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Sample records for ambient aerosols collected

  1. Speciation of arsenic in ambient aerosols collected in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Rabano, E S; Castillo, N T; Torre, K J; Solomon, P A

    1989-01-01

    First-time measurements of the potentially toxic inorganic species of arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) have been obtained in fine (less than 2.5 microns AD) and coarse (greater than 2.5 microns AD) atmospheric particles in the Los Angeles area. A recently developed method that includes procedures for sample collection, preparation, and analysis was used in this study. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected with a high-volume dichotomous virtual impactor that employed polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Results were obtained for the recovery of arsenic standards added to unexposed and collected filters. Data from this study, indicated that the recently developed speciation method can be used to determine concentrations of As(III) and As(V) in atmospheric particulate matter samples. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected in the city of Industry during January and February 1987. In most samples, As(III) and As(V) were above the detection limit (approximately 1 ng m-3 of either species) in both aerosol size fractions. A greater portion (about 75 percent) of the two species were observed in the fine particles. The As(III)/As(V) ratio for both particle sizes was close to 1 (i.e., an equal mixture of both species). Comparison of total suspended particulate arsenic measured by the speciation method to that measured by a routine California Air Resources Board-approved procedure showed good agreement (r = 0.94), indicating both methods were approximately equivalent for the collection and analysis of aerosol arsenic. PMID:2709077

  2. COMMENTS ON "SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANONITRATES IN AMBIENT AEROSOL COLLECTED IN HOUSTON, TEXAS," AEROSOL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 36:983-992 (2002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previous article in this journal reported the results of an FTIR analysis of the ambient aerosol collected during a file study in Houston, Texas during August and September of 2000. The emphasis of that article was on the organonitrates collected during the study. In the disc...

  3. FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry has been evaluated as a method for determining the concentration of selected species present in ambient aerosols collected on Teflon filters. The filters are analyzed by transmission measurements after collection of the fine fraction...

  4. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  5. Analysis of Anions in Ambient Aerosols by Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 µM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 µM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  6. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  7. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  8. GC/MS ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT AIR AEROSOLS IN THE HOUSTON, TEXAS AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air aerosols and vapor samples were collected by Radian Corp., Austin, TX. in the Houston, Texas area using three different samplers. A High Volume sampler and dichotomous sampler were used for the collection of particulate matter; vapor-phase organic samples were collect...

  9. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species.

  10. AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT AIR NEAR A COMMERCIAL LURGI COAL GASIFICATION PLANT, KOSOVO REGION, YUGOSLAVIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air samples were collected continuously from May 14-29, 1980 to determine if the emissions from a commercial Lurgi coal gasification plant could be identified downwind of the facility. Physical, inorganic, and organic analyses were carried out on the collected aerosol sam...

  11. Characteristics of 2-methyltetrols in ambient aerosol in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Linlin; Engling, Guenter; Duan, Fengkui; Cheng, Yuan; He, Kebin

    2012-11-01

    PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected from November, 2010 to October, 2011 at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Various carbohydrates were quantified by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), including the 2-methyltetrols (2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol). A clear seasonal variation in the ambient 2-methyltetrol concentrations was observed, with the highest levels occurring in the summer, followed by autumn, spring and winter. The average concentrations of the 2-methyltetrols in PM10 and PM2.5 were 17.5 ± 15.4 ng m-3 and 13.8 ± 12.2 ng m-3, respectively. The 2-methyltetrols exhibited significant positive correlations with ambient relative humidity and temperature, likely due to the higher isoprene emission strength and enhanced formation yield under higher temperature and humidity conditions. In contrast, there was no relationship between the concentration of 2-methyltetrols and sunshine duration. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.76) between 2-methyltetrols and SO42- indicated that high concentrations of SO42- can increase the formation rate of 2-methyltetrols from isoprene. Moreover, 2-methyltetrols were also observed in the winter time in Beijing, illustrating the enhancement of the 2-methyltetrol formation rate by high concentrations of pollutants in ambient aerosol.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTABLE DEVICE TO COLLECT SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative, interference-free method for collecting sulfuric acid aerosol on a filter was developed and field tested. Since previous research found that severe losses of sulfuric aicd were caused by ammonia, ambient particulate material, and other interferents, a method was n...

  13. Characterization of saccharides in size-fractionated ambient particulate matter and aerosol sources: the contribution of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) and soil to ambient particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuling; Fraser, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Size-fractionated (equivalent to ambient PM2.5 and PM10) local soil, plant, and spore samples were collected in the Sonoran Desert near Phoenix, AZ and measured for saccharide content with the goal of characterizing ambient particulate matter sources including soil and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) from plants and fungi. Different saccharide compositions were observed among soil, plant, and spore samples and between PM2.5 and PM10 fractions. The total measured nonlevoglucosan saccharide content relative to PM mass in ambient aerosols collected in a Phoenix suburb (Higley) was much higher compared to the local soil samples but much lower compared to the PBAP. The enrichment of saccharides from two saccharide-dominated PM source factors resolved by a positive matrix factorization model is also higher than the saccharide content in the size-fractionated local soil samples, but lower than that measured in the size-segregated PBAP samples. This indicates that ambient concentration of particulate saccharides at Higley was dominated by contributions from PBAPs directly injected into the atmosphere from plants and spores rather than from soil and associated biota. Our results also suggest the contribution to the fine size fraction of ambient PM from the primary biologically derived sources may be greater than previously acknowledged. PMID:21214236

  14. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements can p...

  15. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  16. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-12-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions) secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  17. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  18. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  19. ISS Ambient Air Quality: Updated Inventory of Known Aerosol Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft cabin air quality is of fundamental importance to crew health, with concerns encompassing both gaseous contaminants and particulate matter. Little opportunity exists for direct measurement of aerosol concentrations on the International Space Station (ISS), however, an aerosol source model was developed for the purpose of filtration and ventilation systems design. This model has successfully been applied, however, since the initial effort, an increase in the number of crewmembers from 3 to 6 and new processes on board the ISS necessitate an updated aerosol inventory to accurately reflect the current ambient aerosol conditions. Results from recent analyses of dust samples from ISS, combined with a literature review provide new predicted aerosol emission rates in terms of size-segregated mass and number concentration. Some new aerosol sources have been considered and added to the existing array of materials. The goal of this work is to provide updated filtration model inputs which can verify that the current ISS filtration system is adequate and filter lifetime targets are met. This inventory of aerosol sources is applicable to other spacecraft, and becomes more important as NASA considers future long term exploration missions, which will preclude the opportunity for resupply of filtration products.

  20. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  1. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  2. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  3. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    assumption then enters the estimate of the single scattering albedo at ambient relative humidity. To investigate the validity of this assumption we have carried out modeling studies of the absorption humidification factor, assuming that the aerosols contain an insoluble soot core and a coating which determines its hygroscopic growth behavior. The aerosol optical properties are then computed on the basis of the shell/core particle morphology using a Mie-code for concentric shells. From basic physical principles, it is conceivable that aerosol absorption increases when an atmospheric aerosol particle collects a non-absorbing shell, since the soot core is then exposed to an increased (focused) electric field strength. Indeed, our preliminary modeling studies show that the absorption of an atmospheric aerosol particle composed of a soot core and an aqueous sulfuric acid shell may increase by a factor of 50% due to a change in ambient relative humidity from 30 to 95%. We will show how this increased absorption is a function of the initial particle size and soot mass fraction.

  4. Detection and quantification of 2-methyltetrols in ambient aerosol in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Andrea L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Filters collected from the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) air monitoring network were analyzed for the presence of 2-methyltetrols, namely 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol, two compounds that are products of the photooxidation of isoprene and have been detected in aerosol at a variety of sites around the globe. The 2-methytetrols were detected in ambient filter samples collected at the four SEARCH sites, Birmingham, AL, Centreville, AL, Pensacola, FL, and at Jefferson Street in Atlanta, GA, in late June 2004. Average atmospheric concentrations of 11.9 and 4.8 ng m -3 were measured for 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol, respectively, at the inland sampling sites, whereas average concentrations of 4.9 and 1.6 ng m -3 were measured at the coastal sampling location (Pensacola). On average, the aerosol loading from these two compounds accounts for approximately 0.42% and 0.21% of the organic mass collected on a given sampling day at the inland and coastal sites, respectively. The present data on these compounds, which are particulate-phase fingerprints of isoprene photooxidation, add to the growing body of ambient data on secondary organic aerosol from isoprene.

  5. Anomalous telephotometer results for the ambient atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A. W.; Coombes, C. A.

    Simultaneous measurements of the ambient atmospheric aerosol scattering coefficient using a telephotometer δa( λ) and an integrating nephelometer δn( λ) have revealed a seasonal variation in the difference δn( λ) - δa( λ). This variation can be explained by the presence of terpene oil droplets in the boundary layer in the telephotometer line of sight but beyond the telephotometer target. The droplets are due to extensive fir and pine in that far region. A satisfactory modification of the original Koschmeider contrast theory to take account of this effect is outlined.

  6. 13C measurements on organic aerosol - ambient samples versus source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Meusinger, Carl; Oyama, Beatriz; Ramon, Wichert; de Wilde, Peter A.; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The stable carbon isotopes 12C and 13C can be used to get information about sources and processing of organic aerosol (OA). We developed and tested a method to measure δ13C values of OA collected on filter samples in different volatility classes. These filter samples are introduced into an oven, where organic compounds are thermally desorbed in He at different temperatures. The compounds released at each temperature step are oxidized to CO2 using a platinum catalyst at 550 °C. The CO2 is then passed on to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to measure δ13C ratios. With a similar setup the chemical composition at each temperature step can be determined using a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). System evaluation with controlled test compounds showed that organic compounds usually start evaporating from the filter when their melting point is reached. Isotopic fractionation occurs only, if one temperature step is within a few degrees of the melting point of the substance, so that the substance only partially evaporates. However, this effect should be limited in an ambient sample containing thousands of individual chemical compounds. We analysed aerosol samples collected in a tunnel in Brazil (vehicular emissions), laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and ambient filter samples from a regional site in the Netherlands and an urban site in Belgium. First results indicate that SOA is more volatile than organic aerosol from ambient or tunnel filters. The δ13C ratios of SOA and vehicular emissions do not change strongly with oven temperature, i.e. the more refractory organic compounds have similar isotopic composition as the more volatile compounds. This is in contrast to ambient organic aerosol where the more volatile compounds evaporating below 200°C are depleted with respect to the refractory compounds. Possible reasons for this difference (mixture of sources vs the role of

  7. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute

  8. Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, L.

    1996-08-15

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

  9. REDOX AND ELECTROPHILIC PROPERTIES OF VAPOR- AND PARTICLE-PHASE COMPONENTS OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    PubMed Central

    Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Shinyashiki, Masaru; Schmitz, Debra A.; DiStefano, Emma; Hinds, William; Kumagai, Yoshito; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) has been the primary focus of studies aiming to understand the relationship between the chemical properties of ambient aerosols and adverse health effects. Size and chemical composition of PM have been linked to their oxidative capacity which has been postulated to promote or exacerbate pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. But in the last few years, new studies have suggested that volatile and semivolatile components may also contribute to many adverse health effects. The objectives of this study were: i) assess for the first time the redox and electrophilic potential of vapor-phase components of ambient aerosols, and ii) evaluate the relative contributions of particle- and vapor-fractions to the hazard of a given aerosol. To achieve these objectives vapor- and particle-phase samples collected in Riverside (CA) were subjected to three chemical assays to determine their redox and electrophilic capacities. The results indicate that redox active components are mainly associated with the particle-phase, while electrophilic compounds are found primarily in the vapor-phase. Vapor-phase organic extracts were also capable of inducing the stress responding protein, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. These results demonstrate the importance of volatile components in the overall oxidative and electrophilic capacity of aerosols, and point out the need for inclusion of vapors in future health and risk assessment studies. PMID:20152964

  10. LC-MS-MS-TOF analysis of oxygenated organic compounds in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roempp, A.; Moortgat, G.

    2003-04-01

    Ambient aerosol samples were taken at different sites across Europe. The fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz filters at flow rates of 160 L/min and 500 L/min. These samples were analyzed for organic acids (C>4) by an HPLC system coupled to a hybrid mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer consists of a quadrupole mass analyzer, a quadrupole collision cell and a time-of-flight mass analyzer (TOF). Analytes were identified by standards when available or MS-MS experiments and exact mass measurements utilizing the high mass resolution of the TOF instrument. Monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, sabinene, limonene, 3-carene) were ozonolyzed in the laboratory and compared with field samples. Besides the commonly measured organic acids (pinic, pinonic and norpinic acid) sabinic, caric and caronic acid were identified for the first time in ambient aerosol. In addition, nearly all samples showed significant concentrations of newly identified keto dicarboxylic acids (C9 - C12). Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the formation mechanisms of these compounds. By comparing laboratory measurements of wood combustion and field samples from the Eastern Mediterranean region, nitrocatechol was identified as a possible tracer for biomass burning. The data obtained is used to determine the role of biogenic sources in secondary organic aerosol formation.

  11. Characterisation of regional ambient biomass burning organic aerosol mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Capes, G.; Allan, J. D.; Crosier, J.; Williams, P.; Allen, G.; Bower, K.; Jimenez, J. L.; Russell, L. M.; Grutter, M.; Baumgardner, D.

    2012-12-01

    No evidence for a regional additional source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been identified in measurements of biomass burning-influenced ambient air masses. Measurements included in this study were obtained from the deployment of an Aerodyne Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during four field campaigns, involving both research aircraft flights and ground-based measurements. OA concentrations normalised to excess CO (OA/dCO) show strong regional and local scale variability, with a difference of almost a factor of five across fresh OA emissions between campaigns. Average OA/dCO is typically higher in the near-field than at a greater distance from source, indicating an absence of significant SOA formation, despite evidence to suggest OA becomes increasingly oxidized with age. This trend is in contrast with observations of anthropogenic OA in urban environments, where OA/dCO is consistently shown to increase with distance from source. There is no such agreement in the case of biomass burning OA (BBOA) amongst the literature base, with conflicting examples relating to the influence of SOA on aerosol loadings. A wide range of average initial emission ratios (ERs) close to source are observed both within the datasets analysed here and within the literature, together with considerable variability in individual OA/dCO values throughout fresh biomass burning plumes. The extent of this variability far outweighs any increase in OA/dCO in the few instances it is observed here, suggesting that source conditions are of greater importance for the propagation of BBOA loadings within the ambient atmosphere. However, the implications of ageing on OA/dCO variability appear to be highly uncertain, with little consistency between observed trends for different locations. Furthermore, the exact effects of the fire conditions influencing emissions from biomass burning events remain poorly constrained. These uncertainties regarding the evolution of biomass burning emissions

  12. Introducing... The MODIS Collection 6 Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    As evidenced by more than 1000 publications to date, the MODIS aerosol products are indispensable to research as well as operational applications. The products are used independently, but also in conjunction with other remote sensing instruments and serve as the basis for intercomparisons with models of all scales. In collaboration with our data users, we have made a number of changes to the algorithm and product list, and expect to begin processing “Collection 6” (C006) beginning in early 2011. In addition to more robust means of dealing with degraded or missing reflectance observations, and new protocol for Quality Assurance (QA) characterization and reporting structure, C006 offers new scientific products. C006 will explicitly identify clouds within the aerosol scene, determine distance to nearest cloud for each non-cloudy pixel and provide statistics to help quantify cloud/aerosol interactions. In addition to the traditional retrieval at 10 km resolution focused on climate applications, C006 will provide a 3 km product aimed at characterizing regional and local air quality. The range of valid solar zenith is increased from 72° to 84°, thus increasing retrieval coverage in mid and high latitudes over both land and ocean. Over land, C006 will provide a merged “Dark-target” and “Deep-blue” aerosol product. As for the retrieval over traditional dark targets (land and ocean), the C006 product will benefit from better physical constraints. The lookup tables (central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depth) are more consistent in C006, and the over-ocean retrieval now includes dependence on wind speed. The dark-land retrieval is improved with adjusted aerosol map boundaries. Finally, the entire C006 archive will be produced utilizing collective knowledge of the MODIS instrument behavior over time. Impacts from calibration drifts and instrument response will be minimized such that C006 will be ever closer to characterizing a global aerosol climate data record.

  13. Ambient and indoor particulate aerosols generated by dairies in the Southern High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to quantify and size ambient aerosolized dust in and around the facilities of four Southern High Plains dairies of New Mexico and to determine where health of workers might be vulnerable to particulate aerosols, based on aerosol concentrations that exceed national air quality sta...

  14. 13C measurements on organic aerosol - a comparison of sources with ambient samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Meusinger, Carl; Oyama, Beatriz; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon isotopes 12C and 13C can be used to get information about sources and processing of organic aerosol (OA). We developed and tested a method to measure δ13C values of OA collected on filter samples in different volatility classes. These filter samples are introduced into an oven, where organic compounds are thermally desorbed in He at different temperatures. The compounds released at each temperature step are oxidized to CO2 using a platinum catalyst at 550 °C. The CO2 is then passed on to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to measure d13C ratios. With a similar setup the chemical composition at each temperature step can be determined using a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). System evaluation with controlled test compounds showed that organic compounds usually start evaporating from the filter when their melting point is reached. Isotopic fractionation occurs only if one temperature step is within a few degrees of the melting point of the substance, so that the substance only partially evaporates. However, this effect should be limited in an ambient sample containing thousands of individual chemical compounds. δ13C values of aerosol filter samples do not depend on the sample amount used, i.e. the system shows good linearity. The reproducibility depends somewhat on the sample amount and is usually < ± 0.3 ‰ for oven temperatures up to 200 °C and < ± 0.5 ‰ for oven temperatures greater than 200 °C. We analysed aerosol samples collected in a tunnel in Brazil (vehicular emissions), laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and ambient filter samples from a regional site in the Netherlands, an urban site in Belgium, and Sao Paulo Brazil. First results show that δ13C ratios of SOA and vehicular emissions do not change strongly with oven temperature, i.e. the more refractory organic compounds have similar isotopic composition as the more volatile compounds

  15. Miniature instruments for aerosol extinction at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol extinction is a fundamental parameter for the direct forcing of climate, visibility, and comparisons to remote sensing. Bringing air into an instrument "box" almost always changes the relative humidity and loses some dust or other large particles. I will show two techniques for miniature instruments that measure extinction at ambient conditions. One is a miniature sun photometer for vertical profiles. In the last year it has successfully gathered data on test flights with excellent performance and signal to noise. The second instrument is a miniature cavity ring down instrument open to the air. In both cases, small instruments require decisions about just what is necessary for the measurement rather than just scaling down larger designs. I will explore the rationale for some of these design choices.

  16. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2010-04-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is being investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS). The determinations of the three functional groups' contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups) and precursor ion (nitro groups) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photo-oxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounted for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photo-oxidation) of the organic carbon. The diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively differentiate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to distinguish the sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assesses a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional group mass spectra of all

  17. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  18. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-04-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction (WSOC), and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  19. The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huabin; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Yuanhang; Hu, Min; Wu, Yusheng

    2016-04-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed by Peking University based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98 %) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5 %). An inter-comparison between the GAC-IC system and the filter-pack method was performed and the results indicated that the GAC-IC system could supply reliable particulate sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and ammonium data in field measurement with a much wider range of ambient concentrations. From 2008 to 2015, dozens of big field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) were executed in different parts of China, the GAC-IC system took the chance having its field measurement performance checked repeatedly and provided high quality data in ambient conditions either under high loadings of pollutants or background area. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer, the HONO analyzer, a filter sampler, Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), etc. over a wide range of concentrations and proved particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study various environmental issues such as secondary aerosol and haze formation. During these years of applications of GAC-IC in those field campaigns, we found some problems of several instruments running under field environment and some interesting results could also be drew from the large amount of data measured in near 20 provinces of China. Detail results will be demonstrated on the poster afterwards.

  20. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreiss, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Alves, C.; Bossi, R.; Bjerke, A.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Gülcin, A.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-07-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wild fire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for biomass burning particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography (HPAEC), four used High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), and six resorted to Gas Chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 23%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e., for 33% of

  1. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the

  2. Novel measurement technologies for ambient and combustion source aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thie presentaiton examines the chemical properties of atmospheric and combustion source aerosols. It describes the aerosol chemical fractions and the specific chemical constituents in these aerosols. The presentation will cover (i) the limitatins and benefits of hyphenated chroma...

  3. Estimate of municipal refuse incinerator contribution to Philadelphia aerosol using single particle analysis—II. Ambient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Y.

    In a study to differentiate between municipal refuse incinerator particles and other particles in urban air, samples were collected on Teflon and nuclepore filters in dichotomous samplers and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The samples included ambient aerosol from two sites in the Philadelphia area, representing different meteorological conditions. The same samples were previously analyzed by bulk techniques including X-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Particles emitted from incinerators rich in Zn, Cl and K were clearly identified in ambient samples, both in the coarse (2.5-10 μm) and fine aerosol fraction (<2.5 μm). The contribution of incinerators emission was from zero up to 10% of the coarse aerosol mass. Similar particles that contained also Zn and Cl were observed, but they did not originate in refuse incineration. Minerals and biologicals were the most dominant components of the coarse aerosol fraction; sulfates dominate the fine fraction. One of the case studies provided evidence for the missing chlorine in the fine fraction. Apparently fine chlorides emitted from incinerators reacted with ambient sulfates to form mixed sulfates of Zn and K. Good agreement was obtained between the measured coarse aerosol mass concentration and the one estimated by electron microscopy.

  4. Ambient and indoor particulate aerosols generated by dairies in the southern High Plains.

    PubMed

    Purdy, C W; Clark, R N; Straus, D C

    2009-12-01

    The objectives were to quantify and size ambient aerosolized dust in and around the facilities of 4 southern High Plains dairies of New Mexico and to determine where health of workers might be vulnerable to particulate aerosols, based on aerosol concentrations that exceed national air quality standards. Ambient dust air samples were collected upwind (background) and downwind of 3 dairy location sites (loafing pen boundary, commodity, and compost field). The indoor milking parlor, a fourth site, was monitored immediately upwind and downwind. Aerosolized particulate samples were collected using high-volume sequential reference air samplers, laser aerosol monitors, and cyclone air samplers. The overall (main effects and estimable interactions) statistical general linear model statement for particulate matter (PM(10); particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of up to 10 microm) and PM(2.5) resulted in a greater mean concentration of dust in the winter (PM(10) = 97.4 +/- 4.4 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 32.6 +/- 2.6 microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (PM(10) = 71.9 +/- 5.0 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 18.1 +/- 1.2 microg/m(3)). The upwind and downwind boundary PM(10) concentrations were significantly higher in the winter (upwind = 64.3 +/- 9.5 microg/m(3); downwind = 119.8 +/- 13.0 microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (upwind = 35.2 +/- 7.5 microg/m(3); downwind = 66.8 +/- 11.8 microg/m(3)). The milking parlor PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentration data were significantly higher in the winter (PM(10) = 119.5 +/- 5.8 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 55.3 +/- 5.8microg/m(3)) compared with the summer (PM(10) = 88.6.0 +/- 5.8 microg/m(3); PM(2.5) = 21.0 +/- 2.1 microg/m(3)). Personnel should be protected from high aerosol concentrations found at the commodity barn, compost field, and milking parlor during the winter. PMID:19923606

  5. New technique for collecting ambient diesel particles for bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, M.F.; Smith, T.J.; Hammond, S.K.; Beck, B.D.; Brain, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a new application of viable aerosol sampler, the Liquid electrostatic Aerosol Precipitator (LEAP), for the collection of diesel particles for bioassays of pulmonary toxicity and mutagenicity or carinogenicity. Currently used methods (filtration, dry electrostatic precipitation) cause agglomeration of particles and increases in particle size up to twenty-fold, which may alter particle toxicity significantly. Collection of diesel particles with the LEAP preserved submicronic particle size. Differences in chemical composition of extracts of surface adsorbents as compared to particles collected on filters also were observed. This technique may be applicable for collection other types of combustion products or oil mists that agglomerate when collected by filtration.

  6. A new technique for collecting ambient diesel particles for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hallock, M F; Smith, T J; Hammond, S K; Beck, B D; Brain, J D

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a new application of a viable aerosol sampler, the Liquid Electrostatic Aerosol Precipitator (LEAP), for the collection of diesel particles for bioassays of pulmonary toxicity and mutagenicity or carcinogenicity. Currently used methods (filtration, dry electrostatic precipitation) cause agglomeration of particles and increases in particle size up to twenty-fold, which may alter particle toxicity significantly. Collection of diesel particles with the LEAP preserved submicronic particle size. Differences in chemical composition of extracts of surface adsorbents as compared to particles collected on filters also were observed. This technique may be applicable for collection of other types of combustion products or oil mists that agglomerate when collected by filtration. PMID:2438921

  7. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  8. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  9. Inhalation Exposure and Lung Dose Analysis of Multi-mode Complex Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Ambient aerosols are complex mixture of particles with different size, shape and chemical composition. Although they are known to cause health hazard, it is not fully understood about causal mechanisms and specific attributes of particles causing the effects. Internal ...

  10. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2010-08-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS). The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-Ŕ respectively) and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO2) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation) of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional group mass

  11. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-08-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM>sub>10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and the dimeric sugar trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  12. Development and first application of an Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) for quasi online compound specific aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, Thorsten; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Trimborn, Dagmar; Jayne, John; Wahner, Andreas; Worsnop, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate and human health on regional and global scales (IPCC, 2007). In many environments organics are a major fraction of the aerosol influencing its properties. Due to the huge variety of organic compounds present in atmospheric aerosol current measurement techniques are far from providing a full speciation of organic aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009). The development of new techniques for compound specific measurements with high time resolution is a timely issue in organic aerosol research. Here we present first laboratory characterisations of an aerosol collection module (ACM) which was developed to allow for the sampling and transfer of atmospheric PM1 aerosol. The system consists of an aerodynamic lens system focussing particles on a beam. This beam is directed to a 3.4 mm in diameter surface which is cooled to -30 °C with liquid nitrogen. After collection the aerosol sample can be evaporated from the surface by heating it to up to 270 °C. The sample is transferred through a 60cm long line with a carrier gas. In order to test the ACM for linearity and sensitivity we combined it with a GC-MS system. The tests were performed with octadecane aerosol. The octadecane mass as measured with the ACM-GC-MS was compared versus the mass as calculated from SMPS derived total volume. The data correlate well (R2 0.99, slope of linear fit 1.1) indicating 100 % collection efficiency. From 150 °C to 270 °C no effect of desorption temperature on transfer efficiency could be observed. The ACM-GC-MS system was proven to be linear over the mass range 2-100 ng and has a detection limit of ~ 2 ng. First experiments applying the ACM-GC-MS system were conducted at the Jülich Aerosol Chamber. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was formed from ozonolysis of 600 ppbv of b-pinene. The major oxidation product nopinone was detected in the aerosol and could be shown to decrease from 2 % of the total aerosol to 0.5 % of the aerosol over the 48 hours of

  13. Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

    1986-04-01

    The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

  14. Efficiency of aerosol collection on wires exposed in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, H. Y.; Farlow, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of inertial impaction is briefly presented. Stratospheric aerosol research experiments were performed duplicating Wong et al. experiments. The use of the curve of inertial parameters vs particle collection efficiency, derived from Wong et al., was found to be justified. The results show that stratospheric aerosol particles of all sizes are collectible by wire impaction technique. Curves and tables are presented and used to correct particle counts for collection efficiencies less than 100%.

  15. Ambient aerosol and its carbon content in Gainesville, a mid-scale city in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chuaybamroong, Paradee; Cayse, Kimberleigh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lundgren, Dale A

    2007-05-01

    Ambient aerosols were collected during 2000-2001 in Gainesville, Florida, using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to study mass size distribution and carbon composition. A bimodal mass distribution was found in every sample with major peaks for aerosols ranging from 0.32 to 0.56 microm, and 3.2 to 5.6 microm in diameter. The two distributions represent the fine mode (<2.5 microm) and the coarse mode (>2.5 microm) of particle size. Averaged over all sites and seasons, coarse particles consisted of 15% carbon while fine particles consisted of 22% carbon. Considerable variation was noted between winter and summer seasons. Smoke from fireplaces in winter appeared to be an important factor for the carbon, especially the elemental carbon contribution. In summer, organic carbon was more abundant. The maximum secondary organic carbon was also found in this season (7.0 microg m(-3)), and the concentration is between those observed in urban areas (15-20 microg m(-3)) and in rural areas (4-5 microg m(-3)). However, unlike in large cities where photochemical activity of anthropogenic emissions are determinants of carbon composition, biogenic sources were likely the key factor in Gainesville. Other critical factors that affect the distribution, shape and concentration were precipitation, brushfire and wind. PMID:17160439

  16. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near Delhi (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha; Kumar, Bablu; Gupta, Gyan Prakash; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2013-05-01

    Combustion of fuels such as wood, crop residue and dung cakes etc. is one of the major sources of air pollution in developing countries. These fuels are still used commonly for cooking purpose in rural India. This study investigates the chemical composition of the ambient aerosols during cooking hours at a village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Aerosol sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (˜6m). The samples were collected on 8 hourly basis using Teflon filters. The water extract of these filters was analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). Results highlighted that cooking process contributed significant amount of SO42- and K+ṡ. Biomass burning is considered as a potential source of K+ in air. The high concentration of SO42- might be due to oxidation of SO2 contributed by the combustion of dung cakes. Further, the detailed results will be discussed during the conference.

  17. Aqueous photooxidation of ambient Po Valley Italy air samples: Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Sullivan, A. P.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.; Collett, J. L.; Keutsch, F. N.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we conducted aqueous photooxidation experiments with ambient samples in order to develop insights concerning the formation of secondary organic aerosol through gas followed by aqueous chemistry (SOAaq). Water-soluble organics (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone) are formed through gas phase oxidation of alkene and aromatic emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. Their further oxidation in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols can form lower volatility products (e.g., oligomers, organic acids) that remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, thus producing SOA. The aqueous OH radical oxidation of several individual potentially important precursors has been studied in the laboratory. In this work, we used a mist-chamber apparatus to collect atmospheric mixtures of water-soluble gases from the ambient air at San Pietro Capofiume, Italy during the PEGASOS field campaign. We measured the concentration dynamics after addition of OH radicals, in order to develop new insights regarding formation of SOA through aqueous chemistry. Specifically, batch aqueous reactions were conducted with 33 ml mist-chamber samples (TOC ~ 50-100μM) and OH radicals (~10-12M) in a new low-volume aqueous reaction vessel. OH radicals were formed in-situ, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS +/-), and ESI-MS with IC pre-separation (IC/ESI-MS-). Reproducible formation of pyruvate and oxalate were observed both by IC and ESI-MS. These compounds are known to form from aldehyde oxidation in the aqueous phase. New insights regarding the aqueous chemistry of these "more atmospherically-realistic" experiments will be discussed.

  18. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  19. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2015-09-01

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  20. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  1. A novel method to measure the ambient aerosol phase function based on dual ccd-camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yuxuan; Zhao, Chunsheng; Tao, Jiangchuan; Kuang, Ye; Zhao, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol scattering phase function is a measure of the light intensity scattered from particles as a function of scattering angles. It's important for understanding the aerosol climate effects and remote sensing inversion analysis. In this study, a novel method to measure the ambient aerosol phase function is developed based on a dual charge-coupled device(ccd) camera laser detective system. An integrating nephelometer is used to correct the inversion result. The instrument was validated by both field and laboratory measurements of atmospheric aerosols. A Mie theory model was used with the measurements of particle number size distribution and mass concentration of black carbon to simulate the aerosol phase function for comparison with the values from the instrument. The comparison shows a great consistency.

  2. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs. PMID:27200479

  3. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory (38°28'15''N, 28°24'14''W; 2225 m amsl) on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic ~3900 km east and downwind of North America. Filter-collected aerosol during summer 2012 was analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3. Organic aerosol contributed the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol was positively correlated with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from 9/24 and 9/25 aerosol samples collected during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the air masses were very aged (> 12 days). About 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra between m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. WSOC have an average O/C ratio of ~0.45, relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol which might be the result of evaporation and fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplumes and MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with WSOC biomass burning markers and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at Pico had undergone cloud processing. The air masses on 9/25 were more aged (~15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and species characteristic for marine aerosol (e.g. fatty acids). The change in air masses for

  4. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *South...

  5. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements...

  6. CONTRIBUTION OF WOODSMOKE AND MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS TO AMBIENT AEROSOL MUTAGENICITY (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity is frequently considered as a screening test for the carcinogenicity of compounds to which humans are exposed. Past estimates of the mutagenicity of ambient aerosol have depended on measurements of the mutagenic potency (refertants/microg) of the extractable organic ...

  7. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  8. Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Laura Grace

    Composed of a mixture of chemical species and phases and existing in a variety of shapes and sizes, atmospheric aerosols are complex and can have serious influence on human health, the environment, and climate. In order to better understand the impact of aerosols on local to global scales, detailed measurements on the physical and chemical properties of ambient particles are essential. In addition, knowing the origin or the source of the aerosols is important for policymakers to implement targeted regulations and effective control strategies to reduce air pollution in their region. One of the most ground breaking techniques in aerosol instrumentation is single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS), which can provide online chemical composition and size information on the individual particle level. The primary focus of this work is to further improve the ability of one specific SPMS technique, aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), for the use of identifying the specific origin of ambient aerosols, which is known as source apportionment. The ATOFMS source apportionment method utilizes a library of distinct source mass spectral signatures to match the chemical information of the single ambient particles. The unique signatures are obtained in controlled source characterization studies, such as with the exhaust emissions of heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) operating on a dynamometer. The apportionment of ambient aerosols is complicated by the chemical and physical processes an individual particle can undergo as it spends time in the atmosphere, which is referred to as "aging" of the aerosol. Therefore, the performance of the source signature library technique was investigated on the ambient dataset of the highly aged environment of Riverside, California. Additionally, two specific subsets of the Riverside dataset (ultrafine particles and particles containing trace metals), which are known to cause adverse health effects, were probed in greater detail. Finally

  9. Composition and spectral characteristics of ambient aerosol at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R. )

    1991-03-20

    Ambient aerosol particles were sampled continuously with a time resolution of {approximately}4 hours for a period of 8 days at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, in August 1986. The samples were analyzed on-site for their chemical composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra of the samples also provided data on aerosol light absorbance characteristics at 9.1 and 10.6 {mu}m - wavelengths of interest in determining aerosol backscatter coefficients for CO{sub 2} lidars. The chemical species in the ambient aerosol varied considerably during this 8-day period. The aerosol was acidic ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) rather than neutral ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) for a major fraction of the sampling time. The samples generally showed much higher absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m than at 10.6 {mu}m. Changes in the chemical composition between (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and the more acidic forms were accompanied by substantial changes in the sample's absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m but lesser changes in the absorbance at 10.6 {mu}m. These variations could have a profound effect on backscatter coefficients of atmospheric aerosol particles at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  10. 76 FR 60020 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... institutions, industrial groups) use the ambient air quality data for many purposes. Some of the more prominent... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Trinca, Air Quality Assessment Division, Environmental Protection... pollution control agencies, and tribal entities which collect and report ambient air quality data for...

  11. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  12. Ambient aerosols remain highly acidic despite dramatic sulfate reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead

    2016-04-01

    The pH of fine particles has many vital environmental impacts. By affecting aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity, particle pH is linked to regional air quality and climate, and adverse effects on human health. Sulfate is often the main acid component that drives pH of fine particles (i.e., PM2.5) and is neutralized to varying degrees by gas phase ammonia. Sulfate levels have decreased by approximately 70% over the Southeastern United States in the last fifteen years, but measured ammonia levels have been fairly steady implying the aerosol may becoming more neutral. Using a chemically comprehensive data set, combined with a thermodynamic analysis, we show that PM2.5 in the Southeastern U.S. is highly acidic (pH between 0 and 2), and that pH has remained relatively unchanged throughout the past decade and a half of decreasing sulfate. Even with further sulfate reductions, pH buffering by gas-particle partitioning of ammonia is expected to continue until sulfate drops to near background levels, indicating that fine particle pH will remain near current levels into the future. These results are non-intuitive and reshape expectations of how sulfur emission reductions impact air quality in the Southeastern U.S. and possibly other regions across the globe.

  13. Source apportionment methods applied to the determination of the origin of ambient aerosols that affect visibility in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Dzubay, Thomas G.; Lewis, Charles W.; Shaw, Robert W.

    An aerosol characterization, visibility, and receptor modeling study was conducted in the Shenandoah Valley, VA between 14 July and 15 August 1980. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the origin of the ambient particles, (2) determine the major chemical species contributing to the light extinction coefficient, (3) evaluate analytical methods to characterize aerosols and (4) provide data for comparison with chemical composition of aerosols collected in the Great Smoky Mountains and in the Abastumani Mountains of Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic. The average sulfate concentrations measured in fine particles (<2.5μm) at these three locations were: 12.0μgm -3 at Great Smoky Mountains; 13.6 μg m -3 at Shenandoah Valley, and 4.6 μg m -3 at Abastumani Mountains; the fractions of sulfate in the fine particle mass concentrations at each site were 0.50,0.50 and 0.38, respectively. For the two studies in the United States, the fine particle sulfate during sulfate maxima was mostly in the form of ammonium acid sulfate. Factor analysis of the fine aerosol composition measured in the Shenandoah Valley yielded a persistent factor containing large loadings on mass, SO 2-4, S, NH +4, H +, Se and total nitrate (sum of particulate nitrate and nitric acid), which is characteristic of coal-fired sources. This factor analysis grouping along with additional emissions information suggests that coal-fired power plants are the principal source of sulfate and nitrate.

  14. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  15. Technical Note: The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.-B.; Zeng, L.-M.; Hu, M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Slanina, J.; Zheng, M.; Wang, Z.-F.; Jansen, R.

    2012-03-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98%) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5%). When applied in two major field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) in China, the GAC-IC system provided high-quality data in ambient conditions even under high loadings of pollutants. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer (43c, Thermo-Fisher, USA; R2 as 0.96), the HONO analyzer (LOPAP, Germany; R2 as 0.91 for nighttime samples), a filter sampler (Tianhong, China; R2 as 0.86 for SO42-), and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne, USA; R2 above 0.77 for major species) over a wide range of concentrations. Through the application of the GAC-IC system, it was identified that 70% of chloride and nitrate by the filter method could be lost during daytime sampling due to high temperature in the rural site of Kaiping. In Changdao field campaign (coastal site) the comparison with the measurements by the GAC-IC suggested that the collection efficiency of AMS might be greatly influenced by high relative humidity (RH) especially in coastal or marine environment. Through laboratory and field studies, this instrument is proved highly reliable, which is particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study various environmental issues such as secondary aerosol and haze formation, as well as climate change.

  16. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Pandis, S. N.

    2011-08-01

    A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA) has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08). Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8) can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m-3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m-3) and O:C (predicted O:C = 0.78) accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1) the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA) aging rate constant, (2) assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3) the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4) heterogeneous chemistry, (5) the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6) biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, a low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging, keeping in mind that this study does not consider possibly important processes

  17. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Pandis, S. N.

    2011-03-01

    A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA) has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08). Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8) can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m-3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m-3) and O:C ratio (predicted O:C = 0.78) accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1) the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA) aging rate constant, (2) assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3) the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4) heterogeneous chemistry, (5) the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6) biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C ratios well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C ratio from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging. However, many of the cases chosen for this study predict average

  18. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  19. 3. Guidelines for efficacy testing of household insecticide products - Mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document provides specific and standardized procedures and criteria for efficacy testing and evaluation of specific household insecticide products intended for indoor use against mosquitoes, namely, mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols....

  20. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  1. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  2. Seasonal variations of biogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers in ambient aerosols from Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Mozammel; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kim, Yongwon

    2016-04-01

    We investigated total suspended particles (TSP) collected from central Alaska, USA for molecular compositions of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Isoprene-, α-/β-pinene- and β-caryophyllene-SOA tracers were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentration ranges of isoprene, α-/β-pinene and β-caryophyllene oxidation products were 0.02-18.6 ng m-3 (ave. 4.14 ng m-3), 0.42-8.24 ng m-3 (2.01 ng m-3) and 0.10-9 ng m-3 (1.53 ng m-3), respectively. Isoprene-SOA tracers showed higher concentrations in summer (ave. 8.77 ng m-3), whereas α-/β-pinene- and β-caryophyllene-SOA tracers exhibited highest levels in spring (3.55 ng m-3) and winter (4.04 ng m-3), respectively. β-Caryophyllinic acid and levoglucosan showed a positive correlation, indicating that biomass burning may be a major source for β-caryophyllene. We found that mean contributions of isoprene oxidation products to organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic (WSOC) (0.56% and 1.2%, respectively) were higher than those of α-/β-pinene (0.31% and 0.55%) and β-caryophyllene (0.08% and 0.13%). Using a tracer-based method, we estimated the concentrations of secondary organic carbon (SOC) produced from isoprene, α-/β-pinene and β-caryophyllene to be 0.66-718 ngC m-3 (ave. 159 ngC m-3), 7.4-143 ngC m-3 (35 ngC m-3) and 4.5-391 ngC m-3 (66.3 ngC m-3), respectively. Based on SOA tracers, this study suggests that isoprene is a more important precursor for the production of biogenic SOA than α-/β-pinene and β-caryophyllene in subarctic Alaska.

  3. Instrument Would Detect and Collect Biological Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoy, Steve; Mayo, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A proposed compact, portable instrument would sample micron-sized airborne particles, would discriminate between biological ones (e.g., bacteria) and nonbiological ones (e.g., dust particles), and would collect the detected biological particles for further analysis. The instrument is intended to satisfy a growing need for means of rapid, inexpensive collection of bioaerosols in a variety of indoor and outdoor settings. Purposes that could be served by such collection include detecting airborne pathogens inside buildings and their ventilation systems, measuring concentrations of airborne biological contaminants around municipal waste-processing facilities, monitoring airborne effluents from suspected biowarfare facilities, and warning of the presence of airborne biowarfare agents

  4. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Organic Laden Ambient Aerosols in Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, W. C.; Day, D. E.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Carrico, C. M.; Lee, T.; Bench, G.; Carrillo, J.

    2003-12-01

    Water absorption by inorganic compounds can be modeled with some degree of certainty; however, water uptake by ambient organic aerosols remains speculative. To improve the understanding of organic hygroscopicity, an aerosol characterization study was conducted at Yosemite National Park, California, starting in July and ending in the first week of September 2002. High time resolution measurement (15-minute time increments) of PM2.5 ionic species (Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) were measured using PILS (Particle-Into-Liquid-System)/IC (Ion Chromatography). Commercially available annular denuders and a PM2.5 cyclone (URG) were used upstream of the PILS/IC to remove particles greater than 2.5 μm and acidic and basic gases. A dual wavelength aethalometer and an R&P particulate carbon monitor were used to measure carbon on a semi-continuous basis while a DRUM sampler allowed for semi-continuous estimates of concentrations of elements associated with crustal material. Standard IMPROVE type samplers were used to measure 24-hr integrated samples of these same aerosols. Two nephelometers operated in tandem, one dry and the other with a controlled humidity environment, were used to measure f(RH) = bscat(RH)/bscat,dry, where bscat(RH) is the scattering coefficient measured at some relative humidity and bscat,dry is the scattering coefficient measured at RH <10%. The aerosol composition was highly variable in time, with a strong diurnal cycle. Organic carbon mass was observed to be, on the average, 70% of the fine mass with days where its contribution was well over 95% of the mass. Measurements of carbon isotopes revealed the fraction of carbon from biogenic sources to range from approximately 73 to 95%. Water soluble potassium was highly correlated with carbon mass, suggesting the influence of wood smoke. The ionic fraction of the aerosol consisted primarily of ammonium sulfate and in most cases nitrate was in the form of sodium nitrate. Fine soil mass was

  5. Technical Note: The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.-B.; Zeng, L.-M.; Hu, M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Slanina, J.; Zheng, M.; Wang, Z.-F.; Jansen, R.

    2012-11-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98%) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5%). An inter-comparison between the GAC-IC system and the filter-pack method was performed and the results indicated that the GAC-IC system could supply reliable particulate sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and ammonium data in field measurement with a much wider range of ambient concentrations. When applied in two major field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) in China, the GAC-IC system provided high-quality data in ambient conditions even under high loadings of pollutants. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer (43c, Thermo-Fisher, USA; R2 as 0.96), the HONO analyzer (LOPAP, Germany; R2 as 0.91 for samples from 15:00 to 07:00), a filter sampler (Tianhong, China; R2 as 0.86 for SO42-), and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne, USA; R2 above 0.77 for major species) over a wide range of concentrations. Through the application of the GAC-IC system, it was identified that 70% of chloride and nitrate by the filter method could be lost during daytime sampling due to high temperature in the rural site of Kaiping. In Changdao field campaign (coastal site), though a particle dryer was applied, its drying efficiency was not well considered for the collection efficiency of AMS seemed still interfered a bit by local high relative humidity. If the inter-comparison was done with relative humidity below 50%, the correlations ranged from 0.81 to 0.94 for major species. Through laboratory and field studies, this instrument is proved particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study

  6. Aerosol Optical Properties and Black Carbon Measurements (Ambient and Thermally-Denuded) from Detling, UK During the ClearfLo IOP in Winter 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkowski, K.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Freedman, A.; Ng, N. L.; Allan, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Continuous direct online aerosol and trace gas measurements were made in Delting, UK over the course of four weeks during the winter of 2012 as a part of the ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign. Aerosols were sampled from the London plume (~33 miles WNW), fresh highway (~0.15 mi and 1.5 mi S, A249 and M20), urban (Maidstone; ~3 mi SW), power station (~8 mi N), and Continental European outflow (~50+ mi E/SE). LANL measurements include aerosol absorption and scattering at four wavelengths (375, 405, 532, 781 nm; PASS), aerosol extinction at 450 nm (CAPS), single particle black carbon (BC) number and mass concentrations (SP2), aerosol size distributions (LAS and SMPS), ambient and thermally-denuded aerosol filter samples for SEM and EDS analysis, PM10 C-13 aerosol filter samples, gas-phase CO2, H2O, and CH4 (Picarro). The SP2, PASS, and CAPS were located behind a valve-switching set-up to enable ambient and thermally-denuded (TD) samples to be collected at 10 minute intervals during the campaign, cycling between four temperature settings of 50, 120, 180, and 250C. Absorption from organics and coatings on BC are characterized by comparing the ambient data with the TD samples for the different aerosol sources that were sampled. Measurements from the SP2 are combined with absorption measurements from the three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm to determine wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MACs) and absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs). Extinction measurements from the CAPS compare well with the PASS using extinction angstrom exponents calculated from the PASS. BC increases with CO/CO2, a marker for inefficient combustion. We examine the mixing state of BC in the aged aerosol plumes by using the time lag between the scattering and incandescence signals measured by the SP2 and SEM analysis as a function of denuding temperature. The Detling/ClearfLo dataset is one of the most comprehensive in situ sets of

  7. Aerodynamic size associations of 212Pb and 214Pb in ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, C; Bondietti, E A

    1987-11-01

    The aerodynamic size distributions of short-lived Rn daughters (reported as 214Pb and 212Pb) in ambient aerosol particles were measured using low-pressure as well as conventional low-volume and high-volume impactors. The activity distribution of 214Pb and 212Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with submicron aerosols in the accumulation mode (0.08 to 2 microns). The activity median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 0.09 to 0.37 micron (mean 0.16 micron) for 214Pb and from 0.07 to 0.25 micron (mean 0.13 micron) for 212Pb. The mean values of the geometric standard deviation (sigma g) were 2.97 and 2.86, respectively. By comparison, the median diameters of cosmogenic 7Be and ambient SO4(2-) were about 0.24 micron higher. In almost 70% of the low-pressure impactor measurements, the activity distribution of 214Pb showed a small shift to larger particle sizes relative to 212Pb. This shift probably results from alpha-recoil detachment of parent 218Po, which preferentially depletes 214Pb from smaller particles. The subsequent recondensation of 214Pb causes an enrichment of larger aerosols. Early morning and afternoon measurements indicated that similar size associations of 214Pb occur, despite humidity differences and the potential for fresh particle production in the afternoon. Health physics implications of the results are also discussed. PMID:3667271

  8. Temporal variability in Chemical and Stable isotopic characteristics of ambient bulk aerosols over a coastal environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, R.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Sarma, V. V.; Praveen, P.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols are known to influence regional biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in addition to regional radiation budgets. Owing to multiplicity of primary sources of natural and anthropogenic origin, their detailed chemical and isotopic characterization can greatly help in source apportionment and identifying secondary processes. From the roof of NIO-Goa (India) [15.46οN, 73.8oE; at ~55.8 MASL], atmospheric bulk aerosols (n=22) were collected on Quartz filters, from 2009 December to January 2011 covering entire 2010 (except monsoon period) to investigate temporal variability in their chemical and isotopic characteristics of the carbonaceous fraction i.e. TC, TOC and TN mass concentrations and their stable isotopic ratios (δ13CTC, δ13CTOC and δ15NTN). Both δ13CTC and δ13CTOC varied in narrow ranges (-24.9±1.1‰, -25.7±0.9‰ respectively), but significant differences were observed between the two during pre-monsoon months (as high as 2.3‰), possibly due to mixing of inorganic mineral dust. δ15NTN values showed a wide range of variability (average = 13.6±7.2‰), with significantly lower values (~2-5‰; as reported earlier by Agnihotri et al. 2011) during pre-monsoon period compared to those during winter (as high as ~26‰). Using δ13CTC values and two end-member mixing model (assuming δ13C of marine and continental carbon as -21 and -27‰ respectively), the average marine carbon fraction for Goa aerosols was estimated as 36±18.5%, significantly higher than reported for Chennai aerosols (~19%) (Pavuluri et al., 2011), but close to the reported average for marine aerosols at Bermuda (38%) (Turekian et al., 2003). Chemical and isotopic characteristics of ambient aerosols over Goa along with contemporaneous meteorological data indicate that winter aerosols contain significant proportion of carbonaceous fraction originated from biomass burning and other anthropogenic activities carried out in northern parts of

  9. Wood Smoke Contribution to Ambient Aerosol in Fresno During Winter 2003-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, C. A.; Collett, J.; Herckes, P.

    2005-12-01

    The city of Fresno, located in the San Joaquin Valley in central California, experiences elevated levels of particulate matter (PM) during the winter season. In an effort to better quantify winter-time PM and the contribution of wood smoke to pollution events in Fresno, a field campaign was conducted between December 24th, 2003 and January 15th, 2004 collecting daily samples at five sites in the city with high volume aerosol collectors. Subsequent analyses of collected samples were performed to examine the spatial variability in wood smoke concentrations in the city of Fresno, CA and to estimate the contribution of residential wood combustion to PM2.5 concentrations. The estimation of residential wood combustion contribution to ambient PM is based on the quantification of levoglucosan, a compound emitted exclusively from biomass burning. Levoglucosan was measured for all collected samples by high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD). The use of this approach for quantification of levoglucosan has many advantages and results compare well with concentrations estimated from Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Fine particle mass and carbonaceous composition were also measured for all samples. Concentrations of particulate organic tracers for meat cooking and motor vehicle exhaust were quantified by GC/MS for a subset of samples to estimate the these major sources' contributions to PM. The daily mass concentrations of PM2.5, total carbon (TC), and levoglucosan vary with meteorological conditions such as precipitation, wind, and fog events. Daily PM2.5 concentrations measured during this study did not exceed the federal 24-hour standard and the study average of 30 mircograms/m3 is two-thirds lower than a previous Fresno winter average. Lower concentrations appear to be due in part to frequent precipitation during the study period. Inter-site variability of PM2.5, TC, and levoglucosan throughout the

  10. The ambient aerosol characterization during the prescribed bushfire season in Brisbane 2013.

    PubMed

    Milic, A; Miljevic, B; Alroe, J; Mallet, M; Canonaco, F; Prevot, A S H; Ristovski, Z D

    2016-08-01

    Prescribed burnings are conducted in Queensland each year from August until November aiming to decrease the impact of bushfire hazards and maintain the health of vegetation. This study reports chemical characteristics of the ambient aerosol, with a focus on source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) fraction, during the prescribed biomass burning (BB) season in Brisbane 2013. All measurements were conducted within the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health (ILAQH) located in Brisbane's Central Business District. Chemical composition, degree of ageing and the influence of BB emission on the air quality of central Brisbane were characterized using a compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS). AMS loadings were dominated by OA (64%), followed by, sulfate (17%), ammonium (14%) and nitrates (5%). Source apportionment was applied on the AMS OA mass spectra via the multilinear engine solver (ME-2) implementation within the recently developed Source Finder (SoFi) interface. Six factors were extracted including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA). The aerosol fraction that was attributed to BB factor was 9%, on average over the sampling period. The high proportion of oxygenated OA (72%), typically representing aged emissions, could possess a fraction of oxygenated species transfored from BB components on their way to the sampling site. PMID:27101459

  11. Hourly Measurement of the Concentration and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Oxygenated Organic Tracers in Ambient Aerosol: First Results from Berkeley, CA and Rural Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L.; Chan, A.; Worton, D. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Hourly and bi-hourly time-resolved measurements of organic tracer compounds in ambient aerosols have been successfully used to elucidate sources and formation pathways of atmospheric particulate matter. Here we extend the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG), a custom in-situ instrument that collects, desorbs, and analyzes ambient aerosol and semi-volatile compounds with hourly time resolution, to include on-line derivatization and a second, parallel collection cell that provides simultaneous collection of both particle-phase and particle-plus-gas-phase organic compounds. By introducing a silylating agent upon desorption, SVTAG can measure highly oxygenated compounds that are not easily detected using traditional gas chromatography including most of the previously reported oxygenated tracers for biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol. The use of a pair of matched collection cells with parallel sampling and serial analysis provides direct gas-particle partitioning information. One cell collects the total organic fraction of compounds with volatilities lower than a C13 hydrocarbon, while the other cell samples through an activated carbon denuder to selectively remove the gas-phase components. Taken together these provide a direct measurement of gas-particle partitioning to yield a check on classical absorption based partitioning theory while deviations from this theory provide constraints on other driving factors in aerosol formation chemistry, such as oligomerization, salt formation, and acidity. We present here the capabilities and utility of the dual cell SVTAG with derivatization, with chemical insights gained from initial tests on ambient Berkeley air and the first results from a rural site in Alabama obtained during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Tracers for varying isoprene oxidation pathways are used to explore the influence of anthropogenic emissions; concentrations of 2-methyltetrols and 2-methyl

  12. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O/sub 3/ at 143 ppb; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 47.7 micrograms/m/sup 3/; and (H+) at 550 nmole/m/sup 3/. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  13. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmüller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA), and Ångström exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV

  14. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general

  15. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  16. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  17. Characterization of primary organic aerosol emissions from meat cooking, trash burning, and motor vehicles with high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and comparison with ambient and chamber observations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Claudia; Huffman, Alex; Cubison, Michael J; Aiken, Allison C; Docherty, Kenneth S; Kimmel, Joel R; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; Hannigan, Michael; Jimenez, Jose L

    2009-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emissions from motor vehicles, meat-cooking and trash burning are analyzed here using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). High resolution data show that aerosols emitted by combustion engines and plastic burning are dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic compounds. Meat cooking and especially paper burning emissions contain significant fractions of oxygenated organic compounds; however, their unit-resolution mass spectral signatures are very similar to those from ambient hydrocarbon-like OA, and very different from the mass spectra of ambient secondary or oxygenated OA (OOA). Thus, primary OA from these sources is unlikelyto be a significant direct source of ambient OOA. There are significant differences in high-resolution tracer m/zs that may be useful for differentiating some of these sources. Unlike in most ambient spectra, all of these sources have low total m/z 44 and this signal is not dominated by the CO2+ ion. All sources have high m/z 57, which is low during high OOA ambient periods. Spectra from paper burning are similar to some types of biomass burning OA, with elevated m/z 60. Meat cooking aerosols also have slightly elevated m/z 60, whereas motor vehicle emissions have very low signal at this m/z. PMID:19452899

  18. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  19. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Patadia, F.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-11-01

    The twin Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an extensive data set of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. The C6 aerosol data set will be created from three separate retrieval algorithms that operate over different surface types. These are the two "Dark Target" (DT) algorithms for retrieving (1) over ocean (dark in visible and longer wavelengths) and (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible), plus the "Deep Blue" (DB) algorithm developed originally for retrieving (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on DT-ocean and DT-land (#1 and #2). We have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase poleward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence on the surface reflectance, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time, we quantified how "upstream" changes to instrument calibration, land/sea masking and cloud masking will also impact the statistics of global AOD, and affect Terra and Aqua differently. For Aqua, all changes will result in reduced

  20. Stratospheric sulfate from the Gareloi eruption, 1980: Contribution to the ''ambient'' aerosol by a poorly documented volcanic eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, W.A.; Mroz, E.J.; Heiken, G.

    1981-07-01

    While sampling stratospheric aerosols during July--August 1980 a plume of ''fresh'' volcanic debris was observed in the Northern hemisphere. The origin of this material seems to be a poorly documented explosive eruption of Gareloi valcano in the Aleutian Islands. The debris was sampled at an altitude of 19.2 km: almost twice the height of observed eruption clouds. Such remote, unobserved or poorly documented eruptions may be a source that helps maintain the ''ambient'' stratospheric aerosol background.

  1. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    The twin Moderate Imaging resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an incredible dataset of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there is significant impact on the products and their interpretation. The C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties (1) over ocean (dark in visible and near-IR wavelengths), (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible) and (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on the changes to both "dark target" algorithms (#1 and #2; DT-ocean and DT-land). Affecting both DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, and relaxed the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.01) over land, along with some changes in spatial coverage. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6 DT-products should compare at least as well as those from C5. However, at the same time as we

  2. Automated Measurements of Ambient Aerosol Chemical Composition and its Dry and Wet Size Distributions at Pittsburgh Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A. Y.; Stanier, C.; Chun, W.; Vayenas, D.; Mandiro, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2001-12-01

    Ambient aerosol particles change size with changes in ambient relative humidity. The magnitude of the size change depends on the hygroscopic properties of the particles, which is determined by their chemical composition. Hygroscopic properties of particles influence many environmentally important aerosol qualities, such as light scattering and partitioning between the gas and particle phases of semivolitile compounds. Studying the hygroscopic growth of ambient particles is thus of paramount importance. The highroscopic growth of ambient particles and their chemical composition are measured continuously within the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (EPA supersite program). The hygroscopic size changes are measured using an automated system built for this study. The system consists of two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.) and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI Inc.). The three instruments measure aerosol size distribution between 5 nanometers and 10 micrometers in diameter. The inlets of the instruments and the sheath air lines of the SMPS systems are equipped with computer controlled valves that direct air through Nafion dryers (PermaPure Inc.) or bypass them. The Nafion dryers are drying the air stream below 40% RH at which point ambient particles are expected to lose most or all water and thus be virtually dry. To avoid changes in relative humidity and evaporation of volatile particles due to temperature differences the system is kept at ambient temperature. The system measures alternatively dry (below 40% RH) and wet (actual ambient RH) aerosol size distributions every 6 minutes. The hygroscopic growth observed with the size-spectrometer system is compared with theoretic predictions based on the chemical composition of aerosol particles. A modified semi-continuous Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector provides the total available budget (particles and gas) of water-soluble species, which is used as an input to the thermodynamic model. The model calculates

  3. An automated baseline correction protocol for infrared spectra of atmospheric aerosols collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiakova, Adele; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of research on statistical applications for characterization of atmospheric aerosol Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters (e.g., Russell et al., 2011; Ruthenburg et al., 2014) and a rising interest in analyzing FT-IR samples collected by air quality monitoring networks call for an automated PTFE baseline correction solution. The existing polynomial technique (Takahama et al., 2013) is not scalable to a project with a large number of aerosol samples because it contains many parameters and requires expert intervention. Therefore, the question of how to develop an automated method for baseline correcting hundreds to thousands of ambient aerosol spectra given the variability in both environmental mixture composition and PTFE baselines remains. This study approaches the question by detailing the statistical protocol, which allows for the precise definition of analyte and background subregions, applies nonparametric smoothing splines to reproduce sample-specific PTFE variations, and integrates performance metrics from atmospheric aerosol and blank samples alike in the smoothing parameter selection. Referencing 794 atmospheric aerosol samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011, we start by identifying key FT-IR signal characteristics, such as non-negative absorbance or analyte segment transformation, to capture sample-specific transitions between background and analyte. While referring to qualitative properties of PTFE background, the goal of smoothing splines interpolation is to learn the baseline structure in the background region to predict the baseline structure in the analyte region. We then validate the model by comparing smoothing splines baseline-corrected spectra with uncorrected and polynomial baseline (PB)-corrected equivalents via three statistical applications: (1) clustering analysis, (2) functional group quantification

  4. Phenols and hydroxy-PAHs (arylphenols) as tracers for coal smoke particulate matter: source tests and ambient aerosol assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd R.T. Simoneit; Xinhui Bi; Daniel R. Oros; Patricia M. Medeiros; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu

    2007-11-01

    Source tests were conducted to analyze and characterize diagnostic key tracers for emissions from burning of coals with various ranks. Coal samples included lignite from Germany, semibituminous coal from Arizona, USA, bituminous coal from Wales, UK and sample from briquettes of semibituminous coal, bituminous coal and anthracite from China. Ambient aerosol particulate matter was also collected in three areas of China and a background area in Corvallis, OR (U.S.) to confirm the presence of tracers specific for coal smoke. The results showed a series of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, including PAHs and hydroxy-PAHs as the major tracers, as well as a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of compounds. The tracers that were found characteristic of coal combustion processes included hydroxy-PAHs and PAHs. Atmospheric ambient samples from Beijing and Taiyuan, cities where coal is burned in northern China, revealed that the hydroxy-PAH tracers were present during the wintertime, but not in cities where coal is not commonly used (e.g., Guangzhou, South China). Thus, the mass of hydroxy-PAHs can be apportioned to coal smoke and the source strength modeled by summing the proportional contents of EC (elemental carbon), PAHs, UCM and alkanes with the hydroxy-PAHs. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Collection 6 'dark-target' MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Patadia, Falguni; Gupta, Pawan; Remer, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms are applied to Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on both Terra and Aqua, creating two streams of decade-plus aerosol information. Products of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size are used for many applications, but the primary concern is that these global products are comprehensive and consistent enough for use in climate studies. One of our major customers is the international modeling comparison study known as AEROCOM, which relies on the MODIS data as a benchmark. In order to keep up with the needs of AEROCOM and other MODIS data users, while utilizing new science and tools, we have improved the algorithms and products. The code, and the associated products, will be known as Collection 6 (C6). While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. In its entirety, the C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties over different surfaces: These include the dark-target DT algorithms to retrieve over (1) ocean and (2) vegetated-dark-soiled land, plus the (3) Deep Blue (DB) algorithm, originally developed to retrieve over desert-arid land. Focusing on the two DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to 84) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such as topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and

  6. Characterization of the Changes in Hygroscopicity of Ambient Organic Aerosol due to Oxidation by Gas Phase OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J. P.; McWhinney, R. D.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of organic aerosols and their importance in climate forcing, the influence of chemical processes on their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere remains uncertain. Changes to the hygroscopicity of ambient organic aerosol due to OH oxidation were explored at a remote forested (Whistler, British Columbia) and an urban (Toronto, Ontario) site. Organic aerosol was exposed to controlled levels of OH radicals in a portable flow tube reactor, the Toronto Photo-Oxidation Tube (TPOT). An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitored the changes in the chemical composition due to OH-initiated oxidation. The CCN activity of size-selected particles was measured with a DMT Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNc) to determine the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Preliminary results suggest that gas phase OH oxidation increases the degree of oxygenation of organic aerosol, leading to increases in hygroscopicity. These results yield insights into the mechanism by which oxidation affects the hygroscopicity of ambient aerosol of various sources, and to constrain the main aging process that leads to the observation of increasing hygroscopicity with increasing oxidation of organic aerosol.

  7. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  8. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha

    Generally, industrial and transport sectors are considered as major contributors of air pollution but recently, biomass burning is also reported as a major source of atmospheric aerosols (1, 2) especially in the developing world where solid fuels such as dung cake, wood and crop residues are used in traditional cooking which are responsible for poor air quality, respiratory problems and radiative forcing etc .In India, most of the research has been focused on emission estimates from biomass burning and cooking. No effort has been made to understand the chemistry and sources of fine aerosols in rural areas during cooking hours. This study fills this knowledge gap and strengthens our understanding about abundance of various chemical constituents of atmospheric aerosols emitted during cooking hours.Aerosol samples were collected from village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (~6m). The aerosol samples were collected on 8 hourly basis at a flow rate of 1 LPM. Water extracts of these filters were analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). During cooking period, the concentration of the major ions followed the order of Ca2+> SO42-> NO3-> Cl-> K+> NH4+> Mg2+> Na2+> F-. Among anion SO42 (5 µg/m3) showed highest value and in case of cations Ca2+ (7.32µg/m3) has highest value.

  9. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  10. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    .1, were obtained. For all samples, the fine PM 1--2.5 fraction accounts for the largest WSOC content (from 37% to 47%), while the ultrafine particles in PM<0.1 contribute the least to the WSOC content (19% to 29%). Spectroscopic measurements (UV-VIS and fluorescence) confirmed structural similarities with aquatic fulvic and hulic acids. However, absorption and emission maxima were shifted to lower wavelengths compared to aquatic standards, indicating the presence of lower MW species and a lower degree of aromaticity. Results showed that the samples collected during September and especially in October had higher MW and higher percentage of aromatic carbon when compared with samples collected during summer months (July/August). Spectroscopy results were confirmed with ESI/MS analysis. That analysis also confirmed presence of four different classes of compounds in ambient aerosols: carboxylic acids, poly-carboxylic acids, organosulfates, and organonitrates.

  11. Spectral aerosol extinction (SpEx): a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the spectral aerosol extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including nonabsorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx measurements are expected to help identify the presence of ambient brown carbon due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to longer UV and visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by Ångström exponents). Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  12. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx): A New Instrument for In situ Ambient Aerosol Extinction Measurements Across the UV/Visible Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, Edward L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. In addition, the spectra obtained by SpEx carry more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit that is typically defined by the use of Angstrom Exponents. Future improvements aim at lowering detection limits and ruggedizing the instrument for mobile operation.

  13. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx): a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by Ångström Exponents). Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  14. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  15. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using bio-aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.; Steele, Paul T.; Coffee, Keith R.; Fergenson, David P.; Riot, Vincent J.; Woods, Bruce W.; Gard, Eric E.; Frank, Matthias; Tobias, Herbert J.; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2006-05-01

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  17. Evidence and Quantitation of Aromatic Organosulfates in Ambient Aerosols in Lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, B. A.; Kundu, S.; Yu, G.; Keutsch, F. N.; Quraishi, T.

    2012-12-01

    Organosulfates are important components of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in ambient atmospheres, yet their structures, abundances, and formation processes are not well understood. In this study, a new type of organosulfate with an aromatic carbon backbone is identified and quantified in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the heavily polluted megacity of Lahore, Pakistan. An authentic standard of benzyl sulfate was synthesized and confirmed the presence of this unique compound in aerosol samples using high-resolution time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Benzyl sulfate was quantified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with negative electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). The highest monthly-average benzyl sulfate concentrations were recorded in January and November 2007 (0.50±0.11 ng m-3), whereas the lowest concentration was observed in July (0.05±0.02 ng m-3). Seasonal trends were consistent with synoptic meteorology, with maxima occurring during the dry season and minima during the monsoonal summer. Matrix effects were evaluated by comparison of results obtained by external calibration and the method of standard addition; a minor deviation was observed (<10%) and matrix effects were determined to be insignificant in benzyl sulfate quantitation. Although benzyl sulfate contributions to organic carbon were relatively small (<0.001%), it may be an important tracer for organosulfates derived from anthropogenic volatile organic compounds.

  18. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  19. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmüller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    We present the first laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (i.e. 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA';s acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Exact T-matrix method calculations were used to model the absorption and scattering characteristics of fractal-like agglomerates of different compactness and varying number of monomers. With these calculations, we attempted to estimate the number of monomers and fractal dimension of laboratory generated kerosene soot. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009, and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood

  20. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; et al

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m–3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m–3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (>10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small

  1. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-03-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen-Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic

  2. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; et al

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of

  3. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the

  4. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; Kroll, J. H.; Peng, Z.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than

  5. HOUSTON URBAN PLUME STUDY, 1974. MICROSCOPICAL IDENTIFICATION OF COLLECTED AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An urban plume study was conducted in Houston during July 1974 to gain preliminary data on the concentration and composition of primary and secondary aerosols contributing to Houston's air pollution problem. Selected membrane filter samples containing urban aerosols were analyzed...

  6. COLLECTION, CHEMICAL FRACTIONATION, AND MUTAGENICITY BIOASSAY OF AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of industrialization and consequent increased concentration of urban particulate matter on the incidence of cancer has long been a concern. The first bioassays used to evaluate complex ambient air samples were whole-animal carcinogenesis bioassays. In these studies,...

  7. CCN estimates from bulk hygroscopic growth factors of ambient aerosols during the pre-monsoon season over Central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Prabhakar; Barros, Ana P.; Khlystov, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol size distribution (ambient and dried) and chemical composition were measured simultaneously using two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPSs) and filters during the pre-monsoon season (April-June 2009) at two locations in Central Nepal: Dhulikhel, an urban site in the Kathmandu valley, and Besisahar, a rural village in the Marsyangdi valley. Diameter growth factors (DGF) were estimated using the larger mode (around 100 nm) of the aerosol size distributions. The measured DGF suggest that the aerosols were in metastable state below 80% RH owing to the strong diurnal cycle of relative humidity (RH) at Dhulikhel, while no discernible growth was observed for Besisahar. Assuming ideal behavior of water-soluble organic compounds and using their fraction as determined by water extraction of filters produced the best agreement for a two-component hygroscopic growth model with the observed DGFs. This finding together with the DGF and chemical composition data were used to determine the aerosol bulk hygroscopicity parameter, κ. The κ parameter suggests that aerosols in this region are less hygroscopic than aerosols reported in previous studies from other regions. The estimated κ and the vertically scaled aerosol size distribution were then used to estimate the CCN spectra. These are the first estimates of CCN spectra from ground-based observations for the Central Himalaya region.

  8. Evidence and quantitation of aromatic organosulfates in ambient aerosols in Lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Quraishi, T. A.; Yu, G.; Suarez, C.; Keutsch, F. N.; Stone, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Organosulfates are important components of atmospheric organic aerosols, yet their structures, abundances, sources and formation processes are not adequately understood. This study presents the identification and quantitation of benzyl sulfate in atmospheric aerosols, which is the first confirmed atmospheric organosulfate with aromatic carbon backbone. Benzyl sulfate was identified and quantified in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected in Lahore, Pakistan, during 2007-2008. An authentic standard of benzyl sulfate was synthesized, standardized, and identified in atmospheric aerosols with quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS). Benzyl sulfate was quantified in aerosol samples using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to negative electrospray ionization triple quadrupole (TQ) MS. The highest benzyl sulfate concentrations were recorded in November and January 2007 (0.50 ± 0.11 ng m-3) whereas the lowest concentration was observed in July (0.05 ± 0.02 ng m-3). To evaluate matrix effects, benzyl sulfate concentrations were determined using external calibration and the method of standard addition; comparable concentrations were detected by the two methods, which ruled out significant matrix effects in benzyl sulfate quantitation. Three additional organosulfates with m/z 187, 201 and 215 were qualitatively identified as aromatic organosulfates with additional methyl substituents by high-resolution mass measurements and tandem MS. The observed aromatic organosulfates form a homologous series analogous to toluene, xylene, and trimethylbenzene, which are abundant anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), suggesting that aromatic organosulfates may be formed by secondary reactions. However, stronger statistical correlations of benzyl sulfate with combustion tracers (EC and levoglucosan) than with secondary tracers (SO42- and α-pinene-derived nitrooxy organosulfates) suggest that aromatic organosulfates may be emitted from the

  9. Evidence and quantitation of aromatic organosulfates in ambient aerosols in Lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Quraishi, T. A.; Yu, G.; Suarez, C.; Keutsch, F. N.; Stone, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Organosulfates are important components of atmospheric organic aerosols, yet their structures, abundances, sources and formation processes are not adequately understood. This study presents the identification and quantitation of benzyl sulfate in atmospheric aerosols, which is the first reported atmospheric organosulfate with aromatic carbon backbone. Benzyl sulfate was identified and quantified in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected in Lahore, Pakistan during 2007-2008. An authentic standard of benzyl sulfate was synthesized, standardized, and identified in atmospheric aerosols using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS). Benzyl sulfate was quantified in aerosol samples using UPLC coupled to negative electrospray ionization triple quadrupole (TQ) MS. The highest benzyl sulfate concentrations were recorded in November and January 2007 (0.50 ± 0.11 ng m-3) whereas the lowest concentration was observed in July (0.05 ± 0.02 ng m-3). To evaluate matrix effects, benzyl sulfate concentrations were determined using external calibration and the method of standard addition; comparable concentrations were detected by the two methods, which ruled out significant matrix effects in benzyl sulfate quantitation. Three additional organosulfates with m/z 187, 201 and 215 were qualitatively identified as aromatic organosulfates with additional methyl substituents by high-resolution mass measurements and tandem MS. The observed aromatic organosulfates form a homologous series analogous to toluene, xylene, and trimethylbenzene, which are abundant anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), suggesting that aromatic organosulfates may be formed by secondary reactions. Further studies are needed to elucidate the sources and formation pathways of aromatic organosulfates in the atmosphere.

  10. Real-time Characterization of Particle-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ambient Aerosols and From Motor-Vehicles Exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Sioutas, C.

    2007-12-01

    During the spring of 2007 a diffusion charger (DC), a photoelectric aerosol sensor (PAS), and a condensation particle counter (CPC) were operated a) in Wilmington (CA), an urban area near the Los Angeles port heavily influenced by a mix of industrial and gasoline- / diesel-fuelled vehicle emissions, and b) at the California Air Resource Board (CARB) Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Test Laboratory (HDETL), a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA). During the dynamometer tests, we characterized the exhausts of several individual types of vehicles, equipped with different emission control technologies, and operated under different driving conditions. Information about the chemical composition, active surface area, and particle number concentration from the PAS, DC, and CPC were combined to identify the main chemical and physical characteristics of the studied aerosols. In particular, the ratio between the PAS and the DC signals (PAS/DC) provided a reliable measurement of the amount of particle-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (pPAH) per unit area of the active surface of the particles. This quantity may be directly related to the amount of pPAHs transported into the human respiratory tract. Plots of the PAS/DC ratio versus the average surface particle diameter (Dp; estimated by combining DC and CPC measurements) were then used to distinguish between the presence/absence of nuclei mode particles and the presence/absence of an adsorbed layer on accumulation mode particles, for both ambient and dynamometer-tests data. All results were then complemented with measurements of the particle size distribution (SMPS) and of the black carbon (BC) aerosol content to obtain further insights on the pPAHs emitted by motor-vehicles and other sources. Integrated 24-h filter samples were also collected in Wilmington, solvent extracted and analyzed by GC/MS to determine the relative concentrations of the 11 most abundant pPAHs found at the urban site. Finally, these

  11. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  12. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  13. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  14. Estimate of biogenic VOC emissions in Japan and their effects on photochemical formation of ambient ozone and secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatani, Satoru; Matsunaga, Sou N.; Nakatsuka, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    A new gridded database has been developed to estimate the amount of isoprene, monoterpene, and sesquiterpene emitted from all the broadleaf and coniferous trees in Japan with the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). This database reflects the vegetation specific to Japan more accurately than existing ones. It estimates much lower isoprene emitted from other vegetation than trees, and higher sesquiterpene emissions mainly emitted from Cryptomeria japonica, which is the most abundant plant type in Japan. Changes in biogenic emissions result in the decrease in ambient ozone and increase in organic aerosol simulated by the air quality simulation over the Tokyo Metropolitan Area in Japan. Although newly estimated biogenic emissions contribute to a better model performance on overestimated ozone and underestimated organic aerosol, they are not a single solution to solve problems associated with the air quality simulation.

  15. Collection and analysis of inorganic and water soluble organic aerosols over Maryland and Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Phinney, K.; Conny, J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols aloft have slower removal than those near the ground, in part, because dry and wet deposition rates result in longer lifetimes and greater range of influence. Knowledge of deposition rates and range of transport for different species are important for developing local and regional air quality policy. Currently, the vertical distribution of organic aerosols (OA's) and their polar, oxidized fraction is largely unknown. Comprehensive methods to analyze aerosol composition collected in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere are lacking. During DISCOVER AQ 2011, both the NASA P3 and Cessna 402B collected aerosols, through shrouded aerosol inlets, onto Teflon and quartz fiber filters. Collection occurred in both the boundary layer and lower free troposphere over Maryland and Virginia, USA. After extraction with water and optimizing separation via ion chromatography, commonly identified secondary organic aerosols can be separated based on their functionality as mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acids. Inorganic aerosol components can simultaneously be separated and identified with the same method. Individual organic acid compound analysis with detection limits in the low ppb range can be achieved when conductivity/ultraviolet/ and mass spectrometric detectors are placed in tandem. Additionally, thermo optical analysis can be used to determine the mass fraction of water soluble organic carbon versus the total collected mass. This research is designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere, and to provide water soluble organic aerosol structural characterization.

  16. Evaluating MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target Over Water Aerosol Products for Multi-sensor Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; McHardy, T. M.; Lee, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been widely used in aerosol related climate, visibility, and air quality studies for more than a decade. Recently, the MODIS collection 6 (c6) aerosol products from MODIS-Aqua have been released. The reported changes between Collection 5 and Collection 6 include updates in the retrieving algorithms and a new cloud filtering process for the over-ocean products. Thus it is necessary to fully evaluate the collection 6 products for applications that require high quality MODIS aerosol optical depth data, such as operational aerosol data assimilation. The uncertainties in the MODIS c6 DT over ocean products are studied through both inter-comparing with the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol products and by evaluation against ground truth. Special attention is given to the low bias in MODIS DT products due to the misclassifications of heavy aerosol plumes as clouds. Finally, a quality assured data assimilation grade aerosol optical product is constructed for aerosol data assimilation related applications.

  17. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The

  18. Simultaneous determination of trace heavy metals in ambient aerosols by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Talebi, S M; Malekiha, M

    2008-07-01

    The simultaneous determination of heavy metals associated with airborne particulate matter in the atmosphere of the city Isfahan (Iran) was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. The preconcentration procedure developed found instrumental to determine the trace heavy metals associated with ambient aerosols collected at a short sampling period or collected from rural areas where the concentrations of these metals are much less than those in urban areas. Several samples were analyzed by both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as a conventional method and the proposed method. The results obtained by the two methods were found in good agreement. The method was applied to the determination of atmospheric level of heavy metals in rural area and also for study of variation in levels of heavy metals in urban atmosphere during the days and nights. PMID:19552073

  19. Seasonal variations and sources of ambient fossil and biogenic-derived carbonaceous aerosols based on 14C measurements in Lhasa, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Shen, Chengde; Cong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Kexin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lichao

    2010-06-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in Lhasa, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. The fractions of contemporary carbon ( fc) in total carbon (TC) of ambient aerosols are presented using radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements. The value of fc represents the biogenic contribution to TC, as the biosphere releases organic compounds with the present 14C/ 12C level ( fc = 1), whereas 14C has become extinct in anthropogenic emissions of fossil carbon ( fc = 0). The fc values in Lhasa ranging from 0.357 to 0.702, are higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but clearly lower than the rural region of Launceston, which indicates a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Seasonal variations of fc values corresponded well with variations of pollutants concentrations (e.g. NO 2). Higher fc values appeared in winter indicating carbonaceous aerosol is more dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes within this season. The lower fc values in summer and autumn may be caused by increased diesel and petroleum emissions related to tourism in Lhasa. δ13C values ranged from - 26.40‰ to - 25.10‰, with relative higher values in spring and summer, reflecting the increment of fossil carbon emissions.

  20. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  1. Source and composition of size fractionated aerosols collected in the Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.; Kelly, P. B.; Buchholz, B. A.; Clifford, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Valley in California has historically had high levels of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), resulting in significant adverse health effects. The three sources of atmospheric PM in the Central Valley are vehicle exhaust emissions, agricultural activity and residential wood burning. Ambient PM was collected during the winter of 2011 and 2012 in Davis, CA using a DRUM impact analyzer to determine the contributions of the various sources to the size fractionated aerosols. Laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) and radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were performed on size fractionated atmospheric PM. The results show that as particle size decreases the amount of organic carbon increases. In the smallest size fraction (0.09 - 1.2 μm) the organic carbon encompasses approximately 70% of the LDI-TOF signal intensity. A comparison of the size fraction PM LDI-TOF spectra showed that there was a significant difference in the chemical composition with particle size. Three distinct chemical composition modes were observed in the LDI-TOF analysis: 0.09 to 0.34 μm, 0.34 to 0.56 μm and >0.56 μm. The particles <0.34 μm were found to be statistically different than those >0.5 μm. The chemical difference in the PM is driven by the large amount of secondary organic aerosol. Dicarboxylic acids, aromatic acids and nitrated aromatics were predominately found in particles <0.34 μm. The effect on human health of these compounds needs to be further explored. The difference in the chemical composition between the respirable and larger PM needs to be considered when associating health effects with PM exposure. The radiocarbon AMS analysis showed that the size fractionated total carbonaceous particulate matter was mainly biogenic in origin, having an average fraction modern (F14C) = 0.753 × 0.006. The F14C from both sample collections were similar and there wasn't a significant change in fraction modern as particle size

  2. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G.; Watkins, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  3. Radionuclides reveal age and source of aerosols collected over central North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Urban, N. R.; Perlinger, J. A.; Owen, R. C.; China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol filter samples were collected daily during summer 2013, at the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO, 38.47°N, 28.40°W, 2,225 m a.s.l.), Azores Islands. PMO monitors free troposphere air and aerosols transported from neighboring continents; North America has the most frequent influence due to predominantly westerly winds in mid-latitude regions, while aerosols from Europe and Africa are sampled occasionally. The residence time during long-range transport in the atmosphere has a critical impact on aerosol chemical and physical properties, and it can be estimated by measuring activities of radionuclides attached to aerosols. 210Pb (t1/2 = 22.1 years) and 210Po (t1/2 = 138 days) are daughter nuclides in the decay chain of 222Rn, an inert gas species produced throughout the Earth's crust and emitted into the atmosphere. Due to different rates of decay, the activity ratio of 210Po to 210Pb can be used to estimate atmospheric residence times of the carrier aerosols. 210Po activity counting of 58 samples was conducted to investigate aerosol residence times in this study. 210Po activity was measured twice serially for each aerosol sample to predict the initial activity of 210Po on the sampling date and the activity of very slowly decaying 210Pb. Aerosol ages calculated by the activity ratio of 210Po to 210Pb were compared with air tracer ages simulated using the FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model (FLEXPART) and studied together with aerosol particle physical properties. The activity of terrestrial radionuclides per unit of aerosol mass can also reveal source information of the aerosols. FLEXPART backward trajectories will be used to verify correlations between source regions and activity of radionuclides in aerosols. In previous research related to long-range atmospheric transport to PMO, FLEXPART has proven to be reliable in identifying upwind source regions.

  4. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  5. 2-Hydroxyterpenylic acid: An oxygenated marker compound for a-pinene secondary organic aerosol in ambient fine aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    An oxygenated MW 188 compound is commonly observed in substantial abundance in atmospheric aerosol samples and was proposed in previous studies as an α-pinene-related marker compound that is associated with aging processes. Owing to difficulties in producing this compound in suff...

  6. Mutagenicity of ambient air pollutants collected near aluminum industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrane, K. E.; Aune, T.; Søderlund, E.; Aune, K. Tveito; Hongslo, J.; Møller, M.

    Mutagenicity has been tested in air samples collected in the summer and in the winter near four Norwegian aluminum plants. The samples were separated into a particulate and a volatile fraction and tested for mutagenicity by a quantitative reversion assay which showed that the suspended particles were clearly mutagenic. The volatile part of the air pollutants were cytotoxic to the bacteria and showed only marginal mutagenicity. The particulate fractions were tested more extensively in the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test, in two laboratories, using the strains TA 98 and TA 100 with and without enzymatic activation (S9). The mutagenicity was relatively high compared to particulate fractions from other areas with industry and dense traffic. The highest mutagenicity was found in TA 100 with enzymatic activation and the lowest in TA 100 without S9. The mutagenicity was influenced by wind speed and direction during sampling. The mutagenic activity was also determined in the nitroreductase deficient strains TA 98NR and TA 98/1.8DNP. A larger reduction in the activity was found compared to samples from other areas, thus indicating a difference in the sample composition.

  7. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm: Critical Evaluation and Plans for Collection 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the MODIS aerosol algorithm has been applied to measured MODIS radiances to produce a continuous set of aerosol products, over land and ocean. The MODIS aerosol products are widely used by the scientific and applied science communities for variety of purposes that span operational air quality forecasting in estimates o[ clear-sky direct radiative effects over ocean and aerosol-cloud interactions. The products undergo continual evaluation, including self-consistency checks and comparisons with highly accurate ground-based instruments. The result of these evaluation exercises is a quantitative understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the retrieval, where and when the products are accurate and the situations where and when accuracy degrades. We intend 10 present results of the most recent critical evaluations including the first comparison of the over ocean products against the shipboard aerosol optical depth measurements of the Marine Aerosol Network (MAN), the demonstration of the lack of sensitivity to size parameter in the over land products and identification of residual problems and regional issues. While the current data set is undergoing evaluation, we are preparing for the next data processing, labeled Collection 6. Collection 6 will include transparent Quality Flags, a 3 km aerosol product and the 500m resolution cloud mask used within the aerosol n:bicvu|. These new products and adjustments to algorithm assumptions should provide users with more options and greater control, as they adapt the product for their own purposes.

  8. Relationship between indoor and outdoor bioaerosols collected with a button inhalable aerosol sampler in urban homes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T.; Grinshpun, S. A.; Martuzevicius, D.; Adhikari, A.; Crawford, C. M.; Luo, J.; Reponen, T.

    2007-01-01

    This field study investigated the relationship between indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne actinomycetes, fungal spores, and pollen. Air samples were collected for 24 h with a button inhalable aerosol sampler inside and outside of six single-family homes located in the Cincinnati area (overall, 15 pairs of samples were taken in each home). The measurements were conducted during three seasons – spring and fall 2004, and winter 2005. The concentration of culturable actinomycetes was mostly below the detection limit. The median indoor/outdoor ratio (I/O) for actinomycetes was the highest: 2.857. The indoor of fungal and pollen concentrations followed the outdoor concentrations while indoor levels were mostly lower than the outdoor ones. The I/O ratio of total fungal spores (median = 0.345) in six homes was greater than that of pollen grains (median = 0.025). The low I/O ratios obtained for pollen during the peak ambient pollination season (spring) suggest that only a small fraction penetrated from outdoor to indoor environment. This is attributed to the larger size of pollen grains. Higher indoor concentration levels and variability in the I/O ratio observed for airborne fungi may be associated with indoor sources and/or higher outdoor-to-indoor penetration of fungal spores compared to pollen grains. PMID:16420496

  9. Real-time measurements of ambient aerosols in a polluted Indian city: Sources, characteristics, and processing of organic aerosols during foggy and nonfoggy periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Bhattu, Deepika; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2015-09-01

    A detailed time-resolved chemical characterization of ambient nonrefractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) was conducted for the first time in India. The measurements were performed during the winter (November 2011 to January 2012) in a heavily polluted city of Kanpur, which is situated in the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Real-time measurements provided new insights into the sources and evolution of organic aerosols (OA) that could not be obtained using previously deployed filter-based measurements at this site. The average NR-PM1 loading was very high (>100 µg/m3) throughout the study, with OA contributing approximately 70% of the total aerosol mass. Source apportionment of the OA using positive matrix factorization revealed large contributions from fresh and aged biomass burning OA throughout the entire study period. A back trajectory analysis showed that the polluted air masses were affected by local sources and distant source regions where the burning of paddy residues occurs annually during winter. Several fog episodes were encountered during the study, and the OA composition varied between foggy and nonfoggy periods, with higher oxygen to carbon (O/C) ratios during the foggy periods. The evolution of OA and their elemental ratios (O:C and H:C) were investigated for the possible effects of fog processing.

  10. Modeling Elemental Composition of Organic Aerosol: Exploiting Laboratory and Ambient Measurement and the Implications of the Gap Between Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Heald, C. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Zhang, Q.; He, L. Y.; Huang, X. F.; Campuzano Jost, P.

    2014-12-01

    Global chemical transport models have been unable to capture the magnitude and variability of the mass concentrations of organic aerosol (OA). Uncertainty remains in the simulations, including the identification of primary sources and secondary tracers, the understanding of the formation mechanisms, and the representation of the atmospheric evolution of OA. There have been limited ambient measurements available to test simulations that use elemental composition to constrain the sources and aging of OA. In this study, a large dataset including both surface, aircraft, and laboratory observations of the atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios of OA is synthesized and corrected for the bias of general Aerosol Mass Spectrometer elemental analysis. Mean observed O:C and H:C ratios range from 0.3 to 0.9 and 1.3 to 1.9, respectively, for the ground sites. Aircraft measurements show more oxidized OA with a vertical-level mean O:C of 1.2 and H:C of 1.4. We developed a global model simulation for the elemental composition of OA based on laboratory measurements. The standard GEOS-Chem simulation underestimates the O:C ratios, with the largest model bias in remote regions. Model performance is greatly improved by the addition of a laboratory-based oxidative-aging scheme. The revised simulations are best able to capture the observed variability of O:C in remote regions when the heterogeneous aging of secondary organic aerosol is introduced. The simulations underestimate the H:C ratios due to the gap between ambient and laboratory data. This suggests that that we may be missing sources and pathways which increase H:C, or alternatively, that laboratory experiments do not adequately mimic the ambient environment, and thus that their application in models may not reproduce field observations.

  11. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Oo, K.; Brown, M. D.; Dhaniyala, S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets. The collection efficiency study is a prelude to studying contact nucleation, which is a potentially important ice nucleation mode that is not well-understood. This laboratory setup is a step closer to experimentally assessing the importance of contact nucleation. Water droplets with 20 micron diameter and submicron aerosol particles are brought into contact in an injector situated inside a chilled glass flow tube. The water droplets that collect aerosol particles are allowed to pass through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), which accepts large droplets and rejects aerosol particles that have not coagulated with the water droplets. The collected droplets are sent into the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument which performs in situ chemical analysis of a single particle. The number of aerosol particles collected by the single water droplet is quantified by calibrating the PALMS with known concentrations of aerosol particles. The water droplets contain a known amount of ammonium sulfate for identification purpose in the mass spectrometry. Preliminary results from the experiment will be discussed and compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  12. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  13. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles

  14. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed 'collection' or 'coagulation'. Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing at temperatures below 0 C. Theoretical studies have shown that for aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 micrometers, Brownian motion is important, and for particles with diameters larger than 1 micrometer, inertial force dominates. There is a collection efficiency minimum for particles between 0.1-2 micrometers, called the 'Greenfield Gap'. Experimental efforts, however, have been limited to very large drizzle and rain drops until recently, and constrained parameters necessary to describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets have not been available. One reason is that laboratory setups that allow for coagulation to be observed on a single-particle basis have been lacking. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for studying and assessing contact ice nucleation. Contact ice nucleation is currently the least understood ice nucleation mechanism and can be potentially important for mixed-phase cloud formation. The significance of experimentally assessing collection efficiency is therefore two-fold: to first understand the frequency of contacts and to then understand the fraction that lead to ice nucleation. We have constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets and contact freezing. A stream of 30-micron cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles. The outflow

  15. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  16. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  17. Ambient measurements of chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols: Insights into formation, growth, and heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Luke D.

    Organic aerosols are a ubiquitous component of the troposphere, from heavily polluted cities to the remote Arctic. In Chapters II, III, and V of this dissertation, the formation of organic aerosol through observations of ambient size distributions is addressed. Chapter IV presents a new pathway for the formation of nitrous acid (HONO) in the urban atmosphere. In Chapter II, the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micron aerosol was measured at a suburban forested site in North Carolina. Two events were identified in which particle growth, presumably by gas-to-particle conversion, was dominated by accumulation of organic aerosol mass. Growth rates between 1.2 nm hr-1 and 4.9 nm hr-1 were observed. Using a mass-spectral deconvolution method coupled with linear regression analysis, the sub-micron organic aerosol mass observed during the campaign, and during events, was determined to have been influenced by both local and regional secondary processes with only a minor influence from combustion sources. In Chapter III, the chemical characteristics of sub-10-micron aerosol were explored as a function of ambient particle size at a coastal and inland site in New England. Average organic carbon (OC) concentrations of 4.9 microg C m-3 and 3.4 microg C m-3 were observed at the coastal site at the Isles of Shoals (IOS) and at the slightly inland site at Thompson Farm (TF), respectively. An average of 84 and 72% of OC was found to be water-soluble at IOS and TF, respectively. Size distributions indicate that the formation of dicarboxylic acids, especially oxalic acid, is driven by aqueous-phase reactions. A chemical fingerprint analysis suggests that all water-soluble OC at IOS resembles secondary organic aerosol (SOA), while WSOC at TF appears to result from mixed sources. In Chapter IV, a newly identified formation pathway for nitrous acid (HONO) is presented. HONO is an important precursor to hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere and thus contributes to the oxidative

  18. Ambient sulfate aerosol deposition in man: modeling the influence of hygroscopicity.

    PubMed Central

    Martonen, T B; Barnett, A E; Miller, F J

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfate aerosols [H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4] are of international concern because of their global prevalence and potential irritant or toxic effects on humans. To assess hazards following inhalation exposure, the total dose delivered to the human respiratory tract and its regional distribution must be determined. The mass median aerodynamic diameter of the inhaled aerosol will influence the sites of deposition in the respiratory tract. Atmospheric sulfate aerosols are hygroscopic and will have changing particle sizes and densities as they absorb water vapor in the humid environment of the human respiratory tract. Experimental and theoretical data that describe particle size as a function of temperature and relative humidity were used in computer subroutines of an aerosol deposition model in order to calculate the dose dispersion of H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4 aerosols in man. Different temperature and relative humidity environments that approximately correspond to nasal and oral breathing were studied. The predicted deposition patterns are very different from those of nonhygroscopic aerosols with identical inhaled mass median aerodynamic diameter values. PMID:4076076

  19. FORMATION OF 2-METHYL TETROLS AND 2-METHYLGLYCERIC ACID IN SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FROM LABORATORY IRRADIATED ISOPRENE/NO X/SO 2/AIR MIXTURES AND THEIR DETECTION IN AMBIENT PM 2.5 SAMPLES COLLECTED IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of isoprene/NOx/air irradiation experiments, carried out in both the absence and presence of SO2, were conducted to assess whether isoprene contributes to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In the absence of SO2 , the SOA yield of 0.002 was low. However, in th...

  20. Oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosols produced from photooxidation of different hydrocarbons using outdoor chamber under ambient sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huanhuan; Jang, Myoseon; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative potential of various secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was measured using dithiothreitol (DTT) assay to understand how organic aerosols react with cellular materials. SOA was produced via the photooxidation of four different hydrocarbons (toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene and α-pinene) in the presence of NOx using a large outdoor photochemical smog chamber. The DTT consumption rate was normalized by the aerosol mass, which is expressed as DTTmass. Toluene SOA and isoprene SOA yielded higher DTTmass than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA or α-pinene SOA. In order to discover the correlation between the molecular structure and oxidative potential, the DTT responses of selected model compounds were also measured. Among them, conjugated aldehydes, quinones, and H2O2 showed considerable DTT response. To investigate the correlation between DTT response and cell responses in vitro, the expression of biological markers, i.e. IL-6, IL-8, and HMOX-1 were studied using small airway epithelial cells. Higher cellular expression of IL-8 was observed with toluene SOA exposure compared to 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA exposure, which aligned with the results from DTT assay. Our study also suggests that within the urban atmosphere, the contribution of toluene SOA and isoprene SOA to the oxidative potential of ambient SOA will be more significant than that of α-pinene SOA.

  1. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K.; Kelly, T.; Hanft, E.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Walker, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the U.S. EPA's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The U.S. EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to examine ecosystem exposure to nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution and with greater accuracy than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC from September 8th-October 8th, 2010. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by comparing duplicate units and accuracy was evaluated by comparing duplicate MARGAs to duplicate reference denuder/filter packs. The MARGA utilizes a Wet Rotating Denuder (WRD) to collect gases, while aerosols are collected by a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC). Both the WRD and the SJAC produce aqueous sample streams, which are analyzed by online ion chromatography for anions and cations. The reference denuder/filter pack consisted of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and phosphorous acid (H3PO3) coated denuders followed by a Teflon filter, a nylon filter, and a citric acid coated cellulose filter. The assessment of the MARGA units focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3 and NH3 and aerosol SO4-, NO3- and NH4+. To evaluate accuracy, hourly MARGA concentrations were averaged over 12 hours to match with 12-hour integrated concentrations from the reference system. The concentrations were compared using linear regression with performance goals of slope between 0.8-1.2 and y-intercept between -10 ppb and 10 ppb. Accuracy was further quantified as the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between 12-hour MARGA and reference concentrations, with a performance goal of ≤ 40%. The precision of

  2. Using Thermal-Optical Analysis to Examine the OC-EC Split that Characterizes Ambient and Source Emissions Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, B.; Hays, M. D.; Geron, C.; Jetter, J.

    2010-12-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure OC-EC (organic carbon-elemental carbon) ratio in atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a single dual-optics carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of temperature-programming and optics on the OC-EC ratios. The OC-EC ratios for a variety of atmospheric and source emissions aerosols were measured using a National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health method (NIOSH 5040), the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments method (IMPROVE), and a modified NIOSH 5040 method (referred in this paper as NIST-EPA). Use of the dual-optics instrument allowed simultaneous monitoring of the reflectance (TOR) and transmission (TOT) during each thermal protocol. Results showed no statistical difference between NIST-EPA and NIOSH OC-EC ratios for residential cookstove emissions and for an urban aerosol collected in Nairobi, Kenya. However, the OC-EC ratios for diesel exhaust (NIST [TOT and TOR]) and for a denuded rural North Carolina forest aerosol (NIST [TOT]) were significantly greater than the corresponding NIOSH values. Significantly lower IMPROVE (TOT and TOR) OC-EC ratios, compared to NIST-EPA and NIOSH, may be ascribed to the lower temperature protocol of this method. The ratio of TOT-to-TOR for the OC-EC ratio ranged between 1.37 - 1.71 (residential cookstoves), 1.05 - 1.24 (diesel exhaust), 1.63 - 2.23 (rural), and 0.80 - 1.12 (urban) for the three methods. Aerosols containing components susceptible to charring (such as water soluble organic compounds typical of rural and cookstove aerosols) tend to show the higher OC-EC variability among the methods when compared to diesel-impacted aerosols, which showed little to no detectable pyrolyzed carbon (PyC). Different sample types, due to their various chemical compositions, behave differently under dissimilar thermal and optical conditions, such that the search for a “universal” thermal-optical method for all sample types remain

  3. Evaluation of an in-injection port thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for analysis of non-polar organic compounds in ambient aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yu, Jian Zhen; Chow, Judith C; Zielinska, Barbara; Watson, John G; Sit, Elber Hoi Leung; Schauer, James J

    2008-07-25

    Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) is an alternative to solvent extraction (SE)-based GC/MS (SE-GC/MS) for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds in filter or impactor-collected aerosols. TD-GC/MS has no sample pretreatment and requires a small filter aliquot for detecting individual organic compounds. The performance of an in-injection port TD-GC/MS is evaluated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanes, iso-/anteiso-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, branched alkanes, cyclohexanes, alkenes, and phthalates in standards and ambient air samples. Replicate analysis for 132 organic compounds showed relative standard deviations <10%, with the majority <5%. Accuracy for 15 PAHs, determined with NIST standard reference material (SRM) 1649a urban dust, was within +/-5% of the certified values. TD-GC/MS and SE-GC/MS method comparisons for 14 Hong Kong ambient samples agreed within 11% for 106 non-polar compounds. For 19 Tong Liang, China samples, agreement was within 13% for 23 PAHs. PMID:18556009

  4. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ambient Air in an Oxidation Flow Reactor at GoAmazon2014/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; de Sa, Suzane S.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Hu, Weiwei; Seco, Roger; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Saewung; Brito, Joel; Wurm, Florian; Artaxo, Paulo; Yee, Lindsay; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabrial; Goldstein, Allen; Newburn, Matt K.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Martin, Scot T.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    During GoAmazon2014/5, ambient air was exposed to controlled concentrations of OH or O3 in situ using an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). Oxidation ranged from hours-several weeks of aging. Oxidized air was sampled by several instruments (e.g., HR-AMS, ACSM, PTR-TOF-MS, SMPS, CCN) at both the T3 site (IOP1: Feb 1-Mar 31, 2014, and IOP2: Aug 15-Oct 15, 2014) and T2 site (between IOPs and into 2nd IOP). The oxidation of ambient air in the OFR led to substantial and variable secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from any SOA-precursor gases, known and unknown, that entered the OFR. In general, more SOA was produced during the nighttime than daytime, suggesting that SOA-precursor gases were found in relatively higher concentrations at night. Similarly, more SOA was formed in the dry season (IOP2) than wet season (IOP1). The maximum amount of SOA produced during nighttime from OH oxidation ranged from less than 1 μg/m3 on some nights to greater than 10 μg/m3 on other nights. O3 oxidation of ambient air also led to SOA formation, although several times less than from OH oxidation. The amount of SOA formation sometimes, but not always, correlated with measured gas-phase biogenic and/or anthropogenic SOA precursors (e.g., SV-TAG sesquiterpenes, PTR-TOFMS aromatics, isoprene, and monoterpenes). The SOA mass formed in the OFR from OH oxidation was up to an order of magnitude larger than could be explained from aerosol yields of measured primary VOCs. This along with measurements from previous campaigns suggests that most SOA was formed from intermediate S/IVOC sources (e.g., VOC oxidation products, evaporated POA, or direct emissions). To verify the SOA yields of VOCs under OFR experimental conditions, atmospherically-relevant concentrations of several VOCs were added individually into ambient air in the OFR and oxidized by OH or O3. SOA yields in the OFR were similar to published chamber yields. Preliminary PMF factor analysis showed production of secondary factors in

  5. Photoacoustic and filter-based ambient aerosol light absorption measurements: Instrument comparisons and the role of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmüller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.; Raspet, R.; Slaton, W. V.; Hand, J. L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Ambient measurements are reported of aerosol light absorption from photoacoustic and filter-based instruments (aethalometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP)) to provide insight on the measurement science. Measurements were obtained during the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study at the Big Bend National Park in South Texas. The aethalometer measurements of black carbon concentration at this site correlate reasonably well with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption, with a slope of 8.1 m2/g and a small offset. Light absorption at this site never exceeded 2.1 Mm-1 during the month of collocated measurements. Measurements were also obtained, as a function of controlled relative humidity between 40% and 90%, during the Photoacoustic IOP in 2000 at the Department of Energy Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site (SGP). PSAP measurements of aerosol light absorption correlated very well with photoacoustic measurements, but the slope of the correlation indicated the PSAP values were larger by a factor of 1.61. The photoacoustic measurements of light absorption exhibited a systematic decrease when the RH increased beyond 70%. This apparent decrease in light absorption with RH may be due to the contribution of mass transfer to the photoacoustic signal. Model results for the limiting case of full water saturation are used to evaluate this hypothesis. A second PSAP measured the light absorption for the same humidified samples, and indicated very erratic response as the RH changed, suggesting caution when interpreting PSAP data under conditions of rapid relative humidity change.

  6. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  7. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in

  8. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  9. Global and regional validation of the Collection 6 MODIS dark target aerosol products, and comparison to Collection 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark targets aerosol algorithms include several updates, including multiple wind speed look up tables over ocean and improved sensor calibration. We analyze the entirety of the MODIS-Aqua aerosol record against AERONET to characterize uncertainty in the products, and relate the new collection to the well-characterized Collection 5 (C5) products to understand specific improvements. Over land, ~70% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds, which is comparable to C5; however, a slight overestimation of AOD at low optical depths and a slight underestimation at high optical depths that was observed in C5 has been eliminated in C6. The highest agreement with AERONET occurs in the Eastern U.S. and Europe. Regions with large surface reflectance, such as the Western U.S., or higher aerosol loading, including much of Africa and South America, remain a challenge. Over ocean, the inclusion of wind speed in the surface characterization has removed a wind speed dependant bias, and globally, ~63% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds. The dust outflow regions off the coast of Africa show the poorest agreement with AERONET. The aerosol products validate acceptably for science, though users should be aware of some regional biases we present in this work.

  10. Elemental composition and Its seasonal variation of bulk aerosols collected at the Okinawa archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Akihide; Oshiro, Seiji; Azechi, Sotaro; Handa, Daishi; Arakaki, Takemitsu

    2010-05-01

    Okinawa is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km south east of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutions in East Asia, because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. In the present study, elemental composition and its seasonal variation of bulk aerosols collected at the Okinawa archipelago was investigated by a X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). From these results, chemical properties of aerosols transported to Okinawa archipelago and long-range transport of metal pollutions were discussed. We continuously collected bulk aerosols for 7 days at a time during 2008 - 2009. The samplings were performed by using the same type of high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS), respectively. XRF allows us to analyze bulk aerosols rapidly without any pretreatment. However, it is very difficult to determine trace metals in aerosol samples accurately. The concentration ratios to Al for 15-20 elements, whose accuracy was evaluated using standard reference materials (NIES No.28) and measuring by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid-digestion, were obtained by XRF. From seasonal variations obtained, the concentration rations to Al for Pb and As in aerosol particles were clearly higher in winter than in summer. These results suggest that North-west wind blown in winter would transport pollutant aerosols to Okinawa archipelago from East Asia.

  11. Comparison of three methods for measuring light absorption by collected aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ramsey-Bell, D C; Couture, G

    1985-08-01

    Three instruments for measuring absorption of visible light by atmospheric aerosols are compared: the visual comparator; plate diffuser; and photoacoustic spectrometer. Two versions of the photoacoustic spectrometer are tested, one built of acrylic plastic and the other of aluminum. One version of the visual comparator uses Millipore filters for a crucial reflective surface, another a mirror. Several materials collected on Nuclepore filters are used in the comparison. Laboratory generated samples consist of carbon and carbon overlaid with ammonium sulfate. Atmospheric aerosols were collected in Tucson and on an Arizona mountain peak. All methods give reasonably consistent results, even when applied to the lightly absorbing nonurban atmospheric samples. PMID:18223896

  12. GROWTH LAWS FOR THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY AMBIENT AEROSOLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CHEMICAL CONVERSION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evolution of aerosol size distributions growing by gas-to-particle conversion has been observed recently in field and laboratory studies. A technique for extracting particle diameter growth rates from such data is presented. The functional dependence of these growth rates on ...

  13. Library Optimization in EDXRF Spectral Deconvolution for Multi-element Analysis of Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    In multi-element analysis of atmospheric aerosols, attempts are made to fit overlapping elemental spectral lines for many elements that may be undetectable in samples due to low concentrations. Fitting with many library reference spectra has the unwanted effect of raising the an...

  14. SMOG CHAMBER STUDIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM IRRADIATED HYDROCARBONS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the physics and chemistry of aerosols is fundamental to evaluating health risks and developing and evaluating atmospheric models. However, as noted in a recent NRC report only about 10% of the organics in PM2.5 have been identified. A significant portion of the un...

  15. PASSIVE AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR CHARACTERIZATION, AMBIENT CONCENTRATION, AND PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an extended abstract of a presentation made at the Air and Waste Management Association's Symposium on Air Quality Measurement Methods and Technology, Durham, NC, May 9-11, 2006. The abstract describes the theory, design, and initial testing of a passive aerosol sampler f...

  16. Ambient particle characterization by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry in an urban area of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of aerosol particles in Beijing urban area, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from April 22 to May 4, 2011. 510,341 particles out of 2,953,200 sized particles were characterized by SPAMS in combination with the ART-2a neural network algorithm. The particles were classified as rich-K (39.79%), carbonaceous species (32.7%), industry metal (19.2%), dust (5.7%), and rich-Na (1.76%). Industrial emissions related particles, rich-Fe, rich-Pb, and K-nitrate, were the major components of aerosol particles during haze periods, which were mainly from the steel plants and metal smelting processes around Beijing. Under stagnant meterological conditions, these regional emissions have a vital effect on haze formation. Organic carbon (OC) particles were attributed to biomass burning. NaK-EC was likely to come from local traffic emissions. Internally mixed organic and elemental carbon (OCEC) was found to be from possible sources of local traffic emission and biomass burning. It was found that coarse dust particles were mainly composed of four different types of dust particles, dust-Si, dust-Ca, dust-Al, and dust-Ti. It is the first time that SPAMS was used to study a dust storm in Beijing. Our results showed that SPAMS could be a powerful tool in the identification and apportionment of aerosol sources in Beijing, providing useful reference information for environmental control and management.

  17. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of γPAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas γH2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  18. Hygroscopic properties and extinction of aerosol particles at ambient relative humidity in South-Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, H.; Cheng, Y. F.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Herrmann, H.; Althausen, D.; Ansmann, A.; Engelmann, R.; Tesche, M.; Wendisch, M.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hu, M.; Liu, S.; Zeng, L. M.

    During the "Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over Pearl River Delta 2004 (PRIDE-PRD2004)" hygroscopic properties of particles in the diameter range 22 nm to 10μm were determined. For that purpose, a Humidifying Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (H-DMPS) and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor (MOUDI) were operated. The derived size-dependent particle hygroscopic growth factors were interpolated to ambient relative humidity (RH) and used to calculate the particle number size distributions (PNSDs) at ambient conditions. A comparison between the modeled particle extinction coefficients (σ) and those observed with a Raman lidar was made. It is shown that the particle extinction coefficient ( σext) at ambient RH can be properly estimated with Mie-model calculations based on the in situ physico-chemical measurements of dry and humidified PNSD and chemical composition.

  19. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  20. Contribution of wood combustion in winter submicron ambient aerosols over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulas, Iasonas; Fourtziou, Luciana; Zarmpas, Pavlos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Liakakou, Eleni; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    Given that a smog pollution problem, mostly attributed to wood burning in fireplaces and stoves, is currently emerging in the Athens metropolitan area, several monitoring instruments were deployed at the National Observatory of Athens facilities in the region of Thissio, downtown Athens . These included an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor with 30 minute time resolution and a Particle Into Liquid Sampler coupled with Ion Chromatography with 15 minute time resolution. The campaign duration was from December 2013 to February 2014 and the aim was to investigate the chemical composition of ultrafine aerosols connected to biomass burning.. Many events of high particulate matter concentrations (exceeding the 50 μg/m3 daily limit) were observed during night-time, with maximum concentrations occurring when stagnant atmospheric conditions prevailed. Potassium measured by the PILS - IC, and the m/z = 60 fragment measured by the ACSM, was initially used as a tracer of biomass burning events. A good correlation was determined for those two factors, allowing for safe conclusions concerning the identification of these aforementioned biomass burning events. For utmost certainty, Black Carbon measurements coming from three different instruments, was also used. As a second step, Positive Matrix Factorization analysis was performed, using the SoFi interface, which utilizes the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) (Canonaco et Al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 3649-3661, 2013), for the source apportionment of the organic particulate matter, determined by the ACSM. This analysis revealed a very important Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) factor with a clear diurnal cycle, showing maxima in the time interval from 21:00 in the evening to 02:00 in the morning. A Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA) factor is also present with a maximum during the same time interval, attributed to fossil fuel used in central heating systems, and a secondary maximum during the day, attributed

  1. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed "collection" or "coagulation". Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing. There is a theoretical collection efficiency minimum of particles with diameter between 0.1-2 µm, called the "Greenfield Gap". Experimental effort, however, was limited to drizzle and rain drops until recently, and has not constrained parameters that describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for assessing contact freezing, the least known ice nucleation mechanism today. Experimentally assessing collection efficiency can prove the existence of the "Greenfield Gap" and lay the foundation for studying contact freezing. We recently constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study coagulation experimentally. A stream of 40 µm cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles with known size and concentration. The outflow goes through a series of dryers before entering the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures of both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will

  2. Thermal desorption single particle mass spectrometry of ambient aerosol in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Wang, Xinning; Li, Jingyan; Xu, Tingting; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-12-01

    Submicron aerosol volatility, chemical composition, and mixing state were simultaneously measured using a thermodenuder (TD) in-line with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) during Nov.12 to Dec. 11 of 2014 in Shanghai. By heating up to 250 °C, the signals of refractory species such as elemental carbon, metallic compounds, and mineral dust in aerosols were enhanced in the mass spectra. At 250 °C, the main particle types present in the size range of 0.2-1.0 μm were biomass burning (37% by number) and elemental carbon (20%). From 1.0 to 2.0 μm, biomass burning (30%), dust (19%) and metal-rich (18%) were the primary particle types. CN- signal remained in the mass spectra of the heated biomass burning particles suggests the existence of some extremely low-volatility nitrogen-containing organics. Laboratory experiments were conducted by burning rice straws, the main source material of biomass burning particles in Southern China, to confirm the less volatile composition contributed by biomass burning. Strong CN- with relative area >0.21 was observed in most of the laboratory-made biomass burning particles when heated above 200 °C and was selected as a new marker to identify the biomass burning particles in the field. The TD-SPAMS measured the size-resolved chemical composition of the individual particle residues at different temperatures and offered more information on the aging processes of primary particles and their sources.

  3. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  4. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  5. AMBIENT AMMONIA AND AMMONIUM AEROSOL ACROSS A REGION OF VARIABLE AMMONIA EMISSION DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents one year of ambient ammonia (NH3), ammonium (NH4+), hydrochloric acid (HCI), chloride (CI¯), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrate (NO3¯), nitrous acid (HONO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and sulfate (SO4

  6. COMPARISON OF TWO PARTICLE-SIZE SPECTROMETERS FOR AMBIENT AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS. (R827354C002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an ongoing debate on the question which size fraction of particles in ambient air may be responsible for human health effects observed in epidemiological studies. Since there is no single instrument available for the measurement of the particle-size distribution over ...

  7. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol. PMID:19204482

  8. MODIS aerosol products in Collection 6:Moving towards multisensor fusion and interdisciplinary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    As the Terra satellite turns 10, so do the MODIS aerosol products. During the past ten years the MODIS products have evolved and expanded to include opportunities and capabilities nonexistent in the at-launch version. We are anticipating the next step, Collection 6, becoming available in late 2010. The new products in the Collection 6 MODIS aerosol suite of products will include: 1) Fine mode aerosol optical depth over land from the PARASOL POLDER data set, merged into the MODIS data product. This is a direct capture of the PARASOL product that will be placed in the MODIS data files. It is not a separate derivation using PARASOL radiances and polarization. The incorporation of the PARASOL product over land is collocated to the MODIS 10 km product pixel, and is provided as a convenience to MODIS users. 2) Aerosol optical depth over land at 3 km resolution for Air Quality monitoring. 3) Cloud mask and distance to the nearest cloud calculated and presented for every 500 m “cloud-free” pixel that allows better control of cloud contamination in the basic aerosol products. This information is also summarized statistically at the 10 km product resolution, and will be available for both land and ocean. 4) A Quality Assurance (QA) flag in simple plain integers that does not require a binary reader to decode.

  9. 78 FR 12052 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this document announces that the EPA is planning to submit a request to renew an existing approved Information Collection Request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). This ICR will also incorporate the following ICRs which were approved under separate rulemaking actions: ICR 2358......

  10. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  11. THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, M.; Gundel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler’s heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25μm in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  12. Thermophoresis and Its Thermal Parameters for Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara

    2007-08-01

    The particle collection efficiency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25mu m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  13. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  14. Comparison of select analytes in aerosol from e-cigarettes with smoke from conventional cigarettes and with ambient air.

    PubMed

    Tayyarah, Rana; Long, Gerald A

    2014-12-01

    Leading commercial electronic cigarettes were tested to determine bulk composition. The e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes were evaluated using machine-puffing to compare nicotine delivery and relative yields of chemical constituents. The e-liquids tested were found to contain humectants, glycerin and/or propylene glycol, (⩾75% content); water (<20%); nicotine (approximately 2%); and flavor (<10%). The aerosol collected mass (ACM) of the e-cigarette samples was similar in composition to the e-liquids. Aerosol nicotine for the e-cigarette samples was 85% lower than nicotine yield for the conventional cigarettes. Analysis of the smoke from conventional cigarettes showed that the mainstream cigarette smoke delivered approximately 1500times more harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) tested when compared to e-cigarette aerosol or to puffing room air. The deliveries of HPHCs tested for these e-cigarette products were similar to the study air blanks rather than to deliveries from conventional cigarettes; no significant contribution of cigarette smoke HPHCs from any of the compound classes tested was found for the e-cigarettes. Thus, the results of this study support previous researchers' discussion of e-cigarette products' potential for reduced exposure compared to cigarette smoke. PMID:25444997

  15. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ≥ 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in

  16. Characterization of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Ryu, J.; Maskey, S.; Jung, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2010-11-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon that leads to low visibility, and is mostly due to elevated levels of fine particulate matter. It can have effects on cloud formation, public health, agriculture, and even the global climate. Although urban haze has been increasing in occurrence over the past several years over the Seoul-Incheon metropolis, Korea, studies of the morphology and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles by single-particle analysis during haze episodes have rarely been conducted. Herein, a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyze individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13-18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October). Overall, 3600 particles in 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were measured by low-Z particle EPMA. Based on quantitative X-ray analysis, together with secondary electron images of individual particles, we successfully identified the aerosol particle types as follows: elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, genuine (fresh) and reacted (aged) sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMg(CO3)2, etc.), and K-containing, Fe-rich, and fly ash particles. By analyzing the relative abundances of different particle types, it was concluded that (a) on non-haze days, reacted sea-salts and reacted mineral dust particles were abundant in both the PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5 fractions (with relative abundances of 65.0% and 57.7%, respectively); whereas on haze days, the relative abundances of OC and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles were significantly elevated, indicating that organic matter and secondary aerosols were abundant in the atmosphere when haze occurred. (b) in PM2.5-10 fractions, sea-salt and mineral dust particles reacted with NOx/HNO3 significantly outnumbered those reacted with SO2/H2SO4, no matter whether they were collected on haze

  17. Evaporation Kinetics and Phase of Laboratory and Ambient Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan G.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense efforts to find additional SOA sources but leaving the assumption of rapid SOA evaporation unchallenged. We characterized room-temperature evaporation of pure SOA and SOA formed in the presence of spectator organic vapors with and without aging. We find that it takes ~24 hrs for pure SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ~10 minutes timescales predicted by models. The presence of spectator organic vapors and aging dramatically reduces the evaporation, and in some cases nearly stops it. For all cases, SOA evaporation behavior is size independent and does not follow the liquid droplet evaporation kinetics assumed by models.

  18. Ambient aerosol chlorine concentrations and artefacts during the MEGAPOLI Paris campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furger, Markus; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay; Crippa, Monica; Poulain, Laurent; Sciare, Jean; Flechsig, Uwe; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements, especially those that are toxic, can affect the environment in significant ways. Studying them is advantageous with respect to a refinement of source apportionment when measured with high time resolution and appropriate size segregation. This approach is especially useful in urban environments with numerous time-variant emission sources distributed across a relatively narrow space. Two field campaigns took place in the framework of the MEGAPOLI project in Paris, France: one in the summer of 2009 (1-31 July), the other in the winter of 2010 (11 Jan - 10 Feb). Rotating drum impactors (RDI) were operated at an urban and a suburban site in each campaign. The RDI segregated the aerosols into three size ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3) and sampled with 2-hour time resolution. The samples were analyzed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS), where a broad range of elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn) was analyzed for each size range. Time series of the analyzed elements for the different sites and campaigns were prepared to characterize the aerosol trace element composition and temporal behavior for different weather situations and urban environments. Quality assurance was performed partly by intercomparison with independent measurements. An exceptional behavior was observed for chlorine (Cl), where periods with zero RDI concentration alternated with periods of normal load. Zero concentrations were not observed in particle-into-liquid (PILS) measurements. This identifies the observed behavior as a RDI sampling artefact. Nevertheless, the non-zero periods of Cl concentrations are still a gain in information compared to conventional sampling techniques, mainly due to the high time resolution.

  19. Investigation of anthropogenic-origin-metals in the atmospheric aerosols collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Azechi, S.; Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Kasaba, T.; Arakaki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are important to atmospheric chemistry, and affect our lives. Aerosols include fine particles, which consist of inorganic compounds, organic substances, heavy metals, etc. Aerosols can be roughly separated into natural and anthropogenic origins. For example, natural origins include wind-blown sea-salt, Asian dust (called Kosa in Japan), etc. Anthropogenic origins include burning of fossil fuel and agricultural biomass, automobiles, industrial activities, etc. In Japan, Kosa is the most well-known aerosol. This study investigated anthropogenic-origin-metals present in the aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) in Okinawa Island, Japan with a high volume air sampler. Samples analyzed for this study were collected between January 2008 and August 2014. A 1/8 of aerosol filter was digested by the mixture of acids and oxidant (nitric acid/hydrogen fluoride/hydrogen peroxide). The sample was filtered by 0.45 μm membrane filter before analyses. Metal ion concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Na, Mg, K) and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Al, Fe, Ca, Ti, Mn, V, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb). Air mass movement was analyzed by NOAA's HYSPRIT model. Results showed that concentrations of heavy metals were high during winter and spring, and the lowest in summer. V/Mn ratios were used as an indicator for heavy oil burning. High V/Mn ratios were observed during maritime air mass periods. On the other hand, Pb/Zn ratio was used as an indicator for leaded gasoline usage, which was high when air mass was coming from Asian continent during winter and spring. Average Pb/Zn ratio was 0.65. Non-sea-salt K (nss-K) was used as an indicator for biomass burning, and showed good correlation with total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. However, nss-K and crustal-origin-metals also showed good correlation. Thus, we have to be careful when considering whether nss-K is from

  20. Mass loading of size-segregated atmospheric aerosols in the ambient air during fireworks episodes in eastern Central India.

    PubMed

    Nirmalkar, Jayant; Deb, Manas K; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Verma, Santosh K

    2013-04-01

    The effects of combustion of the fire crackers on the air quality in eastern Central India were studied for the first time during Diwali festival. This case study analyzes the size distribution and temporal variation of aerosols collected in the rural area of eastern Central India during pre-diwali, Diwali and post-diwali period for the year of 2011. Fifteen aerosol samples were collected during the special case study of Diwali period using Andersen sampler. The mean concentrations of PM10 (respirable particulate matter) were found to be 212.8 ± 4.2, 555.5 ± 20.2 and 284.4 ± 5.8 during pre-diwali, Diwali and post-diwali period, respectively. During Diwali festival PM10 concentration was about 2.6 and 1.9 times higher than pre-diwali and post-diwali period, respectively. PM2.5 (fine) and PM1 (submicron) concentrations during Diwali festival were more than 2 times higher than pre-diwali and post-diwali. PMID:23287842

  1. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with a long-range transported biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2015-05-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m above mean sea level on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory is located ~ 3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ± 0.7 μg m-3. On average, organic aerosol components represent the largest mass fraction of the total measured aerosol (60 ± 51%), followed by sulfate (23 ± 28%), nitrate (13 ± 10%), chloride (2 ± 3%), and elemental carbon (2 ± 2%). Water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas had unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. FLEXPART retroplume analyses showed the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). These aged aerosol WSOM compounds had an average O/C ratio of ~ 0.45, which is relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in the WSOM and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of phenolic species suggests

  2. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  3. Nonpolar organic compounds in fine particles: quantification by thermal desorption-GC/MS and evidence for their significant oxidation in ambient aerosols in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian Zhen; Huang, X H Hilda; Ho, Steven S H; Bian, Qijing

    2011-12-01

    Nonpolar organic compounds (NPOCs) in ambient particulate matter (PM) commonly include n-alkanes, branched alkanes, hopanes and steranes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The recent development of thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) has greatly reduced time and labor in their quantification by eliminating the laborious solvent extraction and sample concentration steps in the traditional approach that relies on solvent extraction. The simplicity of the TD-GCMS methods has afforded us concentration data of NPOCs in more than 90 aerosol samples in two aerosol field studies and 20 vehicular emissions-dominated source samples in Hong Kong over the past few years. In this work, we examine the interspecies relationships between select NPOCs and their concentration ratios to elemental carbon (EC) among the ambient samples and among the source samples. Our analysis indicates that hopanes were mainly from vehicular emissions and they were significantly oxidized in ambient PM. The hopane/EC ratio in ambient samples was on average less than half of the ratio in vehicular emissions-dominated source samples. This highlights the necessity in considering oxidation loss in applying organic tracer data in source apportionment studies. Select PAH/EC ratio-ratio plots reveal that PAHs had diverse sources and vehicular emissions were unlikely a dominant source for PAHs in Hong Kong. Biomass burning and other regional sources likely dominated ambient PAHs in Hong Kong. PMID:21983947

  4. Verification of traffic emitted aerosol components in the ambient air of Cologne (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckwerth, Gerd

    Emission of heavy metals, besides ozone and diesel-soot, is one of the most significant environmental problems caused by the existing transport systems. Emission arises from different parts of vehicles (tyres, brakes, exhausts) or running trains (rails, wheels, overhead cables, etc.). Various types of emission with their insufficiently known ways of spreading makes it difficult to estimate the risk and to realise effective counter-measures. Size-dependent sampling of aerosols with the virtual impactor technique of a dichotomous sampler (<2.5 μm, 2.5-10 μm) allows one to identify several aerosol components at the sampling locations and to reliably determine their relative proportions. Analyses of 30-40 elements from immission samplings at 12 places in and around Cologne are compared with specific patterns of elements from relevant emission sources. Moreover, taking into account the particle size, relative abundances of Zn, Mo, Cu and Sb can be estimated by assuming an average of around 30% of diesel-soot in the fine fraction, and ˜3% from an abraded tyre material together with ˜0.3% from rubbed off brake-linings in the coarse fraction. The assumption of 0.3% for brake-linings is based on the relative abundances of Cu and Sb which besides Cd are the most highly enriched. Since most brake-linings used in cars contain these elements in an unusually high quantity (5-20% Cu and 1-5% Sb) and are in very similar ratios as measured in the coarse fraction, Cu and Sb may be taken as quantitative tracers for the brake-lining component in the immission. The environmental interest in Sb arises mainly from the toxicological potential of the compounds Sb 2S 3 and Sb 2O 3. Other traffic related components could only be identified very close to the sources of emissions. Besides Pt from cars with catalysators and Cu emitted from overhead cables of trams, an As-enrichment from rusting rails, which segregates into fine particles because of shaking due to passing trains, was

  5. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ericka L; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J Craig; Nelson, Karen E; Jones, Marcus B

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  6. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ericka L.; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K.; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J. Craig; Nelson, Karen E.; Jones, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  7. A new direct thermal desorption-GC/MS method: Organic speciation of ambient particulate matter collected in Golden, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Luyi C.; Ke, Fu; Wang, Daniel K. W.; Dann, Tom; Austin, Claire C.

    Particulate matter having an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is thought to be implicated in a number of medical conditions, including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart attack, and aging. However, very little chemical speciation data is available for the organic fraction of ambient aerosols. A new direct thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) method was developed for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM2.5. Samples were collected in Golden, British Columbia, over a 15-month period. n-Alkanes constituted 33-98% by mass of the organic compounds identified. PAHs accounted for 1-65% and biomarkers (hopanes and steranes) 1-8% of the organic mass. Annual mean concentrations were: n-alkanes (0.07-1.55 ng m -3), 16 PAHs (0.02-1.83 ng m -3), and biomarkers (0.02-0.18 ng m -3). Daily levels of these organics were 4.89-74.38 ng m -3, 0.27-100.24 ng m -3, 0.14-4.39 ng m -3, respectively. Ratios of organic carbon to elemental carbon (OC/EC) and trends over time were similar to those observed for PM2.5. There was no clear seasonal variation in the distribution of petroleum biomarkers, but elevated levels of other organic species were observed during the winter. Strong correlations between PAHs and EC, and between petroleum biomarkers and EC, suggest a common emission source - most likely motor vehicles and space heating.

  8. Effect of biomass burning over the western North Pacific Rim: wintertime maxima of anhydrosugars in ambient aerosols from Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Kawamura, K.

    2014-10-01

    Biomass burning (BB) largely modifies the chemical compositions of atmospheric aerosols on the globe. We collected aerosol samples (TSP) at Cape Hedo, subtropical Okinawa Island from October 2009 to February 2012 to study anhydrosugars as BB tracers. Levoglucosan was detected as the dominant anhydrosugar followed by its isomers, mannosan and galactosan. We found a clear seasonal trend of levoglucosan and mannosan with winter maxima and summer minima. Positive correlation was found between levoglucosan and nss-K+ (r = 0.38, p < 0.001); the latter is another BB tracer. The analyses of air mass trajectories and fire spots demonstrated that the seasonal variations of anhydrsosugsars are caused by a long-range transport of BB emissions from the Asian continent. We found winter maxima of anhydrosugars, which may be associated with open burning and domestic heating and cooking in north and northeast China, Mongolia and Russia and with the enhanced westerly. The monthly averaged levoglucosan/mannosan ratios were lower (2.1-4.8) in May-June and higher (13.3-13.9) in November-December. The lower values may be associated with softwood burning in north China, Korea and southwest Japan whereas the higher values are probably caused by agriculture waste burning of maize straw in the North China Plain. Anhydrosugars comprised 0.22% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and 0.13% of organic carbon (OC). The highest values to WSOC (0.37%) and OC (0.25%) were found in winter, again indicating an important BB contribution to Okinawa aerosols in winter. This study provides useful information to better understand the effect of East Asian biomass burning on the air quality in the western North Pacific Rim.

  9. Effect of biomass burning over the western North Pacific Rim: wintertime maxima of anhydrosugars in ambient aerosols from Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Kawamura, K.; Kunwar, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning (BB) largely modifies the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols on the globe. We collected aerosol samples (TSP) at Cape Hedo, on subtropical Okinawa Island, from October 2009 to February 2012 to study anhydrosugars as BB tracers. Levoglucosan was detected as the dominant anhydrosugar followed by its isomers, mannosan and galactosan. We found a clear seasonal trend of levoglucosan and mannosan with winter maxima and summer minima. Positive correlation was found between levoglucosan and nss-K+ (r = 0.38, p < 0.001); the latter is another BB tracer. The analyses of air mass trajectories and fire spots demonstrated that the seasonal variations of anhydrosugars are caused by long-range transport of BB emissions from the Asian continent. We found winter maxima of anhydrosugars, which may be associated with open burning and domestic heating and cooking in northern and northeastern China, Mongolia and Russia and with the enhanced westerly winds. The monthly averaged levoglucosan / mannosan ratios were lower (2.1-4.8) in May-June and higher (13.3-13.9) in November-December. The lower values may be associated with softwood burning in northern China, Korea and southwestern Japan whereas the higher values are probably caused by agricultural waste burning of maize straw in the North China Plain. Anhydrosugars comprised 0.22% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and 0.13% of organic carbon (OC). The highest values to WSOC (0.37%) and OC (0.25%) were found in winter, again indicating an important BB contribution to Okinawa aerosols in winter. This study provides useful information to better understand the effect of East Asian biomass burning on the air quality in the western North Pacific Rim.

  10. Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols collected in the historic Stockade District of Schenectady, New York, was performed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. This is part of a systematic study in the Mohawk River Valley of upstate New York to identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants and the connection between aerosols, the deposition of pollution, and the uptake of pollutants by wildlife and vegetation. The atmospheric aerosols were collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor that allows for the analysis of the particulate matter as a function of particle size. The samples were bombarded with 2-MeV proton beams from the Union College Pelletron Accelerator and the energy spectra of the X-rays were measured with a silicon drift detector. The X-ray spectra were analyzed using GUPIX software to extract the elemental concentrations of the particulate matter. The sample collection and analysis will be described, and preliminary results will be presented.

  11. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 μm), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 μm) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  12. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I

  13. Raman microscopy of size-segregated aerosol particles, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Kistler, Magdalena; Matzl, Julia; Schauer, Gerhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Lohninger, Johann; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Size classified aerosol samples were collected using low pressure impactors in July 2013 at the high alpine background site Sonnnblick. The Sonnblick Observatory is located in the Austrian Alps, at the summit of Sonnblick 3100 m asl. Sampling was performed in parallel on the platform of the Observatory and after the aerosol inlet. The inlet is constructed as a whole air inlet and is operated at an overall sampling flow of 137 lpm and heated to 30 °C. Size cuts of the eight stage low pressure impactors were from 0.1 to 12.8 µm a.d.. Alumina foils were used as sample substrates for the impactor stages. In addition to the size classified aerosol sampling overall aerosol mass (Sharp Monitor 5030, Thermo Scientific) and number concentrations (TSI, CPC 3022a; TCC-3, Klotz) were determined. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the alumina foils at a resolution of about 0.5 µm. The Raman microscope is equipped with a laser with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm and a grating with 300 gr/mm. Both optical images and the related chemical images were combined and a chemometric investigation of the combined images was done using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs). Based on the well-known environment, a basic assignment of Raman signals of single particles is possible at a sufficient certainty. Main aerosol constituents e.g. like sulfates, black carbon and mineral particles could be identified. First results of the chemical imaging of size-segregated aerosol, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory, will be discussed with respect to standardized long-term measurements at the sampling station. Further, advantages and disadvantages of chemical imaging with subsequent chemometric investigation of the single images will be discussed and compared to the established methods of aerosol analysis. The chemometric analysis of the dataset is focused on mixing and variation of single compounds at

  14. Reconstruction of passive open-path FTIR ambient spectra using meteorological measurements and its application for detection of aerosol cloud drift.

    PubMed

    Kira, Oz; Dubowski, Yael; Linker, Raphael

    2015-07-27

    Remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols is of great importance to public and environmental health. This research promotes a simple way of detecting an aerosol cloud using a passive Open Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) system, without utilizing radiative transfer models and without relying on an artificial light source. Meteorological measurements (temperature, relative humidity and solar irradiance), and chemometric methods (multiple linear regression and artificial neural networks) together with previous cloud-free OP-FTIR measurements were used to estimate the ambient spectrum in real time. The cloud detection process included a statistical comparison between the estimated cloud-free signal and the measured OP-FTIR signal. During the study we were able to successfully detect several aerosol clouds (water spray) in controlled conditions as well as during agricultural pesticide spraying in an orchard. PMID:26367691

  15. Ambient spark generation to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles in continuous aerosol manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-11-01

    We report the use of spark generation in an inert gas atmosphere to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles (CEMNs) in a continuous aerosol manner using a metal (nickel, cobalt, iron)-graphite carbon electrode configuration without the use of a vacuum. The spark-generated particles consisted of CEMNs and carbonaceous aggregated debris. The outer layer of the CEMNs showed parallel fringes (ordered graphitic nanostructures) while the debris consisted of disordered nanostructures. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that both metal and graphite in the CEMNs were the pure elements except for iron-carbon, which contained a carbide phase. Based on the order of the activation energies for carbon diffusion into a metal: iron-carbon (10.5-16.5 kcal mol-1) < cobalt-carbon (34.7 kcal mol-1) ~ nickel-carbon (33.0-34.8 kcal mol-1), it was concluded that carbide particles form more easily from elemental iron than nickel or cobalt. The metal-to-carbon mass fractions of the spark-generated particles from nickel (anode)-carbon (cathode), cobalt-carbon, and iron-carbon spark configurations were 18.7, 28.3, and 11.2%, respectively, while the mass fractions for the configurations of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) were 6.4, 9.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Similarly, the yield of CEMNs from the metal (anode)-carbon (cathode) electrodes was higher (54, 61, and 53%) than that of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) electrodes (18, 30, and 18%).

  16. Radiocarbon Analysis of Elemental Carbon and Total Organic Carbon in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, T.; Handa, D.; Nakajima, H.; Kumata, H.; Suzuki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2008-12-01

    A study was initiated to understand the sources and behaviors of carbon-containing compounds in the atmospheric aerosols in East Asian region. As an initial attempt, we collected airborne particulate matter (APM) with diameter <10 micrometer (PM10) in Okinawa, Japan and analyzed 14C/12C ratio in EC and total organic carbon (TOC) to apportion source of biomass and fossil fuel combustion in PM10 aerosols. Okinawa is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia. Aerosol particles were collected at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) in Okinawa, Japan. Each sample was collected for two weeks with a high-volume air sampler at a rate of 1000 L min-1 to collect aerosol particles on a quartz filter, which was pre-combusted before use to eliminate residual organic compounds. Radiocarbon is measured in AMS facility (NIES-TERRA) at National Institute for Environmental Studies after preparing graphite. The results showed that during Asian dust events in March and April, both APM and EC in PM10 aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan were much higher than those of non-Asian dust event. The percent modern carbon (pMC) of EC and TOC was much smaller for the PM10 aerosols collected during Asian dust events than those of non-dust event. When maritime air mass prevailed, biomass originated organic compounds were the major TOC in the aerosols. We will report data on 14C/12C ratio of EC and TOC in PM10 aerosols collected at CHAAMS during March to October, 2008

  17. Local emission of primary air pollutants and its contribution to wet deposition and concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masahide; Hiraki, Takatoshi; Tomoyose, Nobutaka; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Izumi; Murano, Kentaro; Mukai, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    We studied wet deposition by precipitation and the concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in relation to the primary air pollutants discharged from domestic areas. The concentrations of aerosols and gases were influenced by nearby emissions except for non-sea-salt SO, which is transported long distances. The area facing the Sea of Japan showed much larger wet deposition than other areas, although the domestic emissions of the primary air pollutants there were small and showed a peak in wet deposition from October to March, as distinct from April to September in other areas. We performed the correlation analyses between wet deposition of each component and the product of the concentrations of corresponding aerosols and gases in ambient air and the two-thirds power of the precipitation. From the results, following scavenging processes were suggested. • Sulfate and ammonium were scavenged in precipitation as particulate matter such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4. • Nitrate was scavenged mainly in precipitation through gaseous HNO3. • Ammonium was complementarily scavenged in precipitation through aerosols such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4 and through gaseous NH3.

  18. Role of the ambient aerosol in the atmospheric processing of semivolatile contaminants: A parameterized numerical model (Gas-Particle Partitioning (GASPAR))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Nicola; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Forlano, Luigi

    2000-04-01

    A parameterized description of the ambient aerosol is the basis of a model that treats both gas-particle partitioning and aqueous phase chemical transformations of semivolatile contaminants. Dividing the aerosol population into source, size, hygroscopic, and compositional classes, it is possible to assess the importance of contaminant-aerosol interactions under varying meteorological conditions. Using mercury as a test case, the model provides not only the quantity and speciation of mercury associated with particulate matter for use in dry deposition models and in conjunction with dispersion/meteorological models, but shows conclusively that deliquesced aerosol particles are not simply transporters of adsorbed mercury, but play an active and significant role in the transformation of elemental to oxidized mercury. The sensitivity analysis carried out using a version of the Direct Decoupled Method has shown the transfer of Hg(II) to the gas phase from the aqueous phase to be highly dependent on the chloride ion concentration in the initial parameterization array which describes the ambient aerosol. The chloride ion concentration has a notable effect on the oxidized Hg that is associated with the particle when the chemistry model reaches steady state. The reason for this is clarified by the dependencies of the neutral Hg containing species concentrations on the rates of mass transfer and the initial concentrations. The presence of soot in the aerosol particles is shown to be particularly important in the partitioning of Hg(II) between the gas, aqueous and particulate phases. The implications, given the higher solubility of most oxidized mercury species compared to elemental mercury, are fundamental for the understanding of the cycling and fate of mercury in the environment.

  19. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  20. Organic analysis of ambient samples collected near Tank 241-C-103: Results from samples collected on May 12, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Lucke, R.B.; Young, J.S.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes organic analyses results from ambient samples collected both upwind and through the vapor sampling system (VSS) near Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-103 (referred to as Tank C-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed. Quantitative results were obtained for organic compounds. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. We observed 39. Of these, only one was observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrument detection limit. Dichloromethane was above the detection limits using both methods, but the result from the TO-14 method is traceable to a standard gas mixture and is considered more accurate. Organic analytes were found only in the sample collected through the VSS, suggesting that these compounds were residual contamination from a previous sampling job. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text.

  1. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric

  2. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    calibration is linear. Using samples in the calibration set that have a different OM / OC or ammonium / OC distributions than the test set leads to only a modest increase in bias and normalized error in the predicted samples. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with partial least squares regression is a robust method for accurately predicting TOR OC in IMPROVE network samples; providing complementary information to the organic functional group composition and organic aerosol mass estimated previously from the same set of sample spectra (Ruthenburg et al., 2014).

  3. Impact of Relative Humidity and Collection Media on Mycobacteriophage D29 Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyang; Wen, Zhanbo; Li, Na; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Hu, Lingfei; Dong, Xiaokai; Lu, Jianchun

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aerosol generation, methods of sampling, storage conditions, and relative humidity on the culturability of the mycobacteriophage D29. The lytic phage D29 can kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the phage aerosol can be treated as a potential tool for tuberculosis treatment. The culturability of D29 was tested using a test chamber designed for the bioaerosols research against three spray liquids (deionized water, phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and normal saline), four collection media (suspension medium [SM], nutrient broth, PBS, and deionized water), two sampling systems (the all-glass impinger AGI-30 and the Biosampler) and across a range of humidities (20 to 90%). The effect of storage conditions on the culturability of collected sample was also evaluated for the AGI-30 impinger. The results proved that viable phage D29 particles generated by deionized water were approximately 30- and 300-fold higher than PBS and normal saline, respectively. As collection media, SM buffer and nutrient broth were observed to yield a higher number of plaques compared to PBS and deionized water. No difference was observed in collection efficiency between AGI-30 and Biosampler with two detection methods (culture-based technique and real-time PCR). The culturability of collected D29 in SM buffer or nutrient broth can be maintained up to 12 h irrespective of storage temperature. Relative humidity was found to strongly influence airborne D29 culturability which is 2- to 20-fold higher in low humidity (25%) than medium (55%) or high (85%) humidity. This research will help identify the optimal means for the application of D29 aerosol in animal inhalation experiments. PMID:22194291

  4. Evaluations of the chemical mass balance method for determining contributions of gasoline and diesel exhaust to ambient carbonaceous aerosols.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Arnott, William P; Chow, Judith C; Zielinska, Barbara

    2007-06-01

    The US. Department of Energy Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study was conducted to assess the sources of uncertainties in using an organic compound-based chemical mass balance receptor model to quantify the relative contributions of emissions from gasoline (or spark ignition [SI]) and diesel (or compression ignition [CI]) engines to ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in California's South Coast Air Basin (SOCAB). In this study, several groups worked cooperatively on source and ambient sample collection and quality assurance aspects of the study but worked independently to perform chemical analysis and source apportionment. Ambient sampling included daily 24-hr PM2.5 samples at two air quality-monitoring stations, several regional urban locations, and along freeway routes and surface streets with varying proportions of automobile and truck traffic. Diesel exhaust was the dominant source of total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC) at the Azusa and downtown Los Angeles, CA, monitoring sites, but samples from the central part of the air basin showed nearly equal apportionments of CI and SI. CI apportionments to TC were mainly dependent on EC, which was sensitive to the analytical method used. Weekday contributions of CI exhaust were higher for Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE; 41+/-3.7%) than Speciation Trends Network (32+/-2.4%). EC had little effect on SI apportionment. SI apportionments were most sensitive to higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (indeno[123-cd]pyrene, benzo(ghi)perylene, and coronene) and several steranes and hopanes, which were associated mainly with high emitters. Apportionments were also sensitive to choice of source profiles. CI contributions varied from 30% to 60% of TC when using individual source profiles rather than the composites used in the final apportionments. The apportionment of SI vehicles varied from 1% to 12% of TC depending on the specific profile that was used

  5. OM/OC Ratio and Specific Attenuation Coefficient in Ambient Particulate Matter at a Rural Site in Southern Ontario: Implications for Aerosol Aging and Emission Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. W.; Huang, L.; Leaitch, R.; Sharma, S.; Brook, J.; Slowik, J.; Abbatt, J.

    2008-05-01

    Carbonaceous species (organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC)) contribute a large portion of atmospheric fine particle mass and influence air quality, human health, and climate forcing. However, their emission sources and atmospheric aging processes are not well understood. The OM/OC ratio, defined as the organic mass per unit OC mass, is useful to understand the degree of oxidation of aerosol particles in atmospheric processes. We define the modified BC/EC (mod BC/EC) ratio as the ratio of the non-scattering corrected absorption coefficient per unit mass of EC. The mod BC/EC ratio has a similar meaning as the site specific attenuation coefficient, which is an important parameter used to convert light absorption measurements to black carbon mass. The mod BC/EC ratio can vary due to light scattering effect on absorption measurements, in which the oxygenated organics may play a role. The pyrolysis organic carbon (POC) is defined as the carbon mass fraction obtained at T= 870°C under a pure helium environment using the thermal separation method [Huang et al., 2006]. Since POC mass is generally proportional to the amount of oxygenated OC, studying the relationships among OC, EC, POC, as well as OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios may help us understand the mechanisms of aerosol aging from different emission sources. Two 1-month field studies were conducted at a rural site in southern Ontario (NW of Toronto) during fall 2005 and spring 2007. Quartz filter samples were collected and analyzed for OC, POC, and EC concentrations using a thermal/optical method [Huang et al., 2006]. Together with the total organic matter measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the absorption coefficient obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), the OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios for ambient aerosols were obtained. Our results show that when air mass was mainly from south, OC, POC, and EC were relatively high, with average ratios of OC/EC, OM/OC, and POC/EC as 1

  6. Validation and Uncertainty Estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (Tau(sub M)) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56Tau(sub M))/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20Tau(sub M), comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  7. Validation and uncertainty estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-07-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (τM) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56τM)/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20τM, comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  8. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  9. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  10. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 1: ambient sampling.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected over a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). Three collocated low-volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended particulate matter, < 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) particulate matter, and < 2.5 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) particulate matter, were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a '1 in 6' day sampling schedule. Trace-element analysis was performed to measure levels of potentially harmful metals, while major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of small individual particles. Secondary electron images provided information on particle size and shape. This study shows the three main air pollutant types to be geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and heavy metal condensates (possibly from metals smelting and battery manufacturing facilities). Non-dust storm events resulted in elevated trace metal concentrations in Baghdad, Balad, and Taji in Iraq. Scanning-electron-microscopy secondary electron images of individual particles revealed no evidence of freshly fractured quartz grains. In all instances, quartz grains had rounded edges and mineral grains were generally coated by clay minerals and iron oxides. PMID:19235610

  11. Molecular Characterization of Marine Organic Aerosols Collected during a Round-the-World Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P.; Kawamura, K.; Miura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected on board the R/V Hakuho Maru during a round-the-world cruise (KH89-2) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. More than 140 organic species were detected in the marine aerosols and were grouped into 11 organic compound classes, including aliphatic lipids, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols, lignin/resin acids, sterols, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydroxy-/polyacids, aromatic acids, as well as secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers from the photooxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 0.94 to 98 ng m-3 (average 31 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in coastal regions (California Coast, South China Sea, and Western North Pacific) than in open marine areas (North Pacific and North Atlantic), suggesting that long-range atmospheric transport from the continents is the main source of marine organic aerosols. Isoprene SOA tracers, i.e., 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols, were detected in all the samples (0.11-22 ng m-3, average 3.6 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in the tropical regions. They accounted for 0.48-29% of the total identified organics. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, secondary oxidation products (30-31%), fossil fuel combustion products (27-28%), as well as marine natural emissions (22-34%) were found as major contributors to the marine aerosols. In California Coast, North Indian Ocean and South China Sea, secondary oxidation products can contribute 44-55% of the total identified organics, followed by terrestrial natural emissions (12-27%), while biomass burning emissions were found to contribute only 1-2%. However, in the western North Pacific near the Asian continent, fossil fuel combustion (27%) and

  12. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates.

  13. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Newton, G J; Hoover, M D; Barr, E B; Wong, B A; Ritter, P D

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates. PMID:3425551

  14. Model Evaluation of Aerosol Wet Scavenging in Deep Convective Clouds Based on Observations Collected during the DC3 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Ghan, S. J.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barth, M. C.; Fan, J.; Morrison, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Bela, M. M.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective storms greatly influence the vertical distribution of aerosols by transporting aerosols from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and by removing aerosols through wet scavenging processes. Model representation of wet scavenging is a major uncertainty in simulating the vertical distribution of aerosols due partly to limited constraints by observations. The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep mid-latitude continental convective clouds is studied for a severe storm case in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains site on May 29, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign. A new budget analysis approach is developed to characterize the convective transport to the upper troposphere based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases (i.e., CO, acetone, and benzene). A similar budget framework is applied to aerosols combined with the known transport efficiency to estimate wet-scavenging efficiency. The chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) simulates the storm initiation timing and structure reasonably well when compared against radar observations from the NSSL national 3-D reflectivity Mosaic data. Simulated vertical profiles of humidity and temperature also closely agree with radiosonde measurements before and during the storm. High scavenging efficiencies (~80%) for aerosol number (Dp < 2.5μm) and mass (Dp < 1μm) are obtained from the observations. Both observation analyses and the simulation show that, between the two dominant aerosol species, organic aerosol shows a slightly higher scavenging efficiency than sulfate aerosol, and higher scavenging efficiency is found for larger particle sizes (0.15 - 2.5μm versus 0.03 - 0.15μm). However, the model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency (by up to 50%), in general, for both mass and number concentrations. The effect of neglecting secondary

  15. Vertical distribution of optical and micro-physical properties of ambient aerosols during dry haze periods in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghang; Liu, Qiong; Geng, Fuhai; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Changjie; Xu, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Based on the lidar data obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), the vertical distributions of aerosols are revealed during dry haze periods in the Shanghai vicinity by analyzing the optical and micro-physical parameters including total attenuated backscatter coefficient (TABC), volume depolarization ratio (VDR) and total attenuated color ratio (TACR). The preliminary conclusion is that when dry haze occurs in the Shanghai vicinity, smoke and maritime aerosols are the major types in summer and autumn and aerosols might be affected by long-distance transport of dust in spring; lower troposphere below 2 km is the layer polluted most severely and aerosol scattering with relatively irregular shape is much stronger than that of aerosols with relatively regular shape within 2-10 km in middle and upper troposphere; relatively large aerosols appear more frequently in lower (0-2 km) and middle troposphere (2-6 km) than those in upper troposphere (6-10 km). In addition, HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model is applied to analyze the aerosol sources during two typical episodes. The results indicate that the middle and upper troposphere in the Shanghai vicinity are affected by the long-distance transport of dusts from northwest of China or other upstream regions. The high aerosol concentrations in the Shanghai vicinity are mainly caused not only by local human activities but also by the long-distance transport from other places.

  16. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  17. Field test of a new instrument to measure UV/Vis (300-700 nm) ambient aerosol extinction spectra in Colorado during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R.; Scheuer, E. M.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Troop, D.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    An optical instrument has been developed to investigate aerosol extinction spectra in the ambient atmosphere. Based on a White-type cell design and using a differential optical approach, aerosol extinction spectra over the 300-700 nm ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) wavelength range are obtained. Laboratory tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) in March 2014 showed good agreement with Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS PMex, Aerodyne Research) extinction measurements (at 450, 530, and 630 nm) for a variety of aerosols, e.g., scatterers such as polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate; absorbers such as dust (including pigmented minerals), smoke (generated in a miniCAST burning propane) and laboratory smoke analogs (e.g., fullerene soot and aquadag). The instrument was field tested in Colorado in July and August 2014 aboard the NASA mobile laboratory at various ground sites during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. A description of the instrument, results from the laboratory tests, and summer field data will be presented. The instrument provides a new tool for probing in situ aerosol optical properties that may help inform remote sensing approaches well into the UV range.

  18. Integrated chemical species analysis with source-receptor modeling results to characterize the effects of terrain and monsoon on ambient aerosols in a basin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fan; Liang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-05-01

    This study integrated estimated oxidation ratio of sulfur (SOR) and oxidation ratio of nitrogen (NOR) with source-receptor modeling results to identify the effects of terrain and monsoons on ambient aerosols in an urban area (north basin) and a rural area (south basin) of the Taichung Basin. The estimated results indicate that the conversion of sulfur mainly occurs in fine particles (PM₂.₅), whereas the conversion of nitrogen occurs in approximately equal quantities of PM₂.₅ and coarse particles (PM₂.₅-₁₀). The results show a direct relationship for PM₂.₅ between the modeling results with SOR and NOR. The high PM₂.₅ SOR, NOR, and secondary aerosol values all occurred in the upwind area during both monsoons; this shows that the photochemical reaction and the terrain effect on the pollutant transmission were significant in the basin. Additionally, the urban heat island effect on the urban area and the valley effect on the rural area were significant. The results show that secondary aerosol in PM₂.₅-₁₀ contributed approximately 10 % during both monsoons, and the difference in the contribution from secondary aerosol between both areas was small. Vehicle exhaust emissions and wind-borne dust were two crucial PM2.5-10 contributors during both monsoons; their average contributions in both areas were higher than 34 and 32 %, respectively. PMID:22996820

  19. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-27

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  20. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN AMBIENT AIR COLLECTED ON GLASS-FIBER FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic with 25 other elements are simultaneously determined in ambient air samples collected on glass-fiber filter composites at 250 United States sites. The instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique combined with the power of a dedicated mini-computer resulted in...

  1. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Four-year long-path monitoring of ambient aerosol extinction at a central European urban site: dependence on relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupin, A.; Ansmann, A.; Engelmann, R.; Seifert, P.; Müller, T.

    2016-02-01

    The ambient aerosol particle extinction coefficient is measured with the Spectral Aerosol Extinction Monitoring System (SÆMS) along a 2.84 km horizontal path at 30-50 m height above ground in the urban environment of Leipzig (51.3° N, 12.4° E), Germany, since 2009. The dependence of the particle extinction coefficient (wavelength range from 300 to 1000 nm) on relative humidity up to almost 100 % was investigated. The main results are presented. For the wavelength of 550 nm, the mean extinction enhancement factor was found to be 1.75 ± 0.4 for an increase of relative humidity from 40 to 80 %. The respective 4-year mean extinction enhancement factor is 2.8 ± 0.6 for a relative-humidity increase from 40 to 95 %. A parameterization of the dependency of the urban particle extinction coefficient on relative humidity is presented. A mean hygroscopic exponent of 0.46 for the 2009-2012 period was determined. Based on a backward trajectory cluster analysis, the dependence of several aerosol optical properties for eight air flow regimes was investigated. Large differences were not found, indicating that local pollution sources widely control the aerosol conditions over the urban site. The comparison of the SÆMS extinction coefficient statistics with respective statistics from ambient AERONET sun photometer observations yields good agreement. Also, time series of the particle extinction coefficient computed from in situ-measured dry particle size distributions and humidity-corrected SÆMS extinction values (for 40 % relative humidity) were found in good overall consistency, which verifies the applicability of the developed humidity parameterization scheme. The analysis of the spectral dependence of particle extinction (Ångström exponent) revealed an increase of the 390-881 nm Ångström exponent from, on average, 0.3 (at 30 % relative humidity) to 1.3 (at 95 % relative humidity) for the 4-year period.

  3. Differences in the OC/EC Ratios that Characterize Ambient and Source Aerosols due to Thermal-Optical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure the OC/EC (organic carbon/elemental carbon) and EC/TC (elemental carbon/total carbon) ratios in source and atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a dual-optical carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of...

  4. ANALYSIS OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL COMPOUNDS FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF D-LIMONENE IN THE PRESENCE OF NO X AND THEIR DETECTION IN AMBIENT PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of a d-limonene/NOx/air mixture was carried out. SOA, generated in a smog chamber, was collected on Zefluor filters. To determine the structural characteristics of the compounds, the filter sample...

  5. 78 FR 25078 - Information Collection Request Submitted to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment Request; Ambient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... previously requested via the Federal Register (78 FR 12052) on February 21, 2013 during a 60-day comment...), ``Nitrogen Oxides Ambient Air Monitoring (Renewal)'' (EPA ICR No. 2358.04, OMB Control No. 2060-0638) to the... approved under the Nitrogen Oxides Ambient Monitoring ICR (OMB 2060-0638, EPA ICR Number 2358.03) and...

  6. Ambient flow studies and particulate collection measurements: A laminar flow, reduced entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, G.P.; Furlong, D.A.; Bahner, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    This report describes ambient temperature testing of an electrostatic precipitator having a portion of the main precipitator flow drawn through porous (fabric) plates. The effects of flow through the plates (side flow) on precipitator turbulence and particulate removal efficiency are investigated. Ambient temperature particulate removal efficiency measurements are conducted on both indoor air dust, and on injected coal fly ash. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Real-time measurements of secondary organic aerosol formation and aging from ambient air in an oxidation flow reactor in the Los Angeles area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Peng, Z.; Palm, B. B.; Hu, W.; Day, D. A.; Li, R.; Cubison, M. J.; Brune, W. H.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Field studies in polluted areas over the last decade have observed large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that is often poorly captured by models. The study of SOA formation using ambient data is often confounded by the effects of advection, vertical mixing, emissions, and variable degrees of photochemical aging. An Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) was deployed to study SOA formation in real-time during the CalNex campaign in Pasadena, CA, in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling ambient and reactor-aged air. The reactor produced OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air, achieving equivalent atmospheric aging from hours up to several weeks in 3 min of processing. OH radical concentration was continuously stepped, obtaining measurements of real-time SOA formation and oxidation at multiple equivalent ages from 0.8 days-6.4 weeks. Enhancement of OA from aging showed a maximum net SOA production between 0.8-6 days of aging with net OA mass loss beyond 2 weeks. Reactor SOA mass peaked at night, in the absence of ambient photochemistry, and correlated with trimethylbenzene concentrations. Reactor SOA formation was inversely correlated with ambient SOA and Ox, which along with the short-lived VOC correlation, indicates the importance of relatively reactive (τOH ∼ 0.3 day) SOA precursors in the LA-Basin. Evolution of the elemental composition in the reactor was similar to trends observed in the atmosphere (O : C vs. H : C slope ∼ -0.65). Oxidation state of carbon (OSC) in reactor SOA increased steeply with age and remained elevated (OSC ∼ 2) at the highest photochemical ages probed. The ratio of OA in the reactor output to excess CO (ΔCO, ambient CO above regional background) vs. photochemical age is similar to previous studies at low to moderate ages and also extends to higher ages where OA loss dominates. The mass added at low

  8. Real-time characterization of the size and chemical composition of individual particles in ambient aerosol systems in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.A.; Prather, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosols, although ubiquitous, are highly diverse and continually fluctuating systems. A typical aerosol system may consist of particles with diameters between {approximately}0.002 {mu}m and {approximately}200 {mu}m. Even in rural or pristine areas, atmospheric particle concentration is significant, with concentrations up to 10{sup 8} particles/cm{sup 3} not being uncommon. Chemical composition of atmospheric particles vary from simple water droplets or acidic ices to soot particles and cigarette smoke. Due to changes in atmospheric conditions, processes such as nucleation, coagulation or heterogeneous chemistry may effect both physical and chemical properties of individual particles over relatively short time intervals. Recently, aerosol measurement techniques are focusing on determining the size and/or chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. This research group has recently developed aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), a technique which allows for real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Single particle measurements are performed in one instrument using dual laser aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is briefly described in several other abstracts in this publication.

  9. Chemical and statistical interpretation of sized aerosol particles collected at an urban site in Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridou, Roxani; Papazova, Petia; Simeonova, Pavlina; Simeonov, Vasil

    2013-01-01

    The size distribution of aerosol particles (PM0.015-PM18) in relation to their soluble inorganic species and total water soluble organic compounds (WSOC) was investigated at an urban site of Thessaloniki, Northern Greece. The sampling period was from February to July 2007. The determined compounds were compared with mass concentrations of the PM fractions for nano (N: 0.015 < Dp < 0.06), ultrafine (UFP: 0.015 < Dp < 0.125), fine (FP: 0.015 < Dp < 2.0) and coarse particles (CP: 2.0 < Dp < 8.0) in order to perform mass closure of the water soluble content for the respective fractions. Electrolytes were the dominant species in all fractions (24-27%), followed by WSOC (16-23%). The water soluble inorganic and organic content was found to account for 53% of the nanoparticle, 48% of the ultrafine particle, 45% of the fine particle and 44% of the coarse particle mass. Correlations between the analyzed species were performed and the effect of local and long-range transported emissions was examined by wind direction and backward air mass trajectories. Multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) of the collected data was performed in order to reveal the specific data structure. Possible sources of air pollution were identified and an attempt is made to find patterns of similarity between the different sized aerosols and the seasons of monitoring. It was proven that several major latent factors are responsible for the data structure despite the size of the aerosols - mineral (soil) dust, sea sprays, secondary emissions, combustion sources and industrial impact. The seasonal separation proved to be not very specific. PMID:24007436

  10. Individual Particle TOF-SIMS Imaging Analysis of Aerosol Collected During the April 2001 Asian Dust Event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy can provide information regarding the surface chemistry, including both organic and inorganic compounds, of individual atmospheric aerosol in themicrometer size range. X-ray analysis has commonly been used to analyze the composition of single particles but has several important limitations. Principally, X-ray analysis cannot be used to study organic compounds in the aerosol, it offers low sensitivity for light elements common in crustal material and it cannot distinguish isotopes. TOF-SIMS has the potential to provide superior performance in these areas. We have developed statistical image processing methods to allow extraction of individual particle mass spectra from TOF-SIMS images. In mid April 2001 a strong Asian dust event was tracked by the NASA TOMS satellite across the Pacific Ocean and into the continental United States. While Asian dust deposition is common in Hawaii, strong events characterized by significant visibility degradation have been much less frequently reported in the Rocky Mountain west. Samples were taken during and after the event at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC). Size segregated samples were collected on Al substrates using an 8 stage cascade impactor and total aerosol samples were collected with 47 mm Fluoropore filters. Surface and depth profile analysis of the particles was performed using a Phi Trift I TOF-SIMS instrument. Statistical methods, including PCA, mixture models and neural networks, were used to extract spectra of individual particles from the TOF-SIMS images and to classify particles based on their surface chemistry and depth profiles. Differences in both the chemistry and size distribution of the particles could be seen between the aerosol collected during the Asian dust event and aerosol collected post-event at the University of Utah site. Positive TOF-SIMS spectra of SLC urban aerosol were dominated by sub-micrometer organics, and negative spectra