with an increase in caspase-3 mRNA expression. qRT-PCR and western blot results confirmed that hypoxic stress induced the upregulation of Mnp53 at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed remarkable changes in immunopositive staining after the same hypoxic treatment. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced oxidative stress may cause apoptosis and cooperatively stimulate the expression of Mnp53. PMID:27044329

  8. Organic carbon-14 in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I.; Ertel, J.R.; Quay, P.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Richey, J.E.; Devol, A.H.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.W.; Salati, E.

    1986-03-07

    Coarse and fine suspended particulate organic materials and dissolved humic and fulvic acids transported by the Amazon River all contain bomb-produced carbon-14, indicating relatively rapid turnover of the parent carbon pools. However, the carbon-14 contents of these coexisting carbon forms are measurably different and may reflect varying degrees of retention by soils in the drainage basin. 20 references, 1 table.

  9. Amazon river altimetry through satellite radar altimetry and GPS positionning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuth, P.; Cazenave, A.; Blitzkow, D.

    2003-04-01

    Due to extremely poor road infrastructure and resulting difficulties in direct topographic levelling, Amazon river basin lacks a consistent topographical referential. Space based altimetric techniques appear to be the only feasible alternative to establish such a referential. Extensive processing of Topex/Poseidon satellite radar altimeter data upon continental open water bodies of the Amazon Basin over 1993-2000 period has been realised. Due to relatively poor reliability of Topex/Poseidon data at river low stage, processing focussed on maximum annual water levels. Such maximum annual water levels have been determined for more than 150 intersections between satellite ground traces and rivers, accuracy being improved by correlation analysis with continuous water level time series at closest gauging station. Results have been translated to a geoidal referential using EGM96 geoid model. Annual upper enveloppes of rivers longitudinal water profiles have been interpolated, allowing to quantify maximum annual water levels at existing gauging stations. Confrontation between satellite determined and field measured maximum water levels at these stations allowed to quantify the geoidal altitude of more than 80 stations with a decimetric accuracy (<0.5m). This method has been checked and validated through internal consistency analysis, hydrological consistency analysis and confrontation with bi-frequency GPS positionning measurement results at 22 stations. Mean difference between geoidal altitudes determined by satellite radar altimetry and bi-frequency GPS positionning for these 22 stations is +0.29 m +/- 0.63 m, GPS positionning results being lower than satellite radar altimetry ones. Till now about 30 000 km of Amazon Basin rivers over Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador benefit from these altimetric references. This opens way for improved understanding of Amazon river dynamics and enlightens possible improvements in applying satellite radar altimetry techniques over

  10. Artisanal fisheries of the Xingu River basin in Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Isaac, V J; Almeida, M C; Cruz, R E A; Nunes, L G

    2015-08-01

    The present study characterises the commercial fisheries of the basin of the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon River, between the towns of Gurupá (at the mouth of the Amazon) and São Félix do Xingu. Between April, 2012, and March, 2014, a total of 23,939 fishing trips were recorded, yielding a total production of 1,484 tons of fish, harvested by almost three thousand fishers. The analysis of the catches emphasizes the small-scale and artisanal nature of the region's fisheries, with emphasis on the contribution of the motorised canoes powered by "long-tail" outboard motors. Larger motorboats operate only at the mouth of the Xingu and on the Amazon. Peacock bass (Cichla spp.), croakers (Plagioscion spp.), pacu (a group containing numerous serrasalmid species), aracu (various anostomids), and curimatã (Prochilodus nigricans) together contributed more than 60% of the total catch. Mean catch per unit effort was 18 kg/fisher-1.day-1, which varied among fishing methods (type of vessel and fishing equipment used), river sections, and time of the year. In most cases, yields varied little between years (2012 and 2013). The technical database provided by this study constitutes an important resource for the regulation of the region's fisheries, as well as for the evaluation of future changes resulting from the construction of the Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River. PMID:26691085

  11. Identification of five anti-lipopolysaccharide factors in oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yili; Tang, Ting; Gu, Jihai; Li, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Gao, Xiaobin; Liu, Fengsong; Wang, Jianhui

    2015-10-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are a group of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and antiviral activities mainly found in crustaceans and horseshoe crabs. In the present study, we identified 5 ALF expression sequence tags (ESTs) through analysis of the established M. nipponense transcriptome, and cloned their full-length cDNA sequences using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The 5 ALFs were designated as MnALF1-5, and all of them showed high similarity with their Macrobrachium rosenbergii homologs in the phylogenetic analyses, especially in LPS binding domains. In healthy adult prawns, we found the highest expression of MnALF2 and MnALF4 in haemocytes, and the highest expression of MnALF4 and MnALF3 in intestine. Some isoforms of MnALF were down-regulated but the majority was up-regulated in different prawn tissues upon Aeromonas hydrophila challenge. To conform the expected antimicrobial activities harbored in MnALFs' LPS binding domains, we used a synthesized peptide cMnALF24 that corresponds to the LPS binding domain of MnALF2 as a representative molecule for the antibacterial activity test, and found that cMnALF24 possessed strong and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, but no inhibition activity against fungi; Meanwhile, in the hemolytic test, cMnALF24 showed weak hemolysis activities (around 10%) to the rabbit red blood cells at concentrations of 0.67-33.50 μM. This study provides insights into understanding the antibacterial function of ALFs in the innate immunity of freshwater prawn, and reports a peptide that can be a potential drug candidate with good efficacy against bacterial infection and low toxicity to host cells. PMID:26159095

  12. An extensive reef system at the Amazon River mouth.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rodrigo L; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Moraes, Fernando C; Brasileiro, Poliana S; Salomon, Paulo S; Mahiques, Michel M; Bastos, Alex C; Almeida, Marcelo G; Silva, Jomar M; Araujo, Beatriz F; Brito, Frederico P; Rangel, Thiago P; Oliveira, Braulio C V; Bahia, Ricardo G; Paranhos, Rodolfo P; Dias, Rodolfo J S; Siegle, Eduardo; Figueiredo, Alberto G; Pereira, Renato C; Leal, Camille V; Hajdu, Eduardo; Asp, Nils E; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Neumann-Leitão, Sigrid; Yager, Patricia L; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Fróes, Adriana; Campeão, Mariana; Silva, Bruno S; Moreira, Ana P B; Oliveira, Louisi; Soares, Ana C; Araujo, Lais; Oliveira, Nara L; Teixeira, João B; Valle, Rogerio A B; Thompson, Cristiane C; Rezende, Carlos E; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2016-04-01

    Large rivers create major gaps in reef distribution along tropical shelves. The Amazon River represents 20% of the global riverine discharge to the ocean, generating up to a 1.3 × 10(6)-km(2) plume, and extensive muddy bottoms in the equatorial margin of South America. As a result, a wide area of the tropical North Atlantic is heavily affected in terms of salinity, pH, light penetration, and sedimentation. Such unfavorable conditions were thought to imprint a major gap in Western Atlantic reefs. We present an extensive carbonate system off the Amazon mouth, underneath the river plume. Significant carbonate sedimentation occurred during lowstand sea level, and still occurs in the outer shelf, resulting in complex hard-bottom topography. A permanent near-bottom wedge of ocean water, together with the seasonal nature of the plume's eastward retroflection, conditions the existence of this extensive (~9500 km(2)) hard-bottom mosaic. The Amazon reefs transition from accretive to erosional structures and encompass extensive rhodolith beds. Carbonate structures function as a connectivity corridor for wide depth-ranging reef-associated species, being heavily colonized by large sponges and other structure-forming filter feeders that dwell under low light and high levels of particulates. The oxycline between the plume and subplume is associated with chemoautotrophic and anaerobic microbial metabolisms. The system described here provides several insights about the responses of tropical reefs to suboptimal and marginal reef-building conditions, which are accelerating worldwide due to global changes. PMID:27152336

  13. Suspended sediments of the modern Amazon and Orinoco rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Amazon and Orinoco Rivers are massive transcontinental conveyance systems for suspended sediment. They derive about 90% of their sediment from the Andes that support their western headwaters, transport it for thousands of kilometers across the breadth of the continent and deposit it in the coastal zones of the Atlantic. At their points of maximum suspended-sediment discharge, the Amazon transports an average of 1100-1300 ?? 106 tons per year and the Orinoco transports about 150 ?? 106 tons per year. Relations of sediment discharge to water discharge are complicated by unusual patterns of seasonal storage and remobilization, increased storage and reduced transport of sediment in the middle Orinoco during periods of peak water discharge, and storage of suspended sediment in the lower Amazon during rising discharge and resuspension during falling discharge. Spatial distributions of suspended sediment in cross-sections of both rivers are typically heterogeneous, not only in the vertical sense but also in the lateral. The cross-channel mixing of tributary inputs into the mainstem waters is a slow process that requires several hundred kilometers of downriver transport to complete. Considerable fine-grained sediment is exchanged between rivers and floodplains by the combination of overbank deposition and bank erosion. ?? 1994.

  14. Seasonal variations in methane emission from Amazon River and tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V.; Sawakuchi, A. O.; Richey, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Inland waters are known as important sources of methane to atmosphere. Methane is produced in anaerobic environments usually found in lake and floodplain bottom sediments, which is the main reason why most of the information regarding methane fluxes come from this environments. However, while floodplains dry during low water season, reducing methanogenesis, rivers keep the capacity to emit methane throughout the year. Here we present results of CH4 flux measurements from 4 large tropical rivers within the Amazon basin obtained with floating chambers in 10 sampling sites during low water (between September and November of 2011) and high water seasons (May, 2012). Sampling sites were located in three main tributaries of Amazon Rivers, Madeira, Xingu and Tapajós, and in the Amazon River mainstem. In the Madeira River high water fluxes ranged from 2.85 to 30.99 mmol m-2 yr-1 while during low water from 77.47 to 183.31 mmol m-2 yr-1. Fluxes for the Amazon and Tapajós were, respectively, 110.99 and 80.01 mmol m-2 yr-1 for the high water season and 169.71 and 193.18 mmol m-2 yr-1 for low water. In the Xingu River two sites had higher fluxes during low water, 314.90 and 571.49 mmol m-2 yr-1 (91.93 and 51.11 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the high water respectively). The two other sites had an opposite pattern with 296.56 and 60.80 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the low water and 846.95 and 360.93 mmol m-2 yr-1 during high water; one site showed equal fluxes for both seasons. Most of the fluxes were higher during low water, with the exception of the three sites at the Xingu River, where fluxes during high water were higher or equal than in low water. These results show a different pattern than described before for these riverine systems, in which higher methane fluxes during high water were expected due to inputs from surrounding anoxic floodplain environments. Instead, our data shows that methane in rivers can be produced within river channels. Lower fluxes during high water could be related to

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense Using 454 Pyrosequencing for Discovery of Genes and Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keyi; Qiu, Gaofeng; Feng, Jianbin; Li, Jiale

    2012-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. Methodology and Principal Findings Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59Mb) with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425), cellular component (44,112) and biological process (67,679) categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusions The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating

  16. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of Fem1b from oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N M A; Fu, H; Qiao, H; Jin, S; Bai, H; Zhang, W; Jiang, F W; Liang, G; Sun, S; Gong, Y; Jiang, F F; Xiong, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Feminization-1 homolog b (Fem1b) is one of the genes essential for male development and play central roles in sex determination of Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we cloned and characterized the full-length Fem1b cDNA from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (MnFem1b) in different tissues and at different developmental stages. Real-time quantitative reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed that the MnFem1b gene was expressed in all investigated tissues, with the highest expression level found in the testes. The results revealed that the MnFem1b gene might play roles in aspects of development of the male prawn phenotype. The RT-qPCR also revealed that MnFem1b mRNA expression was significantly increased at 10 days after metamorphosis. The expression levels in all investigated tissues showed a certain degree of sexually dimorphism, the expression levels in males were significantly higher than those in females (P < 0.05). Notably, the highest expression of MnFem1b was found in the testes. The expression of MnFem1b in different tissues indicates that it plays multiple biological functions in M. nipponense. PMID:27323097

  17. Contrasting patterns of habitat use by prawns and crayfish in a headwater marsh of the St. Johns River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Frank; Babbitt, Kimberly J.; McIvor, Carole C.; Miller, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    We compared seasonal patterns of habitat use by the prawn Palaemonetes paludosus and the crayfish Procambarus alleni in Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Florida. Prawn densities were similar to those found in other oligotrophic wetlands of southern Florida, whereas crayfish densities were much greater than reported previously for other wetlands in the area. Prawns and crayfish had strikingly different patterns of habitat use. Prawn density and biomass were similar in wet prairies and sloughs, whereas crayfish density and biomass were significantly higher in wet prairies. Within habitats, the abundance of prawns and crayfish generally increased with increasing structural complexity and the abundance of crayfish generally decreased with increasing water depth. Differences in risk of predation, frequency of agonistic encounters, food availability, and other factors likely contributed to observed patterns of habitat use. Because of differences in their ability to burrow and avoid concentration into dry-season refugia, prawns and crayfish responded very differently to seasonal variation in hydrologic conditions. Prawn densities were initially low (following a severe drought) and then increased during much of the study period, whereas crayfish densities were relatively stable throughout the study period. Overall, it appears that prawns are more responsive to antecedent hydrologic conditions and crayfish are more responsive to the availability of suitable habitats such as wet prairies.

  18. Iron cycling in the Amazon River Basin: the isotopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, Franck; Vieira, Lucieth; Mulholland, Daniel; Seyler, Patrick; Sondag, Francis; Allard, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    With the global climate change and increasing anthropic pressure on nature, it is important to find new indicators of the response of complex systems like the Amazon River Basin. In particular, new tracers like iron isotopes may tell us much on processes such as the chemical exchanges between rivers, soils and the biosphere. Pioneering studies revealed that for some river waters, large δ57Fe fractionations are observed between the suspended and dissolved load (Bergquist and Boyle, 2006), and isotopic variations were also recognized on the suspended matter along the hydrological cycle (Ingri et al., 2006). On land, soil studies from various locations have shown that δ57Fe signatures depend mostly on the weathering regime (Fantle and DePaolo, 2004; Emmanuel et al., 2005; Wiederhold et al., 2007; Poitrasson et al., 2008). It thus seems that Fe isotopes could become an interesting new tracer of the exchanges between soils, rivers and the biosphere. We therefore conducted Fe isotope surveys through multidisciplinary field missions on rivers from the Amazon Basin. It was confirmed that acidic, organic-rich black waters show strong Fe isotope fractionation between particulate and dissolved loads. Furthermore, this isotopic fractionation varies along the hydrological cycle, like previously uncovered in boreal waters suspended matter. In contrast, unfiltered waters show very little variation with time. It was also found that Fe isotopes remain a conservative tracer even in the case of massive iron loss during the mixing of chemically contrasted waters such as the Negro and Solimões tributaries of the Amazon River. Given that >95% of the Fe from the Amazon River is carried as detrital materials, our results lead to the conclusion that the Fe isotope signature delivered to the Atlantic Ocean is undistinguishable from the continental crust value, in contrast to previous inferences. The results indicate that Fe isotopes in rivers represent a promising indicator of the

  19. Amazon River carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L. Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F.; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C.; Savoye, Nicolas; Deborde, Jonathan; Souza, Edivaldo Lima; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F.; Roland, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    River systems connect the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the ocean in the global carbon cycle. A recent estimate suggests that up to 3 petagrams of carbon per year could be emitted as carbon dioxide (CO2) from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon that has been previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis, then transferred to soils, and subsequently transported downstream in run-off. But at the scale of entire drainage basins, the lateral carbon fluxes carried by small rivers upstream do not account for all of the CO2 emitted from inundated areas downstream. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land consists of temporary wetlands, but the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Here we show that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters in the floodplains of the central Amazon. Flooded forests and floating vegetation export large amounts of carbon to river waters and the dissolved CO2 can be transported dozens to hundreds of kilometres downstream before being emitted. We estimate that Amazonian wetlands export half of their gross primary production to river waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared with only a few per cent of gross primary production exported in upland (not flooded) ecosystems. Moreover, we suggest that wetland carbon export is potentially large enough to account for at least the 0.21 petagrams of carbon emitted per year as CO2 from the central Amazon River and its floodplains. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, because these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with large, fast carbon export, potentially supporting a substantial fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters.

  20. Amazon River carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands.

    PubMed

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C; Savoye, Nicolas; Deborde, Jonathan; Souza, Edivaldo Lima; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F; Roland, Fabio

    2014-01-16

    River systems connect the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the ocean in the global carbon cycle. A recent estimate suggests that up to 3 petagrams of carbon per year could be emitted as carbon dioxide (CO2) from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon that has been previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis, then transferred to soils, and subsequently transported downstream in run-off. But at the scale of entire drainage basins, the lateral carbon fluxes carried by small rivers upstream do not account for all of the CO2 emitted from inundated areas downstream. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land consists of temporary wetlands, but the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Here we show that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters in the floodplains of the central Amazon. Flooded forests and floating vegetation export large amounts of carbon to river waters and the dissolved CO2 can be transported dozens to hundreds of kilometres downstream before being emitted. We estimate that Amazonian wetlands export half of their gross primary production to river waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared with only a few per cent of gross primary production exported in upland (not flooded) ecosystems. Moreover, we suggest that wetland carbon export is potentially large enough to account for at least the 0.21 petagrams of carbon emitted per year as CO2 from the central Amazon River and its floodplains. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, because these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with large, fast carbon export, potentially supporting a substantial fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters. PMID:24336199

  1. An extensive reef system at the Amazon River mouth

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Rodrigo L.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Moraes, Fernando C.; Brasileiro, Poliana S.; Salomon, Paulo S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Bastos, Alex C.; Almeida, Marcelo G.; Silva, Jomar M.; Araujo, Beatriz F.; Brito, Frederico P.; Rangel, Thiago P.; Oliveira, Braulio C. V.; Bahia, Ricardo G.; Paranhos, Rodolfo P.; Dias, Rodolfo J. S.; Siegle, Eduardo; Figueiredo, Alberto G.; Pereira, Renato C.; Leal, Camille V.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Asp, Nils E.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Neumann-Leitão, Sigrid; Yager, Patricia L.; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B.; Fróes, Adriana; Campeão, Mariana; Silva, Bruno S.; Moreira, Ana P. B.; Oliveira, Louisi; Soares, Ana C.; Araujo, Lais; Oliveira, Nara L.; Teixeira, João B.; Valle, Rogerio A. B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Rezende, Carlos E.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2016-01-01

    Large rivers create major gaps in reef distribution along tropical shelves. The Amazon River represents 20% of the global riverine discharge to the ocean, generating up to a 1.3 × 106–km2 plume, and extensive muddy bottoms in the equatorial margin of South America. As a result, a wide area of the tropical North Atlantic is heavily affected in terms of salinity, pH, light penetration, and sedimentation. Such unfavorable conditions were thought to imprint a major gap in Western Atlantic reefs. We present an extensive carbonate system off the Amazon mouth, underneath the river plume. Significant carbonate sedimentation occurred during lowstand sea level, and still occurs in the outer shelf, resulting in complex hard-bottom topography. A permanent near-bottom wedge of ocean water, together with the seasonal nature of the plume’s eastward retroflection, conditions the existence of this extensive (~9500 km2) hard-bottom mosaic. The Amazon reefs transition from accretive to erosional structures and encompass extensive rhodolith beds. Carbonate structures function as a connectivity corridor for wide depth–ranging reef-associated species, being heavily colonized by large sponges and other structure-forming filter feeders that dwell under low light and high levels of particulates. The oxycline between the plume and subplume is associated with chemoautotrophic and anaerobic microbial metabolisms. The system described here provides several insights about the responses of tropical reefs to suboptimal and marginal reef-building conditions, which are accelerating worldwide due to global changes. PMID:27152336

  2. Watershed Metabolism Expression in Rivers of the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V.; Victoria, R. L.; Montebelo, A.; da Cunha, H. B.; Neu, V.; Richey, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Amazon basin holds a wide variety of river waters with characteristic chemical signatures imprinted by basin geomorphology, rock types and weathering environments. Extremely contrasting cases are rivers such as the Solimoes, which drains Andean terrain with resulting high ionic content and suspended sediments and the ionic-poor blackish waters of the Negro, which drains highly weathered flat terrain. Such differences in landscape and water types translate into distinct seasonal patterns in their chemical composition. However, when biogenic species are concerned (such as dissolved gases O2 and CO2) rivers of all types and scales we have studied at Amazon present the same seasonal pattern. From the larger tributaries Solimoes and Negro to headwater streams of first order in Mato Grosso and Rondonia, DOC and CO2 increase with discharge, whereas O2 and pH decrease. Our results from smaller scale headwater streams show that seasonality in stream water follows precisely respiration in forest soils, indicating a tight land-water connection at this scale that probably propagates in the riverine network to express the functioning of the watershed as an integrated unit of the landscape.

  3. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary and the Amazon River plume were studied to elucidate processes which control the flux of nuclides to the sea. Major ions (Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Bicarbonate) and selected trace elements (Ra, Ba, Cu, Si) are introduced to the Connecticut River in proportion to the total dissolved load of various groundwaters. Si, Ra, and Ba are subject to removal from solution by seasonal diatom productivity; whereas the other groundwater-derived elements are found in proportion to TDS both time and space. These nuclides are released in the estuary when a portion of the Ra, Ba, and Si in riverine biogenic detritus is trapped in salt marshes and coves bordering the estuary where it redissolves and is exported to the main river channel at ebb tide. In the Amazon River estuary, the Ra and Ba are released in mid-salinity waters. Ra and Ba together with Si are subsequently removed by diatom productivity as reflected in increased Ra and Ba in the suspended particles and depleted dissolved nuclide concentrations in samples from the high productivity zone. In both the Connecticut River system and the Amazon River plume, Cu behaves conservatively; whereas the fates of Fe and Al are linked to soil-derived humic acids. Trace elements in Amazon plume sediments are found simply in proportion to the percentage of fine-grained size materials, despite low Th-228/Ra-228 mean residence times in the plume and the presence of Cs-137 in the sediment column. Estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated on a mass balance basis using groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is net flux to the ocean despite the reactions which occur in both rivers and estuaries.

  4. Dietary Studies on the Predatory Fishes of the Norman River Estuary, with Particular Reference to Penaeid Prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salini, J. P.; Brewer, D. T.; Blaber, S. J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The predatory fish community and their prey in the Norman Rivere estuary, Gulf of Carpentaria Australia, are compared with the communities of other tropical inshore areas, to investigate patterns of predation in tropical inshore areas particularly in relation to penaeid prawns. Abiotic factors (turbidity, freshwater input) and diversity of habitat types affect the composition of both prey and predator communities, resulting in large differences in the communities of tropical inshore waters. The stomach contents of 2059 predatory fish from the Norman River estuary were analysed over four sampling trips in the wet and dry seasons. The stomachs of 61% (1255 fish) of 54 species contained a total of 676·2 g (dry weight) of food, while 39% (804 fish) were empty. Teleosts were the main component of the diet (by dry weight) of 13 of the 22 species analysed, followed by annelids for two species. Five species had only teleosts in their stomachs. Most predator species ate benthic or bentho-pelagic prey, while three species— Rhizoprionodon taylori, Scomberoides commersonianusand Leptobrama mulleri—ate mainly pelagic prey. Although 19 species ate some penaeids, only Polydactylus sheridaniate little else. This species, Lates calcariferand Eleutheronema tetradactylumate 94·5% of all the penaeid prey and 97·9% of all the commercially important penaeid prey recorded in the study. Penaeid predation indices (calculated from gillnet catch rates, proportion of penaeids in the diet and a consumption rate of 3% body weight per day) were 0·23 g of penaeid per net-metre per day for P. sheridani, 0·15 for L. calcariferand 0·03 for E. tetradactylum. Commercially important penaeid predation indices were 0·11, 0·13 and 0·01, respectively. These values are intermediate between those previously recorded for the main penaeid predators in other inshore areas of the Gulf of Carpentaria (Embley River estuary and Groote Eylandt).

  5. Viruses and bacteria in floodplain lakes along a major Amazon tributary respond to distance to the Amazon River.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rafael M; Roland, Fábio; Cardoso, Simone J; Farjalla, Vinícius F; Bozelli, Reinaldo L; Barros, Nathan O

    2015-01-01

    In response to the massive volume of water along the Amazon River, the Amazon tributaries have their water backed up by 100s of kilometers upstream their mouth. This backwater effect is part of the complex hydrodynamics of Amazonian surface waters, which in turn drives the variation in concentrations of organic matter and nutrients, and also regulates planktonic communities such as viruses and bacteria. Viruses and bacteria are commonly tightly coupled to each other, and their ecological role in aquatic food webs has been increasingly recognized. Here, we surveyed viral and bacterial abundances (BAs) in 26 floodplain lakes along the Trombetas River, the largest clear-water tributary of the Amazon River's north margin. We correlated viral and BAs with temperature, pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity, water transparency, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), phytoplankton abundance, and distance from the lake mouth until the confluence of the Trombetas with the Amazon River. We hypothesized that both bacterial and viral abundances (VAs) would change along a latitudinal gradient, as the backwater effect becomes more intense with increased proximity to the Amazon River; different flood duration and intensity among lakes and waters with contrasting sources would cause spatial variation. Our measurements were performed during the low water period, when floodplain lakes are in their most lake-like conditions. Viral and BAs, DOC, pCO2, and water transparency increased as distance to the Amazon River increased. Most viruses were bacteriophages, as viruses were strongly linked to bacteria, but not to phytoplankton. We suggest that BAs increase in response to DOC quantity and possibly quality, consequently leading to increased VAs. Our results highlight that hydrodynamics plays a key role in the regulation of planktonic viral and bacterial communities in Amazonian floodplain lakes. PMID:25788895

  6. The Amazon River reversal explained by tectonic and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacek, V.

    2014-12-01

    The drainage pattern in Amazonia was expressively modified during the mountain building of central and northern Andes. In Early Miocene, the fluvial systems in western Amazonia flowed to the foreland basins and northward to the Caribbean. By Late Miocene the drainage reversal occurred and formed the transcontinental Amazon River, connecting the Andes and the equatorial Atlantic margin. This event is recorded in the stratigraphic evolution of the Foz do Amazonas Basin by the onset of Andean-derived sedimentation. Additionally, an abrupt increase in sedimentation rate after the reversal occurred in the Foz do Amazonas Basin. Based on three-dimensional numerical models that couple surface processes, flexural isostasy and crustal thickening due to orogeny, I concluded that the Miocene drainage reversal can be explained by the flexural and surface processes response to the Andes formation with no need to invoke dynamic topography induced by mantle convection, as previously proposed. I observed that the instant of drainage reversal is directly linked to the rate of crustal thickening in the orogeny, the rate of erosion and, mainly, the efficiency of sediment transport. Moreover, the numerical experiments were able to predict the increase in sedimentation rate in the Amazon fan after the drainage reversal of the Amazon River as observed in the Late Miocene-Pliocene sedimentary record. However, the present numerical model fails to fully reproduce the evolution of the Pebas system, a megawetland in western Amazonia that preceded the drainage reversal. Therefore, further investigation is necessary to evaluate the mechanisms that generated and sustained the Pebas system.

  7. Characterization of the male-specific lethal 3 gene in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Sun, S M; Fu, H T; Ge, X P; Qiao, H; Zhang, W Y; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Gong, Y S; Jin, S B

    2015-01-01

    In this study, male-specific lethal 3 homolog (Mnmsl3) was cloned and characterized from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The deduced amino acid sequences of Mnmsl3 showed high-sequence homology to the insect Msl3 and contained a conserved chromatin organization modifier domain and an MORF4-related gene domain. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that the Mnmsl3 gene was expressed in all the investigated tissues, with the highest level of expression in the testis. The expression level of Mnmsl3 between males and females was different in the gonad (testis or ovary), abdominal ganglion, and heart. The results revealed that the Mnmsl3 gene might play roles in regulating chromatin and in dosage compensation of M. nipponense. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also revealed that Mnmsl3 mRNA expression was significantly increased in both 5 and 20 days post-larvae after metamorphosis, suggesting that Mnmsl3 plays complex and important roles in the early embryonic development and sex differentiation of M. nipponense. PMID:25966075

  8. Viruses and bacteria in floodplain lakes along a major Amazon tributary respond to distance to the Amazon River

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rafael M.; Roland, Fábio; Cardoso, Simone J.; Farjalla, Vinícius F.; Bozelli, Reinaldo L.; Barros, Nathan O.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the massive volume of water along the Amazon River, the Amazon tributaries have their water backed up by 100s of kilometers upstream their mouth. This backwater effect is part of the complex hydrodynamics of Amazonian surface waters, which in turn drives the variation in concentrations of organic matter and nutrients, and also regulates planktonic communities such as viruses and bacteria. Viruses and bacteria are commonly tightly coupled to each other, and their ecological role in aquatic food webs has been increasingly recognized. Here, we surveyed viral and bacterial abundances (BAs) in 26 floodplain lakes along the Trombetas River, the largest clear-water tributary of the Amazon River’s north margin. We correlated viral and BAs with temperature, pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity, water transparency, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), phytoplankton abundance, and distance from the lake mouth until the confluence of the Trombetas with the Amazon River. We hypothesized that both bacterial and viral abundances (VAs) would change along a latitudinal gradient, as the backwater effect becomes more intense with increased proximity to the Amazon River; different flood duration and intensity among lakes and waters with contrasting sources would cause spatial variation. Our measurements were performed during the low water period, when floodplain lakes are in their most lake-like conditions. Viral and BAs, DOC, pCO2, and water transparency increased as distance to the Amazon River increased. Most viruses were bacteriophages, as viruses were strongly linked to bacteria, but not to phytoplankton. We suggest that BAs increase in response to DOC quantity and possibly quality, consequently leading to increased VAs. Our results highlight that hydrodynamics plays a key role in the regulation of planktonic viral and bacterial communities in Amazonian floodplain lakes. PMID:25788895

  9. Degradation of terrestrially derived macromolecules in the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Nicholas D.; Keil, Richard G.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Brito, Daimio C.; Cunha, Alan C.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Yager, Patricia L.; Krusche, Alex V.; Richey, Jeffrey E.

    2013-07-01

    Temperate and tropical rivers serve as a significant source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. However, the source of the organic matter that fuels these globally relevant emissions is uncertain. Lignin and cellulose are the most abundant macromolecules in the terrestrial biosphere, but are assumed to resist degradation on release from soils to aquatic settings. Here, we present evidence for the degradation of lignin and associated macromolecules in the Amazon River. We monitored the degradation of a vast suite of terrestrially derived macromolecules and their breakdown products in water sampled from the mouth of the river throughout the course of a year, using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We identified a number of lignin phenols, together with 95 phenolic compounds, largely derived from terrestrial macromolecules. Lignin, together with numerous phenolic compounds, disappeared from our analytical window following several days of incubation at ambient river temperatures, indicative of biological degradation. We estimate that the net rate of degradation observed corresponds to 30-50% of bulk river respiration. Assuming that a significant fraction of these compounds is eventually remineralized to carbon dioxide, we suggest that lignin and other terrestrially derived macromolecules contribute significantly to carbon dioxide outgassing from inland waters.

  10. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary, and the Amazon River estuary were studied to elucidate some of the processes which control river water chemistry and the flux of elements to the sea. The approach taken was to identify inputs to the Connecticut River and to investigate geochemical processes which modify the dissolved load. The form and quantity of nuclides which are in turn supplied to the estuary are altered by processes unique to that transition zone to the ocean. The Connecticut River estuary was sampled on a seasonal basis to investigate the role of the estuary in controlling the flux of elements to the sea. The knowledge gained from the Connecticut River study was applied to the quantitatively more significant Amazon River estuary. There a variety of samples were analyzed to understand the processes controlling the single greatest flux of elements to the Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated based on groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is that which will eventually be delivered to the ocean despite the reactions which were shown to occur in both rivers and estuaries. 153 references, 63 figures, 28 tables.

  11. Projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. C. D.; Sorribas, M.; Melack, J. M.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Bravo, J. M.; Beighley, E.; Forsberg, B. R.; Costa, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and related effects on the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin can have major impacts on human and ecological communities, transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined projections of climate change effects on discharge and inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the regional hydrological model MGB-IPH coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model's capability to represent physical processes over the Amazon was demonstrated in previous validation against multi in situ and remotely sensed observations. Future climate projections for the 2070 to 2099 time period were obtained by selecting five climate models from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent Amazon climate. The climate projections present large uncertainty and results from different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes in total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, model projections generally show better agreement with wetter (drier) conditions over western (eastern) portions of the Amazon basin. Results indicate increased mean and maximum river discharge for large rivers draining the Andes in northwestern Amazon, with increased mean and maximum discharge and inundation extent over Peruvian floodplains and Solimões River in western and central Amazonia. Decreased river discharges (mainly in the dry season) are projected for eastern basins, and decreased inundation extent at low water period in the central and lower Amazon.

  12. Isotope composition of iron delivered to the oceans by intertropical rivers: The Amazon River Basin case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, F.; Vieira, L. C.; Seyler, P.; dos Santos Pinheiro, G. M.; Mulholland, D. S.; Ferreira Lima, B. A.; Bonnet, M.; Martinez, J.; Prunier, J.

    2011-12-01

    Riverborne iron is a notable source for this biogeochemically key element to the oceans. Recent investigations have shown that its isotopic composition may vary significantly in oceanic waters. Hence, a proper understanding of the Fe cycle at the surface of the Earth requires a good characterization of the isotopic composition of its various reservoirs. However, as the database growths, it appears that the isotope composition of the riverborne Fe delivered to the oceans may be more varied than initially thought, in agreement with inferences from soil studies from different climatic contexts. It is therefore important to compare major rivers from different latitudes. We focused our attention on the Amazon River and its tributaries that represent ca. 20% of the freshwater delivered to the oceans by world rivers. Preliminary experiments suggest that water filtration may induce biases in stable Fe isotope composition. Therefore, we worked first on bulk waters, sampled during multidisciplinary field campaigns on the Amazon River and its tributaries, including the Solimoes, Negro, Madeira and Tapajos Rivers. Besides a complete sample physical-chemical characterization, Fe isotope determinations were conduced after water sample mineralization, iron purification and MC-ICP-MS analysis. Our first results reveal that most bulk water samples cluster close to the continental crust value (0.1% δ57FeIRMM-14) with an overall range of 0.2%. This is consistent with the restricted range found in lateritic soils elsewhere that represent 80% of the Amazon basin surface. Only black water rivers flowing over the podzols of the northern portion of the Amazon basin tend to show lighter isotopic compositions, down to -0.18%. However, sediment analyses suggest that this light Fe isotopic is lost through sedimentation on the river bed, thereby leading the waters to have Fe isotope compositions remaining close to that of the continental crust. This constant isotopic signature holds whatever

  13. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living Amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 dolphins from free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from Sustainable Development Reserve Mamirauá (...

  14. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 dolphins from free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from Sustainable Development Reserve Mamirauá (...

  15. A first quantitative estimate of trace metal fluxes from Amazon river and its main tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, P. T.; Pinelli, M.; Boaventura, G. R.

    2003-05-01

    The trace metal (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, U) concentrations and temporal variabilities of the Amazon river and its main tributaries are studied on time series basis in the major tributaries of Amazon river (Negro, Madeira and Solimões Rivers) and at Obidos station on the Amazon mainsteem which represents 90% of the total discharge of Amazon river to the Ocean. Variations of river chemistry may reflect variations of the sources. The “Shield” rivers (as the Rio Negro) have typically depleted concentrations in As, Sr, Ba, Cu, and V as compared with Andean rivers. Elements such Mn and As are mainly transported by the flood flows. These elements are known to be concentrated in lateric (ferricrete) soils which represent 80% in the Amazon basin, suggesting that these elements are washed away in solution during the high discharge. Moreover, these elements can be stored in the surrounding floodplain areas (varzea) where deposition/resuspension cycles as well as the exchange rate between floodplain and mainstream channel may control at least partially the temporal variation of redox element concentrations such Mn and As. Implication on these results on the trace element flux from Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean is discussed.

  16. Sediment supply as a driver of river evolution in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Joshua; Constantine, José Antonio; Dunne, Thomas; Legleiter, Carl; Lazarus, Eli D.

    2015-04-01

    The Amazon represents the only large river basin in the world where there is a sufficient range of sediment supplies and a lack of engineering controls to assess how sediment supply drives the evolution of meandering rivers. Despite recent analytical advances (Asahi et al., 2013; Pittaluga and Seminara, 2011), modern theory does not yet identify or explain the effects of externally imposed sediment supplies, a fundamental river characteristic, on meandering river evolution. These sediment supplies would be radically reduced by the construction of large dams proposed for the Amazon Basin (Finer and Jenkins, 2012). Here, we demonstrate that the sediment loads imposed by their respective drainage basins determine planform changes in lowland rivers across the Amazon. Our analysis, based on Landsat image sequences, indicates that rivers with high sediment loads draining the Andes and associated foreland basin experience annual migration rates that are on average four times faster than rivers with lower sediment loads draining the Central Amazon Trough and shields. Incidents of meander cutoff also occur more frequently along the rivers of the Andes and foreland basin, where the number of oxbows in the floodplains is more than twice that observed in the floodplains of the Central Amazon Trough and shields. Our results, which cannot be explained by differences in channel slope or hydrology, highlight the importance of sediment supply in modulating the ability of meandering alluvial rivers to reshape the floodplain environment through river migration. Asahi, K., Shimizu, Y., Nelson, J., Parker, G., 2013. Numerical simulation of river meandering with self-evolving banks. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 118(4), 2013JF002752. Finer, M., Jenkins, C.N., 2012. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity. PLOS One, 7(4), e35126. Pittaluga, M.B., Seminara, G., 2011. Nonlinearity and unsteadiness in river

  17. Isolation and characterization of two novel C-type lectins from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Yunji; Hou, Libo; Liu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yinghui; Gu, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    C-type lectins are a family of calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins which are believed to play important roles in the innate immunity of invertebrates. This study identified two novel C-type lectins, designated as MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3, from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. The full-length cDNA of MnCTLDcp2 was of 1582 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 972 bp encoding a polypeptide of 323 amino acids. The complete nucleotide sequence of MnCTLDcp3 cDNA was 583 bp, containing a 555 bp ORF encoding a putative protein of 184 deduced amino acids. The deduced MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 proteins both contained a single C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). Besides, MnCTLDcp2 contains a signal peptide and an low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LDLa) domain. Reverse transcription PCR showed that MnCTLDcp2 was expressed in the heart, gill, nerve hepatopancreas and intestine; MnCTLDcp3 was expressed in the hepatopancreas, heart, nerve, gill and muscle. Their expression in the heart tissue was regulated following challenge with bacteria. The microbial agglutination assay showed that both MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 could agglutinated bacteria in the presence of calcium. All these results suggested that MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 functioned as pattern recognition receptors in the immune system of M. nipponense. PMID:26208755

  18. Constructing and random sequencing analysis of normalized cDNA library of testis tissue from oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hui; Fu, Hongtuo; Jin, Shubo; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Sufei; Gong, Yongsheng; Xiong, Yiwei

    2012-09-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. Sexual precocity is a serious problem because of genetic retrogression, which has negative effects on product quality and dramatically affects price. Culture of all-male populations of this species would be economically advantageous, as the males grow faster and reach a much larger size than females. Developing such a culture scheme will require discovery of sex- or reproduction-related genes that affect sexual maturity and sex determination. In this study, a high-quality normalized testis cDNA library was constructed to identify novel transcripts. Of the 5280 successful sequencing reaction yields, 5202 expressed tagged sequences (ESTs) with an average length of 954 bp. Ultimately, 3677 unique sequences, including 891 contigs and 2786 singletons, were identified based on cluster and assembly analyses. Sixteen hundred (43.5%) genes were novel based on the NCBI protein database, thus these unidentified genes may improve basic molecular knowledge about M. nipponense. Of the novel unigenes, 34.4% (715/2077) were homologous to insects, such as Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila spp. and Apis mellifera. Fifty-two genes were identified as sex- or reproduction-related based on Gene Ontology classification and sequence comparison with data from other publications. These genes can be classified into groups based on different functions, including 10 sex-determination related genes, 8 male-reproductive genes, 5 cathepsin-related genes, 20 ubiquitin-related genes, 5 ferritin-related genes, and 4 LRR genes. The results of this study provide new sequence information about M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies of this species and other decapods crustaceans. PMID:22632994

  19. The Late Miocene paleogeography of the Amazon Basin and the evolution of the Amazon River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Cozzuol, Mario; da Silva-Caminha, Silane A. F.; Rigsby, Catherine A.; Absy, Maria Lucia; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    On the basis of paleontological content (vertebrates and palynology) and facies analysis from river banks, road cuts, and three wells, we have assigned the uppermost levels of the Solimões Formation in western Amazonia, Brazil, to the Late Miocene. The vertebrate fossil record from outcropping sediments is assigned to the Huayquerian-Mesopotamian mammalian biozones, spanning 9-6.5 Ma. Additionally, we present results that demonstrate that deposits in Peruvian Amazonia attributed to Miocene tidal environments are actually fluvial sediments that have been misinterpreted (both environmentally and chronologically) by several authors. The entire Late Miocene sequence was deposited in a continental environment within a subsiding basin. The facies analysis, fossil fauna content, and palynological record indicate that the environment of deposition was dominated by avulsive rivers associated with megafan systems, and avulsive rivers in flood basins (swamps, lakes, internal deltas, and splays). Soils developed on the flatter, drier areas, which were dominated by grasslands and gallery forest in a tropical to subtropical climate. These Late Miocene sediments were deposited from westward of the Purus arch up to the border of Brazil with Peru (Divisor Ranges) and Bolivia (Pando block). Eastward of the Iquitos structural high, however, more detailed studies, including vertebrate paleontology, need to be performed to calibrate with more precision the ages of the uppermost levels of the Solimões Formation. The evolution of the basin during the late Miocene is mainly related to the tectonic behavior of the Central Andes (˜ 3°-15°S). At approximately 5 Ma, a segment of low angle of subduction was well developed in the Nazca Plate, and the deformation in the Subandean foreland produced the inland reactivation of the Divisor/Contamana Ranges and tectonic arrangements in the Eastern Andes. During the Pliocene southwestern Brazilian Amazonia ceased to be an effective sedimentary

  20. Identification and comparative analysis of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) microRNA expression profile during hypoxia using a deep sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Fu, Hongtuo; Ge, Xianping; Zhu, Jian; Gu, Zhimin; Xuan, Fujun

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia refers to a state of oxygen deficiency, which is observed frequently in aquaculture ponds. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are important effectors in regulating gene expression through posttranscriptional mechanisms. They are key elements in the response to hypoxia. The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is an important commercial aquaculture species, and is sensitive to hypoxia. To date, there are no reports describing M. nipponense miRNAs. In this study, Solexa deep sequencing technology was used for high-throughput analysis of miRNAs in a small RNA library isolated from four M. nipponense tissues (gill, hepatopancreas, muscle and hemocytes). In total, 9,227,356 reads were obtained, 4,293,155 of which were related to 267 unique miRNAs, including 203 conserved and 64 prawn-specific miRNAs. Furthermore, miRNA features including length distribution and end variations were characterized. Annotation of targets revealed a broad range of biological processes and signal transduction pathways regulated by M. nipponense miRNAs. In addition, 880 co-expressed and 39 specific (25 normoxia-specific and 14 hypoxia-specific) miRNAs that may be involved in the response to hypoxia were confirmed using miRNA microarray analysis from the four prawn tissues combined. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of eight miRNAs in the normoxia and hypoxia groups showed good concordance between the sequencing and qPCR data. This study provides the first large-scale identification and characterization of M. nipponense miRNAs and their potential targets, and represents a foundation for further characterization of their roles in the regulation of the diversity of hypoxia processes. PMID:26829004

  1. Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Asp, N. E.; Souza Filho, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal influence extends ~800 kilometers upstream of the Amazon River mouth, producing semidiurnal oscillations in water elevation and slowing or reversing the flow of the world's largest river. This tidally influenced reach, known as the tidal river, is flanked by an expansive intertidal floodplain, and includes confluences with two large tributaries, the Xingu and Tapajós. The relative magnitude of the seasonal and tidal signals changes along the length of the tidal river, yielding diverse floodplain environments that span a range of seasonal and tidal influence. Near the upstream limit of tides, natural levees isolate the river from the floodplain during low to moderate flows, while in the lower tidal river, natural levees are absent and river-floodplain exchange is dominated by the tides rather than seasonal variation in river stage. This difference between fluvial and tidal systems strongly affects the nature of sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain, including frequency, duration, and depth of inundation. Here we present data on the impact of this fluvial-tidal continuum on sedimentary processes in the floodplain and resultant depositional signatures. Changes in levee prominence, grain size, and sediment accumulation combine to produce the distinct morphologies of floodplain lakes, intertidal backswamps, and intertidal flats. In addition to sediment accumulation on the periodically exposed floodplain, Amazon River sediment accumulates within the drowned tributary confluences of the Xingu and Tapajós Rivers. Here seasonal and tidal changes in water temperature, discharge, and suspended-sediment concentration drive barotropic and baroclinic flows that transport Amazon River sediment into tributary basins. These findings help to constrain the fate of sediment within the ungauged Amazon tidal river, and will help in understanding the response of the lower Amazon River to changes in accommodation space associated with rising sea level, and changes

  2. A new microsporidium, Potaspora macrobrachium n.sp. infecting the musculature of pond-reared oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (Decapoda: Palaemonidae).

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhengfeng; Sun, Mengling; Liu, Hongyan; Zhao, Yanhua; Pan, Jianlin; Xue, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This paper described a novel microsporidian infection in the pond-reared oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. A conspicuous symptom of the infection was progressive white opacity associated with the musculature. Although neither bacteria nor viruses were detected in routine diagnostic tests, apparently degenerated microsporidian cells or spores were frequently observed in wet smears of the musculature from diseased prawns. Histological observations also revealed characteristics typical of microsporidian infection throughout the host. Transmission electron microscopy revealed multiple life stages of a microsporidian parasite within the cytoplasm of host muscle cells. In addition, partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene was obtained by a nested PCR using microsporidian specific primers. A consensus sequence was then deposited in GenBank (accession no. KU307278) and subjected to a general BLASTn search that yielded hits only for microsporidian sequence records. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was most similar to the fish microsporidian clade containing the genera Kabatana, Microgemma, Potaspora, Spraguea, and Teramicra. The highest sequence identity, 87%, was with Potaspora spp. Based on histological, ultrastructure and molecular phylogenetic data, we erected a new species, Potaspora macrobrachium for the novel microsporidium. The description of microsporidium in this important commercial host was fundamental for future consideration of factors affecting stock health and sustainability. PMID:26925527

  3. Water resources, salinity and salt yields of the rivers of the Bolivian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Michel-Alain; Jauregui, Carlos Fernandez

    1988-06-01

    This is the first time that the water resources, the salinity and the yields of the upper basins of the Madera River have been reported. Formed by the confluence of the Beni and Mamore, the Madera is one of the world's largest rivers: 17,000 m 3s -1, approximately half the discharge of the Congo River. It has a dissolved discharge close to that of the Congo River: 1 ts -1 of ions. Likewise, the Beni and the Mamore Rivers, are also classified as large rivers, greater than the Volga River, the largest in Europe, and the Niger River, the second largest in Africa. The amounts of water involved are considerable. The average dissolved content of these rivers, 57-61 mg l -1 respectively, is relatively low to medium. Many types of water, classified according to their ionic compositions, have been characterized in the Andes, the Amazon Plain, and in the main drainage axis. The slightly mineralized black water of the plain seems the most unique type. Recycling of water vapor in the Amazon Basin is confirmed by the low chloride and sodium contents of the water in the plain. Thus the importance of this phenomenon in the genesis of rainfall throughout the basin is emphasized. The contribution of the Upper Madera River to the Amazon River is 9.7% of the water and 10.9% of ionic load.

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, P S; Albuquerque, G R; da Silva, V M F; Martin, A R; Marvulo, M F V; Souza, S L P; Ragozo, A M A; Nascimento, C C; Gennari, S M; Dubey, J P; Silva, J C R

    2011-12-29

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate the water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve (RDSM), Tefé, Amazonas, Central Amazon, Brazil were tested for T. gondii antibodies using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies (MAT ≥ 25) to T. gondii were found in 82 (86.3%) dolphins with titers of 1:25 in 24, 1:50 in 56, and 1:500 in 2. Results suggest a high level contamination of the aquatic environment of the home range of these animals. PMID:21764516

  5. Sediment supply as a driver of river meandering and floodplain evolution in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, José Antonio; Dunne, Thomas; Ahmed, Joshua; Legleiter, Carl; Lazarus, Eli D.

    2014-12-01

    The role of externally imposed sediment supplies on the evolution of meandering rivers and their floodplains is poorly understood, despite analytical advances in our physical understanding of river meandering. The Amazon river basin hosts tributaries that are largely unaffected by engineering controls and hold a range of sediment loads, allowing us to explore the influence that sediment supply has on river evolution. Here we calculate average annual rates of meander migration within 20 reaches in the Amazon Basin from Landsat imagery spanning 1985-2013. We find that rivers with high sediment loads experience annual migration rates that are higher than those of rivers with lower sediment loads. Meander cutoff also occurs more frequently along rivers with higher sediment loads. Differences in meander migration and cutoff rates between the study reaches are not explained by differences in channel slope or river discharge. Because faster meander migration and higher cutoff rates lead to increased sediment-storage space in the resulting oxbows, we suggest that sediment supply modulates the reshaping of floodplain environments by meandering rivers. We conclude that imposed sediment loads influence planform changes in lowland rivers across the Amazon.

  6. Trapping of sediment along the Amazon tidal river in diverse floodplain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Souza Filho, P. W.; Silveira, O.; Asp, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon tidal river, the freshwater reach that is influenced by tides, extends roughly 800 kilometers upstream of the river mouth. Previous studies suggest that up to one third of the sediment measured at the upstream limit of tides does not reach the ocean, and is likely trapped along the tidal river. Here we present data from a variety of depositional environments along this reach, including intertidal vegetated floodplains, floodplain lakes, and drowned tributary confluences. Sediment delivery to each of these environments is temporally variable as a result of changing tides and river stage, and spatially variable along the continuum from the purely fluvial upstream condition to the strongly tidal downstream environment. Short-term instrument records and direct observations are paired with sedimentological and radiochemical techniques to identify mechanisms of sediment exchange between river and floodplain and associated patterns of sediment accumulation. Sediments in vegetated intertidal floodplains exhibit tidal laminations and incised channel networks similar to muddy marine intertidal areas. Floodplain lakes experience dramatic seasonal changes in size, and during high flows of the river skim water and sediment from the Amazon River by providing a shortcut relative to the meandering mainstem. Amazon sediment is fluxed into the drowned tributary confluences (rías) of the Xingu and Tapajos Rivers by density-driven underflows. In the Tapajos Ría, sediment from the Amazon River has built a 25-km long birdfoot delta, suggesting these tributaries may be net sinks of sediment, rather than sources. These findings help define the importance of each tidal environment in trapping Amazon sediment before it reaches the marine environment.

  7. River discharge and flood inundation over the Amazon based on IPCC AR5 scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Rodrigo; Sorribas, Mino; Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila; Melack, John; Bravo, Juan Martin; Beighley, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and related effects over the hydrologic regime of the Amazon River basin could have major impacts over human and ecological communities, including issues with transportation, flood vulnerability, fisheries and hydropower generation. We examined future changes in discharge and floodplain inundation within the Amazon River basin. We used the hydrological model MGB-IPH (Modelo de Grandes Bacias - Instituto de Pesquisas Hidráulicas) coupled with a 1D river hydrodynamic model simulating water storage over the floodplains. The model was forced using satellite based precipitation from the TRMM 3B42 dataset, and it had a good performance when validated against discharge and stage measurements as well as remotely sensed data, including radar altimetry-based water levels, gravity anomaly-based terrestrial water storage and flood inundation extent. Future scenarios of precipitation and other relevant climatic variables for the 2070 to 2100 time period were taken from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The climate models were chosen based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent (1970 to 2000) Amazon climate. A quantile-quantile bias removal procedure was applied to climate model precipitation to mitigate unreliable predictions. The hydrologic model was then forced using past observed climate data altered by delta change factors based on the past and future climate models aiming to estimate projected discharge and floodplain inundation in climate change scenario at several control points in the basin. The climate projections present large uncertainty, especially the precipitation rate, and predictions using different climate models do not agree on the sign of changes on total Amazon flood extent or discharge along the main stem of the Amazon River. However, analyses of results at different regions indicate an increase

  8. Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter in Amazon Basin: Insights into Negro River Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira-Turcq, P.; Perez, M. P.; Benedetti, M.; Oliveira, M. A.; Lagane, C.; Seyler, P.; Oliveira, E.

    2006-12-01

    The study of global carbon cycle requires a precise knowledge of spatial and temporal distributions and exportation from continents to oceans. Organic carbon fluxes represent approximately half of the total carbon budget carried by rivers. Tropical rivers transport two third of the total organic carbon discharged into the world oceans but important gaps still exist in the knowledge of the tropical river carbon biochemistry. The Amazon River is responsible for 10% of the annual amount of organic carbon transported from rivers to oceans. The most important portion of total organic matter transported in the Amazon Basin is the dissolved fraction (between 80% and 95%). Amazonian annual flux of dissolved organic matter is directly related to hydrological variations. All rivers in the Amazon basin are characterized by monomodal hydrograms, with a low water period in october/november and a high water period in may/june. Temporal variations in Amazon dissolved organic carbon (3.0 to 9.1 mg l^{- 1}) are mainly controled by Negro River inputs. DOC and DON contributions from the Negro River can vary between 120 kgC s-1 and 520 kg C s-1, and between 5 kgN s--1 and 15 kgN s-1, during low and high water period, respectivelly. In the Negro River, during high water stages, while DOC concentrations are stable from the upstream stations to the downstream ones (about 11 mg l-1), discharge increases from 16000 to 46000 m3 s-1 and NOD can quintuple from upstream (0.071 mg l-1) to downstream (0.341 mg l-1). Then the nature of dissolved organic matter is variable (C/N ratio varied from 33 to 120 from upstream to downstream). During low water stages DOC concentrations are lower (mean DOC of 8.1 mg l-1) while DON is in the same range, discharge is about 10000 m3 s-1 at downstream stations of Negro River and the C/N ratio is lower and steadier along the River. Finaly, despite a low basin surface (12%) compared with the two other main Amazon tributaries, Solimões and Madeira Rivers, and a

  9. Sediment budget in the Ucayali River basin, an Andean tributary of the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, W.; Martinez, J.-M.; Espinoza-Villar, R.; Cochonneau, G.; Vauchel, P.; Moquet, J.-S.; Baby, P.; Espinoza, J.-C.; Lavado, W.; Carranza, J.; Guyot, J.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Formation of mountain ranges results from complex coupling between lithospheric deformation, mechanisms linked to subduction and surface processes: weathering, erosion, and climate. Today, erosion of the eastern Andean cordillera and sub-Andean foothills supplies over 99% of the sediment load passing through the Amazon Basin. Denudation rates in the upper Ucayali basin are rapid, favoured by a marked seasonality in this region and extreme precipitation cells above sedimentary strata, uplifted during Neogene times by a still active sub-Andean tectonic thrust. Around 40% of those sediments are trapped in the Ucayali retro-foreland basin system. Recent advances in remote sensing for Amazonian large rivers now allow us to complete the ground hydrological data. In this work, we propose a first estimation of the erosion and sedimentation budget of the Ucayali River catchment, based on spatial and conventional HYBAM Observatory network.

  10. Using GRACE Total Water Storage Changes to constrain River Routing Models in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Lo, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Ray, R. L.; Beighley, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    The GRACE mission provides monthly to 10-day maps of Total Water Storage Anomalies corresponding to the vertically integrated land water storage (soil moisture and groundwater) as well as storage in river channels and floodplains (surface waters). The surface water component is an important contributor to total water storage in the Amazon River basin as shown by improved agreement between GRACE observations and model simulations when runoff is routed through the river network as compared to no river routing. We use the Community Land Model version 3.5 to model land water storage along with runoff by accounting for a simple ground water model. Surface and subsurface runoff predictions are then routed using two different routing models: a simple cell-to-cell routing scheme (e.g. Branstetter and Famiglietti, 1999) and the Hillslope River Routing (Beighley et al. 2010). We evaluate model performances against the spatio-temporal variations of GRACE data by carrying out a Singular Value Decomposition of the cross-covariance matrix. We also compare the two models in the light of their respective intrinsic capabilities. We finally investigate the impact of the precipitation data on model outputs by using TRMM products instead of GLDAS (CMAP) products.

  11. Seasonality of Rare Earth Element concentrations and fluxes in the Amazon river and its main tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, P.; Sonke, J.; Viers, J.; Barroux, G.; Boaventura, G. R.; Rousseau, T.

    2008-12-01

    Many studies carried out on the Amazon River illustrate the complex functioning of this river in terms of geochemistry. Concerning the REE, (Sholkovitz and Szymczak 2000) and (Hannigan and Sholkovitz 2001, Gerard et al, 2003) summarized the actual knowledge we have on the Amazon river. In this study we present a 2-year time series on dissolved REE geochemistry in the Amazon River at Óbidos station (S01°56'50", W55°30'40"), which is the ultimate gauging station on the Amazon River upstream from the marine influence and from the three main Amazon River tributaries, The Negro River at Serrinha (S00°28'55", W064°49'48) station, the Solimões River at Manacapuru stations (S03°20'43", W60°33'12") and the Madeira River at Porto Velho (08°44'12", W63°55'13"), and the Curuaí floodplain, one of the largest várzea located in between Manaus and Óbidos. REE concentrations were measured by ICP-MS in LMTG Laboratory (France). The main results are: -a substantial seasonal variation in REE concentrations that is correlated with discharge. This variation repeats itself from yaer to year, and is also reflected in a compilation of literature data that reflects different years and dates of sampling; - an absence of seasonal variation in REE patterns and Ce* anomalies; - a monthly weighted annual Nd flux to the surface Atlantic Ocean of 607 ± 43 T.yr-1, which is at least 1.6 times larger than the currently used estimate based on one single measurement during the low water stage. A mass balance of the major tributaries shows quasi-conservative behavior of the LREE and an excess of observed HREE during the high water stage. Additional observations are necessary to see if this feature is recurrent or whether it reflects inherent organizational and analytical difficulties involved in the monthly sampling of all Amazonian rivers. Persistence of such a HREE excess requires a source such as suspended matter sorbed REE that transfer to the dissolved phase at tributary confluences

  12. Marine environmental changes at the Brazilian equatorial margin related to Amazon River evolution during the Neogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammertsma, Emmy; Troelstra, Simon; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Chemale, Farid, Jr.; do Carmo, Dermeval A.; D'Avila, Roberto; Soares, Emilson; Hoorn, Carina

    2014-05-01

    Today, the nutrient-rich Amazon River outflow causes massive algal blooms in the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean, forming a considerable carbon sink as well as a primary food source in the otherwise oligotrophic surface water. However, the history of this high-productivity system is largely unknown, although a strong relation to the evolution of the Amazon River can be expected. The Amazon submarine fan provides direct evidence for the development of a transcontinental river system, of which the base of the primarily Andean-sourced siliciclastic deposits is dated as late Miocene. Ditch cuttings from Amazon Fan exploration 'Well 2' were made available by Petrobras for microfossil and lithological research. 'Well 2' is located on the uppermost fan at a water depth of 750 meters. Organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst and foraminifer assemblages were studied to reconstruct Neogene marine environmental changes in relation to the Amazon River development. Planktonic foraminifera are present throughout the studied section and largely confirm the already available biostratigraphic age determination based on nannofossils. Benthic foraminifer assemblages indicate that the paleo-water depth has not substantially deviated from current conditions. The ecological affinities of most observed dinocyst taxa are well known, which allows us to reconstruct changes in paleo-productivity based on the assemblages. Mineral composition suggests that local river systems already drained into the Amazon basin before the onset of the transcontinental system, but environmental conditions remained oligotrophic at this time. Decreased abundances of both dinocysts and planktonic foraminifera during the Pleistocene are related to highest sedimentation rates (dilution effect). Overall, a complex interplay of orogenesis, climatic and sea level variations during the Neogene are responsible for the fluvially-induced changes in the marine environment at the Atlantic margin.

  13. Storage and remobilization of suspended sediment in the lower amazon river of Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.; Dunne, T.; Richey, J.E.; Santos, U.De. M.; Salati, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the lower Amazon River, suspended sediment is stored during rising stages of the river and resuspended during falling river stages. The storage and resuspension in the reach are related to the mean slope of the flood wave on the river surface; this slope is smaller during rising river stages than during falling stages. The pattern of storage and resuspension damps out the extreme values of high and low sediment discharge and tends to keep them near the mean value between 3.0 ?? 106 and 3.5 ?? 106 metric tons per day. Mean annual discharge of suspended sediment in the lower Amazon is between 1.1 ?? 109 and 1.3 ?? 109 metric tons per year.

  14. Insight on the Peruvian Amazon River: A Planform Metric Characterization of its Morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. M. P.; Ortals, C.; Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Vizcarra, J.

    2014-12-01

    Starting in Peru, the Amazon River flows through Colombia and Brazil; additionally, tributaries from Bolivia, Venezuela, and Ecuador contribute to the massive river and its unique geomorphic features. Accordingly, the Amazon Basin has become an important aspect of South America; it is an area of extraordinary biodiversity, rich resources, and unique cultures. However, due to the sheer magnitude and exceptionality of the Amazon River, research regarding the morphodynamic processes that shape and define the river has been difficult. Consequently, current research has not completely understood the planform dynamics of some portions of this river that present a main channel and secondary channels known as "anabranching structures". The purpose of this research was to gain an understanding of the geomorphology of the upper Amazon, the Peruvian section, by obtaining migration rates and planform metrics, including channel count, length, width, and sinuosity, as well as island count, area, and shape. With this data, the morphodynamics of the Peruvian Amazon, especially the relationship between the main channel and its secondary channels in each "anabranching structure" along the river, could be analyzed according to correlations found between various metrics. This analysis was carried out for 5-year time spans over a period of 25 years. Preliminary results showed that the average migration rate versus channel bend radius envelope peak is lower for the secondary channels than for the main channel. However, the maximum migration rate was not always found in the main channel; for several structures, the most dynamic channels were the secondary ones. This implies a certain periodicity to the river's migratory patterns that could be related to the valley boundaries, the local channel sinuosity or geological formations in the study area.

  15. Monitoring the Biophysical Properties along Lagrangian Advection Pathways in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, S.; Gaultier, L.; Vandemark, D. C.; Salisbury, J.; Lee, T.; Gierach, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Large rivers are important biogeochemistry. The freshwater inputs associated with major river plumes modify the local and regional sea surface salinity (SSS) and in the mean time carry a large amount of organic and inorganic particulates into the ocean. Monitoring of the spatial and temporal variability of river plumes extension is therefore important to the physics and biophysical interaction at regional scales. With the launches of the NASA Aquarius/Sac-D missions and the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), we are now able to use the low-resolution SSS observations in combination with altimetry and high-resolution ocean color observations to monitor the physical and biogeochemical properties of river plumes. Our study focuses on the Amazon River, the world's largest river in terms of discharge. Waters from the Amazon River are carried northwestward across the equator along the Brazilian shelf by the North Brazilian Current (NBC) and eastward along the North Equatorial Counter Current. Large oceanic rings shed off the NBC retroflection near 8∘N in the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean. Large-scale gradients of SSS, colored detrital matter (cdm) and sea surface temperature (SST) associated with these rings are visible from space using SSS, SST and ocean color sensors. These rings carry freshwaters highly concentrated in organic and inorganic matter towards the Caribbean Sea and offshore. In this study, the surface properties of the river plume oligotrophic waters trapped into these large eddies are analyzed. We use a Lagrangian advection method to track the particles trapped in NBC rings and follow their biophysical properties along the northwestward trajectories using measurements from Aquarius, SMOS, and Aqua MODIS. The pathways of the Amazon plume waters can therefore be analyzed, enabling an investigation of the physical and biogeochemical processes associated with the Amazon River freshwaters as they are advected and mixed from the river mouth to the

  16. Monitoring river water levels in the Amazon Basin using ICESat GLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. C.; Schumann, G.; Bamber, J. L.; Bates, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    The use of the ICESat (Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite) sensor GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) for monitoring terrestrial water levels is relatively unexplored. Now, these data are being used to investigate water levels of the River Amazon. Catchments like that of the River Amazon are often poorly monitored from the ground due to their large size and the expense associated with installing and maintaining gauge networks. Using space-borne remote sensing to create virtual gauging stations allows more data to be obtained for such uses as hydraulic model input. However, another issue associated with the gauges of the Amazon, other than the limited number and the distances between them (up to 200 km), is the inconsistent geodetic levelling. Corrections of the geodetic levels of the Amazon gauges have never been fully published, though attempts have been made using Topex/Poseidon. Now these corrections will be found using ICESat. GLAS is ideal for this research due to the small footprint of approximately 70 m. Although monitoring of terrestrial hydrology was not within the mission objectives, initial investigations have been promising. A proof of concept study has now been carried out, using comparisons between ICESat GLAS elevations and reliable gauge stations on the Mississippi River and the River Danube. This study has shown that GLAS is able to accurately measure water elevations. GLAS will now be used to correct selected Amazon gauges with the aim of using the results to update the HEC-RAS and LISFLOOD-FP models for a 325 km stretch of the Amazon which has been previously investigated.

  17. Modeling River Hydrologic Regime and Spawning of Migratory Catfishes in Southeastern Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, C. M.; Waylen, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Seasonal hydrologic conditions and catfish larvae production were evaluated in the Madre de Dios River in order to determine whether environmental conditions influence the reproductive activity of a group of large, commercially important catfishes, in the Southeastern Peruvian Amazon. A simple stochastic model of floods is presented to describe the influence of the natural high flow regime on observed patterns of catfish larvae release and drifting. Daily river stage records at Puerto Maldonado are related to weekly larval catches to determine the association between flood and spawning events. On the basis of hydroclimatologic characteristics of Andean- Amazon regions, available long-term historical rainfall records are employed to approximate the likely inter- annual variability of floods within this Amazon headwater basin. Major larval drift appeared associated with stages of over the 5 m, or "Biologic Hydrologic Significant Events" (BSE), which act as triggers, or a reasonable surrogates, for spawning responses of these species. The timing of BSEs, estimated from the historical rainfall records, appear to be uniformly distributed during the rain season and their inter-arrival times exponential. These observations provided the basis of the stochastic model describing the likelihood of volumes of larvae releases from the headwater region to lowland Amazon. The ecologically significant role of the hydroclimatology of this region in the complete life cycle of this important Amazon fish resource is illustrated.

  18. Fate of the Amazon River dissolved organic matter in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Ward, Nicholas D.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Gomes, Helga R.; Niggemann, Jutta; Krusche, Alex V.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Yager, Patricia L.; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Constraining the fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers is a key to understand the global carbon cycle, since DOM mineralization directly influences air-sea CO2 exchange and multiple biogeochemical processes. The Amazon River exports large amounts of DOM, and yet the fate of this material in the ocean remains unclear. Here we investigate the molecular composition and transformations of DOM in the Amazon River-ocean continuum using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and geochemical and biological tracers. We show that there is a strong gradient in source and composition of DOM along the continuum, and that dilution of riverine DOM in the ocean is the dominant pattern of variability in the system. Alterations in DOM composition are observed in the plume associated with the addition of new organic compounds by phytoplankton and with bacterial and photochemical transformations. The relative importance of each of these drivers varies spatially and is modulated by seasonal variations in river discharge and ocean circulation. We further show that a large fraction (50-76%) of the Amazon River DOM is surprisingly stable in the coastal ocean. This results in a globally significant river plume with a strong terrigenous signature and in substantial export of terrestrially derived organic carbon from the continental margin, where it can be entrained in the large-scale circulation and potentially contribute to the long-term storage of terrigenous production and to the recalcitrant carbon pool found in the deep ocean.

  19. The geochemistry of rare earth elements in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Shokovitz, E.R. )

    1993-05-01

    The estuarine geochemistry of rare earth elements (REEs) was studied using samples collected in the Amazon River estuary from the AmasSeds (Amazon Shelf SEDiment Study) cruise of August 1989. Extensive removal of dissolved (0.22 [mu]m filtered) trivalent REEs from river water occurs in the low (0--6) salinity region. Removal by the salt-induced coagulation of river colloids leads to fractionation among the REE(III) series; the order of removal is light REEs > middle REEs > heavy REEs. There also is the enhanced removal of Ce (relative to trivalent La and Nd) in the low salinity (0--6) zone and in the zone of high biological activity. This is the first field observation of strong Ce removal associated with coagulation of river colloids and biological productivity. The argument is made that the decrease in the Ce anomaly across a biological front is caused by biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). Coagulation of river colloids and biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) lead to fractionation of REE(III) and redox modification of Ce. These processes result in the REE composition becoming fractionated relative to the Amazon River water and crust and more evolved toward the REE composition of the oceans. This study implies that reactions in estuaries play significant, yet poorly understood roles in controlling the REE composition and Ce anomaly of the oceans. 46 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Source, transport and fluxes of Amazon River particulate organic carbon: Insights from river sediment depth-profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, Julien; Galy, Valier; Hilton, Robert G.; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Pérez, Marcela Andrea; France-Lanord, Christian; Maurice, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    In order to reveal particulate organic carbon (POC) source and mode of transport in the largest river basin on Earth, we sampled the main sediment-laden tributaries of the Amazon system (Solimões, Madeira and Amazon) during two sampling campaigns, following vertical depth-profiles. This sampling technique takes advantage of hydrodynamic sorting to access the full range of solid erosion products transported by the river. Using the Al/Si ratio of the river sediments as a proxy for grain size, we find a general increase in POC content with Al/Si, as sediments become finer. However, the sample set shows marked variability in the POC content for a given Al/Si ratio, with the Madeira River having lower POC content across the measured range in Al/Si. The POC content is not strongly related to the specific surface area (SSA) of the suspended load, and bed sediments have a much lower POC/SSA ratio. These data suggest that SSA exerts a significant, yet partial, control on POC transport in Amazon River suspended sediment. We suggest that the role of clay mineralogy, discrete POC particles and rock-derived POC warrant further attention in order to fully understand POC transport in large rivers.

  1. Microbial community composition and metagenomes across the river-to-ocean continuum of the Columbia and Amazon Rivers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, B. C.; Doherty, M.; Fortunato, C.; Simon, H. M.; Smit, M. W.; Krusche, A. V.; Brito, D.; Cunha, A.; Fernandes, M.; Zielinski, B.; Paul, J. H.; Ward, N. D.; Richey, J. E.; Satinsky, B. M.; Sharma, S.; Smith, C. B.; Moran, M.; Yager, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for land-to-ocean transfer of materials including terrestrial organic matter, nutrients and anthropogenic pollutants. Microbial communities in rivers, estuaries, and plumes regulate the nutrient concentrations and biogeochemistry of these riverborne materials and mediate their impact on carbon cycling. Despite their importance little is known about the composition and genetic capabilities of these organisms. Here we describe and compare the phylogeny and metagenomic profiles of microbial communities across the river-to-ocean gradients of two very large rivers: the tropical Amazon and temperate Columbia rivers. For the Amazon, samples were collected from the lower 600 km of the river and from surface waters across 1300 km of the plume in 2010 and 2011. For the Columbia, samples were collected along the gradient from river to deep ocean during 14 cruises between 2007 and 2010. Amplicon pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial communities were similar along the length of the lower Amazon River with variability caused by inputs from major tributaries. Freshwater taxa from both rivers were very rare in plume waters, but in the Columbia River estuary freshwater taxa mixed with marine communities. Communities in both rivers shifted with local seasons, likely due to changes in river environmental conditions including dissolved and particulate organic matter, river flow, and light availability. Seasonal variability was less pronounced in river plumes where spatial variability was greater than temporal variability. Bacterial community composition was very different between the two systems, and was most similar at the marine end of the gradient outside the plumes. Illumina-based metagenomic analyses of a subset of these samples showed similarity in the relative abundance of many annotated gene categories despite differences in phylogeny across salinity gradients. However, several categories of genes varied in relative

  2. Vocalizations of Amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis): Characterization, effect of physical environment and differences between populations.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Thiago Orion Simões; Andriolo, Artur; Reis, Sarah S; dos Santos, Manuel E

    2016-03-01

    The vocal repertoire of the Amazon river dolphin and its geographic variations are still poorly known, especially in relation to ecological variables. Here the acoustic characteristics of low frequency pulsed vocalizations, with single or multiple pulses, recorded in two protected areas of the Amazon were described and differences in acoustic emissions related to water properties were analyzed. Both frequency and time parameters differ relative to abiotic condition of water turbidity. Changes in the animals' acoustic behavior might be due to differences in sound propagation between rich-sediment water and clear water. Geographic variation was found in frequency and time parameters, requiring further investigation. PMID:27036265

  3. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements and other trace elements in the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael; Dantas, Elton Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Rivers transport large amounts of dissolved and suspended particulate material from the catchment area to the oceans and are a major source of trace metals to seawater. The Amazon River is the world's largest river and supplies approximately 20% of the oceans' freshwater (Molinier et al., 1997). However, the behavior of trace elements, especially particle-reactive elements such as the rare earth elements (REE), within the river as well as in the estuary is not well constrained and rather little is known about their transport mechanisms. This study aims at understanding the transport properties of particle-reactive elements in the Amazon River and some of its major tributaries, including the Rio Solimões, Rio Negro, Tapajos, Xingu and Jari Rivers. Samples were taken at 12 stations, seven of which were located in the Amazon mainstream, while the other five stations sampled its tributaries. To account for the effects of variable discharge, the samples were collected during periods of high and low discharge. We present data for major and trace elements, including REE, of the dissolved and suspended load of these samples. First results indicate that the shale-normalized REE pattern of the dissolved load (filtered through 0.2 µm membranes) of the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões confirm earlier studies (Elderfield et al., 1990; Gerard et al., 2003) and show an enrichment of the middle REE relative to the light and heavy REE (LaSN/GdSN: 0.25 - 0.32; GdSN/YbSN: 1.54 - 1.78). In contrast to the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões, which are considered to be whitewater rivers, blackwater rivers, such as the Rio Negro, have a flat REE pattern with higher REE concentrations than whitewater rivers. The third water-type found in the Amazon Basin is clearwater, e.g. Rio Tapajos, with REE patterns in between those of the other two types, i.e. LaSN/GdSN: 0.55 - 0.70; GdSN/YbSN: 1.26 - 1.55. A similar behavior can be identified for other major and trace elements. While

  4. Distribution and flux of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Key, R.M.; Sarmiento, J.L.; Stallard, R.F.; Moore, W.S.

    1985-07-20

    Measurements of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River estuary show that desorption from riverborne suspended particulate matter in the estuary increases the riverine flux of both isotopes to the ocean by a factor of approximately 5 over the flux attributable to radium dissolved in the river water alone. The total Amazon flux supplies approximately 0.20% of the /sup 226/Ra and approximately 2.6% of the /sup 228/Ra standing crops in the near-surface Atlantic (0-200 m). Diffusive flux from estuarine and shelf sediments and desorption from resuspended sediments in the region of the estuary approximately double the estuarine /sup 226/Ra concentration and quadruple the estuarine /sup 228/Ra concentration above that caused by the dissolved and desorbed river components alone.

  5. Large-scale hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva, Rodrigo Cauduro Dias; Buarque, Diogo Costa; Collischonn, Walter; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Frappart, FréDéRic; Calmant, Stephane; Bulhões Mendes, Carlos André

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a hydrologic/hydrodynamic modeling of the Amazon River basin is presented using the MGB-IPH model with a validation using remotely sensed observations. Moreover, the sources of model errors by means of the validation and sensitivity tests are investigated, and the physical functioning of the Amazon basin is also explored. The MGB-IPH is a physically based model resolving all land hydrological processes and here using a full 1-D river hydrodynamic module with a simple floodplain storage model. River-floodplain geometry parameters were extracted from the SRTM digital elevation model, and the model was forced using satellite-derived rainfall from TRMM3B42. Model results agree with observed in situ daily river discharges and water levels and with three complementary satellite-based products: (1) water levels derived from ENVISAT altimetry data; (2) a global data set of monthly inundation extent; and (3) monthly terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomalies derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experimental mission. However, the model is sensitive to precipitation forcing and river-floodplain parameters. Most of the errors occur in westerly regions, possibly due to the poor quality of TRMM 3B42 rainfall data set in these mountainous and/or poorly monitored areas. In addition, uncertainty in river-floodplain geometry causes errors in simulated water levels and inundation extent, suggesting the need for improvement of parameter estimation methods. Finally, analyses of Amazon hydrological processes demonstrate that surface waters govern most of the Amazon TWS changes (56%), followed by soil water (27%) and ground water (8%). Moreover, floodplains play a major role in stream flow routing, although backwater effects are also important to delay and attenuate flood waves.

  6. Assessment of climate change impacts on streamflow dynamics in the headwaters of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon River basin is the largest watershed in the world containing thousands of tributaries. Although the mainstream and its larger tributaries have been the focus on much research, there has been few studies focused on the hydrodynamics of smaller rivers in the foothills of the Andes Mountains. These smaller rivers are of particular importance for the fishery industry because fish migrate up these headwater rivers to spawn. During the rainy season, fish wait for storm event to increase water depths to a sufficient level for their passage. Understanding how streamflow dynamics will change in response to future conditions is vital for the sustainable management of the fishery industry. In this paper, we focus on improving the accuracy of river discharge estimates on relatively small-scale sub-catchments (100 ~ 40,000 km2) in the headwaters of the Amazon River basin. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model and remotely sensed datasets are used. We provide annual runoff, seasonal patterns, and daily discharge characteristics for 81 known migration reaches. The model is calibrated for the period 2000-2014 and climate forecasts for the period 2070-2100 are used to assess future changes in streamflow dynamics. The forecasts for the 2070 to 2100 period were obtained by selecting 5 climate models from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent (1970 to 2000) Amazon climate. The river network for the HRR model is developing using surface topography based on the SRTM digital elevation model. Key model forcings include precipitation (TRMM 3B42) and evapotranspiration (MODIS ET, MOD16). Model parameters for soil depth, hydraulic conductivity, runoff coefficients and lateral routing were initially approximated based on literature values and adjusted during calibration. Measurements from stream gauges located near the reaches of interest were used for

  7. Erosion of particulate organic material from an Andean river and its delivery to the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kathryn; Hilton, Robert; West, A. Joshua; Robles Caceres, Arturo; Grocke, Darren; Marthews, Toby; Asner, Greg; New, Mark; Mahli, Yadvinder

    2016-04-01

    Organic carbon and nutrients discharged by mountainous rivers can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles from regional to global scales. The eastern Andes host productive forests on steep, rapidly eroding slopes, a combination that is primed to deliver sediment, carbon and nutrients to the lowland Amazon River. We quantify clastic sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge for the Kosñipata River, Peru, an Andean tributary of the Madre de Dios River, using suspended sediment samples and discharge measurements over one year at two gauging stations. Calculations of sediment yield on the basis of this data suggest that the Madre de Dios basin may have erosion rates ˜10 times greater than the Amazon Basin average. The total POC yield over the sampling period was up to five times higher than the yield in the lowland Amazon Basin, with most POC (70-80%) exported between December and March in the wet season. We use radiocarbon, stable C isotopes and C/N ratios to distinguish between the erosion and discharge of POC from sedimentary rocks (petrogenic POC) and POC eroded from the modern terrestrial biosphere, from vegetation and soil (biospheric POC). We find that biospheric POC discharge was significantly enhanced during flood events, over that of clastic sediment and petrogenic POC. The ultimate fate of the eroded POC may play a central role in the net carbon budget of Andean forest. In these forests, net productivity minus heterotrophic respiration is close to zero at the scale of forest plots, and the erosion of biospheric POC by this Andean river is sufficiently rapid that its fate downstream (sedimentary burial/preservation versus oxidation/degradation) may determine whether the mountain forest is a carbon sink or source to the atmosphere. In addition, the measured discharge of petrogenic POC suggests that fluxes from the Andes may be considerably higher than measured downstream in the Madeira River. If this petrogenic POC is oxidised rather

  8. Barbados Corals as Recorders of Amazon River Salinity Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, L.; Telfeyan, K.; Arienzo, M. M.; Rosenberg, A. D.; Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.

    2010-12-01

    Low salinity plumes of Amazon and Orinoco sourced water have previously been detected around the island of Barbados. Barbados corals may therefore have the potential to record salinity anomalies governed by natural, climate-related, and anthropogenic changes in the Amazon and Orinoco Basin watersheds beyond the recent historic record. In order to determine whether Barbados corals record salinity variations associated with local or Amazon/Orinoco sourced signals, multiple specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons were analyzed for stable C and O isotope and Sr/Ca variations. Corals were collected from the northwest, central-west, and southwest regions of the island to determine degree of salinity signal heterogeneity over a 5-6 year period at approximately monthly resolution. Four separate published paleotemperature equations were used to assess the importance of temperature on stable oxygen isotope composition. In situ temperature measurements obtained from NOAA show an annual sea surface temperature (SST) cycle of approximately 4 degrees Celsius off Barbados. If governed solely by SST, stable isotope data from all 8 corals in this study indicate a significantly greater annual temperature range of approximately 6 degrees Celsius. This suggests that salinity related fluctuations in oxygen isotopic composition of water are an important influence on the geochemistry of Barbados corals. Some regional differences in geochemical composition of corals were apparent. Corals from the southwest of Barbados showed the clearest sub-annual isotope signal, better correlations with mean annual SST measurements, and lowest mean salinity of the regions. Corals from the central-west and northwest showed distinctly higher mean, but more variable, salinity than corals from the south. Stable carbon isotope data from southwest corals also best potentially reflect the Suess Effect. Montastraea sp. corals generally show a higher paleotemperature offset from in situ

  9. Multispecies Fisheries in the Lower Amazon River and Its Relationship with the Regional and Global Climate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Buss de Souza, Ronald; Freire, Juan; Isaac, Victoria Judith

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the spatial-temporal variability in catch of the main fishery resources of the Amazon River and floodplain lakes of the Lower Amazon, as well as relating the Catch per Unit of Effort with anomalies of some of the Amazon River, atmosphere and Atlantic Ocean system variables, determining the influence of the environment on the Amazonian fishery resources. Finfish landings data from the towns and villages of the Lower Amazon for the fisheries of three sites (Óbidos, Santarém and Monte Alegre), were obtained for the period between January 1993 and December 2004. Analysis of variance, detrended correspondence analysis, redundancy analysis and multiple regression techniques were used for the statistical analysis of the distinct time series. Fisheries production in the Lower Amazon presents differences between the Amazon River and the floodplain lakes. Production in the Amazon River is approximately half of the one of the floodplain lakes. This variability occurs both along the Lower Amazon River region (longitudinal gradient) and laterally (latitudinal gradient) for every fishing ground studied here. The distinct environmental variables alone or in association act differently on the fishery stocks and the success of catches in each fishery group studied here. Important variables are the flooding events; the soil the sea surface temperatures; the humidity; the wind and the occurence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation events. Fishery productivity presents a large difference in quantity and distribution patterns between the river and floodplain lakes. This variability occurs in the region of the Lower Amazon as well as laterally for each fishery group studied, being dependent on the ecological characteristics and life strategies of each fish group considered here. PMID:27314951

  10. Multispecies Fisheries in the Lower Amazon River and Its Relationship with the Regional and Global Climate Variability.

    PubMed

    Pinaya, Walter Hugo Diaz; Lobon-Cervia, Francisco Javier; Pita, Pablo; Buss de Souza, Ronald; Freire, Juan; Isaac, Victoria Judith

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the spatial-temporal variability in catch of the main fishery resources of the Amazon River and floodplain lakes of the Lower Amazon, as well as relating the Catch per Unit of Effort with anomalies of some of the Amazon River, atmosphere and Atlantic Ocean system variables, determining the influence of the environment on the Amazonian fishery resources. Finfish landings data from the towns and villages of the Lower Amazon for the fisheries of three sites (Óbidos, Santarém and Monte Alegre), were obtained for the period between January 1993 and December 2004. Analysis of variance, detrended correspondence analysis, redundancy analysis and multiple regression techniques were used for the statistical analysis of the distinct time series. Fisheries production in the Lower Amazon presents differences between the Amazon River and the floodplain lakes. Production in the Amazon River is approximately half of the one of the floodplain lakes. This variability occurs both along the Lower Amazon River region (longitudinal gradient) and laterally (latitudinal gradient) for every fishing ground studied here. The distinct environmental variables alone or in association act differently on the fishery stocks and the success of catches in each fishery group studied here. Important variables are the flooding events; the soil the sea surface temperatures; the humidity; the wind and the occurence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation events. Fishery productivity presents a large difference in quantity and distribution patterns between the river and floodplain lakes. This variability occurs in the region of the Lower Amazon as well as laterally for each fishery group studied, being dependent on the ecological characteristics and life strategies of each fish group considered here. PMID:27314951

  11. The Amazon river breeze and the local boundary layer. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Oliveira, Amauri P.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of the diurnal evolution of the planetary boundary layer over the Amazon rain forest, made at sites close to the confluence of the Solimoes and Negro rivers (approximately at 3 deg S, 60 deg W) near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, show the existence of a diurnal rotation of the wind near the surface and the frequent presence of low-level nocturnal wind maxima. These circulations are shown to be plausibly explained as elements of a river and land breeze circulation induced by the thermal contrast between the rivers and the adjacent forest.

  12. Identification of androgenic gland microRNA and their target genes to discover sex-related microRNA in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Jin, S B; Fu, H T; Jiang, S F; Xiong, Y W; Qiao, H; Zhang, W Y; Gong, Y S; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in the differentiation of crustaceans to the male sex. MicroRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptionally regulates many protein-coding genes, influencing important biological and metabolic processes. However, currently, there is no published data identifying miRNA in M. nipponense. In this study, we identified novel miRNA in the androgenic gland of M. nipponense. Using the high-throughput Illumina Solexa system, 1077 miRNA were identified from small RNA libraries by aligning with the de novo androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense (obtained from RNA-Seq) and the sequences in the miRBase21 database. A total of 8,248, 76,011, and 78,307 target genes were predicted in the EST and SRA sequences provided in the NCBI database, and the androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense, respectively. Some potential sex-related miRNA were identified based on the function of the predicted target genes. The results of our study provide new information regarding the miRNA expression in M. nipponense, which could be the basis for further genetic studies on decapod crustaceans. PMID:26782487

  13. Seasonal fluctuations in the mass of the Amazon River system and Earth's elastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevis, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Kendrick, Eric; Fortes, Luiz Paulo; Forsberg, Bruce; Smalley, Robert; Becker, Janet

    2005-08-01

    A GPS station in Manaus, near the center of the Amazon basin, manifests an annual cycle of vertical displacement with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 50-75 mm. This is by far the largest crustal oscillation observed to date, and nearly 2-3 times larger than the amplitude predicted for this region. Vertical ground displacement is strongly anti-correlated with the local stage height of the Amazon river, with no detectable time lag between the two time series. This suggests that we are observing, for the first time, a purely elastic response to changes in the weight of a flowing river system. We use a simple hydrological model to relate stage height to the regional pattern of flooding, and argue that the elastic oscillations observed in Manaus are dominated by changes in water loading developed within ~200 km of the GPS station.

  14. Nest placement of the giant Amazon river turtle, Podocnemis expansa, in the Araguaia River, Goiás State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo Dias Júnior; Castro, Paulo de Tarso Amorim

    2005-05-01

    The giant Amazon river turtle (Podocnemis expansa) nests on extensive sand bars on the margins and interior of the channel during the dry season. The high concentration of nests in specific points of certain beaches indicates that the selection of nest placement is not random but is related to some geological aspects, such as bar margin inclination and presence of a high, sandy platform. The presence of access channels to high platform points or ramp morphology are decisive factors in the choice of nesting areas. The eroded and escarped margins of the beaches hinder the Amazon river turtle arriving at the most suitable places for nesting. Through the years, changes in beach morphology can alter nest distribution. PMID:16042279

  15. Rivers in the sea - Can we quantify pigments in the Amazon and the Orinoco River plumes from space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Walsh, John J.; Carder, Kendall L.; Zika, Rod G.

    1989-01-01

    Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) images of the western tropical Atlantic (1979-1982) were combined into monthly mean surface pigment fields. These suggest that Amazon River water flows along northeastern South America directly toward the Caribbean sea early in the year. After June, however, the North Brazil Current is shunted eastward, carrying a large fraction of Amazon water into the North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC). This eastward flow causes diminished flow through the Caribbean, which permits northwestward dispersal of Orinoco River water due to local Ekman forcing. The Orinoco plume crosses the Caribbean, leading to seasonal variation in surface salinity near Puerto Rico. At least 50 percent of the pigment concentration estimated in these plumes seems due to viable phytoplankton.

  16. Seasonal dynamics in methane emissions from the Amazon River floodplain to the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devol, Allan H.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    1990-01-01

    Methane fluxes to the troposphere from the three principal habitats of the floodplain of the Amazon River main stem (open waters, emergent macrophyte beds, and flooded forests) were determined along a 1700-km reach of the river during the low-water period of the annual flood cycle (November-December 1988). Overall, emissions averaged 68 mg CH4/sq m per day and were significantly lower than similar emissions determined previously for the high-water period, 184 mg CH4/sq m per day (July-August 1986). This difference was due to significantly lower emissions from floating macrophyte environments. Low-water emissions from open waters and flooded forest areas were not significantly different than at high water. A monthly time series of methane emission from eight lakes located in the central Amazon basis showed similar results. The data were used to calculate a seasonally weighted annual emission to the troposphere from the Amazon River main stem floodplain of 5.1 Tg/yr, which indicates the importance of the area in global atmospheric chemistry.

  17. Seasonal dynamics in methane emissions from the Amazon River floodplain to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Devol, A.H.; Richey, J.E. ); Forsberg, B.R. ); Martinelli, L.A. )

    1990-09-20

    Methane fluxes to the troposphere from the three principal habitats of the floodplain of the Amazon River main stem (open waters, emergent macrophyte beds, and flooded forests) were determined along a 1,700-km reach of the river during the low-water period of the annual flood cycle (November-December 1988). Overall, emissions averaged 68 ({plus minus} 20) mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1} and were significantly lower than similar emissions determined previously for the high-water period, 184 ({plus minus} 41) mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1} (July-August 1986). This difference was due to significantly lower emissions from floating macrophyte environments. Low-water emissions from open waters and flooded forest areas were not significantly different than at high water. A monthly time series of methane emissions from eight lakes located in the central Amazon basin showed similar results. Average annual emission from the lakes was 125 ({plus minus} 28) mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}. Methane emissions from lakes were significantly higher during the high water period, again primarily due to an increase in emissions from macrophyte habitats. The data were used to calculate a seasonally weighted annual emission to the troposphere from the Amazon River main stem floodplain of 5.1 Tg yr{sup {minus}1}, which indicates the importance of the area in global atmospheric chemistry.

  18. Seasonal dynamics in methane emissions from the Amazon River floodplain to the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devol, Allan H.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    1990-09-01

    Methane fluxes to the troposphere from the three principal habitats of the floodplain of the Amazon River main stem (open waters, emergent macrophyte beds, and flooded forests) were determined along a 1700-km reach of the river during the low-water period of the annual flood cycle (November-December 1988). Overall, emissions averaged 68 mg CH4/sq m per day and were significantly lower than similar emissions determined previously for the high-water period, 184 mg CH4/sq m per day (July-August 1986). This difference was due to significantly lower emissions from floating macrophyte environments. Low-water emissions from open waters and flooded forest areas were not significantly different than at high water. A monthly time series of methane emission from eight lakes located in the central Amazon basis showed similar results. The data were used to calculate a seasonally weighted annual emission to the troposphere from the Amazon River main stem floodplain of 5.1 Tg/yr, which indicates the importance of the area in global atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Deforestation monitoring in the Amazon River estuary by multi-temporal Envisat ScanSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Ishwaran, N.; Brito Pezzuti, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have capitalized on the all-weather, all-day operational capability of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems and used multi-temporal (from 2002 to 2006), multi-track (track 174, 360 and 447) Envisat ScanSAR amplitude images for deforestation mapping and change detection in the Amazon River estuary. A synergistic approach to deforestation mapping was adopted using SAR backscattering anomalies, the neighbouring forest constraint and DEM-derived slopes based on the three following characteristics: (1) backscattering is reduced in regions suspected to have undergone deforestation; (2) open regions without neighbouring forests were identified for removal; and (3) false-alarms linked to water bodies are mitigated using the shape threshold of flat-slope objects. Our results show that deforestation in the Amazon River estuary continues to be a serious problem, particularly along the rivers, streams or roads, which are more susceptible to anthropogenic activities than other areas. Up to 2006, the deforested portion accounts for 4.6 per cent (3,096,000 pixels) of the entire study site of approximately 458,000 square kilometers (67,320,000 pixels). However, this figure, validated by Landsat ETM images, may have overestimated deforestation to some extent. Nevertheless, multi-temporal analysis using SAR systems, as done in this study, have a clear potential for surveillance of deforestation in the Amazon, particularly in light of the frequent cloud cover typical of the area and the limitations of deforestation monitoring by means of optical satellite imagery.

  20. A Multi-temporal MODIS Based Platform to Analyze Suspended Sediment Distribution Patterns in the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, E.; Latrubesse, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Patterns of surface sediment concentration distribution in rivers are significant for understanding the broad ranges of fluvial environmental systems. In the case of the Amazon Basin, complexity in sediment pattern distribution is affected by the anabranching channel pattern of the Amazon River, inputs from tributaries (some of which are among the largest rivers on earth) and the existence of huge and complex floodplains. This study presents a remote sensing based platform that aims to improve the understanding of the patterns of sediment distributions over the Amazon River by estimating surface sediment concentration. Field acquired surface sediment concentration data were supplied from three gauging stations representing the upstream, midstream and downstream sections of the Amazon River from 2000 to 2010 and calibrated with over 1,300 MODIS daily surface reflectance images. Robust empirical models were derived (0.63Amazon River Basin, the largest and the most complex river system on earth.

  1. Studies on the ingestion characteristics of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Dai, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Zheng-Guo; Yang, Ming-Hui; Liu, Xian-Zhong; Xu, Gui-Rong; Ding, Fu-Jiang

    2000-12-01

    The ingestion of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn had continuity and the ingestion high peak occurred at night. Light and temperature had significant effects on the daily ingestion rate (DIR) of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Red light and blue light favorably induced favorable ingestion. In the adaptive range of temperature, the DIR increased with rising temperature and feeding frequency, but decreased with rising body weight.

  2. Space-time variability of the Amazon River plume based on satellite ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molleri, Gustavo S. F.; Novo, Evlyn M. L. de M.; Kampel, Milton

    2010-02-01

    Satellite ocean color images were used to determine the space-time variability of the Amazon River plume from 2000-2004. The relationship between sea-surface salinity (SSS) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) absorption coefficient for dissolved and detrital material ( adg) ( r2=0.76, n=30, rmse=0.4) was used to identify the Amazon River plume low-salinity waters (<34 psu). The plume's spatial information was extracted from satellite bi-weekly time series using two metrics: plume area and plume shape. These metrics identified the seasonal variability of plume dimensions and dispersion patterns. During the study period, the plume showed the largest areas from July to August and the smallest from December to January. The mean annual amplitude and the mean, maximum and minimum plume areas were 1020×10 3 km 2, 680×10 3 km 2, 1506×10 3 km 2 and 268×10 3 km 2, respectively. Three main shapes and dispersion pattern periods were identified: (1) flow to the northeastern South American coast, in a narrow band adjacent to the continental shelf, from January to April; (2) flow to the Caribbean region, from April to July; and (3) flow to the Central Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, from August to December. Cross-correlation techniques were used to quantify the relationship between the plume's spatial variability and environmental forcing factors, including Amazon River discharge, wind field and ocean currents. The results showed that (1) river discharge is the main factor influencing plume area variability, (2) the wind field regulates the plume's northwestward flow velocity and residence time near the river mouth, and (3) surface currents have a strong influence over river plume dispersion patterns.

  3. Simulating hydrologic and hydraulic processes throughout the Amazon River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beighley, R.E.; Eggert, K.G.; Dunne, T.; He, Y.; Gummadi, V.; Verdin, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Presented here is a model framework based on a land surface topography that can be represented with various degrees of resolution and capable of providing representative channel/floodplain hydraulic characteristics on a daily to hourly scale. The framework integrates two models: (1) a water balance model (WBM) for the vertical fluxes and stores of water in and through the canopy and soil layers based on the conservation of mass and energy, and (2) a routing model for the horizontal routing of surface and subsurface runoff and channel and floodplain waters based on kinematic and diffusion wave methodologies. The WBM is driven by satellite-derived precipitation (TRMM_3B42) and air temperature (MOD08_M3). The model's use of an irregular computational grid is intended to facilitate parallel processing for applications to continental and global scales. Results are presented for the Amazon Basin over the period Jan 2001 through Dec 2005. The model is shown to capture annual runoff totals, annual peaks, seasonal patterns, and daily fluctuations over a range of spatial scales (>1, 000 to <4D7M km2). For the period of study, results suggest basin-wide total water storage changes in the Amazon vary by approximately +/-5 to 10 cm, and the fractional components accounting for these changes are: root zone soil moisture (20%), subsurface water being routed laterally to channels (40%) and channel/floodplain discharge (40%). Annual variability in monthly water storage changes by +/-2.5 cm is likely due to 0D5 to 1 month variability in the arrival of significant rainfall periods throughout the basin. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Contributions from the Amazon River mouth to the carbonate and nutrient dynamics of the tropical Atlantic Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, P. L.; Richey, J. E.; Page, B. P.; Ward, N.; Krusche, A. V.; Weber, S.; Montoya, J. P.; Rezende, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River contributes considerable freshwater and dissolved constituents to the global ocean, and its low-salinity plume offshore significantly impacts the carbon and nutrient cycles of the western tropical North Atlantic Ocean. Viewing the river-plume-ocean system as a continuum, rather than a point source, is a key component of the ROCA / ANACONDAS project effort. Here we report the findings of a multi-season field effort in the lower reach of the Amazon mainstem and offshore plume to determine the concentrations and variability of the full carbonate system as well as dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and silica at the mouth, providing for the first time the critical "river end members" for the Amazon's contribution to the sea. We find that concentrations at the mouth differ significantly from measurements made upriver at Manaus and Óbidos, historically used to represent the Amazon's contribution. With these new end members, the impact of the plume on the tropical marine ecosystem can be better determined, including its role as a globally significant atmospheric carbon dioxide sink and its sensitivity to change. These data, in combination with other microbial and geochemical data from the Amazon River continuum, improve our understanding of the links between the river, the plume, and the tropical Atlantic carbon cycle, as well as improve predictive capabilities of future climate change impacts. True color satellite image of Amazon River plume - NASA pCO2 versus salinity for outer Amazon River plume with color bar showing chlorophyll a fluorescence. Line is linear regression through the data, not a mixing line.

  5. Particulate Organic Matter Distribution along the Lower Amazon River: Addressing Aquatic Ecology Concepts Using Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Rigal, François; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Bernardes, Marcelo; Abril, Gwenaël; Meziane, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM) cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs) were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM). This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0), an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO2 in rivers, during the high water season (HW). Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3) and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7), were correlated with higher O2, chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW). Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1) downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2) enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence time

  6. Particulate organic matter distribution along the lower Amazon River: addressing aquatic ecology concepts using fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Rigal, François; Rybarczyk, Hervé; Bernardes, Marcelo; Abril, Gwenaël; Meziane, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in understanding the Amazon basin functioning is to ascertain the role played by floodplains in the organic matter (OM) cycle, crucial for a large spectrum of ecological mechanisms. Fatty acids (FAs) were combined with environmental descriptors and analyzed through multivariate and spatial tools (asymmetric eigenvector maps, AEM and principal coordinates of neighbor matrices, PCNM). This challenge allowed investigating the distribution of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM), in order to trace its seasonal origin and quality, along a 800 km section of the Amazon river-floodplain system. Statistical analysis confirmed that large amounts of saturated FAs (15:0, 18:0, 24:0, 25:0 and 26:0), an indication of refractory OM, were concomitantly recorded with high pCO(2) in rivers, during the high water season (HW). Contrastingly, FAs marker which may be attributed in this ecosystem to aquatic plants (18:2ω6 and 18:3ω3) and cyanobacteria (16:1ω7), were correlated with higher O(2), chlorophyll a and pheopigments in floodplains, due to a high primary production during low waters (LW). Decreasing concentrations of unsaturated FAs, that characterize labile OM, were recorded during HW, from upstream to downstream. Furthermore, using PCNM and AEM spatial methods, FAs compositions of SPOM displayed an upstream-downstream gradient during HW, which was attributed to OM retention and the extent of flooded forest in floodplains. Discrimination of OM quality between the Amazon River and floodplains corroborate higher autotrophic production in the latter and transfer of OM to rivers at LW season. Together, these gradients demonstrate the validity of FAs as predictors of spatial and temporal changes in OM quality. These spatial and temporal trends are explained by 1) downstream change in landscape morphology as predicted by the River Continuum Concept; 2) enhanced primary production during LW when the water level decreased and its residence time

  7. Exportation of organic carbon from the Amazon River and its main tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Seyler, Patrick; Loup Guyot, Jean; Etcheber, Henri

    2003-05-01

    As part of a joint Brazilian-French project, entitled Hydrology and Geochemistry of the Amazon Basin, we carried out a seven-year study (1994-2000) on the distribution, behaviour and flux of particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the Amazon River and its main tributaries (the Negro, Solimões, Branco, Madeira, Tapajós, Xingú and Trombetas rivers).The concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic carbon varied from one river to another and according to the season, but dissolved organic carbon (DOC) always accounted for about 70% of the total organic carbon (TOC). The mean concentration of dissolved organic carbon was 6·1 mg l-1 in the Madeira River, 5·83 mg l-1 in the Solimões River and 12·7 mg l-1 in the Negro River. The percentage in weight of the particulate organic carbon decreased as the concentration of suspended matter increased. The Solimões River contributed the most carbon to the Amazon River: about 500 kg C s-1 during the high water period and about 300 kg C s-1 during the low water period. However, the temporal variations in organic carbon in the Amazon River (i.e. downstream of Manaus) are basically controlled by inputs from the Negro River and its variations. The Negro River does not produce a simple dilution effect. During the high water period (between March and August) the TOC flux, calculated as the sum of the Solimões, Negro and Madeira tributaries, was about 5·7 × 1013 g C yr-1, whereas during the low water period (between September and February) the TOC flux was about 2·6 × 1013 g C yr-1.The mean annual flux of TOC at Óbidos (the final gauging station upstream of the estuary) was about 3·27 × 10

  8. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Mertes, L.A.K.; Smith, M.O.; Adams, J.B. )

    1993-03-01

    A method has been developed, based on spectral mixture analysis, to estimate the concentration of suspended sediment in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat MSS and TM images. Endmembers were derived from laboratory reflectance measurements of water-sediment mixtures with a range of sediment concentrations. Using these references spectra, the authors applied a linear mixture analysis to multispectral images after accounting for instrument and atmosphere gains and offsets. Sediment concentrations were estimated for individual pixels from the mixture analysis results based on a nonlinear calibration curve relating laboratory sediment concentrations and reflectance to endmember fractions. The uncertainty in the sediment concentrations derived from this analysis for three Amazon images is predicted to be within [plus minus] 20 mg/L, and the concentrations fall within a range of concentrations of suspended sediment that were measured at several times and places in the field over the past 15 years. The emphasis of their work is to use the patterns of sediment concentrations to compute the approximate volumes of sediment that are transferred between the main channel and floodplain of the Amazon River. However, the methodology can be applied universally if the optical properties of water and sediment at the site are known, and it is, therefore, useful for the study of suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of wetlands elsewhere.

  9. Molecular characterization and developmental expression of vitellogenin in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense and the effects of RNA interference and eyestalk ablation on ovarian maturation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongkun; Qiao, Hui; Li, Fajun; Fu, Hongtuo; Sun, Shengming; Zhang, Wenyi; Jin, Shubo; Gong, Yongsheng; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei

    2015-05-10

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is the precursor of yolk protein, which functions as a nutritive resource that is important for embryonic growth and gonad development. In this study, the cDNA encoding the Vg gene from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense was cloned using expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach. The transcript encoded 2536 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 286.810 kDa. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated high expression of Mn-Vg in the female ovary, hemocytes, and hepatopancreas. As ovaries developed, the expression level of Mn-Vg increased in both the hepatopancreas and ovary. In the hepatopancreas, the expression level rose more slowly at the early stage of vitellogenesis and reached the peak more rapidly compared to the expression pattern in ovary. The observed changes in Mn-Vg expression level at different development stages suggest the role of nutrient source in embryonic and larval development. Eyestalk ablation caused the Mn-Vg expression level to increase significantly compared to eyestalk-intact groups during the ovary development stages. Ablation accelerated ovary maturation by removing hormone inhibition of Mn-Vg in the hepatopancreas and ovary. In adult females, Mn-Vg dsRNA injection resulted in decreased expression of Mn-Vg in both the hepatopancreas and ovary, and two injection treatment dramatically delayed ovary maturation. Vg RNA interference down-regulated the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) expression level in the ovary, which illustrates the close relationship between Vg and VgR in the process of vitellogenesis. PMID:25499697

  10. The impacts of land use changes in the mercury flux in the Madeira River, Western Amazon.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Luiz D; Bastos, Wanderley R; Almeida, Marcelo D

    2012-03-01

    Changes in hydrochemistry and Hg distribution in the Madeira River from Porto Velho to the confluence with the Amazon River were studied in two cruises in 1997 and 2002. Water conductivity was similar in both periods, but the pH was significantly higher in 2002, in particular along the middle reaches of the river. Total suspended matter concentrations also increased from 1997 to 2002 along the same river portion, which is a result of forest conversion to other land uses, in particular pastures and agriculture accelerated during the interval between the cruises. Dissolved Hg concentrations were similar along the river in both cruises, but particulate Hg concentrations increased significantly along the middle portion of the river, although the suspended matter from 2002 was relatively poorer in Hg compared to that from 1997. Since particulate Hg represents more than 90% of the total Hg present in the river water, there was a significant increase in the total Hg transport in the Madeira River. Although gold mining has nearly ceased to exist in the region, the remobilization of Hg from forest soils through conversion to other land uses is responsible for maintaining relatively high Hg content in the Madeira River environment. PMID:22441596

  11. Evidence of a decadal solar signal in the Amazon River: 1903 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antico, Andrés.; Torres, María. E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown that tropical climates can be notably influenced by the decadal solar cycle; however, the relationship between this solar forcing and the tropical Amazon River has been overlooked in previous research. In this study, we reveal evidence of such a link by analyzing a 1903-2013 record of Amazon discharge. We identify a decadal flow cycle that is anticorrelated with the solar activity measured by the decadal sunspot cycle. This relationship persists through time and appears to result from a solar influence on the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The amplitude of the decadal solar signal in flow is apparently modulated by the interdecadal North Atlantic variability. Because Amazonia is an important element of the planetary water cycle, our findings have implications for studies on global change.

  12. Potential negative effects of groundwater dynamics on dry season convection in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lo, Min-Hui; Chou, Chia

    2016-02-01

    Adding a groundwater component to land surface models affects modeled precipitation. The additional water supply from the subsurface contributes to increased water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in modifications of atmospheric convection. This study focuses on how groundwater dynamics affect atmospheric convection in the Amazon River basin (ARB) during July, typically the driest month. Coupled groundwater-land-atmosphere model simulations show that groundwater storage increases evapotranspiration rates (latent heat fluxes) and lowers surface temperatures, which increases the surface pressure gradient and thus, anomalous surface divergence. Therefore, the convection over the Southern Hemispheric ARB during the dry season becomes weaker when groundwater dynamics are included in the model. Additionally, the changes in atmospheric vertical water vapor advection are associated with decreases in precipitation that results from downwelling transport anomalies. The results of this study highlight the importance of subsurface hydrological processes in the Amazon climate system, with implications for precipitation changes during the dry season, observed in most current climate models.

  13. Methane flux from the Amazon River floodplain - Emissions during rising water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Karen B.; Crill, Patrick M.; Bonassi, Jose A.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Harriss, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Methane flux data obtained during a period of high and falling water level in the course of the dry season of 1985 (the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment, ABLE 2A) and a period of moderate and rising water during the wet season of 1987 (ABLE 2B) were used to characterize the influence of seasonal variations in the vegetation, water column depth, and chemistry, as well as atmospheric dynamics, on the methane flux from the Amazon River floodplain. It was found that the annual estimate of methane from wetlands is identical to the annual estimate made by Matthews and Fung (1987) (both at 111 Tg). However, it was found that peatlands between 50 and 70 N contribute 39 Tg, with the large areas of forested and nonforested bogs making up 37 Tg of this figure, while the figures of Matthews and Fung were 63 and 62 Tg, respectively.

  14. Seasonal uranium distributions in the coastal waters off the Amazon and Mississippi Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; McKee, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of uranium was investigated across estuarine gradients from two of the world's largest river systems: the Amazon and Mississippi. Concentrations of dissolved (<0.45 ??m) uranium (U) were measured in surface waters of the Amazon shelf during rising (March 1990), flood (June 1990) and low (November 1991) discharge regimes. The dissolved U content was also examined in surface waters collected across estuarine gradients of the Mississippi outflow region during April 1992, August 1993, and November (1993). All water samples were analyzed for U by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In Amazon shelf surface waters uranium increased nonconservatively from about 0.01 ??g l-1 at the river's mouth to over 3 ??g l-1 at the distal site, irrespective of river discharge stage. Observed large-scale U removal at salinities generally less than 15 implies a) that riverine dissolved U was extensively adsorbed by freshly-precipitated hydrous metal oxides (e.g., FeOOH, MnO2) as a result of flocculation and aggregation, and b) that energetic resuspension and reworking of shelf sediments and fluid muds on the Amazon shelf released a chemically reactive particle/colloid to the water column which can further scavenge dissolved U across much of the estuarine gradient. In contrast, the estuarine chemistry of U is inconclusive within surface waters of the Mississippi shelf-break region. U behavior is most likely controlled less by traditional sorption and/or desorption reactions involving metal oxides or colloids than by the river's variable discharge regime (e.g., water parcel residence time during estuarine mixing, nature of particulates, sediment storage and resuspension in the confined lower river), and plume dispersal. Mixing of the thin freshwater lens into ambient seawater is largely defined by wind-driven rather than physical processes. As a consequence, in the Mississippi outflow region uranium predominantly displays Conser

  15. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2014-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5–2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  16. Lagrangian flow observations of the Amazon River discharge into the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limeburner, Richard; Beardsley, Robert C.; Soares, Ivan D.; Lentz, Steven J.; Candela, Julio

    1995-02-01

    Nine satellite-tracked drifters with near-surface drogues were launched in or near the mouth of the Amazon River on the north Brazil shelf during 1989-1991 at four different stages of river discharge. The drifters initially moved along shelf toward the northwest over the north Brazil shelf with mean speeds varying from 41 to 128 cm/s and a maximum along-shelf velocity of 197 cm/s. Many drifters experienced strong acceleration near 2°N between the 5-m and 20-m isobaths, caused in part by the sharp reduction in cross-shelf cross-sectional area near the shore-perpendicular Cabo Norte shoal. The drifter trajectories showed strong cross-shelf tidal variability in the flow field near the Amazon River mouth, and the largest low-frequency, along-shelf variability was located over the open shelf just north of Cabo Norte. Good visual correlation between drifter along-shelf velocity and along-shelf wind stress supports the dynamical model of Lentz (this issue) that subtidal fluctuations in near-surface along-shelf currents in the Amazon River Plume are strongly wind driven. Drifters left the north Brazil shelf after about 5 to 30 days. Three drifters moved northwestward parallel to the northeast coast of South America, crossed the shelf break near 8°N, and moved into deeper North Atlantic water where they began looping in anticyclonic eddies (often called retroflection eddies or loopers) with periods of approximately 11 days as they moved northwestward to the Caribbean Sea. Four drifters initially moved along shelf toward the northwest and then offshore between 3°N and 7°N, where they followed the retroflection of the North Brazil Current. Only one drifter entered the zonal current system that characterizes the equatorial Atlantic circulation.

  17. Swath altimetry measurements of the mainstem Amazon River: measurement errors and hydraulic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. D.; Durand, M.; Jung, H. C.; Alsdorf, D.

    2014-08-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled for launch in 2020, will provide a step-change improvement in the measurement of terrestrial surface water storage and dynamics. In particular, it will provide the first, routine two-dimensional measurements of water surface elevations. In this paper, we aimed to (i) characterize and illustrate in two-dimensions the errors which may be found in SWOT swath measurements of terrestrial surface water, (ii) simulate the spatio-temporal sampling scheme of SWOT for the Amazon, and (iii) assess the impact of each of these on estimates of water surface slope and river discharge which may be obtained from SWOT imagery. We based our analysis on a "virtual mission" for a 300 km reach of the central Amazon (Solimões) River at its confluence with the Purus River, using a hydraulic model to provide water surface elevations according to SWOT spatio-temporal sampling to which errors were added based on a two-dimension height error spectrum derived from the SWOT design requirements. We thereby obtained water surface elevation measurements for the Amazon mainstem as may be observed by SWOT. Using these measurements, we derived estimates of river slope and discharge and compared them to those obtained directly from the hydraulic model. We found that cross-channel and along-reach averaging of SWOT measurements using reach lengths of greater than 4 km for the Solimões and 7.5 km for Purus reduced the effect of systematic height errors, enabling discharge to be reproduced accurately from the water height, assuming known bathymetry and friction. Using cross-section averaging and 20 km reach lengths, results show Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency values of 0.99 for the Solimões and 0.88 for the Purus, with 2.6 and 19.1% average overall error in discharge, respectively.

  18. Pathways of clay mineral transport in the coastal zone of the Brazilian continental shelf from Ceará to the mouth of the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morais, J. O.; Tintelnot, M.; Irion, G.; Souza Pinheiro, L.

    2006-03-01

    The transport pathways of fine sediments (fraction <2 μm) along the Brazilian continental shelf from Ceará to the Amazon River mouth were studied by means of clay mineral analyses. On the continental shelf southeast of the Amazon mouth, fluctuations in clay mineral compositions reflect simple mixing between the suspended load of the North Brazil Current and sediment from several smaller rivers. Previously, clay mineral variations west of the Amazon mouth have been explained by variable settling velocities of different grain-size classes within the <2 μm fraction or by selective coagulation of individual clay mineral groups. By contrast, our experiments with river bank samples show that selective coagulation does not occur in Amazon River sediments. A more appropriate explanation for observed variations in clay mineral composition off the Amazon mouth seems to be, similarly to that for the shelf between Ceará and the Amazon mouth, a mixing of Amazon sediments with suspended material of the North Brazil Current. This interpretation is supported by data on clay mineral composition east and south of the Amazon mouth, showing more affinity to sediments of the North Brazil Current than to the suspended load of the Amazon River. Additionally, relatively low sedimentation rates and low concentrations of fine-grained sediments on the shelf suggest that high riverine input by the Amazon River does not overprint the sediments of the North Brazil Current in this region. The strong North Brazil Current shunts the Amazon suspended load in a north-westerly direction along the north-eastern coast of South America. Hence, stronger sedimentation of Amazon sediments would occur only west of the river mouth.

  19. Discharge Estimation Using Satellite Gravity During Flood Seasons at the Óbidos Gauge Station, Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable measurement of river discharge is important for management of water resource and understanding of hydrological cycles particularly associated with global and regional climate changes. Practically, to obtain continuous time series of river discharge, regression analysis of an empirical relationship between accumulated water level and discharge data is used. During wet season, however, the relationship includes more uncertainty due to the difficulty of accurate discharge measurement. This is particularly true for the Amazon River because significant amount of water flows outside river channel during flooding. For an alternative way to estimate river discharge, we use GRACE time-varying gravity measurement from January 2003 to December 2012. We first apply Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) for GRACE time-varying gravity fields in Amazon and successfully isolate gravity signal in the main stream. The EOF time series represents relative river discharge variations without larger uncertainty during flooding season compared to conventional in-situ discharge estimate. Estimates of Amazon River discharge based on GRACE data are very close to those from observed at gauge stations during dry seasons. However, our estimates are larger than in-situ data in high water seasons, and the difference is the maximum at the 2009 flooding. This is probably because in-situ observation underestimates river discharge during wet season due possibly to detoured water in river pathway developed during flooding while GRACE observes integrated water mass variations in river channels.

  20. Energy at the Junction of the Rivers Negro and Solimões, Contributors of the Amazon River, in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paulo Kroeff

    2014-01-01

    The Negro and Solimoes rivers join in front of the Brazilian city of Manaus to form the Amazon River. This “meeting of the waters” is a natural phenomenon of great aesthetic beauty that has been the focus of attention of researchers all over the world in various scientific fields. The waters of the Negro are darker and warmer, while the waters of the Solimoes are lighter and cooler. These waters have very different characteristics and remain without mixing, flowing side by side for several miles. Some reports indicate a temperature gradient between the waters of the order of 6°C, which can be used in conjunction with very high flow rates delivered by the two rivers, with a heat engine operating on a thermodynamic cycle to provide electricity. This review paper identifies this energy resource and presents a preliminary assessment of the potential for power generation. A realistic assessment of the potential points to an available power of about 1 GW. It is clear that further studies are needed to accurately assess the available thermal gradient and its variation over time, to move forward in the design of the power converter, and to establish an appropriate location for a power plant. PMID:27437451

  1. Phosphorus in sediments of the Amazon River and the global flux of P to the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ji Long; Berner, R.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    A modification of the sequential extraction method of Ruttenberg (1990), for the determination of various forms of phosphorus in soils and sediments, has been applied to suspended and bank sediments of the Amazon River and river-derived marine bottom muds of the Amazon shelf. The following forms of phosphate are distinguished: P associated with hydrous ferric oxides (Fe-P), organic P (org-P), detrital apatite (detr-P), authigenic and/or biogenic Ca-phosphates (auth-P), and total phosphorus. (Use of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] to determine org-P results in loss of phosphorus which renders it inferior to the Aspila or difference-by-ignition method). Results indicate that: (1) org-P drops as riverine sediments become deposited in the marine environment; (2) org-P and Fe-P both drop as sediment is deposited on river banks and subjected to plant growth; (3) detr-P anticorrelates with Fe-P due probably to the association of detr-P with coarser size fractions combined with the correlation of increased Fe-oxide content with finer size fractions; (4) auth-P undergoes negligible change between riverine and marine environments; (5) total P in marine sediments is distinctly lower than that in suspended sediment of the river. These results suggest that dissolved phosphorus is added to the oceans by rivers via the bacterial decomposition of river-transported organic matter and possibly by the desorption and possibly by the desorption of P from Fe-oxides, in addition to that carried in solution. If these results can be extrapolated to a global basis, presently used residence times for phosphate in seawater are too high.

  2. Modern Environmental Changes on Amapa Coastal Plain under Amazon River Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, V. F.; Figueiredo, A. G.; Silveira, O. M.; Polidori, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Amazonian coastal environment is very dynamic compared to other coasts. It is situated at the edge of the Earth's largest forest, and is segmented by fluvial systems, with the biggest being the Amazon River. The rivers are particularly influenced by the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which controls the water and particle discharge, and the flooding regime. Moderate and strong El Nino conditions correlate with low-precipitation periods, and La Nina events cause precipitation to increase. These variables and others related to the Amazon dispersal system create an interesting area for the study of global and regional environmental changes. The Araguari River floodplain on the Amapa coast is influenced by natural processes of global scale such as ENSO events and ITCZ, and by local processes such as Amazon River discharge, tides and tidal bore (pororoca). Anthropogenic processes such as extensive water-buffalo farming also promote environmental changes. Time- series analyses of remote sensing images and suspended sediment have shown that the maximum turbidity zone inside Araguari River is related to the pororoca phenomenon. The pororoca remobilizes sediment from the river bottom and margins, developing sediment suspension >15 g/l as it passes - creating fluid muds. The pororoca also introduces Amazon- and shelf-derived sediment into the Araguari estuary. Measurements during eight spring-tide cycles indicate erosion of 3 cm of consolidated mud and deposition of 1 cm. The pororoca also influences the remobilization and cycling of nutrients and consequently affects the distribution of benthic organisms, including benthonic foraminifera and thecamoebians. For more than a century, the coastal plain has had water-buffalo farming (>42,000 animals today), which modifies the drainage system and affects sedimentary processes. Areas with more buffalo trails have higher suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) during the dry season and lower SSC during the rainy season

  3. Rivers, refuges and population divergence of fire-eye antbirds (Pyriglena) in the Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Coelho, M; Blake, J G; Silveira, L F; Batalha-Filho, H; Ricklefs, R E

    2013-05-01

    The identification of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that might account for the elevated biotic diversity in tropical forests is a central theme in evolutionary biology. This issue is especially relevant in the Neotropical region, where biological diversity is the highest in the world, but where few studies have been conducted to test factors causing population differentiation and speciation. We used mtDNA sequence data to examine the genetic structure within white-backed fire-eye (Pyriglena leuconota) populations along the Tocantins River valley in the south-eastern Amazon Basin, and we confront the predictions of the river and the Pleistocene refuge hypotheses with patterns of genetic variation observed in these populations. We also investigated whether these patterns reflect the recently detected shift in the course of the Tocantins River. We sampled a total of 32 individuals east of, and 52 individuals west of, the Tocantins River. Coalescent simulations and phylogeographical and population genetics analytical approaches revealed that mtDNA variation observed for fire-eye populations provides little support for the hypothesis that populations were isolated in glacial forest refuges. Instead, our data strongly support a key prediction of the river hypothesis. Our study shows that the Tocantins River has probably been the historical barrier promoting population divergence in fire-eye antbirds. Our results have important implications for a better understanding of the importance of large Amazonian rivers in vertebrate diversification in the Neotropics. PMID:23442128

  4. The evolution of organic matter along the lower Amazon River continuum - Óbidos to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N. D.; Keil, R. G.; Medeiros, P. M.; Brito, D.; Cunha, A.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Moura, J. S.; Yager, P. L.; Krusche, A. V.; Richey, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of the Amazon River on global hydrologic and biogeochemical cycling is well recognized. The Amazon River provides roughly 16% of the global freshwater supply to the ocean and is a significant source of CO2 to the atmosphere, outgassing 0.5 Pg C y-1 to the atmosphere--a flux roughly equivalent to the amount of carbon 'sequestered' by the Amazon rainforest (Field et al, 1998; Richey et al., 2002; Malhi et al., 2008). However, much of our understanding of the flux of matter from the Amazon River into the Atlantic Ocean (and atmosphere) is limited to measurements made at and upstream of Óbidos, 900 km upstream from the actual river mouth. Further, there are few to no observations documenting the transformation of organic matter in a parcel of water as it travels downstream of Óbidos into the ocean. Here we explore the hydrological and biogeochemical evolution of the lower Amazon River continuum, from Óbidos to the Atlantic Ocean. A suite of dissolved and particulate organic matter (OM) parameters were measured during a series of five river expeditions with stations at Óbidos, the Tapajós tributary, the mouth of the Lago Grande de Curuai floodplain lake, both the north and south channels of the Amazon River mouth near Macapá, and the confluence of the Amazon and Tocantins Rivers near Belém. In addition to bulk carbon isotopic signatures, a suite of biomarkers including dissolved and particulate lignin-derived phenols were measured to trace the sources and degradation history of terrestrial vascular plant derived OM throughout the continuum. Dissolved and particulate lignin phenol concentrations both correlated positively with river discharge in the Amazon River mainstem, with variable export patterns from the tributaries and floodplains. As organic matter travels along the continuum it is degraded by microbial composition, fuelling gross respiration and CO2 outgassing. The flux of organic carbon to the ocean is chemically recalcitrant as a result of

  5. Study of the anabranch dynamics for different sinuosity stages in the Upper Amazon River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias, C. E.; Mendoza, A.; Dauer, K.; Abad, J. D.; Montoro, H.; Paredes, J.; Vizcarra, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Upper Peruvian Amazon River is characterized by a sequence of anabranching structures, which are composed by several channels behaving as non-developed and quasy-freely meandering channels. The widest channel in these anabranching structures is considered as the main channel or main anabranch while the other channels are secondary anabranches. Based on satellite imagery, it is observed that the main channels show different sinuosities along the Upper Peruvian Amazon River valley. Little is known about the effects of the planform characteristics of the main channel into the morphodynamics of the secondary anabranches. Thus, two study sites were selected to characterize anabranching structures with low and medium-high sinuosity main channels. For the low sinuosity main channel case, an area at the tri-point boundary between Colombia-Brazil and Peru was selected. For the medium-high sinuosity main channel case, an area upstream of Iquitos City (the largest city in the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest) was selected. A field campaign was carried out on 2010 and 2011 for the medium-high and low sinuosity stages respectively. On this field campaign velocity measurement, bathymetry and water surface elevations were obtained. With the field data it was possible to develop and validate a two dimensional shallow water numerical model to study the hydrodynamics on both sites. This allows us to discuss the effects of the current planform configuration of the anabranching structures into the short-term behavior of individual channels. In past studies, temporal analysis of the Amazon River planform have been carried out using satellite imagery with special focus into the floodplain, main channel, number of islands and valley slope. However, the dynamics in these anabranching structures containing multiple channels have not been studied in detailed. The metrics obtained for this study were sinuosity, channel width and annual migration rates. It was confirmed that in a medium to high

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Androgenic Gland for Discovery of Novel Genes from the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, Using Illumina Hiseq 2000

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubo; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhou, Qiao; Sun, Shengming; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei; Gong, Yongsheng; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Wenyi

    2013-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China, even in whole of Asia. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in sexual differentiation to maleness. This study is the first de novo M. nipponense transcriptome analysis using cDNA prepared from mRNA isolated from the androgenic gland. Illumina/Solexa was used for sequencing. Methodology and Principal Finding The total volume of RNA sample was more than 5 ug. We generated 70,853,361 high quality reads after eliminating adapter sequences and filtering out low-quality reads. A total of 78,408 isosequences were obtained by clustering and assembly of the clean reads, producing 57,619 non-redundant transcripts with an average length of 1244.19 bp. In total 70,702 isosequences were matched to the Nr database, additional analyses were performed by GO (33,203), KEGG (17,868), and COG analyses (13,817), identifying the potential genes and their functions. A total of 47 sex-determination related gene families were identified from the M. nipponense androgenic gland transcriptome based on the functional annotation of non-redundant transcripts and comparisons with the published literature. Furthermore, a total of 40 candidate novel genes were found, that may contribute to sex-determination based on their extremely high expression levels in the androgenic compared to other sex glands,. Further, 437 SSRs and 65,535 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset from which 14 EST-SSR markers have been isolated. Conclusion Our study provides new sequence information for M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies on decapods crustaceans. More importantly, this study dramatically improves understanding of sex-determination mechanisms, and advances sex-determination research in all crustacean species. The huge number of potential SSR and SNP markers isolated from the transcriptome may shed the lights on research in many

  7. The pathways and properties of the Amazon River Plume in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Victoria J.; Brooks, Maureen T.; Hopkins, Julia; Stukel, Michael R.; Yager, Patricia L.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River Plume spreads across the tropical North Atlantic creating a barrier to vertical mixing. Here using a 1/6° HYCOM model and data from three research cruises in May-June 2010, September-October 2011, and July 2012, we investigate the pathways and properties of the plume. Four plume pathways for export of freshwater from the western tropical North Atlantic are identified. These consist of direct and indirect pathways to the northwest, and eastward pathways toward the subtropical gyre and toward Africa in the North Equatorial Counter Current. Because of the seasonality and cooccurrence of these pathways, plume characteristics are highly variable. Two pathways export water to the Caribbean, however the time scales associated with those direct and indirect pathways (3 versus 6+ months) differ, leading to different salinity characteristics of the plume water. Models results show that the Amazon river and tropical precipitation have similar magnitude impact on the observed seasonal cycle of freshwater within the western tropical Atlantic and at the 8°N, 38°W PIRATA mooring. Freshwater associated with the Amazon also influences surface salinity in winter as far as 20W in the model. The mean plume salinity minimum leads maximum discharge, highlighting the importance of currents and advection rather than discharge in maintaining plume properties. Plume pathways are tied to the underlying current structure, with the North Equatorial Counter Current jet preventing direct freshwater transport into the southern hemisphere. The plume influences underlying currents as well, generating vertical current shear that leads to enhanced eddy stirring and mixing in the model simulations.

  8. Insights into iron sources and pathways in the Amazon River provided by isotopic and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Daniel Santos; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Allard, Thierry; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Mancini, Luiz; Seyler, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the weathering and transport mechanisms of Fe in the Amazon River. A particular emphasis was placed on Fe partitioning, speciation, and isotopic fractionation in the contrasting waters of the Solimões and Negro rivers and their mixing zone at the beginning of the Amazon River. Samples collected in the end-member rivers and thirteen sites distributed throughout the mixing zone were processed through frontal vacuum filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration to separate the different suspended solid fractions, i.e., particulate (P > 0.45 μm and P > 0.22 μm), colloidal (0.22 μm > C > 5 kDa) and truly dissolved elements (TD < 5 kDa). The Fe isotopic composition and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) species were measured on these different pore-sized fractions. The acidic and organo-Fe-rich waters of the Negro River displayed dissolved and colloidal fractions enriched in heavy isotopes (∼1.2‰, in δ57Fe values relative to IRMM-14), while the particulate fractions yielded light isotopic compositions of -0.344‰ for P > 0.22 μm and -0.104‰ for P > 0.45 μm fractions). The mineral particulate-rich waters of the Solimões River had dissolved and colloidal fractions with light isotopic composition (-0.532‰ and -0.176‰, respectively), whereas the particulate fractions yielded δ57Fe values close to those of the continental crust (i.e., -0.029‰ for P > 0.22 μm and 0.028‰ for P > 0.45 μm). Ten kilometers downstream from the Negro and Solimões junction, the concentrations of colloidal and dissolved Fe species deviate markedly from conservative mixing. A maximum Fe loss of 43 μg/L (i.e., 50% of the dissolved and colloidal Fe) is observed 110 km downstream from the rivers junction. The contrasting Negro and Solimões Rivers isotopic compositions along the pore-sized water fractions is attributable to the biogeochemical processes involving different types of upland soils and parental materials. For instance, the isotopic

  9. Swath-altimetry measurements of the main stem Amazon River: measurement errors and hydraulic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. D.; Durand, M.; Jung, H. C.; Alsdorf, D.

    2015-04-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled for launch in 2020, will provide a step-change improvement in the measurement of terrestrial surface-water storage and dynamics. In particular, it will provide the first, routine two-dimensional measurements of water-surface elevations. In this paper, we aimed to (i) characterise and illustrate in two dimensions the errors which may be found in SWOT swath measurements of terrestrial surface water, (ii) simulate the spatio-temporal sampling scheme of SWOT for the Amazon, and (iii) assess the impact of each of these on estimates of water-surface slope and river discharge which may be obtained from SWOT imagery. We based our analysis on a virtual mission for a ~260 km reach of the central Amazon (Solimões) River, using a hydraulic model to provide water-surface elevations according to SWOT spatio-temporal sampling to which errors were added based on a two-dimensional height error spectrum derived from the SWOT design requirements. We thereby obtained water-surface elevation measurements for the Amazon main stem as may be observed by SWOT. Using these measurements, we derived estimates of river slope and discharge and compared them to those obtained directly from the hydraulic model. We found that cross-channel and along-reach averaging of SWOT measurements using reach lengths greater than 4 km for the Solimões and 7.5 km for Purus reduced the effect of systematic height errors, enabling discharge to be reproduced accurately from the water height, assuming known bathymetry and friction. Using cross-sectional averaging and 20 km reach lengths, results show Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency values of 0.99 for the Solimões and 0.88 for the Purus, with 2.6 and 19.1 % average overall error in discharge, respectively. We extend the results to other rivers worldwide and infer that SWOT-derived discharge estimates may be more accurate for rivers with larger channel widths (permitting a greater level of cross

  10. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    PubMed

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  11. Carbon and metal concentrations, size distributions and fluxes in major rivers of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Marc F.; Mounier, Stephane; Filizola, Naziano; Benaim, Jean; Seyler, Patrick

    2003-05-01

    The chemical composition of the Amazon River results from the mixing of two water types: black water and white water. On-site fractionation by sequential tangential ultrafiltration (STUF) was used to differentiate transported organic carbon and to determine the distribution and association of major and trace elements with different size fraction of the organic carbon (OC). Several sampling campaigns (1994-1996) allow a monthly quantification of particulate (OCP, MeP), colloidal (OCC, MeC) and dissolved (OCD, MeD) organic carbon and metal ions inputs. In white rivers the OC is mainly concentrated in the low molecular weight fraction (OCD < 5000 D) while in black rivers most of the OC is in the heavier molecular weight fractions (OCP and OCC > 5 kDa). For Mg, Ca and K, 50% of the total amount of each element is found in fraction MeD while 15% and 35% are found in fractions MeC and MeP, respectively. Al and Fe are in the particulate fraction at 99% of the total metal concentration for all river samples. This work emphasizes the coagulation processes and the sink for elements in the mixing zone. These physicochemical transformations of the organic matter vary seasonally. The changes happen during the transition periods: before high-level waters and before low-level waters. By way of flux measurement, a seasonal carbon loss was observed. The estimated annual organic carbon flux of the Amazon at Òbidos is 28 × 106 t. At the same time, an average of 9 × 106 t of organic carbon per year is retained in the reach between Manaus and Òbidos, probably via coagulation processes.

  12. Metagenomics of the Water Column in the Pristine Upper Course of the Amazon River

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Katherine D.; Toyama, Danyelle; Rinke, Raquel; Cristina Souza de Oliveira, Tereza; Wagner Garcia, José; Pellon de Miranda, Fernando; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2011-01-01

    River water is a small percentage of the total freshwater on Earth but represents an essential resource for mankind. Microbes in rivers perform essential ecosystem roles including the mineralization of significant quantities of organic matter originating from terrestrial habitats. The Amazon river in particular is famous for its size and importance in the mobilization of both water and carbon out of its enormous basin. Here we present the first metagenomic study on the microbiota of this river. It presents many features in common with the other freshwater metagenome available (Lake Gatun in Panama) and much less similarity with marine samples. Among the microbial taxa found, the cosmopolitan freshwater acI lineage of the actinobacteria was clearly dominant. Group I Crenarchaea and the freshwater sister group of the marine SAR11 clade, LD12, were found alongside more exclusive and well known freshwater taxa such as Polynucleobacter. A metabolism-centric analysis revealed a disproportionate representation of pathways involved in heterotrophic carbon processing, as compared to those found in marine samples. In particular, these river microbes appear to be specialized in taking up and mineralizing allochthonous carbon derived from plant material. PMID:21915244

  13. The influence of the Amazonian floodplain ecosystems on the trace element dynamics of the Amazon River mainstem (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Viers, Jérôme; Barroux, Guénaël; Pinelli, Marcello; Seyler, Patrick; Oliva, Priscia; Dupré, Bernard; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to forecast the role of riverine wetlands in the transfer of trace elements. One of the largest riverine wetlands in the world is the floodplain (várzea) of the Amazon River and its tributaries (Junk and Piedade, 1997). The central Amazon wetlands are constituted by a complex network of lakes and floodplains, named várzeas, that extend over more than 300,000 km2 (Junk, W.J., The Amazon floodplain--a sink or source for organic carbon? In Transport of Carbon and Minerals in Major World Rivers, edited by E.T. Degens, S. Kempe, R. Herrera, SCOPE/UNEP; 267-283, 1985.) and are among the most productive ecosystems in the world due to the regular enrichment in nutrients by river waters In order to understand if the adjacent floodplain of Amazon River have a significant influence on the trace element concentrations and fluxes of the mainstem, the concentrations of selected elements (i.e., Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Mo, Rb, Sr, Ba, and U) have been measured in the Amazon River water (Manacapuru Station, Amazonas State, Brazil) and in lake waters and plants (leaves) from a várzea(Ilha de Marchantaria, Amazonas State, Brazil) during different periods of the hydrological cycle. Four plant species (two perennial species: Pseudobombax munguba and Salix humboldtiana, and two annual herbaceous plants: Echinochloa polystachya and Eichhornia crassipes) were selected to represent the ecological functioning of the site. Time series obtained for dissolved Mn and Cu (<0.20 microm) in Amazon River water could not be explained by tributary mixing or instream processes only. Therefore, the contribution of the waters transiting the floodplains should be considered. These results suggest that the chemical composition of the waters draining these floodplains is controlled by reactions occurring at sediment-water and plant-water interfaces. Trace elements concentrations in the plants (leaves) vary strongly with hydrological seasonality. Based on the concentration data

  14. Tracing soil organic carbon in the lower Amazon River and its tributaries using GDGT distributions and bulk organic matter properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Zell, Claudia; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Pérez, Marcela A. P.; Abril, Gwenaël; Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Weijers, Johan W. H.; Meziane, Tarik; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2012-08-01

    In order to trace the transport of soil organic carbon (OC) in the lower Amazon basin, we investigated the distributions of crenarchaeol and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) by analyzing riverbed sediments and river suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected in the Solimões-Amazon River mainstem and its tributaries. The Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index, a proxy for river-transported soil OC into the ocean, was determined from the distributions of these GDGTs. The GDGT-derived parameters were compared with other bulk geochemical data (i.e. C:N ratio and stable carbon isotopic composition). The GDGT-derived and bulk geochemical data indicate that riverine SPM and riverbed sediments in the lower Amazon River and its tributaries are a mixture of C3 plant-derived soil OC and aquatic-derived OC. The branched GDGTs in the SPM and riverbed sediments did not predominantly originate from the high Andes soils (>2500 m in altitude) as was suggested previously. However, further constraint on the soil source area of branched GDGTs was hampered due to the deficiency of soil data from the lower montane forest areas in the Andes. Our study also revealed seasonal and interannual variation in GDGT composition as well as soil OC discharge, which was closely related to the hydrological cycle. By way of a simple binary mixing model using the flux-weighted BIT values at Óbidos, the last gauging station in the Amazon River, we estimated that 70-80% of the POC pool in the river was derived of soil OC. However, care should be taken to use the BIT index since it showed a non-conservative behaviour along the river continuum due to the aquatic production of crenarchaeol. Further investigation using a continuous sampling strategy following the full hydrological cycle is required to fully understand how soil-derived GDGT signals are transformed in large tropical river systems through their transport pathway to the ocean.

  15. Flow Estimate of Carbon Dioxide in a Amazon River Hydrological Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, J. M. S.; Ferreira, R. B., Jr.; Tapajós, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Recent measurements in the Amazon suggest that the flow of CO2 in surface waters may reach the order of 1GT per year and isotopic analyzes suggest that this carbon is a direct result of organic matter degradation (OMD) in rivers and the measured concentration exceeds the value expected for there to be equilibrium with the atmosphere (Richey et al, 2002). This study aimed to measure and check the seasonal variability of CO2 fluxes in a range of six months (September 2013-February 2014) in the Strait Óbidos hydrological station located geographically in the coordinates 55 ° 1 '4 "S and 55 ° 31' 4" W. In addiction, it is intended to correlate the data with physical-chemical water parameters pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and temperature and humidity. The method used for the measurement of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere-water interface is the floating chamber liked with an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA- Infrared Gas Analyzer). The physical-chemical parameters of water were measured using a multiparameter probe YSI Professional Plus model. The preliminary results shows values average CO2 flux was approximately 15.65 1,01ppm / m2s-1 for the months of September and October and between the months of November, 2013 and February 2014 the CO2 flux average was 4.40 + 1.94 ppm / m2s-1. In addiction to the high temperature in dry season, in the water column there is sufficient convection for the existence of gases transport from water to atmosphere, resulting in increase of exchange. Thus, the decreased amount of radiation and consequently the low temperatures in the humid period (on average 27.2 ° C) should affect the OMD in the river, responsible for the production of dissolved CO2. Keywords: CO2 flux, seasonal variability, amazon river

  16. The effects of CO2 on phytoplankton community structure in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. L.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H. R.; McKee, K. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River Plume results from an enormous discharge of freshwater and organic matter into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a unique environment with a natural pCO2 gradient in the surface waters of the plume that range from 130-950 μatm. The response of coastal marine phytoplankton to increased anthropogenic CO2 emission is still unknown, hence the Amazon River Plume gradient can serve as a natural laboratory to examine the potential influence of atmospheric CO2 increases and ocean acidification on phytoplankton community composition. A two pronged study was undertaken: the first in which shipboard samples from a 2010 cruise to the Amazon River Plume were analyzed to examine the distribution of 3 major phytoplankton groups (diatoms, diatom-diazotroph associations [DDAs], and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp.) with respect to the natural pCO2 gradient; the second in which the growth response of Thalassiosira weisflogii, a representative diatom species, was examined under experimentally manipulated CO2 conditions. Cruise data analysis showed that diatoms were found with higher cell counts around 150 μatm; DDAs seemed to dominate waters within the narrow range of 350-400 μatm CO2; and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp. grew in a wide range of pCO2 conditions, but with higher cell counts at upwards of 500 μatm. Phytoplankton group distributions along the CO2 gradient may be due to differences in their carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCMs) efficiencies. The CO2 manipulation apparatus was assembled such that the cells were grown under three different CO2 environments. Differential growth of T. weisflogii was observed at 150, 400, and 800 ppm CO2 treatment. T. weisflogii grew at all three CO2 concentrations, reflecting diatoms' physiological flexibility and efficient CCMs. Absorption spectra analysis of pigments and Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer analysis indicate potential changes in photosynthetic machinery with different CO2 treatments. Future CO2 manipulation

  17. DDT concentration in fish from the Tapajós River in the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rosivaldo de Alcântara; Lopes, Anna Sylmara da Costa; de Souza, Larissa Costa; Lima, Marcelo de Oliveira; Santos, Lourivaldo da Silva

    2016-06-01

    DDT and metabolites were measured in six species of fish collected from the Tapajós River in the village of Barreiras, near the town of Itaituba in the Brazilian Amazon region. The selected fish were the most consumed and economically important to the local people. DDT was used frequently in this region for malaria control. Fish samples were analyzed after extraction by microwave-assisted extraction in hexane/acetone (8:2, v/v) by gas chromatography with electron capture detector. Residues of op'-DDT and pp'-DDT and metabolites were detected, including pp'-DDE, pp'-DDD, op'-DDT, and op'-DDE, in 98% of the samples, with a greater abundance of pp'-DDT. Total DDT levels were 7.1-249.5 ng g(-1) wet weight (w.w). The DDE/DDT ratio was low, indicating recent exposure to DDT. The study area that may be related to generated waste used in public health campaigns to combat mosquitos (Anopheles spp.), still present in the Amazon environment, that transmit malaria. DDT levels and metabolites found in fish species do not present risks to human health because they are below acceptable limits for consumption. PMID:27027561

  18. Multisensor observations of the Amazon-Orinoco river plume interactions with hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reul, Nicolas; Quilfen, Yves; Chapron, Bertrand; Fournier, Severine; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Sabia, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    An analysis is presented for the spatial and intensity distributions of North Atlantic extreme atmospheric events crossing the buoyant Amazon-Orinoco freshwater plume. The sea surface cooling amplitude in the wake of an ensemble of storm tracks traveling in that region is estimated from satellite products for the period 1998-2012. For the most intense storms, cooling is systematically reduced by ˜50% over the plume area compared to surroundings open-ocean waters. Historical salinity and temperature observations from in situ profiles indicate that salt-driven vertical stratification, enhanced oceanic heat content, and barrier-layer presence within the plume waters are likely key oceanic factors to explain these results. Satellite SMOS surface salinity data combined with in situ observations are further used to detail the oceanic response to category 4 hurricane Igor in 2010. Argo and satellite measurements confirm the haline stratification impact on the cooling inhibition as the hurricane crossed the river plume. Over this region, the SSS mapping capability is further tested and demonstrated to monitor the horizontal distribution of the vertical stratification parameter. SMOS SSS data can thus be used to consistently anticipate the cooling inhibition in the wake of TCs traveling over the Amazon-Orinoco plume region.

  19. Amazon river flow regime and flood recessional agriculture: Flood stage reversals and risk of annual crop loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomes, Oliver T.; Lapointe, Michel; Templeton, Michael; List, Geneva

    2016-08-01

    The annual flood cycle is an important driver of ecosystem structure and function in large tropical rivers such as the Amazon. Riparian peasant communities rely on river fishing and annual floodplain agriculture, closely adapted to the recession phase of the flood pulse. This article reports on a poorly documented but important challenge facing farmers practicing flood recessional agriculture along the Amazon river: frequent, unpredictable stage reversals (repiquetes) which threaten to ruin crops growing on channel bars. We assess the severity of stage reversals for rice production on exposed river mud bars (barreales) near Iquitos, Peru. Crop loss risk is estimated based on a quantitative analysis of 45 years of daily Amazon stage data and field data from floodplain communities nearby in the Muyuy archipelago, upstream of Iquitos. Rice varieties selected, elevations of silt rich bars where rice is sown, as well as planting and harvest dates are analyzed in the light of the timing, frequencies and amplitudes of observed stage reversals that have the potential to destroy growing rice. We find that unpredictable stage reversals can produce substantial crop losses and shorten significantly the length of average growing seasons on lower elevation river bars. The data reveal that local famers extend planting down to lower bar elevations where the mean probabilities of re-submergence before rice maturity (due to reversals) approach 50%, below which they implicitly consider that the risk of crop loss outweighs the potential reward of planting.

  20. [Prevalence of arterial hypertension in communities along the Madeira River, Western Brazilian Amazon].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Beatriz Fátima Alves de; Mourão, Dennys de Souza; Gomes, Núbia; Costa, Janaina Mara C; Souza, Andreia Vasconcelos de; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Fonseca, Marlon de Freitas; Mariani, Carolina Fiorillo; Abbad, Guilherme; Hacon, Sandra S

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of hypertension among adults (n = 841) in communities along the Madeira River in the Brazilian Amazon, prior to startup of the Santo Antônio Hydroelectric Plant. The study gathered information on sociodemographic conditions, history of diseases, habits, fish consumption, and anthropometric parameters. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and the respective confidence intervals. Among the riverine communities, 26% (95%CI: 23%-29%) of adults presented hypertension (29% in men [95%CI: 24%-33%] and 23% in women [95%CI: 19%-27%]). Factors associated with hypertension were age, BMI, and place of residence in men and age, triglycerides, and blood glucose in women. The findings can contribute to strategies for state and municipal health services to monitor and prevent cardiovascular events. PMID:24005927

  1. Exchanges of sediment between the flood plain and channel of the Amazon River in Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, T.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Meade, R.H.; Richey, J.E.; Forsberg, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment transport through the Brazilian sector of the Amazon River valley, a distance of 2010 km, involves exchanges between the channel and the flood plain that in each direction exceed the annual flux of sediment out of the river at O??bidos (???1200 Mt yr-1). The exchanges occur through bank erosion, bar deposition, settling from diffuse overbank flow, and sedimentation in flood-plain channels. We estimated the magnitude of these exchanges for each of 10 reaches of the valley, and combined them with calculations of sediment transport into and out of the reaches based on sediment sampling and flow records to define a sediment budget for each reach. Residuals in the sediment budget of a reach include errors of estimation and erosion or deposition within the channel. The annual supply of sediment entering the channel from bank erosion was estimated to average 1570 Mt yr-1 (1.3 ?? the O??bidos flux) and the amount transferred from channel transport to the bars (380 Mt yr-1) and the flood plain (460 Mt yr-1 in channelized flow; 1230 Mt yr-1 in diffuse overbank flow) totaled 2070 Mt yr-1 (1.7 ?? the O??bidos flux). Thus, deposition on the bars and flood plain exceeded bank erosion by 500 Mt yr-1 over a 10-16 yr period. Sampling and calculation of sediment loads in the channel indicate a net accumulation in the valley floor of approximately 200 Mt yr-1 over 16 yr, crudely validating the process-based calculations of the sediment budget, which in turn illuminate the physical controls on each exchange process. Another 300-400 Mt yr-1 are deposited in a delta plain downstream of O??bidos. The components of the sediment budget reflect hydrologie characteristics of the valley floor and geomorphic characteristics of the channel and flood plain, which in turn are influenced by tectonic features of the Amazon structural trough.

  2. Riverine Li isotope fractionation in the Amazon River basin controlled by the weathering regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Mathieu; Gaillardet, Jerome; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; Dosseto, Anthony; Gorge, Caroline; Alanoca, Lucia; Maurice, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    We report Li isotope composition (δ7Li) of river-borne dissolved and solid material in the largest River system on Earth, the Amazon River basin, to characterize Li isotope fractionation at a continental scale. The δ7Li in the dissolved load (+1.2‰ to +32‰) is fractionated toward heavy values compared to the inferred bedrock (-1‰ to 5‰) and the suspended sediments (-6.8‰ to -0.5‰) as a result of the preferential incorporation of 6Li into secondary minerals during weathering. Despite having very contrasted weathering and erosion regimes, both Andean headwaters and lowland rivers share similar ranges of dissolved δ7Li (+1.2‰ to +18‰). Correlations between dissolved δ7Li and Li/Na and Li/Mg ratios suggest that the proportion of Li incorporated in secondary minerals during weathering act as the main control on the δ7Lidiss across the entire Amazon basin. A "batch" steady-state fractionation model for Andean and lowland rivers satisfactorily reproduces these variations, with a fractionation factor between weathering products and dissolved load (αsec-dis) of 0.983 ± 0.002. Two types of supply-limited weathering regimes can be identified for the lowlands: "clearwaters" with dominant incorporation of Li in secondary minerals, and "black waters" (e.g., Rio Negro) where dissolution of secondary minerals enhanced by organic matter produces low δ7Li. Apart from the black waters, the δ7Li of Andean and lowland rivers is negatively correlated to the denudation rates with the lowest δ7Li corresponding to the rivers having the highest denudation rates. In contrast, the main tributaries draining both the Andes and the lowlands have higher δ7Li compared to other rivers. We propose that part of the dissolved Li derived from weathering in the Andes is re-incorporated in sediments during transfer of water and sediments in floodplains and that this results in an increase of the dissolved δ7Li along the course of these rivers. Unlike other rivers, the

  3. Iron isotope composition of the suspended matter along depth and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and its tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Pinheiro, Giana Márcia; Poitrasson, Franck; Sondag, Francis; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2013-07-01

    Samples of suspended matter were collected at different locations, seasons, depths and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and three of its main tributaries, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Negro rivers. Their iron isotope compositions were studied in order to understand the iron cycle and investigate the level of isotopic homogeneity at the river cross-section scale. Samples from four depth profiles and three lateral profiles analyzed show suspended matter δ57Fe values (relative to IRMM-14) between -0.501 ± 0.075‰ and 0.196 ± 0.083‰ (2SE). Samples from the Negro River, a blackwater river, yield the negative values. Samples from other stations (whitewater rivers, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Amazon) show positive values, which are indistinguishable from the average composition of the continental crust (δ57FeIRMM-14 ˜ 0.1‰). Individual analyses of the depth and lateral profiles show no significant variation in iron isotope signatures, indicating that, in contrast to certain chemical or other isotopic tracers, one individual subsurface sample is representative of river deeper waters. This also suggests that, instead of providing detailed information on the riverine iron cycling, iron isotopes of particulate matter in rivers will rather yield a general picture of the iron sources.

  4. Preliminary Measurements Of N2O Partial Pressures In Rivers of Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. B.; Rasera, M. F.; Krusche, A. V.; Victoria, R. L.; Richey, J. E.; Cunha, H. B.; Gomes, B. M.

    2006-12-01

    The concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important component of the greenhouse effect and with a long residence time in the atmosphere, have significantly increased in this century. The reasons for this atmospheric increase in N2O are still partially unexplained. This uncertainty is worse in relation to aquatic environments. Here we report on preliminary measurements of N2O partial pressures in rivers of the Amazon basin. The study areas are in the state of Rondonia (rivers Ji Parana, Urupa, Comemoracao and Pimenta Bueno) and Amazonas (rivers Solimoes and Negro). The rivers were sampled from October 2005 to April 2006, using with immersion pumps, lowered in the middle of the channel to 60% of total depth. Water was pumped directly into a 1 l plastic bottle, which was overflown three times before closing. Using syringes, 60 ml of N2 were injected into the bottle, simultaenously to the withdrawn of 60 ml of sample. N2O was extracted into these 60 ml of N2 by shaking vigorously for 2 minutes. With the same syringes, the gas was taken from the bottles and injected into sealed evacuated 25 ml vials. Atmospheric samples were taken from one meter above the water column and stored the same way. N2O partial pressures were determined on a Shimadzu GC-14 Green House Gas Analyzer. All rivers showed little variations in N2O partial pressures. Average values in the rivers of Rondonia were around 0.41 ± 0.07 μ atm (n=46), whereas the Solimoes and Negro rivers, in the state of Amazonas, showed values around 0.43 ± 0.08 μ atm (n=131). Atmospheric averages were approximately 0.34 ± 0.04 μ atm (n=58) and 0.32 ± 0.03 μ atm (n=134) in the states of Rondonia and Amazonas, respectively. This means that, although these waters are supersatured in CO2, making evasive fluxes of this gas an important component of the C cycle in this basin, the same does not occur in the N cycle. Small differences in partial pressures of N2O between water and air will result in small fluxes of

  5. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Brian L; Allen, Andrew E; Carpenter, Edward J; Coles, Victoria J; Crump, Byron C; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A; Goes, Joaquim I; Gomes, Helga R; Hood, Raleigh R; McCrow, John P; Montoya, Joseph P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B; Yager, Patricia L; Paul, John H

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon River has the largest discharge of all rivers on Earth, and its complex plume system fuels a wide array of biogeochemical processes, across a large area of the western tropical North Atlantic. The plume thus stimulates microbial processes affecting carbon sequestration and nutrient cycles at a global scale. Chromosomal gene expression patterns of the 2.0 to 156 μm size-fraction eukaryotic microbial community were investigated in the Amazon River Plume, generating a robust dataset (more than 100 million mRNA sequences) that depicts the metabolic capabilities and interactions among the eukaryotic microbes. Combining classical oceanographic field measurements with metatranscriptomics yielded characterization of the hydrographic conditions simultaneous with a quantification of transcriptional activity and identity of the community. We highlight the patterns of eukaryotic gene expression for 31 biogeochemically significant gene targets hypothesized to be valuable within forecasting models. An advantage to this targeted approach is that the database of reference sequences used to identify the target genes was selectively constructed and highly curated optimizing taxonomic coverage, throughput, and the accuracy of annotations. A coastal diatom bloom highly expressed nitrate transporters and carbonic anhydrase presumably to support high growth rates and enhance uptake of low levels of dissolved nitrate and CO2. Diatom-diazotroph association (DDA: diatoms with nitrogen fixing symbionts) blooms were common when surface salinity was mesohaline and dissolved nitrate concentrations were below detection, and hence did not show evidence of nitrate utilization, suggesting they relied on ammonium transporters to aquire recently fixed nitrogen. These DDA blooms in the outer plume had rapid turnover of the photosystem D1 protein presumably caused by photodegradation under increased light penetration in clearer waters, and increased expression of silicon transporters as

  6. New dactylogyrids (Monogenea) parasitizing the gills of catfishes (Siluriformes) from the Amazon River basin in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Scholz, T

    2009-08-01

    Three dactylogyrid (Monogenea) species are described from the gills of siluriform fishes from the rivers around Iquitos, tributaries of the Amazon River in Peru: Demidospermus centromochli n. sp. from Centromochlus heckelii (de Filippi) (Auchenipteridae) and Demidospermus macropteri n. sp. and Ameloblastella unapi n. sp. from Calophysus macropterus (Lichtenstein) (Pimelodidae). The new species of Demidospermus differ from their congeners in having 2 different hook shapes. Ameloblastella unapi n. sp. differs from the other 3 species of the genus in having anchors with an elongate, straight shaft and a short point that forms a 90 degrees angle, a coiled (counterclockwise) male copulatory organ with 13-14 rings, and a coiled vaginal tube. Based on the present study, Pseudovancleaveus Franca, Issac, Pavanelli, and Takemoto, 2003, is regarded as a junior subjective synonym of Ameloblastella Kritsky, Mendoza-Franco, and Scholz, 2000. The finding of Demidospermus and Ameloblastella spp. on these siluriforms extends our host and geographic knowledge of species of these monogenean genera to Peru. PMID:19215149

  7. Particle size of sediments collected from the bed of the Amazon River and its tributaries in June and July 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, Carl F., Jr.; Meade, R.H.; Mahoney, H.A.; Delany, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    Sixty-five samples of bed material were collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries between Belem, Brazil, and Iquitos, Peru. Samples were taken with a standard BM-54 sampler, a pipe dredge, or a Helley-Smith bedload sampler. Most of the samples have median diameters in the size range of fine to medium sand and contain small percentages of fine gravel. Complete size distributions are tabulated.

  8. Particle size of sediments collected from the bed of the Amazon River and its tributaries in May and June 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, Carl F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Delaney, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    One-hundred-eight samples of bed material were collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries between Belem, Brazil , and Iquitos, Peru. Samples were taken with a standard BM-54 sampler or with pipe dredges from May 18 to June 5, 1977. Most of the samples have median diameters in the size range of fine to medium sand and contain small percentages of fine gravel. Complete size distributions are tabulated. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Sr and Nd isotopes of suspended sediments from rivers of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatting, Karina; Santos, Roberto V.; Sondag, Francis

    2014-05-01

    The Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems are important tools to constrain the provenance of sediment load in river systems. This study presents the isotopic composition of Sr and Nd isotopes and major and minor elements in suspended sediments from the Marañón-Solimões, Amazonas and Beni-Madeira rivers. The data were used to constrain the source region of the sediments and to better understand the main seasonal and spatial transport processes within the basin based on the variations of the chemical and isotopic signals. They also allow establishing a relationship between sediment concentrations and flow rate values. The study presents data collected during a hydrological year between 2009 and 2010. The Marañón-Solimões River presents low Sr isotopic values (0.7090-0.7186), broad EpslonNd(0) range (-15.17 to -8.09) and Nd model (TDM) ages varying from 0.99 to 1.81 Ga. Sources of sediments to the Marañón-Solimões River include recent volcanic rocks in northern Peru and Ecuador, as well as rocks with long crustal residence time and carbonates from the Marañón Basin, Peru. The Beni-Madeira River has more radiogenic Sr isotope values (0.7255-0.7403), more negative EpslonNd(0) values (-20.46 to -10.47), and older Nd isotope model ages (from 1.40 to 2.35 Ga) when compared to the Marañón-Solimões River. These isotope data were related to the erosion of Paleozoic and Cenozoic foreland basins that are filled with Precambrian sediments derived from the Amazonian Craton. These basins are located in Bolivian Subandina Zone. The Amazon River presents intermediate isotopic values when compared to those found in the Marañón-Solimões and Beni-Madeira rivers. Its Sr isotope ratios range between 0.7193 and 0.7290, and its EpslonNd(0) values varies between -11.09 and -9.51. The Nd isotope model ages of the suspended sediments vary between 1.28 and 1.77 Ga. Concentrations of soluble and insoluble elements indicate a more intense weathering activity in sediments of the Beni

  10. Amazon river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) use a high-frequency short-range biosonar.

    PubMed

    Ladegaard, Michael; Jensen, Frants Havmand; de Freitas, Mafalda; Ferreira da Silva, Vera Maria; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-10-01

    Toothed whales produce echolocation clicks with source parameters related to body size; however, it may be equally important to consider the influence of habitat, as suggested by studies on echolocating bats. A few toothed whale species have fully adapted to river systems, where sonar operation is likely to result in higher clutter and reverberation levels than those experienced by most toothed whales at sea because of the shallow water and dense vegetation. To test the hypothesis that habitat shapes the evolution of toothed whale biosonar parameters by promoting simpler auditory scenes to interpret in acoustically complex habitats, echolocation clicks of wild Amazon river dolphins were recorded using a vertical seven-hydrophone array. We identified 404 on-axis biosonar clicks having a mean SLpp of 190.3 ± 6.1 dB re. 1 µPa, mean SLEFD of 132.1 ± 6.0 dB re. 1 µPa(2)s, mean Fc of 101.2 ± 10.5 kHz, mean BWRMS of 29.3 ± 4.3 kHz and mean ICI of 35.1 ± 17.9 ms. Piston fit modelling resulted in an estimated half-power beamwidth of 10.2 deg (95% CI: 9.6-10.5 deg) and directivity index of 25.2 dB (95% CI: 24.9-25.7 dB). These results support the hypothesis that river-dwelling toothed whales operate their biosonars at lower amplitude and higher sampling rates than similar-sized marine species without sacrificing high directivity, in order to provide high update rates in acoustically complex habitats and simplify auditory scenes through reduced clutter and reverberation levels. We conclude that habitat, along with body size, is an important evolutionary driver of source parameters in toothed whale biosonars. PMID:26447198

  11. DDT AND ITS METABOLITES IN BREAST MILK FROM THE MADEIRA RIVER BASIN IN THE AMAZON, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Antonio; Torres, João P. M.; de Freitas Fonseca, Márlon; Britto, José Lailson; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Azevedo e Silva, Cláudio E.; Cavalcanti, Giselle; Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Sarcinelli, Paula N.; Claudio, Luz; Markowitz, Steven; Malm, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Until the 1990’s the 1,1,1-trichloro-bis-2,2′-(4chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) was sprayed in the walls of the house in the along the Madeira River basin, Brazilian Amazon, a region well known by its large number of malaria cases. In the 1910, the relate of Oswaldo Cruz about health conditions in Madeira River region describes the presence of malaria in rates ranging until 100% of infected people in some localities. Data available in the literature points to the DDT contamination in fishes captured in Madeira River region. Fish is the major source of dietary protein to this people. DDT tends to accumulate in lipid rich tissues being eliminated by different events, including lactation. Considering the importance of the breast milk to the children feeding, the associated risks of DDT exposure via breast milk intake to children must be assessed. This is the main objective of this work: to analyse the presence of the p,p′-DDT and its metabolites p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDD in 69 human milk samples and to estimate the intake of DDT and its metabolite in terms of total DDT (total DDT = p,p′-DDE+ p,p′-DDD+ p,p′-DDT). All sample showed contamination with DDT and its metabolites ranging from 25.4 to 9361.9 ng of total DDT / g of lipid (median=369.6 ng of total DDT / g of lipid) and 8.7 % of the Estimated Daily Intake (EDI), in terms of total DDT, was higher than the Acceptable Daily Intake proposed by the WHO. Key words: DDT, breast milk, children, organochlorine pesticide, fish. PMID:18495200

  12. Characterization of confluences in free meandering rivers of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Ronald R.; Abad, Jorge D.; Choi, Marianne; Montoro, Hugo

    2014-09-01

    Past studies on river confluence dynamics are mostly based on a limited number of experimental and field data that mainly represent the morphodynamic, hydrodynamic, and sedimentary processes of alluvial river channels with limited planform activity and concentrated solely around the confluence region. The present contribution is novel and focuses on the study of the planimetric configuration of confluences in tropical free meandering rivers located in the upper Amazon catchment. Confluences are environmental controls that impose convective instabilities in all the associated channels, namely the main stretch channel upstream of the confluence (M), the tributary (T), and the main post-confluent channel (MT). By performing a wavelet analysis on channels' curvature, we quantify the extent of the transitional region. Our results indicate that the strength of these transitional instabilities are in some degree dependent on the confluence width ratio (β); such that for β > 0.45, marked instabilities are developed. These instabilities induce the following general changes and in the planimetric configurations of the aforementioned channels: [i] the arc-wavelength in the confluent (M and T) and post-confluence channels increase in the transitional region, and [ii] the peaks on the curvature of MT channel decrease with respect to the M channel, thus resembling a constructive effect in the superposition of the meander trains. Although most of the confluence angles are acute, regardless the width-ratio, some instances of obtuse angles of confluence are observed. They are associated with β ≥ 0.80, where possibly the confluence is forced to become accordant. Our results show that no evident cause-effect relationship is found between the angle of confluence and the length of the transitional region; however, some degree of dependence is seen between the confluence angle and the arc-wavelength of the post-confluence channel (i.e., higher values of the arc

  13. Comparison of bacterial communities in the Solimões and Negro River tributaries of the Amazon River based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, J C C; Leomil, L; Souza, J V; Peixoto, F B S; Astolfi-Filho, S

    2011-01-01

    The microbiota of the Amazon River basin has been little studied. We compared the structure of bacterial communities of the Solimões and Negro Rivers, the main Amazon River tributaries, based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Water was sampled with a 3-L Van Dorn collection bottle; samples were collected at nine different points/depths totaling 27 L of water from each river. Total DNA was extracted from biomass retained by a 0.22-μm filter after sequential filtration of the water through 0.8- and 0.22-μm filters. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced, and the sequences were analyzed with the PHYLIP and DOTUR programs to obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and to calculate the diversity and richness indices using the SPADE program. Taxonomic affiliation was determined using the naive Bayesian rRNA Classifier of the RDP II (Ribosomal Database Project). We recovered 158 sequences from the Solimões River grouped into 103 OTUs, and 197 sequences from the Negro River library grouped into 90 OTUs by the DOTUR program. The Solimões River was found to have a greater diversity of bacterial genera, and greater estimated richness of 446 OTUs, compared with 242 OTUs from the Negro River, as calculated by ACE estimator. The Negro River has less bacterial diversity, but more 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the bacterial genus Polynucleobacter were detected; 56 sequences from this genus were found (about 30% of the total sequences). We suggest that a more in-depth investigation be made to elucidate the role played by these bacteria in the river environment. These differences in bacterial diversity between Solimões and Negro Rivers could be explained by differences in organic matter content and pH of the rivers. PMID:22183948

  14. Mercury distribution and exchanges between the Amazon River and connected floodplain lakes.

    PubMed

    Maia, Poliana Dutra; Maurice, Laurence; Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David; Cossa, Daniel; Pérez, Marcela; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Rhéault, Isabelle

    2009-11-15

    This work presents the distribution and the partition of mercury (Hg) in the Curuai floodplain lakes along the Amazon River. The maximum Total Filtered Hg (T-FHg) concentrations in the floodplain lakes (28 to 52 pmol L(-1)) coincide with the maximum T-FHg concentrations of the Amazon River and are measured during the flooding period. The lowest T-FHg values (3 to 5 pmol L(-1)) are observed during the flood peak of the mainstream, during the rainy season, when waters are diluted by the local rainfall. In this system, Hg is mainly transported in the particulate phase, confirmed by elevated values of the Hg partition coefficient (4.77

  15. Late Quaternary Paleohydrology of the Madre de Dios River, southwestern Amazon Basin, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsby, Catherine A.; Hemric, Erin M.; Baker, Paul A.

    2009-12-01

    Late Quaternary climatic and hydrologic variability triggered changes in fluvial deposition and erosion along the course of the Madre de Dios River, Peru, the largest tributary basin of the Madeira basin, itself the largest tributary basin of the Amazon. Three laterally extensive, Quaternary-age, terrace tracts are present within the Madre de Dios basin. Analysis of sedimentary facies, present in the modern cut banks and terraced sequences, along with radiocarbon dates on fossil wood and leaf material preserved in the terraced strata, allow reconstruction of the Late Quaternary depositional history of the sedimentary sequences, including determination of the approximate timing of aggradation and downcutting episodes and its relationship to the timing of past climate change in this portion of the Amazon basin and beyond. The Quaternary sediments underlying the terraces most often recorded deposition in a coarse-grained meandering fluvial system. The T3 terrace, the highest terrace, is underlain by the Miocene (?) Ipururi Formation, which is unconformably overlain by the late Miocene-Pleistocene (?) (> 48,000 cal yrs BP) Madre de Dios Formation, a multistory coarse-sandy to gravelly channel and point bar complex. The latter was downcut before 29,850 ± 100 cal yrs BP. This downcut landscape was infilled by meandering fluvial strata characterized by gravelly channel deposits in a sequence dominated by floodplain and lateral accretion deposits. These strata were in turn downcut to form the T2 terrace before 11,970 ± 100 cal yrs BP. A third episode of aggradation resulted in the deposition of a sand-dominated meandering channel complex that infilled the T2 valley and was subsequently downcut after 3780 ± 50 cal yrs BP. This most recent terrace is infilled by the modern fluvial sediment, which has been actively aggrading since at least 870 ± 50 cal yrs BP. Importantly, the Madre de Dios fluvial system actively aggraded between 30,000 and 25,000 cal yrs BP, (and likely

  16. Reconnaissance investigations of the discharge and water quality of the Amazon River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltman, Roy Edwin

    1968-01-01

    Selected published estimates of the discharge of Amazon River in the vicinity of Obidos and the mouth are presented to show the great variance of available information. The most reasonable estimates prepared by those who measured some parameters of the flow were studied by Maurice Parde, who concluded that the mean annual discharge is 90,000 to 100,000 cms (cubic meters per second) or 3,200,000 to 3,500,000 cfs (cubic feet per second). A few published estimates of discharge at mouth of 110,000 cms (3,900,000 cfs) based on rainfall-runoff relationships developed for other humid regions of the world are available. Three measurements of discharge made at the Obidos narrows in 1963-64 by a joint Brazil-United States expedition at high, low, and medium river stage are referred to the datum used at the Obidos gage during the period of operation, 1928-46, and a relationship between stage and discharge prepared on the basis of the measurements and supplementary data and computations. Recovery of the original Obidos gage datum is verified by referring the 1963-64 concurrent river stages at Manaus, Obidos, and Taperinha to gage relation curves developed for Manaus-Obidos and Obidos-Taperinha for periods of concurrent operation, 1928-46 and 1931-46, respectively. The average discharge, based on the stage-discharge relation and record of river stage for the period 1928-46, is computed to be 5,500,000 cfs (157,000 cms) for the Obidos site. The greatest known flood at Obidos, that of June 1953, is computed to have been a flow of 12,500,000 cfs (350,000 cms) at stage of 7.6 meters (24.9 feet) in the main channel and an indeterminate amount of overflow which, under the best assumed overflow conditions, may have amounted to about 10 percent of the main channel flow. Overflow discharge at stage equivalent to mean annual discharge is judged to be an insignificant percentage of flow down the main channel. Miscellaneous data collected during the flow measurements show that the tidal

  17. Influence of the Amazon River on the surface optical properties of the western tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Rossana; Subramaniam, Ajit

    2004-11-01

    The distribution of chromophoric-dissolved-organic-matter (CDOM) was investigated in the western tropical North Atlantic Ocean (WTNA) during the low and high flow periods of the Amazon River. A strong correlation was observed between in situ CDOM absorption at 490 nm and in situ diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (K490) during the high flow period (ratio of 0.7). SeaWiFS monthly composites of K490 showed (1) very low values over most of the WTNA, with higher values restricted to the continental shelf during the low flow season and (2) higher K490 over much of the WTNA extending offshore to >1000 km from the river mouth during the high flow season. The relative contribution to light absorption by particulate (phytoplankton and detritus) and dissolved (CDOM) materials was investigated at selected wavelengths. At 440 nm during the high flow period (1) CDOM dominated (˜70%) total light absorption closer to the river mouth; (2) phytoplankton and detritus dominated (˜40% each) absorption farther offshore but still within the Amazon plume; and (3) CDOM contributed ˜20%, phytoplankton >60%, and detritus ˜10% outside the plume. In situ data suggests a terrestrial source for the CDOM off the coast of South America during the high flow period with possible offshore local sinks (photodegradation) as well as sources (in situ production). The Amazon River strongly influences the optical properties of the WTNA at distances over 1000 km from the river mouth. Retrievals of phytoplankton biomass based on satellite ocean color data can be largely overestimated in the WTNA, if the contribution to light absorption by CDOM and detritus is not taken into account.

  18. Planform evolution of two anabranching structures in the Upper Peruvian Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Mendoza, A.; Paredes, J.; Ortals, C.; Montoro, H.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study to relate the sinuosity of the main channel and its effect on the dynamics of the secondary channels of anabranching structures. For this purpose, two locations of the Peruvian Amazon River were selected: (1) a site with a medium to high-sinuosity main channel (MS site: Muyuy, Peru) and (2) a site with a low-sinuosity main channel (LS site: at the triple boundary between Brazil, Colombia, and Peru). The main channels for both the MS and LS anabranching structures have freedom to migrate in the lateral direction, while at least one of their secondary channels is adjacent to the geological valley. For MS and LS sites, temporal analysis of planform evolution was carried out using 30 years of satellite imagery from which metrics such as width, sinuosity, and annual maximum migration rates of main and secondary channels were calculated. Additionally, detailed hydrodynamic and bed morphology field measurements were carried out, and a two-dimensional shallow water numerical model was developed. For a medium to high-sinuosity main channel anabranching structure, the secondary channels present a dominant mechanism for reworking the floodplain, while for the low-sinuosity anabranching structure, the main channel planform dynamics is dominant. Flow velocities along the main and secondary channels for low, transition, and high-flow discharges describe that for MS (LS) site, the velocities are much higher along the secondary (main) channels.

  19. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27304520

  20. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27334815

  1. Mercury in fish of the Madeira river (temporal and spatial assessment), Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Wanderley R; Dórea, José G; Bernardi, José Vicente E; Lauthartte, Leidiane C; Mussy, Marilia H; Lacerda, Luiz D; Malm, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    The Madeira River is the largest tributary of the Amazon River Basin and one of the most impacted by artisanal gold-mining activities, deforestation for agricultural projects, and recent hydroelectric reservoirs. Total Hg (and methylmercury-MeHg) concentrations was determined in 3182 fish samples of 84 species from different trophic levels as a function of standard size. Species at the top of the trophic level (Piscivorous, Carnivorous) showed the highest mean total Hg concentrations (51-1242 µg/kg), Planctivorous and Omnivorous species showed intermediate total Hg concentrations (26-494 µg/kg), while Detritivorous and Herbivorous species showed the lowest range of mean total Hg concentrations (9-275 µg/kg). Significant correlations between fish size (standard length) and total Hg concentrations were seen for Planctivorous (r=0.474, p=0.0001), Piscivorous (r=0.459, p=0.0001), Detritivorous (r=0.227, p=0.0001), Carnivorous (r=0.212, p=0.0001), and Herbivorous (r=0.156, p=0.01), but not for the Omnivorous species (r=-0.064, p=0.0685). Moreover, fish trophic levels influenced the ratio of MeHg to total Hg (ranged from 70% to 92%). When adjusted for standard body length, significant increases in Hg concentrations in the last 10 years were species specific. Spatial differences, albeit significant for some species, were not consistent with time trends for environmental contamination from past alluvial gold mining activities. Fish-Hg bioaccumulation is species specific but fish feeding strategies are the predominant influence in the fish-Hg bioaccumulation pattern. PMID:25863592

  2. Simulation of Water Sources and Precipitation Recycling for the MacKenzie, Mississippi and Amazon River Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Chern, Jiun-Dar

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model simulation for 1948-1997 of the water budgets for the MacKenzie, Mississippi and Amazon River basins is presented. In addition to the water budget, we include passive tracers to identify the geographic sources of water for the basins, and the analysis focuses on the mechanisms contributing to precipitation recycling in each basin. While each basin s precipitation recycling has a strong dependency on evaporation during the mean annual cycle, the interannual variability of the recycling shows important relationships with the atmospheric circulation. The MacKenzie River basin has only a weak interannual dependency on evaporation, where the variations in zonal moisture transport from the Pacific Ocean can affect the basin water cycle. On the other hand, the Mississippi River basin has strong interannual dependencies on evaporation. While the precipitation recycling weakens with increased low level jet intensity, the evaporation variations exert stronger influence in providing water vapor for convective precipitation at the convective cloud base. High precipitation recycling is also found to be partly connected to warm SSTs in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The Amazon River basin evaporation exhibits small interannual variations, so that the interannual variations of precipitation recycling are related to atmospheric moisture transport from the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. Increasing SSTs over the 50-year period are causing increased easterly transport across the basin. As moisture transport increases, the Amazon precipitation recycling decreases (without real time varying vegetation changes). In addition, precipitation recycling from a bulk diagnostic method is compared to the passive tracer method used in the analysis. While the mean values are different, the interannual variations are comparable between each method. The methods also exhibit similar relationships to the terms of the basin scale water budgets.

  3. Hydrological Controls of Riverine Ecosystems of the Napo River (Amazon Basin): Implications for the Management and Conservation of Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    Scientific understanding of neotropical floodplains comes mainly from work on large rivers with predictable seasonal flooding regimes. Less studied rivers and floodplains on the Andean-Amazon interface are distinct in their hydrology, with more erratic flow regimes, and thus ecological roles of floodplain inundation differ in those ecosystems. Multiple and unpredictable flooding events control inundation of floodplains, with important implications for fish and wildlife, plant communities, and human activities. Wetlands along the river corridor exist across a continuum from strong river control to influence only by local waters, with the latter often lying on floodplain paleoterraces. The goal of this study was to understand the hydrological interactions and habitat diversity of the Napo River, a major Amazon tributary that originates in the Andes and drains exceptionally biodiverse Andean foreland plains. This river system is envisioned by developers as an industrial waterway that would require hydrological alterations and affect floodplain ecosystems. Water level regimes of the Napo River and its associated environments were assessed using networks of data loggers that recorded time under water across transects extending inland from the river across more than 100 sites and for up to 5 years. These networks also included rising stage samplers that collected flood water samples for determination of their origin (i.e., Andean rivers vs. local waters) based on hydrochemical composition. In addition, this work entails a classification of aquatic environments of the Napo Basin using an object-oriented remote sensing approach to simultaneously analyze optical and radar satellite imagery and digital elevation models to better assess the extent and diversity of flooded environments. We found out a continuum of hydrological regimes and aquatic habitats along the Napo River floodplains that are linked to the river hydrology in different degrees. Overall, environments that

  4. U-Th-Ra in Amazon rivers: New insights on U-series fractionation during chemical weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, A.; Bourdon, B.; Gaillardet, J.; Allegre, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    Seawater ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) has been proposed as a proxy for understanding past continental weathering conditions. Thus, it is crucial to constrain the parameters that control U-series fractionation during present day weathering in order to understand what they have recorded in the past. Additionally, U-series provide useful constraints for understanding chemical weathering as a function of environmental variables. We have analyzed { 238} U-{ 234} U-{ 230} Th-{ 226} Ra compositions in the dissolved phase (< 0.2μm) of Amazon river and major tributaries. Two groups can be distinguished within Amazon tributaries: river draining mainly the Andes and the Brazilian shield; and rivers dominated by dissolved organic material. The latter are characterized by the absence of { 238} U-{ 234} U fractionation and very high Th contents (> 80ng/l) whereas the former display { 234} U excess over { 238} U and lower Th contents (< 30ng/l). High Th concentrations for organic-rich waters are consistent with a previous study, which revealed the existence of strong complexes between Th and humic acids (Viers et al., 1997). The lack of { 234} U-{ 238} U disequilibrium in organic-rich waters suggests that dissolved organic matter may play a role on { 234} U-{ 238} U fractionation. However, as ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) ratio of the Amazon mainstream is dominated by Solim\\~{ o}es and Madeira compositions, dissolved organic matter is believed to have minor consequences on the ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) input to the ocean. { 232} Th/{ 238} U of the source material based on ({ 230} Th/{ 232} Th) ratios range, for some rivers, between 5.5 and 8.7, which is higher than the estimated value based on { 208} Pb-{ 206} Pb systematics in Amazon rivers (ca. 3.8; All\\`{ e}gre et al., 1996). This may be the result of past U-removal during previous weathering events over time-scales longer than the half-life of thorium-230 (75 ka). References: Viers J. et al. (1997) Chem. Geol., vol. 140, pp. 181-206 All\\`{ e

  5. A comparison of dissolved humic substances from seawater with Amazon River counterparts by sup 13 C-NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I. ); Hatcher, P.G. ); Ertel, J.R. ); Meyers-Schulte, K.J. )

    1992-04-01

    Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater constitutes one of the major reservoirs of reduced carbon on earth, the biochemical and geographic origins of this material and its hydrophobic humic component remain unclear. Rivers have been suggested as a potentially important source of marine DOM, but this implication has not yet been systematically tested by direct comparisons of the bulk structural characteristics of DOM isolated from representative ocean reservoirs and their major river sources. The authors report here such a comparison and find that dissolved humic substances isolated from surface and deep seawater in the East Equatorial and north Central Pacific are enriched in nitrogen and {sup 13}C and depleted in unsaturated carbon with respect to counterparts from the Amazon River system. Based on these observations, riverine dissolved humic substances appear to comprise a small fraction of seawater humic substances and therefore must be efficiently and rapidly removed from the ocean.

  6. The reactivity of plant-derived organic matter and the potential importance of priming effects along the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Nicholas D.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.; Gagne-Maynard, William; Cunha, Alan C.; Brito, Daimio C.; Neu, Vania; Matos Valerio, Aline; Silva, Rodrigo; Krusche, Alex V.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Keil, Richard G.

    2016-06-01

    Here we present direct measurements of the biological breakdown of 13C-labeled substrates to CO2 at seven locations along the lower Amazon River, from Óbidos to the mouth. Dark incubation experiments were performed at high and low water periods using vanillin, a lignin phenol derived from vascular plants, and at the high water period using four different 13C-labeled plant litter leachates. Leachates derived from oak wood were degraded most slowly with vanillin monomers, macrophyte leaves, macrophyte stems, and whole grass leachates being converted to CO2 1.2, 1.3, 1.7, and 2.3 times faster, respectively, at the upstream boundary, Óbidos. Relative to Óbidos, the sum degradation rate of all four leachates was 3.3 and 2.6 times faster in the algae-rich Tapajós and Xingu Rivers, respectively. Likewise, the leachates were broken down 3.2 times more quickly at Óbidos when algal biomass from the Tapajós River was simultaneously added. Leachate reactivity similarly increased from Óbidos to the mouth with leachates breaking down 1.7 times more quickly at Almeirim (midway to the mouth) and 2.8 times more quickly across the river mouth. There was no discernible correlation between in situ nutrient levels and remineralization rates, suggesting that priming effects were an important factor controlling reactivity along the continuum. Further, continuous measurements of CO2, O2, and conductivity along the confluence of the Tapajós and Amazon Rivers and the Xingu and Jarauçu Rivers revealed in situ evidence for enhanced O2 drawdown and CO2 production along the mixing zone of these confluences.

  7. Chain of commercialization of Podocnemis spp. turtles (Testudines: Podocnemididae) in the Purus River, Amazon basin, Brazil: current status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Consumption of turtles by natives and settlers in the Amazon and Orinoco has been widely studied in scientific communities. Accepted cultural customs and the local dietary and monetary needs need to be taken into account in conservation programs, and when implementing federal laws related to consumption and fishing methods. This study was conducted around the Purus River, a region known for the consumption and illegal trade of turtles. The objective of this study was to quantify the illegal turtle trade in Tapauá and to understand its effect on the local economy. Methods This study was conducted in the municipality of Tapauá in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. To estimate turtle consumption, interviews were conducted over 2 consecutive years (2006 and 2007) in urban areas and isolated communities. The experimental design was randomized with respect to type of household. To study the turtle fishery and trade chain, we used snowball sampling methodology. Results During our study period, 100% of respondents reported consuming at least three species of turtles (Podocnemis spp.). Our estimates indicate that about 34 tons of animals are consumed annually in Tapauá along the margins of a major fishing river in the Amazon. At least five components related to the chain of commercialization of turtles on the Purus River are identified: Indigenous Apurinã and (2) residents of bordering villages (communities); (3) of local smugglers buy and sell turtles to the community in exchange for manufactured goods, and (4) regional smugglers buy in Tapauá, Lábrea, and Beruri to sell in Manaus and Manacapuru; Finally, (5) there are professional fishermen. Conclusions We quantify the full impact of turtle consumption and advocate the conservation of the region’s turtle populations. The Brazilian government should initiate a new turtle consumption management program which involves the opinions of consumers. With these measures the conservation of freshwater turtles in the

  8. Seasonal dynamics of the fish assemblage in a floodplain lake at the confluence of the Negro and Amazon Rivers.

    PubMed

    Röpke, C P; Amadio, S A; Winemiller, K O; Zuanon, J

    2016-07-01

    The temporal effect of discharge and limnology on fish composition and species diversity in a floodplain lake at the confluence of the Amazon and Negro Rivers was evaluated. Species richness, abundance and assemblage composition were strongly influenced by seasonal discharge of the Amazon and Negro Rivers, which affects lateral connectivity, water conductivity and temperature. As a consequence, temporal β-diversity was high in the lake and the assemblage was dominated by seasonally transient species. Relatively large species known to feed on resources within the floodplain were captured almost exclusively during the flood period. During the dry season, the assemblage was dominated by fishes adapted to harsh conditions of high temperature and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. An open system with high spatial and temporal heterogeneity created by the meeting of two large rivers with different water chemistry, Lago Catalão has a dynamic fish assemblage. Given its high temporal β-diversity and abundance of fishes, many of great importance in local fisheries, Lago Catalão and other floodplain lakes in this region merit special attention for conservation. PMID:26563716

  9. The distribution of thiamin and pyridoxine in the western tropical North Atlantic Amazon River plume

    PubMed Central

    Barada, Laila P.; Cutter, Lynda; Montoya, Joseph P.; Webb, Eric A.; Capone, Douglas G.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2013-01-01

    B-vitamins are recognized as essential organic growth factors for many organisms, although little is known about their abundance and distribution in marine ecosystems. Despite their metabolic functions regulating important enzymatic reactions, the methodology to directly measure different B-vitamins in aquatic environments has only recently been developed. Here, we present the first direct measurements of two B-vitamins, thiamin (B1), and pyridoxine (B6), in the Amazon River plume-influenced western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA) Ocean, an area known to have high productivity, carbon (C) and dinitrogen (N2) fixation, and C sequestration. The vitamins B1 and B6 ranged in concentrations from undetectable to 230 and 40 pM, respectively. Significantly higher concentrations were measured in the surface plume water at some stations and variation with salinity was observed, suggesting a possible riverine influence on those B-vitamins. The influences of vitamins B1 and B6 on biogeochemical processes such as C and N2 fixation were investigated using a linear regression model that indicated the availability of those organic factors could affect these rates in the WTNA. In fact, significant increases in C fixation and N2 fixation were observed with increasing vitamin B1 concentrations at some low and mesohaline stations (stations 9.1 and 1; p value <0.017 and <0.03, respectively). N2 fixation was also found to have a significant positive correlation with B1 concentrations at station 1 (p value 0.029), as well as vitamin B6 at station 9.1 (p value <0.017). This work suggests that there can be a dynamic interplay between essential biogeochemical rates (C and N2 fixation) and B-vitamins, drawing attention to potential roles of B-vitamins in ecosystem dynamics, community structure, and global biogeochemistry. PMID:23471170

  10. Metatranscriptomics of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in the Amazon River plume

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Jason A; Satinsky, Brandon M; Doherty, Mary; Zielinski, Brian; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation is an important nitrogen source for surface ocean microbial communities. However, nearly all information on the diversity and gene expression of organisms responsible for oceanic N2 fixation in the environment has come from targeted approaches that assay only a small number of genes and organisms. Using genomes of diazotrophic cyanobacteria to extract reads from extensive meta-genomic and -transcriptomic libraries, we examined diazotroph diversity and gene expression from the Amazon River plume, an area characterized by salinity and nutrient gradients. Diazotroph genome and transcript sequences were most abundant in the transitional waters compared with lower salinity or oceanic water masses. We were able to distinguish two genetically divergent phylotypes within the Hemiaulus-associated Richelia sequences, which were the most abundant diazotroph sequences in the data set. Photosystem (PS)-II transcripts in Richelia populations were much less abundant than those in Trichodesmium, and transcripts from several Richelia PS-II genes were absent, indicating a prominent role for cyclic electron transport in Richelia. In addition, there were several abundant regulatory transcripts, including one that targets a gene involved in PS-I cyclic electron transport in Richelia. High sequence coverage of the Richelia transcripts, as well as those from Trichodesmium populations, allowed us to identify expressed regions of the genomes that had been overlooked by genome annotations. High-coverage genomic and transcription analysis enabled the characterization of distinct phylotypes within diazotrophic populations, revealed a distinction in a core process between dominant populations and provided evidence for a prominent role for noncoding RNAs in microbial communities. PMID:25514535

  11. Climate variability and extreme drought in the upper Solimões River (western Amazon Basin): Understanding the exceptional 2010 drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Jhan Carlo; Ronchail, Josyane; Guyot, Jean Loup; Junquas, Clementine; Vauchel, Philippe; Lavado, Waldo; Drapeau, Guillaume; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2011-07-01

    This work provides an initial overview of climate features and their related hydrological impacts during the recent extreme droughts (1995, 1998, 2005 and 2010) in the upper Solimões River (western Amazon), using comprehensive in situ discharge and rainfall datasets. The droughts are generally associated with positive SST anomalies in the tropical North Atlantic and weak trade winds and water vapor transport toward the upper Solimões, which, in association with increased subsidence over central and southern Amazon, explain the lack of rainfall and very low discharge values. But in 1998, toward the end of the 1997-98 El Niño event, the drought is more likely related to an anomalous divergence of water vapor in the western Amazon that is characteristic of a warm event in the Pacific. During the austral spring and winter of 2010, the most severe drought since the seventies has been registered in the upper Solimões. Its intensity and its length, when compared to the 2005 drought, can be explained by the addition of an El Niño in austral summer and a very warm episode in the Atlantic in boreal spring and summer. As in 2005, the lack of water in 2010 was more important in the southern tropical tributaries of the upper Solimões than in the northern ones.

  12. Provenance of sands from the confluence of the Amazon and Madeira rivers based on detrital heavy minerals and luminescence of quartz and feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Daniel R.; Sawakuchi, André O.; Guedes, Carlos C. F.; Giannini, Paulo C. F.; Grohmann, Carlos H.; Ferreira, Manuela P.

    2015-03-01

    Source-to-sink systems are poorly known in tropical rivers. For the Amazonian rivers, the majority of the provenance studies remain focused on the suspended load, implying a poor understanding of the processes governing production and distribution of sands. In this study, we perform heavy mineral and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis to cover the entire spectrum (heavy and light minerals fraction) of 29 sand samples of the Lower Madeira river region (Amazon and Madeira rivers), of which the main goal was to find provenance indicators specific to these rivers. Despite the tropical humid climate, the sands of the Amazon and Lower Madeira rivers are rich in unstable heavy minerals as augite, hypersthene, green hornblende and andalusite. The Madeira river is highlighted by its higher content of andalusite, with source attributed to the Amazon Craton (medium-to-high grade metamorphic rocks), while the Amazon river, upstream of the Madeira river mouth, has a signature of augite and hypersthene, that suggests an Andean provenance (volcanic rocks). Sands from the Madeira river can be tracked in the Amazon river by the increasing concentration in andalusite. OSL analysis of the light minerals fraction was used as an index of feldspar concentration and sedimentary history of quartz grains. Lower feldspar concentration and quartz grains with longer sedimentary history (higher OSL sensitivity) also point to a major contribution of cratonic sources for the sands in the Madeira river. While the sands from the Lower Madeira would be mainly supplied by cratonic rocks, previous work recognised that suspended sediments (silt and clay) are derived from Andean rocks. Therefore, we interpret a decoupling between the sources of sand and mud (silt and clay) under transport in the Madeira river. Andean sands (rich in augite and hypersthene) would be trapped in the foreland zones of the Beni and Mamoré tributaries. In the Amazon river sands, the low OSL sensitivity of the

  13. Amazon And Negro River Breeze And Manaus Urban Area Influence In Surface Wind And Water Vapor Daily Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, M.; da Silva Dias, M. F.; Freitas, E. D.; Meteorologia Aplicada A Sistemas de Tempo Regionais-Master

    2013-05-01

    Close to the urban area of Manaus the Negro and Amazon rivers provide a scenario where river breeze can be particularly well detected due to their width of about 5 - 10 km. Previous studies have looked into the river breeze in the Amazon Basin and detected their influence in surface data, particularly into the effect on wind and moisture. The heat island effect of the Manaus urban area has also been demonstrated using surface temperature data. Here we present an analysis using 35 years of surface weather station hourly data from the two Manaus airports, Eduardo Gomes (AEG) and Ponta de Pelada (APP). The location of these stations allows the analysis of local circulations contrasting the evolution close to the margin and in the Southern tip of the urban area and a more inland location (APP) about 25 km to the Northewest of AEG. We focus on dew point temperature, water vapor pressure, wind speed and direction providing direction statistics for the two stations and contrasting the evolution in the dry and wet seasons.In the AEG weather station data we found relatively high values of accumulated frequency of the southwest and northwest wind in the period from 9 am to 6 pm (local time - LT) due to the action of the river breeze associated to the Negro River. In June and July (dry season), when the wind was blowing from the Southeast (river-breeze wind), high values of vapor pressure (VP) were observed during the daytime due to the transport of moist air from river to land. In the wind frequency data of the APP weather station we verified maximums in nighttime and minimums in daytime period when the wind direction was from the Northwest. These characteristics of maximums and minimums of wind frequency were observed in Northeastern winds only in the dry season. High frequency of South winds in daytime and minimums in nighttime period also indicates the action of river breeze. When the wind direction was southern, we found high values of VP (e.g, higher than 30.5 hPa in

  14. Evaluation of the Amazon River delta as a barrier to gene flow for the regional malaria vector, Anopheles aquasalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fairley, T L; Póvoa, M M; Conn, J E

    2002-11-01

    The Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles aquasalis Curry is distributed predominantly along the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts because of its tolerance for breeding in salt water. We tested the hypothesis that the freshwater Amazon River acts as a barrier to gene flow in northeastern Brazil, by examining variation at a 588-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Igene from five populations. We identified 15 haplotypes of which 5 were shared both (1) between sample localities and (2) across the Amazon River Delta. Sequence divergence ranged from 0.0017-0.0272 (average = 0.0137). Estimates of genetic subdivision based on the presence of the Amazon Riverwere greatest within localities (phi = 0.029) and among regions (phi = 0.018), followed by among localities (phi = 0.011), but none were significant. Parsimony, neighbor-joining, and Nested Clade Analyses were used to estimate relationships among populations and infer evolutionary processes. Two phylogenetically distinct clusters of populations were moderately supported by parsimony. Neighbor-joining trees were poorly resolved, thus providing no geographical resolution and no support for the Amazon River as a barrier to migration. Phylogeographic structure as detected by the Nested Clade Analysis was consistent with restricted gene flow coupled with isolation by distance. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the localities within this region of northeastern Brazil constitute a single large population of An. aquasalis that spans the Amazon Delta. PMID:12495184

  15. Role of gas exchange in the inorganic carbon, oxygen, and /sup 222/Rn budgets of the Amazon River

    SciTech Connect

    Devol, A.H.; Quay, P.D.; Richey, J.E.; Martinelli, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen, /sup 222/Rn, pCO/sub 2/, alkalinity, respiration rate, and discharge have been measured at eight mainstem and seven tributary stations during February-March 1984 in a 1700-km stretch of the Amazon River between Vargem Grande and Obidos in Brazil. Air-water gas exchange rates were estimated two ways: measurements of the flux of /sup 222/Rn int floating domes yielded an average boundary layer thickness of 78..mu..m, and oxygen mass balance calculations resulted in an average of 38..mu..m. Given a boundary layer thickness on the order of 50..mu..m, CO/sub 2/ loss to the atmosphere in the entire reach would have been 37.4 kmol s/sup -1/, which is about equal to the total tributary dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) input and is about half of the total fluvial DIC input to the section. Thus, CO/sub 2/ evasion is a major component of Amazon River DIC balance. Because gas exchange within the section was rapid relative to water travel time through the section, a quasi-steady state was maintained between respiratory input and evasion of CO/sub 2/. Dissolved /sup 222/Rn activities in the mainstem varied from 3.5 to 8.3 dpm liter/sup -1/ and were always highly supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. Dissolved radon was also not supported by decay of /sup 222/Ra in the mainstem. A /sup 222/Rn mass balance indicated that direct groundwater input into this stretch of the Amazon mainstem probably accounted for no more than 1% of water discharge.

  16. Transport, distribution and speciation of mercury in the Amazon River at the confluence of black and white waters of the Negro and Solimões Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice-Bourgoin, Laurence; Quemerais, Bernadette; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Seyler, Patrick

    2003-05-01

    This study describes the transport and speciation of mercury (Hg) and the associated role of organic matter in these processes at the confluence of the Negro (black waters) and Solimões (white waters) Rivers, which form the Amazon River. The Negro has the highest total Hg content (11·6 to 18·2 ng l-1) due to the extreme particulate Hg concentrations (2074 ng g-1 at the surface), 10 to 20 times higher than those measured in other Amazon tributaries. The total organic carbon (TOC) consists primarily of dissolved organic carbon, which corresponds to 89% and 66% of the TOC in the Negro and Solimões Rivers respectively, and is mainly composed of humic substances, carriers for most of the metal ions transported in rivers. At the confluence of the Negro and Solimões Rivers, the total Hg concentrations decrease markedly. An isotopic mass balance showed that the complete mixing of the two rivers was achieved 25 km downstream of the confluence. At 60 km downstream of the confluence, the flux of Hg decreases to 73 kg day-1, which represents a net losses of 5 kg day-1 and 15 kg day-1 of dissolved Hg and particulate Hg respectively, assuming that the discharge was constant during the sampling survey and without significant lateral input. Moreover, the Hg losses are correlated with the total suspended matter concentrations, which vary throughout the mixing zone, and also with the particulate and dissolved organic carbon distribution. We suggest that the dissolved loss occurs during the flocculation of organic matter within the zone of rapidly changing physical and chemical conditions downstream of the confluence, and that the particulate loss is by the deposition of particles along the mixing zone favoured by decreasing stream velocities during the sampling survey. Adsorption processes of Hg on dissolved organic matter seem to be responsible for the decrease of dissolved Hg concentrations in the mixing zone.

  17. Seasonal dissolved rare earth element dynamics of the Amazon River main stem, its tributaries, and the Curuaí floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroux, GwéNaëL.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Boaventura, Geraldo; Viers, JéRôMe; Godderis, Yves; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Sondag, Francis; Gardoll, SéBastien; Lagane, Christelle; Seyler, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    We present a comprehensive dissolved rare earth element (REE) data set for the Amazon River and its main tributaries, Rio Negro, Solimões, and Madeira, as well as the Curuaí floodplain. The two-year time series show that REE vary seasonally with discharge in each of the tributaries, and indicate a hydrologically dominated control. Upper crust normalized REE patterns are relatively constant throughout the year, with Ce/Ce* anomalies being positively related to discharge. We propose revised annual dissolved REE fluxes to the surface Atlantic Ocean based on an integration of the seasonal data. For Nd (<0.22 μm) this results in an average flux of 607 ± 43 T/yr, which is at least 1.6 times larger than the previous estimate of 374 T/yr (<0.45 μm) based on low water stage data. Moreover, during the high water season the maximum Nd flux measures 1277 t.yr-1, constituting 30% of the required flux to the Atlantic Ocean (Tachikawa et al., 2003). Consequently, a smaller contribution of Nd from atmospheric and river particle desorption is required than was previously suggested. A mass balance of Amazon tributaries and observed fluxes at Óbidos indicates that dissolved LREE behave quasi-conservatively. Conversely, the HREE mass balance presents a deficit during the high water stages, which could be related to the passage of water through the floodplain system accompanied by solid/dissolved phase transfer.

  18. Decrease of soil fertility and release of mercury following deforestation in the Andean Amazon, Napo River Valley, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Mainville, N; Webb, J; Lucotte, M; Davidson, R; Betancourt, O; Cueva, E; Mergler, D

    2006-09-01

    Soil erosion and degradation provoked by deforestation in the Amazon is a global concern, and recent studies propose a link between deforestation, soil erosion and the leaching of naturally occurring mercury (Hg). In the Ecuadorian Amazon, elevated deforestation rates and the proximity of volcanoes could play an important role in soil fertility and soil Hg levels. The goal of this study is to evaluate the impacts of deforestation on Andisol and Inceptisol fertility and Hg levels in the Napo River Valley, Ecuador. Results show a significant decrease in surface soil organic matter (-15% to -70% of C and N) and exchangeable cations (-25% to -60%) in deforested plots. Hg concentrations at the surface (0-5 cm), higher in Andisols (225 ng/g average) than in Inceptisols (95 ng/g average), show a decrease of up to 60% following deforestation. Soil erosion exposes the mineral horizon, a layer with a higher Hg burden, to the elements thus provoking and accelerating Hg leaching. These results suggest that deforestation and the associated Hg leaching could contribute to the fish Hg contamination measured in the Napo River watershed. PMID:16499953

  19. Impact of seasonal hydrological variation on the distributions of tetraether lipids along the Amazon River in the central Amazon basin: implications for the MBT/CBT paleothermometer and the BIT index

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Claudia; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Abril, Gwenaël; Sobrinho, Rodrigo Lima; Dorhout, Denise; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was collected along the Amazon River in the central Amazon basin and in three tributaries during the rising water (RW), high water (HW), falling water (FW) and low water (LW) season. Changes in the concentration and the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), i.e., the methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and the cyclization of brGDGTs (CBT), were seen in the Amazon main stem. The highest concentration of core lipid (CL) brGDGTs normalized to particulate organic carbon (POC) was found during the HW season. During the HW season the MBT and CBT in the Amazon main stem was also most similar to that of lowland Amazon (terra firme) soils, indicating that the highest input of soil-derived brGDGTs occurred due to increased water runoff. During the other seasons the MBT and CBT indicated an increased influence of in situ production of brGDGTs even though soils remained the main source of brGDGTs. Our results reveal that the influence of seasonal variation is relatively small, but can be clearly detected. Crenarchaeol was mostly produced in the river. Its concentration was lower during the HW season compared to that of the other seasons. Hence, our study shows the complexity of processes that influence the GDGT distribution during the transport from land to ocean. It emphasizes the importance of a detailed study of a river basin to interpret the MBT/CBT and BIT records for paleo reconstructions in adjacent marine setting. PMID:23966986

  20. Mercury Pollution in Soils from the Yacuambi River (Ecuadorian Amazon) as a Result of Gold Placer Mining.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, Charo; Collahuazo, Luis; Torres, Sandra; Chinchay, Luis; Ayala, Diana; Benítez, Paulina

    2015-09-01

    Gold mining is known to generate important economic products but also to produce several types of contamination/pollution. We report here the first data about Hg concentrations in the soils of the Yacuambi River in the Ecuadorian Amazon. We analyzed soil samples to assess the extent of contamination caused by gold placer mining in this area. Hg concentrations in soils exceeded the local background concentrations. High concentrations of Mn, As, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn in some soil samples were probably derived from the geology of the site, which is rich in polysulfides and metamorphic rocks. Placer mining may accelerate the natural release of these elements to the environment by the exposure of the bedrock to the atmosphere. Accumulation of Hg in the river soils may be a potential source of toxicity for aquatic life and a risk to human health in the future. PMID:26183387

  1. A rapid approach to evaluate putative nursery sites for penaeid prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Matthew D.; Smith, James A.; Boys, Craig A.; Whitney, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    Identifying nursery habitats for an aquatic species generally requires tracing adult individuals back through time and space to the area or habitat in which they developed as juveniles. We develop and trial a study design and analytical approach to evaluate the suitability of using stable isotopes to trace emigrating prawns to putative nursery sites, and evaluate assumptions inherent in the application of the approach using two penaeid species with Type-II life cycles: Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus and Metapenaeus macleayi. Prawns were collected in putative nursery sites within the Hunter River, Australia, and analysed as composite samples of 6 individuals to provide habitat-specific isotopic signatures. Prawns emigrating from the mouth of the river were used as a proxy for individuals recruiting to the adult population, and assigned to putative nursery sites using a probabilistic mixing model and a simple, distance-based approach. Bivariate (δ15N and δ13C) isotopic data was sufficient to distinguish prawns from different putative nursery sites, and isotopic composition correlated closely with salinity. Approximately 90% of emigrating prawns collected could be assigned to these sites using bivariate isotopic data, and both analytical approaches gave similar results. The design developed here is broadly applicable to a suite of penaeid species, but its application will be most powerful when sampling is also aimed at understanding nursery function by simultaneous monitoring of size structure/growth, density, and trophic relationships within nursery habitats.

  2. Impact of seasonal hydrological variation on the distributions of branched and isoprenoid tetraether lipids along the Amazon River in the central Amazon basin: Implications for the MBT/CBT paleothermometer and the BIT index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Claudia; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lima Sobrinho, Rodrigo; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Abril Abril, Gwenaël; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2013-04-01

    We assessed the effects of hydrodynamical variations on the distributions and sources of branched and isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs and isoGDGTs, respectively) transported by the Amazon River in the central Amazon basin. Particulate suspended matter was collected in the Amazonian rivers and floodplain lakes at four different seasons (rising water, high water, falling water, and low water) at 6 stations along the main stem of the Amazon River, 3 tributaries (Negro, Madeira, and Tapajós) and 5 floodplain lakes (Manacapuru, Janauacá, Mirituba, Canaçari and Curuai). The concentration and distribution of brGDGTs of both core lipid (CL) and intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived fractions were investigated applying IPL-derived brGDGTs as an indicator of brGDGTs derived from recently-living cells. The organic carbon (OC)-normalized concentrations of CL brGDGTs mimicked the trend of the hydrological variation with highest concentrations during the high water season. The CL brGDGT distributions were most alike those of lowland Amazon (terra firme) soils during the high water season, indicating that input of soil-derived, allochthonous brGDGTs to the Amazon River was highest at that period. Accordingly, the methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and the cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) varied corresponding to the hydrological changes, with the increasing influence of in situ produced brGDGTs in rivers and floodplain lakes during the low water season. The concentrations of CL crenarchaeol were highest during the low water season, due to increased autochthonous production. The concentration changes of both brGDGTs and crenarchaeol lead to a variation of the branched and isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index between 0.4 (low water) and 0.9 (high water). Hence, our study hints at the effect of hydrodynamical variations on the source of brGDGTs and isoGDGTs transported by rivers to the ocean and emphasized the importance of a detailed

  3. Changes in the land cover and land use of the Itacaiunas River watershed, arc of deforestation, Carajas, southeastern Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Filho, P. W. M.; Nascimento, W. R., Jr.; Versiani de Mendonca, B. R.; Silva, R. O., Jr.; Guimaraes, J. T. F.; Dall'Agnol, R.; Siqueira, J. O.

    2015-04-01

    Human actions are changing the Amazon's landscape by clearing tropical forest and replacing it mainly by pasturelands. The focus of this work is to assess the changes in the Itacaiunas River watershed; an area located in the southeastern Amazon region, near Carajas, one of the largest mining provinces of the World. We used a Landsat imagery dataset to map and detect land covers (forest and montane savanna) and land use (pasturelands, mining and urban) changes from 1984 to 2013. We employed standard image processing techniques in conjunction with visual interpretation and geographic object-based classification. Land covers and land use (LCLU) "from-to" change detection approach was carried out to recognize the trajectories of LCLU classes based on object change detection analysis. We observed that ~47% (~1.9 million ha) of forest kept unchanged; almost 41% (~1.7 million ha) of changes was associated to conversion from forest to pasture, while 8% (~333,000 ha) remained unchanged pasture. The conversion of forest and montane savannah to mining area represents only 0.24% (~9,000 ha). We can conclude that synergy of visual interpretation to discriminate fine level objects with low contrast associated to urban, mining and savanna classes; and automatic classification of coarse level objects related to forest and pastureland classes is most successfully than use these methods individually. In essence, this approach combines the advantages of the human quality interpretation and quantitative computing capacity.

  4. Tropical Cyclone interaction with the Amazon-Orinoco river Plume: new insights from SMOS and Aquarius missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, R.; Yves, Q.; Joe, T.; Grodsky, S. A.; Bertrand, C.

    2012-12-01

    The fresh and neutrally buoyant water plume that forms in the Northwestern Tropical Atlantic from the discharge of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers is a salient oceangraphic feature at the surface of the main developement region of north atlantic Tropical Cyclones. The plume region is characterized by warmer ocean heat content, deeper thermocline and sub-surface barrier layers associated with the strong surface halocline. New microwave L-band radiometer sensors SMOS and Aquarius have clearly identified large scale haline changes after the passage of several hurricanes in 2010 and 2011 over that region. In this talk, we will give an overview of these observed signatures with a particular focus on hurricane Igor, a category 4 storm that developed in September 2010. Multiple satellite and in situ observations of Igor wake will be presented and discussed. In addition, we will present an historical perspective on the potential cooling inhibition impact of the plume and its potential feedback for hurricane intensification.

  5. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis; Villela, André Luis Oliveira; Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado; Wendroth, Ole

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0-30 and the 0-100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km(2) and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m(-2), respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. PMID:25918893

  6. Elevated mercury concentrations in soils, sediments, water, and fish of the Madeira River basin, Brazilian Amazon: a function of natural enrichments?

    PubMed

    Lechler, P J; Miller, J R; Lacerda, L D; Vinson, D; Bonzongo, J C; Lyons, W B; Warwick, J J

    2000-10-01

    Previous site-specific investigations have found that mercury concentrations in water, sediments, and biota of the Brazilian Amazon are elevated above global averages, and that these concentrations are a direct result of widespread mercury amalgamation mining operations conducted by non-organized prospectors. In order to assess the regional impacts of Hg contamination from these non-organized gold mining activities, water, sediments, and fish were systematically collected in 1997 along a 900-km reach of the Madeira River. The sampling program extended from the Amazon River upstream to Porto Velho, the site of historic and ongoing mercury amalgamation mining. Mercury concentrations were found to be elevated above global averages in all sampled media. However, the geochemical data suggest that the high mercury levels are due largely to natural sources and natural biogeochemical processes, and that the impacts of anthropogenically released mercury from mine sites is relatively localized. PMID:11032118

  7. Interannual variability patterns of the world's total column water content: Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, Isabella; De Bonis, Roberto; Fraedrich, Klaus; Sutera, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    Global trend patterns of yearly mean total column water (TCW) from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 20th century atmosphere model ERA-20CM (1900-2009) and the currently state-of-the-art reanalysis ERA-Interim (1979-2012) show common features of statistically significant upward trends. Of particular interest appears a pronounced regional dipole pattern of interannual climate variability over the South American continent particularly evident in ERA-Interim data. The trend dipole affects two distinct areas: the Andean Amazon basin and the Northeast Brazil. The target regions are characterized by rising and decreasing water content associated with water vapor convergence (divergence) and upward (downward) mass fluxes, respectively. As expected, local water vapor feedback due to local surface temperature change does to not fully explain this TCW trend dipole; other mechanisms may play a role in establishing the observed feature such as moisture transports and monsoon variability in the last decade. The observed trends of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) during the period 1982-2005 show an increasing greenness that coincides with the moistening of the atmospheric column in the Amazon basin. These results are substantiated by two single-station ground-based GPS measurements of TCW vapor (TCWV) from the two target regions.

  8. Surface water types and sediment distribution patterns at the confluence of mega rivers: The Solimões-Amazon and Negro Rivers junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Edward; Latrubesse, Edgardo M.

    2015-08-01

    Large river channel confluences are recognized as critical fluvial features because both intensive and extensive hydrophysical and geoecological processes take place at this interface. However, identifications of suspended sediment routing patterns through channel junctions and the roles of tributaries on downstream sediment transport in large rivers are still poorly explored. In this paper, we propose a remote sensing-based approach to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns of the postconfluence suspended sediment transport by mapping the surface water distribution in the ultimate example of large river confluence on Earth where distinct water types meet: The Solimões-Amazon (white water) and Negro (black water) rivers. The surface water types distribution was modeled for three different years: average hydrological condition (2007) and 2 years when extreme events occurred (drought-2005 and flood-2009). Amazonian surface water domination along the main channel is highest during the water discharge rising season. Surface water mixing along the main channel depends on the hydrological seasons with the highest mixed-homogenized area observed during water discharge peak season and the lowest during discharge rising season. Water mixture also depends on the yearly hydrological regime with the highest rates of water mixing in 2009, followed by 2005 and 2007. We conclude that the dominant mixing patterns observed in this study have been persistent over a decadal scale and the anabranching patterns contribute to avoid a faster mixing in a shorter distance. Our proposed approach can be applied to a variety of morphodynamic and environmental analyses in confluences of large rivers around the world.

  9. The estuarine chemistry and isotope systematics of 234,238U in the Amazon and Fly Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.; Campbell, P.; Porcelli, D.; McKee, B.

    2004-01-01

    Natural concentrations of 238U and ??234U values were determined in estuarine surface waters and pore waters of the Amazon and Fly (Papua New Guinea) Rivers to investigate U transport phenomena across river-dominated land-sea margins. Discharge from large, tropical rivers is a major source of dissolved and solid materials transported to the oceans, and are important in defining not only oceanic mass budgets, but also terrestrial weathering rates. On the Amazon shelf, salinity-property plots of dissolved organic carbon, pH and total suspended matter revealed two vastly contrasting water masses that were energetically mixed. In this mixing zone, the distribution of uranium was highly non-conservative and exhibited extensive removal from the water column. Uranium removal was most pronounced within a salinity range of 0-16.6, and likely the result of scavenging and flocculation reactions with inorganic (i.e., Fe/Mn oxides) and organic colloids/particles. Removal of uranium may also be closely coupled to exchange and resuspension processes at the sediment/water interface. An inner-shelf pore water profile indicated the following diagenetic processes: extensive (???1 m) zones of Fe(III) - and, to a lesser degree, Mn(IV) - reduction in the absence of significant S(II) concentrations appeared to facilitate the formation of various authigenic minerals (e.g., siderite, rhodocrosite and uraninite). The pore water dissolved 238U profile co-varied closely with Mn(II). Isotopic variations as evidenced in ??234U pore waters values from this site revealed information on the origin and history of particulate uranium. Only after a depth of about 1 m did the ??234U value approach unity (secular equilibrium), denoting a residual lattice bound uranium complex that is likely an upper-drainage basin weathering product. This suggests that the enriched ??234U values represent a riverine surface complexation product that is actively involved in Mn-Fe diagenetic cycles and surface

  10. Source to sink: Evolution of lignin composition in the Madre de Dios River system with connection to the Amazon basin and offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Feakins, Sarah J.; Liu, Zongguang; Ponton, Camilo; Wang, Renée. Z.; Karkabi, Elias; Galy, Valier; Berelson, William M.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Meir, Patrick; West, A. Joshua

    2016-05-01

    While lignin geochemistry has been extensively investigated in the Amazon River, little is known about lignin distribution and dynamics within deep, stratified river channels or its transformations within soils prior to delivery to rivers. We characterized lignin phenols in soils, river particulate organic matter (POM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) across a 4 km elevation gradient in the Madre de Dios River system, Peru, as well as in marine sediments to investigate the source-to-sink evolution of lignin. In soils, we found more oxidized lignin in organic horizons relative to mineral horizons. The oxidized lignin signature was maintained during transfer into rivers, and lignin was a relatively constant fraction of bulk organic carbon in soils and riverine POM. Lignin in DOM became increasingly oxidized downstream, indicating active transformation of dissolved lignin during transport, especially in the dry season. In contrast, POM accumulated undegraded lignin downstream during the wet season, suggesting that terrestrial input exceeded in-river degradation. We discovered high concentrations of relatively undegraded lignin in POM at depth in the lower Madre de Dios River in both seasons, revealing a woody undercurrent for its transfer within these deep rivers. Our study of lignin evolution in the soil-river-ocean continuum highlights important seasonal and depth variations of river carbon components and their connection to soil carbon pools, providing new insights into fluvial carbon dynamics associated with the transfer of lignin biomarkers from source to sink.

  11. A retrospective study of pathologic findings in the Amazon and Orinoco river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Boede, Ernesto O; Hartmann, Manuel García; Lowenstein-Whaley, Joanne; Mujica-Jorquera, Esmeralda; Parish, Scott V; Parish, James V; Garner, Michael M; Stadler, Cynthia K

    2007-06-01

    River dolphins are especially susceptible to negative human impacts. For their conservation, attempts of relocation or procreation ex situ may become important in the future to avoid their extinction. Additional knowledge and medical experiences of river dolphin management in captivity may aid such conservation efforts. The medical records and necropsy and histopathology reports on 123 captive Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) were re-viewed. Of these 123 animals, 105 were necropsied and 70 necropsies were supported with histopathology. Eighteen animals were not necropsied. Among wild-born animals, mortality was highest in the first 2 mo immediately postcapture and transport, accounting for 32 of 123 deaths. Pneumonia and skin lesions (cutaneous and subcutaneous ulcerations and abscesses) were the most common findings, found in 44 of 105 (42%) and 38 of 105 (36%) of gross diagnoses, respectively. At least 10 of 44 cases of pneumonia diagnosed grossly included a verminous component. Cachexia, from a variety of causes, was a major gross finding in 21 animals. Fifteen animals had histologic evidence of significant renal pathology, and this was the primary cause of death in 13 cases. Hepatic pathology was found in 18 cases, and bacterial sepsis was confirmed via histology in 16 cases. Based on these findings, it may be concluded that keys to successful maintenance of this species include 1) prophylactic anthelminthic and antibiotic therapy immediately post-capture; 2) maintenance of animals in larger enclosures than in past attempts, in compatible groups, and in facilities capable of separating aggressive animals; 3) maintenance in microbiologically hygienic water quality at all times; and 4) a proactive program of preventive medicine during the immediate postcapture, quarantine, and maintenance period of captivity. PMID:17679501

  12. Temporal and Water Column Variability in Particulate Organic Carbon Composition on the Amazon River Main-stem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S.; Galy, V.; Spencer, R. G.; McNichol, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon River exports ~14 teragrams (0.014 gigatons) of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the Atlantic coast each year, ~15% of the global riverine carbon source to the oceans. Understanding the source and fate of this exported POC is complicated by (1) hydrodynamic sorting of suspended particles in the river cross-section, and (2) seasonality in discharge over the hydrological cycle. Here, we characterize suspended POC composition down the water column (surface-to-bed) and through time (rising discharge in April 2014, falling discharge in July 2014) to assess the extent of and mechanism underlying this variability. Depth-specific sampling of the river cross-section took place at Óbidos, the most downstream gauging station on the main-stem, and was coupled to an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to calculate export fluxes at both times. Between April and July, raw water discharge increased from 150,000 to 250,000 m3/s. Bulk compositional features (e.g., % OC, δ13C, C/N) varied with both hydrodynamic sorting and seasonality, while thermal stability, derived from ramped oxidation of the suspended sediments, did not differ with depth or season. Compound-specific δ 13C of extracted lipids varied seasonally, as well. We plan to supplement these preliminary data with measurements of POC 14C content across space and time. The observations thus far suggest that the variability in suspended POC composition with depth and season is dominated by physical changes in source. Moreover, the similarities in thermal stability suggest that POC reactivity, and relatedly, its fate downstream and ultimately in the coastal ocean, is relatively invariant across these variable sources.

  13. Estimation of erosion and sedimentation yield in the Ucayali river basin, a Peruvian tributary of the Amazon River, using ground and satellite methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, William; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Espinoza, Raul; Vauchel, Philippe; Lavado, Waldo

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the works of HYBAM observatory (www.ore-hybam.org) has allowed to quantify with accuracy, precision and over a long period Amazon's main rivers discharges and sediments loads. In Peru, a network of 8 stations is regularly gauged and managed in association with the national meteorological and Hydrological service (SENAMHI), the UNALM (National Agrological University of La Molina) and the National Water Agency (ANA). Nevertheless, some current processes of erosion and sedimentation in the foreland basins are still little known, both in volumes and in localization. The sedimentary contributions of Andean tributaries could be there considerable, masking a very strong sedimentation in subsidence zones localized between the control points of the HYBAM's network. The development of spatial techniques such as the Altimetry and reflectance measurement allows us today to complete the ground's network: HYBAM's works have allowed establishing a relation between surface concentration and reflectance in Amazonian rivers (Martinez et al., 2009, Espinoza et al., 2012) and reconstituting water levels series (Calmant et al., 2006, 2008). If the difficulty of calibration of these techniques increases towards the upstream, their use can allow a first characterization of the tributaries contributions and sedimentation zones. At world level, erosion and sedimentation yields in the upper Ucayali are exceptional, favored by a marked seasonality in this region (Espinoza et al., 2009, Lavado, 2010, Pépin et al., 2010) and the presence of cells of extreme precipitation ("Hotspots") (Johnson et al., 1976, Espinoza et al, 2009a). The upper Ucayali drainage basin is a Piggyback where the River run with a low slope, parallel to the Andean range, deposing by gravity hundred millions a year of sands, silts and clays. In this work, we thus propose an estimation of sedimentation and erosion yield in the Ucayali river basin using ground and satellite methods.

  14. New views on "old" carbon in the Amazon River: Insight from the source of organic carbon eroded from the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Hilton, R. G.; West, A. J.; Malhi, Y.; GröCke, D. R.; Bryant, C. L.; Ascough, P. L.; Robles Caceres, A.; New, M.

    2013-05-01

    rivers play a key role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon (POC) to large river systems and the ocean. Due to the extent of its drainage area and runoff, the Amazon River is one of Earth's most important biogeochemical systems. However, the source of POC eroded from the humid region of the Eastern Andes and the input of fossil POC from sedimentary rocks (POCfossil) remains poorly constrained. Here we collected suspended sediments from the Kosñipata River during flood events to better characterize Andean POC, measuring the nitrogen to organic carbon ratio (N/C), stable carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) and radiocarbon (Δ14Corg). Δ14Corg values ranged from -711‰ to -15‰, and significant linear trends between Δ14Corg, N/C and δ13Corg suggested that this reflects the mixing of POCfossil with very young organic matter (Δ14Corg ~ 50‰) from the terrestrial biosphere (POCnon-fossil). Using N/C and Δ14Corg in an end-member mixing analysis, we quantify the fraction of POCfossil (to within 0.1) and find that it contributes a constant proportion of the suspended sediment mass (0.37 ± 0.03%) and up to 80% of total POC. In contrast, the relative contribution of POCnon-fossil was variable, being most important during the rising limb and peak discharges of flood events. The new data shed light on published measurements of "old" POC (low Δ14Corg) in Andean-fed tributaries of the Amazon River, with their Δ14Corg and δ13Corg values consistent with variable addition of POCfossil. The findings suggest a greater persistence of Andean POC in the lowland Amazon than previously recognized.

  15. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae) from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Fabíola Araújo; Marques, Diego Ferreira; Terencio, Maria Leandra; Feldberg, Eliana; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3) in populations from the Amazonas river (white water), the Negro river (black water) and the Tapajós river (clear water), in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics) in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments. PMID:27007897

  16. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae) from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fabíola Araújo Dos; Marques, Diego Ferreira; Terencio, Maria Leandra; Feldberg, Eliana; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo R

    2016-03-01

    Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3) in populations from the Amazonas river (white water), the Negro river (black water) and the Tapajós river (clear water), in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics) in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments. PMID:27007897

  17. Top-down, bottom-up and physical controls on diatom-diazotroph assemblage growth in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, M. R.; Coles, V. J.; Brooks, M. T.; Hood, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    The nutrient-rich waters of the Amazon River Plume (ARP) support dense blooms of diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDA) that introduce large quantities of new nitrogen to the planktonic ecosystem and, unlike other nitrogen-fixers, are likely to directly fuel vertical carbon flux. To investigate the factors controlling DDA blooms, we develop a five phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, diatoms, unicellular microbial diazotrophs, DDA, and Trichodesmium), two zooplankton model and embed it within a 1/6° resolution physical model of the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. The model generates realistic DDA blooms in the ARP and also exhibits basin-wide primary production, nitrogen fixation, and grazing rates consistent with observed values. By following ARP water parcels with synthetic Lagrangian drifters released at the river mouth we are able to assess the relative impacts of grazing, nutrient supply, and physical forcing on DDA bloom formation. DDA bloom formation is stimulated in the silica-rich water of the ARP by decreases in grazing pressure when mesozooplankton (which co-occur in high densities with coastal diatom blooms) concentrations decrease. Bloom termination is driven primarily by silica limitation of the DDA. In agreement with in situ data, this net growth niche for DDA exists in a salinity range from ~ 20-34 PSU, although this co-occurrence is coincidental rather than causative. Because net growth rates are relatively modest, bloom formation in ARP water parcels depends critically on the time spent in this ideal habitat, with high DDA biomass only occurring when water parcels spent > 23 days in the optimal habitat niche.

  18. Top-down, bottom-up and physical controls on diatom-diazotroph assemblage growth in the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, M. R.; Coles, V. J.; Brooks, M. T.; Hood, R. R.

    2014-06-01

    The nutrient-rich waters of the Amazon River plume (ARP) support dense blooms of diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDAs) that introduce large quantities of new nitrogen to the planktonic ecosystem and, unlike other nitrogen-fixers, are likely to directly fuel vertical carbon flux. To investigate the factors controlling DDA blooms, we develop a five phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, diatoms, unicellular microbial diazotrophs, DDAs, and Trichodesmium), two zooplankton model and embed it within a 1/6° resolution physical model of the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. The model generates realistic DDA blooms in the ARP and also exhibits basin-wide primary production, nitrogen fixation, and grazing rates consistent with observed values. By following ARP water parcels with synthetic Lagrangian drifters released at the river mouth we are able to assess the relative impacts of grazing, nutrient supply, and physical forcing on DDA bloom formation. DDA bloom formation is stimulated in the nitrogen-poor and silica-rich water of the ARP by decreases in grazing pressure when mesozooplankton (which co-occur in high densities with coastal diatom blooms) concentrations decrease. Bloom termination is driven primarily by silica limitation of the DDAs. In agreement with in situ data, this net growth niche for DDAs exists in a salinity range from ∼20-34 PSU, although this co-occurrence is coincidental rather than causative. Because net growth rates are relatively modest, bloom formation in ARP water parcels depends critically on the time spent in this ideal habitat, with high DDA biomass only occurring when water parcels spent >23 days in the optimal habitat niche.

  19. The optical properties of river and floodplain waters in the Amazon River Basin: Implications for satellite-based measurements of suspended particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jean-Michel; Espinoza-Villar, Raul; Armijos, Elisa; Silva Moreira, Luciane

    2015-07-01

    Satellite images can now be used to assess river sediment discharge, and systematic studies over rivers and lakes are required to support such applications and document the variability of inland water optical properties at the watershed scale. The optical properties of the Amazon Basin waters were analyzed from in situ measurements of the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) at 279 stations and downwelling diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd) at 133 stations. Measurements of the apparent optical properties, suspended particulate matter (SPM) contents, and characteristics and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption spectra were performed during 16 cruises along the main Amazonian Rivers draining the Andes and for some tributaries. Surface-suspended sediment granulometry and mineralogy showed a stable distribution at the catchment scale, even over large distances and between tributaries. The particle number-size distribution was best described using a segmented distribution with a slope of 2.2 for the fine range (1-15 µm), and the CDOM absorption coefficient at 440 nm varied from 1.8 to 7.9 m-1. Overall, both Rrs and Kd were strongly correlated with SPM, although strong CDOM absorption limited the use of the blue spectrum. Reflectance saturation from blue to red was observed at approximately 100 g m-3, whereas the near-infrared (NIR) wavelength enabled the monitoring of the full SPM range (5-620 g m-3). In contrast, Kd showed no saturation for SPM from green to NIR, and a linear model was calculated. The use of the reflectance ratio was investigated and shown to improve the suspended sediment concentration retrieval performance.

  20. Monitoring mercury exposure in reproductive aged women inhabiting the Tapajós river basin, Amazon.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Corvelo, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Érika Abdon Fiquene; de Parijós, Amanda Magno; de Oliveira, Claudia Simone Baltazar; do Socorro Pompeu de Loiola, Rosane; de Araújo, Amélia A; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos; da Conceição Nascimento Pinheiro, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Among Amazonian communities, exposure to methylmercury is associated mainly with fish consumption that may affect fetal development in pregnant women. Therefore a temporal assessment was performed to assess the exposure of reproductive aged women to mercury who reside in the riparian communities of São Luís do Tapajós and Barreiras located in the Tapajós basin of the Brazilian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. The total mercury concentration in the 519 hair samples was assessed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Data analysis showed that the average total mercury concentration decreased from 1.066 to 0.743 μg/g in those years. In 1999 the proportion of volunteers with mercury levels ≥ 10 μg/g was approximately 68 %. In general, exposure to mercury decreased among women of reproductive age, but the potential risks to reproduction and human health is still an issue as 22 % of the woman continued showing high mercury levels (≥ 10 μg/g) in 2012. PMID:24789525

  1. Differentiation in the fertility of Inceptisols as related to land use in the upper Solimões river region, western Amazon.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza; Nóbrega, Rafaela Simão Abrahão; Jesus, Ederson da Conceição; Ferreira, Daniel Furtado; Pérez, Daniel Vidal

    2009-12-20

    The Upper Solimões river region, western Amazon, is the homeland of indigenous populations and contains small-scale agricultural systems that are important for biodiversity conservation. Although traditional slash-and-burn agriculture is being practiced over many years, deforestation there is relatively small compared to other Amazon regions. Pastures are restricted to the vicinity of cities and do not spread to the small communities along the river. Inceptisols are the main soil order (>90%) in the area and have unique attributes including high Al content and high cation exchange capacity (CEC) due to the enrichment of the clay fraction with 2:1 secondary aluminosilicates. Despite its importance, few studies have focussed on this soil order when considering land use effects on the fertility of Amazon soils. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate changes in soil fertility of representative land use systems (LUSs) in the Upper Solimões region, namely: primary rainforest, old secondary forest, young secondary forest, agroforestry, pasture and agriculture. LUSs were significantly differentiated by the chemical attributes of their topsoil (0-20 cm). Secondary forests presented soil chemical attributes more similar to primary rainforest areas, while pastures exhibited the highest dissimilarity from all the other LUSs. As a whole, soil chemical changes among Inceptisols dominated LUSs showed patterns that were distinct from those reported from other Amazon soils like Oxisols and Ultisols. This is probably related to the presence of high-activity clays enriched in exchangeable aluminum that heavily influenced the soil chemical reactions over the expected importance of organic matter found in most studies conducted over Oxisol and Ultisol. PMID:19853281

  2. Correlation between river slope and meandering variability (obtained by DGPS data) and morphotectonics for two Andean tributaries of the Amazon river: the case of Beni (Bolivia) and Napo (Ecuador-Peru) rivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrel, L.; Darrozes, J.; Guyot, J.; Christophoul, F.; Bondoux, F.

    2007-05-01

    The Beni river drains a catchment area of 282 000 km2 of which 40 percent are located in the Cordillera of the Bolivian and Peruvian Andes, and the rest in the Amazonian plain : the studied reaches runs from Guanay (Andean Piedmont) to Riberalta (junction with Madre de Dios river) that represents a distance by the river of 1055 km. The Napo river starts in the Ecuadorian Andes and leaves Ecuador in Nuevo Rocafuerte (27 400 km2) and enters in Peru until its junction with the Amazon river : the studied section runs from Misahualli (Andean Piedmont) to this junction, that represents a distance by the river of 995 km. The GPS data were acquired using a mobile GPS embarked on a boat and 4 fixed bases located along the Beni river, 6 along the Napo river and the two rivers profile calculated from post-treated differential GPS solutions. For the Beni river, two sectors were identified: - the upstream sector (~230 km) between Guanay (414 m) and 50 km downstream Rurrenabaque (245 m) is located in Andean Piedmont, which consists in a series of thrusts associated with anticlines and synclines (the subandean zone), and presents slope values range between 135 cm/km and 10 cm/km and an average index of sinuosity (IS) of 1.29, - the downstream sector (~ 820 km) which runs in Amazonian plain (until Riberalta -165 m-), is characterized by an average slope of 8 cm/km and an average IS of 2.06 (this sector is much more homogeneous and the Beni river shows a meandering channel). For the Napo River, three sectors were identified: - the first sector (~140 km) between Misahualli (401 m) and Coca (265 m), is located in Andean Piedmont (subandean zone) and presents slope values range between 170 cm/km and 30 cm/km and an average IS of 1.6, - the second sector (~250 km) between Coca (when the Napo river enters in the Amazonian plain) and Nuevo Rocafuerte (190 m), presents slope values range between 30 cm/km and 20 cm/km and an average IS of 1.2, and a convex-up shape profile corresponding to

  3. A checklist for the zooplankton of the Middle Xingu - an Amazon River system.

    PubMed

    Brito, S A C; Camargo, M; Melo, N F A C; Estupiñan, R A

    2015-08-01

    A zooplankton checklist is presented for the Middle Xingu River, based on surveys conducted at four sites in the main channel and two fluvial lakes. A total of 175 taxa are listed, including 141 rotifers, 20 cladocerans, and five copepods. Rapids presented the greatest species richness, with up to 124 taxa, while Ilha Grande lake had 70 taxa, the lowest number. Non-planktonic benthic larvae were recorded frequently in the samples. PMID:26691076

  4. Fish assemblages of the Casiquiare River, a corridor and zoogeographical filter for dispersal between the Orinoco and Amazon basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winemiller, K.O.; Lopez-Fernandez, H.; Taphorn, D.C.; Nico, L.G.; Duque, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether the Casiquiare River functions as a free dispersal corridor or as a partial barrier (i.e. filter) for the interchange of fish species of the Orinoco and Negro/Amazon basins using species assemblage patterns according to geographical location and environmental features. Location: The Casiquiare, Upper Orinoco and Upper Negro rivers in southern Venezuela, South America. Methods: Our study was based on an analysis of species presence/absence data and environmental information (11 habitat characteristics) collected by the authors and colleagues between the years 1984 and 1999. The data set consisted of 269 sampled sites and 452 fish species (> 50,000 specimens). A wide range of habitat types was included in the samples, and the collection sites were located at various points along the entire length of the Casiquiare main channel, at multiple sites on its tributary streams, as well as at various nearby sites outside the Casiquiare drainage, within the Upper Orinoco and Upper Rio Negro river systems. Most specimens and field data used in this analysis are archived in the Museo de Ciencias Naturales in Guanare, Venezuela. We performed canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) based on species presence/absence using two versions of the data set: one that eliminated sites having < 5 species and species occurring at < 5 sites; and another that eliminated sites having < 10 species and species occurring at < 10 sites. Cluster analysis was performed on sites based on species assemblage similarity, and a separate analysis was performed on species based on CCA loadings. Results: The CCA results for the two versions of the data set were qualitatively the same. The dominant environmental axis contrasted assemblages and sites associated with blackwater vs. clearwater conditions. Longitudinal position on the Casiquiare River was correlated (r2 = 0.33) with CCA axis-1 scores, reflecting clearwater conditions nearer to its origin

  5. Seasonal and provenance controls on Nd Sr isotopic compositions of Amazon rivers suspended sediments and implications for Nd and Sr fluxes exported to the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viers, Jérôme; Roddaz, Martin; Filizola, Naziano; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Sondag, Francis; Brunet, Pierre; Zouiten, Cyril; Boucayrand, Carole; Martin, François; Boaventura, Géraldo Resende

    2008-10-01

    This study reports daily water discharge and suspended sediment load concentrations and Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic systematics and major and trace elements concentrations of twelve monthly sampled suspended load sediments of the Solimões and Madeira rivers, the two major Andean tributaries of the Amazon, during the year 2004. As observed in other long-term monitoring studies of Amazon Rivers, the maximum of suspended sediment load occurs before or during the rising water period (i.e. during the rainy season). In 2004, the Solimões River exported ˜ 289 × 10 6 tonnes of suspended sediments and the Madeira River 294 × 10 6 tonnes which correspond to erosion rates of 129 and 214 T/km 2/yr for the Solimoes and Madeira rivers basins, respectively. Both the Solimoes and Madeira suspended sediments are enriched in LREE over HREE and exhibit similar MREE enrichment; the difference being that the Madeira sediments are more fractionated than the Solimoes ones. When plotted in Al 2O 3-CaO + Na 2O-K 2O diagram, the suspended sediments of the Solimoes and Madeira rivers exhibit two different weathering trends which suggests that these sediments evolved along two different trends starting from felsic rocks with different chemical compositions. The Nd isotopic compositions (ɛNd) of the Solimoes sediments (- 8.9 to 9.9) are slightly more radiogenic than the corresponding values of the Madeira sediments (- 10.8 to - 12.1). The 87Sr/ 86Sr isotopic compositions of the Madeira sediments (0.728 to 0.740) are significantly more radiogenic than those of the Solimoes (0.713 to 0.717). Together with other major elements and REE evidences, these isotopic compositions suggest that the Solimoes sediments are more influenced by Andean volcanic arc detritus than the Madeira sediments that might be due to input of young basaltic products owing to strong volcanic activity in Ecuador. Mineralogical compositions as well as Nd isotopic compositions do not vary seasonally. Based on our data set

  6. Pseudoparasitism by Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica; Hepaticola hepatica) in the Negro River, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Silva, Adriano Gomes; de Souza, Alberto H; Moreira, Carlos J de C; de Souza, Daniela L; Valverde, Joanna G; Jaeger, Lauren H; Martins, Patrícia P; de Meneses, Viviane F; Araújo, Adauto; Bóia, Márcio N

    2009-10-01

    We report the finding of eggs of Calodium spp. (syn. Capillaria spp.; Hepaticola spp.) in a fecal sample from an old woman living in a riverine community in the Negro River Basin and describe the associated epidemiological investigation. The case probably does not represent true parasitism; the eggs, which were compatible with the species Calodium hepaticum, were most likely ingested upon consumption of infected tapir (Tapirus terrestris) liver, subsequently passing through the gut and being eliminated. The evolution of these eggs to infective stages in the environment, given the poor sanitation background, could provide the risk of occurrence of hepatic disease in humans. PMID:19477475

  7. Population and biological parameters of selected fish species from the middle Xingu River, Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Camargo, M; Giarrizzo, T; Isaac, V J

    2015-08-01

    This study estimates the main biological parameters, including growth rates, asymptotic length, mortality, consumption by biomass, biological yield, and biomass, for the most abundant fish species found on the middle Xingu River, prior to the construction of the Belo Monte Dam. The specimens collected in experimental catches were analysed with empirical equations and length-based FISAT methods. For the 63 fish species studied, high growth rates (K) and high natural mortality (M) were related to early sexual maturation and low longevity. The predominance of species with short life cycles and a reduced number of age classes, determines high rates of stock turnover, which indicates high productivity for fisheries, and a low risk of overfishing. PMID:26691084

  8. Methane flux from the Amazon River floodplain: Emissions during rising water

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, K.B.; Crill, P.M. ); Bonassi, J.A. ); Richey, J.E. ); Harriss, R.C. NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA )

    1990-09-20

    During April and May of 1987, an extensive methane flux data set from Amazonian wetland habitats was collected during the wet season as river water levels were high and rising. This work extends measurements made in the dry season of 1985, when water levels were falling. A total of 284 flux measurements were made in the three primary floodplain environments of open-water lakes and channels, floating grass mats, and flooded forests, along approximately 1,500 km of the central floodplain. Emissions (means and standard errors) were 74 {plus minus} 14 mg CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2}/d (open water), 201 {plus minus} 35 mg CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2}/d (grass mats), and 126 {plus minus} 20 mg CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2}/d (flooded forests). These values were not significantly different from the majority of those from 1985, in part due to the high variability in flux seen at both times. Although ebullition was a significant component of methane emissions at both periods, the frequency of bubbling and its contribution to total flux was lower during the period of rising water than during falling water. A prominent diurnal pattern in atmospheric methane concentrations was observed, with minimum levels of about 1.75 ppm at midday and a maximum of 2.12 ppm at about midnight. Given the relatively small season changes observed in flux at the two stages of the rivers hydrographic curve, earlier estimates of regional methane flux remain largely unchanged. Revision of global estimates of wetland methane sources based on these tropical data and recently published figures for northern peatlands indicated that tropical wetlands may be more important than previously suggested, but that wetland sources overall remain at approximately 110 Tg/yr.

  9. Resource availability and diet in Harpy Eagle breeding territories on the Xingu River, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Silva, F H; Junqueira, T G; Sanaiotti, T M; Guimarães, V Y; Mathias, P V C; Mendonça, C V

    2015-08-01

    In the Tapajos-Xingu interfluve, one of the largest birds of prey, the Harpy Eagle, is under intense anthropogenic pressure due to historical and recent reductions in forest cover. We studied prey availability and use by Harpy Eagle on six breeding territories on the low- and mid-Xingu River, between 2013 and 2015. We evaluated food resource availability using the environmental-surveys database from two methods: terrestrial surveys (RAPELD method) and fauna rescue/flushing before vegetation suppression for the Belo Monte Hydroelectric Complex construction. Harpy Eagle diet was identified by prey remains sampled around six nest trees. Eighteen species of mammals, birds and reptiles comprised the prey items. Most prey species were sloths, primates and porcupines, which have arboreal habits and are found in forested areas, but two species, hoatzin and iguana, are usually associated with riverine habitats. The proportion of prey from each species predated on the nest best studied was different from estimated availability (χ2 = 54.23; df = 16; p < 0.001), however there was a positive correlation (rs = 0.7; p < 0.01) between prey species consumed and abundance available, where the predation was more on species more abundant. Continuous monitoring of the Harpy Eagle diet at these nests could evidence changes in the assemblage of prey species available for Harpy Eagles, due to changes in the seasonal flood pulse of the Xingu River to be caused by the operation of the hydroelectric dam, and changes in habitat features by forest reduction around breeding territories. We believe that it is important to consider the protection of remnants of forested areas in the landscape matrix surrounding the breeding territories to maintain the food resource availability and allow all pairs to successfully reproduce. PMID:26691092

  10. Evaluation of monotonic trends for streamflow in austral Amazon, Brazil: a case study for the Xingu and Tapajós rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, L. Z.

    2015-06-01

    This paper has the goal of evaluating monotonic trends in the Xingu and Tapajós river basins in the Austral Amazon region, Brazil. Non-parametric statistical tests such as Mann-Kendall, Bootstrap Mann-Kendall, Sen and Bootstrap Sen are applied on streamflow gauging stations data, to determine the significance and magnitude of possible trends. Data in these river basins is relatively scarce, with time series ranging from twenty to forty years, having many gaps. Former studies indicate a decreasing trend for both annual average and minimum streamflow values in the Tapajós river basin, with 99% confidence level, and a decrease in maximum values in the Xingu river basin, with 90% confidence level. However, past analyses have only used one station near the basin outlet. This study uses data from 7 gauging stations in the Xingu basin and 14 stations in the Tapajós basin. Results indicate opposite trends at the 95% confidence level for different regions in the basins, and for different flow regimes. For the Xingu river basin, trends in the minimum flow for different sub-basins even out at the Altamira station, near its outlet. For the Tapajós river, the southeastern part of the basin has increasing trends, while the southwestern part decreases. At the Itaituba station, they also balance out.

  11. Post-confluence surface water and sediment distribution patterns of the Solimões-Amazon and Negro Rivers: a remote sensing-based geomorphic study of surface patterns at the large rivers confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Edward; Latrubesse, Edgardo

    2015-04-01

    River channel confluences are recognized as critical features of the fluvial system, because both intensive and extensive hydro-physical and geo-ecological processes take place within this momentous interface. Despite the relevant findings on confluences as listed above, only a few cases concentrated on field measurements in large rivers. Along with improvements in hydrographic and geochemical surveying techniques, trials have been occasionally made to improve understanding of larger rivers confluences and their downstream hydro-morphodynamics, such as in some reaches of the Amazon, Brahmaputra, Jamuna, and Paraná Rivers. However, finite collections of point-based and cross-sectional measurements obtained from field using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), multi-beam echo sounder, global positioning system (GPS) or other geochemical applications (e.g. isotope tracing) around river confluences provide limited information of post-confluence hydro-geomorphologic behaviors. The identification of sediment routing through channel junctions and the role of confluence on downstream sediment transport is still poorly understood. Into this context, satellite remote sensing is the most relevant and efficient mean to regularly monitor the river sediment discharge over the large (regional to continental) scale. In this paper, we aim to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns of post-confluence sediment transport by mapping the surface water distribution using the ultimate example of large river confluence on Earth, where distinct water types drain: The Solimões-Amazon (muddy-white water) versus Negro (black water) Rivers, exploring the seasonal and inter-annual variations of water types and the spatial distribution patterns of surface waters through the branches of the main stem.

  12. Dams in the Amazon: Belo Monte and Brazil's Hydroelectric Development of the Xingu River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnside, Phillip M.

    2006-07-01

    Hydroelectric dams represent major investments and major sources of environmental and social impacts. Powerful forces surround the decision-making process on public investments in the various options for the generation and conservation of electricity. Brazil’s proposed Belo Monte Dam (formerly Kararaô) and its upstream counterpart, the Altamira Dam (better known by its former name of Babaquara) are at the center of controversies on the decision-making process for major infrastructure projects in Amazonia. The Belo Monte Dam by itself would have a small reservoir area (440 km2) and large installed capacity (11, 181.3 MW), but the Altamira/Babaquara Dam that would regulate the flow of the Xingu River (thereby increasing power generation at Belo Monte) would flood a vast area (6140 km2). The great impact of dams provides a powerful reason for Brazil to reassess its current policies that allocate large amounts of energy in the country’s national grid to subsidized aluminum smelting for export. The case of Belo Monte and the five additional dams planned upstream (including the Altamira/Babaquara Dam) indicate the need for Brazil to reform its environmental assessment and licensing system to include the impacts of multiple interdependent projects.

  13. Dams in the Amazon: Belo Monte and Brazil's hydroelectric development of the Xingu River Basin.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Phillip M

    2006-07-01

    Hydroelectric dams represent major investments and major sources of environmental and social impacts. Powerful forces surround the decision-making process on public investments in the various options for the generation and conservation of electricity. Brazil's proposed Belo Monte Dam (formerly Kararaô) and its upstream counterpart, the Altamira Dam (better known by its former name of Babaquara) are at the center of controversies on the decision-making process for major infrastructure projects in Amazonia. The Belo Monte Dam by itself would have a small reservoir area (440 km2) and large installed capacity (11, 181.3 MW), but the Altamira/Babaquara Dam that would regulate the flow of the Xingu River (thereby increasing power generation at Belo Monte) would flood a vast area (6140 km2). The great impact of dams provides a powerful reason for Brazil to reassess its current policies that allocate large amounts of energy in the country's national grid to subsidized aluminum smelting for export. The case of Belo Monte and the five additional dams planned upstream (including the Altamira/Babaquara Dam) indicate the need for Brazil to reform its environmental assessment and licensing system to include the impacts of multiple interdependent projects. PMID:16738820

  14. Detection of long-term trends in monthly hydro-climatic records of Colombia and the Amazon River basin through Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.

    2011-12-01

    We search for long-term trends in 25- to 50-year records of monthly rainfall (100 stations), average river discharges (42 stations), and mean and minimum air temperature records (37 stations) in Colombia, as well as monthly records in 29 rain gauges within the Amazon River basin. Time series of average monthly river discharges are selected from 10 Colombian river basins with gauging stations located downstream along the main channel. The Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method is used as a filtering process to decompose a given time series into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMF), assuming that diverse simple oscillatory modes of different frequencies coexist in the series, and that the residual captures the long-term trend of the record. The Mann-Kendall test for autocorrelated data is used to assess the statistical significance of the trends, and the Sen test is used for the magnitude of the trends. Results show that 62% of monthly river discharge series exhibit decreasing trends between 0.01-1.92 m3/s yr-1. The identified trends are strongly consistent downstream, albeit with contrasting results for the ratios between the magnitude of the trend and mean discharges. Most minimum temperature series (87%) show increasing trends [0.01-0.08°C yr-1]. Results on precipitation are inconclusive as monthly records exhibit a mixed pattern of increasing (41%, between 0.1-7.0 mm yr-1) and decreasing (44%, between 0.1-7.4 mm yr-1) trends, except for the Pacific region, which shows clear-cut positive trends, consistently with an increasing trend identified in the strength of the Chocó low-level jet winds over the Pacific coast of Colombia, the main moisture advection mechanism into the region. Maximum trend magnitudes in precipitation records on the Amazon basin were found to be decreasing (53%, between 0.04 -9.1 mm yr-1), mostly around the basin's central and south-eastern regions. The highest decreasing trend magnitude in the Amazon was found to be -9.1mm

  15. Delimiting Evolutionarily Significant Units of the Fish, Piaractus brachypomus (Characiformes: Serrasalmidae), from the Orinoco and Amazon River Basins with Insight on Routes of Historical Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Maria Doris; Andrade-López, Juana; Farias, Izeni P; Hrbek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Piaractus brachypomus is an economically important for human consumption both in commercial fisheries and aquaculture in all South American countries where it occurs. In recent years the species has decreased in abundance due to heavy fishing pressure. The species occurs in the Amazon and Orinoco basins, but lack of meristic differences between fishes from the 2 basins, and extensive migration associated with reproduction, have resulted in P. brachypomus being considered a single panmictic species. Analysis of 7 nuclear microsatellites, mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and COI), and body shape variables demonstrated that each river basin is populated by a distinct evolutionarily significant unit (ESU); the 2 groups had an average COI divergence of 3.5% and differed in body depth and relative head length. Historical connection between the 2 basins most probably occurred via the Rupununi portal rather than via the Casiquiare canal. The 2 ESUs will require independent fishery management, and translocation of fisheries stocks between basins should be avoided to prevent loss of local adaptations or extinction associated with outbreeding depression. Introductions of fishes from the Orinoco basin into the Putumayo River basin, an Amazon basin drainage, and evidence of hybridization between the 2 ESUs have already been detected. PMID:26245778

  16. Scorched mussels (Brachidontes spp., Bivalvia: Mytilidae) from the tropical and warm-temperate southwestern Atlantic: the role of the Amazon River in their speciation.

    PubMed

    Trovant, Berenice; Basso, Néstor G; Orensanz, José María; Lessa, Enrique P; Dincao, Fernando; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2016-03-01

    Antitropicality is a distribution pattern where closely related taxa are separated by an intertropical latitudinal gap. Two potential examples include Brachidontes darwinianus (south eastern Brazil to Uruguay), considered by some authors as a synonym of B. exustus (Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean), and B. solisianus, distributed along the Brazilian coast with dubious records north of the intertropical zone. Using two nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and one mitochondrial gene (mtDNA COI), we aimed to elucidate the phylogeographic and phylogenetic relationships among the scorched mussels present in the warm-temperate region of the southwest Atlantic. We evaluated a divergence process mediated by the tropical zone over alternative phylogeographic hypotheses. Brachidontes solisianus was closely related to B. exustus I, a species with which it exhibits an antitropical distribution. Their divergence time was approximately 2.6 Ma, consistent with the intensification of Amazon River flow. Brachidontes darwinianus, an estuarine species is shown here not to be related to this B. exustus complex. We suspect ancestral forms may have dispersed from the Caribbean to the Atlantic coast via the Trans-Amazonian seaway (Miocene). The third species, B rodriguezii is presumed to have a long history in the region with related fossil forms going back to the Miocene. Although scorched mussels are very similar in appearance, their evolutionary histories are very different, involving major historical contingencies as the formation of the Amazon River, the Panama Isthmus, and the last marine transgression. PMID:26929816

  17. Sciadicleithrum juruparii n. sp. (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) from the gills of Satanoperca jurupari (Heckel) (Osteichthyes: Cichlidae) in the Guamá River, Amazon Delta, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Marly de Fátima Carvalho; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento; Santos, Cláudia Portes

    2012-06-01

    Sciadicleithrum juruparii n. sp. is described from the gills of the Neotropical cichlid fish Satanoperca jurupari (Heckel) caught in the Guamá River, in the delta of the Amazon River, at Belém, Pará State, Brazil. Diagnostic characters of the new species are a basally articulated male copulatory organ with clockwise coils and an accessory piece; a ventral bar with a median process; similar hooklets; vagina in the form of a sclerotised tube; and a sinistral vaginal aperture with a sclerotised papilla lying in a small surface depression. It is the only species of Sciadicleithrum Kritsky, Thatcher & Boeger, 1989 with a medial projection on the ventral bar. PMID:22581249

  18. Mixing in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2010-05-01

    The research area of this work is located at the estuary of the Amazon River (Brazil), near the river mouth. The results of air movement analysis on the surface atmospheric circulation over the Mouth of the Amazonas River, salinity and temperature measures as well as measurements of currents, carried out along a longitudinal section in the navigation canal region of the Northern Bar of the Amazon River (Barra Norte do Rio Amazonas) in June 2006, during the river flood season in the quadrature tide. The dynamics effects affect hydrodynamic,meteorological and hydrographical parameters at the river mouth. The conclusion drawn include that: a) the saline wedge-type stratification can be detected approximately 100km away from the mouth of the Amazon River during the end of the rainy season in the quadrature tide; b) probably, at the Amazon estuary the quadrature entrainment processes are dominant and they are the ones responsible for increased salinity detected in the surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is not so important. c) The large flow of fresh water from the Amazon River at the end of the rainy season implies the displacement of the saline front position over the internal Amazon continental platform, and d) The tidal wave shows a positive asymmetry in the canal, with floods lasting less than in the ebb tide. This asymmetry decreases towards the ocean, eventually becoming reversed in the presence of a saline wedge. The speeds, however, have a negative asymmetry, with more intense ebb tides, due to the river flow and is more evident by the existence of quadrature tides.

  19. Effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen content on oxygen consumption rate of Chinese prawn, giant tiger prawn and giant freshwater prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xi-Lin; Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Shi, Yong-Hai; Liu, Wen-Cui; Xu, Gui-Rong; Li, Shi-Hua

    1999-06-01

    Temperature and the dissolved oxygen content affect the oxygen consumption of juveniles of Chinese prawn ( Penaeus chinensis), giant tiger prawn ( P. monodon) and giant freshwater prawn ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii). There is good correlation between the oxygen consumption rate ( V, mg/g·h) of the above three prawn species and the water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. In the range of test temperature, V increased with water temperature and dissolved oxygen content. The V of the above three prawn species increased 0.085 mg/g·h, 0.093 mg/g·h and 0.08 mg/g·h respectively with each °C of rising temperature. The comatose point and stifling point of the juveniles rose obviously at unsuitable temperature.

  20. How livestock and flooding mediate the ecological integrity of working forests in Amazon River floodplains.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Christine M; Sheikh, Pervaze; Gagnon, Paul R; Mcgrath, David G

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of working forests to tropical conservation and development depends upon the maintenance of ecological integrity under ongoing land use. Assessment of ecological integrity requires an understanding of the structure, composition, and function and major drivers that govern their variability. Working forests in tropical river floodplains provide many goods and services, yet the data on the ecological processes that sustain these services is scant. In flooded forests of riverside Amazonian communities, we established 46 0.1-ha plots varying in flood duration, use by cattle and water buffalo, and time since agricultural abandonment (30-90 yr). We monitored three aspects of ecological integrity (stand structure, species composition, and dynamics of trees and seedlings) to evaluate the impacts of different trajectories of livestock activity (alleviation, stasis, and intensification) over nine years. Negative effects of livestock intensification were solely evident in the forest understory, and plots alleviated from past heavy disturbance increased in seedling density but had higher abundance of thorny species than plots maintaining low activity. Stand structure, dynamics, and tree species composition were strongly influenced by the natural pulse of seasonal floods, such that the defining characteristics of integrity were dependent upon flood duration (3-200 d). Forests with prolonged floods ≥ 140 d had not only lower species richness but also lower rates of recruitment and species turnover relative to forests with short floods <70 d. Overall, the combined effects of livestock intensification and prolonged flooding hindered forest regeneration, but overall forest integrity was largely related to the hydrological regime and age. Given this disjunction between factors mediating canopy and understory integrity, we present a subset of metrics for regeneration and recruitment to distinguish forest condition by livestock trajectory. Although our study design

  1. Methylmercury exposure affects motor performance of a riverine population of the Tapajós river, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Dolbec, J; Mergler, D; Sousa Passos, C J; Sousa de Morais, S; Lebel, J

    2000-04-01

    Gold mining and deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon are increasing mercury pollution of the extensive water system, exposing riverine populations to organic mercury through fish-eating. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of such exposure on motor performance. This cross-sectional study was carried out in May 1996, in a village located on the banks of the Tapajós river in the Amazonian Basin, Brazil. Information concerning sociodemographics, health, smoking habits, alcohol drinking, dietary habits and work history were collected using an interview-administered questionnaire. Mercury concentrations were measured by cold vapor atomic absorption in blood and hair of each participant, of whom those aged between 15 and 79 years were assessed for motor performance (n = 84). Psychomotor performance was evaluated using the Santa Ana manual dexterity test, the Grooved Pegboard Fine motor test and the fingertapping motor speed test. Motor strength was measured by dynamometry for grip and pinch strength. Following the exclusion of 16 persons for previous head injury, working with mercury in the goldmining sites, or for diabetes, the relationship between performance and bioindicators of mercury was examined using multivariate statistical analyses, taking into account covariables. All participants in the study reported eating fish, which comprised 61.8% of the total meals eaten during the preceding week. The median hair total mercury concentration was 9 microg/g. Organic mercury accounted for 94.4 = 1.9% of the total mercury levels. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that hair mercury was inversely associated with overall performance on the psychomotor tests, while a tendency was observed with blood mercury. Semipartial regression analyses showed that hair total mercury accounted for 8% to 16% of the variance of psychomotor performance. Neither hair nor blood total mercury was associated with the results of the strength tests in women and men

  2. Coupling a basin erosion and river sediment transport model into a large scale hydrological model: an application in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buarque, D. C.; Collischonn, W.; Paiva, R. C. D.

    2012-04-01

    erosion or deposition is allowed for silt and clay. The model was first applied on the Madeira River basin, one of the major tributaries of the Amazon River (~1.4*106 km2) accounting for 35% of the suspended sediment amount annually transported for the Amazon river to the ocean. Model results agree with observed data, mainly for monthly and annual time scales. The spatial distribution of soil erosion within the basin showed a large amount of sediment being delivered from the Andean regions of Bolivia and Peru. Spatial distribution of mean annual sediment along the river showed that Madre de Dios, Mamoré and Beni rivers transport the major amount of sediment. Simulated daily suspended solid discharge agree with observed data. The model is able to provide temporaly and spatialy distributed estimates of soil loss source over the basin, locations with tendency for erosion or deposition along the rivers, and to reproduce long term sediment yield at several locations. Despite model results are encouraging, further effort is needed to validate the model considering the scarcity of data at large scale.

  3. Seasonal and interannual variability of sea-air CO2 fluxes in the tropical Atlantic affected by the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Diverrès, Denis; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    CO2 fugacities obtained from a merchant ship sailing from France to French Guyana were used to explore the seasonal and interannual variability of the sea-air CO2 exchange in the western tropical North Atlantic (TNA; 5-14°N, 41-52°W). Two distinct oceanic water masses were identified in the area associated to the main surface currents, i.e., the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Current (NEC). The NBC was characterized by permanent CO2 oversaturation throughout the studied period, contrasting with the seasonal pattern identified in the NEC. The NBC retroflection was the main contributor to the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC), thus spreading into the central TNA, the Amazon River plume, and the CO2-rich waters probably originated from the equatorial upwelling. Strong CO2 undersaturation was associated to the Amazon River plume. Total inorganic carbon drawdown due to biological activity was estimated to be 154 µmol kg-1 within the river plume. As a consequence, the studied area acted as a net sink of atmospheric CO2 (from -72.2 ± 10.2 mmol m-2 month-1 in February to 14.3 ± 4.5 mmol m-2 month-1 in May). This contrasted with the net CO2 efflux estimated by the main global sea-air CO2 flux climatologies. Interannual sea surface temperature changes in the TNA caused by large-scale climatic events could determine the direction and intensity of the sea-air CO2 fluxes in the NEC. Positive temperature anomalies observed in the TNA led to an almost permanent CO2 outgassing in the NEC in 2010.

  4. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies a 3-D state space representation of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E ⁄ P, Φ = Ep ⁄ P and Ω = E ⁄ Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep ⁄ P = 0 when E ⁄ Ep → 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = kΦe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by

  5. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies a 3-D generalization of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E/P, Φ = Ep/P and Ω = E/Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep/P → 0 at E/Ep = 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = k Φe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by linking spatial patterns of the power law parameters

  6. Acoustic characteristics of biosonar sounds of free-ranging botos (Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxis (Sotalia fluviatilis) in the Negro River, Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukiko; Akamatsu, Tomonari; da Silva, Vera M F; Yoshida, Yayoi; Kohshima, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    Odontoceti emit broadband high-frequency clicks on echolocation for orientation or prey detection. In the Amazon Basin, two odontoceti species, boto (Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis), live sympatrically. The acoustic characteristics of the echolocation clicks of free-ranging botos and tucuxis were measured with a hydrophone array consisting of a full-band and an acoustic event recorder (A-tag). The clicks of the two species were short-duration broadband signals. The apparent source level was 201 dB 1 μPa peak-to-peak at 1 m in the botos and 181 dB 1 μPa peak-to-peak at 1 m in the tucuxis, and the centroid frequency was 82.3 kHz in the botos and 93.1 kHz in the tucuxis. The high apparent source level and low centroid frequency are possibly due to the difference in body size or sound production organs, especially the nasal structure, the sound source of clicks in odontoceti. PMID:26328686

  7. Food sources and carbon dudget of chinese prawn Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Fang

    2002-03-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn ( Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semi-intensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20 28)×10-3.

  8. (210)Pb and composition data of near-surface sediments and interstitial waters evidencing anthropogenic inputs in Amazon River mouth, Macapá, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nery, José Reinaldo Cardoso; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2011-04-01

    Activity profiles of excess (210)Pb determined in three sediment cores from Amazon River mouth, Macapá city, Brazil, provided the evaluation of sedimentation rates, contributing to a better knowledge of the hydrological conditions in the site that is the capital of Amapá State and is drained by the waters of the huge Amazon River. Chemical data were also determined in the sediments, allowing identify signatures coupled to anthropogenic inputs held in the past in Amapá State. Significant direct relationships between LOI (loss on ignition) and organic matter were found for all sediments profiles. Silica was found to be inversely related to organic matter in the three profiles; its decrease accompanied an increase on the specific surface of the sediments. This relationship was confirmed by a great number of inverse significant correlations among silica and oxides Na(2)O, K(2)O, CaO, MgO, Al(2)O(3), P(2)O(5), Fe(2)O(3) and MnO. It was possible to identify the role of organic matter on adsorption of several oxides in the core sediments profiles. Apparent sediment mass accumulation rates corresponding to values between 450 and 2510 mg cm(-2)yr(-1) were obtained, and are compatible with the results of others studies. The (210)Pb activities in one sampling point suggested the occurrence of anthropogenic inputs related to the initial period of the mining activities conducted in Serra do Navio, Amapá State, for the commercialization of Mn ores. This was reinforced by the abrupt fluctuations in chemical data obtained for the sediments and composition of the interstitial waters occurring there. The Atlantic hurricane activity also appeared to affect the sedimentation rates in the area, as two different values were recorded in each profile. PMID:21353731

  9. The Influence of Changes in Lifestyle and Mercury Exposure in Riverine Populations of the Madeira River (Amazon Basin) near a Hydroelectric Project

    PubMed Central

    Hacon, Sandra S.; Dórea, José G.; Fonseca, Márlon de F.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.; Mourão, Dennys S.; Ruiz, Claudia M. V.; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A.; Mariani, Carolina F.; Bastos, Wanderley R.

    2014-01-01

    In the Amazon Basin, naturally occurring methylmercury bioaccumulates in fish, which is a key source of protein consumed by riverine populations. The hydroelectric power-plant project at Santo Antônio Falls allows us to compare the Hg exposure of riverine populations sparsely distributed on both sides of the Madeira river before the area is to be flooded. From 2009 to 2011, we concluded a population survey of the area (N = 2,008; representing circa 80% of community residents) that estimated fish consumption and mercury exposure of riverine populations with different degrees of lifestyle related to fish consumption. Fish samples from the Madeira river (N = 1,615) and 110 species were analyzed for Hg. Hair-Hg was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in less isolated communities near to the capital of Porto Velho (median 2.32 ppm) than in subsistence communities in the Cuniã Lake, 180 km from Porto Velho city (median 6.3 ppm). Fish Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.06 µg/g, depending on fish size and feeding behavior. Currently available fish in the Madeira river show a wide variability in Hg concentrations. Despite cultural similarities, riparians showed hair-Hg distribution patterns that reflect changes in fish-eating habits driven by subsistence characteristics. PMID:24577285

  10. The influence of changes in lifestyle and mercury exposure in riverine populations of the Madeira River (Amazon Basin) near a hydroelectric project.

    PubMed

    Hacon, Sandra S; Dórea, José G; Fonseca, Márlon de F; Oliveira, Beatriz A; Mourão, Dennys S; Ruiz, Claudia M V; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Mariani, Carolina F; Bastos, Wanderley R

    2014-03-01

    In the Amazon Basin, naturally occurring methylmercury bioaccumulates in fish, which is a key source of protein consumed by riverine populations. The hydroelectric power-plant project at Santo Antônio Falls allows us to compare the Hg exposure of riverine populations sparsely distributed on both sides of the Madeira river before the area is to be flooded. From 2009 to 2011, we concluded a population survey of the area (N = 2,008; representing circa 80% of community residents) that estimated fish consumption and mercury exposure of riverine populations with different degrees of lifestyle related to fish consumption. Fish samples from the Madeira river (N = 1,615) and 110 species were analyzed for Hg. Hair-Hg was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in less isolated communities near to the capital of Porto Velho (median 2.32 ppm) than in subsistence communities in the Cuniã Lake, 180 km from Porto Velho city (median 6.3 ppm). Fish Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.06 µg/g, depending on fish size and feeding behavior. Currently available fish in the Madeira river show a wide variability in Hg concentrations. Despite cultural similarities, riparians showed hair-Hg distribution patterns that reflect changes in fish-eating habits driven by subsistence characteristics. PMID:24577285

  11. Assimilating in situ and radar altimetry data into a large-scale hydrologic-hydrodynamic model for streamflow forecast in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. C.; Collischonn, W.; Bonnet, M.; Goncalves, L.; Getirana, A.; Calmant, S.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale hydrological models and forecast systems may be important tools to reduce the vulnerability of local population in places such as the Amazon River basin, where extreme hydrological events have occurred in the past few years. Due to the size of the basin and the slow speed of movement of its floods, uncertainty on model initial conditions (ICs) may play an important role for discharge forecasts using large scale hydrological models, even for relatively large lead times (~ 1 to 3 months). Data assimilation (DA) methods may provide an interesting way of merging both in situ and newly remotely sensed observations with models to estimate optimal ICs. We present the development and evaluation of a data assimilation framework for both gauged and radar altimetry based discharge and water levels into a large scale hydrological-hydrodynamic model of the Amazon River basin. We also explore the usefulness of such system to provide streamflow forecasts when forced by past climate and based mostly on model initial conditions. This work is in the context of recent developments of techniques for integrating information from models and remotely sensed data, and also of regional/global hydrological forecast systems including poorly gauged basins. We use the conceptual and physically based MGB-IPH model. The model uses the Penman Monteith for evapotranspiration and the Moore and Clarke model for soil water storage. River dynamics is simulated using full Saint-Venant equations and a simple floodplain storage model. The model was forced using satellite-derived daily rainfall (TRMM 3B42). We implemented a DA scheme based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) capable of assimilating three types of data: (1) discharge observations; (2) water levels provided by the ENVISAT radar altimeter; and (3) discharge estimated from radar altimetry. All state variables of the hydrological model were updated at each analyses time step. Model state variables errors were generated by

  12. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  13. Four decades of land-cover, land-use and hydroclimatology changes in the Itacaiúnas River watershed, southeastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Souza-Filho, Pedro Walfir M; de Souza, Everaldo B; Silva Júnior, Renato O; Nascimento, Wilson R; Versiani de Mendonça, Breno R; Guimarães, José Tasso F; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Siqueira, José Oswaldo

    2016-02-01

    Long-term human-induced impacts have significantly changed the Amazonian landscape. The most dramatic land cover and land use (LCLU) changes began in the early 1970s with the establishment of the Trans-Amazon Highway and large government projects associated with the expansion of agricultural settlement and cattle ranching, which cleared significant tropical forest cover in the areas of new and accelerated human development. Taking the changes in the LCLU over the past four decades as a basis, this study aims to determine the consequences of land cover (forest and savanna) and land use (pasturelands, mining and urban) changes on the hydroclimatology of the Itacaiúnas River watershed area of the located in the southeastern Amazon region. We analyzed a multi-decadal Landsat dataset from 1973, 1984, 1994, 2004 and 2013 and a 40-yr time series of water discharge from the Itacaiúnas River, as well as air temperature and relative humidity data over this drainage area for the same period. We employed standard Landsat image processing techniques in conjunction with a geographic object-based image analysis and multi-resolution classification approach. With the goal of detecting possible long-term trends, non-parametric Mann-Kendall test was applied, based on a Sen slope estimator on a 40-yr annual PREC, TMED and RH time series, considering the spatial average of the entire watershed. In the 1970s, the region was entirely covered by forest (99%) and savanna (∼0.3%). Four decades later, only ∼48% of the tropical forest remains, while pasturelands occupy approximately 50% of the watershed area. Moreover, in protected areas, nearly 97% of the tropical forest remains conserved, while the forest cover of non-protected areas is quite fragmented and, consequently, unevenly distributed, covering an area of only 30%. Based on observational data analysis, there is evidence that the conversion of forest cover to extensive and homogeneous pasturelands was accompanied by systematic

  14. The impact of varying depositional processes on the preservation of lignin from the Mississippi and Amazon Rivers: A dual application of compound-specific and ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. K.; Rosenheim, B. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Roberts, M.; Xu, L.

    2012-12-01

    The establishment of reliable terrestrial-marine particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes is important to understanding biogeochemical cycling of carbon, reconstructing environmental and depositional processes, and organic carbon (OC) storage in continental margins. Marine preservation of riverine POC differs between river systems and depositional settings, determined by a combination of fluvial and marine processes. In this study, we compare the preservation of terrestrial OC in two depositional sediments related to major river systems - the Amazon and the Mississippi - using a combination of compound class extraction and radiocarbon determination and ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon determination that targets the bulk POC by separating it along lines of thermochemical stability. Submarine mudbanks emanating from the Amazon are continuously re-oxygenated on decadal timescales and have high iron and marine sulfate content. Conversely, subaerial marshes dominate the Mississippi delta, marked by low oxygen, iron, and sulfate content. These factors potentially result in a higher degree of selective preservation of terrestrial OC and different molecular components (Canfield, 1994; Zonneveld et al., 2010; Hedges et al., 1995) in Mississippi deltaic sediments than in the Amazon mudbank deposits. Because of these differing depositional conditions, we anticipate that more degradation-resistant terrestrial compounds, such as lignin, will be greater preserved in deltaic Mississippi River sediments versus in Amazon mudbank sediments. Preliminary results show that the Mississippi deltaic sediments have higher concentrations of lignin phenols (0.632 mg/mgOC) compared to the Amazon (Guianas mudbanks) sediments (0.176 mg/mgOC), consistent with rapid burial and less post-depositional marine processing in the wetlands. For both rivers, lignin phenol concentrations in the deposited sediment were higher than reported (Hedges et al., 1986; Onsted et al., 2000) suspended sediment lignin

  15. The role of fluvial sediment supply and river-mouth hydrology in the dynamics of the muddy, Amazon-dominated Amapá-Guianas coast, South America: A three-point research agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Proisy, Christophe; Fromard, François; Gensac, Erwan; Peron, Christina; Walcker, Romain; Lesourd, Sandric

    2013-07-01

    The morphology and sediment dynamics of the 1500 km-long coast of South America between the mouths of the Amazon and the Orinoco Rivers are largely dependent on the massive suspended-sediment discharge of the Amazon, part of which is transported alongshore as mud banks. These mud banks have an overwhelming impact on the geology, the geomorphology, the ecology and the economy of this coast. Although numerous field investigations and remote sensing studies have considerably enhanced our understanding of the dynamics of this coast over the last three decades, much still remains to be understood of the unique functional mechanisms and processes driving its evolution. Among the themes that we deem as requiring further attention three come out as fundamental. The first concerns the mechanisms of formation of individual mud banks from mud streaming on the shelf off the mouth of the Amazon. An unknown quantity of the fluid mud generated by offshore estuarine front activity is transported shoreward and progressively forms mud banks on the Amapá coast, Brazil. The volume of each mud bank can contain from the equivalent of the annual mud supply of the Amazon to several times this annual sediment discharge. The mechanisms by which individual banks are generated from the Amazon turbidity maximum are still to be elucidated. Areas of research include regional mesoscale oceanographic conditions and mud supply from the Amazon. The second theme is that of variations in rates of migration of mud banks, which influence patterns of coastal accretion. Research emphasis needs to be placed on the analysis of both regional meteorological-hydrodynamic forcing and distant Atlantic forcing, as well as on the hydrology of the large rivers draining the Guyana Shield. The rivers appear to generate significant offshore deflection of mud banks in transit alongshore, through a hydraulic-groyne effect. This may favour both muddy accretion on the updrift coast and downdrift mud liquefaction with

  16. Combining precipitation data from observed and numerical models to forecast precipitation characteristics in sparsely-gauged watersheds: an application to the Amazon River basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwelle, M. C.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Berrocal, V.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting rainfall in areas with sparse monitoring efforts is critical to making inferences about the health of ecosystems and built environments. Recent advances in scientific computing have allowed forecasting and climate models to increase their spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with observed point precipitation from monitoring stations, these models can be used to inform dynamic spatial statistical models for precipitation using methods from geostatistics and machine learning. To prove the feasibility, process, and capabilities of these statistical models, we present a case study of two statistical models of precipitation for the Amazon River basin from 2003-2010 that can infer a spatial process at a point using areal data from numerical model output. We investigate the seasonality and accumulation of rainfall, and the occurrence of no-rainfall and large-rainfall events. These parameters are used since they provide valuable information on possible model biases when using climate models for forecasts of the future process of precipitation in the Amazon basin. This information can be vital for ecosystem, agriculture, and water-resource management. We use observed precipitation data from weather stations, three areal datasets derived from observed precipitation (CFSR, CMORPH-CRT, GPCC) and three climate model precipitation datasets from CMIP5 (MIROC4h, HadGEM2-CC, and GISS-E2H) to construct the models. The observational data in the model domain is sparse, with 195 stations in the approximate 7×106 square kilometers of the Amazon basin, and therefore requires the areal data to create a more robust model. The first model uses the method of Bayesian melding to combine and make inferences from the included data sets, and the second uses a regression model with spatially and temporally-varying coefficients. The models of precipitation are fitted using the areal products and a subset of the point data, while another subset of point data is held out for

  17. Geothermal aquaculture: a guide to freshwater prawn culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.; Johnson, W.C.

    1980-05-01

    Biological data of the Malaysian prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are summarized. A history on its rearing techniques is given, but through the use of geothermal water or industrial warm water effluent, its range can be expanded. The use of wasted geothermal water at the Oregon Institute of Technology for prawn ponds is noted. Pond management and design; the hatchery design and function for larval culture; and geothermal applications (legal aspects and constraints) are discussed. (MCW)

  18. Morphology and phylogeny of Thelohanellus marginatus n. sp. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea), a parasite infecting the gills of the fish Hypophthalmus marginatus (Teleostei: Pimelodidae) in the Amazon River.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sónia; Casal, Graça; Velasco, Michele; Alves, Angela; Matos, Edilson; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Azevedo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Thelohanellus marginatus n. sp., a new myxosporean parasite infecting the primary gill filaments of the teleost fish Hypophthalmus marginatus (Pimelodidae) in the Amazon River, is described on the basis of microscopic and molecular procedures. The parasite forms whitish and ellipsoidal cysts up to 250 μm in diam. Myxospores ellipsoidal with a slightly more pointed anterior end, measuring 17.1 ± 0.6 μm in length, 6.9 ± 0.4 μm in width, and 5.1 ± 0.5 μm in thickness. A single pyriform polar capsule, 9.0 ± 0.3 μm long and 6.1 ± 0.4 μm wide, positioned slightly right to the medial plane in valvular view, contains a polar filament arranged in 4-5 coils. Molecular analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by Maximum Parsimony, Neighbor-Joining, and Maximum Likelihood revealed the parasite clustering among other myxobolids, namely Henneguya and Myxobolus. Host affinity is supported as an important evolutionary signal for the phylogeny of myxobolids. The parasite here described represents the first record of the genus Thelohanellus Kudo, 1933 from the South American fauna. PMID:25039988

  19. Production of dissolved organic carbon enriched in deoxy sugars representing an additional sink for biological C drawdown in the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, Travis B.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.

    2014-10-01

    In North Atlantic waters impacted by discharges from the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers, where planktonic diatom-diazotroph associations (DDA) were active, we observed that an average (± standard deviation) of 61 ± 12% of the biological drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) was partitioned into the accumulating total organic carbon pool, representing a flux of up to 9 ± 4 Tg C yr-1. This drawdown corresponded with chemical alteration of ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (UDOM), including increases in stable C isotopic composition (δ13C) and C:N. The dissolved carbohydrate component of UDOM also increased with biological DIC drawdown and diatom-associated diazotroph (i.e., Richelia) abundance. New carbohydrates could be distinguished by distinctively high relative abundances of deoxy sugars (up to 55% of monosaccharides), which may promote aggregate formation and enhance vertical carbon export. The identified production of non-Redfieldian, C-enriched UDOM thus suggests a mechanism to explain enhanced C sequestration associated with DDA N2 fixation, which may be widespread in mesohaline environments.

  20. Routine Metabolic Rate and Limiting Oxygen Concentration of Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii Larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malaysian prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are hatched and raised indoors in small tanks. Prawns may be raised and shipped at high densities which could result in low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. Because DO may play an important role in prawn development and survival, we measured routine me...

  1. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13–53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1–0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age—mercury-exposed and non-exposed—the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts

  2. Manganese and Mercury Levels in Water, Sediments, and Children Living Near Gold-Mining Areas of the Nangaritza River Basin, Ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    González-Merizalde, Max V; Menezes-Filho, José A; Cruz-Erazo, Claudia Teresa; Bermeo-Flores, Santos Amable; Sánchez-Castillo, María Obdulia; Hernández-Bonilla, David; Mora, Abrahan

    2016-08-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold-mining activities performed in mountain areas of the Southern Ecuadorian Amazon have incorporated several heavy metals into the aquatic systems, thus increasing the risk of exposure in populations living in adjacent zones. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the contamination levels of mercury (Hg) and manganese (Mn) in several rivers of the Nangaritza River basin and assess the exposure in school-aged children residing near the gold-mining zones. River water and sediment samples were collected from a highly contaminated (HEx) and a moderately contaminated (MEx) zones. Hair Mn (MnH) and urinary Hg (HgU) levels were determined in school-aged children living in both zones. High concentrations of dissolved Mn were found in river waters of the HEx zone (between 2660 and 3990 µg l(-1)); however, Hg levels, in general, were lower than the detection limit (DL; <1.0 µg l(-1)). Similarly, Mn levels in sediments were also increased (3090 to 4086 µg g(-1)). Median values of MnH in children of the HEx and MEx zones were 5.5 and 3.4 µg g(-1), respectively, whereas the median values of HgU concentrations in children living in the HEx and MEx zones were 4.4 and 0.62 µg g-creat(-1), respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed between both biomarkers in children from the HEx and MEx zones. In addition, boys presented significantly greater MnH levels in both zones. The greater MnH values were found in children living in alluvial areas, whereas children living in the high mountain areas, where some ore-processing plants are located close to or inside houses and schools, had the greater HgU concentrations. In summary, the data reported in this paper highlights that artisanal and small-scale gold-mining activities can not only produce mercurial contamination, that can also release other heavy metals (such as Mn) that may pose a risk to human health. PMID:27173830

  3. Inverse mercury and selenium concentration patterns between herbivorous and piscivorous fish in the Tapajos River, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Sampaio da Silva, D; Lucotte, M; Paquet, S; Brux, G; Lemire, M

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the levels of selenium and mercury in five fish species commonly eaten by local populations of the Brazilian Amazon. Fish specimens were sampled in two lotic and three lentic areas at two different phases of the hydrological cycle. Analyses of Carbon and Nitrogen stable isotopes allowed us to confirm the trophic levels of the fish species (one herbivorous, two omnivorous and two piscivorous) and verify that these levels remained unchanged with the habitats and the season. The levels of selenium and mercury in fish varied from 50ng/g to 1006ng/g and from 17ng/g to 3502ng/g respectively. For both seasons, fish from lotic ecosystems presented higher selenium concentrations. An inverse pattern was observed between selenium and mercury concentrations within the trophic chain, and this in both seasons. Indeed, the highest mean concentrations of selenium and lowest mean concentrations of mercury were measured in the herbivorous species and the opposite in the piscivorous species. Our results unequivocally demonstrate that local riverside populations will maximize the selenium health benefits of eating fish while minimizing their risk of being chronically exposed to mercury by preferentially consuming herbivorous species and to some extent omnivorous species, while avoiding piscivorous species. PMID:23921221

  4. Effect of seasonal flooding cycle on litterfall production in alluvial rainforest on the middle Xingu River (Amazon basin, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Camargo, M; Giarrizzo, T; Jesus, A J S

    2015-08-01

    The assumption for this study was that litterfall in floodplain environments of the middle Xingu river follows a pattern of seasonal variation. According to this view, litterfall production (total and fractions) was estimated in four alluvial rainforest sites on the middle Xingu River over an annual cycle, and examined the effect of seasonal flooding cycle. The sites included two marginal flooded forests of insular lakes (Ilha Grande and Pimentel) and two flooded forests on the banks of the Xingu itself (Boa Esperança and Arroz Cru). Total litterfall correlated with rainfall and river levels, but whereas the leaf and fruit fractions followed this general pattern, the flower fraction presented an inverse pattern, peaking in the dry season. The litterfall patterns recorded in the present study were consistent with those recorded at other Amazonian sites, and in some other tropical ecosystems. PMID:26691098

  5. Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of suspended sediment at the mouth of the Amazon river: The role of continental and oceanic forcing, and implications for coastal geomorphology and mud bank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensac, Erwan; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Vantrepotte, Vincent; Anthony, Edward J.

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained sediments supplied to the Ocean by the Amazon River and their transport under the influence of continental and oceanic forcing drives the geomorphic change along the 1500 km-long coast northward to the Orinoco River delta. The aim of this study is to give an encompassing view of the sediment dynamics in the shallow coastal waters from the Amazon River mouth to the Capes region (northern part of the Amapa region of Brazil and eastern part of French Guiana), where large mud banks are formed. Mud banks are the overarching features in the dynamics of the Amazon-Orinoco coast. They start migrating northward in the Capes region. Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentrations were calculated from satellite products (MODIS Aqua and Terra) acquired over the period 2000-2013. The Census-X11 decomposition method used to discriminate short-term, seasonal and long-term time components of the SPM variability has rendered possible a robust analysis of the impact of continental and oceanic forcing. Continental forcing agents considered are the Amazon River water discharge, SPM concentration and sediment discharge. Oceanic forcing comprises modelled data of wind speed and direction, wave height and direction, and currents. A 150 km-long area of accretion is detected at Cabo Norte that may be linked with a reported increase in the river's sediment discharge concurrent with the satellite data study period. We also assess the rate of mud bank migration north of Cabo Norte, and highlight its variability. Although we confirm a 2 km y-1 migration rate, in agreement with other authors, we show that this velocity may be up to 5 km y-1 along the Cabo Orange region, and we highlight the effect of water discharge by major rivers debouching on this coastal mud belt in modulating such rates. Finally, we propose a refined sediment transport pattern map of the region based on our results and of previous studies in the area such as the AMASSEDS programme, and discuss the

  6. Expression of biotransformation and oxidative stress genes in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii exposed to chlordecone.

    PubMed

    Gaume, Béatrice; Dodet, Nathalie; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Lemoine, Soazig

    2015-06-01

    Chlordecone is a persistent organochlorine pesticide widely used between 1972 and 1993 in the French West Indies to control the root borer in banana fields. Chlordecone use resulted in long-term pollution of soils, contamination of waters, of aquatic organisms, and of fields. Chlordecone is known to be neurotoxic, to increase prostate cancer, and to have negative effects on cognitive and motor development during infancy. In Guadeloupe, most of the freshwater species living in contaminated rivers exceed the French legal limit of 20 μg·kg(-1) wet weight. In the present study, we chose a transcriptomic approach to study the cellular effects of chlordecone in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii, an important economical species in Guadeloupe. Quantitative PCR revealed an induction of genes involved in defense mechanism against oxidative stress (catalase and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase) in prawns exposed to low environmental concentrations of chlordecone after 12 and 24 h of exposure. In prawns reared in a contaminated farm, transcription of genes involved in the biotransformation process (cytochrome P450 and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)) were induced after 8 days of exposure. Our results provide information on the mechanims of defense induced by chlordecone in aquatic crustacean species. This gene expression study of selected genes should be further strengthened by proteomic analyses and enzymatic activity assays to confirm the response of these biomarkers of stress in crustaceans and to give new insights into the mechanism of toxicity by chlordecone. PMID:24920261

  7. River Boats Contribute to the Regional Spread of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C.; Barboza, Jose Luis; Requena, Edwin; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The dramatic range expansion of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is associated with various anthropogenic transport activities, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms driving this geographic expansion. We longitudinally characterized infestation of different vehicle types (cars, boats, etc.) to estimate the frequency and intensity of mosquito introductions into novel locations (propagule pressure). Methods Exhaustive adult and immature Ae. aegypti collections were performed on six different vehicle types at five ports and two bus/ taxi departure points in the Amazonian city of Iquitos, Peru during 2013. Aquatic vehicles included 32 large and 33 medium-sized barges, 53 water taxis, and 41 speed boats. Terrestrial vehicles sampled included 40 buses and 30 taxis traveling on the only highway in the region. Ae. aegypti adult infestation rates and immature indices were analyzed by vehicle type, location within vehicles, and sampling date. Results Large barges (71.9% infested) and medium barges (39.4% infested) accounted for most of the infestations. Notably, buses had an overall infestation rate of 12.5%. On large barges, the greatest number of Ae. aegypti adults were found in October, whereas most immatures were found in February followed by October. The vast majority of larvae (85.9%) and pupae (76.7%) collected in large barges were produced in puddles formed in cargo holds. Conclusions Because larges barges provide suitable mosquito habitats (due to dark, damp cargo storage spaces and ample oviposition sites), we conclude that they likely serve as significant contributors to mosquitoes’ propagule pressure across long distances throughout the Peruvian Amazon. This information can help anticipate vector population mixing and future range expansions of dengue and other viruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti. PMID:25860352

  8. The reactivity of plant-derived organic matter in the Amazon River and implications on aquatic carbon fluxes to the atmosphere and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N. D.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Keil, R. G.; da Silva, R.; Brito, D. C.; Cunha, A. C.; Gagne-Maynard, W.; de Matos, A.; Neu, V.; Bianchi, T. S.; Krusche, A. V.; Richey, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The remineralization of terrestrially-derived organic carbon (OC), along with direct CO2 inputs from autochthonous plant respiration in floodplains, results in an evasive CO2 gas flux from inland waters that is an order of magnitude greater than the flux of OC to the ocean. This phenomenon is enhanced in tropical systems as a result of elevated temperatures and productivity relative to temperate and high-latitude counterparts. Likewise, this balance is suspected to be influenced by increasing global temperatures and alterations to hydrologic and land use regimes. Here, we assess the reactivity of terrestrial and aquatic plant-derived OM near the mouth of the Amazon River. The stable isotopic signature of CO2 (δ13CO2) was monitored in real-time during incubation experiments performed in a closed system gas phase equilibration chamber connected to a Picarro Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer. Incubations were performed under natural conditions and with the injection of isotopically labeled terrestrial macromolecules (e.g. lignin) and algal fatty acids. Under natural conditions, δ13CO2 became more depleted, shifting from roughly -23‰ to -27‰ on average, suggesting that C3 terrestrial vegetation was the primary fuel for CO2 production. Upon separate injections of 13C-labeled lignin and algal fatty acids, δ13CO2 increased near instantaneously and peaked in under 12 hours. Roughly 75% of the labeled lignin was converted to CO2 at the peak in δ13CO2, whereas less than 20% of the algal fatty acids were converted to CO2 (preliminary data subject to change). The rate of labeled-OC remineralization was enhanced by the addition of a highly labile substrate (e.g. ethyl acetate). Likewise, constant measurements of O2/pCO2 along the lower river revealed anomalously high CO2 and low O2 levels near the confluence of the mainstem and large tributaries with high algal productivity. These collective results suggest that the remineralization of complex terrestrial macromolecules is

  9. Recovery of Arapaima sp. populations by community-based management in floodplains of the Purus River, Amazon.

    PubMed

    Petersen, T A; Brum, S M; Rossoni, F; Silveira, G F V; Castello, L

    2016-07-01

    In the present study a unique dataset on population abundance in various community-based management (CBM) and non-CBM areas is analysed to address the question of whether CBM can recover overexploited populations of Arapaima sp. in river-floodplain ecosystems. All non-CBM areas possessed depleted Arapaima sp. populations with a mean density of 0·01 individuals ha(-1) . Arapaima sp. population densities in all CBM areas changed over time from depleted to overexploited or well managed status, with a mean rate of increase of 77% year(-1) . Rates of Arapaima sp. population recovery in CBM areas differed, probably reflecting differences in ecosystem productivity and compliance with management regulations. These results indicate that CBM schemes can be effective tools for the recovery and conservation of fish populations with non-migratory life cycles in tropical river-floodplain ecosystems. PMID:27094974

  10. [Diet and reproduction of the main fish species from the Mesay river (Colombian Amazon region) during the flooding season].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Parra, María del Pilar; Bejarano-Rodríguez, Ivonne

    2006-09-01

    The diet and reproduction of fish communities in three biotopes (river, stream, and lake) of the Mesay floodplain-river complex (Puerto Abeja, Serrania de Chiribiquete National Natural Park, Caquetá, Colombia) were sampled during the "high water" level or flooding period. A total of 79 species of fishes from 15 families and four orders were collected between July and September 2000. The most important items in their diet were fruits and seeds. Approximately 46 % of captured fish were near maturity, and 35 % were mature. The feeding and reproductive behavior of these fish were consistent with other studies on migratory Amazonian species during the high water period, when the floodplain plays an important role in the availability of food and refuge. During this period the fish make use of the vast food availability to accumulate fat reserves that later produce the energy needed for gonadal maturation and breeding migrations. PMID:18491626

  11. Mercury and methyl mercury in fishes from Bacajá River (Brazilian Amazon): evidence for bioaccumulation and biomagnification.

    PubMed

    Souza-Araujo, J; Giarrizzo, T; Lima, M O; Souza, M B G

    2016-07-01

    This study assessed total mercury (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations, bioaccumulation and biomagnification of THg through the food web in fishes consumed by indigenous communities of Bacajá River, the largest tributary of the right bank of Xingu River. In total, 496 fish (22 species) were sampled. Nine species had THg concentrations above the limit recommended by the World Health Organisation (0·5 µg g(-1) wet mass), and one exceeded the recommended level for Hg in predatory fishes by Brazilian law (1·0 µg g(-1) ). The average concentration of THg increased significantly with trophic guild (herbivorous to piscivorous) and trophic level, with higher accumulation in fishes with greater total length. Ninety-six per cent of all mercury was methylated. These results suggest that feeding habits determine THg concentrations in fishes and that Hg elimination rate is slow during growth, which allows greater accumulation. These findings show that fishes in the Bacajá River contain high concentrations of THg and MeHg. PMID:27241551

  12. Impact of forested fallows on fertility and mercury content in soils of the Tapajós River region, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Patry, Cynthia; Davidson, Robert; Lucotte, Marc; Béliveau, Annie

    2013-08-01

    Recent research on slash-and-burn agriculture conducted in the Amazonian basin has suggested that soils must be left under forested fallows for at least 10 to 15 years to regain fertility levels comparable to non-disturbed forests in order to allow for short cycle crop cultivation. However, small scale farmers tend nowadays to re-burn secondary forests as soon as after 3 to 5 years, thus could contribute to further reduce soil fertility and could enhance the transfer of mercury (Hg) naturally present in soils of the region towards water courses. The present research project sets out to characterize the impact of forested fallows of differing age and land-use history on soils properties (fertility and Hg contents) in the region of the Tapajós River, an active pioneer front of the Brazilian Amazon. To do this, soil samples in forested fallows of variable age and in control primary forests were retrieved. In general, soil fertility of grouped forested fallows of different ages was similar to that of the primary forests. But when discriminating soils according to their texture, forested fallows on coarse grained soils still had much higher NH4/NO3 ratios, NH4 and Ca contents than primary forests, this even 15 years after burning. The impact of repeated burnings was also assessed. Fallows on coarse grained soils showed an impoverishment for all variables related to fertility when the number of burnings was 5 or more. For fallows on fine grained soils that underwent 5 or more burnings, NO3 contents were low although a cation enrichment was observed. Total soil Hg content was also sensitive to repeated burnings, showing similar losses for forested fallows established on both types of soil. However, Hg linked to coarse particles appeared to migrate back towards fine particles at the surface of coarse grained soils in fallows older than 7 years. PMID:23651778

  13. U-Pbdating on detrital zircon and Nd and Hf isotopes related to the provenance of siliciclastic rocks of the Amazon Basin: Implications for the origin of Proto-Amazonas River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, Elton Luiz; Silva Souza, Valmir; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Ventura Santos, Roberto; Poitrasson, Franck; Vieira Cruz, Lucieth; Mendes Conceição, Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Previous provenance studies along the Amazonas river have demonstrated that the Amazon drainage basin has been reorganized since the Late Cretaceous with the uplift of the Andes and the establishment of the transcontinental Amazon fluvial system from Late Miocene to Late Pleistocene (Hoorn et al., 1995; Potter, 1997, Wesselingh et al., 2002; Figueiredo et al. 2009, Campbell et al., 2006, Nogueira et al. 2013).There is a lack of data from Eastern and Central Amazonia and only limited core data from the Continental Platform near to current Amazonas river mouth. Central Amazonia is strategic to unveil the origin of Amazonas River because it represents the region where the connection of the Solimões and Amazonas basin can be studied through time (Nogueira et al. 2013). Also, there is a shortage of information on the old Precambrian and Paleozoic sediment sources relative to Cretaceous and Miocene siliciclastic deposits of the Solimões and Amazonas basins. We collected stratigraphic data, detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Nd and Hf isotopes from Precambrian, Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Miocene siliciclastic deposits of the Northwestern border of Amazonas Basin. They are exposed in the Presidente Figueiredo region and in the scarps of Amazon River, and occur to the east of the Purus Arch. This Northwest-Southeast trending structural feature that divides the Solimões and Amazonas basin was active at various times since the Paleozoic. Detrital zircon ages for the Neoproterozoic Prosperança Formation yielded a complex signature, with different populations of Neoproterozoic (550, 630 and 800 Ma) and Paleoproterozoic to Archean sources (1.6, 2.1 and 2.6 Ga). Also Nd and Hf isotopes show two groups of TDM model ages between 1.4 to 1.53 Ga and 2.2 and 3.1 Ga. Sediments typical of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the Nhamundá and Manacapuru Formations revealed NdTDM model ages of 1.7, 2.2 and 2.7 Ga, but Hf isotopes and U-Pb zircon ages are more varied. They characterize a

  14. Length variation of Gravity-Driven systems in the Amazon River Mouth Basin: a history of carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation and post-rift subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Alberto; Gorini, Christian; Letouzey, Jean; Suc, Jean-Pierre; Reis, Tadeu; Silva, Cleverson; Le Bouteiller, Pauline; Granjeon, Didier; Haq, Bilal; Delprat-Jannaud, Florence

    2016-04-01

    This study address the post-rift sedimentary record of the Amazon River Mouth Basin with a focus on gravity tectonics. We investigate shale detachment layers and the timing of different gravity deformation phases. Our study was based on more than 20,000 km of 2D multi-channel seismic data, 4,453 km2 of 3D multi-channel seismic data and 40 exploratory well data. A reliable age model was constructed based on biostratigraphic data. Five industry wells on the shelf/upper slope region and seven scientific wells drilled by DSDP and ODP in the distal Ceará Rise region were used for platform and deep environments correlations. This allowed us to calibrate the seismic lines and compare the sedimentation rates in different domains of the basin (e.g. shelf, slope, deep basin). In the Basin's shelf a widespread carbonate sequence dated as Late Paleocene grew up over a Latest Albian to Early Paleocene prograding clastic sequence. From the Eocene to the Late Miocene a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate aggrading megasequence developed. The first gravitational deformation event took place during the Eocene. The proximal limit (normal faults) of this this gravity-deformation system occurs along the hinge line. The major and deeper detachment layer was identified within the previously deposed Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene stratigraphic sequence (Cenomanian-Turonian deep shale source rock?). Further downslope, during the same period a stack of thrust sheets was created. In the central part of the Basin, a second gravitational deformation phase took place from Late Oligocene to early Late Miocene. During this period the basal detachment layer (Late Cretaceous?) was reactivated and the frontal thrust sheet created ridges and piggy-back basins. From the Late Miocene to present time, a major increase in the siliciclastic sedimentation rates was evidenced in the axis of the modern Amazon Delta. A huge aggrading-prograding mega-sequence forced the expansion of a third gravitational system

  15. Extraction from prawn shells of substances cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Shimodori, S; Moriya, T; Kohashi, O; Faming, D; Amako, K

    1989-01-01

    Substances cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae were detected from prawn shells immersed in phosphate-buffered saline. This cryoprotective activity was heat resistant and sensitive to treatment with trypsin. For the exhibition of its full activity, the presence of Mg ion was indispensable. The cryoprotective activity of this substance was more active than that of other known cryoprotectants, like glycerol or serum. PMID:2604409

  16. Early attempts at production of prawn cell lines.

    PubMed

    Owens, L; Smith, J

    1999-01-01

    This report describes some unsuccessful attempts to produce continuous cell lines from penaeid prawn tissues in the late 1980s. This information is presented so that others might save time by not repeating the unsuccessful measures that were attempted. The osmolarity of Penaeus monodon haemolymph was measured at 687 mOsmol/kg (N = 10). Of the media tested, the best medium for cell growth and maintenance was shown to be double strength L-15, supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum, and 10% prawn muscle extract at 28 degrees C ( approximately 675.5 mOsmol/kg). Prawn muscle extract was made by homogenizing 30 g of prawn muscle in 50/50 ratio of distilled water/autoclaved seawater, clarified stepwise by centrifugation at 2k, 14k, 14k xg for 30 minutes each. The resultant supernatant was heat-inactivated on occasions with no improvement in growth. Preconditioned medium, cholesterol, galactose and trehalose supplements and the use of Cell-Tak did not improve growth conditions, and haemolymph extracts were detrimental to the cells. In addition it was shown that Nunc 25 cm(2) plastic culture flasks were better than Linbro and both were better than glass as substrates. The fate of 101 individual primary cell cultures, established from penaeid prawns, was as follows. Fifteen of the cultures succumbed to bacterial contamination, five became contaminated with fungi, four with thauastrochytrids, four succumbed to presumptive viral autocultures and two to ciliate contamination. Cell cultures derived from heart tissue could be maintained for a mean of 12.7 days (sd 9.7d), those derived from the epidermis 15.6 days (sd 9.0d), ovarian tissue 10 days (sd 2d), lymphoid organ 6.8 days (sd 0.4d), nerve cord and hepatopancreas 2 days. The most persistent cell cultures -- those derived from the heart explants -- contained dividing cells at 40 days, and epidermis cells were still dividing at 30 days. The longest lasting, non- proliferating, but viable, cell cultures were those of

  17. The {sup 18}O:{sup 16}O of dissolved oxygen in rivers and lakes in the Amazon Basin: Determining the ratio of respiration to photosynthesis rates in freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Quay, P.D.; Wilbur, D.O.; Richey, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    The concentration and {sup 18}O:{sup 16}O ratio of dissolved oxygen were measured for 23 rivers and lakes of the Amazon Basin during 1988, 1990, and 1991. With only two exceptions, the rivers and lakes had dissolved oxygen concentrations that were at 20-90% of atmospheric saturation levels. The {delta}{sup 18}O of the dissolved oxygen ranged from 15 to 30% (vs. SMOW). The {delta}{sup 18}O for the lakes were the lowest at 15-23%. {delta}{sup 18}O < 24.2{per_thousand} (the atmospheric equilibrium value) are the result of photosynthetic oxygen input. The {delta}{sup 18}O of the rivers, in contrast, ranged from 24 to 30{per_thousand} > 24.2{per_thousand} resulted from respiration. Despite this clear difference between the {delta}{sup 18}O for rivers and lakes, these water bodies had similar levels of oxygen undersaturation. The {delta}{sup 18}O and dissolved oxygen concentrations are used to determine the ratio of community respiration (R) to gross photosynthesis (P) rates. R:P varied between {approximately}1 and 1.5 for lakes and between 1.5 and 4 for rivers. For all rivers and lakes, the measured {delta}{sup 18}O indicated the presence of photosynthetically produced oxygen, with the highest proportion occurring in lakes. The {delta}{sup 18}O of dissolved oxygen is a unique tracer of photosynthetic oxygen and provides, through a determination of R:P, a means of quantifying the heterotrophic state of freshwaters. 29 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Infection with schistosome parasites in snails leads to increased predation by prawns: implications for human schistosomiasis control.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Scott J; De Leo, Giulio A; Wood, Chelsea L; Sokolow, Susanne H

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis - a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people across the globe - is primarily transmitted between human definitive hosts and snail intermediate hosts. To reduce schistosomiasis transmission, some have advocated disrupting the schistosome life cycle through biological control of snails, achieved by boosting the abundance of snails' natural predators. But little is known about the effect of parasitic infection on predator-prey interactions, especially in the case of schistosomiasis. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments performed on Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria glabrata snails to investigate: (i) rates of predation on schistosome-infected versus uninfected snails by a sympatric native river prawn, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, and (ii) differences in snail behavior (including movement, refuge-seeking and anti-predator behavior) between infected and uninfected snails. In predation trials, prawns showed a preference for consuming snails infected with schistosome larvae. In behavioral trials, infected snails moved less quickly and less often than uninfected snails, and were less likely to avoid predation by exiting the water or hiding under substrate. Although the mechanism by which the parasite alters snail behavior remains unknown, these results provide insight into the effects of parasitic infection on predator-prey dynamics and suggest that boosting natural rates of predation on snails may be a useful strategy for reducing transmission in schistosomiasis hotspots. PMID:26677260

  19. The turbidity behavior in an Amazon floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcântara, E.; Novo, E.; Stech, J.; Lorenzzetti, J.; Barbosa, C.; Assireu, A.; Souza, A.

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the turbidity behavior of an Amazon Floodplain Lake. Observations of turbidity provide quantitative information about water quality. However, the number of available in situ measurements for water quality determination is usually limited in time and space. Here, we present an analysis of the temporal and spatial variability using two approaches: (i) the first is based on wavelet analysis of a turbidity time series measured by an automatic monitoring system; (ii) the second is based on turbidity samples measured in different locations and then interpolated by an ordinary kriging algorithm. The space/time turbidity variability is clearly related to the Amazon River flood pulses in the floodplain. When the water level in the floodplain is rising or receding, the exchange between the Amazon River and the floodplain is the major driving force in turbidity variability. At high water level, the turbidity variability is controlled by the lake bathymetry. Finally, when the water level is low, the wind action and lake morphometry are the main causes of turbidity variability. The combined use of temporal and spatial data showed a great potential for understanding the turbidity behavior in a complex aquatic system, like the Amazon floodplain.

  20. An Appalachian Amazon? Magnetofossil evidence for the development of a tropical river-like system in the mid-Atlantic United States during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, R. E.; Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Powars, D. S.; Godfrey, L. V.; Swanson-Hysell, N.; Maloof, A. C.; Vali, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum is preserved within the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain as a unique clay deposited in the Salisbury Embayment, a tectonic downwarp that stretches from southeastern Virginia to central New Jersey. The mostly massive and kaolinite-rich clay is distinct from the glauconitic sediments that otherwise characterize regional Paleocene and lower Eocene deposits. It contains abundant magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria and by larger, presumptively eukaryotic microorganisms not yet known from any other locality. Because most magnetotactic bacteria live within a specific, narrow redox environment -- the suboxic zone of a water column or sediments, where both oxygen and sulfide concentrations are low and iron concentrations relatively high -- their biominerals can be used as a paleoenvironmental tracer. High iron bioavailability indicates a relatively thick suboxic zone. The preservation of iron biominerals suggests that this zone was located in sediments, rather than in the water column, as water column suboxia is associated with high sedimentary organic carbon concentrations, which promote magnetite dissolution. The thickest modern, sedimentary, high-iron suboxic zones occur in tropical river-dominated shelves, such as the Amazon Shelf. These zones result from the combination of a moderately high input of reactive Fe (produced by tropical weathering conditions) with a high-energy environment (produced by tides, frontal-zone currents, and surface waves) that promotes the regular physical reworking of the sediments, thus allowing the re-oxidation of reduced Fe and increasing the availability of Fe as an electron acceptor. To test the "Appalachian Amazon" hypothesis, we mapped the distribution of magnetofossils throughout the Salisbury Embayment using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy, supplemented by organic carbon isotope data. We find three magnetic facies in the clay: Facies 1, characterized by a mix of

  1. Metal accumulation in the greentail prawn, Metapenaeus bennettae, in Sydney and Port Hacking estuaries, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lewtas, K L M; Birch, G F; Foster-Thorpe, C

    2014-01-01

    Metal concentrations of the inshore greentail prawn, Metapenaeus bennettae, and surface sediments from locations within Sydney estuary and Port Hacking (Australia) were assessed for bioaccumulation and contamination. The current study aimed to assess metal concentrations in prawn tissue (tail muscle, exoskeleton, hepatopancreas and gills), relate whole body prawn tissue metal concentrations to sediment metal concentrations and animal size, as well as assess prawn consumption as a risk to human health. Metal concentrations were highest in sediment and prawns from contaminated locations (Iron Cove, Hen and Chicken Bay and Lane Cove) in Sydney estuary compared with the reference estuary (Port Hacking). Concentrations in sediments varied considerably between sites and between metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn), and although concentrations exceeded Interim Sediment Quality Guideline-Low values, metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were below Australian National Health and Medical Research Council human consumption guidelines in prawn tail muscle tissue. Metal concentrations in prawn tail muscle tissue were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) amongst locations for Pb, Zn and Cd, and metal concentrations were generally highest in gills tissue, followed by the hepatopancreas, exoskeleton and tail muscle. The exoskeleton contained the highest Sr concentration; the hepatopancreas contained the highest As, Cu and Mo concentrations; and the gills contained the highest Al, Cr, Fe and Pb concentrations. Concentrations of Pb, As and Sr were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between size groups amongst locations. PMID:23852467

  2. The JERS Amazon Multi-Season Mapping Study (JAMMS): Observation Strategies and Data Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, B.; Freeman, A.; Siqueira, P.

    2000-01-01

    The JERS-1 Amazon Multi-season Mapping Study (JAMMS), part of the Global Rain Forest Mapping (GRFM) project led by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), had an ambitious agenda to completely map the Amazon River floodpain (and surrounding areas) twice at high resolution.

  3. Water quality changes in floodplain lakes due to the Amazon River flood pulse: Lago Grande de Curuaí (Pará).

    PubMed

    Affonso, A G; Barbosa, C; Novo, E M L M

    2011-08-01

    Assurance of water quality for human consumption is essential for public health policies. In the Amazon floodplain, the seasonal water level variation causes periodic flooding of marginal areas that are usually used for settlements, agriculture and livestock. Therefore, the exchange of materials between the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem affects the proportion of suspended and dissolved components in water and its physical-chemical characteristics, and consequently the quality of the water used by local people. Following this approach, the aim of this study is to evaluate changes in water quality in Lago Grande de Curuaí floodplain, Óbidos, Pará in response to the flood pulse, during one hydrological year from 2003 to 2004, based on water use classes (according to National Water Agency 357/2005 resolution) using chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen concentration as parameters and the eutrophication index. Ordinary kriging was applied to interpolate chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen and to predict values at non sampled locations. Each location was then classified according to water use acceptable parameters and to Carlson Trophic State Index modified by Toledo to map lake water classes and trophic status. The result showed that Lago Grande de Curuaí floodplain is a supereutrophic system, with levels of dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a not suitable for human supply during the receding water phase. These areas are located near the riverine communities, which can cause health problems due to the presence of potentially toxic algae. Therefore, monitoring water quality in Amazon lakes is essential to ensure the availability has appropriate quality for human and animal supplies. PMID:21881783

  4. Carbon isotopic composition of Amazon shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Showers, W.J.; Angle, D.G.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of carbon isotopes in Amazon shelf sediment is controlled by the same processes that are forming the modern subaqueous delta. The terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) isotopic carbon signal observed in surficial sediments near the river mouth extends over 400 km northwest along the shelf. Terrestrial carbon is associated with areas of rapid sediment accumulation (topset and foreset regions). A sharp boundary between terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) and marine (-23 to -22 per thousand) isotopic carbon values in surficial sediments is associated with a change in depositional conditions (foreset to bottomset regions) and a decrease in sediment accumulation rate. POC water-column isotopic values (-27 per thousand) near the river mouth are similar to the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values, but POC water-column samples collected 20 km off the river mouth have marine carbon isotopic values (-22 to -19 per thousand) and differ from the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values. These water column observations are related to variations in turbidity and productivity. Down-core isotopic variation is only observed in cores taken in areas of lower sediment accumulation rates. These observations indicate that the organic carbon in Amazon shelf sediment is dominantly terrestrial in composition, and the location of deposition of this carbon is controlled by modern processes of sediment accumulation. The modern Amazon shelf is similar to large clinoform shale deposits of the Cretaceous in North America. Thus, the stratigraphic setting may help predict the isotopic variations of carbon in ancient deposits.

  5. Treatment efficiency of effluent prawn culture by wetland with floating aquatic macrophytes arranged in series.

    PubMed

    Henares, M N P; Camargo, A F M

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of a series of wetland colonized with Eichhornia crassipes and Salvinia molesta to treat the effluent of a giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) broodstock pond was evaluated in this study. The experimental design was completely randomized and was performed in 9 rectangular tanks (1.6 m3) with three treatments (constructed wetlands) and three replicates. The treatment types included: a wetland colonized with E. crassipes and S. molesta (EcSm) arranged sequentially, a wetland with E. crassipes only (Ec) and a wetland with S. molesta only (Sm). The means of suspended particulate material (SPM), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), P-orthophosphate (PO4-P) and total phosphorus (TP) of the treated effluents were compared using ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P<0.05). The effluent treated in Ec and EcSm wetlands exhibited lower SPM concentrations. The Ec wetland reduced TIN, TKN, PO4-P and TP by 46.0, 43.7, 44.4 and 43.6%, respectively. In the EcSm wetland, the reduction of TIN (23.0%), TKN (33.7%) and PO4-P (26.7%) was similar to the Sm wetland (19.8% TIN, 30.9% TKN and 23.8% PO4-P). The Ec wetland was more efficient in treating pond effluent due likely to the higher root surface of E. crassipes, which forms an extensive area favorable to retention and adsorption of debris and absorption of nutrients. PMID:25627602

  6. Rare earth elements in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, M.; Seyler, P.; Benedetti, M. F.; Alves, V. P.; Boaventura, G. R.; Sondag, F.

    2003-05-01

    The rare earth element (REE) concentrations of the dissolved and particulate fractions and bed sediment between Manaus and Santarém in the Amazon River, and in some major tributaries, were evaluated. A very important zone in the Amazon basin, the encontro das aguas area where the Rio Solimões and the Rio Negro meet, was especially sampled. Different size fractions were isolated by ultrafiltration. Water samples were collected at different stages of the mixing. Three groups of waters are distinguished: group I has a low pH (<5·5) and is represented by the Negro basin rivers; group II has alkalinity less than 0·2 meq l-1 and is represented by the Rios Tapajós and Trombetas; group III has high alkalinity (>0·2 meq l-1) and higher pH (>6·5) and is represented by the Madeira basin rivers, the Solimões and the Amazon. The highest dissolved REE concentration is in the Rio Negro and the lowest in the Rio Tapajós (dissolved REEs vary by more than a factor of ten). The solubility of REEs is pH dependent: in river waters with a pH < 6 the Ce concentration is twice that of La, whereas in rivers with a higher pH the concentrations of Ce and La are similar. Dissolved REE concentrations are positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon. Correlations between Fe, Al, and La suggest that La is associated with Al (Fe)-rich organic matter and/or related to dissolved Fe-rich inorganic material. Dissolved REEs normalized to North American shale composite show an enrichment in intermediate/heavy REEs (from Eu to Er), except for the shields rivers (such as Rio Negro and Rio Trombetas). Both of them are depleted in heavy REEs and show a relative Ce enrichment. In contrast, for the Andeans rivers (such as Rio Solimões), light REEs are slightly depleted and a negative Ce relative anomaly occurs. The pattern of the Amazon River at Óbidos confirms the major influence of the Rios Negro and Solimões with REE fractionation. For the Rio Negro, 60 to 70% of REEs are

  7. Geochemistry of Amazon Basin supported by the ADCP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paca, Victor; Moreira, Daniel; Monteiro, Achiles; Roig, Henrique

    2014-05-01

    The Amazon River is the largest river in the world in volume of water. The basin has 6.915.000 Km2, but the last gauging station of Amazon River with regular and continuous measurements of discharge and sediment transport are Óbidos station with 4.670.000 Km2. Óbidos It is also the last stream gauge station with no or less tidal effect observed from Atlantic Ocean and registered. The Clim-Amazon Project has been done the first measurements with the purpose to acquire geochemical and hydrological informations downstream Óbidos station. The system studied has input data of sediments load after Óbidos, and the output of the system, at the Amazon River is at Macapá, close to the mouth of Amazon river. And flow the main tributaries along this way, between these two stations. To evaluate the geochemical source, the mass balance, and isotopic geochemistry is necessary the informations about the traces the main chemical elements, transported by the discharge from the main rivers of this area: Tapajos, Xingu, Paru, Jari, and the Amazon River at Monte Alegre and at Macapá. The ADCP - Acoustic Doppler Current Profile, equipment is used to get the stream discharge value at the moment of transect. But also get two more informations necessary for the geochemistry, and do the collecting points profiles. The place with most velocity at transect or the place with more backscatter. These informations are related with the sediment load of the river. Or which one can provide the better idea of how are transported the sediments at the measured transects. What was to observe was the main speed of the stream flow or the main backscatter sectional. The main purpose of the work is to show how works the correlation between the backscatter and speed data given by the ADCP, downstream Óbidos, and the main confluences of Amazon River, until Macapá. The ADCP measurements support the geochemical studies and the course of sediments load transported by the discharge of these rivers.

  8. The Wavelet ToolKat: A set of tools for the analysis of series through wavelet transforms. Application to the channel curvature and the slope control of three free meandering rivers in the Amazon basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudor, Lise; Piegay, Herve; Wawrzyniak, Vincent; Spitoni, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The form and functioning of a geomorphic system result from processes operating at various spatial and temporal scales. Longitudinal channel characteristics thus exhibit complex patterns which vary according to the scale of study, might be periodic or segmented, and are generally blurred by noise. Describing the intricate, multiscale structure of such signals, and identifying at which scales the patterns are dominant and over which sub-reach, could help determine at which scales they should be investigated, and provide insights into the main controlling factors. Wavelet transforms aim at describing data at multiple scales (either in time or space), and are now exploited in geophysics for the analysis of nonstationary series of data. They provide a consistent, non-arbitrary, and multiscale description of a signal's variations and help explore potential causalities. Nevertheless, their use in fluvial geomorphology, notably to study longitudinal patterns, is hindered by a lack of user-friendly tools to help understand, implement, and interpret them. We have developed a free application, The Wavelet ToolKat, designed to facilitate the use of wavelet transforms on temporal or spatial series. We illustrate its usefulness describing longitudinal channel curvature and slope of three freely meandering rivers in the Amazon basin (the Purus, Juruá and Madre de Dios rivers), using topographic data generated from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in 2000. Three types of wavelet transforms are used, with different purposes. Continuous Wavelet Transforms are used to identify in a non-arbitrary way the dominant scales and locations at which channel curvature and slope vary. Cross-wavelet transforms, and wavelet coherence and phase are used to identify scales and locations exhibiting significant channel curvature and slope co-variations. Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transforms decompose data into their variations at a series of scales and are used to provide

  9. Reconciling geography and genealogy: phylogeography of giant freshwater prawns from the Lake Carpentaria region.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Mark; Wilson, John C; Mather, Peter B

    2004-11-01

    There is convincing geological evidence for the historical existence of an ancient lake on the Australian-New Guinea continental shelf during the late Pleistocene. Lake Carpentaria was a vast fresh- to brackishwater lake that would presumably have provided habitat for, and facilitated gene flow among, aquatic taxa that tolerate low to moderate salinities in this region. Moreover, it has been argued that the outflow of Papua New Guinea's Fly River was diverted westward into Lake Carpentaria during this period, although this hypothesis is controversial. We predicted that these events, if a true history, would have promoted gene flow and population growth via range-expansion events in the giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and restricted gene flow subsequently by way of a vicariant event as sea levels rose during the late Pleistocene, and a marine environment replaced Lake Carpentaria. We tested these hypotheses using phylogeographical and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA variation in M. rosenbergii populations sampled from the Lake Carpentaria region. Our results support the hypothesis that Lake Carpentaria facilitated gene flow among populations of M. rosenbergii that are today isolated, but contest claims of a westward diversion of the Fly River. We inferred the timing of initial expansion in the 'Lake Carpentaria lineage' and found the timing of this event to be broadly concordant with geological dating of the formation of Lake Carpentaria. Reconciling geological and molecular data, as presented here, provides a powerful framework for investigating the influence of historical earth history events on the distribution of biological (i.e. molecular) diversity. PMID:15488008

  10. Factors influencing the structure and spatial distribution of fishes in the headwater streams of the Jaú River in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Kemenes, A; Forsberg, B R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of spatial variation in river channels and habitats on the distribution of fish communities in the headwater streams of the Jaú River System, a blackwater tributary of the Negro River. Collections and measurements were made in 34 headwater streams during the period of November- December, 1998. Fish were captured with fish traps and hand nets along standard reaches of two meanders. Data on benthic habitat structure, stream depth and width were collected along lateral transects in each sample reach. A total of 66 fish species from 24 families were collected and classified into seven trophic guilds: allocthonous insectivore, autochthonous insectivore, general insectivore, piscivore, detritivorous planktivore, detritivorous insectivore and insectivorous piscivore. Variations in the distribution and diversity of bottom substrates were important factors influencing fish community structures in these systems. Also, variation in stream size explained the observed variability in fish communities. PMID:25627363

  11. In-Depth Tanscriptomic Analysis on Giant Freshwater Prawns

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Shamsudin, Maizatul Izzah; Kang, Yi; Lili, Zhao; Tan, Tian Tian; Kwong, Qi Bin; Liu, Hang; Zhang, Guojie; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2013-01-01

    Gene discovery in the Malaysian giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) has been limited to small scale data collection, despite great interest in various research fields related to the commercial significance of this species. Next generation sequencing technologies that have been developed recently and enabled whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), have allowed generation of large scale functional genomics data sets in a shorter time than was previously possible. Using this technology, transcriptome sequencing of three tissue types: hepatopancreas, gill and muscle, has been undertaken to generate functional genomics data for M. rosenbergii at a massive scale. De novo assembly of 75-bp paired end Ilumina reads has generated 102,230 unigenes. Sequence homology search and in silico prediction have identified known and novel protein coding candidate genes (∼24%), non-coding RNA, and repetitive elements in the transcriptome. Potential markers consisting of simple sequence repeats associated with known protein coding genes have been successfully identified. Using KEGG pathway enrichment, differentially expressed genes in different tissues were systematically represented. The functions of gill and hepatopancreas in the context of neuroactive regulation, metabolism, reproduction, environmental stress and disease responses are described and support relevant experimental studies conducted previously in M. rosenbergii and other crustaceans. This large scale gene discovery represents the most extensive transcriptome data for freshwater prawn. Comparison with model organisms has paved the path to address the possible conserved biological entities shared between vertebrates and crustaceans. The functional genomics resources generated from this study provide the basis for constructing hypotheses for future molecular research in the freshwater shrimp. PMID:23734171

  12. Large-scale Modeling of Inundation in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Li, H. Y.; Getirana, A.; Leung, L. R.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Flood events have impacts on the exchange of energy, water and trace gases between land and atmosphere, hence potentially affecting the climate. The Amazon River basin is the world's largest river basin. Seasonal floods occur in the Amazon Basin each year. The basin being characterized by flat gradients, backwater effects are evident in the river dynamics. This factor, together with large uncertainties in river hydraulic geometry, surface topography and other datasets, contribute to difficulties in simulating flooding processes over this basin. We have developed a large-scale inundation scheme in the framework of the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART) river routing model. Both the kinematic wave and the diffusion wave routing methods are implemented in the model. A new process-based algorithm is designed to represent river channel - floodplain interactions. Uncertainties in the input datasets are partly addressed through model calibration. We will present the comparison of simulated results against satellite and in situ observations and analysis to understand factors that influence inundation processes in the Amazon Basin.

  13. Proliferation of Hydroelectric Dams in the Andean Amazon and Implications for Andes-Amazon Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  14. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    PubMed

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  15. Monitoring the Amazon plume northwestward transport along Lagrangian pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Severine; Gaultier, Lucile; Vandemark, Douglas; Lee, Tong; Gierach, Michelle

    2016-04-01

    Large rivers are important to marine air-sea interactions and local biogeochemistry. By modifying the local and regional sea surface salinity (SSS), the freshwater inputs associated with major river plumes cause the formation of a layer near the surface with salinity stratification but near-uniform temperature, known as the barrier layer (BL). The BL prevent exchanges between the warm mixed layer and the cold ocean interior, and thus affect the vertical mixing of heat between the mixed layer and the thermocline. This can have an important impact on air-sea interactions such as hurricanes intensification. Our study focuses on the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, respectively the first and fourth world's largest rivers in terms of discharge. Amazon-Orinoco waters are carried northwestward by the North Brazilian Current (NBC) during the first part of the year and then eastward along the North Equatorial Counter Current. The hurricane season in the tropical Atlantic extends from June through November, the period of Amazon-Orinoco plume maximum northwestward extension, on a hurricane route. Being able to monitor the spatial and temporal dispersal of the Amazon and Orinoco river plumes is therefore important to better understand their impact on barrier layer thickness and SST variation at seasonal to interannual time scales. Variations from year to year in spatial extent of the plume may result from several processes including changes in Amazon discharge, ocean advection, turbulent mixing, and wind field. Satellite remote sensing data provide several means to visualize the surface dispersal of the Amazon plume, with ocean color data being the first to track it in the tropical Atlantic ocean further than 1000 km from shore. With the launches of the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius/SAC-D missions, we are now able to use the SSS observations in combination with ocean color, altimetry and sea surface temperature observations to track surface plume

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution in density and biomass of two Pseudodiaptomus species (Copepoda: Calanoida) in the Caeté river estuary (Amazon region--North of Brazil).

    PubMed

    Magalhães, A; Costa, R M; Liang, T H; Pereira, L C C; Ribeiro, M J S

    2006-05-01

    Spatial and temporal density and biomass distribution of the planktonic copepods Pseudodiaptomus richardi and P. acutus along a salinity gradient were investigated in the Caeté River Estuary (North-Brazil) in June and December, 1998 (dry season) and in February and May, 1999 (rainy season). Copepod biomass was estimated using regression parameters based on the relation of dry weight and body length (prosome) of adult organisms. The Caeté River Estuary was characterized by high spatial and temporal variations in salinity (0.8-37.2). Exponential length-weight relationships were observed for both Pseudodiaptomus species. Density and biomass values oscillated between 0.28-46.18 ind. m-3 and 0.0022-0.3507 mg DW. m-3 for P. richardi; and between 0.01-17.02 ind. m-3 and 0.0005-0.7181 mg DW. m-3 for P. acutus. The results showed that the contribution of P. richardi for the secondary production in the Caeté River Estuary is more important in the limnetic zone than in other zones where euhaline-polyhaline regimes were predominant. However, it was not possible to observe a clear pattern of spatial and temporal distribution for P. acutus. PMID:16862295

  17. Genetic diversity of cultured and wild populations of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii based on microsatellite analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii culture in the Western Hemisphere is primarily, if not entirely, based on thirty-six individual prawn introduced to Hawaii from Malaysia in 1965 and 1966. Little information is available regarding the genetic background or current population status of cult...

  18. The Amazon and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobre, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The climatologies of cloudiness and precipitation for the Amazon, are reviewed and the physical causes of some of the observed features and those which are not well known are explained. The atmospheric circulation over the Amazon is discussed on the large scale tropical circulations forced by deep diabatic heating sources. Weather deforestation which leads to a reduction in evapotranspiration into the atmosphere, and a reduction in precipitation and its implicated for the gobal climate is discussed. It is indicated that a large scale clearing of tropical rainforests there would be a reduction in rainfall which would have global effects on climate and weather both in the tropical and extratropical regions.

  19. GYRKPPFNGSIFamide (Gly-SIFamide) Modulates Aggression in the Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Acevedo, Nietzell; Rivera, Nilsa M.; Torres-González, Alejandra M.; Rullan-Matheu, Yarely; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Eduardo A.; Sosa, María A.

    2010-01-01

    The freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii is a tropical crustacean with characteristics similar to those of lobsters and crayfish. Adult males develop through three morphological types—small (SC), yellow (YC), and blue claws (BC)—with each representing a level in the dominance hierarchy of a group, BC males being the most dominant. We are interested in understanding the role played by neuropeptides in the mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior and the establishment of dominance hierarchies in this type of prawn. SIFamides are a family of arthropod peptides recently identified in the central nervous system of insects and crustaceans, where it has been linked to olfaction, sexual behavior, and gut endocrine functions. One of the six SIFamide isoforms, GYRKPPFNGSIFamide (Gly-SIFamide), is highly conserved among decapod crustaceans such as crabs and crayfish. We wanted to determine whether Gly-SIFamide plays a role in modulating aggression and dominant behavior in the prawn. To do this, we performed behavioral experiments in which interactions between BC/YC pairs were recorded and quantified before and after injecting Gly-SIFamide directly into the circulating hemolymph of the living animal. Behavioral data showed that aggression among interacting BC/YC prawns was enhanced by injection of Gly-SIFamide, suggesting that this neuropeptide does have a modulatory role for this type of behavior in the prawn. PMID:20040755

  20. Fishing for prawn larvae in Bangladesh: an important coastal livelihood causing negative effects on the environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nesar; Troell, Max

    2010-02-01

    Freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) farming in Bangladesh has, to a large extent, been dependent on the supply of wild larvae. Although there are 81 freshwater prawn hatcheries in the country, a lack of technical knowledge, inadequate skilled manpower, and an insufficient supply of wild broods have limited hatchery production. Many thousands of coastal poor people, including women, are engaged in fishing for wild prawn larvae along the coastline during a few months each year. On average, 40% of the total yearly income for these people comes from prawn larvae fishing activity. However, indiscriminate fishing of wild larvae, with high levels of bycatch of juvenile fish and crustaceans, may impact negatively on production and biodiversity in coastal ecosystems. This concern has provoked the imposition of restrictions on larvae collection. The ban has, however, not been firmly enforced because of the limited availability of hatchery-raised larvae, the lack of an alternative livelihood for people involved in larvae fishing, and weak enforcement power. This article discusses the environmental and social consequences of prawn larvae fishing and concludes that, by increasing awareness among fry fishers, improving fishing techniques (reducing bycatch mortality), and improving the survival of fry in the market chain, a temporal ban may be a prudent measure when considering the potential negative impacts of bycatch. However, it also suggests that more research is needed to find out about the impact of larvae fishing on nontarget organisms and on the populations of targeted species. PMID:20496649

  1. TBT Effects on the Development of Intersex (Ovotestis) in Female Fresh Water Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Peranandam, Revathi; Palanisamy, Iyapparaj; Lourdaraj, Arockia Vasanthi; Natesan, Munuswamy; Vimalananthan, Arun Prasanna; Thangaiyan, Suganya; Perumal, Anantharaman; Muthukalingan, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    The impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the female gonad and the endocrine system in Macrobrachium rosenbergii was studied. Prawns were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L of TBT for 6 months. Dose dependent effects were noticed in TBT exposed prawns. At 1000 ng/L TBT caused ovotestis formation (formation of male germ cells in ovary). Presence immature oocytes, fusion of developing oocytes, increase in interstitial connective tissues, and its modification into tubular like structure and abundance of spermatogonia in the ovary of TBT treated prawns. The control prawn ovary showed normal architecture of cellular organelles such as mature oocytes with type 2 yolk globules, lipid droplets, normal appearance of yolk envelop, and uniformly arranged microvilli. On the other hand, type 1 yolk globules, reduced size of microvilli, spermatogonial cells in ovary, spermatogonia with centrally located nucleus, and chromatin distribution throughout the nucleoplasm were present in the TBT treated group. Immunofluorescence staining indicated a reduction in vitellin content in ovary of TBT treated prawn. Moreover, TBT had inhibited the vitellogenesis by causing hormonal imbalance in M. rosenbergii. Thus, the present investigation demonstrates that TBT substantially affects sexual differentiation and gonadal development in M. rosenbergii. PMID:25121096

  2. Seeing orange: prawns tap into a pre-existing sensory bias of the Trinidadian guppy

    PubMed Central

    De Serrano, Alexandra R.; Weadick, Cameron J.; Price, Anna C.; Rodd, F. Helen

    2012-01-01

    Sensory bias, a predisposition towards certain signals, has been implicated in the origin of mate preferences in some species. A risk associated with these biases is that they can be co-opted by predators as sensory lures. Here we propose that the orange spots on the brown pincers of a diurnal, predatory species of prawn function as lures for Trinidadian guppies, which have a sensory bias for orange. We exposed female guppies to (i) a life-like model of this Trinidadian prawn with orange, green or no spots on the pincers or (ii) a live, novel (non-Trinidadian) crustacean (crayfish), also with spotted pincers. First, we provide evidence that guppies sympatric with the prawn recognized our model as a potential predator. Next, we found that guppies spent more time in the dangerous head region of the model prawn with orange-spotted pincers compared with unspotted pincers. Finally, we show that allopatric, but not sympatric, guppies spent more time in the vicinity of the head of a live crayfish when orange spots were added to its pincers than when brown spots were added. Our results suggest that the orange spots on prawn pincers can act as a sensory lure. PMID:22593111

  3. Effect of waterfalls and the flood pulse on the structure of fish assemblages of the middle Xingu River in the eastern Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, T A P; Benone, N L; Begot, T O R; Gonçalves, A; Sousa, L; Giarrizzo, T; Juen, L; Montag, L F A

    2015-08-01

    The structure of fish assemblages in Neotropical rivers is influenced by a series of environmental, spatial and/or temporal factors, given that different species will occupy the habitats that present the most favourable conditions to their survival. The present study aims to identify the principal factors responsible for the structuring of the fish assemblages found in the middle Xingu River, examining the influence of environmental, spatial, and temporal factors, in addition to the presence of natural barriers (waterfalls). For this, data were collected every three months between July 2012 and April 2013, using gillnets of different sizes and meshes. In addition to biotic data, 17 environmental variables were measured. A total of 8,485 fish specimens were collected during the study, representing 188 species. Total dissolved solids, conductivity, total suspended matter, and dissolved oxygen concentrations were the variables that had the greatest influence on the characteristics of the fish fauna of the middle Xingu. Only the barriers and hydrological periods played a significant deterministic role, resulting in both longitudinal and lateral gradients. This emphasizes the role of the connectivity of the different habitats found within the study area in the structuring of its fish assemblages. PMID:26691079

  4. Development of regional future climate change scenarios in South America using the Eta CPTEC/HadCM3 climate change projections: climatology and regional analyses for the Amazon, São Francisco and the Paraná River basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Jose A.; Chou, Sin Chan; Kay, Gillian; Alves, Lincoln M.; Pesquero, José F.; Soares, Wagner R.; Santos, Daniel C.; Lyra, André A.; Sueiro, Gustavo; Betts, Richard; Chagas, Diego J.; Gomes, Jorge L.; Bustamante, Josiane F.; Tavares, Priscila

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the climate projections over South America using the Eta-CPTEC regional model driven by four members of an ensemble of the Met Office Hadley Centre Global Coupled climate model HadCM3. The global model ensemble was run over the twenty-first century according to the SRES A1B emissions scenario, but with each member having a different climate sensitivity. The four members selected to drive the Eta-CPTEC model span the sensitivity range in the global model ensemble. The Eta-CPTEC model nested in these lateral boundary conditions was configured with a 40-km grid size and was run over 1961-1990 to represent baseline climate, and 2011-2100 to simulate possible future changes. Results presented here focus on austral summer and winter climate of 2011-2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100 periods, for South America and for three major river basins in Brazil. Projections of changes in upper and low-level circulation and the mean sea level pressure (SLP) fields simulate a pattern of weakening of the tropical circulation and strengthening of the subtropical circulation, marked by intensification at the surface of the Chaco Low and the subtropical highs. Strong warming (4-6°C) of continental South America increases the temperature gradient between continental South America and the South Atlantic. This leads to stronger SLP gradients between continent and oceans, and to changes in moisture transport and rainfall. Large rainfall reductions are simulated in Amazonia and Northeast Brazil (reaching up to 40%), and rainfall increases around the northern coast of Peru and Ecuador and in southeastern South America, reaching up to 30% in northern Argentina. All changes are more intense after 2040. The Precipitation-Evaporation (P-E) difference in the A1B downscaled scenario suggest water deficits and river runoff reductions in the eastern Amazon and São Francisco Basin, making these regions susceptible to drier conditions and droughts in the future.

  5. Regulation of essential heavy metals (Cu, Cr, and Zn) by the freshwater prawn macrobrachium malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayram, K.; Geraldine, P.

    1996-02-01

    Despite the low concentrations of heavy metals in the surrounding medium, aquatic organisms take them up and accumulate them in their soft tissues to concentrations several fold higher than those of ambient levels. Knowledge of accumulation patterns of a particular trace metal is a prerequisite for understanding the significance of an observed metal concentration in a particular animal, especially from the aspect of biomonitoring. Many marine invertebrates accumulate heavy metals without any regulation and the accumulation necessarily being associated with mechanisms to store the metals in a detoxified form. Two detoxification mechanisms have been described, both of which may occur in one specimen. Heavy metals can either be bound up in insoluble metalliferous {open_quote}granules{close_quote}, or are bound to soluble metal-binding ligands, such as metallothioneins. Some marine decapod crustaceans have an innate ability to regulate the internal concentrations of essential but potentially toxic metals within a constant level, presumably to meet their metabolic demands. However, at present, there is no such information relating to freshwater decapod crustaceans, especially shrimps which occupy a totally different environment. Macrobrachium malcolmsonii, a potential aquaculture species for freshwater is found in abundance in one of the major Indian rivers, the Cauvery. In the present study, an attempt was made to determine whether the freshwater prawn, M. malcolmsonlii, is able to regulate the three essential elements, copper, chromium and zinc, over a wide range of dissolved concentrations. These three metals were chosen because the Cauvery River receives pollutants containing these metals.

  6. The effect of copper nanoparticles supplementation on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii post larvae.

    PubMed

    Muralisankar, Thirunavukkarasu; Saravana Bhavan, Periyakali; Radhakrishnan, Subramanian; Seenivasan, Chandirasekar; Srinivasan, Veeran

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of dietary supplementation of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) on growth, biochemical constituents, digestive enzyme activities, antioxidant, metabolic enzyme levels, and non specific immune response of the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii post larvae (PL). The Cu-NPs (200 nm) were synthesized by facile and environmental friendly hydrothermal method. Cu-NPs were supplemented at 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 mg kg(-1) with the basal diets. These Cu-NPs supplemented diets were fed to M. rosenbergii PL for 90 days. Results showed significant (P<0.05) improvements were observed in survival, growth, digestive enzyme activities, concentrations of biochemical constituents and total and differential haemocytes count of prawns fed with 20 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) supplemented feed. Prawns fed with 40-80 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) supplemented feed showed negative performance. Activity of antioxidants and metabolic enzymes in the muscle and hepatopancreas of prawns showed no significant alterations (P>0.05) prawns fed with up to 20 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) supplemented feeds. Whereas, prawns fed with 40-80 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) supplemented feed showed significant (P<0.05) elevations in antioxidant and metabolic enzymes activities. Hence, 40-80 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) diets may have toxic effect to M. rosenbergii. Hence, present study suggests that 20 mg Cu-NPs kg(-1) can be supplemented for regulating better survival, growth and immune response of M. rosenbergii PL. PMID:26854244

  7. Qualitative mathematical models to support ecosystem-based management of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Rothlisberg, Peter C; Loneragan, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    A major decline in the catch of the banana prawn [shrimp], Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) merguiensis, occurred over a six-year period in the Weipa region of the northeastern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Three main hypotheses have been developed to explain this decline: (1) prawn recruitment collapsed due to overfishing; (2) recruitment collapsed due to a change in the prawn's environment; and (3) adult banana prawns were still present, but fishers could no longer effectively find or catch them. Qualitative mathematical models were used to link population biology, environmental factors, and fishery dynamics to evaluate the alternative hypotheses. This modeling approach provides the means to rapidly integrate knowledge across disciplines and consider alternative hypotheses about how the structure and function of an ecosystem affects its dynamics. Alternative models were constructed to address the different hypotheses and also to encompass a diversity of opinion about the underlying dynamics of the system. Key findings from these analyses are that: instability in the system can arise when discarded fishery bycatch supports relatively high predation pressure; system stability can be enhanced by management of fishing effort or stock catchability; catch per unit effort is not necessarily a reliable indicator of stock abundance; a change in early-season rainfall should affect all stages in the banana prawn's life cycle; and a reduced catch in the Weipa region can create and reinforce a shift in fishing effort away from Weipa. Results from the models informed an approach to test the hypotheses (i.e., an experimental fishing program), and promoted understanding of the system among researchers, management agencies, and industry. The analytical tools developed in this work to address stages of a prawn life cycle and fishery dynamics are generally applicable to any exploited natural. resource. PMID:26255373

  8. Distribution and partition of trace metals in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Patrick T.; Boaventura, Geraldo R.

    2003-05-01

    The distribution of trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, U) was investigated in surface waters and associated particulates in the Amazon mainstream (Solimões and Amazon rivers). Dissolved V, Cu, As, Sr, Ba, U correlate with major ions and appear to be predominantly derived from soluble rocks occurring in the Amazon upper basin. These elements appear conservative in waters and are progressively diluted by less-concentrated waters coming from the lowland and shield areas. A monthly time series obtained at the Óbidos gauging station shows that temporal variability of trace element concentrations reflects the source, remobilization and/or biological processes occurring in the channel or in the surrounding floodplain lakes. The trace element concentrations in the particulate matter show a clear relationship with the location of the samples. V, Co, Cr, Mn, Sr, Cs and Ba concentrations are higher in the Solimões and the Rio Negro is enriched in Fe, Al and Zn. In the Rio Solimões, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Cs and Pb are almost entirely carried by the river particulate matter; Cu, Rb, Sr, Ba and U are transported mainly by the suspended particles, but a dissolved phase contributes to the transport. In the Rio Negro, the proportion of elements transported by the dissolved phase is higher for the whole set of elements. The implications of these results allow us to compute the fluxes from the Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean.

  9. Dopaminergic modulation of neuromuscular transmission in the prawn.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M W; Parnas, H; Parnas, I

    1985-01-01

    The action of the putative crustacean neurohormone dopamine was examined in the fast extensor musculature of the prawn with intracellular and extracellular recording techniques. Dopamine produced a concentration-dependent (10(-7)-10(-5) M) decrease in the size of the excitatory junctional potential (e.j.p.). It had no effect on the muscle fibre resting membrane potential or input resistance. High concentrations (10(-5)M) of dopamine had no effect on the amplitude distribution or decay time of quantal unit currents, indicating that the agent does not act by blocking post-synaptic receptors or channels. Bath application of dopamine reduced the quantal content at single release sites with a similar time course and concentration dependence as that observed for the e.j.p. Dopamine had no effect on histograms of synaptic delays determined over a 10 degree C range, indicating that it does not modify the time course of phasic neurosecretion. Twin-impulse facilitation experiments showed a marked decrease in the duration of facilitation in the presence of dopamine. These results are interpreted according to recent theoretical and experimental findings as indicating that the dopamine-induced reduction in transmitter release is produced by a decrease in the entry of Ca during the nerve terminal action potential. PMID:2862279

  10. Trace metals in the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon and mangrove sediments of the Tanzania coast: Is there a risk to marine fauna and public health?

    PubMed

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Mdegela, Robinson H; Kochzius, Marc; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Mangroves ecosystems support livelihood and economic activities of coastal communities in the tropics and subtropics. Previous reports have documented the inefficiency of waste treatment facilities in Tanzania to contain trace metals. Therefore, the rapidly expanding coastal population and industrial sector is likely to threaten mangrove ecosystems with metal pollution. This study analysed trace metals in 60 sediment samples and 160 giant tiger prawns from the Tanzanian coast in order to document the distribution of trace metals and to establish if measured levels present a threat to mangrove fauna and are of public health importance. High levels of Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and V was observed in mangroves of river Pangani, Wami, and Rufiji. Multivariate analysis showed that they originate mainly from weathering and erosion in the river catchments. Extreme enrichment of Cd was observed in a mangrove affected by municipal sewage. The distribution of Hg, Pb, and Zn was related with urbanisation and industrial activities along the coast. The metal pollution index was high at Pangani, Saadani, and Rufiji, suggesting that these estuarine mangroves are also affected by human activities in the catchment. Moderate to considerable ecological risks were observed in all sampled mangroves, except for Kilwa Masoko. It was revealed that As, Cd, and Hg present moderate risks to fauna. High levels of Cu, Fe and Zn were observed in prawns but the level of the non-essential Cd, Hg, and Pb did not exceed the maximum allowed levels for human consumption. However, based on the trends of fish consumption in the country, weekly intake of Hg is likely to exceed provisional tolerable weekly intake level, especially in fishing communities. This calls for measures to control Hg emissions and to strengthen sewage and waste treatment in coastal cities and urban centres in the basin of major rivers. PMID:27281719

  11. Antibiotics in South Indian coastal sea and farmed prawns (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Venkatesh; Nagalingam, Arun Kumar; Ranganathan, Hari Prasad; Kandhikuppam, Krishnamoorthy Bharathi; Kothandam, Hari Prasath; Vasu, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Sulphonamides and chloramphenicol antibiotics were analysed by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in sea and farmed prawn (Penaeus monodon) samples obtained from the coastal region of southern India during 2011-2012. Average recoveries were 77-99% and precision was between 1% and 8%. The results revealed that in sea prawn samples neither of the two antibiotics was detected, but in farmed samples from coastal Andhra Pradesh some sulphonamides were detected in a concentration range greater than the maximum residual limit as set by Council Directive 2377/90 EC. PMID:24779904

  12. Inundation, Wetland Vegetation and Biogeochemical Processes in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Hess, L. L.; Hamilton, S. K.; Richey, J. E.; Novo, E. M.

    2001-12-01

    Remote sensing of the Amazon basin with passive and active microwave techniques were applied to determine the temporally varying extent of inundation and associated vegetation, and used in conjunction with field measurements to calculate regional rates of carbon dioxide emission from wetlands to the atmosphere. Monthly inundation areas were derived from analysis of the 37-GHz polarization difference observed by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (1979 to 1987) for the mainstem Amazon floodplain in Brazil, the Llanos de Moxos (Beni and Mamore rivers) in Bolivia, the Bananal Island (Araguaia River) and Roraima savannas. Maximum areas subject to inundation, including permanent open waters in rivers and lakes, were as follows (in km2): mainstem Amazon 97,400; Moxos 92,000; Bananal 58,500, and Roraima 16,500. Data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1, L-band synthetic aperture radar were used to determine inundation and wetland vegetation for a quadrat in the central Amazon basin (0o N to 8o S, 72o W to 54o W) at high water (May-June 1996) and low water (October 1995). Flooded area of rivers and floodplains (> 100 m in width) ranged from 79,000 km2 to 290,000 km2. When combined with estimates of inundation associated with streams not detected by the radar, a maximum area of 350,000 km2 (or 20% of the quadrat) was flooded. Combining the areal extent of flooding and measurements of free dissolved CO2 with an evasion model leads to outgassing of CO2 from inundated surfaces to the atmosphere in the central Amazon of 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 MgC ha-1 y-1. Extrapolated over the whole basin, the flux is 10 times the fluvial export of organic carbon to the ocean.

  13. Monitoring the spreading of the Amazon freshwater plume by MODIS, SMOS, Aquarius, and TOPAZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Counillon, François; Johannessen, Johnny A.

    2015-01-01

    synergistic tool for studying the Amazon River plume dynamics based on a novel algorithm for deriving sea surface salinity (SSS) from MODIS reflectance data together with SSS data from the SMOS and Aquarius satellites and the TOPAZ data assimilation system is proposed. The new algorithm is based on a neural network to relate spectral remote sensing reflectance measured by MODIS with SSS measured by SMOS in the Amazon River plume. The algorithm is validated against independent in situ data and is found to be valid in the range of SSS from 29 to 35 psu, for the period of highest rates of Amazon River discharge with RMSE = 0.79 psu and r2 = 0.84. Monthly SSS fields were reconstructed from the MODIS data for late summers from 2002 to 2012 at a 10 km resolution and compared to surface currents and SSS derived from the TOPAZ reanalysis system. The two data sets reveal striking agreement, suggesting that the TOPAZ system could be used for a detailed study of the Amazon River plume dynamics. Both the position and speed of the North Brazilian Current as well as the spreading of the Amazon River plume are monitored. In particular, a recurrent mechanism was observed for the spreading of the rivers plumes, notably that the fresh water is usually advected toward the Caribbean Sea by the North Brazilian Current but get diverted into the tropical Atlantic when North Brazilian Current Rings are shed.

  14. Changes in optical properties caused by UV-irradiation of aquatic humic substances from the amazon river basin: seasonal variability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira; da Silva, Wilson Tadeu Lopes; Martin-Neto, Ladislau; Oliveira, Luciana Camargo; Rocha, Julio Cesar

    2008-03-15

    Aquatic humic substances (AHS) isolated from two characteristic seasons of the Negro river, winter and summer corresponding to floody and dry periods, were structurally characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic ressonance. Subsequently, AHS aqueous solutions were irradiated with a polychromatic lamp (290-475 nm) and monitored by its total organic carbon (TOC) content, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorbance, fluorescence, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). As a result, a photobleaching up to 80% after irradiation of 48 h was observed. Conformational rearrangements and formation of low molecular complexity structures were formed during the irradiation, as deduced from the pH decrement and the fluorescence shifting to lower wavelengths. Additionally a significant mineralization with the formation of CO2, CO, and inorganic carbon compounds was registered, as assumed by TOC losses of up to 70%. The differences in photodegradation between samples expressed by photobleaching efficiency were enhanced in the summer sample and related to its elevated aromatic content. Aromatic structures are assumed to have high autosensitization capacity effects mediated by the free radical generation from quinone and phenolic moieties. PMID:18409619

  15. Mercury levels assessment in hair of riverside inhabitants of the Tapajós River, Pará State, Amazon, Brazil: fish consumption as a possible route of exposure.

    PubMed

    Faial, Kleber; Deus, Ricardo; Deus, Simonny; Neves, Ramiro; Jesus, Iracina; Santos, Elisabeth; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Brasil, Davi

    2015-04-01

    all showed values in accordance with the range established by current legislation. In this regard, the results provided by this study, while not conclusive, are strong indicators that despite not having been shown the relationship between the concentration of mercury in hair and feeding habits along the Tapajós River basin communities showed that a plausible correlation exists between levels of mercury and selenium in fish. This fact may serve as a subsidy to research human health, because in the Amazon, there is still a lot to examine with regards to the full understanding of the Se cycle. PMID:25467850

  16. The Amazon and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobre, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The climatologies of cloudiness and precipitation for the Amazon are reviewed. The physical causes of observed features are explained. The question whether deforestation leads to a reduction in evapotranspiration into the atmosphere is examined, as well as the reduction in precipitation and its implication for the global climate. There are indications that for large scale clearing of tropical rain forests there would indeed be a reduction in rainfall, which would have global effects in terms of climate and weather.

  17. Molecular Characterisation of Colour Formation in the Prawn Fenneropenaeus merguiensis

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Nicole G.; Elizur, Abigail; Brooks, Peter; Kuballa, Anna V.; Anderson, Trevor A.; Knibb, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Body colouration in animals can have a range of functions, with predator protection an important aspect of colour in crustaceans. Colour determination is associated with the carotenoid astaxanthin, which is taken up through the diet and stabilised in the tissues by the protein crustacyanin. As a variety of genes are found to play a role in colour formation in other systems, a holistic approach was employed in this study to determine the factors involved in Fenneropenaeus merguiensis colouration. Results Full length F. merguiensis crustacyanin subunit A and C sequences were isolated. Crustacyanin subunit A and C were found in the F. merguiensis transcriptomes of the muscle/cuticle tissue, hepatopancreas, eye stalk and nervous system, using 454 next generation sequencing technology. Custom microarray analysis of albino, light and dark F. merguiensis cuticle tissue showed genes encoding actin, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and arginine kinase to be 4-fold or greater differentially expressed (p<0.05) and down-regulated in albinos when compared to light and dark samples. QPCR expression analysis of crustacyanin and total astaxanthin pigment extraction revealed significantly (p<0.05) lower crustacyanin subunit A and C gene transcript copy numbers and total astaxanthin levels in albinos than in the light and dark samples. Additionally, crustacyanin subunit A and C expression levels correlated positively with each other. Conclusions This study identified gene products putatively involved in crustacean colouration, such as crustacyanin, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and forms of actin, and investigated differences in gene expression and astaxanthin levels between albino, light and dark coloured prawns. These genes open a path to enhance our understanding of the biology and regulation of colour formation. PMID:23441225

  18. A Simple "in Vitro" Culture of Freshwater Prawn Embryos for Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porntrai, Supaporn; Damrongphol, Praneet

    2008-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn ("Macrobrachium rosenbergii" De Man) embryos can be cultured "in vitro" to hatching in 15% (v/v) artificial seawater (ASW). This technique can be applied as a bioassay for testing toxicity or for the effects of various substances on embryo development and can be used as a simple and low-cost model for studying embryo…

  19. Quantification of lectin in freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii ) hemolymph by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Agundis, C; Pereyra, A; Zenteno, R; Brassart, C; Sierra, C; Vazquez, L; Zenteno, E

    2000-10-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was developed to quantify the lectin present in the hemolymph of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. This method involves the use of murine monoclonal IgG1 with kappa light chain (designated as 3G1) antibodies raised against the purified lectin, the assay that we developed recognized as little as 30 ng/ml of lectin, and was used to measure the lectin concentration in animals at different maturation stages. The highest concentration of lectin was identified in the hemolymph from post-larval prawns and the lowest in molt stage adult animals. The hemagglutination activity of the lectin was four-fold higher in adult than in juvenile specimens, although in all cases N-acetylated sugar residues, such as N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid were inhibitors of the lectin activity, suggesting that lectin plays a role in the transport of N-acetylated sugar in juvenile prawns. Our results indicate that lectin concentration and hemagglutinating activity could be influenced by developmental conditions of the freshwater prawn. PMID:11079370

  20. Cypermethrin toxicity to aquatic life: bioassays for the freshwater prawn Palaemonetes argentinus.

    PubMed

    Collins, P; Cappello, S

    2006-07-01

    Cypermethrin (CY) effects were evaluated in freshwater prawn Palaemonetes argentinus, a common member of the aquatic fauna in the vegetated littoral of lotic and lentic environment of La Plata basin. LC50 was calculated, and oxygen uptakes together with ammonia-N excretion were related to biocide concentrations. Behavioral and growth changes were analyzed, and a unique application of CY was evaluated in P. argentinus micropopulations. LC50 and their 95% confidence limit were 0.0031 microg CY L(-1) (0.0023-0.0039) for 24 h and 0.0020 microg CY L(-1) (0.0014-0.0027) for 96 h. Oxygen uptake and ammonia-N excretion increased in the prawns kept in CY solutions. The behavioral effect was hyperactivity. Although prawns in biocide groups have null or negative growth, the intermolt period was 246% larger than in the control group. Moreover, the mortality in the second cycle was 100%. A unique application of pyrethoid provoked high mortality after 50 days. The low concentrations of this biocide affected the survival and altered the prawn metabolic activity, behavioral and ecdysis cycle. These results suggest that juveniles of P. argentinus are much more sensitive to CY pollution than other crustaceans, fish, and tadpoles. PMID:16418889

  1. Desperate Prawns: Drivers of Behavioural Innovation Vary across Social Contexts in Rock Pool Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Callum; Wilson, Alastair J.; Thornton, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Innovative behaviour may allow animals to cope with changes in their environment. Innovative propensities are known to vary widely both between and within species, and a growing body of research has begun to examine the factors that drive individuals to innovate. Evidence suggests that individuals are commonly driven to innovate by necessity; for instance by hunger or because they are physically unable to outcompete others for access to resources. However, it is not known whether the factors that drive individuals to innovate are stable across contexts. We examined contextual variation in the drivers of innovation in rock pool prawns (Palaemon spp), invertebrates that face widely fluctuating environments and may, through the actions of tides and waves, find themselves isolated or in groups. Using two novel foraging tasks, we examined the effects of body size and hunger in prawns tested in solitary and group contexts. When tested alone, small prawns were significantly more likely to succeed in a spatial task, and faster to reach the food in a manipulation task, while hunger state had no effect. In contrast, size had no effect when prawns were tested in groups, but food-deprived individuals were disproportionately likely to innovate in both tasks. We suggest that contextual variation in the drivers of innovation is likely to be common in animals living in variable environments, and may best be understood by considering variation in the perception of relative risks and rewards under different conditions. PMID:26488728

  2. Desperate Prawns: Drivers of Behavioural Innovation Vary across Social Contexts in Rock Pool Crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Callum; Wilson, Alastair J; Thornton, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Innovative behaviour may allow animals to cope with changes in their environment. Innovative propensities are known to vary widely both between and within species, and a growing body of research has begun to examine the factors that drive individuals to innovate. Evidence suggests that individuals are commonly driven to innovate by necessity; for instance by hunger or because they are physically unable to outcompete others for access to resources. However, it is not known whether the factors that drive individuals to innovate are stable across contexts. We examined contextual variation in the drivers of innovation in rock pool prawns (Palaemon spp), invertebrates that face widely fluctuating environments and may, through the actions of tides and waves, find themselves isolated or in groups. Using two novel foraging tasks, we examined the effects of body size and hunger in prawns tested in solitary and group contexts. When tested alone, small prawns were significantly more likely to succeed in a spatial task, and faster to reach the food in a manipulation task, while hunger state had no effect. In contrast, size had no effect when prawns were tested in groups, but food-deprived individuals were disproportionately likely to innovate in both tasks. We suggest that contextual variation in the drivers of innovation is likely to be common in animals living in variable environments, and may best be understood by considering variation in the perception of relative risks and rewards under different conditions. PMID:26488728

  3. Effect of salt treatments on survival and consumer acceptance of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Post harvest acclimation of live freshwater prawns to a mixture of water and marine salt increases the consumer acceptability of the finished product. However, the high cost of marine salts prohibits their use in commercial practice. Therefore, the identification of successful, cost effective salt a...

  4. Uranium geochemistry on the Amazon shelf: Evidence for uranium release from bottom sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, B.A.; DeMaster, D.J.; Nittrouer, C.A. )

    1987-10-01

    In Amazon-shelf waters, as salinity increases to 36.5 x 10{sup {minus}3}, dissolved uranium activities increase to a maximum of 4.60 dpm 1{sup {minus}1}. This value is much higher than the open-ocean value (2.50 dpm 1{sup {minus}1}), indicating a source of dissolved uranium to shelf waters in addition to that supplied from open-ocean and riverine waters. Uranium activities are much lower for surface sediments in the Amazon-shelf sea bed (mean: 0.69 {plus minus} .09 dpm g{sup {minus}1}) than for suspended sediments in the Amazon river (1.82 dpm g{sup {minus}1}). Data suggest that the loss of particulate uranium from riverine sediments is probably the result of uranium desorption from the ferric-oxyhydroxide coatings on sediment particles, and/or uranium release by mobilization of the ferric oxyhydroxides. The total flux of dissolved {sup 238}U from the Amazon shelf (about 1.2 x 10{sup 15} dpm yr{sup {minus}1}) constitutes about 15% of uranium input to the world ocean, commensurate to the Amazon River's contribution to world river-water discharge. Measurement of only the riverine flux of dissolved {sup 238}U underestimates, by a factor of about 5, the flux of dissolved {sup 238}U from the Amazon shelf to the open ocean.

  5. Risk assessment of pesticides used in rice-prawn concurrent systems in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sumon, Kizar Ahmed; Rico, Andreu; Ter Horst, Mechteld M S; Van den Brink, Paul J; Haque, Mohammad Mahfujul; Rashid, Harunur

    2016-10-15

    The objectives of the current study were to determine the occupational health hazards posed by the application of pesticides in rice-prawn concurrent systems of south-west Bangladesh and to assess their potential risks for the aquatic ecosystems that support the culture of freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). Information on pesticide use in rice-prawn farming was collected through structured interviews with 38 farm owners held between January and May of 2012. The risks of the pesticide use to human health were assessed through structured interviews. The TOXSWA model was used to calculate pesticide exposure (peak and time-weighted average concentrations) in surface waters of rice-prawn systems for different spray drift scenarios and a simple first tier risk assessment based on threshold concentrations derived from single species toxicity tests were used to assess the ecological risk in the form of risk quotients. The PERPEST model was used to refine the ecological risks when the first tier assessment indicated a possible risk. Eleven synthetic insecticides and one fungicide (sulphur) were recorded as part of this investigation. The most commonly reported pesticide was sulphur (used by 29% of the interviewed farmers), followed by thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and phenthoate (21%). A large portion of the interviewed farmers described negative health symptoms after pesticide applications, including vomiting (51%), headache (18%) and eye irritation (12%). The results of the first tier risk assessment indicated that chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, and malathion may pose a high to moderate acute and chronic risks for invertebrates and fish in all evaluated spray drift scenarios. The higher tier assessment using the PERPEST model confirmed the high risk of cypermethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, and chlorpyrifos for insects and macro- and micro-crustaceans thus indicating that these pesticides may have severe adverse consequences for the prawn

  6. Snake River fall Chinook salmon life history investigations, 1/1/2012 - 12/31/2012: Annual report 2002-032-00

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, Willam P.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Chittaro, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Finally, we examined the role of different invasive invertebrates in lower Snake River reservoir food webs that are food, or competitors for food, for juvenile fall Chinook salmon. The Siberian prawn, a relatively new invader, is relatively abundant but its role on the food web is largely unexplored. Prawns are successfully reproducing and their diet is 81% Neomysis (an invasive opossum shrimp) which is heavily used at times by juvenile salmon for food. Neomysis has become very abundant in lower Snake River reservoirs in recent years and may be a profitable food item for many fish species.

  7. Methane Evasion and Carbon Dynamics on the Amazon Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The fringing floodplain along the 2600 km reach of the Amazon River in Brazil inundates up to about 80,000 km squared of flooded forests, open water and floating macrophytes. These habitats outgas significant amount of carbon dioxide and methane as a result of autochthonous and allochthonous fixation and exchanges of carbon on the floodplain and with the neighboring uplands. Based on our measurements and those of others, we have assembled sufficient data to characterize the following fluxes and transformations in a representative central Amazon floodplain lake: inputs of litterfall, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rainfall, DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) in streams, DOC in groundwater seepage; exchanges of DOC and POC with the mainstem river; net primary productivity of floating macrophyes, periphyton and phytoplankton; sedimentation; carbon dioxide and methane evasion. These data are the basis for models of carbon processing and methane evasion.

  8. Methane emissions to the troposphere from the Amazon floodplain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devol, Allen H.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Wayne A.; King, Stagg L.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    1988-01-01

    The magnitudes of CH4 emissions to the troposphere from the Amazon River floodplain and the mechanism of these emissions were investigated using the data of 94 individual flux measurements made along a 1700-km stretch of the river during July/August 1985. The overall average rate of CH4 emission from wetlands was found to be 390 mg CH4/sq m per day, with the highest emissions (590 mg CH4/sq m per day) attributed to the water surfaces covered by aquatic macrophytes. Ebullition was the dominant mechanism of emission, accounting for 85 percent of the total. Surface-water CH4 concentrations were highly supersaturated, averaging 6.4 micromolar. The annual emission of CH4 from the Amazon Basin to the troposphere, estimated from the area and the known emission rate, is about 10 CH4 Tg/yr, indicating the importance of the area in the global atmospheric CH4 cycle.

  9. Current Characterization at the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    At the estuary there are several mechanisms that cause turbulence: influence of solid contours (estuary bottom and shores), speed vertical shearing (fluid inside), wind shearing stress (free surface) and surface and internal gravity waves. Turbulence intensity controls vertical distribution of estuary water mass property concentration. As flow into the estuary takes place during the transition or turbulent regimen, produced by small space and time scale movements, entrainment, turbulent scattering and advection are the processes responsible for fresh water mixing up with the sea and for local salinity variation, as well as for concentration of natural properties and man-made ones. According to this focus, we shall describe general circulation, conveyance and mixing characteristics of the Amazon low estuary waters. Amazon estuary shows unusual characteristics: it is of vast length and enormous outflow. It is extremely wide - 150 Km - and its discharge into the Atlantic amounts to 180,000 m3s-1 (Otman, 1968, Figueiredo et al, 1991), which means 18% of all water discharged by rivers into oceans; this is the largest punctual source of fresh water for oceans (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Maximum outflow is 2.5 x 105 m3s-1, and it happens at the end of May. Minimum outflow is 1.2 x 105 m3 s-1, and it takes place in November. At Amazon River, the Mixing Zone occurs where the Coastal Zone usually is. The reason for that is the extension of fresh water plume moves Northeast for over 1000 Km (Gibbs, 1970; Muller-Karger et al 1988). This is the most extensive estuarine plume ever found in the ocean. During low fluvial discharge (June-November) plume reaches 300 Km; however, on high discharge (November-May) plume reaches 500 Km. Plume already is 3 to 10 m thick and 80 to 300 Km wide (Lentz and Limeburner, 1995). From June to January plume moves towards Africa, from whence 70% of it goes east carried by North Brazil Current retroflection and 30% goes towards the Caribbean. From

  10. Isolation and characterization of a female-specific DNA marker in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, T; Aflalo, E D; Weil, S; Kashkush, K; Sagi, A

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a female-specific DNA marker in the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii was identified through amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The AFLP-derived sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker was tested in over 200 individuals, giving reproducible sex identification. Further molecular characterization of the sex-marker's genomic region (∼3 kb long) revealed the presence of tandem and inverted repeats. The ∼3-kb sequence was identified both in male and female prawns, but with subtle differences: a deletion of 3 bp (present in female prawn but absent in male prawn) identified upstream of the SCAR marker sequence and two female-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms, both indicating that male prawns are homozygous, whereas female prawns are heterozygous in this locus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization showed the ∼3-kb sequence to be unique: to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a unique sex-specific sequence observed in situ in crustaceans. The sex-specific marker identified in M. rosenbergii may have considerable applied merit for crustacean culture in that it will enable the determination of genetic sex at early developmental stages when phenotypic differences are not identifiable. PMID:21522169

  11. Influence Deforestation on Hydrological Cycle at Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. C.; Beltrao, J.; Gandu, A. W.

    2007-05-01

    The last three decades, the Amazon Basin has been affected for the occupation with consequence large deforestation. The principal area deforested is located from Maranhao state to Rondonia state. This area is common called "Arc Deforestation", and representing the transition between two important Brazilian ecosystems, Amazon Forest and Savanna Region. Theses ecosystems have precious biodiversity, and it has population about 10.331.000. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of arc deforestation on the hydrological cycle at Amazon basin, using BRAMS (Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) including a model of dynamic vegetation, called GEMTM (General Energy and Mass Transport Model). In this study, numerical simulations were performed with a high spatial resolution regional model that allows capture some mesoscale aspects associated to the land used, topography, coastlines and large rivers. In order to predict the impact of the arc deforestation over the hydrological cycle, it was run two model simulations, conducted over a one-year period. In the first simulation, designated "control", it was used the scenarios derived from Soares Filho (2002), for the year 2002, in governance situation. In the second simulation called "deforestation", it was used the scenarios for the 2050, derived from results of Soares-Filho with governance, too. The higher-resolution regional modeling revealed important features of the deforestation process, displaying some associated mesoscale effects that are not typically represented in similar Global Circulation Model simulations. Near coastal zones and along large rivers, deforestation resulted in reduced precipitation. However, it was predicted increased precipitation over mountainous areas, especially on mountain slopes facing river valleys. Then, these higher-resolution simulations showed that, in general, orography, coastline profile and large river distribution play important roles in

  12. The effect of astaxanthin on resistance of juvenile prawns Macrobrachium nipponense (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) to physical and chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Tizkar, Babak; Seidavi, Alireza; Ponce-Palafox, Jesús Trinidad; Pourashoori, Parastoo

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the use of new scientific techniques has effectively improved aquaculture production processes. Astaxanthin has various properties in aquaculture and its antioxidant benefits have been closely related to stress resistance; besides, it is an essential factor for growth in many crustaceans and fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) fed diets containing different amounts of astaxanthin (AX) to the shock and stress of different physicochemical environments. A 70-day trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a source of astaxanthin (Carophyll Pink, 10% astaxanthin, w/w, Hoffman-La Roche, Switzerland) at various levels in the diet of M. nipponense juveniles. Four dry diets were prepared: AX0 without astaxanthin, AX50 with 50 mg/kg, AX100 with 100 mg/kg, and AX150 with 150 mg/kg astaxanthin. The feeding trial was conducted in a recirculation water system consisting of 12 fiberglass tanks (1000L) used for holding prawns. Three replicate aquaria were initially stocked with 36 org/m2 per tank. During the trial, prawns were maintained on a 12:12-h light:dark photoperiod with an ordinary incandescent lamp, and the water quality parameters were maintained as follows: water temperature, 25-26°C; salinity, 1 g/L; pH, 8.5-8.8; dissolved oxygen, 6.0-6.5 mg/L; and ammonia-nitrogen, 0.05 mg/L. Incorporation of AX, production output, and physiological condition were recorded after 10 weeks of feeding. At the end of the growing period, the prawns were exposed to thermal shock (0°C), ammonia (0.75 mg/L), and reduced oxygen (0.5 mg/L). The time to lethargy and the time to complete death of the prawns were recorded. The results showed that control prawns had the shortest time to lethargy and death compared with prawns subjected to the other treatments. The results of this study have shown that the amount of muscle tissue and gill carotenoids in prawn fed with an AX150 diet showed

  13. How Pecten Brazil drilled the Amazon basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1983-09-01

    Pecten Brazil overcame numerous obstacles to drill two exploratory wells in the Amazon Basin last year. These included: The threat of low water in normally navigable rivers. Dense jungle growth at both locations. Lack of suitable roads for heavy hauling. Inconvenient distances from supply points. An unusual basalt formation responsible for unique drilling problems. Hundreds of helicopter lifts to move drilling rigs, supplies, and personnel. Pecten contracted with Petrobras, the Brazilian national oil company, to evaluate three blocks in the Amazon jungle, each about 68 miles (110 km) on a side, through seismic study and ultimate drilling. Planning for the drilling phase got started on March 17, 1981 with December 1 targeted as spud date for the first well. Actual spud date was November 25, 5 days ahead of schedule, in spite of all obstacles. Pecten has a mid-Amazonas block now under seismic investigation for possible exploratory drilling. Logistics problems in this one provide new difficulties, as the area is extremely wet. Most work is carried on by boat. The company is also looking offshore Bahia, testing the possible extension of the Renconcavo basin. Two wells have already provided good shows of a high pour point oil, with flow rates from 400 to 1,000 b/d. Another area of interest to Pecten is offshore Rio Grande do Norte.

  14. Copepods and fishes in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Vernon E.

    1998-06-01

    The Amazon basin comprises the largest river ecosystem in the world (7 million km 2) with annual high and low water peaks and a constant temperature near 29°C. Some 2000 fish species and 40 species of free-living copepods are known to occur in Amazonia. The free-living forms serve as food for most larval fishes and some adults, but they also transmit several parasites including representatives of the nematode family Camallanidae. About three dozen species of parasitic copepods have been described from the Brazilian Amazon. Females of Amazonian parasitic copepods are found on skin, gill filaments, gill rakers or within the nasal fossae. Parasitic copepods are found on fishes that are from a few millimeters long up to those over 2 m in length and they are usually quite host specific. All have body pigmentation in different patterns and colors (frequently blues, such as cerulean, cobalt, spectrum, smalt or campanula). It is suggested that the coloration serves to attract specific host fish. Copepods have evolved adaptations for attachment and feeding, especially in the second antennae and endopods. Examples of progenesis, phoresis and commensalism are shown. Some species produce pathology such as a tourniquet effect, hyperplasia, blood loss and anemia, and can kill fishes by limiting their respiration.

  15. Impact of tributyltin on antioxidant and DNA damage response in spermatozoa of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Rani, K Umaa; Musthafa, M Saiyad; War, Mehrajuddin; Al-Sadoon, Mohammad K; Paray, Bilal Ahmad; Shareef, T H Mohamed Ahadhu; Nawas, P Mohideen Askar

    2015-12-01

    Effects of tributyltin (TBT) on antioxidant [total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR)] and DNA damage levels in the spermatozoa were studied and reported here for the first time in the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Three groups of (n = 10 in each group) fishes were exposed to three different nominal concentrations of TBT viz., 1, 2, and 4 mg L(-1) along with control group for 90 days. Significant decrease of antioxidant and increased DNA damage levels were seen at higher doses of 2 and 4 mg L(-1). In prawn, the antioxidant level plays a vital role in sperm protection, activation, differential functions related to the physiology, and reproductive behavior. This study serves as a biomonitoring tool to assess the TBT effects on reproductive behavior of aquatic biota. PMID:26296505

  16. Feasibility of using hydrothermal resources in Malaysian prawn aquaculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.I.J.; Rhodes, R.J.; Wannamaker, A.W.

    1982-08-01

    The potential application of geothermal resources in South Carolina for freshwater prawn aquaculture was examined. In coastal S.C. 23 existing geothermal well sites were identified which encompassed an area which ranged from Georgetown to Beaufort. Depth averaged approx. 615 m while temperature averaged approx. 37/sup 0/C. Artesian flow rates varied from 190 to 2650 1/min. Detailed water quality analyses were conducted at 12 sites. In general, major differences from surface waters were in chlorides, fluorides, dissolved solids, ph, alkalinity, and ammonia levels. A detailed replicated laboratory study was conducted to examine the effect of geothermal water on growth and survival of prawns. After 42 days very poor survival was recorded from the various 100% geothermal water treatments. However, 50:50 mixture of shallow well water and geothermal water resulted in a survival rate of 83%, which was similar to the control treatments. Growth was also similar to that observed among the control animals.

  17. Total and inorganic arsenic in freshwater fish and prawn in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saipan, Piyawat; Ruangwises, Suthep; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2012-10-01

    Total and inorganic arsenic levels were determined in 120 samples of eight freshwater animal species collected from five distribution centers in the central region of Thailand between January and March 2011. Eight species with the highest annual catch, consisting of seven fish species and one prawn species, were analyzed. Concentrations of inorganic arsenic (on a wet weight basis) ranged from 0.010 μg/g in giant prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) to 0.230 μg/g in striped snakehead (Channa striata). Climbing perch (Anabas testudineus) exhibited the highest mean concentrations of total arsenic (0.459 ± 0.137 μg/g), inorganic arsenic (0.121 ± 0.044 μg/g), and percentage of inorganic arsenic (26.2%). Inorganic arsenic levels found in freshwater animals in this study were much lower than the Thai regulatory standard of 2 μg/g. PMID:23043844

  18. Identification of the major allergen of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (giant freshwater prawn)

    PubMed Central

    Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohamad; Misnan, Rosmilah; Abdullah, Noormalin; Bakhtiar, Faizal; Arip, Masita; Murad, Shahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Objective To characterize the major allergens of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (giant freshwater prawn). Methods Raw and cooked extracts of the giant freshwater prawn were prepared. The IgE reactivity pattern was identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting technique with the sera of 20 skin prick test (SPT) positive patients. The major allergen identified was then characterized using the proteomics approach involving a combination of two-dimensional (2-DE) electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools. Results SDS-PAGE of the raw extract showed 23 protein bands (15–250 kDa) but those ranging from 40 to 100 kDa were not found in the cooked extract. From immunoblotting experiments, raw and cooked extracts demonstrated 11 and 5 IgE-binding proteins, respectively, with a molecular mass ranging from 15 to 155 kDa. A heat-resistant 36 kDa protein was identified as the major allergen of both extracts. In addition, a 42 kDa heat-sensitive protein was shown to be a major allergen of the raw extract. The 2-DE gel fractionated the prawn proteins to more than 50 different protein spots. Of these, 10 spots showed specific IgE reactivity with patients' sera. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis led to identification of 2 important allergens, tropomyosin and arginine kinase. Conclusions It can be concluded that the availability of such allergens would help in component-based diagnosis and therapy of prawn allergies. PMID:23569834

  19. Involvement of opioid peptides in the regulation of reproduction in the prawn Penaeus indicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasula Reddy, P.

    The possible involvement of an endogenous opioid system in the regulation of ovarian development in the prawn Penaeus indicus was investigated. Injection of leucine-enkephalin significantly increased the ovarian index and oocyte diameter in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, injection of methionine-enkephalin significantly decreased the ovarian index and oocyte diameters. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that an opioid system is involved in the regulation of reproduction in crustaceans.

  20. Impact of cyclones and aquatic macrophytes on recruitment and landings of tiger prawns Penaeus esculentus in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loneragan, N. R.; Kangas, M.; Haywood, M. D. E.; Kenyon, R. A.; Caputi, N.; Sporer, E.

    2013-07-01

    The cover of seagrasses and macroalgae, landings and fishery-independent measures of spawning stock and recruitment for brown tiger prawns, were monitored immediately following a major cyclone in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia in March 1999. Anecdotal evidence on the extent of seagrass from 1990 to 1998 suggests that the cyclone caused a major, immediate disruption and loss of the seagrass/macroalgal beds (to ≤2% cover), the critical prawn nursery habitat, and mangroves in the shallow inshore waters of the system. Prawn landings and recruitment to the fishery were not affected in the year of the cyclone, but were markedly lower in the two years immediately afterwards and then increased as the cover of macrophytes increased to over 40% in 2003. Tiger prawn landings and catch rates were not affected in Shark Bay, a system 500 km south of Exmouth Gulf that did not experience cyclonic disturbance. Seagrasses in Exmouth Gulf showed a succession of species from small colonising species (Halophila ovalis and Halodule uninervis) to larger, broad-leaved species (Cymodocea serrulata, Syringodium isoetifolium) only two years after the cyclone. The recruitment and landings of tiger prawns were correlated significantly with the total cover of macroalgae and seagrass. The large loss of seagrass and macroalgae reduced the settling habitat for postlarvae and the nursery habitat for juvenile tiger prawns, probably leading to the lower recruitment to the fishery. These findings suggest that the extent of seagrass and macroalgae are some of the factors defining the productivity of the tiger prawn fishery in Exmouth Gulf.

  1. Analogical reasoning in amazons.

    PubMed

    Obozova, Tanya; Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Two juvenile orange-winged amazons (Amazona amazonica) were initially trained to match visual stimuli by color, shape, and number of items, but not by size. After learning these three identity matching-to-sample tasks, the parrots transferred discriminative responding to new stimuli from the same categories that had been used in training (other colors, shapes, and numbers of items) as well as to stimuli from a different category (stimuli varying in size). In the critical testing phase, both parrots exhibited reliable relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) behavior, suggesting that they perceived and compared the relationship between objects in the sample stimulus pair to the relationship between objects in the comparison stimulus pairs, even though no physical matches were possible between items in the sample and comparison pairs. The parrots spontaneously exhibited this higher-order relational responding without having ever before been trained on RMTS tasks, therefore joining apes and crows in displaying this abstract cognitive behavior. PMID:26084679

  2. Acute toxicity of organochlorine insecticide endosulfan to the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrochium rosenbergii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xilin; Xiong, Zhaodi; Xie, Jian; Ding, Fujiang

    2014-01-01

    Endosulfan, an organochlorine pesticide, is highly toxic and effective at controlling pests in agriculture, horticulture, and public health programs. In this study, static bioassays were used to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan to freshwater prawns ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii) of various lengths (1.5±0.03, 4±0.08, and 7±0.06 cm). Additionally, the activities of peroxidase (POD), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Na+/K+-ATPase were analyzed to reflect the effects of endosulfan exposure. The 96 h LC50 of endosulfan for prawns 1.5, 4, and 7 cm long were 1.86, 4.53, and 6.09 μg/L, respectively, improved tolerance to endosulfan with growth. The POD activities of test organisms exposed to low concentrations of endosulfan were inhibited, indicating the presence of oxygen damaged tissue. Moreover, a notable decrease in AChE activity was observed due to overstimulation of neurotransmission, which might result in abnormal behavior. The effect caused by endosulfan on phosphatase production in the hepatopancreas of prawns 1.5, 4, and 7 cm long was different because the ability of nonspecific immune regulation increased with growth. The 96 h LC50 values obtained in this study could be used in the formulation of water-quality criteria in China. Moreover, the changes in enzymes activities of M. rosenbergii under stress of endosulfan could be applied in the establishment of early warning indicators for bio-safety.

  3. Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method based on electronic nose and non-linear stochastic resonance technique

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Yuanyuan, Han; Yanping, Cai; Jiaojiao, Jin; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear data processing technique is studied. E-nose responses to prawns stored at 4°C are measured. Meanwhile, physical/chemical indexes (firmness, pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), total viable count (TVC), and human sensory evaluation) are examined to provide freshness references for e-nose analysis. E-nose measurement data is analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), stochastic resonance (SR), and double-layered cascaded serial stochastic resonance (DCSSR). PCA partially discriminates prawns under different storage time. SR and DCSSR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum eigen values discriminate prawns successfully. Multi-variables regressions (MVR) are conducted between physical/chemical indexes and SR/DCSSR output SNR minimal (SNR-Min) values. Results indicate that SNR-Min values present more significant linearity relation with physical/chemical indexes. Prawn freshness forecasting model is developed via Harris fitting regression on DCSSR SNR-Min values. Validating experiments demonstrate that forecasting accuracy of this model is 94.29%. PMID:25551520

  4. Ballast water: a threat to the Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Newton Narciso; Botter, Rui Carlos; Folena, Rafael Dompieri; Pereira, José Pinheiro Fragoso Neto; da Cunha, Alan Cavalcanti

    2014-07-15

    Ballast water exchange (BWE) is the most efficient measure to control the invasion of exotic species from ships. This procedure is being used for merchant ships in national and international voyages. The ballast water (BW) salinity is the main parameter to evaluate the efficacy of the mid-ocean ballast water exchange. The vessels must report to the Port State Control (PSC), via ballast water report (BWR), where and how the mid-ocean BWE was performed. This measure allows the PSC to analyze this information before the ship arrives at the port, and to decide whether or not it should berth. Ship BW reporting forms were collected from the Captaincy of Santana and some ships were visited near the Port of Santana, located in Macapá (Amazon River), to evaluate the BW quality onboard. We evaluated data submitted in these BWR forms and concluded that the BWE efficacy might be compromised, because data contained in these BWR indicate that some ships did not change their BW. We found mistakes in filling the BWR forms and lack of information. Moreover, these ships had discharged BW with high level of salinity, Escherichia coli and total coliforms into the Amazon River. We concluded that the authorities of the Amazon Region need to develop more efficient proceedings to evaluate the ballast water reporting forms and BW quality, as there is potential risk of future invasion of exotic species in Brazilian ports. PMID:24928458

  5. Deforestation, floodplain dynamics, and carbon biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.; Dunne, T.; Richey, J.; Melack, J.; Simonett, D. S.; Woodwell, G.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of the physical geographic environment of the Amazon Basin are considered: (1) deforestation and reforestation, (2) floodplain dynamics, and (3) fluvial geomorphology. Three independent projects are coupled in this experiment to improve the in-place research and to ensure that the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) experiment stands on a secure base of ongoing work. Major benefits to be obtained center on: (1) areal and locational information, (2) data from various depression angles, and (3) digital radar signatures. Analysis will be conducted for selected sites to define how well SIR-B data can be used for: (1) definition of extent and location of deforestation in a tropical moist forest, (2) definition and quantification of the nature of the vegetation and edaphic conditions on the (floodplain) of the Amazon River, and (3) quantification of the accuracy with which the geometry and channel shifting of the Amazon River may be mapped using SIR-B imagery in conjunction with other remote sensing data.

  6. Low-water maps of the groundwater table in the central Amazon by satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Julia; Seyler, Frédérique; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Calmant, Stéphane; Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Satgé, Frédéric; Silva, Joecila Santos Da

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater plays a fundamental role in rainforest environments, as it is connected with rivers, lakes, and wetlands, and helps to support wildlife habitat during dry periods. Groundwater reservoirs are however excessively difficult to monitor, especially in large and remote areas. Using concepts from groundwater-surface water interactions and ENVISAT altimetry data, we evaluated the topography of the groundwater table during low-water periods in the alluvial plain of the central Amazon. The water levels are monitored using an unprecedented coverage of 491 altimetric stations over surface waters in the central Amazon. The groundwater table maps interpolated at spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 100 km are consistent with groundwater wells data. They provide evidence of significant spatiotemporal organization at regional scale: heterogeneous flow from the hillslope toward the main rivers is observed, as well as strong memory effects and contrasted hydrological behaviors between the North and the South of the Amazon.

  7. Changes in the Carbon Cycle of Amazon Ecosystems During the 2010 Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Christophera; Klooster, Steven; Hiatt, Cyrus; Genovese, Vanessa; Castilla-Rubino, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing was combined with the NASA-CASA carbon cycle simulation model to evaluate the impact of the 2010 drought (July through September) throughout tropical South America. Results indicated that net primary production (NPP) in Amazon forest areas declined by an average of 7% in 2010 compared to 2008. This represented a loss of vegetation CO2 uptake and potential Amazon rainforest growth of nearly 0.5 Pg C in 2010. The largest overall decline in ecosystem carbon gains by land cover type was predicted for closed broadleaf forest areas of the Amazon River basin, including a large fraction of regularly flooded forest areas. Model results support the hypothesis that soil and dead wood carbon decomposition fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere were elevated during the drought period of 2010 in periodically flooded forest areas, compared to forests outside the main river floodplains.

  8. New sediment budget calculations for the submarine Amazon Delta indicates enhanced modern sediment fluxes of the Amazon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Haberkern, J.; Mulitza, S.; Chiessi, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The submarine Amazon Delta is one major sink in the Amazon source-to-sink system. It is estimated, that the Amazon transports around 1200 Mt/yr. Around 50% of this river sediment load, namely 400 - 800 Mt/yr, is stored on the submarine delta, leading to sedimentation rates of decimeters per year (Nittrouer et al., 1995). The majority of the remaining sediments is deposited on the lower delta plain of the Amazon, but another significant portion is accumulated at the Amapa shoreline or is bypassed further northwestwards. These sediment budget calculations are mainly based on radioisotopic profiles measured at sediment cores in the frame of the AmasSeds project, which was carried out in the 1980ties and 1990ties (Nittrouer et al., 1995). Here we present another approach for calculating mass fluxes in the Amazon system. Within the Project AMADEUS, a cooperation between the MARUM, Bremen, Germany and the University Sao Paulo, Brazil, high-resolution seismic multichannel seismic data and sediment echosounder data (PARASOUND) were collected during Cruise MSM20/3 in February/March 2012. Main emphases of the surveying were set to the forset and bottomset of the delta, where most of the accretion occurs. A special outcome of the new data is the comparison with PARASOUND data collected in 1996 during Cruise M34/4. Due to several crossing points of both data sets it is now possible to carry out direct measurements of the accumulation during these 16 years. Another time horizon is a prominent unconformity spreading over the submarine delta, since the sedimentation on top of this unconformity had been dated to start roughly 100 yrs ago (Sommerfield et al., 1995). Mapping of this unconformity as well as the reflector representing the seafloor of 1996 gives the opportunity to calculate volumes and mass of the sediment stored within the survey area for two different time spans. First calculations show, that the sediment accumulation on the submarine delta since 1996 is

  9. Monitoring the spreading of the Amazon freshwater plume by MODIS, SMOS, Aquarius and TOPAZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Counillon, Francois; Johannessen, Johnny A.

    2015-04-01

    A synergistic tool for studying the Amazon River Plume dynamics based on a novel algorithm for deriving sea surface salinity (SSS) from MODIS reflectance data together with SSS data from the SMOS and Aquarius satellites and the TOPAZ data assimilation system is proposed. The new algorithm is based on a neural network to relate spectral remote sensing reflectance measured by MODIS with SSS measured by SMOS in the Amazon river plume. The algorithm is validated against independent in-situ data and is found to be valid in the range of SSS from 29 to 35 psu, for the period of highest rates of Amazon River discharge with RMSE=0.79 psu and R2=0.84. Monthly SSS fields were reconstructed from the MODIS data for late summers from 2002 to 2012 at a 10 km resolution and compared to surface currents and SSS derived from the TOPAZ reanalysis system. The two datasets reveal striking agreement, suggesting that the TOPAZ system could be used for a detailed study of the Amazon River plume dynamics. Both the position and speed of the North Brazilian Current as well as the spreading of the Amazon River plume are monitored. In particular a recurrent mechanism was observed for the spreading of the rivers plumes, notably that the fresh water is usually advected towards the Caribbean Sea by the North Brazilian Current but get diverted into the tropical Atlantic when North Brazilian Current rings are shed. Innovative method for satellite data temporal morphing based on remotely sensed surface ocean currents allow to derive SSS at unprecedented spatial (1km) and temporal (1 day) resolution.

  10. Tidal fronts and their influence on prawn postlarvae immigration in Albatross Bay, the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Hua

    1995-06-01

    Studies of dynamics in Albatross Bay, the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, show strong tides of which M2 is the dominant constituent in the region. Tidal fronts are present and they can be modelled by a 2-D tidal model. Density currents have also been observed with seasonal variations due to the influence of wet or dry seasons. This paper reviews the effects of these dynamics on the migration of prawn postlarvae in Albatross Bay and its estuaries. It is found that through its vertical movement triggered by change of salinity the prawn postlarvae can be transported from the coast to the estuary by tides within 2.8 weeks. However, this horizontal displacement mechanism may be destroyed by the tidal front in Albatross Bay. Density currents may alter prawn postlarvae positions in Albatross Bay on a seasonal scale.

  11. Bilingual Education and Language Use among the Shipibo of the Peruvian Amazon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tacelosky, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Investigates how language choice for education contributes to changes in the way a society views and uses language in the context of the Peruvian Amazon. Oral surveys were administered to Shipibo people in 13 communities along the Ucayali River of eastern Peru where a transition type bilingual education program was introduced several decades ago.…

  12. Recent Amazon climate as background for possible ongoing and future changes of Amazon humid forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, M.; Barichivich, J.; Ziv, G.; Brienen, R.; Schöngart, J.; Peylin, P.; Ladvocat Cintra, B. Barcante; Feldpausch, T.; Phillips, O.; Baker, J.

    2015-09-01

    Recent analyses of Amazon runoff and gridded precipitation data suggest an intensification of the hydrological cycle over the past few decades in the following sense: wet season precipitation and peak river runoff (since ˜1980) as well as annual mean precipitation (since ˜1990) have increased, while dry season precipitation and minimum runoff have slightly decreased. There has also been an increase in the frequency of anomalously severe floods and droughts. To provide context for the special issue on Amazonia and its forests in a warming climate we expand here on these analyses. The contrasting recent changes in wet and dry season precipitation have continued and are generally consistent with changes in catchment-level peak and minimum river runoff as well as a positive trend of water vapor inflow into the basin. Consistent with the river records, the increased vapor inflow is concentrated to the wet season. Temperature has been rising by 0.7°C since 1980 with more pronounced warming during dry months. Suggestions for the cause of the observed changes of the hydrological cycle come from patterns in tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Tropical and North Atlantic SSTs have increased rapidly and steadily since 1990, while Pacific SSTs have shifted during the 1990s from a positive Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) phase with warm eastern Pacific temperatures to a negative phase with cold eastern Pacific temperatures. These SST conditions have been shown to be associated with an increase in precipitation over most of the Amazon except the south and southwest. If ongoing changes continue, we expect forests to continue to thrive in those regions where there is an increase in precipitation with the exception of floodplain forests. An increase in flood pulse height and duration could lead to increased mortality at higher levels of the floodplain and, over the long term, to a lateral shift of the zonally stratified floodplain forest communities. Negative effects on

  13. Nutrient dynamics in Amazon shelf waters: results from AMASSEDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaster, David J.; Pope, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Four hydrographic cruises were conducted on the Amazon shelf as part of the AMASSEDS field program. During each cruise, approximately 55 stations were occupied and nutrients, as well as other hydrographic parameters, were measured. The results of this time series sampling program indicate that the nutrient concentrations in the riverine end-member (silicate = 144 μmol kg -1, phosphate = 0.7 μmol kg -1, nitrate = 16 μmol kg -1, ammonium = 0.4 μmol kg -1, and urea = 0.9 μmol kg -1) remain relatively constant, despite a two-fold seasonal variation in river water discharge rate. Of the major nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, ammonium and silicate), nitrate shows the greatest seasonal change in riverine end-member concentration with a high value (23 μmol kg -1) during the March cruise (rising river discharge) and a low value (12 μmol kg -1) during the November cruise (falling river discharge). Nitrate is the dominant nutrient form of inorganic nitrogen throughout most of the river/ocean mixing zone, however, in the outershelf area, where nitrate has been depleted by biological production, this nutrient occurs at concentrations comparable to the other nitrogen species (ammonium, nitrite and urea), which are at levels < 1 μmol kg -1. Nearshore, high turbidity inhibits phytoplankton production because of light limitation, whereas on the outershelf, nitrate appears to be limiting growth more than silicate or phosphate. Nutrient uptake was observed during all four cruises, however, nearly all of this production must be regenerated in shelf bottom waters, because very little of the biogenic materials are buried in the seabed (silicate burial <4% of flux to algal blooms; ˜10% burial of biologically available inorganic nitrogen reaching the river/ocean mixing zone; and <3% burial of phosphate flux to shelf environment). Clearly the Amazon shelf is not an efficient nutrient trap. Initial estimates of primary production on the Amazon shelf suggest that algal blooms are

  14. Metallothionein-Like Proteins and Energy Reserve Levels after Ni and Pb Exposure in the Pacific White Prawn Penaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Nogueira, Gabriel; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Muntz, Alice; Fernandez-Bringas, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the changes in metallothionein-like proteins (MTLPs) and Energy Reserves (ERs) in hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle of the white prawn Penaeus vannamei. Realistic metal concentration exposure for 10 days to Ni and Pb in solution revealed that juvenile prawns partially induce MTLP in hepatopancreas after Pb exposure. Ni was distributed equally between soluble and insoluble fractions, while Pb was present only in the insoluble fraction, suggesting different detoxification strategy. No changes in lipids and glycogen concentration were detected under these experimental conditions in both tissues analyzed. MTLP could not be considered as a suitable indicator for lead exposure in hepatopancreas. PMID:20862200

  15. Molecular importance of prawn large heat shock proteins 60, 70 and 90.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Nizam, Faizal; Ravichandran, Gayathri; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arshad, Aziz; Elumalai, Preetham; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the innate immune system of prawn, a comparative molecular approach was proposed to study the crustacean large HSPs 60, 70 and 90. Three different large HSPs were identified from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) cDNA library during screening. The structural and functional characteristic features of HSPs were studied using various bioinformatics tools. Also, their gene expression and mRNA regulation upon various pathogenic infections was studied by relative quantification using 2(-ΔΔCT) method. MrHSP60 contains a long chaperonin 60 domain at 46-547 which carries a chaperonin 60 signature motif between 427 and 438, whereas MrHSP70 contains a long HSP70 domain at 21-624 and MrHSP90 carries a HSP90 domain at 188-719. The two dimensional analysis showed that MrHSP60 contains more amino acids (52%) in helices, whereas MrHSP70 (40.6%) and MrHSP90 (51.8%) carried more residues in coils. Gene expression results showed significant (P < 0.05) expression of MrHSP60, 70 and 90 in haemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas, respectively. Further, the expression level was up-regulated upon bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophilla and Vibrio harveyi) and viral [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and M. rosenbergii nodo virus (MrNV)] infections during various time periods. The gene expression results exhibited the potential involvement of these three HSPs in the immune system of prawn. The study indicated the potentiality of these molecules, thereby protecting cells against pathogens as well as severe cellular and environmental stresses in crustaceans. PMID:26631804

  16. Toxicity of cryoprotectants agents in freshwater prawn embryos of Macrobrachium amazonicum.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Arthur Vinícius Lourenço; Castro, Elias José Teles; Barbosa, Mariana Silva Alves; de Sousa, Míriam Luzia Nogueira Martins; de Araújo Neto, Manoel Paiva; Filho, Aldeney Andrade Soares; de Souza Sampaio, Celia Maria

    2015-12-01

    The process of cooling and cryopreservation of prawn embryos is a viable alternative for a continuous supply of larvae for freshwater prawn farming ponds. However, studies involving the application of those techniques as well as on toxicity of cryoprotectants in freshwater prawn embryos are scarce. Thus, this study aims to test the toxicity of methylic alcohol (MET), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethylene glycol (EG) on Macrobrachium amazonicum embryos. For the present experiment, pools of embryos were taken from 15 M. amazonicum females and were divided into three groups and tested in duplicate at concentrations of 10, 5, 3; 1, 0.5 or 0.1%. Toxicity tests were conducted for 24 h in Falcon® pipes to obtain the lethal concentration for 50% of the larvae (LC50). After the set period for testing, random samples of embryos were removed for morphological analysis under stereoscopic microscopes. Results were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test at a 5% significance level and Trimmed Spearman-Karber Analysis to determine LC50-24 h. DMSO toxicity tests revealed that 5% and 10% concentrations showed the highest toxicity and differed from the control (P ≤ 0.05), 24h-LC50 was 437.4 ± 14.4 µL. MET was less toxic among the tested cryoprotectants and concentrations did not allow the determination of its LC50-24h. For tests with EG, concentrations of 3, 5 or 10% solutions resulted in a 100% mortality to tested embryos; EG was the tested cryoprotectant with the highest toxicity, with an LC50-24h average of 81.91 ± 35.3 µl. PMID:25255785

  17. Cyanobacteria and prawn farming in northern New South Wales, Australia--a case study on cyanobacteria diversity and hepatotoxin bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanpaeae, Harri T.; Holliday, Jon; Schroeder, Helge; Goddard, Timothy J.; Fister, Richard von; Carmichael, Wayne W

    2005-03-15

    Harmful cyanobacteria pose a hazard to aquatic ecosystems due to toxins (hepatotoxic microcystins, nodularins, and cylindrospermopsin) they produce. The microcystins and nodularins are potent toxins, which are also tumor promoters. The microcystins and nodularins may accumulate into aquatic organisms and be transferred to higher trophic levels, and eventually affect vector animals and consumers. Prawn farming is a rapidly growing industry in Australia. Because information regarding effects of cyanobacteria at prawn farms was lacking, we examined diversity of cyanobacteria and toxin production plus bioaccumulation into black tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) under both field (northern New South Wales, Australia, December 2001-April 2002) and laboratory conditions. Samples were analyzed for hepatotoxins using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximum density of cyanobacteria (1 x 10{sup 6} to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l) was reached in April. Cyanobacteria encountered were Oscillatoria sp. (up to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Pseudanabaena sp. (up to 1.8 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Microcystis sp. (up to 3.5 x 10{sup 4} cells/l), and Aphanocapsa sp. (up to 2 x 10{sup 4} cells/l). An uncommon cyanobacterium, Romeria sp. (up to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), was also observed. Contrasting earlier indications, toxic Nodularia spumigena was absent. Despite that both Oscillatoria sp. and Microcystis sp. are potentially hepatotoxic, hepatotoxin levels in phytoplankton samples remained low (up to 0.5-1.2 mg/kg dw; ELISA) in 2001-2002. ELISA was found suitable not only for phytoplankton but prawn tissues as well. Enzymatic pretreatment improved extractability of hepatotoxin from cyanobacteria (nodularin from N. spumigena as an example), but did not generally increase toxin recovery from prawn hepatopancreas. There were slightly increasing hepatotoxin concentrations in prawn hepatopancreas (from 6-20 to 20-80 {mu}g/kg dw; ELISA) during the

  18. Methane emissions from northern Amazon savanna wetlands and Balbina Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemenes, A.; Belger, L.; Forsberg, B.; Melack, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    To improve estimates of methane emission for the Amazon basin requires information from aquatic environments not represented in the central basin near the Solimoes River, where most of the current data were obtained. We have combined intensive, year-long measurements of methane emission and water levels made in interfluvial wetlands located in the upper Negro basin with calculations of inundation based on a time series of Radarsat synthetic aperature radar images. These grass-dominated savannas emitted methane at an average rate of 18 mg C per m squared per day, a low rate compared to the habitats with floating grasses the occur in the Solimoes floodplains. Reservoirs constructed in the Amazon typically flood forested landscapes and lead to conditions conducive for methane production. The methane is released to the atmosphere from the reservoir and as the water exits the turbines and from the downstream river. Balbina Reservoir near Manaus covers about 2400 km squared along the Uatuma River. Annual averages of measurements of methane emission from the various habitats in the reservoir range from 23 to 64 mg C per m squared per day. Total annual emission from the reservoir is about 58 Gg C. In addition, about 39 Gg C per year are released below the dam, about 50 percent of which is released as the water passes through the turbines. On an annual areal basis, Balbina Reservoir emits 40 Mg C km squared, in contrast to 30 Mg km squared for the Solimoes mainstem floodplain

  19. Palaeohydrological controls on sedimentary organic matter on Amazon floodplain lakes during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L. S.; Moreira-Turcq, P. F.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Turcq, B.

    2014-12-01

    A synthesis of the impacts of the Amazon River hydrological changes on the sedimentation process of organic matter (OM) in three different floodplain lakes (Santa Ninha, Maracá, and Comprido lakes) is presented in this study. Today the Santa Ninha and Maracá lakes are directly and permanently connected with the main channel of the Amazon River, in contrast to Comprido Lake, which is indirectly and periodically influenced by the Amazon River due to its high distance from the main channel. All the sedimentary lake records showed a reduced river inflow due to dry climatic conditions during the Early and Middle Holocene followed by a humid Late Holocene with an increased fluvial input. In Santa Ninha and Maraca Lakes the reduced river inflow period was characterized by sediments with a low abundance of smectite (on average ~20 wt. %), a clay mineral mainly transported by the fluvial system, high total organic carbon (TOC) contents and a predominant C3 vegetation input evidenced by the C/N ratio and d13C. During the Late Holocene, a higher smectite abundance (on average ~43 wt. %) and a low TOC content (on average ~1.4 wt. %) pointed to dilution with the riverine lithogenic matter. In this period a enhanced aquatic primary productivity was evidenced by the increased d13C values and by a C/N typical of algae, suggesting an increased lake water level. In Comprido Lake, a sedimentation gap occurred during the Early and Middle Holocene. The humid Late Holocene, after 3,000 cal years BP, was characterized by high TOC values (on average ~9 wt. %) and increasing abundance of planktonic species, like Aulacoseira sp., which reflects the expansion of water bodies. The predominance of C3-vegetation and low smectite content suggest that in Comprido Lake the soil OM input from the local catchment area was predominant during the humid Late Holocene due to its high distance from the Amazon River main stem. Consequently, our study shows that the sedimentation processes of OM in

  20. Cyclic sediment deposition within Amazon deep-sea fan

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, P.L.; Flood, R.D.

    1988-08-01

    The Upper and middle Amazon Fan has grown in a cyclic fashion. An individual deposition cycle consists of (1) a widespread basal, acoustically transparent seismic unit (interpreted as debris-flow deposits) that fills and levels preexisting topographic lows, and (2) a levee complex built of overlapping channel-levee systems. Two and possibly three cycles have been identified within the Amazon Fan. The levee complex beneath one debris flow originated from a different submarine canyon than did the levee complex above the debris flow, suggesting that these levee complexes formed during different sea level lowstands. Calculations based on present sediment discharge of the Amazon River suggest that an entire levee complex can form within the time span of a single glacial stage, such as the Wisconsin; however, the levee complex probably could not have formed during the relatively short time interval when sea level rose rapidly at the end of a glacial stage. The basal seismic units (debris-flow deposits) may have been deposited at any time during sea level fluctuations. Although seismic evidence suggests that this cyclic sedimentation pattern may be related to glacio-eustatic sea level variations, cyclic fan growth may be attributed to other processes as well. For example, a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) observed within the upper fan appears to be a gas hydrate. Migration of the hydrate phase boundary during sea level fluctuations and diapiric activity may be mechanisms for initiating widespread debris flows. 10 figs.

  1. Analysis of Amazon Extreme Drought in Two Reanalysis Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, D. O.; Herdies, D. L.; Berbery, E. H.

    2013-05-01

    Over the past 10 years the Amazon region experienced two major drought events, which had large impacts on vegetation and rivers, affecting directly the transport, fishing, agriculture and health. These events were characterized by large changes in precipitation patterns over the region in the dry wet season. Aiming to analyze and identify anomalies related to the 2005 and 2010 drought, as well as the effects of larger-scale disturbances such as El Niño, we used reanalysis datasets from CFSR/NCEP and MERRA/NASA. Overall the results show that the droughts don't show a very clear signal in datasets reanalyses. Only drought events related to El Niño are well identified in the data. For the 2005 event, the reanalysis move precipitation anomalies for the regions where they are not observed in observational data. The case os 2010 presents the same charateristic, with displacement of the anomalies, and underestimating the observed effects. In the general context of the results, it was observed that there is a direct relationship between the vertical motion in the Atlantic and the precipitation anomalies over the Amazon. The drop in rates of precipitation over the Amazon and the possible increase of the flow in low levels in cases of drought affected directly the precipitation over the La Plata Basin. Thus, even the drought events not being well represented in datasets of reanalysis, it was possible to observe their effects on local and remote almost all South America.

  2. First description of 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) and its possible association with Vibrio and Photobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Hatje, Eva; Minniti, Giusi; Stewart, Michael J; Neuman, Christina; Knibb, Wayne; Katouli, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Here we report a newly identified 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) farmed in North Queensland, Australia. This was characterized by localized white discoloured segmentation of the cervical groove, moreover, after cooking the prawns exploded, making them unfit for commercial sale. Histological examination revealed breakdown of gut and abdominal muscle tissue in some moribund specimens. We selectively isolated Vibrio spp., which are known prawn pathogens, from healthy and Chalky back specimens. Isolated bacteria were identified, typed and tested for the presence of eight virulence genes (VGs), biofilm formation, adherence and cytotoxicity to fish cells. In all, 32 isolates were recovered and identified as Vibrio harveyi, V. owensii, V. sinaloensis-like, V. campbellii, V. shilonii, Vibrio sp. and Photobacterium damselae using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. All V. harveyi carried VGs coding for haemolysin, toxR and flagella; formed biofilm; and adhered to both cell lines. This was similar to the V. sinaloensis-like strains that were only isolated from Chalky back specimens. Our data suggest that Vibrio spp. may play a role in the pathogenesis of Chalky back. This study is the first report of Chalky back phenomenon in farmed banana prawns that needs to be closely monitored by the industry. PMID:26825678

  3. Changes in the fish fauna of a tropical Australian estuary since 1990 with reference to prawn predators and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, S. J. M.; Griffiths, S. P.; Pillans, R.

    2010-03-01

    As part of a study of the reasons for declining commercial banana prawn catches in the Weipa area of the Gulf of Carpentaria, and in order to assess whether changes in predator numbers may be a factor influencing prawn numbers, the species composition, numbers and biomasses of fishes in the Embley estuary were re-examined in February 2005 for comparison with the results of a study between 1986 and 1990. The new study duplicated previous methods and used the same sampling sites and the same gear employed during February sampling periods from 1986 to 1990. Overall, the species diversity and catch rates, as well as the numbers of penaeid prawn predators had changed little over 20 years. The overall catch rate for 2005 was 37.4 g m -1 h -1, not significantly different from the overall catch rate of 32.8 g m -1 h -1 (SE 6.6) for the period from 1987 to 1989. The results are discussed in relation to environmental factors and climate change, as well as the substantial declines in prawn catches, which had fallen from over 800 tonnes per annum prior to 1998, to about 70 tonnes per annum.

  4. hydrochemistry of the Andeans and sub-andeans Amazon basins - Weathering and CO2 consumption rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérome; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Lagane, Christelle; Sven Lavado Casimiro, Waldo; Pombosa, Rodrigo; Noriega, Luis; Chavary, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Measuring mountain weathering rates, estimating their role on C cycle and identifying the parameters which control them are key to better constrain the knowledge of the continental-ocean-atmosphere interactions over geological timescale. The Andes, in contrast to the Himalaya, have received poor attention in terms of chemical weathering. Several authors have worked on the Amazon river basin, but it is difficult to assess the role of the Andes (10% of the surface area of the Amazon river basin) by only sampling the Amazon at mouth or sampling its largest tributaries. As shown by earlier works, the Upper-Amazon basins are the main matter source of the Amazon basin. The studied area participates at more than 70% of the Amazon weathering rates while it contributes to the total discharge on 30% for 27% of the total area. The studied area is comprised between latitude 0°47'N and 20°28'S and between longitude 79°36'W and 58°45'W and can be divided in three major hydrosystems (the Napo river at North, the Maranon-Ucayali rivers on the central part and the upper Madeira at south) which can be separated on Andes and sub-Andes parts. This work presents the results of the HYBAM research program (present-day hydro-geodynamics of the Amazon Basin) on the upper Amazon basin. The concentration of major elements was analyzed on a monthly basis, sampling at 26 gauging stations which include the Andean basins of the Amazon River and a part of the downstream catchment domain. The objectives of this work are i) calculate the major elements fluxes and their spatial distribution, ii) estimate the present-day rate of rock weathering, as well as the flux of atmospheric/soil CO2 consumption from total rock and silicate weathering, and iii) constrain the major environmental factor which controls the dissolved matter production using unique high temporal and spatial resolution data sampling. The main difficulty of studying large river geochemistry is to separate the main sources of the

  5. New observations of sinuous channels on the Amazon Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    High-sinuosity submarine fan channels on the Amazon Fan were first observed using long-range (GLORIA) side-scan sonar in 1982 and mapped in greater detail using multibeam sonar in 1984. These data have provided important insights into the nature and evolution of submarine channel systems. Subsequent studies on the Amazon Fan have focused on avulsion patterns, sedimentation patterns, fan growth and the climate record contained in fan sediments, and there has been relatively little additional work on the details of sinuous channel morphology. Channels on the Amazon Fan have been imaged by multibeam sonar on several occasions since 1984 during focused studies, regional mapping and ship transit. These multibeam data are being compiled and studied to better characterize these iconic channels. One observation of particular interest is that, on the Amazon Fan, channel-wall slumps appear to be more common than previously thought. Drilling of a cut-off meander during ODP Leg 155 on the Amazon Fan showed the presence of slumped material deeper in the channel suggesting that failure of the channel wall was in part responsible for the abandonment and filling of that meander loop. The failure also apparently created a sandy debris flow with clasts of fine-grained levee material transported in a sandy matrix. This sandy debris flow may have been able to flow along the channel and deposit at the seaward end where similar sediments can be found. Disturbed zones now visible on the inner walls of channels at several other places along the channels suggest that these kinds of inner-wall slumps may play important roles in channel evolution and fan growth. Channel-blocking slumps can isolate channel loops which can then fill with sandy sediments, and avulsions are likely if this kind of slump fills the channel. The failure of channel walls can also lead to new channel segments that tend to straighten the channel. Dramatic changes to the shape of the channel can likely lead to large and

  6. Deepwater Chondrichthyan Bycatch of the Eastern King Prawn Fishery in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Cassandra L; White, William T; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The deepwater chondrichthyan fauna of the Great Barrier Reef is poorly known and life history information is required to enable their effective management as they are inherently vulnerable to exploitation. The chondrichthyan bycatch from the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery at the Swain Reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef was examined to determine the species present and provide information on their life histories. In all, 1533 individuals were collected from 11 deepwater chondrichthyan species, with the Argus skate Dipturus polyommata, piked spurdog Squalus megalops and pale spotted catshark Asymbolus pallidus the most commonly caught. All but one species is endemic to Australia with five species restricted to waters offshore from Queensland. The extent of life history information available for each species varied but the life history traits across all species were characteristic of deep water chondrichthyans with relatively large length at maturity, small litters and low ovarian fecundity; all indicative of low biological productivity. However, variability among these traits and spatial and bathymetric distributions of the species suggests differing degrees of resilience to fishing pressure. To ensure the sustainability of these bycatch species, monitoring of their catches in the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery is recommended. PMID:27218654

  7. Steroids and genes related to steroid biosynthesis in the female giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Thongbuakaew, Tipsuda; Siangcham, Tanapan; Suwansa-ard, Saowaros; Elizur, Abigail; Cummins, Scott F; Sobhon, Prasert; Sretarugsa, Prapee

    2016-03-01

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is important to many Asian countries due to its high economic value as an aquaculture product. With demand increasing, there is requirement for a better understanding of the biosynthetic components that regulate its growth and reproduction, including steroids, in order to help increase production. Vertebrate-type steroids and their receptors were identified in crustaceans and implicated in reproduction. In this study, we presented the sex steroids estradiol and progesterone by LC-MS/MS in female M. rosenbergii, and reveal steroidogenic-related genes by in silico analysis of de novo assembled transcriptomes. Comparative analysis with other species was performed to confirm their putative role, as well as tissue-specific and quantitative gene expression. We reveal 29 transcripts that encode for steroidogenic-related proteins, including steroidogenic enzymes, a nuclear steroid hormone receptors, and a steroidogenic factor. Moreover, we identified for the first time the presence of steroidogenic factor 1, StAR-related lipid transfer protein, estradiol receptor- and progesterone-like protein in M. rosenbergii. Those targeted for gene expression analysis (3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, estrogen sulfotransferase and progesterone receptor-like) showed widespread expression within many tissues, and at relatively high levels in the central nervous system (CNS) during ovarian maturation. In summary, we provide further evidence for the existence of steroidogenic pathways in crustaceans, which may be useful for advancing prawn aquaculture. PMID:26774430

  8. Deepwater Chondrichthyan Bycatch of the Eastern King Prawn Fishery in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Cassandra L.; White, William T.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    The deepwater chondrichthyan fauna of the Great Barrier Reef is poorly known and life history information is required to enable their effective management as they are inherently vulnerable to exploitation. The chondrichthyan bycatch from the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery at the Swain Reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef was examined to determine the species present and provide information on their life histories. In all, 1533 individuals were collected from 11 deepwater chondrichthyan species, with the Argus skate Dipturus polyommata, piked spurdog Squalus megalops and pale spotted catshark Asymbolus pallidus the most commonly caught. All but one species is endemic to Australia with five species restricted to waters offshore from Queensland. The extent of life history information available for each species varied but the life history traits across all species were characteristic of deep water chondrichthyans with relatively large length at maturity, small litters and low ovarian fecundity; all indicative of low biological productivity. However, variability among these traits and spatial and bathymetric distributions of the species suggests differing degrees of resilience to fishing pressure. To ensure the sustainability of these bycatch species, monitoring of their catches in the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery is recommended. PMID:27218654

  9. Potential Hydrologic Changes in the Amazon By the End of the 21st Century and the Groundwater Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Y. N.; Fan, Y.; Miguez-Macho, G.

    2014-12-01

    This study contributes to the discussions on the future of the Amazon rainforest under a projected warmer-drier climate from the perspectives of land hydrology. Using IPCC HadGEM2-ES simulations of the present and future Amazon climate to drive a land hydrology model that accounts for groundwater constraint on land drainage, we assess potential hydrologic changes in soil water, evapotranspiration (ET), water table depth, and river discharge, assuming unchanged vegetation. We ask: how will ET regimes shift at the end of the 21st century, and will the groundwater help buffer the anticipated water stress in some places-times? We conducted four 10yr model simulations, at the end of 20th and 21st century, with and without the groundwater. Our model results suggest that, first, over the western and central Amazon, ET will increase due to increased potential evapotranspiration (PET) with warmer temperatures, despite a decrease in soil water; that is, ET will remain atmosphere or demand-limited. Second, in the eastern Amazon dry season, ET will decrease in response to decreasing soil water, despite increasing PET demand; that is, ET in these regions-seasons will remain or become more soil water or supply-limited. Third, the area of water-limited regions will likely expand in the eastern Amazonia, with the dry season, as indicated by soil water store, even drier and longer. Fourth, river discharge will be significantly reduced over the entire Amazon but particularly so in the southeastern Amazon. By contrasting model results with and without the groundwater, we found that the slow soil drainage constrained by a shallow groundwater can buffer soil water stress, particularly in southeastern Amazon dry season. Our model suggests that, if the groundwater buffering effect is accounted for, the future Amazon water stress may be less than projected by most climate models.

  10. Potential hydrologic changes in the Amazon by the end of the 21st century and the groundwater buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.; Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo

    2014-08-01

    This study contributes to the discussions on the future of the Amazon rainforest under a projected warmer-drier climate from the perspectives of land hydrology. Using IPCC HadGEM2-ES simulations of the present and future Amazon climate to drive a land hydrology model that accounts for groundwater constraint on land drainage, we assess potential hydrologic changes in soil water, evapotranspiration (ET), water table depth, and river discharge, assuming unchanged vegetation. We ask: how will ET regimes shift at the end of the 21st century, and will the groundwater help buffer the anticipated water stress in some places-times? We conducted four 10 yr model simulations, at the end of 20th and 21st century, with and without the groundwater. Our model results suggest that, first, over the western and central Amazon, ET will increase due to increased potential evapotranspiration (PET) with warmer temperatures, despite a decrease in soil water; that is, ET will remain PET or atmospheric demand-limited. Second, in the eastern Amazon dry season, ET will decrease in response to decreasing soil water, despite increasing PET demand; that is, ET in these regions-seasons will remain or become more soil water or supply-limited. Third, the area of water-limited regions will likely expand in the eastern Amazonia, with the dry season, as indicated by soil water store, even drier and longer. Fourth, river discharge will be significantly reduced over the entire Amazon but particularly so in the southeastern Amazon. By contrasting model results with and without the groundwater, we found that the slow soil drainage constrained by shallow groundwater can buffer soil water stress, particularly in southeastern Amazon dry season. Our model suggests that, if groundwater buffering effect is accounted for, the future Amazon water stress may be less than that projected by most climate models.

  11. Act No. 24994 of 19 January 1989. Basic Law on the Rural Development of the Peruvian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This Act sets forth the government's policy on rural development of the Peruvian Amazon region. Major objectives of the Act include the promotion of new rural settlements in the Amazon region, the promotion of migration from the Andes to the Amazon region, and the stimulation of agriculture, livestock, and forestry activities in the Amazon region. The following are the means that the government will use, among others, to attain these goals: 1) the development of Population Displacement Programmes, which will give individual persons and families economic and logistic support in moving; 2) the establishment of Civic Colonizing Services, temporary mobile units, which will offer settlers health services, education services, technical assistance with respect to agriculture and livestock, and promotional credits; 3) the creation of the Council for Amazon River Transport to coordinate and recommend activities to improve river transport; 4) the granting to settlers of land, free education for their children, medical care, technical training and assistance with respect to agriculture, and a supply of seeds; 5) the exemption of certain investors from payment of income taxes; and 6) the granting of a wide range of incentives for agricultural production. The Act also creates a Council for Planning and Development in the Amazon Region to draw up and approve a Plan for the Development of the Amazon Region. It calls for the rational use of the natural resources of the Amazon Region in the framework of preserving the ecosystem and preventing its ruin and delegates to the regional governments the authority to enter into contracts on the use of forest materials and to undertake reforestation programs. Finally, the Act provides various guarantees for the native population, including guarantees with respect to land and preservation of ethnic and social identity. PMID:12344257

  12. Intensification of the Amazon hydrological cycle over the last two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, M.; Brienen, R. J. W.; Galbraith, D.; Feldpausch, T. R.; SchöNgart, J.; Guyot, J.-L.; Espinoza, J. C.; Lloyd, J.; Phillips, O. L.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazon basin hosts half the planet's remaining moist tropical forests, but they may be threatened in a warming world. Nevertheless, climate model predictions vary from rapid drying to modest wetting. Here we report that the catchment of the world's largest river is experiencing a substantial wetting trend since approximately 1990. This intensification of the hydrological cycle is concentrated overwhelmingly in the wet season driving progressively greater differences in Amazon peak and minimum flows. The onset of the trend coincides with the onset of an upward trend in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SST). This positive longer-term correlation contrasts with the short-term, negative response of basin-wide precipitation to positive anomalies in tropical North Atlantic SST, which are driven by temporary shifts in the intertropical convergence zone position. We propose that the Amazon precipitation changes since 1990 are instead related to increasing atmospheric water vapor import from the warming tropical Atlantic.

  13. Isolation of AHL-degrading bacteria from micro-algal cultures and their impact on algal growth and on virulence of Vibrio campbellii to prawn larvae.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Natrah, Fatin Mohd Ikhsan; Flandez, Ace Vincent Bravo; Kumar, Uday; Niu, Yufeng; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Inactivation of quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules, such as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) of pathogenic bacteria, has been proposed as a novel method to combat bacterial diseases in aquaculture. Despite the importance of micro-algae for aquaculture, AHL degradation by bacteria associated with micro-algal cultures has thus far not been investigated. In this study, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. NFMI-T and Bacillus sp. NFMI-C from open cultures of the micro-algae Tetraselmis suecica and Chaetoceros muelleri, respectively. An AHL degradation assay showed that either monocultures or co-cultures of the isolates were able to degrade the AHL N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. In contrast, only Bacillus sp. NFMI-C was able to inactivate N-hydroxybutanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, the AHL produced by Vibrio campbellii. The isolated bacteria were able to persist for up to 3 weeks in conventionalized micro-algal cultures, indicating that they were able to establish and maintain themselves within open algal cultures. Using gnotobiotic algal cultures, we found that the isolates did not affect growth of the micro-algae from which they were isolated, whereas a mixture of both isolates increased the growth of Tetraselmis and decreased the growth of Chaetoceros. Finally, addition of Bacillus sp. NFMI-C to the rearing water of giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) larvae significantly improved survival of the larvae when challenged with pathogenic V. campbellii, whereas it had no effect on larval growth. PMID:26344339

  14. Uranium in river water

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. ); Edmond, J.M. )

    1993-10-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains do not represent a significant source of U in river waters. In addition, the authors have determined dissolved U levels in forty rivers from around the world and coupled these data with previous measurements to obtain an estimate for the global flux of dissolved U to the oceans. The average concentration of U in river waters is 1.3 nmol/kg, but this value is biased by very high levels observed in the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Yellow rivers. When these river systems are excluded from the budget, the global average falls to 0.78 nmol/kg. The global riverine U flux lies in the range of 3-6 [times] 10[sup 7] mol/yr. The major uncertainty that restricts the accuracy of this estimate (and that of all other dissolved riverine fluxes) is the difficulty in obtaining representative samples from rivers which show large seasonal and annual variations in runoff and dissolved load.

  15. Trans-Amazon Drilling Project (TADP): origins and evolution of the forests, climate, and hydrology of the South American tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, P.A.; Fritz, S.C.; Silva, C.G.; Rigsby, C.A.; Absy, M.L.; Almeida, R.P.; Caputo, M.C.; Chiessi, C.M.; Cruz, F.W.; Dick, C.W.; Feakins, S.J.; Figueiredo, J.; Freeman, K.H.; Hoorn, C.; Jaramillo, C.A.; Kern, A.; Latrubesse, E.M.; Ledru, M.P.; Marzoli, A.; Myrbo, A.; Noren, A.; Piller, W.E.; Ramos, M.I.F.; Ribas, C.C.; Trinadade, R.; West, A.J.; Wahnfried, I.; Willard, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the scientific rationale for an ambitious ICDP drilling project to continuously sample Late Cretaceous to modern sediment in four different sedimentary basins that transect the equatorial Amazon of Brazil, from the Andean foreland to the Atlantic Ocean. The goals of this project are to document the evolution of plant biodiversity in the Amazon forests and to relate biotic diversification to changes in the physical environment, including climate, tectonism, and the surface landscape. These goals require long sedimentary records from each of the major sedimentary basins across the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, which can only be obtained by drilling because of the scarcity of Cenozoic outcrops. The proposed drilling will provide the first long, nearly continuous regional records of the Cenozoic history of the forests, their plant diversity, and the associated changes in climate and environment. It also will address fundamental questions about landscape evolution, including the history of Andean uplift and erosion as recorded in Andean foreland basins and the development of west-to-east hydrologic continuity between the Andes, the Amazon lowlands, and the equatorial Atlantic. Because many modern rivers of the Amazon basin flow along the major axes of the old sedimentary basins, we plan to locate drill sites on the margin of large rivers and to access the targeted drill sites by navigation along these rivers.

  16. Trans-Amazon Drilling Project (TADP): origins and evolution of the forests, climate, and hydrology of the South American tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, P. A.; Fritz, S. C.; Silva, C. G.; Rigsby, C. A.; Absy, M. L.; Almeida, R. P.; Caputo, M.; Chiessi, C. M.; Cruz, F. W.; Dick, C. W.; Feakins, S. J.; Figueiredo, J.; Freeman, K. H.; Hoorn, C.; Jaramillo, C.; Kern, A. K.; Latrubesse, E. M.; Ledru, M. P.; Marzoli, A.; Myrbo, A.; Noren, A.; Piller, W. E.; Ramos, M. I. F.; Ribas, C. C.; Trnadade, R.; West, A. J.; Wahnfried, I.; Willard, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the scientific rationale for an ambitious ICDP drilling project to continuously sample Late Cretaceous to modern sediment in four different sedimentary basins that transect the equatorial Amazon of Brazil, from the Andean foreland to the Atlantic Ocean. The goals of this project are to document the evolution of plant biodiversity in the Amazon forests and to relate biotic diversification to changes in the physical environment, including climate, tectonism, and the surface landscape. These goals require long sedimentary records from each of the major sedimentary basins across the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, which can only be obtained by drilling because of the scarcity of Cenozoic outcrops. The proposed drilling will provide the first long, nearly continuous regional records of the Cenozoic history of the forests, their plant diversity, and the associated changes in climate and environment. It also will address fundamental questions about landscape evolution, including the history of Andean uplift and erosion as recorded in Andean foreland basins and the development of west-to-east hydrologic continuity between the Andes, the Amazon lowlands, and the equatorial Atlantic. Because many modern rivers of the Amazon basin flow along the major axes of the old sedimentary basins, we plan to locate drill sites on the margin of large rivers and to access the targeted drill sites by navigation along these rivers.

  17. Genetic variability in three Amazon parrot species.

    PubMed

    Lopes, I F; Del Lama, M A; Del Lama, S N

    2007-12-01

    Parrots of the genus Amazona are among the most threatened species of the Order Pscittaciformes. This work describes allozyme polymorphisms in three Amazon parrot species--the Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva), the Orange-winged Amazon (Amazona amazonica), and the Festive Amazon (Amazona festiva) -, and provides useful data for the evaluation of their genetic variability. We electrophoretically analyzed blood samples from 68 wild-caught individuals, maintained in captivity in three Brazilian zoos. Eight of the ten studied enzyme loci exhibited polymorphism. Glucosephosphate isomerase (Gpi) proved to be a diagnostic locus for the identification of these Amazon species. The expected average heterozygosity of the Blue-fronted Amazon (0.060) differed significantly from the expected heterozygosities of the Orange-winged Amazon and the Festive Amazon (0.040 and 0.039, respectively). This result was discussed as a consequence of hybridization between two geographic A. aestiva subspecies, and alternatively as a particular trait of this species. Genetic variability of the Blue-fronted Amazon compared to birds in general is not low on a species-wide level, despite the fact that this parrot is one of the most illegally traded species. Allozyme analysis proved to be an useful tool in monitoring the genetic variation within the genus Amazona and can be applied in the management program of other threatened species of this genus. PMID:18278355

  18. Direct use of low temperature geothermal water by Aquafarms International, Inc. for freshwater aquaculture (prawns and associated species). An operations and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, R.; Price, M.; Price, V.; Grajcer, D.

    1984-04-01

    In connection with an ongoing commercial aquaculture project in the Coachella Valley, California; a twelve month prawn growout demonstration project was conducted. This project began in August, 1979 and involved the use of low temperature (85/sup 0/F) geothermal waters to raise freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (deMan), in earthen ponds. The following publication is an operations and maintenance guide which may by useful for those interested in conducting similar enterprises.

  19. Extratropical Respones to Amazon Deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, A.; Dirmeyer, P.

    2014-12-01

    Land-use change (LUC) is known to impact local climate conditions through modifications of land-atmosphere interactions. Large-scale LUC, such as Amazon deforestation, could have a significant effect on the local and regional climates. The question remains as to what the global impact of large-scale LUC could be, as previous modeling studies have shown non-local responses due to Amazon deforestation. A common shortcoming in many previous modeling studies is the use of prescribed ocean conditions, which can act as a boundary condition to dampen the global response with respect to changes in the mean and variability. Using fully coupled modeling simulations with the Community Earth System Model version 1.2.0, the Amazon rainforest has been replaced with a distribution of representative tropical crops. Through the modifications of local land-atmosphere interactions, a significant change in the region, both at the surface and throughout the atmosphere, can be quantified. Accompanying these local changes are significant changes to the atmospheric circulation across all scales, thus modifying regional climates in other locales. Notable impacts include significant changes in precipitation, surface fluxes, basin-wide sea surface temperatures and ENSO behavior.

  20. Ultrastructural changes during spermatogenesis, biochemical and hormonal evidences of testicular toxicity caused by TBT in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man, 1879).

    PubMed

    Revathi, Peranandam; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Vasanthi, Lourduraj Arockia; Munuswamy, Natesan; Krishnan, Muthukalingan

    2014-10-01

    The present investigation documents the impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the ultrastructural variation of spermatogenesis in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The environmentally realistic concentration of TBT can cause damages to the endocrine and reproductive physiology of crustaceans. In this context, three concentrations viz. 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L were selected and exposed to prawns for 90 days. The TBT exposed prawn exhibited decrease the reproductive activity as evidenced by sperm count and sperm length compared to control. Histopathological results revealed the retarded testicular development, abnormal structure of seminiferous tubule, decrease in the concentration of spermatozoa, diminution of seminiferous tubule membrane, abundance of spermatocytes and vacuolation in testis of treated prawns. Ultrastructural study also confirmed the impairment of spermatogenesis in treated prawns. Furthermore, radioimmunoassay (RIA) clearly documented the reduction of testosterone level in TBT exposed groups. Thus, TBT substantially reduced the level of male sex hormone as well as biochemical constituents which ultimately led to impairment of spermatogenesis in the freshwater male prawn M. rosenbergii. PMID:23362226

  1. A contribution to understanding the turbidity behaviour in an Amazon floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcântara, E.; Novo, E.; Stech, J.; Lorenzzetti, J.; Barbosa, C.; Assireu, A.; Souza, A.

    2010-02-01

    Observations of turbidity provide quantitative information about water quality. However, the number of available in situ measurements for water quality determination is usually limited in time and space. Here, we present an analysis of the temporal and spatial variability of the turbidity of an Amazon floodplain lake using two approaches: (1) wavelet analysis of a turbidity time series measured by an automatic monitoring system, which should be improved/simplified, and (2) turbidity samples measured in different locations and then interpolated using an ordinary Kriging algorithm. The spatial and temporal variability of turbidity are clearly related to the Amazon River flood pulses in the floodplain. When the water level in the floodplain is rising or receding, the exchange between the Amazon River and the floodplain is the major driving force in turbidity variability. At high-water levels, turbidity variability is controlled by Lake Bathymetry. When the water level is low, wind action and Lake Morphometry are the main causes of turbidity variability. The combined use of temporal and spatial data shows a good potential for better understanding of the turbidity behaviour in a complex aquatic system such as the Amazon floodplain.

  2. Projected increases in the annual flood pulse of the Western Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, Zed; Buytaert, Wouter; Manz, Bastian; Véliz Rosas, Claudia; Willems, Patrick; Lavado-Casimiro, Waldo; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Santini, William

    2016-01-01

    The impact of a changing climate on the Amazon basin is a subject of intensive research because of its rich biodiversity and the significant role of rainforests in carbon cycling. Climate change has also a direct hydrological impact, and increasing efforts have focused on understanding the hydrological dynamics at continental and subregional scales, such as the Western Amazon. New projections from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 ensemble indicate consistent climatic warming and increasing seasonality of precipitation in the Peruvian Amazon basin. Here we use a distributed land surface model to quantify the potential impact of this change in the climate on the hydrological regime of the upper Amazon river. Using extreme value analysis, historical and future projections of the annual minimum, mean, and maximum river flows are produced for a range of return periods between 1 and 100 yr. We show that the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios of climate change project an increased severity of the wet season flood pulse (7.5% and 12% increases respectively for the 100 yr return floods). These findings agree with previously projected increases in high extremes under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios climate projections, and are important to highlight due to the potential consequences on reproductive processes of in-stream species, swamp forest ecology, and socio-economy in the floodplain, amidst a growing literature that more strongly emphasises future droughts and their impact on the viability of the rainforest system over greater Amazonia.

  3. Floodplain hydrology in an Amazon floodplain lake (Lago Grande de Curuaí)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, M. P.; Barroux, G.; Martinez, J. M.; Seyler, F.; Moreira-Turcq, P.; Cochonneau, G.; Melack, J. M.; Boaventura, G.; Maurice-Bourgoin, L.; León, J. G.; Roux, E.; Calmant, S.; Kosuth, P.; Guyot, J. L.; Seyler, P.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThe floodplains of the Amazon basin influence the hydrology and fluxes of suspended solids and solutes on multiple scales. Our study focused on the floodplain of Lago Grande de Curuaí (Óbidos, Brazil), a 4000 km 2 segment of floodplain and local upland catchment representative of the lower Amazon. Based on in situ and satellite data acquired from 1997 to 2003, we calculated the exchanges of water between the floodplain and the river and determined the temporal dynamics of flooded area water derived from river flooding, rainfall, runoff, and exchange with groundwater annually for six years. The Amazon River dominated the inputs of water to the flooded area year-round, accounting about 77% of the annual total inputs; rainfall and runoff accounted for about 9% and 10%, respectively, while seepage from the groundwater system accounted for 4%. The hydrologic residence time of the lake was about three months, and the floodplain made a net contribution of water to the river. The exported volume (net balance between water input and losses) varied between 4.2 and 7.3 km 3 depending on the year and represented about 0.75 times the maximal storage reached each year.

  4. Diatoms from the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon: the Genera Encyonema, Encyonopsis and Gomphonema (Cymbellales: Bacillariophyceae).

    PubMed

    Vouilloud, Amelia A; Sala, Silvia E; Avellaneda, Marcela Núñez; Duque, Santiago R

    2010-03-01

    The diatom flora of the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon is far less studied than the flora of the Brazilian sector of the basin. Here we present results related to the genera Encyonema, Encyonopsis and Gomphonema. Plankton and periphyton samples were collected in lotic and lentic waterbodies from the Amazonian-Andean region, the Amazon River, Japurá River and Porvenir River basins during 1993, 1994, 2001 and 2003. At each sampling station pH, temperature, water transparency and conductivity were registered. Samples were analyzed with phase contrast microscope (LM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Ten taxa are new records for the area; Encyonema for the Peruvian and Colombian Amazon and Encyonopsis for the Colombian Sector. Encyonema neogracile var. tenuipunctatum, E. vulgare, Encyonopsis frequentis, Gomphonema augur var. sphaerophorum and G. contraturris are recorded for the first time in Colombia; Encyonema venezolanum and G. neoapiculatum in Colombia and Peru and the latter also for Amazonia. E. angustecapitatum was mentioned in Colombia before at a pond located at 3000 m asl. We describe a new species from Porvenir River, Amazonas, Colombia: Encyonema amazonianum. PMID:20411706

  5. Establishment of an Altimetric Reference Network Over the Amazon Basin Using Satellite Radar Altimetry (TOPEX POSEIDON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuth, P.; Blitzkow, D.; Cochonneau, G.

    2006-07-01

    Satellite radar altimetry (Topex/Poseidon T/P) was used to establish a consistent altimetric reference network over the Amazon basin. A methodolody was developed that uses radar altimetry to quantify maximum annual water levels (referred to the geoid) at intersections between the satellite ground tracks and the river network and derive, through spatial interpolation, maximum annual water levels at hydrometric stations. Comparison with maximum annuyal readings at gauges allowed the determination of local orthometric heights at these stations. Altimetric levelling from Topex/Poseidon measurements has been realized for 97 hydrometric stations along 27 740 km of the Amazon hydrographic network. Validation has been realized both by checking the overall hydraulic consistency of longitudinal river profiles at low and high river stages and by comparing, for 23 hydrometric stations, orthometric heights obtrained from T/P measurements with values obtained from bi-frequency GPS positioning. These results are of major importance for the study of Amazon river flow dynamics and sediment transport.

  6. Manaus city Flow Warning system and extreme events monitoring in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. L. M. R.; Oliveira, D.; Oliveira, M. A.; Moreira, D.; Maciel, J. S. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Amazon basin is the biggest watershed in the world, in the center of this basin, there is a city called Manaus, with population next to 2 million habitants. Manaus city is bounded by Negro River; one of the main rivers in Amazon, this river has its level checked by Fluvial Station in the Manaus harbor, which has a range of 100 years of hydrological data records. The hydrological cycle in the region next to Manaus has certain regularity, its common variety is considered of 7 months of rising river, in other words, the fluvial quotes rising and 5 months of falling (ebb). Although, the water level variation in Manaus Harbor, from its draft to flow can achieve the variation up to 16 meters of water level height, this difference can affect all the Amazon region, happening impacts such as the interference of regional agriculture and fluvial transportation, besides the economic activities in the harbor and local population welfare, arising from extreme events. Considering the relevance of prediction and accompanying of flows and drafts, the Geologic Survey of Brazil implemented, since 1989, a warning system to these extreme events. This paper focused to demonstrate the a warning system implemented from equations based on the Manaus Harbor quotes, since Negro River has a regular hydrological cycle, thus, it is possible to predict the highest quotes in the hydrological year, in advance till 75 days with accurate prediction, in a gap of 45 to 15 days before the flow. This paper presents, also, the biggest events occurred in a hundred years of records collected by Manaus Harbor, as example, the draft happened in December 2010 and the flow in June 2009, as well demonstrating the values and impacts in the Amazon region.

  7. Toxicity identification evaluation of landfill leachate using fish, prawn and seed plant.

    PubMed

    Budi, Setia; Suliasih, B Asih; Othman, Mohammad Shuhaimi; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah

    2016-09-01

    The first phase of toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) method comprised of physic-chemical fractionation steps of pH adjustment, pH adjustment followed by filtration, aeration, extraction with solid phase C18 column (SPE), oxidant reduction with sodium thiosulphate and EDTA chelation was conducted to characterize the toxicants of a Malaysian landfill leachate. The battery of organisms test chosen were freshwater fish (Rasbora sumatrana), freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) and tomato seed (Lycoperson esculentum). Toxicity reductions at each step were comparable for all test organisms. The major toxicants present in the leachate were found to be mostly basic in nature and precipitable under acidic conditions as well as containing non-polar organic compounds. A small reduction in toxicity was observed when leachate was treated with sodium thiosulphate in oxidant reduction test indicating the presence of oxidizers. The EDTA chelating step did not significantly reduce toxicity in the test organisms suggesting insignificant level of (toxic) metals. PMID:26459190

  8. Gamma irradiation-aided chitin/chitosan extraction from prawn shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlous, M.; Tahtat, D.; Benamer, S.; Nacer Khodja, A.

    2007-12-01

    Chitin and chitosan were extracted from prawn shells. The influence of a 25 kGy irradiation dose on the deproteination process was investigated. The deproteination degree was followed by Lowry-Folin method. The demineralisation degree versus reaction time with 1 N hydrochloric acid solution was followed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Chitin and chitosan obtained were characterised by FTIR spectrometry. The influence of some parameters, such as reaction time, alkaline concentration and temperature on the deacetylation degree was also investigated. The deacetylation degree was evaluated by FTIR spectrometry using the bands at 1320 cm -1 and 1420 cm -1. It was found that the irradiation of the shells at a dose of 25 kGy reduces the time of the deproteination reaction by a factor of three, comparatively to the non-irradiated samples.

  9. The complete mitogenome of the rock pool prawn Palaemon serenus (Heller, 1862) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae).

    PubMed

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the rock pool prawn (Palaemon serenus), is sequenced, making it the third for genera of the family Palaemonidae and the first for the genus Palaemon. The mitogenome is 15,967 base pairs in length and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The P. serenus mitogenome has an AT bias of 58.97% and a base composition of 29.79% for T, 24.14% for C, 29.18% for A, and 16.89% for G. The mitogenome gene order of P. serenus is identical to Exopalaemon carinicauda. PMID:25693708

  10. Sediment transport and sedimentation along the Amazon floodplain

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, T.; Mertes, A.K.L.; Meade, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    As the Amazon River leaves the Andean foothills and crosses the structural trough in its Brazilian segment, it receives a large increment of discharge, but a small increase in sediment load from the bounding cratons. The gradient of the river declines gradually from Iquitos, Peru, downstream to Coari, Brazil, before increasing downstream to the vicinity of Manaus as the river crosses a structural arch. Between Manaus and Obidos, the river slope declines sharply. The interplay of the variable gradient and increasing discharge creates a pattern of boundary shear stress and sediment transport which the authors have defined by measurement and calculation. The downstream divergence of suspended and bed load transport is responsible for the patterns of aggradation, channel behavior and floodplain morphology. Aggradation has been computed on the basis of three years of sediment transport measurements; floodplain morphology was documented from radar photography and navigation charts; and channel migration from these charts and from aerial and satellite photography. In the reach between the Peruvian border and Coari, the river deposits sand bars within and alongside the channel and shifts laterally at a relatively rapid rate, forming a scroll-bar floodplain topography with long, narrow lakes. In the middle, steeper reach no net aggradation was measured, sand-bar development and channel shifting are limited. Below Manaus, the rapid decline in gradient and the large influx of Andean sediment from the Rio Madeira result in deposition of almost the entire sand load and a portion of the silt.

  11. Acyclic Lipids in Amazon Shelf Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, V. O.; Cardoso, J. N.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    2000-02-01

    Acyclic lipids were analysed for dissolved (<1·2 μm) and particulate (>1·2 μm) material from surface water of the Amazon continental shelf to correlate the direct inputs with diagenetic processes of the organic matter and to assess the differences in compound distribution patterns of the samples. The dissolved samples contained n -alkanes with an unusual even-to-odd carbon number predominance Amazon River. Furthermore, the Pr/Ph ratios calculated for the dissolved samples indicate that the organic matter in the surface of the highly turbid waters passed through an anaerobic stage. The differences in the acyclic hydrocarbon profiles of the dissolved and particulate phases show that organic inputs are preserved differently in smaller and larger particles.

  12. Transcriptomics of a Giant Freshwater Prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): De Novo Assembly, Annotation and Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyungtaek; Lyons, Russell E.; Dinh, Hung; Hurwood, David A.; McWilliam, Sean; Mather, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii or GFP), is the most economically important freshwater crustacean species. However, as little is known about its genome, 454 pyrosequencing of cDNA was undertaken to characterise its transcriptome and identify genes important for growth. Methodology and Principal Findings A collection of 787,731 sequence reads (244.37 Mb) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing analysis of cDNA prepared from muscle, ovary and testis tissues taken from 18 adult prawns was assembled into 123,534 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Of these, 46% of the 8,411 contigs and 19% of 115,123 singletons possessed high similarity to sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database, with most significant (E value < 1e–5) contig (80%) and singleton (84%) matches occurring with crustacean and insect sequences. KEGG analysis of the contig open reading frames identified putative members of several biological pathways potentially important for growth. The top InterProScan domains detected included RNA recognition motifs, serine/threonine-protein kinase-like domains, actin-like families, and zinc finger domains. Transcripts derived from genes such as actin, myosin heavy and light chain, tropomyosin and troponin with fundamental roles in muscle development and construction were abundant. Amongst the contigs, 834 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1198 indels and 658 simple sequence repeats motifs were also identified. Conclusions The M. rosenbergii transcriptome data reported here should provide an invaluable resource for improving our understanding of this species' genome structure and biology. The data will also instruct future functional studies to manipulate or select for genes influencing growth that should find practical applications in aquaculture breeding programs. PMID:22174756

  13. Determination of biogenic amines in squid and white prawn by high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Xi; Xu, Jie; Xue, Chang-Hu; Sheng, Wen-Jing; Gao, Rui-Chang; Xue, Yong; Li, Zhao-Jie

    2007-04-18

    A simple method was developed for the determination of biogenic amines in aquatic food products using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn automatic o-phthalaldehyde derivatization and fluorescence detection. The linearity, repeatability, and recovery of the method for seven amines (tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, agmatine, spermidine, and spermine) were evaluated. This optimized method was applied to detect biogenic amines in squid and white prawn during refrigerated storage. Sensory analysis, pH value, and total volatile base nitrogen value were combined to evaluate the freshness quality of these two raw materials. Agmatine and cadaverine in squid, cadaverine, and putrescine in white prawn were the most obviously changed amines during the storage at two different temperatures, and these biogenic amines could be the effective quality indicators for the freshness of the raw aquatic materials. PMID:17381105

  14. Amazon deforestation and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, J.; Nobre, C.; Sellers, P. )

    1990-03-16

    A coupled numerical model of the global atmosphere and biosphere has been used to assess the effects of Amazon deforestation on the regional and global climate. When the tropical forests in the model were replaced by degraded grass (pasture), there was a significant increase in surface temperature and a decrease in evapotranspiration and precipitation over Amazonia. In the simulation, the length of the dry season also increased; such an increase could make reestablishment of the tropical forests after massive deforestation particularly difficult. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Habitat Type Influences the Microhabitat Preference of Juvenile Tiger Prawns ( Penaeus esculentusHaswell and Penaeus semisulcatusDe Haan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, R. A.; Loneragan, N. R.; Hughes, J. M.; Staples, D. J.

    1997-09-01

    The microhabitat preferences of juvenile tiger prawns (3-10 mm carapace length),Penaeus esculentusandPenaeus semisulcatus, were tested in the field at Groote Eylandt, in the western Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. A partitioned apparatus containing live seagrass was used. Both species of prawns selected seagrass (Syringodium isoetifolium) over bare substrate. JuvenileP. esculentus, the most abundant species in this region, were also given paired choices of seagrasses with different leaf morphologies (representing a range of structural complexity) and sediments of different particle size. They selected a seagrass with broad, long leaves (Cymodocea serrulata) over one with narrow, long leaves (S. isoetifolium), which in turn was selected over the seagrasses with narrow, short leaves (Halodule uninervisand shortenedS. isoetifolium). Predation experiments have shown that juvenileP. esculentusare detected and eaten less often in broad, long-leaved seagrass than in narrow, short-leaved seagrass or bare substrate, so their preference for the former may shelter them from predators. No habitat preference was evident forP. esculentuswhen offered a choice between sediments consisting mainly of sand (71% sand particles) and silt (60% of silt and clay). The selection by both species of tiger prawn of seagrass over bare substrate, andP. esculentus's selection of seagrass with long, broad leaves, provides an explanation for the distribution of juvenile tiger prawns in the field. Thus, in the seagrass beds around Groote Eylandt,P. esculentusis more abundant in seagrass with broad, long leaves than in seagrass with short, thin leaves. In addition, its distribution in this region is relatively independent of sediment type. Leaf surface area (or habitat structural complexity) appears to be the main determinant of distribution for juvenileP. esculentus.

  16. Exploring the Geomorphology of the Amazon's Planalto and Understanding the Origin of the Modern Amazon Basin with Imaging Radar:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, R.; McDonald, K. C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Campbell, K.; Cracraft, J.; Carnaval, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon basin is a biodiversity biome and plays a significant role into shaping the earth's climate, ocean and atmospheric gases. Understanding the history of the formation of the basin is essential to our understanding of the region's biodiversity loss and response to climate change. Ancient River channels in lowland Amazonia exhibit right angle branching structures as well as intricately intertwined channels. Past research has attributed these characteristic as a result of subsurface faults but makes it difficult to validate this augment due to dense vegetation and sedimentation. We seek to employ remote sensing techniques for examining geomorphological features and the relationship to evolutionary processes that shaped biodiversity in the modern Amazon River Basin. We utilize UAVSAR imagery gathered from the NASA/JPL airborne imaging radar over the Planalto, in the Madre de Dios region of Southeastern Peru in an assessment of the underlying geomorphology, its relationship to the current distribution of vegetation, and geologic processes through deep time. In the late Neogene, the Amazonian lowlands comprised either a series of independent basins or a single sedimentary basin. The Amazonian Planalto is variously described as either erosional surface or a surface of deposition. We employ UAVSAR data collection to assess (1) the utility of these radar data for use in identifying associated geomorphologic features, and (2) UAVSAR's utility in aiding interpretation of ALOS PALSAR and STRM datasets to support a basin-wide characterization. We derive maps of river networks using a canny based edge detection method applied on the UAVSAR backscatter images. We develop an algorithm, which separates the river networks into various catchments based on connected component and then calculates angles at each branch point. We then assess distribution of right angle branching structure throughout the entire region. The results of the analysis will have a major impact on

  17. The spatial extent of change in tropical forest ecosystem services in the Amazon delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo Barbosa, C. C.; Atkinson, P.; Dearing, J.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas hold major economic potential due their strategic location, close to seas and inland waterways, thereby supporting intense economic activity. The increasing pace of human development activities in coastal deltas over the past five decades has also strained environmental resources and produced extensive economic and sociocultural impacts. The Amazon delta is located in the Amazon Basin, North Brazil, the largest river basin on Earth and also one of the least understood. A considerable segment of the population living in the Amazon delta is directly dependent on the local extraction of natural resources for their livelihood. Areas sparsely inhabited may be exploited with few negative consequences for the environment. However, increasing pressure on ecosystem services is amplified by large fluxes of immigrants from other parts of the country, especially from the semi-arid zone in Northeast Brazil to the lowland forests of the Amazon delta. Here we present partial results from a bigger research project. Therefore, the focus will be on presenting an overview of the current state, and the extent of changes on forest related ecosystem services in the Amazon delta over the last three decades. We aggregated a multitude of datasets, from a variety of sources, for example, from satellite imagery such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Global Inventory Modelling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climate datasets at meteorological station level from the Brazilian National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) and social and economic statistics data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and from the Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA). Through analysis of socioeconomic and satellite earth observation data we were able to produce and present spatially-explicit information with the current state and transition in forest cover and its impacts to forest

  18. Patterns of Geographic Expansion of Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Barboza, José Luis; Morrison, Amy C.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the Peruvian Amazon, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is abundant in large urban centers such as Iquitos. In recent years, it has also been found in a number of neighboring rural communities with similar climatic and socioeconomic conditions. To better understand Ae. aegypti spread, we compared characteristics of communities, houses, and containers in infested and uninfested communities. Methods We conducted pupal-demographic surveys and deployed ovitraps in 34 communities surrounding the city of Iquitos. Communities surveyed were located along two transects: the Amazon River and a 95km highway. We calculated entomological indices, mapped Ae. aegypti presence, and developed univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to predict Ae. aegypti presence at the community, household, or container level. Results Large communities closer to Iquitos were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Within infested communities, houses with Ae. aegypti had more passively-filled containers and were more often infested with other mosquito genera than houses without Ae. aegypti. For containers, large water tanks/drums and containers with solar exposure were more likely to be infested with Ae. aegypti. Maps of Ae. aegypti presence revealed a linear pattern of infestation along the highway, and a scattered pattern along the Amazon River. We also identified the geographical limit of Ae. aegypti expansion along the highway at 19.3 km south of Iquitos. Conclusion In the Peruvian Amazon, Ae. aegypti geographic spread is driven by human transportation networks along rivers and highways. Our results suggest that urban development and oviposition site availability drive Ae. aegypti colonization along roads. Along rivers, boat traffic is likely to drive long-distance dispersal via unintentional transport of mosquitoes on boats. PMID:25101786

  19. Uranium geochemistry on the Amazon shelf: Chemical phase partitioning and cycling across a salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarzenski, P. W.; McKee, B. A.; Booth, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    The size distribution of U was examined in surface waters of the Amazon shelf. Water samples were collected during a low discharge river stage across a broad salinity gradient (0.3-35.4%) and fractionated by planar filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration into (1) solution (Us, <10,000 MW; ˜1-10 nm), (2) colloidal (Uc 10,000 MW-0.4 μm), (3) dissolved (Ud, <0.4 μm), and (4) particulate (Up, >0.4 μm) phases. Concentrations of colloidal U comprise up to 92% of the dissolved U fraction at the river mouth and attain highest values (˜0.45 μg/L) in the productive, biogenic region of the Amazon shelf (salinities above ˜20%). Ud and Uc distributions are highly nonconservative relative to ideal dilution of river water and seawater, indicating extensive removal at salinities below ˜10%. The distribution of Us also shows some nonconservative behavior, yet removal, if any, is minimal. Saltwater-induced precipitation and aggregation of riverine colloidal material is most likely the dominant mechanism of U removal in the low salinity, terrigenous region of the Amazon shelf. There is evidence of a substantial colloidal U input (˜245% of the riverine Uc flux into surface waters above 5%. Such Uc enrichment most likely is the result of colloidal U-rich porewater diffusion/advection from the seabed and fluid muds or shelf-wide particle-colloid disaggregation. Removal of solution and dissolved phase U via a colloidal intermediate and Uc aggregation was examined in terms of coagulation theory. The highly reactive nature of all U phases on the Amazon shelf suggests that remobilization and fractionation of U may also occur in other river-influenced coastal environments.

  20. Effect of legume seed extracts on the inhibition of proteolytic activity and muscle degradation of fresh water prawn (Macrobrachiumrosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Sriket, Chodsana; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Hara, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    Trypsin inhibitors in the extracts from soybean (Glycine max), adzuki bean (Vigna angularis), bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and red kidney bean (Phaseoulus vulgaris) varied in amount and molecular weight. The soybean extract had the highest level of trypsin inhibitor with molecular weight (MW) of 21kDa, followed by bambara groundnut extract possessing trypsin inhibitor with MW of 15kDa. Both extracts showed a more effective inhibition towards crude protease extract (CE) from the hepatopancreas of fresh water prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) than the extracts from adzuki and red kidney beans. Activity staining also reconfirmed the higher inhibitory activity on CE from hepatopancreas by the extracts from both soybean and bambara groundnut. The extracts from all seeds were able to inhibit the degradation of fresh water prawn meat containing CE in a concentration dependent manner. Based on inhibitor study, the extracts from soybean and bambara groundnut can be a potential aid to suppress the muscle softening of fresh water prawn, mediated by trypsin-like proteases released from hepatopancreas, during extended iced storage. PMID:25212342

  1. Spermatophore affects the egg-spawning and egg-carrying behavior in the female giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Kruangkum, Thanapong; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Saetan, Jirawat; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Cummins, Scott F; Hanna, Peter J; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-10-01

    In crustaceans, mating occurs during the ecdysis after female molting. During this period, a male transfers its spermatophore into a female which, in some species, stores the spermatophore for a long period prior to spawning and fertilization. However, in some species including the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, the male deposits its spermataphore onto the external surface of the thoracic segment of the female which affects the spawning time and maternal behavior. This study investigated the spawning behavior of the M. rosenbergii females, which was divided into pre-spawning, spawning, and post-spawning phases. It was revealed that mated female prawns with attached spermatophore exhibited an earlier spawning than unmated individuals, leading to assessment of the factors that may elicit this phenomenon. Four groups of female prawns were allocated to groups including mating females with spermatophore still attached, mating females with the spermatophore removed, artificially inseminated females with spermatophores, and an unmated control. There was a significant reduction in the time of egg-spawning in the presence of spermatophores, and the mating activity was also a contributing factor. Furthermore, over 90% of the mated and artificially inseminated females in which spermatophores were deposited carried the eggs in the abdominal brood chamber until completion of embryonic development while others discarded the eggs within 2 days post-spawning. This study implies that the spermatophore may contain ovulation-inducing factors which stimulate an earlier spawning and fostering of brooding behavior. PMID:26388033

  2. A first insight into temperature stress-induced neuroendocrine and immunological changes in giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Jiang, Jia-Rong; Cheng, Winton

    2015-11-01

    Haemolymph norepinephrine (NE); total haemocyte count (THC); respiratory bursts (RBs); superoxide dismutase (SOD), phenoloxidase (PO), and phagocytic activity; and prophenoloxidase (proPO)-system-related genes (lipopolysaccharide- and β-1,3-glucan-binding protein: LGBP, proPO, peroxinectin: PE, and α2-macroglobulin: α2-M) in haemocytes of Macrobrachium rosenbergii were investigated after transferring them from 28 °C to 22 °C, 28 °C, and 34 °C respectively. The results revealed that haemolymph NE, hyaline cells (HCs), and PO activity per granulocyte increased from 30 to 120 min of exposure, and however, RBs and phagocytic activity significantly decreased from 30 to 120 min of exposure as well as granular cells (GCs), semigranular cells (SGCs), and SOD activity decreased from 60 to 120 min of exposure for the prawns subjected to temperature stress. The proPO-system-related gene expression markedly increased with 60-120 min of exposure for the prawns transferred from 28 °C to 22 °C and 34 °C, except α2M at 120 min. These results provide a first insight into the effects of temperature stress on haemolymph NE level and immune functions in prawns and suggest that temperature-stress-induced acute modulation in immunity is associated with the release of haemolymph NE in M. rosenbergii. PMID:26434711

  3. Identification and characterization of differentially expressed transcripts in the gills of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Barman, Hirak Kumar; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Das, Varsha; Mohapatra, Shibani Dutta; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Mohapatra, Chinmayee; Mohanta, Ramya; Panda, Rudra Prasanna; Rath, Surya Narayan

    2012-01-01

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is an economically important species. It is a euryhaline shrimp, surviving in wide-range salinity conditions. A change in gene expression has been suggested as an important component for stress management. To better understand the osmoregulatory mechanisms mediated by the gill, a subtractive and suppressive hybridization (SSH) tool was used to identify expressed transcripts linked to adaptations in saline water. A total of 117 transcripts represented potentially expressed under salinity conditions. BLAST analysis identified 22% as known genes, 9% as uncharacterized showing homologous to unannotated ESTs, and 69% as unknown sequences. All the identified known genes representing broad spectrum of biological pathways were particularly linked to stress tolerance including salinity tolerance. Expression analysis of 10 known genes and 7 unknown/uncharacterized genes suggested their upregulation in the gills of prawn exposed to saline water as compared to control indicating that these are likely to be associated with salinity acclimation. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was used for obtaining full-length cDNA of MRSW-40 clone that was highly upregulated during salt exposure. The sequenced ESTs presented here will have potential implications for future understanding about salinity acclimation and/or tolerance of the prawn. PMID:22619594

  4. Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsior, Michael; Valle, Juliana; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hertkorn, Norbert; Bastviken, David; Luek, Jenna; Harir, Mourad; Bastos, Wanderley; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Regions in the Amazon Basin have been associated with specific biogeochemical processes, but a detailed chemical classification of the abundant and ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM), beyond specific indicator compounds and bulk measurements, has not yet been established. We sampled water from different locations in the Negro, Madeira/Jamari and Tapajós River areas to characterize the molecular DOM composition and distribution. Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) combined with excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed a large proportion of ubiquitous DOM but also unique area-specific molecular signatures. Unique to the DOM of the Rio Negro area was the large abundance of high molecular weight, diverse hydrogen-deficient and highly oxidized molecular ions deviating from known lignin or tannin compositions, indicating substantial oxidative processing of these ultimately plant-derived polyphenols indicative of these black waters. In contrast, unique signatures in the Madeira/Jamari area were defined by presumably labile sulfur- and nitrogen-containing molecules in this white water river system. Waters from the Tapajós main stem did not show any substantial unique molecular signatures relative to those present in the Rio Madeira and Rio Negro, which implied a lower organic molecular complexity in this clear water tributary, even after mixing with the main stem of the Amazon River. Beside ubiquitous DOM at average H / C and O / C elemental ratios, a distinct and significant unique DOM pool prevailed in the black, white and clear water areas that were also highly correlated with EEM-PARAFAC components and define the frameworks for primary production and other aspects of aquatic life.

  5. Low-level nocturnal wind maximum over the Central Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greco, Steven; Ulanski, Stanley; Garstang, Michael; Houston, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    A low-level nocturnal wind maximum is shown to exist over extensive and nearly undisturbed rainforest near the central Amazon city of Manaus. Meteorological data indicate the presence of this nocturnal wind maximum during both the wet and dry seasons of the Central Amazon Basin. Daytime wind speeds which are characteristically 3-7 m/s between 300 and 1000 m increase to 10-15 m/s shortly after sunset. The wind-speed maximum is reached in the early evening, with wind speeds remaining high until several hours after sunrise. The nocturnal wind maximum is closely linked to a strong low-level inversion formed by radiational cooling of the rainforest canopy. Surface and low-level pressure gradients between the undisturbed forest and the large Amazon river system and the city of Manaus are shown to be responsible for much of the nocturnal wind increase. The pressure gradients are interpreted as a function of the thermal differences between undisturbed forest and the river/city. The importance of both the frictional decoupling and the horizontal pressure gradient suggest that the nocturnal wind maximum does not occur uniformly over all Amazonia. Low-level winds are thought to be pervasive under clear skies and strong surface cooling and that, in many places (i.e., near rivers), local pressure gradients enhance the low-level nocturnal winds.

  6. Use of GNSS Data for Hydrological Surveys in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stephane; Perosanz, Félix; Rotunno, Otto; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Santos, Andre

    2016-04-01

    GNSS data are constantly being used in hydrology. The key applications are the levelling of hydrological gauge stations, that of ADCP profiles for discharge and bathymetry of the cross-sections, and characterization of river's longitudinal slope of the free . These information are required to develop hydrological and hydrodynamic studies and to assess the quality of water level data obtained through space altimetry techniques. Establishing quality altimetry data from GNSS receivers to obtain gauge levelling and rivers profiles in the Amazon Basin is challenging. The GNSS reference network is sparse, the distance between survey points and reference stations is large, the major part of the basin can be only accessed by boat and rivers can have an extension of several thousands of kilometres. All these factors limit the efficiency of classical techniques of GNSS data processing like those based on double differences (DD). In addition, the Amazon Basin is strongly affected by loading effects, mainly caused by the hydrological cycle. In this basin, vertical displacements of these effects can reach more than 10 cm of amplitude. In the present work, we discuss the capability of calculating thousands of kilometres long altimetric profiles along the major rivers of the Amazon basin. GNSS data coming from receivers installed on-board boats are used together with GNSS stations fixed on gauges. First, differential techniques implemented in the GINS-PC software developed at the CNES-CLS IGS AC are used. These results are compared to those obtained with the Precise Point Position (PPP) technique. The impacts of fixing ambiguities to integer values in PPP technique are discussed as the use of Glonass data. We point on the specific corrections and cautions that are necessary during the data collection and the data processing. The accuracy of the profiles is assessed by comparing the results with fix points at gauge stations. The base application of the method is to enable fast

  7. Impacts of trawling on benthic macro-fauna and -flora of the Spencer Gulf prawn fishing grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, Ib; Hammett, Zoe; Lauer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The overall effects of trawling on benthic habitats and their assemblages are dependent on the distribution and intensity of trawl effort. The benthic habitats of the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are subjected to known variable levels of trawling disturbance recorded from fisher's logbooks. These habitats have not been quantitatively investigated. The aim of the study was firstly to characterise the macro-faunal and -floral assemblages and secondly, to comparatively assess trawl impact by testing the null hypothesis of no differences between five sites exposed to different intensity of trawl effort. The distribution and abundance of benthic macro-fauna and -flora were studied at two sampling resolutions by using beam trawl sampling (˜10,000 m 2) and underwater stereophotography (˜4.5 m 2) at five sites with different levels of trawl disturbance (effort). The results showed that the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are characterised by sandy sediments with a low content of silt and clay, with the exception of one site with very fine gravel. Biomass, abundance and cover of macro-fauna and -flora were generally low throughout, but with large differences among sites. Biomass, abundance and cover were found to be negatively correlated to both trawl hours from 1994-1998 and during the period of study. ANOSIM and SIMPER analyses using biomass, abundance and percentage cover as variables showed significant differences between sites with eight species or taxonomic groups contributing more than 10% to the observed similarity within sites. The two northern sites were dominated by sponges and the bearded mussel, Trichomya hirsutus, and the southern hammer oyster, Malleus meridianus. Other species that contributed to the similarity within sites were the ascidian, Polycarpa viridis, mobile epifauna (the blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus, and the western king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) latisulcatus) and demersal fish species (Degens leatherjacket, Thamnaconus

  8. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed protein in hemocytes of wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV)

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, T.; Bin, Kwong Q.; Vejayan, J.; Othman, R.Y.; Bhassu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic diseases cause huge mortality and economical loses at post larvae stages in freshwater prawn aquaculture industry. These prawns seem less susceptible to viral diseases except for infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). During viral infection in prawns, hemocytes are the primary organ that shows immunological response within the early stages of infection. We applied proteomic approaches to understand differential expression of the proteins in hemocytes during the viral disease outbreak. To aid the goal, we collected Macrobrachium rosenbergii broodstocks from the local grow out hatchery which reported the first incidence of IHHNV viral outbreak during larvae stage. Primarily, application of the OIE primer targeting 389 bp fragments of IHHNV virus was used in identification of the infected and non-infected samples of the prawn breeding line. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed specific down-regulation of Arginine kinase and Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and up/down-regulation of Prophenoloxidase1 and hemocyanin isoforms. These proteins were validated using semi quantitative RT-PCR and gene transcripts at mRNA level. These identified proteins can be used as biomarkers, providing a powerful approach to better understanding of the immunity pathway of viral disease with applications in analytic and observational epidemiology diagnosis. Proteomic profiling allows deep insight into the pathogenesis of IHHNV molecular regulation and mechanism of hemocyte in freshwater prawns. PMID:26106581

  9. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed protein in hemocytes of wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV).

    PubMed

    Alinejad, T; Bin, Kwong Q; Vejayan, J; Othman, R Y; Bhassu, S

    2015-09-01

    Epizootic diseases cause huge mortality and economical loses at post larvae stages in freshwater prawn aquaculture industry. These prawns seem less susceptible to viral diseases except for infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). During viral infection in prawns, hemocytes are the primary organ that shows immunological response within the early stages of infection. We applied proteomic approaches to understand differential expression of the proteins in hemocytes during the viral disease outbreak. To aid the goal, we collected Macrobrachium rosenbergii broodstocks from the local grow out hatchery which reported the first incidence of IHHNV viral outbreak during larvae stage. Primarily, application of the OIE primer targeting 389 bp fragments of IHHNV virus was used in identification of the infected and non-infected samples of the prawn breeding line. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed specific down-regulation of Arginine kinase and Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and up/down-regulation of Prophenoloxidase1 and hemocyanin isoforms. These proteins were validated using semi quantitative RT-PCR and gene transcripts at mRNA level. These identified proteins can be used as biomarkers, providing a powerful approach to better understanding of the immunity pathway of viral disease with applications in analytic and observational epidemiology diagnosis. Proteomic profiling allows deep insight into the pathogenesis of IHHNV molecular regulation and mechanism of hemocyte in freshwater prawns. PMID:26106581

  10. Interpretation of seismic stratigraphy on the Amazon continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.R. Jr.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Amazon subaqueous delta has been examined using high-resolution reflection profiles. 15 piston cores from the Amazon Shelf were used to interpret the significance of the reflectors evident in the seismic profiles. Acoustic reflectors correlate with changes in grain size within cores, and generally represent coarser layers within the muddy deposits of the delta. Measurement of compressional-wave seismic velocity and saturated bulk density demonstrate that the correlation results from changes in acoustic impedance, caused by the grain-size variations. The reflectors reveal two predominant types of seismic stratigraphy: depositional and erosional. The depositional stratigraphy contains reflectors formed by relatively subtle change in grain size. Gently dipping topset and steeply dipping foreset demonstrate upward and seaward progradation of the subaqueous delta. This stratigraphy is truncated by erosional reflectors, which are significantly coarser layers. The erosional reflectors divide the depositional stratigraphy into distinct sets. The prevalence of erosional reflectors is greatest in the topset region near the river mouth, suggesting that sediment in this region, which is rapidly accumulating on 100-year time scales, has been eroded over longer time scales within the Holocene.

  11. The dispersal of the Amazon's water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Richardson, Philip L.

    1988-01-01

    New information obtained with NASA's Coastal Zone Color Scanner and with drifting buoys reveals that the discharge of the Amazon is carried offshore around a retroflection of the North Brazil Current and into the North Equatorial Countercurrent towards Africa between June and January each year. From about February to May, the countercurrent and the retroflection weaken or vanish, and Amazon water flows northwestward toward the Caribbean Sea.

  12. Amazon Forest Responses to Drought and Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation and agricultural land uses provide a consistent source of ignitions along the Amazon frontier during the dry season. The risk of understory fires in Amazon forests is amplified by drought conditions, when fires at the forest edge may spread for weeks before rains begin. Fire activity also impacts the regional response of intact forests to drought through diffuse light effects and nutrient redistribution, highlighting the complexity of feedbacks in this coupled human and natural system. This talk will focus on recent advances in our understanding of fire-climate feedbacks in the Amazon, building on research themes initiated under NASA's Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). NASA's LBA program began in the wake of the 1997-1998 El Niño, a strong event that exposed the vulnerability of Amazon forests to drought and fire under current climate and projections of climate change. With forecasts of another strong El Niño event in 2015-2016, this talk will provide a multi-scale synthesis of Amazon forest responses to drought and fire based on field measurements, airborne lidar data, and satellite observations of fires, rainfall, and terrestrial water storage. These studies offer new insights into the mechanisms governing fire season severity in the southern Amazon and regional variability in carbon losses from understory fires. The contributions from remote sensing to our understanding of drought and fire in Amazon forests reflect the legacy of NASA's LBA program and the sustained commitment to interdisciplinary research across the Amazon region.

  13. Dependence of hydropower energy generation on forests in the Amazon Basin at local and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Stickler, Claudia M; Coe, Michael T; Costa, Marcos H; Nepstad, Daniel C; McGrath, David G; Dias, Livia C P; Rodrigues, Hermann O; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S

    2013-06-01

    Tropical rainforest regions have large hydropower generation potential that figures prominently in many nations' energy growth strategies. Feasibility studies of hydropower plants typically ignore the effect of future deforestation or assume that deforestation will have a positive effect on river discharge and energy generation resulting from declines in evapotranspiration (ET) associated with forest conversion. Forest loss can also reduce river discharge, however, by inhibiting rainfall. We used land use, hydrological, and climate models to examine the local "direct" effects (through changes in ET within the watershed) and the potential regional "indirect" effects (through changes in rainfall) of deforestation on river discharge and energy generation potential for the Belo Monte energy complex, one of the world's largest hydropower plants that is currently under construction on the Xingu River in the eastern Amazon. In the absence of indirect effects of deforestation, simulated deforestation of 20% and 40% within the Xingu River basin increased discharge by 4-8% and 10-12%, with similar increases in energy generation. When indirect effects were considered, deforestation of the Amazon region inhibited rainfall within the Xingu Basin, counterbalancing declines in ET and decreasing discharge by 6-36%. Under business-as-usual projections of forest loss for 2050 (40%), simulated power generation declined to only 25% of maximum plant output and 60% of the industry's own projections. Like other energy sources, hydropower plants present large social and environmental costs. Their reliability as energy sources, however, must take into account their dependence on forests. PMID:23671098

  14. Simulation of SWOT measurements over the Amazon delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, C.; Lyard, F.; Calmant, S.; Crétaux, J.; Le Bars, Y.; Fjortoft, R.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of our study is to evaluate SWOT’s skills with the high mode of resolution (pixel: 4m x 10 to 70m) to highlight estuaries dynamic or to complete a lack of in situ data used by the hydrodynamic models . To reach this goal we have two simulators: one end-to-end developed by S. Biancamaria at Legos and another one developed by the help of industrials Altamira Information and Cap Gemini which describes the physic phenomenon. Both of them need a full description of the instantaneous water states described by a DEM and model’s output. We present first results on the Amazon’s delta due to his peculiar tided-sensitivity. To perform our simulation we have used the hydrodynamic finite element model T-UGOm, the Ore-Hybam data base and data collected during a campaign realised in 2010 over the Amazon river.

  15. Hydrological Controls on Macrophyte Productivity in the Amazon Floodplain Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. S.; Novo, E. M.; Melack, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazon River floodplain is an important source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, but the relative contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous sources to floodplain emissions is still uncertain. Macrophytes comprise an important carbon source, growing during both low and high water conditions, and averaging 5,000 g.m-2.yr-1 in dry weight. The controls exerted by the annual flooding on macrophyte productivity result from two opposing mechanisms: the "horizontal expansion" of plant stands during low water levels and the stem elongation ("vertical growth") promoted by rising water levels. As studies suggest more frequent and intense droughts for the Amazon, determining how these mechanisms interact to control macrophyte net primary productivity (NPP) can lead to a better understanding of the effects of extreme hydrological conditions on autochthonous carbon fixation in the Amazon floodplain. Our study combines remote sensing estimates of macrophyte cover, in situ measurements of macrophyte biomass, historical water level records, and statistical modeling and simulation to answer 1) how plant horizontal expansion and vertical growth respond to inter-annual flooding variability, 2) how these responses modulate annual NPP, and 3) how climatic changes will affect the contribution of macrophytes to the carbon budget of the Amazon floodplain. Biomass data was collected along a stretch of the Lower Amazon Floodplain, at monthly intervals in 2004, and a time series of Radarsat-1 and EOS-MODIS images was acquired for the same area for the 2003-2005 period. Daily river stage data was acquired from the Brazilian National Water Agency (ANA) for the Óbidos station, covering the 1970 - 2011 period. Macrophyte cover was estimated for each available image in the series, using a multitemporal object-based image analysis algorithm. Empirical regression models were used to model the relationship between flood levels and both plant biomass and cover area, and combined into a semi

  16. Radiation-resistant Macrococcus caseolyticus (A) isolated from radiation-processed semidried prawns.

    PubMed

    Karani, Manisha; Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Kakatkar, Aarti; Gautam, Raj Kamal; Sukhi, Shibani; Pansare-Godambe, Lipika; Bandekar, Jayant

    2015-01-01

    A radiation-resistant bacterial isolate from gamma-radiation-processed (5 kGy) semidried prawns was identified as a new strain of Macrococcus caseolyticus and was designated as M. caseolyticus (A) on the basis of morphological and biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA sequencing. DNA-DNA hybridization studies with M. caseolyticus DSM 20597(T) further confirmed the isolate as M. caseolyticus. Major fatty acids present in M. caseolyticus (A) were C14:0, C16:1ω11c, and C18:1ω9c, whereas C15:0anteiso, C16:0iso, and C18:0iso were absent. The closest match for the isolate, as per fatty acid methyl ester analysis, was M. caseolyticus DSM 20597(T). However, the similarity index was significantly low (0.112), which indicates that the isolate could be a new strain of M. caseolyticus. The decimal reduction dose (D10) for M. caseolyticus (A), M. caseolyticus JCSC5402, and Staphylococcus aureus MTCC96 was 1.18, 0.607, and 0.19 kGy, respectively. This is the first report on radiation resistance of M. caseolyticus. Macrococcus caseolyticus (A) is more resistant to gamma and UV radiation stress than are M. caseolyticus JCSC5402 and S. aureus MTCC96; however, it is sensitive to heat as well as desiccation stress. PMID:25515772

  17. Purification and characterization of chitinases from ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jiquan; Song, Fengge; Gui, Tianshu; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we purified two native chitinases from the hepatopancreas of the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda by using ion-exchange resin chromatography (IEC) and gel filtration. These two chitinases, named EcChi1 and EcChi2, were identified by chitinolytic activity assay and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Their apparent molecular weights were 44 kDa and 65 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The specific activity of EcChi1 and EcChi2 was 1305.97 U·mg-1 and 28.69 U·mg-1. The optimal temperature and pH of EcChi1 were 37 °C and pH 4.0, respectively. Co2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Cu2+ had an obvious promoting effect upon chitinase activity of EcChi1. For colloidal chitin, the Km and Vmax values of EcChi1 were 2.09 mg·mL-1 and 31.15 U·mL-1·h-1. PMID:25629456

  18. Identification and occurrence of endogenous semicarbazide in prawns and crabs from Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Si; Xu, Hanxiang; Zhang, Shuai; Yan, Zhongyong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Semicarbazide (SEM) is a side-chain metabolite of the antibiotic drug nitrofurazone (NFZ) and is employed as a conclusive marker for the use of banned NFZ. Recent studies have shown that SEM in aquatic crustaceans can be derived natively or from other sources. The presence and distribution of endogenous SEM within aquatic crustaceans is examined in this paper, which finds that the SEM content varies amongst the muscle, shell, and viscera of various prawn and crab species within the range of 0.35-26.62 ng g(-1). The effects of heating and hypochlorite treatment on SEM levels were examined. The results indicate that thermal processing introduced a more significant impact, resulting in a maximum SEM value of 15.48 ng g(-1) in a sample of shell of Portunus trituberculatus crab, while SEM levels in muscle samples were not affected by the duration of heating. Though 6% active chlorine treatment led to SEM production ranging between 39.9 and 196.4 ng g(-1) in muscle samples from various crustaceans, SEM is unlikely to originate from hypochlorite or chlorine in practice where there are limits to actual chlorine in sanitation water and facilities. 5-Nitro-2-furaldehyde (NF) was proposed as a selective marker to differentiate between endogenous SEM and NFZ-derived SEM in seafood. PMID:26673043

  19. Dietary supplementation of green synthesized manganese-oxide nanoparticles and its effect on growth performance, muscle composition and digestive enzyme activities of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Asaikkutti, Annamalai; Bhavan, Periyakali Saravana; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Karthik, Madhayan; Cheruparambath, Praseeja

    2016-05-01

    The green synthesized Mn3O4 nanoparticles (manganese-oxide nanoparticles) using Ananas comosus (L.) peel extract was characterized by various techniques. HR-SEM photograph showed that manganese-oxide nanoparticles (Mn-oxide NPs) were spherical in shape, with an average size of 40-50 nm. The Zeta potential revealed the surface charge of Mn-oxide NPs to be negative. Further, the Mn-oxide NPs were dietary supplemented for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The experimental basal diets were supplemented with Mn-oxide NPs at the rates of 0 (control), 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12, 15 and 18 mg/kg dry feed weight. The as-supplemented Mn-oxide NPs were fed in M. rosenbergii for a period of 90 days. The experimental study demonstrated that prawns fed with diet supplemented with 3-18 mg Mn-oxide NPs/kg shows enhanced (P<0.05) growth performance, including final weight and weight gain (WG). Significant differences (P<0.05) in feed conversion ratio (FCR) were observed in prawn fed with different diets. Additionally, prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets achieved significant (P<0.05) improvement in growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and muscle biochemical compositions, while, the prawns fed with 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs showed enhanced performance. Prawns fed on diet supplemented with 16 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs showed significantly (P<0.05) higher total protein level. The antioxidants enzymatic activity (SOD and CAT) metabolic enzymes status in muscle and hepatopancreas showed no significant (P>0.05) alterations in prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets. Consequently, the present work proposed that 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs could be supplemented for flexible enhanced survival, growth and production of M. rosenbergii. Therefore, the data of the present study recommend the addition of 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs diet to developed prawn growth and antioxidant defense system. PMID:27049122

  20. Regionalization of Methane Emissions in the Amazon Basin with Multi-temporal Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Hess, L. L.; Forsberg, B. R.; Hamilton, S. K.; Novo, E. M.

    2002-12-01

    Remote sensing of the Amazon basin with passive and active microwave techniques were applied to determine the temporally varying extent of inundation and associated vegetation, and used in conjunction with field measurements to calculate regional rates of methane emission from wetlands to the atmosphere. Monthly inundation areas were derived from analysis of the 37-GHz polarization difference observed by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (1979 -87) for the mainstem Amazon floodplain in Brazil, the Llanos de Moxos (Beni and Mamore rivers) in Bolivia, the Bananal Island (Araguaia River) and Roraima savannas. Data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1, L-band synthetic aperture radar were used to determine inundation and wetland vegetation for Amazon basin less than 500 m above sea level at high water (May-June 1996) and low water (October 1995). Although all the measurements of methane emission from aquatic habitats have been performed in the deeply inundated, central basin in open water, flooded forests or floating macrophytes, our basin-wide remote sensing has revealed large areas of seasonally flooded savannas. Therefore, improvements in basin-wide estimates of methane emission will require field studies in wetlands such as those in Bolivia, Roraima and the Bananal.

  1. The legacy of cultural landscapes in the Brazilian Amazon: implications for biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Heckenberger, Michael J; Russell, J Christian; Toney, Joshua R; Schmidt, Morgan J

    2007-02-28

    For centuries Amazonia has held the Western scientific and popular imagination as a primordial forest, only minimally impacted by small, simple and dispersed groups that inhabit the region. Studies in historical ecology refute this view. Rather than pristine tropical forest, some areas are better viewed as constructed or 'domesticated' landscapes, dramatically altered by indigenous groups in the past. This paper reviews recent archaeological research in several areas along the Amazon River with evidence of large pre-European (ca 400-500 calendar years before the present) occupations and large-scale transformations of forest and wetland environments. Research from the southern margins of closed tropical forest, in the headwaters of the Xingu River, are highlighted as an example of constructed nature in the Amazon. In all cases, human influences dramatically altered the distribution, frequency and configurations of biological communities and ecological settings. Findings of historical change and cultural variability, including diverse small to medium-sized complex societies, have clear implications for questions of conservation and sustainability and, specifically, what constitutes 'hotspots' of bio-historical diversity in the Amazon region. PMID:17255029

  2. Fishing Effort and Catch Composition of Urban Market and Rural Villages in Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallwass, Gustavo; Lopes, Priscila Fabiana; Juras, Anastacio Afonso; Silvano, Renato Azevedo Matias

    2011-02-01

    The management of small-scale freshwater fisheries in Amazon has been based usually on surveys of urban markets, while fisheries of rural villages have gone unnoticed. We compared the fishing characteristics (catch, effort and selectivity) between an urban market and five small villages in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon), downstream from a large reservoir. We recorded 86 and 601 fish landings in the urban market and villages, respectively, using the same methodology. The urban fishers showed higher catch per unit of effort, higher amount of ice (related to a higher fishing effort, as ice is used to store fish catches) and larger crew size per fishing trip, but village fishers had a higher estimated annual fish production. Conversely, urban and village fishers used similar fishing gear (gillnets) and the main fish species caught were the same. However, village fishers showed more diverse strategies regarding gear, habitats and fish caught. Therefore, although it underestimated the total amount of fish caught in the Lower Tocantins River region, the data from the urban market could be a reliable indicator of main fish species exploited and fishing gear used by village fishers. Monitoring and management should consider the differences and similarities between urban and rural fisheries, in Amazon and in other tropical regions.

  3. Indications of regional scale groundwater flows in the Amazon Basins: Inferences from results of geothermal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Elizabeth T.; Hamza, Valiya M.

    2012-08-01

    The present work deals with determination groundwater flows in the Amazon region, based on analysis of geothermal data acquired in shallow and deep wells. The method employed is based on the model of simultaneous heat transfer by conduction and advection in permeable media. Analysis of temperature data acquired in water wells indicates down flows of groundwaters with velocities in excess of 10-7 m/s at depths less than 300 m in the Amazonas basin. Bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data sets have been used in determining characteristics of fluid movements at larger depths in the basins of Acre, Solimões, Amazonas, Marajó and Barreirinhas. The results of model simulations point to down flow of groundwaters with velocities of the order of 10-8 to 10-9 m/s, at depths of up to 4000 m. No evidence has been found for up flow typical of discharge zones. The general conclusion compatible with such results is that large-scale groundwater recharge systems operate at both shallow and deep levels in all sedimentary basins of the Amazon region. However, the basement rock formations of the Amazon region are relatively impermeable and hence extensive down flow systems through the sedimentary strata are possible only in the presence of generalized lateral movement of groundwater in the basal parts of the sedimentary basins. The direction of this lateral flow, inferred from the basement topography and geological characteristics of the region, is from west to east, following roughly the course of surface drainage system of the Amazon River, with eventual discharge into the Atlantic Ocean. The estimated flow rate at the continental margin is 3287 m3/s, with velocities of the order of 218 m/year. It is possible that dynamic changes in the fluvial systems in the western parts of South American continent have been responsible for triggering alterations in the groundwater recharge systems and deep seated lateral flows in the Amazon region.

  4. Methane Emission from Tropical Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Rasera, M. F. F. L.; Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V. R.

    2012-04-01

    Inland water is already known as an important source of methane to atmosphere. Methane is produced in anaerobic environments usually find in lakes and floodplain bottom sediment. It is the main reason that almost all information regarding methane flux come from this environments. However, while floodplain dries during low water season reducing methanogenesis, rivers keep the capacity to emit methane throughout the year. Here we present preliminary results of CH4 flux measurements done in 6 large tropical rivers within the Amazon basin. We measured 17 areas using floating chamber during dry (low water) season, between September and November of 2011, in Amazon river mainstem, Araguaia, Xingu, Tapajós, Madeira, and Negro Rivers. Measured fluxes of all rivers ranged from 59.3 to 2974.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Geomorphologic structure of channels is one important factor that contributes to this high heterogeneity due to development of low flow velocity depositional settings allowing formation of anoxic zones in rivers. Hydraulic and sediment barriers in the confluence of river channels promote the generation of natural dams which function as a trap for the suspension load favoring the deposition of organic rich muds. This kind of environment is very different from common river channels and has a stronger potential of methane emission. Average values of our flux measurements for this two river environments show that depositional areas can have much higher fluxes than the main channel, 1089.6 and 163.1 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively. Hence, CH4 flux from these depositional zones is similar to some tropical floodplain lakes and reservoirs. Although the low flux from channel, the area covered by water is very large resulting in a significant contribution to the regional methane emission to the atmosphere. Moreover, mapping the area of these depositional river zones will give us a better idea of the magnitude of methane flux from tropical rivers.

  5. Business as Usual: Amazon.com and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ullen, Mary K.; Germain, Carol Anne

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Steve Coffman proposed that libraries form a single interlibrary loan based entity patterned after Amazon.com. This study examined the suitability of Amazon.com's Web interface and record enhancements for academic libraries. Amazon.com could not deliver circulating monographs in the University at Albany Libraries' collection quickly…

  6. Pre-Columbian urbanism, anthropogenic landscapes, and the future of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Heckenberger, Michael J; Russell, J Christian; Fausto, Carlos; Toney, Joshua R; Schmidt, Morgan J; Pereira, Edithe; Franchetto, Bruna; Kuikuro, Afukaka

    2008-08-29

    The archaeology of pre-Columbian polities in the Amazon River basin forces a reconsideration of early urbanism and long-term change in tropical forest landscapes. We describe settlement and land-use patterns of complex societies on the eve of European contact (after 1492) in the Upper Xingu region of the Brazilian Amazon. These societies were organized in articulated clusters, representing small independent polities, within a regional peer polity. These patterns constitute a "galactic" form of prehistoric urbanism, sharing features with small-scale urban polities in other areas. Understanding long-term change in coupled human-environment systems relating to these societies has implications for conservation and sustainable development, notably to control ecological degradation and maintain regional biodiversity. PMID:18755979

  7. Pre-Columbian Urbanism, Anthropogenic Landscapes, and the Future of the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckenberger, Michael J.; Russell, J. Christian; Fausto, Carlos; Toney, Joshua R.; Schmidt, Morgan J.; Pereira, Edithe; Franchetto, Bruna; Kuikuro, Afukaka

    2008-08-01

    The archaeology of pre-Columbian polities in the Amazon River basin forces a reconsideration of early urbanism and long-term change in tropical forest landscapes. We describe settlement and land-use patterns of complex societies on the eve of European contact (after 1492) in the Upper Xingu region of the Brazilian Amazon. These societies were organized in articulated clusters, representing small independent polities, within a regional peer polity. These patterns constitute a “galactic” form of prehistoric urbanism, sharing features with small-scale urban polities in other areas. Understanding long-term change in coupled human-environment systems relating to these societies has implications for conservation and sustainable development, notably to control ecological degradation and maintain regional biodiversity.

  8. Ecology and seasonal variation of parasites in wild Aequidens tetramerus, a Cichlidae from the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Dias, Marcos; Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Gonçalves, Raissa Alves; Silva, Luis Maurício Abdon

    2014-03-01

    This study is the first investigation on seasonal dynamics of parasites component community of the Aequidens tetramerus from an Amazon River tributary, in Northern Brazil. A total of 239,2407 parasites were recovered from 92 hosts examined from February to October 2011. Such parasites included Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Tripartiella tetramerii and Trichodina nobilis (Protozoa), Dolops longicauda (Argulidae), Gussevia alioides, Gussevia disparoides (Monogenoidea), Digenea metacercarie, Pseudoproleptus larvae, Anisakidae larvae (Nematoda), Proteocephalidea plerocercoid (Eucestoda) and Gorytocephalus spectabilis (Acanthocephala). Ciliates were the most dominant and abundant taxon, while cestodes were the least prevalent. The parasites showed seasonal variation in their infection dynamics associated with environmental changes during the Amazonian drainage season, except the infection with I. multifiliis. The parasites community in A. tetramerus was also characterized by higher diversity, species richness and uniformity during the drainage season when compared to Amazon flood season. With the exception of T. tetramerii, these parasite species are new records for A. tetramerus. PMID:24570063

  9. [Historical review of the distribution of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Peruvian Amazon].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Vera, Hubert; Calderón, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi has been reported since 1931 in border areas of the department of Loreto, mainly along the borders with Brazil and Colombia. In 1994, during an outbreak of malaria, An. darlingi was found in neighboring towns to Iquitos. At present, its distribution has expanded considerably in Loreto. This paper reviews literature available for all possible information on the distribution of mosquitoes, particularly anopheline in the Amazon region of the country, with special emphasis on An darlingi. Entomological collections were also conducted in the departments of Madre de Dios and Ucayali in order to know and verify the distribution of An. darlingi. At present, the distribution of the species is confined to localities in southeastern Peru with Bolivia border towns, in a town near the Abujao River in the department of Ucayali, and widely in the northeastern region of the Amazon basin of Loreto in Peru. PMID:25123872

  10. New species of Gieysztoria (Platyhelminthes, Rhabdocoela) from Peruvian Amazon floodplain with description of their stylet ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Damborenea, Cristina; Brusa, Francisco; Noreña, Carolina

    2005-12-01

    The free-living Platyhelminthes of the Amazon basin are poorly known. Presently only four turbellarian species have been mentioned from the Amazon river, a fact that confirms the lack of information on this kind of faunas in this huge basin. Three new species of Gieysztoria from Amazonian floodplain in Peru are described herein: G. chiqchi n. sp., G. kasasapa n. sp. and G. sasa n. sp. The samples were taken in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve (Peru) during September 2002. Besides the usual description of the stylet based on whole mounted specimens, we provide a complementary description using SEM, which allowed differentiation of the new species within the currently yet imperfect picture of the Amazonian turbellarian fauna. Although further research is desired, current findings are suggestive of high diversity of free-living Turbellaria in the surveyed region. PMID:16462104

  11. Modelling conservation in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo Silveira; Nepstad, Daniel Curtis; Curran, Lisa M.; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Garcia, Ricardo Alexandrino; Ramos, Claudia Azevedo; Voll, Eliane; McDonald, Alice; Lefebvre, Paul; Schlesinger, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Expansion of the cattle and soy industries in the Amazon basin has increased deforestation rates and will soon push all-weather highways into the region's core. In the face of this growing pressure, a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Amazon basin should protect its watersheds, the full range of species and ecosystem diversity, and the stability of regional climates. Here we report that protected areas in the Amazon basin-the central feature of prevailing conservation approaches-are an important but insufficient component of this strategy, based on policy-sensitive simulations of future deforestation. By 2050, current trends in agricultural expansion will eliminate a total of 40% of Amazon forests, including at least two-thirds of the forest cover of six major watersheds and 12 ecoregions, releasing 32 +/- 8Pg of carbon to the atmosphere. One-quarter of the 382 mammalian species examined will lose more than 40% of the forest within their Amazon ranges. Although an expanded and enforced network of protected areas could avoid as much as one-third of this projected forest loss, conservation on private lands is also essential. Expanding market pressures for sound land management and prevention of forest clearing on lands unsuitable for agriculture are critical ingredients of a strategy for comprehensive conservation.

  12. Modelling conservation in the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Britaldo Silveira; Nepstad, Daniel Curtis; Curran, Lisa M; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Garcia, Ricardo Alexandrino; Ramos, Claudia Azevedo; Voll, Eliane; McDonald, Alice; Lefebvre, Paul; Schlesinger, Peter

    2006-03-23

    Expansion of the cattle and soy industries in the Amazon basin has increased deforestation rates and will soon push all-weather highways into the region's core. In the face of this growing pressure, a comprehensive conservation strategy for the Amazon basin should protect its watersheds, the full range of species and ecosystem diversity, and the stability of regional climates. Here we report that protected areas in the Amazon basin--the central feature of prevailing conservation approaches--are an important but insufficient component of this strategy, based on policy-sensitive simulations of future deforestation. By 2050, current trends in agricultural expansion will eliminate a total of 40% of Amazon forests, including at least two-thirds of the forest cover of six major watersheds and 12 ecoregions, releasing 32 +/- 8 Pg of carbon to the atmosphere. One-quarter of the 382 mammalian species examined will lose more than 40% of the forest within their Amazon ranges. Although an expanded and enforced network of protected areas could avoid as much as one-third of this projected forest loss, conservation on private lands is also essential. Expanding market pressures for sound land management and prevention of forest clearing on lands unsuitable for agriculture are critical ingredients of a strategy for comprehensive conservation. PMID:16554817

  13. Relating river discharges to salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    New river discharge data are brought together with spacebased sea surface salinity measurements by Aquarius and SMOS to demonstrate the role of river discharge in salinity changes near three river mouths: the Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Amazon. The characteristics of the seasonal cycle and the year-to-year changes of the river runoff are described. Various versions of the satellite salinity data are compared. The relative roles of river discharge, surface water flux, and horizontal advection in changing surface salinity in regions near the river mouths are examined. Satellite measurements of SSS clearly track movements of the fresh water from river discharges. Besides the river discharge, E-P plays an important role in the seasonal salinity variation near the Ganges and Irrawaddy River mouths. For the Mississippi and Amazon river mouths, central and eastern ITCZ, E-P contributes very little to the salinity seasonal change. In the central and eastern ITCZ, contribution of advection to the salinity tendency is clearly identified. Both salinity and salinity tendency are dominated by semi-annual cycle in the Atlantic ITCZ between 5ºN to 9ºN, whereas annual cycle dominates at other latitudes.

  14. Surface water dynamics in Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad Wetlands from remote sensing and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Getirana, A.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2013-05-01

    The capability of satellites to understand and monitor surface water dynamics in tropical wetlands is presented by analysis various remote sensing technologies over the Amazon, Congo, and Lake Chad regions. Although different in size and location, all these basins are tropical, representing riparian tropical, swamp tropical and inland Saharan wetlands, respectively. First, yearly flooding in the Logone floodplain is investigated using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Flooding has a direct impact on agricultural, pastoral and fishery systems in the Lake Chad Basin. Since the flooding extent, depth, and duration are highly variable, flood inundation mapping facilitates efficient use of water resources and have more knowledge of the coupled human-natural system in the Logone floodplain. Flood maps are generated from 33 multi-temporal ETM+ images acquired during the period 2006 to 2008. The maximum flooding extent in the study area increases up to ~5.8K km2 in late October 2008. A strong correlation is observed between the flooding extents and water height variations in both the floodplain and the river. Second, interferometric processing of JERS-1 SAR data from the central portions of both Amazon and Congo Wetlands provides centimeter-scale measurements of water level change. The Amazon is marked by a myriad of floodplain channels, but the Congo has comparatively few. Amazon floodplain channels, lakes and pans are well interconnected, whereas the Congo wetlands are expanses with few boundaries or flow routes. The hydraulic processes that build the Amazon floodplain are not similarly apparent in the Congo. Third, we evaluate the potential of large altimetry datasets as a complementary gauging network capable of providing water discharge in ungauged regions. A rating-curve-based methodology is adopted to derive water discharge from altimetric data provided by the Envisat satellite within the Amazon basin. From a global-scale perspective, the stage

  15. Amazon Rain Forest Classification Using J-ERS-1 SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Kramer, C.; Alves, M.; Chapman, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Amazon rain forest is a region of the earth that is undergoing rapid change. Man-made disturbance, such as clear cutting for agriculture or mining, is altering the rain forest ecosystem. For many parts of the rain forest, seasonal changes from the wet to the dry season are also significant. Changes in the seasonal cycle of flooding and draining can cause significant alterations in the forest ecosystem.Because much of the Amazon basin is regularly covered by thick clouds, optical and infrared coverage from the LANDSAT and SPOT satellites is sporadic. Imaging radar offers a much better potential for regular monitoring of changes in this region. In particular, the J-ERS-1 satellite carries an L-band HH SAR system, which via an on-board tape recorder, can collect data from almost anywhere on the globe at any time of year.In this paper, we show how J-ERS-1 radar images can be used to accurately classify different forest types (i.e., forest, hill forest, flooded forest), disturbed areas such as clear cuts and urban areas, and river courses in the Amazon basin. J-ERS-1 data has also shown significant differences between the dry and wet season, indicating a strong potential for monitoring seasonal change. The algorithm used to classify J-ERS-1 data is a standard maximum-likelihood classifier, using the radar image local mean and standard deviation of texture as input. Rivers and clear cuts are detected using edge detection and region-growing algorithms. Since this classifier is intended to operate successfully on data taken over the entire Amazon, several options are available to enable the user to modify the algorithm to suit a particular image.

  16. Effects of hot-water extract of banana (Musa acuminata) fruit's peel on the antibacterial activity, and anti-hypothermal stress, immune responses and disease resistance of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbegii.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Cheng, Winton

    2014-08-01

    The hot-extracts isolated from fruit's peel of banana, Musa acuminata, was evaluated on the antibacterial activity to pathogens from aquatic animals, and immunostimulating potential, disease resistance and anti-hypothermal stress in giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii through injection administration. The banana peel extract (BPE) showed good activity against 1 Gram-positive and 3 Gram-negative pathogens, including Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacteria damsella, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus especially in prawn pathogen of L. garvieae strain, which were carried out by a disk diffusion method. Prawn received BPE via injection administration at 1-6 μg (g prawn)(-1) significantly increased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cell (HC), granular cell (GC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity and phagocytic activity against L. garvieae from 3 to 6 days, and significantly increased clearance efficiency against L. garvieae and a significantly decreased coagulation time of prawn from 1 to 6 days. Prawn injected with BPE at 6.0 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but significantly decreased respiratory bursts (RBs) of per haemocyte. Survival rates of M. rosenbergii injected with BPE at concentrations of 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) were significantly higher than those injected with saline control after challenge with L. garvieae for 4-6 days, and the respective relative survival percentages of prawn were 28.6%, 38.1%, and 47.8%, respectively at 6 days. The sublethal time of prawns that had received saline and BPE at 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days and then were transferred from 28 °C to 14 °C were 69.4, 79.8, 83.6, and 90.2 h, respectively. It was concluded that the BPE can be used as the bacteriostat, and immunostimulant and physiological regulator for prawn through injection administration to enhance immunity, physiological responses, and resistance against L. garvieae. PMID

  17. Influence of El Nino and ITCZ on Brazilian River Streamflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A.; Dracup, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    This study analyzes effects of climatic phenomena El Nino and ITCZ latitudinal movements on streamflow patterns in major Brazilian river basins: Amazon (north), Araguaia-Tocantins (central-north), Parana (central-south) and Sao Francisco (central-northeast). Multiple correlation between annual streamflows and the NINO 3.4 and North Tropical Atlantic SST indexes (NTA) were analyzed for each river basin using different annual periods in order to account for the delay in streamflow response. The data consists of unimpaired river discharge time series at key points (from the Brazilian National Water Agency (ANA)); normalized yearly averaged NINO3.4 index characterizing El Nino (from NOAA); and NTA index (from NOAA), as a surrogate of the latitudinal movement of the ITCZ, since it is correlated to the Atlantic SST gradient. As a result, each river basin showed a different response. At the Amazon river basin, almost all dry years occurred when NINO3.4 was above average (El Nino years). Moreover, in almost every year when NINO3.4 was below average (La Nina) the streamflows were above average. Thus, it seems that La Nina have strong effects in floods in Amazon river. Moreover, El Nino events seem to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition for low streamflows at Amazon river. A weaker relationship was found for Xingu river basin, since it is probably affected by cold fronts from the south. As the location of river basins changes towards the south, the effect of El Nino events gets weaker as for Araguaia-Tocantins and Sao Francisco river basins. At the Parana river basin, the relationship is reversed. Almost all extreme wet years occurred during El Nino years. The correlation between streamflows and the NTA indexes were very weak for all river basins except for the Amazon. When the NTA anomaly is negative, wet years occurs, since the ITCZ moves southwards and stays longer at that position, increasing rainfall over the Amazon and Northeast of Brazil. In contrast, almost

  18. Sources and distributions of branched and isoprenoid tetraether lipids on the Amazon shelf and fan: Implications for the use of GDGT-based proxies in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Claudia; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Hollander, David; Lorenzoni, Laura; Baker, Paul; Silva, Cleverson Guizan; Nittrouer, Charles; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-08-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) in river fan sediments have been used successfully to reconstruct mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and soil pH of the Congo River drainage basin. However, in a previous study of Amazon deep-sea fan sediments the reconstructed MAATs were ca. 10 °C colder than the actual MAAT of the Amazon basin. In this study we investigated this apparent offset, by comparing the concentrations and distributions of brGDGTs in Amazon River suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments to those in marine SPM and surface sediments. The riverine brGDGT input was evident from the elevated brGDGT concentrations in marine SPM and surface sediments close to the river mouth. The distributions of brGDGTs in marine SPM and sediments varied widely, but generally showed a higher relative abundance of methylated and cyclic brGDGTs than those in the river. Since this difference in brGDGT distribution was also found in intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived brGDGTs, which were more recently produced, the change in the marine brGDGT distribution was most likely due to marine in situ production. Consequently, the MAATs calculated based on the methylation of branched tetraethers (MBT) and the cyclisation of branched tetraethers (CBT) were lower and the CBT-derived pH values were higher than those of the Amazon basin. However, SPM and sediments from stations close to the river mouth still showed MBT/CBT values that were similar to those of the river. Therefore, we recommend caution when applying the MBT/CBT proxy, it should only be used in sediment cores that were under high river influence. The influence of riverine derived isoprenoid GDGT (isoGDGT) on the isoGDGT-based TEX86 temperature proxy was also examined in marine SPM and sediments. An input of riverine isoGDGTs from the Amazon River was apparent, but its influence on the marine TEX86 was minor since the TEX86 of SPM in the Amazon River was similar to that in the marine SPM and sediments.

  19. Radionuclide tracers of sediment-water interactions on the Amazon shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Willard S.; DeMaster, David J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; McKee, Brent A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive study of a variety of radionuclide tracers has been coupled with other geochemical investigations and with sedimentary and physical oceanographic measurements to elucidate processes and their characteristic time scales at the mouth of the Amazon River. This two-year field study on the Amazon continental shelf involved four cruises designed to provide information during different stages of the river hydrograph. Although the cruises were coordinated with river stage, other physical variables including spring-neap tidal stages, the flow of the North Brazil Current and trade-wind stress caused important effects on the shelf environment. Partitioning of uranium among dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases was investigated during AmasSeds. A detailed examination of uranium water-column behavior during low river discharge found that most (89%) of the uranium near the Amazon River mouth was associated with the particulate phase and that most (92%) of the riverine dissolved-phase uranium was in the colloidal size fraction (0.001-0.4 μm). A non-conservative uranium/salinity distribution was observed for dissolved uranium, indicating large-scale uranium removal from surface waters with salinities less than 20 ppt. Colloidal uranium was non-conservative across the entire salinity regime, exhibiting removal of colloidal uranium from waters with salinities less than 12 ppt and a significant input at higher salinities. A short-lived particle-reactive tracer, 234Th, was used to evaluate the rates of particle scavenging on the shelf. Suspended-sediment concentrations respond to each turn of the tide, thus limiting the time available for equilibrium to be established between the particles and the tracers. Experiments demonstrated that on the Amazon shelf the partitioning and distribution of trace elements are governed by particle dynamics (particle residence times < sorption times). The high suspended load, including fluid muds, retards the incorporation of

  20. Reproductive biology of the prawn Melicertus kerathurus (Decapoda: Penaeidae) in Thermaikos Gulf (N. Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Kosmas; Thessalou-Legaki, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The reproductive biology including insemination frequency, ovarian maturation, gonadosomatic index (GSI), size at first maturity, and fecundity of Melicertus kerathurus were investigated using monthly samples from Thermaikos Gulf. Insemination was recorded by the presence of a spermatophore in the thelycum, and ovarian development was based on macroscopic ovarian staging (ST1-ST5). Inseminated females were found throughout the year with high percentages recorded from April to July. Although all ovarian stages were represented in mated females, insemination increased with size and ovarian maturation. High percentages of vitellogenic or mature ovarian stages were observed from May to July, while immature and developing ovaries were predominant mainly in winter. Spawned ovaries occurred from May to October. Carapace length at first maturity based on the presence of a spermatophore (CL50sp) was estimated at 39.20 mm, while that based on the presence of vitellogenic and mature ovaries (CL50ov) at 40.70 mm. The seasonal peak in the proportion of mature females (ST4) varied with size. Inseminated females at ST4 and GSI peaked in June-July. GSI varied in relation to insemination status and ovarian stage. In large females (>50 mm CL), the decline in mature ovaries and GSI increment with size indicates a relative reduction in the reproductive output. The number of oocytes ranged from 62,742 to 602,947 (mean ± SD: 268,000 ± 113,000). As the prawns are targeted during the spawning season, mainly by the artisanal fishery, and female size at first maturity is selected by artisanal net size, managerial measures toward artisanal fishery should be implemented.

  1. Genetic Inheritance of Female and Male Morphotypes in Giant Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn (GFP) Macrobrachium rosenbergii is unique with males categorized in five different morphotypes (small claw, orange claw, blue claw, old blue claw and no claw males) and females in three reproductive statuses (mature ovary, berried and spawned females). In the present study we examined genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes, their body weights and genetic associations between morphotypes and body traits. Restricted maximum likelihood fitting a multi-trait animal model was performed on a total of 21,459 body records collected over five generations in a GFP population selected for high growth rate. The estimates of variance components showed that there were substantial differences in additive genetic variance in body weight between male morphotypes. The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs. By contrast, body weights of female types are essentially the same characters as indicated by the high genetic correlations between homologous trait expressions. In addition to body weight, male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses were treated as traits in themselves and were analysed as binary observations using animal and sire linear mixed models, and logit and probit threshold models. The estimates of heritability back-transformed from the liability scale were in good agreement with those obtained from linear mixed models, ranging from 0.02 to 0.43 for male morphotypes and 0.06 to 0.10 for female types. The genetic correlations among male morphoptypes were generally favourable. Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (−0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76). Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving

  2. Vibrio zhuhaiensis sp. nov., isolated from a Japanese prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunying; Luo, Peng; Zuo, Huali; Chen, Jianming; Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Wei

    2013-05-01

    A Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain E20121, was isolated from the digestive tract of a Japanese prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus) collected from the coastal sea water area of Zhuhai, Guangdong province, China. The new isolate was determined to be closely related to Vibrio ponticus DSM 16217(T), having 97.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis based on recA, pyrH and rpoA also showed low levels of sequence similarities (72.6-96.6 %) with all species of the genus Vibrio. A multigene phylogenetic tree using concatenated sequences of the four genes (16S rRNA, rpoA, recA and pyrH) clearly showed that the new isolate is different from the currently known Vibrio species. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed similarity values below 70 % with the closest related species V. ponticus DSM 16217(T). Several phenotypic traits enabled the differentiation of strain E20121 from the closest phylogenetic neighbours. The DNA G+C content of strain E20121 was determined to be 47.6 mol % and the major fatty acid components identified were C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c (39.8 %), C18:1ω7c (13.6 %) and C16:0 (9.6 %). Based on genotypic, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, strain E20121 is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Vibrio for which the name Vibrio zhuhaiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is E20121(T)(=DSM 25602(T) = CCTCC AB 2011174(T)). PMID:23338602

  3. Crustin, a WAP domain containing antimicrobial peptide from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: immune characterization.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Gnanam, Annie J; Muthukrishnan, Dhanaraj; Gudimella, Ranganath; Milton, James; Singh, Arun; Muthupandian, Saravanan; Kasi, Marimuthu; Bhassu, Subha

    2013-01-01

    Crustin (MrCrs) was sequenced from a freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The MrCrs protein contains a signal peptide region at N-terminus between 1 and 22 and a long whey acidic protein domain (WAP domain) at C-terminus between 57 and 110 along with a WAP-type 'four-disulfide core' motif. Phylogenetic results show that MrCrs is clustered together with other crustacean crustin groups. MrCrs showed high sequence similarity (77%) with crustin from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and Japanese spiny lobster Panulirus japonicas. I-TASSER uses the best structure templates to predict the possible structures of MrCrs along with PDB IDs such as 2RELA and 1FLEI. The gene expressions of MrCrs in both healthy M. rosenbergii and those infected with virus including infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila (Gram-negative) and Enterococcus faecium (Gram-positive) were examined using quantitative real time PCR. To understand its biological activity, the recombinant MrCrs gene was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MrCrs protein agglutinated with the bacteria considered for analysis at a concentration of 25 μg/ml, except Lactococcus lactis. The bactericidal results showed that the recombinant MrCrs protein destroyed all the bacteria after incubation, even less than 6 h. These results suggest that MrCrs is a potential antimicrobial peptide, which is involved in the defense system of M. rosenbergii against viral and bacterial infections. PMID:23069787

  4. Changes in the levels, expression, and possible roles of serotonin and dopamine during embryonic development in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Tinikul, Ruchanok; Sobhon, Prasert

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the changes in the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), and their possible roles during embryonic development of the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The 5-HT and DA concentrations were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The levels of 5-HT and DA gradually increased from early developing embryos to late developing embryos. The 5-HT concentrations gradually increased from the pale yellow egg to orange egg stages, and reaching a maximum at the black egg stage. DA concentrations were much lower in the early embryos than those of 5-HT (P<0.05), and gradually increased to reach the highest level at the black egg stage. Immunohistochemically, 5-HT was firstly detected in the early embryonic stages, whereas DA developed later than 5-HT. Functionally, 5-HT-treated female prawns at doses of 2.5×10(-5), 2.5×10(-6) and 2.5×10(-7)mol/prawn, produced embryos with significantly shortened lengths of early embryonic stages, whereas DA-treated prawns at all three doses, exerted its effects by significantly lengthening the period of mid-embryonic stage onwards. These results suggest significant involvement of 5-HT and DA in embryonic developmental processes of this species. PMID:26393313

  5. Characterization of Key Aroma Compounds in Raw and Thermally Processed Prawns and Thermally Processed Lobsters by Application of Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Veronika; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to an aroma distillate of blanched prawn meat (Litopenaeus vannamei) (BPM) revealed 40 odorants in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range from 4 to 1024. The highest FD factors were assigned to 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. To understand the influence of different processing conditions on odorant formation, fried prawn meat was investigated by means of AEDA in the same way, revealing 31 odorants with FD factors between 4 and 2048. Also, the highest FD factors were determined for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, followed by 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. As a source of the typical marine, sea breeze-like odor attribute of the seafood, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole was identified in raw prawn meat as one of the contributors. Additionally, the aroma of blanched prawn meat was compared to that of blanched Norway and American lobster meat, respectively (Nephrops norvegicus and Homarus americanus). Identification experiments revealed the same set of odorants, however, with differing FD factors. In particular, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone was found as the key aroma compound in blanched Norway lobster, whereas American lobster contained 3-methylindole with a high FD factor. PMID:27486834

  6. The recent extreme hydrological events in the Western Amazon Basin: The role of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, J.; Ronchail, J.; Guyot, J.; Santini, W.; Lavado, W.; Ore-Hybam Observatory

    2013-05-01

    The Peruvian Amazonas River, the main western tributary of the Amazon basin, has a huge drainage (750 000 km2, 50% of which lies in the Andes) and a mean discharge estimated in 32 000 m3/s, which correspond to 15% of the Amazon discharge at the estuary. Recently, in a context of significant discharge diminution during the low-water season (1970-2012), severe hydrological events, as intense droughts and floods, have been reported in the Peruvian Amazonas River. As they have not been always observed in other regions of the Amazon basin and because they have strong impacts on vulnerable riverside residents, we shall focus on the origin and the predictability of the western Amazon extremes, providing a review of the main findings about the climate features during recent extreme hydrological events in western Amazon. While the lowest discharge value was observed in September 2010 (8 300 m3/s) at the hydrological Tamshiyacu station (near to Iquitos city), a rapid transition toward a high discharge was noticed in April 2011 (45 000 m3/s). Finally, in April 2012, during the on going high waters period, the Amazonas River is experimenting its historical highest discharge (55 000 m3/s). Our work is based on several datasets including in-situ discharge and rainfall information from ORE-HYBAM observatory. Extreme droughts (1995, 2005 and 2010) are generally associated with positive SST anomalies in the tropical North Atlantic and weak trade winds and water vapor transport toward the western Amazon, which, in association with increased subsidence over central and southern Amazon, explain the lack of rainfall and very low discharge values. But, in 1998, toward the end of the 1997-98 El Niño event, the drought has been more likely related to an anomalous divergence of water vapor in the western Amazon that is characteristic of a warm event in the Pacific. The years with a rapid transition form low waters to very high floods (e.g. September 2010 to April 2011) are characterized

  7. Water-soluble jack-knife prawn extract inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in humans.

    PubMed

    Gamoh, Shuji; Kanai, Tasuku; Tanaka-Totoribe, Naoko; Ohkura, Masamichi; Kuwabara, Masachika; Nakamura, Eisaku; Yokota, Atsuko; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Akiko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-02-01

    Coronary artery spasm plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various ischemic heart diseases or serious arrhythmia. The aim of this study is to look for functional foods which have physiologically active substances preventing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-related vasospastic diseases including peri- and postoperative ischemic complications of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) from ocean resources in Japanese coastal waters. First, we evaluated the effect of water-soluble ocean resource extracts on the response to 5-HT in HEK293 cells which have forcibly expressed cyan fluorescent protein-fused 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A-CFP). Among 5 different water-soluble extracts of ocean resources, the crude water-soluble jack-knife prawn extract (WJPE) significantly reduced maximal Ca(2+) influx induced by 0.1 μM 5-HT in a concentration-dependent manner. The Crude WJPE significantly inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, 5-HT-induced constriction of human saphenous vein. 5-HT released from activated platelets plays a crucial roles in the constriction of coronary artery. Next the WJPE was purified for applying the experiment of 5-HT-induced human platelet aggregation. The purified WJPE significantly inhibited 5-HT-induced human platelet aggregation also in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on our findings, jack-knife prawn could be one of a functional food with health-promoting benefits for most people with vasospastic diseases including patients who have gone CABG. PMID:25464143

  8. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yafei; Liu, Ping; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the most important commercial species in eastern China. However, little information of immune genes in E. carinicauda has been reported. To identify distinctive genes associated with immunity, an expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from hemocytes of E. carinicauda. A total of 3411 clones were sequenced, yielding 2853 ESTs and the average sequence length is 436 bp. The cluster and assembly analysis yielded 1053 unique sequences including 329 contigs and 724 singletons. Blast analysis identified 593 (56.3%) of the unique sequences as orthologs of genes from other organisms (E-value < 1e-5). Based on the COG and Gene Ontology (GO), 593 unique sequences were classified. Through comparison with previous studies, 153 genes assembled from 367 ESTs have been identified as possibly involved in defense or immune functions. These genes are categorized into seven categories according to their putative functions in shrimp immune system: antimicrobial peptides, prophenoloxidase activating system, antioxidant defense systems, chaperone proteins, clottable proteins, pattern recognition receptors and other immune-related genes. According to EST abundance, the major immune-related genes were thioredoxin (141, 4.94% of all ESTs) and calmodulin (14, 0.49% of all ESTs). The EST sequences of E. carinicauda hemocytes provide important information of the immune system and lay the groundwork for development of molecular markers related to disease resistance in prawn species. PMID:23092732

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) spermatozoa using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianyi; Paterson, Brian D; Webb, Robyn; Johnston, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF-SEM) was used in this study to examine the ultrastructural morphology of Penaeus monodon spermatozoa. SBF-SEM provided a large dataset of sequential electron-microscopic-level images that facilitated comprehensive ultrastructural observations and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sperm cell. Reconstruction divulged a nuclear region of the spermatophoral spermatozoon filled with decondensed chromatin but with two apparent levels of packaging density. In addition, the nuclear region contained, not only numerous filamentous chromatin elements with dense microregions, but also large centrally gathered granular masses. Analysis of the sperm cytoplasm revealed the presence of degenerated mitochondria and membrane-less dense granules. A large electron-lucent vesicle and "arch-like" structures were apparent in the subacrosomal area, and an acrosomal core was found in the acrosomal vesicle. The spermatozoal spike arose from the inner membrane of the acrosomal vesicle, which was slightly bulbous in the middle region of the acrosomal vesicle, but then extended distally into a broad dense plate and to a sharp point proximally. This study has demonstrated that SBF-SEM is a powerful technique for the 3D ultrastructural reconstruction of prawn spermatozoa, that will no doubt be informative for further studies of sperm assessment, reproductive pathology and the spermiocladistics of penaeid prawns, and other decapod crustaceans. J. Morphol. 277:565-574, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26877112

  10. Inhibition of Luminescence and Virulence in the Black Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon) Pathogen Vibrio harveyi by Intercellular Signal Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Manefield, Michael; Harris, Lachlan; Rice, Scott A.; de Nys, Rocky; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2000-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in the Penaeus monodon pathogen Vibrio harveyi is regulated by an intercellular quorum sensing mechanism involving the synthesis and detection of two signaling molecules, one of which is N-hydroxy butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone and the other of which is uncharacterized. Indirect evidence has suggested that virulence, associated with a toxic extracellular protein, and luminescence in V. harveyi are coregulated. In this study the effects of an acylated homoserine lactone antagonist produced by the marine alga Delisea pulchra on luminescence and toxin production in a virulent strain of V. harveyi were analyzed. Luminescence and toxin production were both inhibited by the signal antagonist at concentrations that had no impact on growth. Toxin production was found to be prematurely induced in V. harveyi cultures incubated in a 10% conditioned medium. Additionally, a significant reduction in the toxicity of concentrated supernatant extracts from V. harveyi cultures incubated in the presence of the signal antagonist, as measured by in vivo toxicity assays in mice and prawns, was observed. These results suggest that intercellular signaling antagonists have potential utility in the control of V. harveyi prawn infections. PMID:10788385

  11. Observations of sediment transport on the Amazon subaqueous delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Paulson, B.; Kineke, G.C.; Drake, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    A 19-day time series of fluid, flow, and suspended-sediment characteristics in the benthic boundary layer is analyzed to identify major sedimentary processes active over the prodelta region of the Amazon subaqueous delta. Measurements were made by the benthic tripod GEOPROBE placed on the seabed in 65 m depth near the base of the deltaic foreset beds from 11 February to 3 March 1990, during the time of rising water and maximum sediment discharge of the Amazon River; and the observations included: hourly measurements of velocity and suspended-sediment concentration at four levels above the seabed; waves and tides; and seabed elevation. Results of the first 14-day period of the time series record indicate that sediment resuspension occurred as a result of tidal currents (91% of the time) and surface gravity waves (46% of the time). Observations of suspended sediment indicated that particle flux in this region is 0.4-2% of the flux measured on the adjacent topset deposits and is directed to the north and landward relative to the Brazilian coast (268??T). Fortnightly variability is strong, with particle fluxes during spring tides five times greater than during neap tides. On the 15th day of the data record, a rapid sedimentation event was documented in which 44 cm of sediment was deposited at the study site over a 14-h period. Evaluation of various mechanisms of mass sediment movement suggests that this event represents downslope migration of fluid muds from the upper foreset beds that were set in motion by boundary shear stresses generated by waves and currents. This transport mechanism appears to occur episodically and may represent a major source of sediment to the lower foreset-bottomset region of the subaqueous delta.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Nostoc piscinale CENA21, Isolated from the Brazilian Amazon Floodplain

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Pedro Ivo; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Leão, Pedro Nuno; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence of Nostoc piscinale CENA21, a diazotrophic heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium isolated from the Solimões River, Amazon Basin, Brazil. It consists of one circular chromosome scaffold with 11 contigs and total size of 7,094,556 bp. Secondary metabolite annotations indicate a good source for the discovery of novel natural products. PMID:27034496

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Nostoc piscinale CENA21, Isolated from the Brazilian Amazon Floodplain.

    PubMed

    Leão, Tiago; Guimarães, Pedro Ivo; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Leão, Pedro Nuno; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence ofNostoc piscinaleCENA21, a diazotrophic heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium isolated from the Solimões River, Amazon Basin, Brazil. It consists of one circular chromosome scaffold with 11 contigs and total size of 7,094,556 bp. Secondary metabolite annotations indicate a good source for the discovery of novel natural products. PMID:27034496

  14. Structural Factors That Increase HIV/STI Vulnerability Among Indigenous People in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, E. Roberto; Alva, Isaac E.; Cárcamo, Cesar P.; García, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined structural factors—social, political, economic, and environmental—that increase vulnerability to HIV among indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon. Indigenous adults belonging to 12 different ethnic groups were purposively recruited in four Amazonian river ports and 16 indigenous villages. Qualitative data revealed a complex set of structural factors that give rise to environments of risk where health is constantly challenged. Ferryboats that cross Amazonian rivers are settings where unprotected sex—including transactional sex between passengers and boat crew and commercial sex work—often take place. Population mobility and mixing also occurs in settings like the river docks, mining sites, and other resource extraction camps, where heavy drinking and unprotected sex work are common. Multilevel, combination prevention strategies that integrate empirically based interventions with indigenous knowledge are urgently needed, not only to reduce vulnerability to HIV transmission, but also to eliminate the structural determinants of indigenous people’s health. PMID:23925407

  15. Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil's Tapajós Basin plans.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Philip M

    2015-09-01

    Brazil plans to build 43 "large" dams (>30 MW) in the Tapajós Basin, ten of which are priorities for completion by 2022. Impacts include flooding indigenous lands and conservation units. The Tapajós River and two tributaries (the Juruena and Teles Pires Rivers) are also the focus of plans for waterways to transport soybeans from Mato Grosso to ports on the Amazon River. Dams would allow barges to pass rapids and waterfalls. The waterway plans require dams in a continuous chain, including the Chacorão Dam that would flood 18,700 ha of the Munduruku Indigenous Land. Protections in Brazil's constitution and legislation and in international conventions are easily neutralized through application of "security suspensions," as has already occurred during licensing of several dams currently under construction in the Tapajós Basin. Few are aware of "security suspensions," resulting in little impetus to change these laws. PMID:25794814

  16. Polycystic Echinococcosis in Pacas, Amazon Region, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Pedro; Baquedano, Laura E.; Sanchez, Elisabeth; Aramburu, Javier; Gomez-Puerta, Luis A.; Mamani, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    In the Peruvian Amazon, paca meat is consumed by humans. To determine human risk for polycystic echinococcosis, we examined wild pacas from 2 villages; 15 (11.7%) of 128 were infected with Echinococcus vogeli tapeworms. High E. vogeli prevalence among pacas indicates potential risk for humans living in E. vogeli–contaminated areas. PMID:25695937

  17. Principal Connection / Amazon and the Whole Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent controversy over Amazon's culture has strong implications for the whole child approach, and it offers powerful lessons for principals. A significant difference between the culture of so many businesses today and the culture at good schools is that in good schools, the welfare of the employees is very important. Student success is the…

  18. Amazon Flooded Forest. Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Todd

    This teacher's resource guide was created to accompany the Amazon Flooded Forest exhibit at the Oregon Zoo. The enclosed lessons and activities are designed to extend into several aspects of daily curriculum including science, math, reading, writing, speaking, and geography. The materials are intended for use in grades 3-6 although most activities…

  19. The Amazon-influenced muddy coast of South America: A review of mud-bank-shoreline interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Gratiot, Nicolas; Proisy, Christophe; Allison, Mead A.; Dolique, Franck; Fromard, François

    2010-12-01

    The 1500 km-long coast of South America between the Amazon and the Orinoco river mouths is the world's muddiest. This is due to the huge suspended-sediment discharge of the Amazon River (10 6 × 754 tons yr - 1 ± 9%), part of which is transported alongshore as mud banks. Mud-bank formation is controlled by the physical oceanography of the continental shelf seaward of the Amazon River mouth, an initial seafloor storage area for much of the suspended sediment discharged from the river. In this area, rapid and sustained fluid-mud concentration and trapping are associated with fresh water-salt water interaction and estuarine front activity on the shelf due to the enormous Amazon water discharge (ca. 173,000 m 3 s - 1 at Obidos, 900 km upstream of the mouth). Fluid mud is transported shoreward and then along the coasts of the Guianas by a complex interaction of wave and tidal forcing, and wind-generated coastal currents. The mud banks, which may number up to 15 or more at any time, are up to 5 m-thick, 10 to 60 km-long, and 20 to 30 km-wide, and each may contain the equivalent mass of the annual mud supply of the Amazon. As the banks migrate alongshore, their interaction with waves results in complex and markedly fluctuating shorelines that are associated with space- and time-varying depositional 'bank' phases and erosional 'inter-bank' phases. Bank zones are protected from wave attack as a result of wave-energy dampening by mud, and undergo significant, albeit temporary, coastal accretion accompanied by rapid mangrove colonization. The dampening of waves in bank areas as they propagate onshore is accompanied by the shoreward recycling of mud, commonly in the form of individual mud bars. These bars progressively undergo desiccation and consolidation, and thus constitute a major pathway for rapid and massive colonization by mangroves. Erosion by waves propagating across relatively mud-deficient shoreface zones in inter-bank areas can lead to muddy shoreline retreat

  20. Methane emissions from Amazonian Rivers and their contribution to the global methane budget.

    PubMed

    Sawakuchi, Henrique O; Bastviken, David; Sawakuchi, André O; Krusche, Alex V; Ballester, Maria V R; Richey, Jeffrey E

    2014-09-01

    Methane (CH4 ) fluxes from world rivers are still poorly constrained, with measurements restricted mainly to temperate climates. Additional river flux measurements, including spatio-temporal studies, are important to refine extrapolations. Here we assess the spatio-temporal variability of CH4 fluxes from the Amazon and its main tributaries, the Negro, Solimões, Madeira, Tapajós, Xingu, and Pará Rivers, based on direct measurements using floating chambers. Sixteen of 34 sites were measured during low and high water seasons. Significant differences were observed within sites in the same river and among different rivers, types of rivers, and seasons. Ebullition contributed to more than 50% of total emissions for some rivers. Considering only river channels, our data indicate that large rivers in the Amazon Basin release between 0.40 and 0.58 Tg CH4  yr(-1) . Thus, our estimates of CH4 flux from all tropical rivers and rivers globally were, respectively, 19-51% to 31-84% higher than previous estimates, with large rivers of the Amazon accounting for 22-28% of global river CH4 emissions. PMID:24890429

  1. Potential impact of the colored Amazon and Orinoco plume on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newinger, C.; Toumi, R.

    2015-02-01

    The Amazon and the Orinoco river plumes modulate ocean stratification and color in the tropical North Atlantic. This changes air-sea interactions and may thus be important for tropical cyclones (TCs). Using a regional ocean model, we try to separate the potential impact of river freshwater and light absorption on ocean temperatures, stability, and TC intensity. While the freshwater plume stabilizes the water column, there is no significant change in sea surface temperatures. However, increased stability and temperature inversions may reduce surface cooling feedbacks. The cooling inhibition index (CI) is +2.2 (J/m2)1/3 larger when the river freshwater plume is present. Ocean color in the river plume on the other hand, blocks the deeper ocean from sunlight, leading to moderate surface warming (+0.1°C) and substantial subsurface cooling (-0.3°C 100 m mean temperature). As a consequence cold water is more readily available to passing storms and the CI decreases by -2.1 (J/m2)1/3. Using simple, idealized relationships between expected surface cooling and TC intensity, we find that river-induced stability enhances strong TCs by up to -5 to -12 hPa, while ocean color may reduce intensity by +8 hPa to +16 hPa. The net impact of the colored plume is negligible for weak storms and a slight intensity reduction for stronger cyclones. Within the Amazon and Orinoco plume, the river freshwater effect may thus be substantially reduced or even offset by light absorbing particles.

  2. Dissolved organic matter and terrestrial-lotic linkages in the Central Amazon Basin of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Michael E.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Brandes, Jay A.; Pimentel, Tania P.

    1997-09-01

    We evaluate the hypothesis that decomposition and adsorption reactions operating in upland soils of headwater catchments control the concentration and composition of dissolved and fine particulate organic matter in rivers of the Amazon basin. In two contrasting first-order catchments characteristic of the central Amazon basin, we analyzed plant, litter, soil, groundwater, and stream water chemistry. Our results indicate that clear and persistent differences exist in the concentration and elemental composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in stream waters and groundwaters from the two catchments, due mainly to corresponding differences in soil texture and chemistry. Within the more oxide and clay rich Oxisols underlying terra firme forest, groundwater DOM concentrations were uniformly low (120 μMC) and C/N ratios averaged 10. Conversely, within the oxide and clay deficient Spodosols underlying campinarana forest, groundwater DOM concentrations were greatly elevated (3000 μMC), and C/N ratios averaged near 60. We found that, in the terra firme/Oxisol terrain, the majority of DOM contributions to the stream derived from the riparian zone, while in the campinarana/Spodosol terrain, upland groundwater contributions could account for the concentration and composition of DOM in the stream. The implications of our findings are that in the terra firme terrains which dominate the region, upland soil profiles are not the site of definitive processes which impart compositional signatures to organic matter carried by the largest rivers of the