Sample records for ambient aerosols collected

  1. A 113 L/min ambient aerosol sampler for collection of thoracic and respirable fractions

    E-print Network

    Rue, Clayton Matthew

    1981-01-01

    A 113 L/min AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR COLLECTION OF THORACIC AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS A Thesis by Clayton Matthew Rue Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the i equirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A 113 L/min AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR COLLECTION OF THORACIC AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS A Thesis by Clayton Matthew Rue Approved as to style arid content by: A. R. McFarland (C. E...

  2. CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACTABLE ORGANIC MATTER FROM AMBIENT AEROSOLS COLLECTED IN BOISE, ID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine fraction (2.5 micron) ambient air aerosols were collected in Boise, ID between November, 1986, and February, 1987. wo composite samples of extractable organic matter (EOM) were prepared with partial resolution of chemicals from Boise's wood smoke (WS) and mobile source (MS) ...

  3. COMMENTS ON "SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANONITRATES IN AMBIENT AEROSOL COLLECTED IN HOUSTON, TEXAS," AEROSOL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 36:983-992 (2002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previous article in this journal reported the results of an FTIR analysis of the ambient aerosol collected during a file study in Houston, Texas during August and September of 2000. The emphasis of that article was on the organonitrates collected during the study. In the disc...

  4. Chemical characterization of ambient aerosol collected during the northeast monsoon season over the Arabian Sea: Anions and cations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne M. Johansen; Michael R. Hoffmann

    2004-01-01

    Ambient aerosol samples were collected over the Arabian Sea during the month of March 1997, aboard the German R\\/V Sonne, as part of the German JGOFS project (Joint Global Ocean Flux Study). This is the third study in a series of analogous measurements taken over the Arabian Sea during different seasons of the monsoon. Dichotomous high volume collector samples were

  5. Chemical characterization of ambient aerosol collected during the northeast monsoon season over the Arabian Sea: Anions and cations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne M. Johansen

    2004-01-01

    (1) Ambient aerosol samples were collected over the Arabian Sea during the month of March 1997, aboard the German R\\/V Sonne, as part of the German JGOFS project (Joint Global Ocean Flux Study). This is the third study in a series of analogous measurements taken over the Arabian Sea during different seasons of the monsoon. Dichotomous high volume collector samples

  6. Volatile organic compounds in ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Kumi; Mizuno, Riichi; Igawa, Manabu

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the concentration levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient aerosols, monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) in the particulate phase were measured simultaneously with those in the gas phase in the urban atmosphere. Six compounds were detected in the aerosols at concentrations from 0.051 (1,2-dichloroethane) to 1.75 ng m - 3 (benzene). Benzene was detected as the most dominant compound in the aerosols, although toluene was the most dominant compound in the gas phase. The VOCs in the aerosols had concentrations comparable to those reported for some semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) in the aerosols. The concentrations of the VOCs in the aerosols were primarily controlled by the aerosol mass loading. Temperature and relative humidity had no significant effect on the gas/particle partitioning of the VOCs. Our results also suggested that the hygroscopic properties of the aerosols should be considered to discuss the partitioning of the VOCs.

  7. Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose L. Jimenez; John T. Jayne; Quan Shi; Charles E. Kolb; Douglas R. Worsnop; Ivan Yourshaw; John H. Seinfeld; Richard C. Flagan; Xuefeng Zhang; Kenneth A. Smith; James W. Morris; Paul Davidovits

    2003-01-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) has been designed to measure size-resolved mass distributions and total mass loadings of volatile and semivolatile chemical species in\\/on submicron particles. This paper describes the application of this instrument to ambient aerosol sampling. The AMS uses an aerodynamic lens to focus the particles into a narrow beam, a roughened cartridge heater to vaporize them

  8. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  9. Analytical techniques for ambient sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Kumar, R.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    Work done to further develop the infrared spectroscopic analytical method for the analysis of atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as some exploratory work on a new procedure for determining proton acidity in aerosol samples is described. Earlier work had led to the successful use of infrared (ir) spectrophotometry for the analysis of nitrate, ammonium, and neutral and acidic sulfates in aerosol samples collected by an impactor on a Mylar-film substrate. In this work, a filter-extraction method was developed to prepare filter-collected aerosol samples for ir analysis. A study was made comparing the ir analytical results on filter-collected samples with impactor-collected samples. Also, the infrared analytical technique was compared in field studies with light-scattering techniques for aerosol analysis. A highly sensitive instrument for aerosol analysis using attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy was designed, built, and tested. This instrument provides a measurement sensitivity much greater (by a factor of 6 for SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) than that obtainable using the KBr-pellet method. This instrument collect size- and time-resolved samples and is potentially capable of providing automated, near real-time aerosol analysis. Exploratory work on a novel approach to the determination of proton acidity in filter- or impactor-collected aerosol samples is also described. In this technique, the acidic sample is reacted with an access of a tagged, vapor-phase base. The unreacted base is flushed off and the amount of the tag retained by the sample is a direct measure of the proton acidity of the sample. The base was tagged with Ge, which can be conveniently determined by the x-ray fluorescence technique.

  10. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Arneth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-01

    Subarctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68° latitude and 385 m above sea level (m asl), this site is classified as a semicontinuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Back trajectories showed that three distinct air masses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with air mass origin to the south, northeast, or west, suggesting that particle source and transport were important factors. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at midlatitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ˜200- to 2000-nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust that had interacted with gas-phase species was observed in all air masses. Sea salt, due to the uptake of nitrate species and loss of chlorine, was the aerosol type that most varied chemically with air mass.

  11. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01

    (. 34-cm to 1, 02-cm diameter) even w1th isokinetic sampling give up to 20-percent bias to the measured con- centrat1on. He also noted an 1ncrease in concentration ratio for sub- isokinetic sampling of particles smaller than 5 qm due to particle... oriented inlet (16, 17). The wind tunnel used in that study had a cross-section of 3. 65 m wide x 1. 83 m high and was operated over a range of velocities from 1. 5 to 4. 5 m/s. Flow turbulence intensity could be set at 8 percent and &I percent...

  12. Ambient Aerosol Cloud-Forming Potential: CCN Closure Analysis in Boise, Idaho

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Ambient Aerosol Cloud-Forming Potential: CCN Closure Analysis in Boise, Idaho Ryan Collins1 to conduct a closure analysis. The data collection for this project took place in Boise, Idaho from November ­ Aerosol data Logan Callen ­ Preliminary analysis WSU LAR Boise campaign team members Idaho Department

  13. GC/MS ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT AIR AEROSOLS IN THE HOUSTON, TEXAS AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air aerosols and vapor samples were collected by Radian Corp., Austin, TX. in the Houston, Texas area using three different samplers. A High Volume sampler and dichotomous sampler were used for the collection of particulate matter; vapor-phase organic samples were collect...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTABLE DEVICE TO COLLECT SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative, interference-free method for collecting sulfuric acid aerosol on a filter was developed and field tested. Since previous research found that severe losses of sulfuric aicd were caused by ammonia, ambient particulate material, and other interferents, a method was n...

  15. AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT AIR NEAR A COMMERCIAL LURGI COAL GASIFICATION PLANT, KOSOVO REGION, YUGOSLAVIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air samples were collected continuously from May 14-29, 1980 to determine if the emissions from a commercial Lurgi coal gasification plant could be identified downwind of the facility. Physical, inorganic, and organic analyses were carried out on the collected aerosol sam...

  16. Rapid Sampling of Individual Organic Aerosol Species in Ambient Air with the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Dreyfus; Murray V. Johnston

    2008-01-01

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. In the work presented here, high-time resolution ambient measurements (3.5 minutes) are achieved by using the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) in conjunction with the mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (m-VACES).

  17. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  18. Transport and characterization of ambient biological aerosol near Laurel, MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarpia, J. L.; Cunningham, D.; Gilberry, J.; Kim, S.; Smith, E. E.; Ratnesar-Shumate, S.; Quizon, J.

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial aerosol have been observed and studied in the ambient environment since the mid nineteenth century. These studies have sought to provide a better understanding of the diversity, variability and factors that control the biological aerosol population. In this study, we show comparisons between diversity of culturable bacteria and fungi, using culture and clinical biochemical tests, and 16S rRNA diversity using Affymetrix PhyloChips. Comparing the culturable fraction and surveying the total 16S rRNA of each sample provides a comprehensive look at the bacterial population studied and allows comparison with previous studies. Thirty-six hour back-trajectories of the air parcels sampled, over the two day period beginning 4 November 2008, provide information on the sources of aerosol sampled on the campus of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, MD. This study indicates that back-trajectory modeling of air parcels may provide insights into the observed diversity of biological aerosol.

  19. AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT BIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AM AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENTAMBIAMBIENT AMBIENTAMBIAMBIENT AMBIENTAMBIAMBI AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIEN AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT AMBIENT

  20. ISS Ambient Air Quality: Updated Inventory of Known Aerosol Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft cabin air quality is of fundamental importance to crew health, with concerns encompassing both gaseous contaminants and particulate matter. Little opportunity exists for direct measurement of aerosol concentrations on the International Space Station (ISS), however, an aerosol source model was developed for the purpose of filtration and ventilation systems design. This model has successfully been applied, however, since the initial effort, an increase in the number of crewmembers from 3 to 6 and new processes on board the ISS necessitate an updated aerosol inventory to accurately reflect the current ambient aerosol conditions. Results from recent analyses of dust samples from ISS, combined with a literature review provide new predicted aerosol emission rates in terms of size-segregated mass and number concentration. Some new aerosol sources have been considered and added to the existing array of materials. The goal of this work is to provide updated filtration model inputs which can verify that the current ISS filtration system is adequate and filter lifetime targets are met. This inventory of aerosol sources is applicable to other spacecraft, and becomes more important as NASA considers future long term exploration missions, which will preclude the opportunity for resupply of filtration products.

  1. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol <0.1 ?m aerodynamic equivalent diameter were collected, elutriated and used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter ? (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than ?chem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  2. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  3. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  4. Sources of ambient submicron aerosol in the Zurich metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Claudia; Richter, Rene; Decarlo, Peter F.; Chirico, Roberto; Heringa, Maarten F.; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-05-01

    For the data presented here, two Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) (Canagaratna, 2007) were deployed together with additional instrumentation in the metropolitan area of Zurich in winter 2007-8 and 2008-9. A low mixing layer height and stable air masses due to thermal inversions (typically occurring during winter time) often lead to an accumulation of particulate matter (PM) emissions in the region of Zurich. The quantification of various types of aerosol components is important for source identification which in turn is the basis of mitigation activities. A high-resolution time-of-flight AMS was stationed at an urban courtyard in the center, shielded against direct traffic emissions. A quadrupole-based AMS was deployed in a mobile van allowing for on-road measurements and investigations into the spatial variability of aerosol concentration and composition. Contributions of different source types to ambient submicron aerosol mass were analyzed using factor analytical modelling results. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the organic mass spectral matrix (Lanz, 2007) to determine source profiles and strengths. Results indicate that traffic emissions are the main contributor to primary submicron aerosol mass concentrations measured on-road, followed by emissions from domestic wood burning for heating purposes. Oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), most of which is secondary, represents the remaining fraction. At the urban site, the measured aerosol composition is more strongly influenced by secondary species. The relative mass contributions of OOA, sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium contributions are higher than on-road. An important task in terms of local mitigation activities is the distinction and quantification of contributions of local emissions versus regional background to ambient particulate matter. We will present a new method to estimate local contributions based on mobile measurements data. Canagaratna, M. R., et al. (2007). Mass Spectrom. Rev., 26: 185-222. Lanz, V. A., et al. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7: 1503-1522

  5. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  6. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.; Salt, K.; Nordmeyer, T.; Fergenson, D.; Morrical, B.

    1995-12-31

    Particulate pollution is an area of growing concern in light of recent studies which suggest a link between high concentrations of ambient PM{sub 10} (particles with diameters equal to or less than 10 {mu}m) and adverse health effects ranging from respiratory ailments to premature death. However, analytical chemistry techniques aimed at sampling and analysis of atmospheric aerosols are extremely limited in comparison to the number of methods that exist for studying gas phase smog components. As a result, current government regulations for levels of ambient particulates are necessarily general, lacking any chemical specificity. The authors have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. In one of the aerosol studies performed in this laboratory, this instrument is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. To date, the authors have observed very distinct size/composition correlations for organic and inorganic particles.

  7. Collection Efficiencies in an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer as a Function of Particle Phase for Laboratory Generated Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brendan M. Matthew; Ann M. Middlebrook; Timothy B. Onasch

    2008-01-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is a useful tool to study ambient particles. To be quantitative, the mass or (number) of particles detected by the AMS relative to the mass (or number) of particles sampled by the AMS, or the AMS collection efficiency (CE), must be known. Here we investigated the effect of particulate phase on AMS CE for

  8. Processing of Ambient Aerosols During Fog Events: Role of Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Gupta, T.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bhattu, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fog is a major processing and removal agent of ambient aerosols. Enhanced secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production has been reported during fog events indicating major role of aqueous processing. Present study was carried out in a heavily polluted city of Kanpur situated in Indo-Gangetic plain of India,from 02- 18 Nov, 2012 and then from 22 Dec, 2012 to 10 January, 2013. 12 fog events were identified from 22 Dec to 10 January based on low visibility (< 300 m) with high liquid water content (~ 0.04 g/m3) and termed as foggy period while remaining as non-foggy period. Foggy period typically showed very high RH (~95%), low temperatures (~2-6°C) compared to non-foggy period. An array of instruments were deployed during this campaign for real time measurement of aerosol physico-chemical properties - High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCN), fog water collector and Vaisala RH & T sensor. Average aerosol loading during foggy period was 104×44 ?g/m3, much higher than 73×49 ?g/m3of non-foggy period, but during actual fog events the loading reduced to 85×23 ?g/m3 indicating overall aerosol removal by fog. Overall aerosol composition during both the period was dominated by organics which constitutes about 60-70% of the total AMS mass followed by nitrate, but during foggy period sulfate was found to be increased many fold.HR analysis of AMS data revealed noticeable differences in the diurnal average values of O:C ratio between foggy and non -foggy period. Although diurnal O:C ratio was highest around noontime for both period but during fog events, night to early morning O:C ratio was 0.51×0.04, higher than that of non-foggy period 0.44×0.07, clearly indicating enhanced oxidation. AMS data also showed that mode size of all the species specially of organics and sulphate had shifted to a higher diameter during foggy period, an indication of secondary processing. Aerosol acidity which is calculated from ratio of stoichiometric neutralization of ammonium to sulphate, nitrate and chloride, is playing a major role in aerosol processing. Highly oxidized aerosols (O:C> 0.6) in both periods were always either less acidic or completely neutralized, whereas less oxidized aerosols (O:C < 0.35) were either highly or mildly acidic in nature.Van Krevelen diagram of H/C vs O/C also showed different slopes for acidic and neutralized aerosols.Both these findings indicate that different processing mechanisms are operating under acidic and neutralized conditions.Organic hygroscopicity showed a linear relationship with oxidation level of organics or O:C ratio, which in turn depends on acidity,indicate neutralized aerosol to be most likely more CCN active than acidic aerosol.

  9. Collection of charged aerosol particles in granular beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Takahashi; S. A. Walata; C. Tien

    1985-01-01

    Collection of charged aerosol particles in granular beds was studied experimentally. The major emphasis was placed on examining the effect of the deposition of charged aerosols on filter performances. The enhancement of the unit collector efficiency due to deposition was found to be more pronounced in the case of charged aerosols than neutral aerosols.

  10. Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-08-15

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

  11. Ambient and indoor particulate aerosols generated by dairies in the Southern High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to quantify and size ambient aerosolized dust in and around the facilities of four Southern High Plains dairies of New Mexico and to determine where health of workers might be vulnerable to particulate aerosols, based on aerosol concentrations that exceed national air quality sta...

  12. 13C measurements on organic aerosol - a comparison of sources with ambient samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Meusinger, Carl; Oyama, Beatriz; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon isotopes 12C and 13C can be used to get information about sources and processing of organic aerosol (OA). We developed and tested a method to measure ?13C values of OA collected on filter samples in different volatility classes. These filter samples are introduced into an oven, where organic compounds are thermally desorbed in He at different temperatures. The compounds released at each temperature step are oxidized to CO2 using a platinum catalyst at 550 °C. The CO2 is then passed on to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to measure d13C ratios. With a similar setup the chemical composition at each temperature step can be determined using a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). System evaluation with controlled test compounds showed that organic compounds usually start evaporating from the filter when their melting point is reached. Isotopic fractionation occurs only if one temperature step is within a few degrees of the melting point of the substance, so that the substance only partially evaporates. However, this effect should be limited in an ambient sample containing thousands of individual chemical compounds. ?13C values of aerosol filter samples do not depend on the sample amount used, i.e. the system shows good linearity. The reproducibility depends somewhat on the sample amount and is usually < ± 0.3 ‰ for oven temperatures up to 200 °C and < ± 0.5 ‰ for oven temperatures greater than 200 °C. We analysed aerosol samples collected in a tunnel in Brazil (vehicular emissions), laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and ambient filter samples from a regional site in the Netherlands, an urban site in Belgium, and Sao Paulo Brazil. First results show that ?13C ratios of SOA and vehicular emissions do not change strongly with oven temperature, i.e. the more refractory organic compounds have similar isotopic composition as the more volatile compounds. This is in contrast to the Dutch and Belgium ambient organic samples, where the more volatile compounds evaporating below 200°C are often depleted with respect to the refractory compounds by more than 2 permil. Ambient samples in Sao Paulo, Brazil however, are enriched in 13C compared to vehicular emissions that are the main source of urban pollutants. This indicates either an enriched background source for the aerosols or that the ambient aerosol has been strongly aged. Measurements at the Cabauw site show interesting differences between ?13C measured in polluted air masses and relatively clean air with marine air mass origin. In polluted, continental air masses ?13C is only weakly dependent on oven temperature, similar to the tunnel samples. In air masses with marine origin, organic compounds evaporating at low temperatures are strongly depleted in 13C. Possible reasons for the difference between source profiles and ambient samples (mixture of sources vs. the role of heterogeneous oxidation in the ambient filter samples vs. sampling artefacts) will be discussed and related to the chemical composition of the aerosol.

  13. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-04-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction (WSOC), and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  14. EQUILIBRIUM SIZE OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL SULFATES AS A FUNCTION OF PARTICLE ACIDITY AND AMBIENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid aerosol events in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, were studied during the summer of 1990. ize-fractionated acid aerosols were collected using a microorifice cascade impactor. he collected samples were analyzed for hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion concentrations. hese me...

  15. Quantitative chemical analysis of ambient organic aerosols using high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allison Carol Aiken

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are important due to their effects on health, climate, visibility, and ecosystems. Organic aerosols (OA) comprise a large fraction of the submicron particle mass, yet their total composition, sources, and processing are not well understood. This thesis focuses on the composition and sources in order to improve the current state of knowledge on ambient OA. To analyze the

  16. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al. (2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (?Hvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions, on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ?Hvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ?Hvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ?Hvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (?Hvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (?Hvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ?Hvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ?Hvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ?Hvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20% to 400% of the OA mass, with smaller values generally corresponding to the higher ?Hvap assumptions. The volatility of various OA components determined from factor analysis of AMS spectra has also been assessed. In general, it is found that the fraction of non-volatile material follows the pattern: biomass burning OA < hydrocarbon-like OA < semivolatile oxygenated OA < low-volatility oxygenated OA. Correspondingly, the sensitivity to dilution and the estimated amount of semivolatile gas-phase material for the OA factors follows the reverse order. Primary OA has a substantial semivolatile fraction, in agreement with previous results, while the non-volatile fraction appears to be dominated by oxygenated OA produced by atmospheric aging. The overall OA volatility is thus controlled by the relative contribution of each aerosol type to the total OA burden. Finally, the model/measurement comparison appears to require OA having an evaporation coefficient (?e) substantially greater than 10-2; at this point it is not possible to place firmer constraints on ?e based on the observations.

  17. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al.~(2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (?Hvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions; on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ?Hvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ?Hvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ?Hvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (?Hvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (?Hvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ?Hvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ?Hvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ?Hvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20% to 400% of the OA mass, with smaller values generally corresponding to the higher ?Hvap assumptions. The volatility of various OA components determined from factor analysis of AMS spectra has also been assessed. In general, it is found that the fraction of non-volatile material follows the pattern: biomass burning OA < hydrocarbon-like OA < semivolatile oxygenated OA < low-volatility oxygenated OA. Correspondingly, the sensitivity to dilution and the estimated amount of semivolatile gas-phase material for the OA factors follows the reverse order. Primary OA has a substantial semivolatile fraction, in agreement with previous results, while the non-volatile fraction appears to be dominated by oxygenated OA produced by atmospheric aging. The overall OA volatility is thus controlled by the relative contribution of each aerosol type to the total OA burden. Finally, the model/measurement comparison appears to require OA having an evaporation coefficient (?e) substantially greater than 10-2; at this point it is not possible to place firmer constraints on ?e based on the observations.

  18. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreiss, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Alves, C.; Bossi, R.; Bjerke, A.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Gülcin, A.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-07-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wild fire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for biomass burning particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography (HPAEC), four used High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), and six resorted to Gas Chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 23%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e., for 33% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%. For galactosan, the mean PE for the participating laboratories ranged from -84 to 593%, and as for mannosan 33% of the laboratories reported a mean PE within ±10%. The variability of the various analytical methods, as defined by their minimum and maximum PE value, was typically better for levoglucosan than for mannosan and galactosan, ranging from 3.2 to 41% for levoglucosan, from 10 to 67% for mannosan, and from 6 to 364% for galactosan. For the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio, which may be used to assess the relative importance of softwood vs. hardwood burning, the variability only ranged from 3.5 to 24%. To our knowledge, this is the first major intercomparison on analytical methods used to quantify monosaccharide anhydrides in ambient aerosol filter samples conducted and reported in the scientific literature. The results show that for levoglucosan the accuracy is only slightly lower than that reported for analysis of SO42- on filter samples, a constituent that has been analyzed by numerous laboratories for several decades, typically by ion chromatography, and which is considered a fairly easy constituent to measure. Hence, the results obtained for levoglucosan with respect to accuracy are encouraging and suggest that levels of levoglucosan, and to a lesser extent mannosan and galactosan, obtained by most of the analytical methods currently used to quantify monosaccharide anhydrides in ambient aerosol filter samples, are comparable. Finally, the various analytical methods used in the current study should be tested for other aerosol matrices and concentrations as well, the most obvious being summertime aerosol samples affected by wild fires and/or agricultural fires.

  19. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%. For galactosan, the mean PE for the participating laboratories ranged from -84 to 593%, and as for mannosan 33% of the laboratories reported a mean PE within ±10%. The variability of the various analytical methods, as defined by their minimum and maximum PE value, was typically better for levoglucosan than for mannosan and galactosan, ranging from 3.2 to 41% for levoglucosan, from 10 to 67% for mannosan and from 6 to 364% for galactosan. For the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio, which may be used to assess the relative importance of softwood versus hardwood burning, the variability only ranged from 3.5 to 24 . To our knowledge, this is the first major intercomparison on analytical methods used to quantify monosaccharide anhydrides in ambient aerosol filter samples conducted and reported in the scientific literature. The results show that for levoglucosan the accuracy is only slightly lower than that reported for analysis of SO42- (sulfate) on filter samples, a constituent that has been analysed by numerous laboratories for several decades, typically by ion chromatography and which is considered a fairly easy constituent to measure. Hence, the results obtained for levoglucosan with respect to accuracy are encouraging and suggest that levels of levoglucosan, and to a lesser extent mannosan and galactosan, obtained by most of the analytical methods currently used to quantify monosaccharide anhydrides in ambient aerosol filter samples, are comparable. Finally, the various analytical methods used in the current study should be tested for other aerosol matrices and concentrations as well, the most obvious being summertime aerosol samples affected by wildfires and/or agricultural fires.

  20. 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid: an oxygenated marker compound for ?-pinene secondary organic aerosol in ambient fine aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Ariane; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Blockhuys, Frank; Mutzel, Anke; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H; Lewandowski, Michael; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut; Maenhaut, Willy; Claeys, Magda

    2014-05-01

    An oxygenated MW 188 compound is commonly observed in substantial abundance in atmospheric aerosol samples and was proposed in previous studies as an ?-pinene-related marker compound that is associated with aging processes. Owing to difficulties in producing this compound in sufficient amounts in laboratory studies and the occurrence of isobaric isomers, a complete assignment for individual MW 188 compounds could not be achieved in these studies. Results from a comprehensive mass spectrometric analysis are presented here to corroborate the proposed structure of the most abundant MW 188 compound as a 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid diastereoisomer with 2R,3R configuration. The application of collision-induced dissociation with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry in both negative and positive ion modes, as well as chemical derivatization to methyl ester derivatives and analysis by the latter technique and gas chromatography/electron ionization mass spectrometry, enabled a comprehensive characterization of MW 188 isomers, including a detailed study of the fragmentation behavior using both mass spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, a MW 188 positional isomer, 4-hydroxyterpenylic acid, was tentatively identified, which also is of atmospheric relevance as it could be detected in ambient fine aerosol. Quantum chemical calculations were performed to support the diastereoisomeric assignment of the 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid isomers. Results from a time-resolved ?-pinene photooxidation experiment show that the 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid 2R,3R diastereoisomer has a time profile distinctly different from that of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid, a marker for oxygenated (aged) secondary organic aerosol. This study presents a comprehensive chemical data set for a more complete structural characterization of hydroxyterpenylic acids in ambient fine aerosol, which sets the foundation to better understand the atmospheric fate of ?-pinene in future studies. PMID:24697354

  1. Oxidation of ambient biogenic secondary organic aerosol by hydroxyl radicals: Effects on cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-print Network

    Wong, J. P. S.

    Changes in the hygroscopicity of ambient biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to controlled OH oxidation were investigated at a remote forested site at Whistler Mountain, British Columbia during July of 2010. ...

  2. Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS)

    E-print Network

    Osborn, Robert John

    2007-09-17

    A field-deployable instrument has been developed that isolates from an ambient aerosol population only those particles that have critical supersaturations, Sc, within a narrow, user-specified, range. This Differential Critical Supersaturation...

  3. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  4. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *South...

  5. Inhalation Exposure and Lung Dose Analysis of Multi-mode Complex Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Ambient aerosols are complex mixture of particles with different size, shape and chemical composition. Although they are known to cause health hazard, it is not fully understood about causal mechanisms and specific attributes of particles causing the effects. Internal ...

  6. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    E-print Network

    Hohaus, T.

    In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

  7. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-08-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM>sub>10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and the dimeric sugar trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  8. Collection of Aerosolized Human Cytokines Using Teflon® Filters

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Jennifer H.; McDevitt, James J.; Fabian, M. Patricia; Hwang, Grace M.; Milton, Donald K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Collection of exhaled breath samples for the analysis of inflammatory biomarkers is an important area of research aimed at improving our ability to diagnose, treat and understand the mechanisms of chronic pulmonary disease. Current collection methods based on condensation of water vapor from exhaled breath yield biomarker levels at or near the detection limits of immunoassays contributing to problems with reproducibility and validity of biomarker measurements. In this study, we compare the collection efficiency of two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices to a filter-based collection method for recovery of dilute laboratory generated aerosols of human cytokines so as to identify potential alternatives to exhaled breath condensate collection. Methodology/Principal Findings Two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices, the SKC® Biosampler and Omni 3000™, as well as Teflon® filters were used to collect aerosols of human cytokines generated using a HEART nebulizer and single-pass aerosol chamber setup in order to compare the collection efficiencies of these sampling methods. Additionally, methods for the use of Teflon® filters to collect and measure cytokines recovered from aerosols were developed and evaluated through use of a high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay. Our results show successful collection of cytokines from pg/m3 aerosol concentrations using Teflon® filters and measurement of cytokine levels in the sub-picogram/mL concentration range using a multiplex immunoassay with sampling times less than 30 minutes. Significant degradation of cytokines was observed due to storage of cytokines in concentrated filter extract solutions as compared to storage of dry filters. Conclusions Use of filter collection methods resulted in significantly higher efficiency of collection than the two aerosol-to-liquid samplers evaluated in our study. The results of this study provide the foundation for a potential new technique to evaluate biomarkers of inflammation in exhaled breath samples. PMID:22574123

  9. The Chemical Characteristics of Marine Mineral Aerosol Solutions at Ambient Relative Humidities and Some Effects on Iron Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaorong

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that iron could play a critical role as a limiting micronutrient in some ocean regions where the concentration of major nutrients is high but primary productively is low. Because aerosol iron is the predominant pathway to supply iron to the open oceans, this dissertation focuses on the factors that affect the iron solubility in aerosol particles before they enter the oceans. The major thrust is the study of the mechanisms of the interactions between aerosol iron and marine aerosol solutions while the particles are suspended in the marine atmosphere. Iron solubilities in marine aerosol solutions were estimated at the pH and ionic strength that are characteristic of ambient trade wind aerosol particles collected at Barbados. Under typical marine conditions, aerosol solutions could have very high ionic strength and extremely low pH even when part of the acid has been neutralized by NH_3 and CaCO_3. The iron solubility in aerosol solutions is far higher than that normally expected for seawater and even rainwater. Thus aerosol solution processes may be the major factor that determines how much iron will readily dissolve when particles enter the ocean. Iron photochemical and speciation studies indicated that only about 1% of the total Fe and 7.5% of the soluble Fe in Barbados mineral aerosols was in the Fe(II) form. Although the presence of organic ligands such as oxalate can greatly increase the Fe(II) concentration during photolysis, Fe(II) levels dropped rapidly in the dark due to the oxidation of Fe(II) with H_2O_2 that is also produced during irradiation. Geothite solubility studies suggested that photochemical processes affect only the soluble iron species and have no significant impact on the total iron solubility. These results suggest that marine aerosol solutions are characterized by extreme conditions that can greatly affect the chemical processes that occur in the aerosol phase. As a result, the mobilization of iron and its subsequent fate in natural waters will be strongly dependent on the past history of the aerosol particles in the atmosphere.

  10. Application of the VH-TDMA technique to coastal ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Ristovski, Z.; Morawska, L.

    2004-08-01

    A newly developed VH-TDMA has been used for the first time to measure the volatile fractions and post volatilization hygroscopic growth factors of ambient aerosols in the coastal marine and urban environments. The results are compared with comparable data for laboratory generated aerosols of known composition. Measurements conducted on coastal Aitken mode particles showed volatilization behavior similar to laboratory generated aerosols composed of methane sulfonic acid and ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted on 60 nm particles during nucleation events contained a greater fraction of material with similar volatility to ammonium sulfate than was found at other times. These particles were hygroscopic but less so than pure ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted in the Brisbane central business district during sea breeze conditions show similar behavior to the coastal aerosol, but with additional low volatility species. This aerosol may originate from urban sources or from marine particles acquiring additional secondary aerosol species during transport.

  11. Observations of ice nucleation by ambient aerosol in the homogeneous freezing regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mathews S.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Petters, Markus D.; Carrico, Christian M.

    2010-02-01

    We measured the freezing activation curves for ambient particles as a function of relative humidity with respect to water over the temperature range of -40° to -50°C using a continuous flow diffusion chamber, and compared the observations with those for ammonium sulfate particles and predictions from a parametric representation of homogeneous freezing of solution particles as a function of water activity and temperature. Since it has been proposed that the rate of homogeneous freezing depends on solution water activity, we made separate measurements of the hygroscopicity ($\\kappa$) of the ambient aerosol. Observed $\\kappa$ ranged from 0.1 to 0.2, lower than that of ammonium sulfate (0.6) and representative of a continental aerosol. As predicted for this difference in $\\kappa$, there was no significant difference between the homogeneous freezing conditions of size-selected ammonium sulfate and the apparent homogeneous freezing conditions of same-sized ambient aerosol. Further, the parameterization predicted freezing fraction-relative humidity relationships for non size-selected ambient aerosol that differed by only 0.5 to 1.5% relative humidity from observed relations at the tested temperatures, well within experimental uncertainty. Our findings confirm that the tested ambient aerosols, with hygroscopicities typical of continental regions, freeze homogeneously as expected based on present understanding for single component solution drops in the laboratory. Results also confirm that freezing is more sensitive to particle size than to composition, for particles containing at least a few percent by volume of hygroscopic species.

  12. Water content of ambient aerosol during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, Andrey; Stanier, Charles O.; Takahama, Satoshi; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2005-04-01

    The aerosol water content and volumetric growth factors of fine particulate matter were measured during July-August 2001 and January-June 2002 in an urban park about 6 km from downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Most of the aerosol during the study was transported to the region from other areas, and its composition and concentration were characteristic of the regional particulate matter in the northeastern United States. During the summer months the ambient aerosol practically always contained water even when the relative humidity (RH) was as low as 30%. In contrast, during the winter the aerosol was dry below 60% RH. The spring months were characterized by a transitional behavior between these two states. The observed seasonal behavior can be explained by the aerosol acidity. The summer aerosol was acidic and retained water at low RH. The winter aerosol was neutral and became wet when the relative humidity reached the deliquescence point of ammonium nitrate. The observations during July 2001 were compared with the predictions of the thermodynamic Gibbs Free Energy Minimization (GFEMN) model and the aerosol inorganics model (AIM), neglecting the organic aerosol contribution to water absorption. The models under-predicted water concentrations by about 35%, but no clear correlation between organic mass and the excess water was observed. On average, the contribution of the organics to water absorption appeared to be higher during the afternoon hours and when the aerosol was presumably more oxidized.

  13. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near Delhi (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha; Kumar, Bablu; Gupta, Gyan Prakash; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2013-05-01

    Combustion of fuels such as wood, crop residue and dung cakes etc. is one of the major sources of air pollution in developing countries. These fuels are still used commonly for cooking purpose in rural India. This study investigates the chemical composition of the ambient aerosols during cooking hours at a village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Aerosol sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (˜6m). The samples were collected on 8 hourly basis using Teflon filters. The water extract of these filters was analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). Results highlighted that cooking process contributed significant amount of SO42- and K+?. Biomass burning is considered as a potential source of K+ in air. The high concentration of SO42- might be due to oxidation of SO2 contributed by the combustion of dung cakes. Further, the detailed results will be discussed during the conference.

  14. Aqueous photooxidation of ambient Po Valley Italy air samples: Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Sullivan, A. P.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.; Collett, J. L.; Keutsch, F. N.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we conducted aqueous photooxidation experiments with ambient samples in order to develop insights concerning the formation of secondary organic aerosol through gas followed by aqueous chemistry (SOAaq). Water-soluble organics (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone) are formed through gas phase oxidation of alkene and aromatic emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. Their further oxidation in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols can form lower volatility products (e.g., oligomers, organic acids) that remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, thus producing SOA. The aqueous OH radical oxidation of several individual potentially important precursors has been studied in the laboratory. In this work, we used a mist-chamber apparatus to collect atmospheric mixtures of water-soluble gases from the ambient air at San Pietro Capofiume, Italy during the PEGASOS field campaign. We measured the concentration dynamics after addition of OH radicals, in order to develop new insights regarding formation of SOA through aqueous chemistry. Specifically, batch aqueous reactions were conducted with 33 ml mist-chamber samples (TOC ~ 50-100?M) and OH radicals (~10-12M) in a new low-volume aqueous reaction vessel. OH radicals were formed in-situ, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS +/-), and ESI-MS with IC pre-separation (IC/ESI-MS-). Reproducible formation of pyruvate and oxalate were observed both by IC and ESI-MS. These compounds are known to form from aldehyde oxidation in the aqueous phase. New insights regarding the aqueous chemistry of these "more atmospherically-realistic" experiments will be discussed.

  15. Contribution to bacterial mutagenicity from nitro-pah compounds in ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siak, J.; Chan, T. L.; Gibson, T. L.; Wolff, G. T.

    To demonstrate a method for the identification of mutagenic components in organic fractions of ambient aerosols, the mutagenic activity was studied in samples collected simultaneously for six consecutive days during the summer of 1931 at an urban site and a suburban site in southeast Michigan. The filter samples were extracted with dichloromethane and fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) into sixteen fractions. The individual TLC fractions were then examined by the Ames test using tester strains TA98, TA98NR and TA98DNP 6. Similar daily variations in the activity and the mutagenicity profiles of the TLC fractions occurred at both sites. In samples collected from both locations, approximately half of the mutagenic activity was found in the four most polar fractions of the particulate extracts. The remaining mutagenic activity was distributed among the less polar fractions where PAH, nitro-PAH and dinitro-PAH would be eluted. The mutagenic activity in all fractions decreased sharply when tested with two nitroreductase deficient tester strains, TA98NR and TA98DNP 6, indicating that the mutagens (especially those in the polar fractions) were nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds. Three nitro compounds, 1-nitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene and 1,8-dinitropyrene were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) but could account for no more than 3% of the total airborne mutagenicity. A National Bureau of Standards' Ambient Particulate Sample (SRM No. 1649), collected for a long sampling period of 18 months, differed markedly from the urban and suburban Michigan samples in its mutagenicity profile.

  16. Determining Ultrafine Particle Collection Efficiency in a Nanometer Aerosol Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengjue Li; Shusen Liu; Yifang Zhu

    2010-01-01

    The Nanometer Aerosol Sampler (NAS, Model 3089) manufactured by TSI Incorporated (Minnesota, USA) is commonly used to collect ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter < 100 nm) for off-line analysis. However, the UFP collection efficiency for this instrument has only been reported for polystyrene latex (PSL) particles at a flow rate of 1 L· min and a voltage of 10 KV. To

  17. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLER INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data are presented on the wind tunnel performances of two prototype Inhalable Particulate Matter (IPM) inlets designed for use with a dichotomous sampler. One was developed at the Aerosol Science Laboratory (ASL) Colorado State University, while the other was developed in an inde...

  18. Water content of ambient aerosol during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study

    E-print Network

    Stanier, Charlie

    . For example, the deliquescence point of ammonium sulfate at 25°C is at approximately 80% RH [Tang­40% for ammonium sulfate. Most other inorganic species present in the ambient aerosol have a similar behavior [Tang, 1997]. Because of the hysteresis effect even for ammonium sulfate particles there is a wide range

  19. CONTRIBUTION OF WOODSMOKE AND MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS TO AMBIENT AEROSOL MUTAGENICITY (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity is frequently considered as a screening test for the carcinogenicity of compounds to which humans are exposed. Past estimates of the mutagenicity of ambient aerosol have depended on measurements of the mutagenic potency (refertants/microg) of the extractable organic ...

  20. Source apportionment methods applied to the determination of the origin of ambient aerosols that affect visibility in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Dzubay, Thomas G.; Lewis, Charles W.; Shaw, Robert W.

    An aerosol characterization, visibility, and receptor modeling study was conducted in the Shenandoah Valley, VA between 14 July and 15 August 1980. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the origin of the ambient particles, (2) determine the major chemical species contributing to the light extinction coefficient, (3) evaluate analytical methods to characterize aerosols and (4) provide data for comparison with chemical composition of aerosols collected in the Great Smoky Mountains and in the Abastumani Mountains of Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic. The average sulfate concentrations measured in fine particles (<2.5?m) at these three locations were: 12.0?gm -3 at Great Smoky Mountains; 13.6 ?g m -3 at Shenandoah Valley, and 4.6 ?g m -3 at Abastumani Mountains; the fractions of sulfate in the fine particle mass concentrations at each site were 0.50,0.50 and 0.38, respectively. For the two studies in the United States, the fine particle sulfate during sulfate maxima was mostly in the form of ammonium acid sulfate. Factor analysis of the fine aerosol composition measured in the Shenandoah Valley yielded a persistent factor containing large loadings on mass, SO 2-4, S, NH +4, H +, Se and total nitrate (sum of particulate nitrate and nitric acid), which is characteristic of coal-fired sources. This factor analysis grouping along with additional emissions information suggests that coal-fired power plants are the principal source of sulfate and nitrate.

  1. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC); DeGange, John J. (Aiken, SC); Cable-Dunlap, Paula (Waynesville, NC)

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  2. Collection of Aerosol Particles by Electrostatic Droplet Spray Scrubbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Pilat

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements show that the collection of small aerosol particles (0.05 to 5 micron diameter range) by water droplets in spray scrubbers can be substantially increased by electrostatically charging the droplets and particles to opposite polarity. Measurements with a 140 acfm two chamber spray scrubber (7 seconds gas residence time) showed an increase in the overall particle

  3. Instrument Would Detect and Collect Biological Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoy, Steve; Mayo, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A proposed compact, portable instrument would sample micron-sized airborne particles, would discriminate between biological ones (e.g., bacteria) and nonbiological ones (e.g., dust particles), and would collect the detected biological particles for further analysis. The instrument is intended to satisfy a growing need for means of rapid, inexpensive collection of bioaerosols in a variety of indoor and outdoor settings. Purposes that could be served by such collection include detecting airborne pathogens inside buildings and their ventilation systems, measuring concentrations of airborne biological contaminants around municipal waste-processing facilities, monitoring airborne effluents from suspected biowarfare facilities, and warning of the presence of airborne biowarfare agents

  4. Source apportionment of ambient aerosol applying PMF on AMS mobile and stationary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Weimer, S.; Richter, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2009-04-01

    Ambient aerosols are divided into the categories "primary" and "secondary", referring to particles directly emitted into the air, or formed out of precursor species such as volatile organic compounds, respectively. Main sources for primary urban aerosol and precursor species are traffic emissions, but also wood burning for domestic heating purposes especially in winter time (Alfarra et al., 2007). The quantification of various types of aerosol components is important for source identification which in turn is the basis of all mitigation activities. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) is a statistical based source apportionment tool that uses constrained, weighted least squares estimation to determine source profiles and strengths. PMF has been applied recently for the first time on highly time resolved organic mass spectra (Lanz et al., 2007) measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) (Canagaratna et al., 2007). For the data presented here, two AMS were deployed together with additional instrumentation in the metropolitan area of Zurich in winter 2007/2008. The high-resolution time-of-flight AMS was stationed at an urban background site in the center, 30 meters from and shielded against direct traffic emissions. The quadrupole-based AMS was deployed in a mobile van allowing for on-road submicron aerosol composition measurements, and investigations into the spatial variability of aerosol concentration and composition. Results indicate that traffic emissions are the main contributor to submicron aerosol concentrations measured on-road. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a marker for traffic emissions (Lanz et al. 2007), dominates the primary aerosol mass, together with black carbon (BC). BC was monitored with the MAAP (multi angle absorption photometer). Another significant contributor to primary organic aerosol mass in downtown Zurich is domestic wood burning for heating purposes. Traffic and wood burning emissions make up roughly 50% of the total organic mass. Oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), most of which is secondary, represents the remaining fraction. At the background site, the measured aerosol composition is more strongly influenced by secondary species, since this site is less exposed to primary emissions. The relative OOA contribution is higher than on-road, as well are particulate sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium contributions. Calculations of particulate sulphate ratios suggest that differences in absolute background and on-road concentration levels are mostly due to meteorological transport processes, but local emissions play a major role. Additional PMF analysis of AMS data from other regions and recent mobile AMS measurements will also be presented. Alfarra, M. R., et al. (2007). Environ. Sci. Technol., 41: 5770 - 5777. Canagaratna, M. R., et al. (2007). Mass Spectrom. Rev. , 26: 185-222. Lanz, V. A., et al. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7: 1503-1522.

  5. HULIS in emissions of fresh rice straw burning and in ambient aerosols in the pearl river delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.; Engling, G.; Yu, J. Z.

    2010-03-01

    HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS) are an abundant unresolved mixture of organic compounds present in atmospheric samples. Biomass burning (BB) has been recognized as an important primary source of HULIS, but measurements of HULIS in various fresh BB particles are lacking. In this work, HULIS in emissions of rice straw burning in a number of field and chamber experiments was measured. The HULIS/OC ratio was 0.34±0.05 in ?g/?gC, showing small variance among emissions under different burning conditions. The influence of BB on ambient HULIS levels was investigated by examining the spatial and temporal variation of HULIS and other aerosol constituents and interspecies relations in ambient PM2.5 collected at an urban and a suburban location in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China over a period of one year. The HULIS concentrations in the ambient PM2.5 were significantly higher in air masses originating from regions influenced by BB. Significant correlations between HULIS and water-soluble K+ concentrations at both sites further support that BB was an important source of HULIS. HULIS also correlated well with sulfate, oxalate, and oxidant (the sum of O3 and NO2). The HULIS/OC ratios in BB-influenced ambient aerosols (~0.6) were much higher than those in the fresh BB emissions (0.34), implying that secondary formation was also an important source of HULIS in the atmosphere. The annual average HULIS concentrations were 4.9 ?g m-3 at the urban site and 7.1 ?g m-3 at the suburban site while the annual average concentrations of elemental carbon were 3.3 ?g m-3 and 2.4 ?g m-3, respectively. The urban-suburban spatial gradient of HULIS was opposite to that of elemental carbon, negating vehicular emissions as a significant source of HULIS.

  6. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  7. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the HR-ToF-AMS. The measurements are interpreted in the context of the measurements over tropical rain forest at Danum and aircraft measurements across Sabah.

  8. Aerosol Interfaces Examined with Ambient Pressure Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysak, E. R.; Starr, D. E.; Wilson, K. R.; Bluhm, H.

    2007-12-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the liquid/vapor and solid/vapor interfaces plays a significant role in environmental and atmospheric chemistry. Despite the importance of understanding differences in chemical reactivity between surface and bulk solutions, there is a considerable lack of quantitative and chemically specific techniques that can operate under environmental and atmospherically relevant conditions. The significance of these interfacial types of measurements is becoming increasingly apparent. For example, recent studies have shown that ions can segregate to the surface in liquid salt solutions, changing the chemical reactivity of the liquid at its interface. Recent development of the ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) facilitates chemical identification of molecules adsorbed onto liquid and solid surfaces at atmospherically relevant pressures. The specific advantage of this technique is that measurements can be made at pressures greater than 5 Torr, i.e. above the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at its triple point. Here, we describe the development of a novel synchrotron-based instrument that combines APPES with real-time droplet and nanoparticle surface analysis. Three experiments that address chemistry of model systems are presented: (a) the adsorption and chemical reaction of an atmospherically relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound on model surfaces (b) a combined droplet train/APPES setup for the investigation of the liquid/vapor interface and (c) a particle flow reactor for the investigation of heterogeneous chemistry on liquid and solid nanoparticle surfaces. Initial results of the surface composition of methanol/water mixtures in the droplet train and oxidation of the PAH coronene by ozone on a model surface will be presented.

  9. Comparison of aerosol and bioaerosol collection on air filters.

    PubMed

    Miaskiewicz-Peska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Air filters efficiency is usually determined by non-biological test aerosols, such as potassium chloride particles, Arizona dust or di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) oily liquid. This research was undertaken to asses, if application of non-biological aerosols reflects air filters capacity to collect particles of biological origin. The collection efficiency for non-biological aerosol was tested with the PALAS set and ISO Fine Test Dust. Flow rate during the filtration process was 720 l/h, and particles size ranged 0.246-17.165 ?m. The upstream and downstream concentration of the aerosol was measured with a laser particle counter PCS-2010. Tested bioaerosol contained 4 bacterial strains of different shape and size: Micrococcus luteus,Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. Number of the biological particles was estimated with a culture-based method. Results obtained with bioaerosol did not confirmed 100% filters efficiency noted for the mineral test dust of the same aerodynamic diameter. Maximum efficiency tested with bacterial cells was 99.8%. Additionally, cells reemission from filters into air was also studied. Bioaerosol contained 3 bacterial strains: Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. It was proved that the highest intensity of the reemission process was during the first 5 min. and reached maximum 0.63% of total number of bacteria retained in filters. Spherical cells adhered stronger to the filter fibres than cylindrical ones. It was concluded that non-biological aerosol containing particles of the same shape and surface characteristics (like DEHS spherical particles) can not give representative results for all particles present in the filtered air. PMID:22523449

  10. Hourly Measurement of the Concentration and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Oxygenated Organic Tracers in Ambient Aerosol: First Results from Berkeley, CA and Rural Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L.; Chan, A.; Worton, D. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Hourly and bi-hourly time-resolved measurements of organic tracer compounds in ambient aerosols have been successfully used to elucidate sources and formation pathways of atmospheric particulate matter. Here we extend the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG), a custom in-situ instrument that collects, desorbs, and analyzes ambient aerosol and semi-volatile compounds with hourly time resolution, to include on-line derivatization and a second, parallel collection cell that provides simultaneous collection of both particle-phase and particle-plus-gas-phase organic compounds. By introducing a silylating agent upon desorption, SVTAG can measure highly oxygenated compounds that are not easily detected using traditional gas chromatography including most of the previously reported oxygenated tracers for biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol. The use of a pair of matched collection cells with parallel sampling and serial analysis provides direct gas-particle partitioning information. One cell collects the total organic fraction of compounds with volatilities lower than a C13 hydrocarbon, while the other cell samples through an activated carbon denuder to selectively remove the gas-phase components. Taken together these provide a direct measurement of gas-particle partitioning to yield a check on classical absorption based partitioning theory while deviations from this theory provide constraints on other driving factors in aerosol formation chemistry, such as oligomerization, salt formation, and acidity. We present here the capabilities and utility of the dual cell SVTAG with derivatization, with chemical insights gained from initial tests on ambient Berkeley air and the first results from a rural site in Alabama obtained during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Tracers for varying isoprene oxidation pathways are used to explore the influence of anthropogenic emissions; concentrations of 2-methyltetrols and 2-methyl glyceric acid provide constraints on the relative importance of NOx and HO2 as the fate of the alkylperoxy (RO2) radical. Measuring these and other known biogenic tracers with hourly time resolution yields detailed diurnal variability patterns of these compounds, elucidating formation timescales and pathways. Gas-particle partitioning of these biogenic oxygenated compounds, as well as oxygenated tracers common in urban environments, are found in many cases to be well-modeled by absorptive partitioning theory. However, for many compounds, the particle-phase fraction is greatly under-predicted by simple absorption. Several commonly used biogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers that are typically considered to exist primarily in the particle phase, such as 2-methyltetrols, are shown to be 20-80% in the gas phase.

  11. MECHANISM OF COLLECTION OF AEROSOLS BY AN ARRAY OF OPPOSITELY CHARGED DROPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kojevnikova; Y. Zimmels

    2000-01-01

    The collection mechanism of charged aerosols by a two-dimensional array of oppositely charged drops is conisdered. Trajectories of aerosols are computed, using a new simulation program, under conditions of gravity sedimentation of the collecting drops and aerosols. Electric forces, given in spherical coordinate system of each drop, are projected on the spherical coordinate system of the central drop. The equation

  12. Mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon (EC) in ambient aerosols: Characterization from high-altitude sites in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, K.; Sarin, M.

    2012-12-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE, ?abs) is an important parameter for the determination of atmospheric black carbon (BC) mass concentration by optical instruments. Recent studies suggest that ?abs is highly variable in space and time depending on the type of emission sources of carbonaceous aerosols and analytical methods employed. We have studied changes in ?abs of elemental carbon (EC) from two high-altitude sites in India; Mt Abu (coordinates; 1700 m asl): located in the Thar desert of western India (dominated by mineral dust) and Manora Peak (coordinates; 2200 m asl): located in the southern slopes of Himalaya (influenced by anthropogenic sources in the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Based on the data set collected during 2005-2006, we document large temporal variability in ?abs of EC (range: 3.6-13.7 m2g-1) at Mt Abu. The average ?abs (9.8±2.1 m2g-1) is similar to the most accepted value of 10 m2g-1 for ambient aerosols. Analytical data suggest that mineral dust contributes ~70% of the total suspended particulate (TSP) mass. Assuming it to be externally mixed with carbonaceous species and its absorption efficiency of 0.009 m2g-1, absorption due to mineral dust is no more than ~10% at Mt Abu. In contrast, long-term (2005-2008) average of 12.8±2.9 m2g-1 for ?abs (range: 6.1-19.1 m2g-1) is documented at Manora Peak. We suggest that relatively high ?abs of EC at Manora Peak is attributed to the internal mixing of carbonaceous aerosols and anthropogenic species (NO3- and SO4--) during transport from the Indo-Gangetic Plain. These results have implications to large seasonal variability in the aerosol absorption properties (due to change in the morphological feature of EC) and atmospheric radiative forcing on a regional scale.

  13. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Patadia, F.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-11-01

    The twin Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an extensive data set of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. The C6 aerosol data set will be created from three separate retrieval algorithms that operate over different surface types. These are the two "Dark Target" (DT) algorithms for retrieving (1) over ocean (dark in visible and longer wavelengths) and (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible), plus the "Deep Blue" (DB) algorithm developed originally for retrieving (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on DT-ocean and DT-land (#1 and #2). We have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to ? 84°) to increase poleward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence on the surface reflectance, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time, we quantified how "upstream" changes to instrument calibration, land/sea masking and cloud masking will also impact the statistics of global AOD, and affect Terra and Aqua differently. For Aqua, all changes will result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.02) over land, along with changes in spatial coverage. We compared preliminary data to surface-based sun photometer data, and show that C6 should improve upon C5. C6 will include a merged DT/DB product over semi-arid land surfaces for reduced-gap coverage and better visualization, and new information about clouds in the aerosol field. Responding to the needs of the air quality community, in addition to the standard 10 km product, C6 will include a global (DT-land and DT-ocean) aerosol product at 3 km resolution.

  14. A molecular-level approach for characterizing water-insoluble components of ambient organic aerosol particulates using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willoughby, A. S.; Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-04-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols in the atmosphere is strongly influenced by human emissions, and the effect these have on the environment, human health, and climate change is determined by the molecular nature of these chemical species. The complexity of organic aerosol samples limits the ability to study the chemical composition, and, therefore, the associated properties and the impacts they have. Many studies address the water-soluble fraction of organic aerosols, and have had much success in identifying specific molecular formulas for thousands of compounds present. However, little attention is given to the water-insoluble portion, which can contain most of the fossil material that is emitted through human activity. Here we compare the organic aerosols present in water extracts and organic solvent extracts (pyridine and acetonitrile) of an ambient aerosol sample collected in a rural location that is impacted by natural and anthropogenic emission sources. A semi-quantitative method was developed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine that the amount of organic matter extracted by pyridine is comparable to that of water. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra show that pyridine extracts a molecularly unique fraction of organic matter compared to water or acetonitrile, which extract chemically similar organic matter components. The molecular formulas unique to pyridine were less polar, more aliphatic, and reveal formulas containing sulfur to be an important component of insoluble aerosol organic matter.

  15. A molecular-level approach for characterizing water-insoluble components of ambient organic aerosol particulates using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willoughby, A. S.; Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols in the atmosphere is strongly influenced by human emissions. The effect these have on the environment, human health, and climate change is determined by the molecular nature of these chemical species. The complexity of organic aerosol samples limits the ability to study the chemical composition, and therefore the associated properties and the impacts they have. Many studies have addressed the water-soluble fraction of organic aerosols and have had much success in identifying specific molecular formulas for thousands of compounds present. However, little attention is given to the water-insoluble portion, which can contain most of the fossil material that is emitted through human activity. Here we compare the organic aerosols present in water extracts and organic solvent extracts (pyridine and acetonitrile) of an ambient aerosol sample collected in a rural location that is impacted by natural and anthropogenic emission sources. A semiquantitative method was developed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine that the amount of organic matter extracted by pyridine is comparable to that of water. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra show that pyridine extracts a molecularly unique fraction of organic matter compared to water or acetonitrile, which extract chemically similar organic matter components. The molecular formulas unique to pyridine were less polar, more aliphatic, and reveal formulas containing sulfur to be an important component of insoluble aerosol organic matter.

  16. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  17. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  18. Particle size characteristics of levoglucosan in ambient aerosols from rice straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, James J.; Engling, Guenter; Candice Lung, Shih-Chun; Lee, Kuo-Yang

    Agricultural residue burning in Asia is an important source of atmospheric aerosol particles. This study investigates the impact of post-harvest burning of rice fields on the air quality in Taiwan, a subtropical island in East Asia. Size-resolved measurements of the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (biomass burning tracer derived from the thermal breakdown of cellulose) were conducted before, during and after an episode of intensive rice straw burning at a rural and suburban site. While substantially enhanced levoglucosan concentrations were observed during the active rice straw burning episode (up to 1400 ng m -3), fairly high values of the smoke tracer were measured throughout the entire study period. Moreover, unusually high levoglucosan levels were present in aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters larger than 10 ?m (PM >10), possibly influenced by the ambient atmospheric conditions, such as high relative humidity, in addition to unique properties of rice straw smoke and the specific burning practices of rice fields.

  19. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O/sub 3/ at 143 ppb; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 47.7 micrograms/m/sup 3/; and (H+) at 550 nmole/m/sup 3/. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  20. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  1. The Collection 6 'dark-target' MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Patadia, Falguni; Gupta, Pawan; Remer, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms are applied to Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on both Terra and Aqua, creating two streams of decade-plus aerosol information. Products of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size are used for many applications, but the primary concern is that these global products are comprehensive and consistent enough for use in climate studies. One of our major customers is the international modeling comparison study known as AEROCOM, which relies on the MODIS data as a benchmark. In order to keep up with the needs of AEROCOM and other MODIS data users, while utilizing new science and tools, we have improved the algorithms and products. The code, and the associated products, will be known as Collection 6 (C6). While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. In its entirety, the C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties over different surfaces: These include the dark-target DT algorithms to retrieve over (1) ocean and (2) vegetated-dark-soiled land, plus the (3) Deep Blue (DB) algorithm, originally developed to retrieve over desert-arid land. Focusing on the two DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to 84) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such as topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time as we have introduced algorithm changes, we have also accounted for upstream changes including: new instrument calibration, revised land-sea masking, and changed cloud masking. Upstream changes also impact the coverage and global statistics of the retrieved AOD. Although our responsibility is to the DT code and products, we have also added a product that merges DT and DB product over semi-arid land surfaces to provide a more gap-free dataset, primarily for visualization purposes. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6, Level 2 (along swath) DT-products compare at least as well as those from C5. C6 will include new diagnostic information about clouds in the aerosol field, including an aerosol cloud mask at 500 m resolution, and calculations of the distance to the nearest cloud from clear pixels. Finally, we have revised the strategy for aggregating and averaging the Level 2 (swath) data to become Level 3 (gridded) data. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms will result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.02) over land, along with changes in spatial coverage. Changes in calibration will have more impact to Terras time series, especially over land. This will result in a significant reduction in artificial differences in the Terra and Aqua datasets, and will stabilize the MODIS data as a target for AEROCOM studie

  2. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  3. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 ?g m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 ?g m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC ratio, which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; these divisions also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact-correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass, indicating that the calibration is linear. Using samples in the calibration set that have different OM / OC or ammonium / OC distributions than the test set leads to only a modest increase in bias and normalized error in the predicted samples. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with partial least-squares regression is a robust method for accurately predicting TOR OC in IMPROVE network samples - providing complementary information to the organic functional group composition and organic aerosol mass estimated previously from the same set of sample spectra (Ruthenburg et al., 2014).

  4. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME2008)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Lee; E. Kostenidou; L. Hildebrandt; I. Riipinen; G. J. Engelhart; C. Mohr; P. F. Decarlo; N. Mihalopoulos; A. S. H. Prevot; U. Baltensperger; S. N. Pandis

    2010-01-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed

  5. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha

    Generally, industrial and transport sectors are considered as major contributors of air pollution but recently, biomass burning is also reported as a major source of atmospheric aerosols (1, 2) especially in the developing world where solid fuels such as dung cake, wood and crop residues are used in traditional cooking which are responsible for poor air quality, respiratory problems and radiative forcing etc .In India, most of the research has been focused on emission estimates from biomass burning and cooking. No effort has been made to understand the chemistry and sources of fine aerosols in rural areas during cooking hours. This study fills this knowledge gap and strengthens our understanding about abundance of various chemical constituents of atmospheric aerosols emitted during cooking hours.Aerosol samples were collected from village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (~6m). The aerosol samples were collected on 8 hourly basis at a flow rate of 1 LPM. Water extracts of these filters were analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). During cooking period, the concentration of the major ions followed the order of Ca2+> SO42-> NO3-> Cl-> K+> NH4+> Mg2+> Na2+> F-. Among anion SO42 (5 µg/m3) showed highest value and in case of cations Ca2+ (7.32µg/m3) has highest value.

  6. Characterization of the Changes in Hygroscopicity of Ambient Organic Aerosol due to Oxidation by Gas Phase OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J. P.; McWhinney, R. D.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of organic aerosols and their importance in climate forcing, the influence of chemical processes on their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere remains uncertain. Changes to the hygroscopicity of ambient organic aerosol due to OH oxidation were explored at a remote forested (Whistler, British Columbia) and an urban (Toronto, Ontario) site. Organic aerosol was exposed to controlled levels of OH radicals in a portable flow tube reactor, the Toronto Photo-Oxidation Tube (TPOT). An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitored the changes in the chemical composition due to OH-initiated oxidation. The CCN activity of size-selected particles was measured with a DMT Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNc) to determine the hygroscopicity parameter, ?. Preliminary results suggest that gas phase OH oxidation increases the degree of oxygenation of organic aerosol, leading to increases in hygroscopicity. These results yield insights into the mechanism by which oxidation affects the hygroscopicity of ambient aerosol of various sources, and to constrain the main aging process that leads to the observation of increasing hygroscopicity with increasing oxidation of organic aerosol.

  7. HOUSTON URBAN PLUME STUDY, 1974. MICROSCOPICAL IDENTIFICATION OF COLLECTED AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An urban plume study was conducted in Houston during July 1974 to gain preliminary data on the concentration and composition of primary and secondary aerosols contributing to Houston's air pollution problem. Selected membrane filter samples containing urban aerosols were analyzed...

  8. Chemical characterization of ambient submicron aerosol during summer 2012 in Patras, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Pandis, Spyros

    2013-04-01

    Ultrafine aerosol was measured at an urban background site in Patras, Greece, during summer 2012 (8-27 June) in an effort to better understand the sources and the characteristics of atmospheric aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean. An Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of the non-refractory PM1. The average total PM1 concentration was 11 ?g m,-3with organic aerosol (OA) contributing 44.3%, sulfate 38.9%, ammonium 11.1%, nitrate 1.2%, and black carbon (BC) 4.5%. Using the algorithm of Kostenidou et al. (2007) the collection efficiency (CE) and the organic density was estimated with a 2 hour resolution. The average CE was 0.75±0.13 and the average organic density was 1.27±0.21 g cm-3. The overall organic to carbon (O:C) mass ratio was 0.64, and average fragments of m-z 44 and 57 represented 0.15 and 0.01 of the organic signal correspondingly. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was performed on the high resolution (HR) organic mass spectra. 3 sources could be identified: LV-OOA (low volatility oxygenated OA) related to aged OA, SV-OOA (semi-volatile oxygenated OA) a less oxygenated OA and HOA (hydrocarbon-like OA) associated with traffic emissions. On average the organic matter consisted of 30% LV-OOA, 50% SV-OOA and 20% HOA. The LV-OOA correlated well with sulfate and ammonium (R2=0.81 and 0.78). The SV-OOA had a good correlation with chlorobenzene and nopinone (R2=0.62 and 0.58), measured by a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). The HOA factor correlated well with BC (R2=0.51), nitrate (R2=0.62), NO2 (R2=0.40), benzene (R2=0.48) and toluene (R2=0.45). The mass fraction of the HOA factor anti-correlated with the organic density indicating that the density of the fresher OA is lower than the density of the oxygenated OA. During the campaign no nucleation event was observed, due to the fact that the aerosol was always acid (0.73±0.07 acidity). References: Kostenidou, E., Pathak, R. K., and Pandis, S. N.: An algorithm for the calculation of secondary organic aerosol density combining AMS and SMPS data, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 41, 1002-1010, 2007.

  9. Simultaneous Physical, Chemical and Optical Characterization of Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Single Particle Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, R.; Furutani, H.; dall'Osto, M.; Prather, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently shown that optical information obtained with an optical particle tracking system in a single particle mass spectrometer may be used to determine the refractive index and effective density for laboratory particles as a function of chemical composition (R.C. Moffet, K. A. Prather Anal. Chem., accepted, 2005). This study focuses on the light scattering information obtained from ambient particles with Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) during shipboard measurements off the coast of California. We have found that the majority of sea salt and processed sea salt particles appear to be spherical, with a refractive index and density in between that of a dilute solution and crystallized solute. A result similar to this was obtained in laboratory studies of salt (NaCl) particles. Most of the elemental carbon particles were found to be internally mixed with nitrate and sulfate. These elemental carbon particle classes are correlated with absorption measurements made with an aethalometer. Additionally, the optical information suggests that most of these elemental carbon particles have similar morphologies. The goal of this study is to determine the density and complex refractive index for single ambient particle classes for 1) optical closure studies and 2) input into optical models. As part of this presentation, we will discuss efforts aimed at evaluating whether the aethalometer data can be used to retrieve a complex refractive index for the elemental carbon particles. These measurements are unique because they are the first to couple single particle size and chemical composition with optical properties. This is an important step in linking particle mixing state with optical properties, and is therefore an essential step for an accurate understanding of the impacts that different aerosol sources have on the earth's climate system.

  10. Levoglucosan enhancement in ambient aerosol during springtime transport events of biomass burning smoke to Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xue-Fang; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Engling, Guenter; Chan, Lo-Yin; Wang, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Shi, Si; Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Ming

    2011-02-01

    An intensive field experiment was conducted at an urban and a rural site in Hong Kong to identify the influence of biomass burning emissions transported from distinct regions on ambient aerosol in coastal southeast China. Water-soluble ionic and carbonaceous species, specifically the biomass burning tracer levoglucosan, were analysed. Elevated levoglucosan concentrations with maxima of 91.5 and 133.7 ng m-3 and overall average concentrations of 30 and 36 ng m-3 were observed at the rural and urban sites, respectively. By combining the analysed meteorological data, backward trajectories, fire counts and Aerosol Index from the Earth Probe satellite, southwest China and the northern Philippines, together with the southeast China coast, were identified for the first time as source regions of the transported biomass burning particles at the surface level in rural Hong Kong. Occasional levoglucosan enhancements observed at urban Hong Kong were attributed to local incense and joss paper burning during the Ching-Ming festival period. The contributions of transported biomass burning emissions, especially from the northern Philippines, were estimated to account for 7.5% and 2.9% of OC and PM2.5, respectively.

  11. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  12. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using bio-aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.; Steele, Paul T.; Coffee, Keith R.; Fergenson, David P.; Riot, Vincent J.; Woods, Bruce W.; Gard, Eric E.; Frank, Matthias; Tobias, Herbert J.; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2006-05-01

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  13. WIDE RANGE AEROSOL CLASSIFIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to design, construct, calibrate, and field test a mobile ambient particulate matter sampler (Wide Range Aerosol Classifier) to collect size-classified samples of large aerosol particles. The sampler design was based on a similar stationary sampling...

  14. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-03-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converter) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average=0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation=0.46 ng/m3 were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  15. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2007-12-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converted) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average = 0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation = 0.46 ng/m3) were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  16. A method to quantify organic functional groups and inorganic compounds in ambient aerosols using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate chemometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coury, Charity; Dillner, Ann M.

    An attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique and a multivariate calibration method were developed to quantify ambient aerosol organic functional groups and inorganic compounds. These methods were applied to size-resolved particulate matter samples collected in winter and summer of 2004 at three sites: a downtown Phoenix, Arizona location, a rural site near Phoenix, and an urban fringe site between the urban and rural site. Ten organic compound classes, including four classes which contain a carbonyl functional group, and three inorganic species were identified in the ambient samples. A partial least squares calibration was developed and applied to the ambient spectra, and 13 functional groups related to organic compounds (aliphatic and aromatic CH, methylene, methyl, alkene, aldehydes/ketones, carboxylic acids, esters/lactones, acid anhydrides, carbohydrate hydroxyl and ethers, amino acids, and amines) as well as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate were quantified. Comparison of the sum of the mass measured by the ATR-FTIR technique and gravimetric mass indicates that this method can quantify nearly all of the aerosol mass on sub-micrometer size-segregated samples. Analysis of sample results shows that differences in organic functional group and inorganic compound concentrations at the three sampling sites can be measured with these methods. Future work will analyze the quantified data from these three sites in detail.

  17. Condensed Volcanic Aerosols Collected Near-Source at Poas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M.; Rietmeijer, F.; Brearley, A.; Basame, S.; Fischer, T.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are mixtures of gases and liquids that react with air to form aerosols. In this study, atmospheric samples were collected near fumarolic vents at Poas Volcano inside the crater and 380m away on the crater rim. Aerosols were captured on supportive Cu grids coated by a thin C-film, encased within a sealed collector designed for this experiment. Grids were exposed to plume constituents for 30-seconds then frozen to prevent further reaction before analysis. Morphologic and chemical features were examined by TEM, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A thin heterogeneous coating of Si and lesser Fe with minor, variable Cl and S covers the C-film. Solid particles additionally contain O and Mg. Liquid droplets of splattered appearance containing Na, Mg and O, lesser amounts of K, Ca and Cl, and minor S and Fe, are surrounded by satellite droplets and radially symmetrical dendritic patterns. Varied components in single droplets suggest that near source, liquids are not necessarily differentiated. O found in particles and droplets but not in the coating may demonstrate partitioning of O out of the condensable gaseous phase. These two observations show that differentiation has begun, but is not completed, at short distances from source. Liquid droplets of varying heights (15-35nm) and diameters (300-500nm) are topped with smaller (5nm high; 50nm diameter) domes. A mottled surface covers morphological highs and flat areas. Contraction marks that grew wider as analysis progressed extend between and linearly across the surface of the droplets. Different size droplets could represent fluids of differing surface tensions growing to individually preferential size, or droplets that have not achieved ideal size. Smaller domes atop larger ones may be gases escaping. These samples represent a portion of volcanic plumes that must be studied to understand the evolution of volcanic aerosols, and, consequently, their influence on atmospheric chemistry. We observe that components begin partitioning immediately upon interaction with air. This observation combined with the tendency of some gases to form a liquid phase supports the idea that measurements made kilometers away from source may be underestimates.

  18. Humic-like substances in fresh emissions of rice straw burning and in ambient aerosols in the Pearl River Delta Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.; Engling, G.; Yu, J. Z.

    2010-07-01

    HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS) are an abundant unresolved mixture of organic compounds present in atmospheric samples. Biomass burning (BB) has been recognized as an important primary source of HULIS, but measurements of HULIS in various fresh BB particles are lacking. In this work, HULIS in emissions of rice straw burning was measured in a number of field and chamber experiments. The average HULIS/OC ratio was 0.34±0.05 in ?g/?gC, showing small variance among emissions under different burning conditions. The influence of BB on ambient HULIS levels was investigated by examining the spatial and temporal variation of HULIS and other aerosol constituents and interspecies relations in ambient PM2.5. The PM2.5 samples were collected at an urban and a suburban location in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China over a period of one year. The HULIS concentrations in the ambient PM2.5 were significantly higher in air masses originating from regions influenced by BB. Significant correlations between HULIS and water-soluble K+ concentrations at both sites further support that BB was an important source of HULIS. Ambient concentrations of HULIS also correlated well with those of sulfate, oxalate, and oxidant (the sum of O3 and NO2). The HULIS/OC ratios in BB-influenced ambient aerosols (~0.6) were much higher than those in the fresh BB emissions (0.34), implying that secondary formation was also an important source of HULIS in the atmosphere. The annual average HULIS concentrations were 4.9 ?g m-3 at the urban site and 7.1 ?g m-3 at the suburban site while the annual average concentrations of elemental carbon were 3.3 ?g m-3 and 2.4 ?g m-3, respectively. The urban-suburban spatial gradient of HULIS was opposite to that of elemental carbon, negating vehicular exhaust as a significant primary emission source of HULIS.

  19. Flattening coefficient of aerosols collected on treated slides

    E-print Network

    Olan-Figueroa, Excel

    1981-01-01

    Cond1t1ons. II. Measured Part1cle Diameters of Oleic Acid Aerosols and Flatten1ng Coeff1cients From Use of Frozen Aerosol Approach III. Flattening Coeffic1ents for Oleic Acid Aerosols 17 26 Tagged with Uran1ne. IV. Flatten1ng Coeff1c1ents for S1... PIEZOELECTRIC CERAMIC HOLDER POROUS PLATE ~ DISP E RSED DROPLETS ~ ORIFICE / PLATE 0-RING MONODISPERSE AEROSOL OUT Kr -85 RADIOACTIVE SOURCE DISPERSION AIR PLUG LIQUID ELEC 7IIC: ROPLET GENERATOR DETAIL COMPRESSED AIR DISPERSION AIR...

  20. On the link between hygroscopicity, volatility, and oxidation state of ambient and water-soluble aerosol in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, K. M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Hite, J. R., Jr.; Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Weber, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) combined with the partitioning of semi-volatile organic components can impact numerous aerosol properties including cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, hygroscopicity and volatility. During the summer 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the Southeastern United States, a suite of instruments including a CCN counter, a thermodenuder (TD) and a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to measure CCN activity, aerosol volatility, composition and oxidation state. Particles were either sampled directly from ambient or through a Particle Into Liquid Sampler (PILS), allowing the investigation of the water-soluble aerosol component. Ambient aerosol exhibited size-dependent composition with larger particles being more hygroscopic. The hygroscopicity of thermally-denuded aerosol was similar between ambient and PILS-generated aerosol and showed limited dependence on volatilization. Results of AMS 3-factor Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis for the PILS-generated aerosol showed that the most hygroscopic components are most likely the most and the least volatile features of the aerosol. No clear relationship was found between organic hygroscopicity and oxygen-to-carbon ratio; in fact, Isoprene organic aerosol (Isoprene-OA) was found to be the most hygroscopic factor, while at the same time being the least oxidized and likely most volatile of all PMF factors. Considering the diurnal variation of each PMF factor and its associated hygroscopicity, Isoprene-OA and More Oxidized - Oxidized Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (MO-OOA) are the prime contributors to hygroscopicity and covary with Less Oxidized - Oxidized Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (LO-OOA) in a way that induces the observed diurnal invariance in total organic hygroscopicity. Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) contributed little to aerosol hygroscopicity, which is expected since there was little biomass burning activity during the sampling period examined.

  1. Collection of Aerosol Particles by a Conducting Sphere in an External Electric Field-Continuum Regime Approximation

    E-print Network

    Wang, Pao K.

    53706 Received January 4, 1982; accepted December 13, 1982 The collection of charged aerosol particlesCollection of Aerosol Particles by a Conducting Sphere in an External Electric Field want to investigate the collection process of aerosol particles by a spherical collector

  2. Ambient temperature and the occurrence of collective violence: the "long, hot summer" revisited.

    PubMed

    Baron, R A; Ransberger, V M

    1978-04-01

    Archival data pertaining to 102 instances of serious collective violence were examined in order to study the relationship between ambient temperature and the occurrence of such events. Results indicated that the frequency of collective violence and ambient temperature were curvilinearly related. Specifically, ambient temperature was directly associated with the frequency of collective violence through the mid-80s (degrees Fahrenheit). Beyond this point, however, further increments in temperature were associated with a decreasing incidence of such events. Additional findings indicated that ambient temperature increased significantly during the 7 days preceding the outbreak of collective violence, remained stable during its occurrence, but then decreased significantly in the 3 days following its termination. Possible implications of these findings, as well as their relationship to the results of previous laboratory studies, are discussed. PMID:650385

  3. Extended papers from NPAR 2010 Stylized ambient displays of digital media collections

    E-print Network

    Collomosse, John

    Extended papers from NPAR 2010 Stylized ambient displays of digital media collections Tinghuai Wang collections of personal digital media. However, once captured, this media is infrequently accessed and often lies dormant on users' PCs. We present a system to breathe life into home digital media collections

  4. A GC-TCD method for measuring the liquid water mass of collected aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Te Lee; Shih-Yu Chang

    2002-01-01

    This work presents a gas chromatographic method that uses a thermal conductivity detector (GC-TCD) to measure the liquid water mass (LWM) of collected aerosols. The method is a modification of the previously developed EA-TCD method (Journal of Aerosol Science 29, 827). A microcomputer was incorporated into the system to control the analytical procedures, improve the measurement precision, and make possible

  5. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  6. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  7. Atmospheric 210Pb and 7Be in ambient aerosols over low- and high-altitude sites in semiarid region: Temporal variability and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.

    2008-06-01

    Time series measurements of 210Pb and 7Be made on ambient aerosols, collected from a low-altitude urban site (Ahmedabad, 23.0°N, 72.6°E, 49 m asl) and a high-altitude station (Mt. Abu, 24.6°N, 72.7°E, 1680 m asl) located in a high-dust semiarid region of western India, reveal characteristic pattern of temporal variability consistent over three years (2000-2002). The relatively high concentrations of 210Pb (>1 mBq m-3) during wintertime (November-February) are dominated by continental air masses from the northeast; whereas lower values during the summer months (April-May) and southwest monsoon season (June-August) are associated with (southwesterly) maritime air. The concentration of 210Pb in individual rain events at Ahmedabad, collected during the southwest monsoon for the same three-year period, also exhibits large variability (range of 3-367 mBq L-1; volume-weighted mean of 74 mBq L-1). This first set of data on the simultaneous measurements in rain and aerosols from a semiarid region is useful in deriving scavenging ratio (SR = 290) of 210Pb. On the basis of data for the three consecutive years (2000-2002), we find that both dry and wet deposition fluxes of 210Pb center around 2-4 mBq cm-2 a-1, suggesting relative dominance of dry deposition in a semiarid region. When used in conjunction with 210Pb, 7Be provides information on the vertical mixing of air masses. During the dry season (January-May and September-December), abundances of 7Be and 210Pb (mBq m-3) in ambient aerosols over Ahmedabad (7Be, 1.9 ± 0.1 to 6.0 ± 0.3; 210Pb, 0.32 ± 0.03 to 1.9 ± 0.2) and Mt. Abu (7Be, 3.8 ± 0.2 to 7.6 ± 0.3; 210Pb, 0.39 ± 0.05 to 1.8 ± 0.2) do not show any covariance, suggesting their usefulness as independent tracers of air masses and pollutants transport. Assuming literature-based constant 222Rn flux and measured abundance of 210Pb in aerosols, a model-based approach has provided a simple way to ascertain residence time of tropospheric aerosols, varying from ˜5 days during the dry season and ˜2 days in the wet season. These results attempt to fill a major existing gap for the south Asian region under Global Atmospheric Watch program.

  8. Speciation of Water-Soluble Organic Carbons in Aerosols from two collecting methods: PILS and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, H.; Ahn, Y.; Shin, J.; Lee, M.; Park, M.

    2013-12-01

    Total suspended particles aerosol sampling for collection of 24 h by high volume air sampler at Campus of Korea University in metropolitan city Seoul. To measure WSOC, an aliquot (2 cm2) of quartz fiber filter ( 20.3 × 25.4 cm) was extracted 5 mL Milli-Q water with hot water (80 °C) and room temperature water (25 °C) under ultrasonication (10 min, three times). Hot water extracted method was comparison with PILS samples. WSOC was quantified using a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. For speciation analysis of organic compounds, the extracts were concentrated to dryness using freeze dryer and then derivatized with MSTFA (N-Methyl-N-trimethy- silyltrifluoroacetamide+1% trimethylchlorosilane) and analyzed with GC-MS scan mode. In extracted with hot water, total carbon concentrations were higher than room temperature extracts. Organic compounds widely recognized to be generated from anthropogenic sources with a low solubility at ambient temperature organic were detected in both samples obtained from PILS and hot water extraction. It is demonstrating that difference between total carbon concentration and composition of sampling obtain from two different systems (i.e. PILS and filter) in analytical procedure of WSOCs. Acknowledgement This research was susported by Center for Women In Science, Engineering Technology(WISET) commissioned by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and the National Research Foundation of korea. The authors also acknowledge the support made by a grant from the Korea Basic Science Institute.

  9. China Collection 2.0: The aerosol optical depth dataset from the synergetic retrieval of aerosol properties algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; He, Xingwei; Xu, Hui; Guang, Jie; Guo, Jianping; Mei, Linlu

    2014-10-01

    A wide range of data products have been published since the operation of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on NASA's TERRA and AQUA satellites. Based on DarkTarget and DeepBlue method, NASA has published Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products Collection 5.0 and Collection 5.1 at 10 km spatial resolution. The Collection 6.0 will be published soon with spatial resolution of 3 km. Although validated globally, regional and systematic errors are still found in the MODIS-retrieved AOD products. This is especially remarkable for bright heterogeneous land surface, such as mainland China. In order to solve the aerosol retrieval problem over heterogeneous bright land surface, the Synergetic Retrieval of Aerosol Properties algorithm (SRAP) has been developed based on the synergetic use of the MODIS data of TERRA and AQUA satellites. Using the SRAP algorithm, we produced AOD dataset-China Collection 2.0, dated from August 2002 to August 2012, and compared the AOD results with AErosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) and Chinese Meteorological Administration Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) measurements. We find that 62% of China Collection 2.0 AOD values are within an expected error (EE) range of ±(0.05 + 20%) and that 56% are within an EE range of ±(0.05 + 15%) when compared with AERONET-observed values. For CARSNET validation, we find that 60% of China Collection 2.0 AOD values are within an expected error (EE) range of ±(0.05 + 20%) and that 53% are within an EE range of ±(0.05 + 15%). In addition, we also compare the AOD results with MODIS aerosol products, the cross validation shows that the two AOD have good consistency. Monthly averaged AOD results show that AOD is generally high in China's eastern coastal region from March to August, and AOD is not more than 0.5 in other months. Season averaged results show that the higher values of AOD are mostly distributed in eastern and southern China.

  10. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  11. Analysis of single aerosol particles collected in urban and cave environment by proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs; Borbély-Kiss, I.; Rajta, I.; Uzonyi, I.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2000-03-01

    Quantitative PIXE analysis was performed on several single aerosol particles collected with cascade impactor by the scanning proton microprobe of Debrecen. The cascade impactor samples were collected at an urban location in Debrecen and in a speleotherapeutic cave situated under Budapest during the winter of 1998. The aerosol samples have already been analysed by bulk PIXE technique. Elemental concentrations for 23 elements and also the size of the particles were determined. Cluster analysis was carried out to identify the different particle groups. The contribution of the different types of particles to each size fraction were investigated with special regard to the smaller size fractions which are interesting from the point of view of the speleotherapy. Traces of anthropogenic pollution were also shown in the cave aerosol, and the possible composition of particles containing these pollutants is given. Comparison of the urban and cave aerosol particles is also discussed.

  12. 2-Hydroxyterpenylic acid: An oxygenated marker compound for a-pinene secondary organic aerosol in ambient fine aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    An oxygenated MW 188 compound is commonly observed in substantial abundance in atmospheric aerosol samples and was proposed in previous studies as an a-pinene-related marker compound that is associated with aging processes. Owing to difficulties in producing this compound in suff...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 AEROSOL AT A SOUTHEASTERN US SITE: FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED ANALYSIS OR PARTICLE PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a field study in the summer of 2000 in the Research Triangle Park (RTP), aerosol samples were collected using a five stage cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The impaction surfaces were stainless steel disks....

  14. Comparison of ambient aerosol extinction coefficients obtained from in-situ, MAX-DOAS and LIDAR measurements at Cabauw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Weingartner, E.; Henzing, J.; Moerman, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Mikkilä, J.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Clémer, K.; van Roozendael, M.; Yilmaz, S.; Frieß, U.; Irie, H.; Wagner, T.; Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Apituley, A.; Wilson, K.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-03-01

    In the field, aerosol in-situ measurements are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH<30-40%). Since ambient aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced RH, their microphysical and optical properties - especially the aerosol light scattering - are also strongly dependent on RH. The knowledge of this RH effect is of crucial importance for climate forcing calculations or for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. Here, we will present results from a four-month campaign which took place in summer 2009 in Cabauw, The Netherlands. The aerosol scattering coefficient ?sp(?) was measured dry and at various, predefined RH conditions between 20 and 95% with a humidified nephelometer. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH,?) is the key parameter to describe the effect of RH on ?sp(?) and is defined as ?sp(RH,?) measured at a certain RH divided by the dry ?sp(dry,?). The measurement of f(RH,?) together with the dry absorption measurement (assumed not to change with RH) allows the determination of the actual extinction coefficient ?ep(RH,?) at ambient RH. In addition, a wide range of other aerosol properties were measured in parallel. The measurements were used to characterize the effects of RH on the aerosol optical properties. A closure study showed the consistency of the aerosol in-situ measurements. Due to the large variability of air mass origin (and thus aerosol composition) a simple parameterization of f(RH,?) could not be established. If f(RH,?) needs to be predicted, the chemical composition and size distribution need to be known. Measurements of four MAX-DOAS (multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy) instruments were used to retrieve vertical profiles of ?ep(?). The values of the lowest layer were compared to the in-situ values after conversion of the latter ones to ambient RH. The comparison showed a good correlation of R2 = 0.62-0.78, but the extinction coefficients from MAX-DOAS were a factor of 1.5-3.4 larger than the in-situ values. Best agreement is achieved for a few cases characterized by low aerosol optical depths and low planetary boundary layer heights. Differences were shown to be dependent on the applied MAX-DOAS retrieval algorithm. The comparison of the in-situ extinction data to a Raman LIDAR (light detection and ranging) showed a good correlation and higher values measured by the LIDAR (R2 = 0.82-0.85, slope of 1.69-1.76) if the Raman retrieved profile was used to extrapolate the directly measured extinction coefficient to the ground. The comparison improved if only nighttime measurements were used in the comparison (R2 = 0.96, slope of 1.12).

  15. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 ?m mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 ?m, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles. Cladosporium spp., which are among the most abundant fungal spores in many terrestrial environments, were not correlated with any of the real-time fluorescence channels, suggesting that the real-time fluorescence instruments are relatively insensitive to PBAP classes with dark, highly absorptive cell walls. Fluorescence microscopy images of cascade impactor plates showed large numbers of coarse-mode particles consistent with the morphology and weak fluorescence expected of sea salt. Some of these particles were attached to biological cells, suggesting that a marine source influenced the PBAPs observed at the site and that the ocean may be an important contributor to PBAP loadings in coastal environments.

  16. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 ?m mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 ?m, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles. Cladosporium spp., which are among the most abundant fungal spores in many terrestrial environments, were not correlated with any of the real-time fluorescence channels, suggesting that the real-time fluorescence instruments are insensitive to PBAP classes with dark, highly absorptive cell walls. Fluorescence microscopy images of cascade impactor plates showed large numbers of coarse mode particles consistent with the morphology and weak fluorescence expected of sea salt. Some of these particles were attached to biological cells, suggesting that a marine source influenced the PBAP observed at the site and that the ocean may be an important contributor to PBAP loadings in coastal environments.

  17. Hygroscopic Behavior of Ambient Aerosols at an Anthropogenically Perturbed Continental U.S.A. Site, Bondville, Illinois.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kus, P.; Rood, M. J.; Ogren, J.; Quinn, P.; Covert, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    The dependence of ambient aerosols' light scattering coefficient on controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions was measured for ambient aerosol at the Bondville Aerosol Research Site (BEARS), located in east-central Illinois, USA. The measurements were made with a controlled RH nephelometry system between 1995 and 2000. The fact that an aerosol's hygroscopic growth is one of the most important parameters in estimating an aerosol's ability to cause radiative forcing makes it important to characterize that property at relevant locations on a regional scale. Total and hemispheric back scattering coefficients were measured by two nephelometers operating in series as a function of wavelength of light (450, 550, and 700 nm), controlled RH, and upper particle diameter (Dp) of 1 and 10 ?m. In addition, gravimetric and inorganic ion composition of the sub-micrometer diameter particles were determined using filter samples. Particle size distributions were measured by a combined system of Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) during a 20-day intensive field campaign. Hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH=82%)) is expressed as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at 82% RH to the scattering at a reference RH (RH<40%). The measured f(RH) values exhibited both deliquescent and monotonic types of growth and were fitted to two different nonlinear equations depending on the type of observed growth. The value of f(RH=82%) at 550 nm was 1.84 +/- 0.43 for sub-micrometer and almost the same with 1.83 +/- 0.42 for super-micrometer aerosols. Higher f(RH) values were associated with the periods where the scattering was dominated by sub-micrometer diameter particles. Deliquescent type of growth was observed 20% of the time. The f(RH) values were higher for aerosol exhibiting deliquescent growth by 8%, which is statistically significant. Available air mass trajectories revealed that the highest f(RH) values were observed when the air mass reaching the site spent the last 3-days in the Midwestern region where major large SO2 emitters are present. The percent occurrence of such trajectories was 17%. The 3-day back trajectories originating from the eastern U.S. occurred 50% of the time with an f(RH) value that is 20% less than the f(RH=82%) from Midwestern region. The intensive field campaign revealed the effect of particle size and composition on the hygroscopic growth of the ambient aerosols. The measured geometric mean based on volume (Dgv) size distribution varied from 0.1 ?m to 0.25 ?m with a fairly constant standard deviation of 1.7 +/- 0.1. Larger mean diameters were associated with higher f(RH) values. When particles contain more than 40% sulfate by mass, their corresponding Dgv value becomes larger than 0.20?m. In addition, f(RH) values increased with increasing percent SO4. The value of f(RH=82%) is larger than 1.9 when the sulfate exceeds 34% by mass of the particulate mass. The value of f(RH) also increased with decreasing NH4/SO4 molar ratios. Air mass trajectories supported the fact that higher sulfate mass fractions and higher f(RH) were associated with periods when the 3-day back trajectories were from the Midwestern and Eastern U.S. regions.

  18. Improved Aerosol Collection by Combined Impaction and Centrifugal Motion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus willeke; Xuejun Lin; Sergey A. Grinshpun

    1998-01-01

    A new principle for collecting airborne particles, including microorganisms, has been introduced by injecting the particles into a swirling airflow from where they are removed onto a collection surface. A dry surface, a surface coated with an adhesive substance or a surface wetted by a liquid swirled onto the collection surface from a reservoir below can be used in the

  19. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  20. An investigation of the formation of ambient NH 4NO 3 aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Young-Soo; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Kurita, Hidemi; Ueda, Hiromasa

    The aerosol equilibrium formulation of Stelson and Seinfeld (1982a, b, Atmospheric Environment16, 983-992, 993-1000) is incorporated into the STEM-II transport/chemistry model and is evaluated against NH 3, HNO 3 and aerosol NH 4+ and NO 3- measured at Nagano Prefecture, Japan on 29 and 30 July 1983. These results indicate that this modeling approach is useful in analyzing field data.

  1. A wintertime study of atmospheric aerosols collected in São Paulo, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Vasconcellos; L. Ogura; W. Lopes; P. A. Pereira; J. B. Andrade; O. Sanchez-Ccoyllo

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution has become a significant problem for urban areas worldwide. In megacities aerosols are released by different emissions sources. These sources can emit particles in a large variety of sizes. Size distributions provide information on the sources and the sources processes of particles or species (Maenhaut et al. 2002). In the wintertime (2005) twenty PM10 samples were collected in

  2. Efficient Collection of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Particle Concentrator—Electrostatic Precipitator Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bangwoo Han; Neelakshi Hudda; Zhi Ning; Yong-Jin Kim; Constantinos Sioutas

    2009-01-01

    A novel particle sampling methodology developed recently by our group (Han et al. 2008) has been extended in this article to collect atmospheric particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) for chemical and biological–toxicological analysis. Particles are grown to super-micron droplets via condensation of ultrapure deionized water, and concentrated by virtual impaction in the versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES). The grown

  3. Theoretical Determination of the Efficiency of Aerosol Particle Collection by Falling Columnar Ice Crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. L. Miller; P. K. Wano

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical model for the removal of aerosol particles by falling columnar ice crystals which incorporates gravitational, inertial, thermophoreic, diffusiophoretic, and electrostatic mechanisms has been formulated. The results of this trajectory model, combined with earlier resuslts, determine the collection efficiency for submicron particles as a flux onto a collector surface for any geometry and due to Brownian diffusion, thermo- and

  4. Collection and Characterization of Aerosols from Metal Cutting Techniques Typically Used in Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GEORGE J. NEWTON; MARK D. HOOVER; EDWARD B. BARR; BRIAN A. WONG; PAUL D. RITTER

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques

  5. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using bioaerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Paul T.; McJimpsey, Erica L.; Coffee, Keith R.; Fergenson, David P.; Riot, Vincent J.; Tobias, Herbert J.; Woods, Bruce W.; Gard, Eric E.; Frank, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  6. Long-term trends in california mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations of black carbon and organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Brian C; Goldstein, Allen H; Harley, Robert A

    2015-04-21

    A fuel-based approach is used to assess long-term trends (1970-2010) in mobile source emissions of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosol (OA, including both primary emissions and secondary formation). The main focus of this analysis is the Los Angeles Basin, where a long record of measurements is available to infer trends in ambient concentrations of BC and organic carbon (OC), with OC used here as a proxy for OA. Mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations have decreased similarly, reflecting the importance of on- and off-road engines as sources of BC and OA in urban areas. In 1970, the on-road sector accounted for ?90% of total mobile source emissions of BC and OA (primary + secondary). Over time, as on-road engine emissions have been controlled, the relative importance of off-road sources has grown. By 2010, off-road engines were estimated to account for 37 ± 20% and 45 ± 16% of total mobile source contributions to BC and OA, respectively, in the Los Angeles area. This study highlights both the success of efforts to control on-road emission sources, and the importance of considering off-road engine and other VOC source contributions when assessing long-term emission and ambient air quality trends. PMID:25793355

  7. AMBIENT AMMONIA AND AMMONIUM AEROSOL ACROSS A REGION OF VARIABLE AMMONIA EMISSION DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents one year of ambient ammonia (NH3), ammonium (NH4+), hydrochloric acid (HCI), chloride (CI¯), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrate (NO3¯), nitrous acid (HONO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and sulfate (SO4...

  8. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  9. Thermophoresis and Its Thermal Parameters for Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara

    2007-08-01

    The particle collection efficiency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25mu m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  10. THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, M.; Gundel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler’s heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25?m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  11. Source Characterization from Ambient Measurements of Aerosol Optical Christopher D. Cappa1

    E-print Network

    optical property (i.e. single scatter albedo) and the extensive property of total light absorption be estimated from the albedo-absorption relationship. During the NEAQS 2004 study, the primary aerosol scenarios it is important to have a sound understanding of the contributions of different sources

  12. From molecular clusters to nanoparticles: Role of ambient ionization in tropospheric aerosol formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fangqun Yu; Richard P. Turco

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the role of background ionization, associated mainly with galactic cosmic radiation, in the generation and evolution of ultrafine particles in the marine boundary layer. We follow the entire course of aerosol evolution, from the initial buildup of molecular clusters (charged and uncharged) through their growth into stable nanoparticles. The model used for this purpose is based on a

  13. PASSIVE AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR CHARACTERIZATION, AMBIENT CONCENTRATION, AND PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an extended abstract of a presentation made at the Air and Waste Management Association's Symposium on Air Quality Measurement Methods and Technology, Durham, NC, May 9-11, 2006. The abstract describes the theory, design, and initial testing of a passive aerosol sampler f...

  14. SMOG CHAMBER STUDIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM IRRADIATED HYDROCARBONS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the physics and chemistry of aerosols is fundamental to evaluating health risks and developing and evaluating atmospheric models. However, as noted in a recent NRC report only about 10% of the organics in PM2.5 have been identified. A significant portion of the un...

  15. Ambient particle characterization by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry in an urban area of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of aerosol particles in Beijing urban area, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from April 22 to May 4, 2011. 510,341 particles out of 2,953,200 sized particles were characterized by SPAMS in combination with the ART-2a neural network algorithm. The particles were classified as rich-K (39.79%), carbonaceous species (32.7%), industry metal (19.2%), dust (5.7%), and rich-Na (1.76%). Industrial emissions related particles, rich-Fe, rich-Pb, and K-nitrate, were the major components of aerosol particles during haze periods, which were mainly from the steel plants and metal smelting processes around Beijing. Under stagnant meterological conditions, these regional emissions have a vital effect on haze formation. Organic carbon (OC) particles were attributed to biomass burning. NaK-EC was likely to come from local traffic emissions. Internally mixed organic and elemental carbon (OCEC) was found to be from possible sources of local traffic emission and biomass burning. It was found that coarse dust particles were mainly composed of four different types of dust particles, dust-Si, dust-Ca, dust-Al, and dust-Ti. It is the first time that SPAMS was used to study a dust storm in Beijing. Our results showed that SPAMS could be a powerful tool in the identification and apportionment of aerosol sources in Beijing, providing useful reference information for environmental control and management.

  16. Library Optimization in EDXRF Spectral Deconvolution for Multi-element Analysis of Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    In multi-element analysis of atmospheric aerosols, attempts are made to fit overlapping elemental spectral lines for many elements that may be undetectable in samples due to low concentrations. Fitting with many library reference spectra has the unwanted effect of raising the an...

  17. AMBIENT SULFATE AEROSOL DEPOSITION IN MAN: MODELING THE INFLUENCE OF HYGROSCOPICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric sulfate aerosols (H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4) are of international concern because of their global prevalence and potential irritant or toxic effects on humans. To assess hazards following inhalation exposure, the total dose delivered to the human respiratory tract...

  18. GROWTH LAWS FOR THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY AMBIENT AEROSOLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CHEMICAL CONVERSION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evolution of aerosol size distributions growing by gas-to-particle conversion has been observed recently in field and laboratory studies. A technique for extracting particle diameter growth rates from such data is presented. The functional dependence of these growth rates on ...

  19. Development and first application of an Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) for quasi online compound specific aerosol measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thorsten Hohaus; Astrid Kiendler-Scharr; Dagmar Trimborn; John Jayne; Andreas Wahner; Doug Worsnop

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate and human health on regional and global scales (IPCC, 2007). In many environments organics are a major fraction of the aerosol influencing its properties. Due to the huge variety of organic compounds present in atmospheric aerosol current measurement techniques are far from providing a full speciation of organic aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009). The development of

  20. Photoemission Charging of a Collective of Aerosol Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Lyalin; K. I. Semenov

    2002-01-01

    The photoemission charging of a collective of particles at normal atmospheric pressure and at lowered pressure of the air has been investigated. The dependences of the average initial charge of a droplet, the average equilibrium photoemission loss of charge by a droplet, and the equilibrium concentration of the electrons on the air pressure are presented as the basic experimental results.

  1. Direct measurement of the impact of the reactive uptake of ammonia and alkylamines on the CCN activity of ambient aerosol sampled during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Ryder, O. S.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Surratt, J. D.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Bairai, S. T.; Hicks, W.; Renfro, J.; Brady, J.; Schill, S.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The neutralization of condensed-phase organic acids via reaction with gas-phase ammonia or alkylamines to form ammonium and amminium salts, respectively, has been shown to change the supersaturated hygroscopicity (CCN activity) of laboratory generated organic aerosol (1). Understanding the extent to which CCN activity is perturbed by the reactive uptake of reduced nitrogen gases permits us to assess the sensitivity of current models of hygroscopicity to future changes in the concentration of ammonia and alkylamines. Data presented will focus on the measurement of ambient aerosol CCN activity during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign at Look Rock, TN, as well as changes in CCN activity following the reactive uptake of gas-phase methylamine, dimethylamine, and ammonia. Ambient CCN measurements are compared with literature values from laboratory studies focusing on SOA formed via isoprene oxidation. Implications for the effect of these multi-phase reactions on the cloud formation properties of ambient aerosols and the comparison of field measurements with laboratory-based studies of model compounds will be discussed. References: 1. Dinar, E. et al., CCN Activity and Hygroscopic growth of organic aerosols following reactive uptake of ammonia, Environ. Sci. Technol., 42, 793-799, 2008.

  2. A study of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of ambient aerosol particles in Southeast Asia during hazy and nonhazy days

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. See; R. Balasubramanian; W. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Many Southeast Asian countries have been constantly plagued by recurring smoke haze episodes as a result of traditional slash-and-burn practices in agricultural areas to clear crop lands or uncontrolled forest fires. However, our current knowledge on the physiochemical and optical properties of ambient aerosols associated with regional haze phenomenon is still fairly limited. Therefore a comprehensive field study was carried

  3. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  4. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ?g m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ? 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in WSOC species and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory had undergone cloud processing before reaching the site. Finally, the air masses on 9/25 were more aged (∼15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and other species characteristic for marine aerosol such as fatty acids. The change in air masses for the two samples was corroborated by the changes in ozone and the non-methane hydrocarbons ethane and propane, morphology of particles, as well as by the FLEXPART retroplume simulations. This manuscript presents the first detailed molecular characterization of free tropospheric aged aerosol intercepted at a lower free troposphere remote location in the North Atlantic.

  5. Contribution of wood combustion in winter submicron ambient aerosols over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulas, Iasonas; Fourtziou, Luciana; Zarmpas, Pavlos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Liakakou, Eleni; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    Given that a smog pollution problem, mostly attributed to wood burning in fireplaces and stoves, is currently emerging in the Athens metropolitan area, several monitoring instruments were deployed at the National Observatory of Athens facilities in the region of Thissio, downtown Athens . These included an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor with 30 minute time resolution and a Particle Into Liquid Sampler coupled with Ion Chromatography with 15 minute time resolution. The campaign duration was from December 2013 to February 2014 and the aim was to investigate the chemical composition of ultrafine aerosols connected to biomass burning.. Many events of high particulate matter concentrations (exceeding the 50 ?g/m3 daily limit) were observed during night-time, with maximum concentrations occurring when stagnant atmospheric conditions prevailed. Potassium measured by the PILS - IC, and the m/z = 60 fragment measured by the ACSM, was initially used as a tracer of biomass burning events. A good correlation was determined for those two factors, allowing for safe conclusions concerning the identification of these aforementioned biomass burning events. For utmost certainty, Black Carbon measurements coming from three different instruments, was also used. As a second step, Positive Matrix Factorization analysis was performed, using the SoFi interface, which utilizes the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) (Canonaco et Al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 3649-3661, 2013), for the source apportionment of the organic particulate matter, determined by the ACSM. This analysis revealed a very important Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) factor with a clear diurnal cycle, showing maxima in the time interval from 21:00 in the evening to 02:00 in the morning. A Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA) factor is also present with a maximum during the same time interval, attributed to fossil fuel used in central heating systems, and a secondary maximum during the day, attributed to city traffic. Two more factors were determined, an Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA) factor implying processing in the atmosphere and a minor Cooking Organic Aerosol (COA) factor.¬

  6. Electrostatic and Inertial Collection of Aerosol Particles by Water Droplets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Chang; K. H. Leong; J. J. Stukel

    1987-01-01

    Inertial impaction and electrostatic attraction are generally the two most important mechanisms for the collection of charged micron-sized particles by charged droplets. An experiment was carried out to determine the collision efficiencies of charged 142-?m-radius water droplets for charged micron-sized particles under different values of the electrostatic force. Experimental results agree well with a trajectory model that used a numerically

  7. Characterization of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Ryu, J.; Maskey, S.; Jung, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2010-11-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon that leads to low visibility, and is mostly due to elevated levels of fine particulate matter. It can have effects on cloud formation, public health, agriculture, and even the global climate. Although urban haze has been increasing in occurrence over the past several years over the Seoul-Incheon metropolis, Korea, studies of the morphology and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles by single-particle analysis during haze episodes have rarely been conducted. Herein, a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyze individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13-18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October). Overall, 3600 particles in 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were measured by low-Z particle EPMA. Based on quantitative X-ray analysis, together with secondary electron images of individual particles, we successfully identified the aerosol particle types as follows: elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, genuine (fresh) and reacted (aged) sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMg(CO3)2, etc.), and K-containing, Fe-rich, and fly ash particles. By analyzing the relative abundances of different particle types, it was concluded that (a) on non-haze days, reacted sea-salts and reacted mineral dust particles were abundant in both the PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5 fractions (with relative abundances of 65.0% and 57.7%, respectively); whereas on haze days, the relative abundances of OC and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles were significantly elevated, indicating that organic matter and secondary aerosols were abundant in the atmosphere when haze occurred. (b) in PM2.5-10 fractions, sea-salt and mineral dust particles reacted with NOx/HNO3 significantly outnumbered those reacted with SO2/H2SO4, no matter whether they were collected on haze or non-haze days; but in PM1.0-2.5 fractions on non-haze days, the nitrate-containing reacted particles significantly outnumbered the sulfate-containing ones, whereas it was the reverse on haze days, implying that on haze days there were special sources or formation mechanisms for the reacted fine aerosol particles (aerodynamic diameter<2.5 ?m). It is hypothesized that motor vehicles, biomass burning from the areas surrounding Incheon, and haze transported from Eastern China are the major contributors to urban haze formation in Incheon under stagnant meteorological conditions such as low wind speed, high relative humidity, etc.

  8. Aerosol Evolution Within a Low-Temperature Volcanic Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M. A.; Rietmeijer, F. J.; Brearley, A. J.; Fischer, T. P.

    2003-12-01

    In order to investigate the early evolution of aerosols within a volcanic plume, atmospheric samples were collected at Poas, a persistently degassing volcano in Costa Rica. Chemical bulk compositions and morphologies of the collected aerosols were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Aerosol morphologies correlate with distinctions in composition and with sampling location. A bimodal size distribution of aerosols is observed at all sampling locations. The small aerosols exist in clusters of semi-spherical bodies averaging 35nm across, characteristic of homogeneously nucleated aerosols. The large aerosols are solid and/or liquid, with the solid aerosols averaging 150nm across, characteristic of primary aerosols. The large liquid aerosols have more complex bulk chemistry than the small homogeneously nucleated aerosols, both size and composition suggesting they condensed on already existing aerosols. Both size modes of aerosols are 300nm larger 280m distant from source, indicating that coagulation commences immediately and occurs uniformly for both modes of aerosols. Aerosol compositions were compared with predictions of an equilibrium model assuming homogeneous nucleation of aerosols generated by mixing the 92° C volcanic gases with ambient temperature air. The collected aerosols have different and more complex compositions than the model predicts to be stable in the plume. We suggest that heterogeneous nucleation and coagulation are important processes in the first seconds of plume travel and these processes, as well as the inclusion of airborne, locally-produced mineral dust must be considered in an accurate model of plume evolution.

  9. COMPARISON OF TWO PARTICLE-SIZE SPECTROMETERS FOR AMBIENT AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS. (R827354C002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an ongoing debate on the question which size fraction of particles in ambient air may be responsible for human health effects observed in epidemiological studies. Since there is no single instrument available for the measurement of the particle-size distribution over ...

  10. Seasonal air quality profile of size-segregated aerosols in the ambient air of a central Indian region.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Deb, Manas K; Verma, Devsharan; Nirmalkar, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    Seasonal distribution trends of size-segregated aerosols i.e. submicron (PM1), fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) and their relationship with meteorological variables employing correlation analysis were studied in the ambient air of central India from July 2009 to June 2010. The annual mean concentrations of PM1, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were found to be 65.7, 135.0 and 118.5 ?g m(-3), respectively. The annual mean PM2.5 concentration is three times higher than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards of India (NAAQS). Higher concentrations of PM1, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were found during winter due to enormous biomass burning especially during night time due to the use of combustible goods like fire wood and dung cake in the open space by the peoples to keep themselves warm and lower concentrations were observed during monsoon when there were high precipitations. PM2.5 showed high positive correlation with PM1 (r = 0.69) and moderate correlation with PM2.5-10 indicating that variation in PM2.5 mass is governed by the variation in PM1 mass or vice versa. PMID:24129422

  11. Ambient temperature and the occurrence of collective violence: a new analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlsmith, J M; Anderson, C A

    1979-03-01

    Prevalent folklore suggests that riots tend to occur during periods of very hot weather. Baron and Ransberger examined 102 major riots in the United States between 1967 and 1971 and concluded that the frequency of collective violence and ambient temperature are curvilinearly related. The present article points out that the Baron and Ransberger analysis did not take account of the different number of days in different temperature ranges. The artifact is eliminated, and the probability of a riot, conditional upon temperature, is estimated. When this is done, the evidence strongly suggests that the conditional probability of a riot increases monotonically with temperature. Some general implications of such data analyses are discussed. PMID:458551

  12. The average carbon oxidation state of organic aerosol: Synthesis of laboratory and ambient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumit, K. E.; Kroll, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is typically made up of a highly complex mixture of compounds that evolve chemically over the atmospheric lifetime of a given aerosol particle. This poses substantial challenges to modeling and measuring the formation and evolution of atmospheric OA. However, describing OA in terms of its bulk (or average) chemical properties provides insight into the overall chemical evolution of the component species, without requiring that every compound in OA be individually tracked. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the average oxidation state of carbon (OSc) and average carbon number (Nc) as metrics for the atmospheric evolution (oxidation) of OA. The reactions governing the transformation of atmospheric organics can be broken down into three key reaction types: functionalization (the oxidative addition of polar functional groups to the carbon skeleton), fragmentation (the oxidative cleavage of C-C bonds), and oligomerization (the association of two organic molecules), each of which has a unique effect on OSc and Nc. OSc can be estimated from average elemental ratios (most importantly O:C and H:C) which are readily measurable through techniques such as combustion analysis (CHNS), electrospray ionization Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ESI-FTICR), and high-resolution electron impact aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-AMS). Here, we synthesize measurements of OSc (and Nc) from a number of sources, including field and laboratory studies, to further elucidate the reactions that govern the chemical evolution of OA. We also examine the uncertainties and challenges in measuring OSc with modern analytical techniques, giving detailed attention to the role of the abundances of key elements in OA - not only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, but also nitrogen and sulfur.

  13. Raman microscopy of size-segregated aerosol particles, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Kistler, Magdalena; Matzl, Julia; Schauer, Gerhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Lohninger, Johann; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Size classified aerosol samples were collected using low pressure impactors in July 2013 at the high alpine background site Sonnnblick. The Sonnblick Observatory is located in the Austrian Alps, at the summit of Sonnblick 3100 m asl. Sampling was performed in parallel on the platform of the Observatory and after the aerosol inlet. The inlet is constructed as a whole air inlet and is operated at an overall sampling flow of 137 lpm and heated to 30 °C. Size cuts of the eight stage low pressure impactors were from 0.1 to 12.8 µm a.d.. Alumina foils were used as sample substrates for the impactor stages. In addition to the size classified aerosol sampling overall aerosol mass (Sharp Monitor 5030, Thermo Scientific) and number concentrations (TSI, CPC 3022a; TCC-3, Klotz) were determined. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the alumina foils at a resolution of about 0.5 µm. The Raman microscope is equipped with a laser with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm and a grating with 300 gr/mm. Both optical images and the related chemical images were combined and a chemometric investigation of the combined images was done using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs). Based on the well-known environment, a basic assignment of Raman signals of single particles is possible at a sufficient certainty. Main aerosol constituents e.g. like sulfates, black carbon and mineral particles could be identified. First results of the chemical imaging of size-segregated aerosol, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory, will be discussed with respect to standardized long-term measurements at the sampling station. Further, advantages and disadvantages of chemical imaging with subsequent chemometric investigation of the single images will be discussed and compared to the established methods of aerosol analysis. The chemometric analysis of the dataset is focused on mixing and variation of single compounds at different stages of the impactors.

  14. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I, fractioned concentrations are still under investigation, and will be reported and discussed during the meeting. For seasonal variation, in general, concentrations of halogens were the lowest in summer and higher in fall and winter, reflecting air mass movement and wind speed around Okinawa, Japan.

  15. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations suggest that peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is one of the most important organic peroxides in the atmosphere, whose budget is potentially related to the aerosols. Here we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto the ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (?) of 10-4, and both ?PAA and ?H2O2 increase with increasing RH. However, ?PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than is ?H2O2, which indicates that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust Storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar ? value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., inorganic soluble salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.3 h on haze days and 7.6 h on non-haze days, values which agree well with the field observed result.

  16. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS was probably transported from the Asian continent.

  17. Mass loading of size-segregated atmospheric aerosols in the ambient air during fireworks episodes in eastern Central India.

    PubMed

    Nirmalkar, Jayant; Deb, Manas K; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Verma, Santosh K

    2013-04-01

    The effects of combustion of the fire crackers on the air quality in eastern Central India were studied for the first time during Diwali festival. This case study analyzes the size distribution and temporal variation of aerosols collected in the rural area of eastern Central India during pre-diwali, Diwali and post-diwali period for the year of 2011. Fifteen aerosol samples were collected during the special case study of Diwali period using Andersen sampler. The mean concentrations of PM10 (respirable particulate matter) were found to be 212.8 ± 4.2, 555.5 ± 20.2 and 284.4 ± 5.8 during pre-diwali, Diwali and post-diwali period, respectively. During Diwali festival PM10 concentration was about 2.6 and 1.9 times higher than pre-diwali and post-diwali period, respectively. PM2.5 (fine) and PM1 (submicron) concentrations during Diwali festival were more than 2 times higher than pre-diwali and post-diwali. PMID:23287842

  18. A new direct thermal desorption-GC/MS method: Organic speciation of ambient particulate matter collected in Golden, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Luyi C.; Ke, Fu; Wang, Daniel K. W.; Dann, Tom; Austin, Claire C.

    Particulate matter having an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) is thought to be implicated in a number of medical conditions, including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart attack, and aging. However, very little chemical speciation data is available for the organic fraction of ambient aerosols. A new direct thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) method was developed for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM2.5. Samples were collected in Golden, British Columbia, over a 15-month period. n-Alkanes constituted 33-98% by mass of the organic compounds identified. PAHs accounted for 1-65% and biomarkers (hopanes and steranes) 1-8% of the organic mass. Annual mean concentrations were: n-alkanes (0.07-1.55 ng m -3), 16 PAHs (0.02-1.83 ng m -3), and biomarkers (0.02-0.18 ng m -3). Daily levels of these organics were 4.89-74.38 ng m -3, 0.27-100.24 ng m -3, 0.14-4.39 ng m -3, respectively. Ratios of organic carbon to elemental carbon (OC/EC) and trends over time were similar to those observed for PM2.5. There was no clear seasonal variation in the distribution of petroleum biomarkers, but elevated levels of other organic species were observed during the winter. Strong correlations between PAHs and EC, and between petroleum biomarkers and EC, suggest a common emission source - most likely motor vehicles and space heating.

  19. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... is needed for monitoring air quality and for understanding climate change. During the last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol ... MISR Team. Text acknowledgment: Clare Averill (Acro Service Corporation/Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Other formats available ...

  20. a Study of the Origin of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Mary Hildemann

    1990-01-01

    The sources of ambient organic particulate matter in urban areas are investigated through a program of emission source measurements, atmospheric measurements, and mathematical modeling of source\\/receptor relationships. A dilution sampler intended to collect fine organic aerosol from combustion sources is designed to simulate atmospheric cooling and dilution processes, so that organic vapors which condense under ambient conditions will be collected

  1. Impact of Relative Humidity and Collection Media on Mycobacteriophage D29 Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyang; Wen, Zhanbo; Li, Na; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Hu, Lingfei; Dong, Xiaokai; Lu, Jianchun

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aerosol generation, methods of sampling, storage conditions, and relative humidity on the culturability of the mycobacteriophage D29. The lytic phage D29 can kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the phage aerosol can be treated as a potential tool for tuberculosis treatment. The culturability of D29 was tested using a test chamber designed for the bioaerosols research against three spray liquids (deionized water, phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and normal saline), four collection media (suspension medium [SM], nutrient broth, PBS, and deionized water), two sampling systems (the all-glass impinger AGI-30 and the Biosampler) and across a range of humidities (20 to 90%). The effect of storage conditions on the culturability of collected sample was also evaluated for the AGI-30 impinger. The results proved that viable phage D29 particles generated by deionized water were approximately 30- and 300-fold higher than PBS and normal saline, respectively. As collection media, SM buffer and nutrient broth were observed to yield a higher number of plaques compared to PBS and deionized water. No difference was observed in collection efficiency between AGI-30 and Biosampler with two detection methods (culture-based technique and real-time PCR). The culturability of collected D29 in SM buffer or nutrient broth can be maintained up to 12 h irrespective of storage temperature. Relative humidity was found to strongly influence airborne D29 culturability which is 2- to 20-fold higher in low humidity (25%) than medium (55%) or high (85%) humidity. This research will help identify the optimal means for the application of D29 aerosol in animal inhalation experiments. PMID:22194291

  2. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 ?m were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular dicarboxylic acids as well as sugars and sugar related compounds. Additionally fatty acids were analyzed to investigate surface active substances. Usually, the highest PM1 concentrations were observed during periods with prevailing wind directions from southern areas, while northern wind directions led to significantly lower concentrations. The main components of the fine particles are inorganic ions like the secondary formed ammonium nitrate und ammonium sulphate, as well as carbonaceous material. The organic carbon fraction is mostly dominated by water soluble organic carbon (80% in average). High concentrations of tracers like the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (Iinuma et al., 2007) suggest biomass burning emissions as a dominant source of organic particles in the area. A significant fraction of PM1 remains unidentified and most likely consists of crust material like dust as well as water. Iinuma, Y., E. Brüggemann, T. Gnauk, K. Müller, M. O. Andreae, G. Helas, R. Parmar, and H. Herrmann (2007), Source characterization of biomass burning particles: The combustion of selected European conifers, African hardwood, savanna grass, and German and Indonesian peat, J. Geophys. Res. [Atmos.], 112(D8), Doi 10.1029/2006jd007120.

  3. Effect of biomass burning over the western North Pacific Rim: wintertime maxima of anhydrosugars in ambient aerosols from Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Kawamura, K.

    2014-10-01

    Biomass burning (BB) largely modifies the chemical compositions of atmospheric aerosols on the globe. We collected aerosol samples (TSP) at Cape Hedo, subtropical Okinawa Island from October 2009 to February 2012 to study anhydrosugars as BB tracers. Levoglucosan was detected as the dominant anhydrosugar followed by its isomers, mannosan and galactosan. We found a clear seasonal trend of levoglucosan and mannosan with winter maxima and summer minima. Positive correlation was found between levoglucosan and nss-K+ (r = 0.38, p < 0.001); the latter is another BB tracer. The analyses of air mass trajectories and fire spots demonstrated that the seasonal variations of anhydrsosugsars are caused by a long-range transport of BB emissions from the Asian continent. We found winter maxima of anhydrosugars, which may be associated with open burning and domestic heating and cooking in north and northeast China, Mongolia and Russia and with the enhanced westerly. The monthly averaged levoglucosan/mannosan ratios were lower (2.1-4.8) in May-June and higher (13.3-13.9) in November-December. The lower values may be associated with softwood burning in north China, Korea and southwest Japan whereas the higher values are probably caused by agriculture waste burning of maize straw in the North China Plain. Anhydrosugars comprised 0.22% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and 0.13% of organic carbon (OC). The highest values to WSOC (0.37%) and OC (0.25%) were found in winter, again indicating an important BB contribution to Okinawa aerosols in winter. This study provides useful information to better understand the effect of East Asian biomass burning on the air quality in the western North Pacific Rim.

  4. Effect of biomass burning over the western North Pacific Rim: wintertime maxima of anhydrosugars in ambient aerosols from Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Kawamura, K.; Kunwar, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning (BB) largely modifies the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols on the globe. We collected aerosol samples (TSP) at Cape Hedo, on subtropical Okinawa Island, from October 2009 to February 2012 to study anhydrosugars as BB tracers. Levoglucosan was detected as the dominant anhydrosugar followed by its isomers, mannosan and galactosan. We found a clear seasonal trend of levoglucosan and mannosan with winter maxima and summer minima. Positive correlation was found between levoglucosan and nss-K+ (r = 0.38, p < 0.001); the latter is another BB tracer. The analyses of air mass trajectories and fire spots demonstrated that the seasonal variations of anhydrosugars are caused by long-range transport of BB emissions from the Asian continent. We found winter maxima of anhydrosugars, which may be associated with open burning and domestic heating and cooking in northern and northeastern China, Mongolia and Russia and with the enhanced westerly winds. The monthly averaged levoglucosan / mannosan ratios were lower (2.1-4.8) in May-June and higher (13.3-13.9) in November-December. The lower values may be associated with softwood burning in northern China, Korea and southwestern Japan whereas the higher values are probably caused by agricultural waste burning of maize straw in the North China Plain. Anhydrosugars comprised 0.22% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and 0.13% of organic carbon (OC). The highest values to WSOC (0.37%) and OC (0.25%) were found in winter, again indicating an important BB contribution to Okinawa aerosols in winter. This study provides useful information to better understand the effect of East Asian biomass burning on the air quality in the western North Pacific Rim.

  5. Validation and Uncertainty Estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (Tau(sub M)) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56Tau(sub M))/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20Tau(sub M), comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  6. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt-containing boundary layer. Sea salt-cored aggregates could form when ash particles travel over a maritime environment and sea salt aerosol could easily be incorporated in the plume from the surrounding atmosphere. When the particles are sampled, pressure drops within the DRUM impactor cause the water in the droplet to evaporate, leaving behind ash aggregated with salt

  7. Evidence of high PM 2.5 strong acidity in ammonia-rich atmosphere of Guangzhou, China: Transition in pathways of ambient ammonia to form aerosol ammonium at [NH 4+]/[SO 42-] = 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Qiu, R.; Chan, Chak K.; Ravi Kant, Pathak

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected using Harvard Honeycomb denuder/filter-pack system during different seasons in 2006 and 2007 at an urban site in Guangzhou, China. The particles collected in this study were generally acidic (average strong acidity ([H+]) ~ 70 nmol m- 3). Interestingly, aerosol sulfate was not fully neutralized in the ammonia-rich atmosphere (NH3 ~ 30 ppb) and even when NH4+]/[SO42-] was larger than 2. Consequently, strong acidity ([H+]) as high as 170 nmol m- 3 was observed in these samples. The kinetic rate of neutralization of acidity (acidic sulfate) by ambient ammonia was significantly higher than the rate of formation of ammonium nitrate involving HNO3 and NH3 for [NH4+]/[SO42-] ? 1.5 and much lower for NH4+]/[SO42-] > 1.5. Therefore, higher nitrate principally formed via homogeneous gas phase reactions involving ammonia and nitric acid were observed for [NH4+]/[SO42-] > 1.5. However, little nitrate, probably formed via heterogeneous processes e.g. reaction of HNO3 with sea salt or crustal species, was observed for [NH4+]/[SO42-] ? 1.5. These demonstrate a clear transition in the pathways of ambient ammonia to form aerosol ammonium at [NH4+]/[SO42-] = 1.5 and evidently explain the observed high acidity due to the unneutralized sulfate in the ammonium-rich aerosol (NH4+]/[SO42-] > 1.5). In fact, the measured acidity was almost similar to the excess acid defined as the acid that remains at [NH4+]/[SO42-] = 1.5 due to the un-neutralized fraction of sulfate ([H+] = 0.5[SO42-]). The presence of high excess acid and ammonium nitrate significantly lowered the deliquescence relative humidity of ammonium sulfate (from 80% to 40%) in the ammonium-rich samples.

  8. Statistical issues in epidemiologic studies of the health effects of ambient acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.H.; Stram, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Although the ecologic effects of acid rain have been widely reported, relatively little is known about the effects of acidic air pollution on human health. Some epidemiologic and animal studies suggest, however, that acidity is an important determinant of the respiratory health effects of aerosols. The paper reviews some of that evidence and discusses its implications for the design and analysis of epidemiologic studies. Two types of exposure patterns are contrasted: peak exposures associated with air pollution episodes, and chronic exposures resulting from persistently high levels of air pollutants. Recent work on the analysis of repeated categorical outcome variables provides new methods for the analysis of episode studies. Studies of long-term exposure require comparisons among population groups, and these comparisons can be subject to the design effects characteristic of multistage sample surveys. The paper examines the implications of these design effects for epidemiologic studies. The paper also discusses the measurement errors induced by the use of outdoor measurements to quantify personal exposure, and ways to assess effects of such errors on conventional analyses of air pollution studies.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Marine Organic Aerosols Collected during a Round-the-World Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P.; Kawamura, K.; Miura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected on board the R/V Hakuho Maru during a round-the-world cruise (KH89-2) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. More than 140 organic species were detected in the marine aerosols and were grouped into 11 organic compound classes, including aliphatic lipids, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols, lignin/resin acids, sterols, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydroxy-/polyacids, aromatic acids, as well as secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers from the photooxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 0.94 to 98 ng m-3 (average 31 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in coastal regions (California Coast, South China Sea, and Western North Pacific) than in open marine areas (North Pacific and North Atlantic), suggesting that long-range atmospheric transport from the continents is the main source of marine organic aerosols. Isoprene SOA tracers, i.e., 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols, were detected in all the samples (0.11-22 ng m-3, average 3.6 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in the tropical regions. They accounted for 0.48-29% of the total identified organics. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, secondary oxidation products (30-31%), fossil fuel combustion products (27-28%), as well as marine natural emissions (22-34%) were found as major contributors to the marine aerosols. In California Coast, North Indian Ocean and South China Sea, secondary oxidation products can contribute 44-55% of the total identified organics, followed by terrestrial natural emissions (12-27%), while biomass burning emissions were found to contribute only 1-2%. However, in the western North Pacific near the Asian continent, fossil fuel combustion (27%) and biomass burning (25%) were recognized as the main sources for the total identified compounds, followed by terrestrial natural emission (23%), indicating a significant influence of the Asian outflow in winter/spring. This study demonstrates that long-range atmospheric transport from the continent is one of the major factors controlling the chemical composition of organic aerosols in the marine boundary layer. However, in the tropical oceanic regions, secondary photooxidation could be the dominant source for marine organic aerosols.

  10. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates.

  11. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Newton, G J; Hoover, M D; Barr, E B; Wong, B A; Ritter, P D

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates. PMID:3425551

  12. A receptor model using a specific non-negative transformation technique for ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Israël, G. W.

    Factor analysis receptor models attempt to estimate both the source composition and the source intensity from a series of observations. The factor analysis solution resulting from Principle Component Analysis (PCA) has no real physically interpretable meaning. Only an appropriate transformation enables a realistic interpretation. Any realistic transformation solution must obey certain natural and physical constraints, such as non-negative source elemental composition and non-negative source intensity, which are not explicitly examined in the existing receptor models. If these natural constraints are violated the results will be uninterpretable. All observed data sets contain more or less information about the sources. This paper presents a receptor model, which extracts source information from the observed data set to deduce the source profiles, and respects the important natural constraints. This receptor model was tested with a simulated test data set, which was generated with the source profiles and intensities used in the Quail Roost II Workshop. It has also been applied to an ambient data set sampled in Berlin (West) during January and February 1984.

  13. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 ?g m-3, all ?g m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 ?g m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the calibration is linear. Using samples in the calibration set that have a different OM / OC or ammonium / OC distributions than the test set leads to only a modest increase in bias and normalized error in the predicted samples. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with partial least squares regression is a robust method for accurately predicting TOR OC in IMPROVE network samples; providing complementary information to the organic functional group composition and organic aerosol mass estimated previously from the same set of sample spectra (Ruthenburg et al., 2014).

  14. Levoglucosan and Lipid Class Compounds in the Asian Dusts and Marine Aerosols Collected During the ACE-Asia Campaign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kobayashi; B. R. Simoneit; K. Kawamura; M. Mochida; M. Lee; G. Lee; B. J. Huebert

    2002-01-01

    In order to characterize organic aerosols in the Asian Pacific region, we collected filter samples at Gosan (formerly Kosan) and Sapporo sites as well as on mobile platforms (R.V. R.H. Brown and NCAR C-130) in the western North Pacific. The aerosol extracts were analyzed by capillary GC-MS employing a TMS derivatization technique. We identified over 100 organic compounds in the

  15. An Experimental Determination of the Efficiency with Which Aerosol Particles are Collected by Water Drops in Subsaturated Air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. K. Wang; H. R. Pruppacher

    1977-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the efficiency with which aerosol particles of 0.25 m radius are collected due to Brownian diffusion, and due to hydrodynamic, phoretic and electrical effects by water drops of 150 to 2500.m equivalent radius falling in subsaturated air. In the absence of electrical effects it was found that with increasing drop size the collection

  16. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 1: ambient sampling.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected over a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). Three collocated low-volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended particulate matter, < 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) particulate matter, and < 2.5 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) particulate matter, were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a '1 in 6' day sampling schedule. Trace-element analysis was performed to measure levels of potentially harmful metals, while major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of small individual particles. Secondary electron images provided information on particle size and shape. This study shows the three main air pollutant types to be geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and heavy metal condensates (possibly from metals smelting and battery manufacturing facilities). Non-dust storm events resulted in elevated trace metal concentrations in Baghdad, Balad, and Taji in Iraq. Scanning-electron-microscopy secondary electron images of individual particles revealed no evidence of freshly fractured quartz grains. In all instances, quartz grains had rounded edges and mineral grains were generally coated by clay minerals and iron oxides. PMID:19235610

  17. The wedding ambient aerosol sampling inlet ( D50 = 10 ?m) for the high-volume sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedding, James B.; Weigand, Michael A.

    The Wedding Inlet has a nominal cutpoint of 10 ?m at the flow rate of the High-Volume Sampler (40 cfm, 1.13 m 3 min -1) and fits existing samplers. Tests were conducted in both the wind tunnel and the field essentially as specified by 40 CFR, Part 53, Subpart D delineating performance tests for "PM-10" samplers. The results of these and additional tests were: (1) D 50 values ranged from 9.6 to 9.9 ?m over a wind speed range of 2-48 km h -1 with only ? 16 changing slightly at the 48 km h -1 condition (2) D 50 was essentially invariant with a volumetric flowrate change of ±10% (3) particles do not reach the collection substrate when the sampler is inoperative (4) D 50 was essentially invariant with angle of attack (tilt) of approaching wind flow of ±21° (5) effectiveness at 20 ?m for solid ammonium fluorescein was 3% as compared with 1% for oleic acid particles (6) a consistent D0 ? 25 ?m was observed in field tests (7) the sampler duplicates the performance of the EPA "ideal Sampler" within 5%.

  18. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-19

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  19. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN AMBIENT AIR COLLECTED ON GLASS-FIBER FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic with 25 other elements are simultaneously determined in ambient air samples collected on glass-fiber filter composites at 250 United States sites. The instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique combined with the power of a dedicated mini-computer resulted in...

  20. COMPOSITION AND ORIGINS OF AEROSOL AT A FORESTED MOUNTAIN IN SOVIET GEORGIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient aerosol particles were collected by means of dichotomous samplers during July, 1979, at Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, which is in a remote forested area of Georgia, USSR. Samples were analyzed for mass, elemental, crystalline, and ionic species concentrations and ...

  1. Integrated chemical species analysis with source-receptor modeling results to characterize the effects of terrain and monsoon on ambient aerosols in a basin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fan; Liang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-05-01

    This study integrated estimated oxidation ratio of sulfur (SOR) and oxidation ratio of nitrogen (NOR) with source-receptor modeling results to identify the effects of terrain and monsoons on ambient aerosols in an urban area (north basin) and a rural area (south basin) of the Taichung Basin. The estimated results indicate that the conversion of sulfur mainly occurs in fine particles (PM?.?), whereas the conversion of nitrogen occurs in approximately equal quantities of PM?.? and coarse particles (PM?.?-??). The results show a direct relationship for PM?.? between the modeling results with SOR and NOR. The high PM?.? SOR, NOR, and secondary aerosol values all occurred in the upwind area during both monsoons; this shows that the photochemical reaction and the terrain effect on the pollutant transmission were significant in the basin. Additionally, the urban heat island effect on the urban area and the valley effect on the rural area were significant. The results show that secondary aerosol in PM?.?-?? contributed approximately 10 % during both monsoons, and the difference in the contribution from secondary aerosol between both areas was small. Vehicle exhaust emissions and wind-borne dust were two crucial PM2.5-10 contributors during both monsoons; their average contributions in both areas were higher than 34 and 32 %, respectively. PMID:22996820

  2. Differences in the OC/EC Ratios that Characterize Ambient and Source Aerosols due to Thermal-Optical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure the OC/EC (organic carbon/elemental carbon) and EC/TC (elemental carbon/total carbon) ratios in source and atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a dual-optical carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of...

  3. The hygroscopicity parameter (?) of ambient organic aerosol at a field site subject to biogenic and anthropogenic influences: Relationship to degree of aerosol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Shantz, N. C.; Vlasenko, A.; Liggio, J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2009-11-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations were measured at a rural site in Ontario, Canada during the spring of 2007. The CCN concentrations were compared to values predicted from the aerosol chemical composition and size distribution using ?-Köhler theory. The hygroscopicity of the organic component was characterised by two methods, both of which are based on the aerosol's degree of oxygenation as determined by the mass spectra measured with an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer. The first approach uses a statistical technique, positive matrix factorization (PMF), to separate hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic factors while the second uses the O/C, which is an indication of the aerosol's degree of oxygenation. In both cases, the hygroscopicity parameter (?) of the organic component is varied so that the predicted and measured CCN concentrations are internally consistent and in good agreement. By focussing on a small number of organic components defined by their composition, we can simplify the estimates needed to describe the aerosol's hygroscopicity. We find that ? of the oxygenated organic component from the PMF analysis is 0.20±0.03 while ? of the entire organic component can be parameterized as ?org=(0.30±0.05)×(O/C).

  4. Aerosols Collected at a Tropical Marine Environment: Size-Resolved Chemical Composition Using IC, TOC, and Thermal-Optical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-García, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Repollet-Pedrosa, M.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-05-01

    Size-resolved chemical characterization was performed on aerosol samples collected at two different marine sites in the tropics: Dian Point (DP), Antigua and Cape San Juan (CSJ), Puerto Rico. A 13-stage Dekati low- pressure impactor (Dp 0.1 to 10 ?m), a 10-stage micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (Dp 0.054 to 18 ?m), and stacked-filter units (Dp < 1.7 ?m) were used to collect the samples. Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate were determined using ion chromatography (IC). Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) was used to determine the concentrations of aerosol total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC). Five-day back trajectories calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model identified air masses coming from the North Atlantic (maritime air), Northwest Africa (desert dust), and North America (anthropogenic pollution). Size-resolved chemical characterization of aerosol samples using IC and TOA confirmed that aerosols become aged as they are transported to the Caribbean and their composition depends on the air mass origin. Gravimetric analyses showed that average fine mass concentrations for CSJ station were higher than for DP station (CSJ: 1.9 ?g m-3; DP: 1.2 ?g m-3). The aerosol chemical composition changed with air masses of different origin and with different pollution levels. In both locations the predominant water-soluble ions in the fine aerosol fraction were Cl-, Na+, and SO42-. Sulphate was observed in higher concentrations during the polluted case and particulate organic matter concentrations were higher for the maritime case. During desert dust events an increase in Ca2+ and Mg2+ of 4 and 2 times, respectively, was observed mainly in the coarse mode. Results for the size-resolved chemical composition and complete aerosol chemical apportionment including the residual mass will be presented.

  5. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Rinkleff; C. F. Cahill

    2010-01-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual

  6. DEVELOPMENT, DESIGN, AND OPERATION OF A CASCADE IMPACTOR TO COLLECT AEROSOL SAMPLES FOR WAVELENGTH DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research project was to design and construct a particle sizing device that will collect and size source emitted aerosols on 47 mm diameter substrates for subsequent wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Calibration studies were conducted with a proto...

  7. The hygroscopicity parameter (?) of ambient organic aerosol at a field site subject to biogenic and anthropogenic influences: relationship to degree of aerosol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Shantz, N. C.; Vlasenko, A.; Liggio, J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2010-06-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations were measured at Egbert, a rural site in Ontario, Canada during the spring of 2007. The CCN concentrations were compared to values predicted from the aerosol chemical composition and size distribution using ?-Köhler theory, with the specific goal of this work being to determine the hygroscopic parameter (?) of the oxygenated organic component of the aerosol, assuming that oxygenation drives the hygroscopicity for the entire organic fraction of the aerosol. The hygroscopicity of the oxygenated fraction of the organic component, as determined by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), was characterised by two methods. First, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to separate oxygenated and unoxygenated organic aerosol factors. By assuming that the unoxygenated factor is completely non-hygroscopic and by varying ? of the oxygenated factor so that the predicted and measured CCN concentrations are internally consistent and in good agreement, ? of the oxygenated organic factor was found to be 0.22±0.04 for the suite of measurements made during this five-week campaign. In a second, equivalent approach, we continue to assume that the unoxygenated component of the aerosol, with a mole ratio of atomic oxygen to atomic carbon (O/C) ? 0, is completely non-hygroscopic, and we postulate a simple linear relationship between ?org and O/C. Under these assumptions, the ? of the entire organic component for bulk aerosols measured by the AMS can be parameterised as ?org=(0.29±0.05)·(O/C), for the range of O/C observed in this study (0.3 to 0.6). These results are averaged over our five-week study at one location using only the AMS for composition analysis. Empirically, our measurements are consistent with ?org generally increasing with increasing particle oxygenation, but high uncertainties preclude us from testing this hypothesis. Lastly, we examine select periods of different aerosol composition, corresponding to different air mass histories, to determine the generality of the campaign-wide findings described above.

  8. DETERMINATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL PRODUCTS FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF TOLUENE AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN AMBIENT PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic aerosol products from photooxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. The laboratory experiments consisted of irradiating toluene/propylene/NOX/air mixtures in a smog chamber operated in the dynamic mode...

  9. Influence of collecting substrates on the characterization of hygroscopic properties of inorganic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Li, Xue; Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2014-03-01

    The influence of six collecting substrates with different physical properties on the hygroscopicity measurement of inorganic aerosol particle surrogates and the potential applications of these substrates were examined experimentally. Laboratory-generated single salt particles, such as NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4, 1-5 ?m in size, were deposited on transmission electron microscopy grids (TEM grids), parafilm-M, Al foil, Ag foil, silicon wafer, and cover glass. The particle hygroscopic properties were examined by optical microscopy. Contact angle measurements showed that parafilm-M is hydrophobic, and cover glass, silicon wafer, Al foil, and Ag foil substrates are hydrophilic. The observed deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) values for NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4 on the TEM grids and parafilm-M substrates agreed well with the literature values, whereas the DRHs obtained on the hydrophilic substrates were consistently ?1-2% lower, compared to those on the hydrophobic substrates. The water layer adsorbed on the salt crystals prior to deliquescence increases the Gibb's free energy of the salt crystal-substrate system compared to the free energy of the salt droplet-substrate system, which in turn reduces the DRHs. The hydrophilic nature of the substrate does not affect the measured efflorescence RH (ERH) values. However, the Cl(-) or SO4(2-) ions in aqueous salt droplets seem to have reacted with Ag foil to form AgCl or Ag2SO4, respectively, which in turn acts as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation of the original salts, leading to higher ERHs. The TEM grids were found to be most suitable for the hygroscopic measurements of individual inorganic aerosol particles by optical microscopy and when multiple analytical techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and/or Raman microspectrometry, are applied to the same individual particles. PMID:24506470

  10. Sugars as source indicators of biogenic organic carbon in aerosols collected above the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Conte, Maureen H.; Weber, John C.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Bulk aerosols (>1 ?m) were collected continuously above the canopy at the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine, USA from May to October 2002. Each sample integrated over an approximately 2-week period. Mono- and disaccharide sugars were extracted using a microscale technique and were analyzed as their TMS derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of total aerosol sugars ranged from 10 to 180 ng m -3. Glucose was the most abundant sugar (40-75% of the total sugars). The monosaccharides arabinose, fructose, galactose, mannose, arabitol and mannitol, and the disaccharides sucrose, maltose and mycose (aka trehalose) were also present in lower concentrations. The sugar composition in the aerosols varied seasonally. Fructose and sucrose were prevalent in early spring and decreased in relative abundance as the growing season progressed. Sugar polyols (arabitol and mannitol) and the disaccharide mycose (a fungal metabolite) were more prevalent in autumn during the period of leaf senescence. The changes in the sugar composition in the aerosol samples appear to reflect the seasonality of sugar production and utilization by the ecosystem. Plant waxes were present as significant components also indicating an input from biogenic background. Smoke plumes from Quebec forest fires passed over the Howland site in early July 2002. Levoglucosan, a biomarker of biomass burning, increased by an order of magnitude in the aerosol samples collected during this time. Glucose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, and also, plant waxes increased in concentration by factors of 2-5 in the smoke-impacted samples, indicating that wildfires enhance atmospheric emissions of uncombusted organic compounds. In contrast, concentrations of fructose, sugar polyols and disaccharides were not significantly higher in the smoke-impacted samples and indicated that biomass burning was not a significant source of these compounds in the aerosols.

  11. Mechanism of aerosol collection by two- and three-dimensional inhomogeneous arrays of charged drops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kojevnikova; Y. Zimmels

    2000-01-01

    Three- and two-dimensional trajectories of charged aerosols, in a system of three- and two-dimensional array of oppositely charged drops, are computed by a new simulation model. The trajectory pattern of the aerosol is shown to depend on the size and geometry of the array, as well as on operational parameters, such as charge and size of drops and aerosols. Low-inertia

  12. Aerosol-Assisted Solid Debris Collection for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Ivanov, V V; Astanovitskiy, A L; Lewis, L A; Rundberg, R S

    2010-05-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and has made its first shots on-target. While upcoming experiments will be focused on achieving ignition, a variety of subsequent experiments are planned for the facility, including measurement of cross sections, astrophysical measurements, and investigation of hydrodynamic instability in the target capsule. In order to successfully execute several of these planned experiments, the ability to collect solid debris following a NIF capsule shot will be required. The ability to collect and analyze solid debris generated in a shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will greatly expand the number of nuclear reactions studied for diagnostic purposes. Currently, reactions are limited to only those producing noble gases for cryogenic collection and counting with the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS). The radchem solid collection diagnostic has already been identified by NIF to be valuable for the determination and understanding of mix generated in the target capsule's ablation. LLNL is currently developing this solid debris collection capability at NIF, and is in the stage of testing credible designs. Some of these designs explore the use of x-ray generated aerosols to assist in collection of solid debris. However, the variety of harsh experimental conditions this solid collection device will encounter in NIF are challenging to replicate. Experiments performed by Gary Grim et al. at Sandia National Laboratory's RHEPP1 facility have shown that ablation causes a cloud of material removed from an exposed surface to move normal to and away from the surface. This ablation is certain to be a concern in the NIF target chamber from the prompt x-rays, gamma rays, etc. generated in the shot. The cloud of ablated material could interfere with the collection of the desired reaction debris by slowing down the debris so that the kinetic energy is too low to allow implantation, or by stopping the debris from reaching the collection device entirely. Our goal is to use this primary ablation wave to our advantage, by the creation of ionized alkali metal halide salt aerosols. This technique is similar to that used by many particle accelerator groups for gas-jet transport. Ideally the salt would be ablated from a substrate, encounter the reaction debris, agglomerate, and be collected for further study. We have done studies at laser and pulsed-power facilities (Titan laser at LLNL, Trident laser at LANL, Zebra z-pinch at Nevada Terawatt Facility) evaluating the hardiness of materials for placement in the NIF target chamber, as well as testing aerosol generation by the incident x-rays generated in device shots. To test this method's potential success in the NIF environment, we have tested KCl, KI, RbI, and CsI films of 1 and 2 um linear thickness on aluminum and silicon wafer substrates in these aforementioned facilities, at varied distances. These salts do ablate in the presence of sufficient x-ray fluence. Further analysis to quantify the final ablation depth as a function of x-ray fluence is ongoing. Half of each sample was masked with a thick tungsten foil for photon opacity. KCl was the most difficult salt to ablate, from comparing the tungsten-masked side of the samples to the unmasked side of the samples. This is likely due to KCl's absorbance peak being at lower wavelengths than that of KI, {approx}160 nm vs. {approx}220 nm, respectively. Samples with and without collimation were tested to identify if any condensation of these ablated salts occurred after ablation. Visual inspection of the silicon wafer witness plates placed parallel to the direction of the incident photons showed that a vapor was deposited on the wafers next to the collimators. Further analysis with EDS in the case of the collimated samples conclusively identified the vapor as CsI. We also intend to examine samples of bare substrate exposed to the same experimental conditions for post-shot change via SEM images, optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, tests with separated isotopes

  13. Characterization of ambient aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry: results from the CENICA Supersite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Salcedo; Timothy B. Onasch; K. Dzepina; M. R. Canagaratna; Q. Zhang; J. A. Huffman; Peter DeCarlo; J. T. Jayne; P. Mortimer; Douglas R. Worsnop; C. E. Kolb; Kirsten S. Johnson; Bilal M. Zuberi; L. C. Marr; Rainer M. Volkamer; Luisa Molina; Mario J. Molina; B. Cardenas; R. M. Bernabé; C. Márquez; Jeffrey S. Gaffney; Nancy A. Marley; Alexander Laskin; V. Shutthanandan; YuLong Xie; W. H. Brune; R. Lesher; T. Shirley; J. L. Jimenez

    2006-01-01

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite, during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from 31 March-4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 µm (NR-PM1) with high time and

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF PROCEDURES FOR COLLECTION, CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MUTAGENICITY TESTING OF AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this Research Triangle Institute pilot study was to develop and evaluate a minimal testing protocol which could detect and quantify the mutagenic potential of ambient air. The cost-effective biological and chemical testing protocol developed under this pr...

  15. MONITORING SYSTEM FOR COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT ETHYLENE DICHLORIDE (EDC) LEVELS IN THE URBAN ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the measurement of ambient levels of ethylene dichloride (EDC) was developed and field tested. A 24-hour integrated sample is taken with an activated charcoal tube, followed by desorption of the EDC with carbon disulfide. The carbon disulfide solution is then analyze...

  16. ATR-FTIR characterization of organic functional groups and inorganic ions in ambient aerosols at a rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coury, Charity; Dillner, Ann M.

    An Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic method was used to measure organic functional groups and inorganic ions at Tonto National Monument (TNM), an Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sampling site in a rural area near Phoenix, Arizona. Functional groups and ions from common aerosol compound classes such as aliphatic and aromatic CH, methylene, methyl, aldehydes/ketones, carboxylic acids, ammonium sulfate and nitrate as well as functional groups from difficult to measure compound classes such as esters/lactones, acid anhydrides, carbohydrate hydroxyl and ethers, amino acids, and amines were quantified. On average, ˜33% of the PM 1.0 mass was composed of organic aerosol. The average (standard deviation) composition of the organic aerosol at TNM was 34% (6%) biogenic functional groups, 21% (5%) oxygenated functional groups, 28% (7%) aliphatic hydrocarbon functional groups (aliphatic CH, methylene and methyl) and 17% (1%) aromatic hydrocarbon functional groups. Compositional analysis, functional group correlations, and back trajectories were used to identify three types of events with source signatures: primary biogenic-influenced, urban-influenced, and regional background. The biogenic-influenced event had high concentrations of amino acids and carbohydrate hydroxyl and ether, as well as aliphatic CH and aromatic CH functional groups and qualitatively high levels of silicate. The urban-influenced events had back trajectories traveling directly from the Phoenix area and high concentrations of hydrocarbons, oxygenated functional groups, and inorganic ions. This aerosol characterization suggests that both primary emissions in Phoenix and secondary formation of aerosols from Phoenix emissions had a major impact on the aerosol composition and concentration at TNM. The regional background source had low concentrations of all functional groups, but had higher concentrations of biogenic functional groups than the urban source.

  17. Investigation of sources of ambient submicron aerosol in the Barcelona metropolitan area using AMS mobile and stationary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Claudia; Richter, Rene; Decarlo, Peter F.; Chirico, Roberto; Heringa, Maarten F.; Crippa, Monica; Daure Team; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-05-01

    The metropolitan area of Barcelona is exposed to relatively high particulate matter (PM) levels compared to other European regions (Pérez et al., 2008). A dry and warm Mediterranean climate, low dispersive conditions due to a unique topographical situation and high anthropogenic emissions contribute to the high PM levels. The 2009 DAURE Aerosol Winter Campaign (23-February-2009 to 27-March-2009) focused on the characterization of the sources of fine and coarse aerosols in the Barcelona region, with particular attention to carbonaceous aerosols. An urban background and a rural background site were selected in order to characterize both urban plume and rural aerosols. Data presented here comes from the deployment of two Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) (DeCarlo et al., 2006); one at the urban background site, the other in the PSI mobile van. The fixed site AMS recorded continuously for the duration of the campaign and measured between 2 and 80 ?g m-3 of non-refractory submicron PM, with organics making up the biggest fraction (42% on average). The mobile van was used for on-road measurements and investigations into the spatial variability of aerosol concentration and composition. 4 different driving routes including downtown Barcelona, the harbour area, the heavily industrialized valley of Llobregat and the region of Valles/Montserrat were driven 2-5 times each. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to the organic fraction of submicron PM as measured by the two AMS in order to investigate components and sources of organic aerosol in the Barcelona region. Results indicate significant contributions from primary traffic sources and secondary sources, with less contribution from biomass burning. Other possible contributors include cooking emissions. Mobile van data shows that secondary organic aerosol makes up a significant fraction of PM1 mass in the whole Barcelona region. Spatially, different sources can be dominant with local concentration peaks in different areas attributed to primary emissions from traffic, biomass and waste burning, industry or ships. Pérez, N., et al, (2008). Atmos. Environ., 42: 1677-1691. DeCarlo, P., et al. (2006). Anal. Chem., 78, 8281-8289

  18. DEVELOPMENTS IN DIRECT THERMAL EXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FINE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This examines thermal extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE/GC/MS) applied to aerosols collected on filters. Several different TE/GC/MS systems as a group have speciated hundreds of individual organic constituents in ambient fine aerosols. Molecular marker source ap...

  19. Variation of particle number and mass concentration in various size ranges of ambient aerosols in Eastern Germany

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Th. Tuch; P. Brand; H. E. Wichmann; J. Heyder

    1997-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the question which size fraction of particles in ambient air may be responsible for short-term responses of the respiratory system as observed in several epidemiological studies. However, the available data on ambient particle concentrations in various size ranges are not sufficient to answer this question.Therefore, on 180 days during the winter 1991\\/92 daily mean

  20. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Achtert, P.; Ivchenko, N.; Magnusson, P.; Kuremyr, T.; Shepenkov, V.; Tibert, G.

    2013-03-01

    A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  1. EFFECT OF AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT ON AMBIENT AIR DENSITIES OF AEROSOLS CONTAINING BACTERIA AND VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria and virus-containing aerosols were studied during late summer and fall in a U.S. midwestern suburb before and during the start up and operation of an unenclosed activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The air in this suburban area contained low-level densities of in...

  2. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the development and bench-testing of a versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES) capable of simultaneously concentrating ambient particles of the coarse, fine and ultrafine size fractions for conducting in vivo and in vitro studies. The VACE...

  3. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the Collection Efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Water droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with a radius of ~20 ?m fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer Polystyrene Latex Sphere (PSL) particles of variable size and concentrations. Two RH conditions, ~15 and ~88%, hereafter termed "Low" and "High", respectively, were varied with different particles size and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single particle basis. Coagulated droplets had mass spectra that contain signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 5.7 × 10-3 to 4.6 × 10-2 for the Low RH and from 6.4 × 10-3 to 2.2 × 10-2 for the High RH cases. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this work were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first coagulation experiment performed on a single droplet basis.

  4. Effects of meteorology on concentrations of acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenka, M.P.; Suh, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    Ambient air samples of strong acid aerosol, sulfate, ammonia, and ammonium were collected in Pittsburgh and Uniontown, Pennsylvania during the summer of 1990. High correlations were found for both acid aerosol and sulfate concentrations between Pittsburgh and the semi-rural site in Uniontown. One possible implication is that acid aerosols and their precursors are regionally transported. To test this hypothesis, air samples from the Uniontown site were statistically analyzed for the meteorological relationships that resulted in episodic events of elevated ambient acid aerosol levels. Standard measures of atmospheric conditions in both Pittsburgh and Uniontown were used; they included temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction. Results show that the episodic events of elevated acid aerosol occurred with the same general set of meteorological conditions. The major meteorological variables which correlated with the episodes were the mean wind speed in Pittsburgh and the mean westerly wind component (U) at Uniontown. These two variables accounted for one-third of the variance.

  5. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Daishi; Somada, Yuka; Ijyu, Moriaki; Azechi, Sotaro; Nakaema, Fumiya; Arakaki, Takemitsu; Tanahara, Akira

    2010-05-01

    The economic development and population growth in recent Asia spread air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. The study of the long-range transported air pollution from Asian continent has gained a special attention in Japan because of increase in photochemical oxidants in relatively remote islands. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the bulk aerosols collected at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. We will report water-soluble chemical components data of anions, cations and DOC in bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS during August, 2005 to April, 2010. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components showed that the concentrations were relatively low in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian Continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components were much higher compared to the other directions. In addition, we calculated background concentration of water-soluble chemical components at Okinawa, Japan.

  6. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected at Lhasa City in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Duo, Bu; Zhang, Yunchen; Kong, Lingdong; Fu, Hongbo; Hu, Yunjie; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Lin; Qiong, A

    2015-03-01

    To understand the composition and major sources of aerosol particles in Lhasa City on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), individual particles were collected from 2 February to 8 March, 2013 in Tibet University. The mean concentrations of both PM2.5 and PM10 during the sampling were 25.7±21.7 and 57.2±46.7?g/m(3), respectively, much lower than those of other cities in East and South Asia, but higher than those in the remote region in TP like Nam Co, indicating minor urban pollution. Combining the observations with the meteorological parameters and back trajectory analysis, it was concluded that local sources controlled the pollution during the sampling. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) was used to study 408 particles sampled on four days. Based on the EDS analysis, a total of 8 different particle categories were classified for all 408 particles, including Si-rich, Ca-rich, soot, K-rich, Fe-rich, Pb-rich, Al-rich and other particles. The dominant elements were Si, Al and Ca, which were mainly attributed to mineral dust in the earth's crust such as feldspar and clay. Fe-, Pb-, K-, Al-rich particles and soot mainly originated from anthropogenic sources like firework combustion and biomass burning during the sampling. During the sampling, the pollution mainly came from mineral dust, while the celebration ceremony and religious ritual produced a large quantity of anthropogenic metal-bearing particles on 9 and 25 February 2013. Cement particles also had a minor influence. The data obtained in this study can be useful for developing pollution control strategies. PMID:25766026

  7. Chemically segregated optical and microphysical properties of ambient aerosols measured in a single-particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Qin, Xueying; Rebotier, Thomas; Furutani, Hiroshi; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes results from the first direct measurements of the size-resolved optical properties as a function of chemical mixing states for atmospheric particle types sampled in Mexico City and Riverside, California. The coupled size, chemistry, and optical measurements were used to derive refractive indices and effective densities for chemically distinct particle mixing states. On the basis of the measured dependence of scattering intensity as a function of relative humidity and size, the Riverside particles contained detectable amounts of liquid water, whereas the Mexico City particles were relatively dry. Aerosol particles in Mexico City were observed to exhibit a wide range of densities (1.1-3.4 g/cm3), suggesting a dynamic, externally mixed aerosol population. Daily variations were observed as the particles in Mexico City underwent photochemical aging processes leading to a diurnal variation in particle morphology. In contrast, the optical properties of the Riverside aerosol, sampled during the fall season, were strongly impacted by the condensation of water and ammonium nitrate during periods of intense pollution buildup, resulting in microphysical properties that were similar across mixing states for a specific relative humidity.

  8. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  9. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K. A.; Walker, J. T.; Kelly, T. J.; Hanft, E. A.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Beachley, G. M.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Otjes, R. P.

    2013-09-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The US EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to characterize atmospheric chemistry and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the US EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina from 8 September-8 October 2010 and focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3 and NH3 and aerosol SO4-, NO3- and NH4+. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between paired hourly results from duplicate MARGA units (MUs), with a performance goal of <25%. The accuracy of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) for each MU relative to the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations, with a performance goal of ?40%. Accuracy was also evaluated by using linear regression, where MU concentrations were plotted against the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations. From this, a linear least squares line of best fit was applied. The goal was for the slope of the line of best fit to be between 0.8 and 1.2. The MARGA performed well in comparison to the denuder/filter pack for SO2, SO42- and NH4+, with all three compounds passing the accuracy and precision goals by a significant margin. The performance of the MARGA in measuring NO3- could not be evaluated due to the different sampling efficiency of coarse NO3- by the MUs and the filter pack. Estimates of "fine" NO3- were calculated for the MUs and the filter pack. Using this and results from a previous study, it is concluded that if the MUs and the filter pack were sampling the same particle size, the MUs would have good agreement in terms of precision and accuracy. The MARGA performed moderately well in measuring HNO3 and NH3, though neither met the linear regression slope goals. However, recommendations for improving the measurement of HNO3 and NH3 are discussed. It is concluded that SO42-, SO2, NO3-, HNO3, NH4+ and NH3 concentrations can be measured with acceptable accuracy and precision when the MARGA is operated in conjunction with the recommendations outlined in the manuscript.

  10. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K. A.; Walker, J. T.; Kelly, T. J.; Hanft, E. A.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Beachley, G. M.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Otjes, R. P.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The US EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to characterize atmospheric chemistry and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at an hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the US EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, from 8 September to 8 October 2010 and focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3, and NH3 and aerosol SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between paired hourly results from duplicate MARGA units (MUs), with a performance goal of ? 25%. The accuracy of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the MARPD for each MU relative to the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations, with a performance goal of ? 40%. Accuracy was also evaluated by using linear regression, where MU concentrations were plotted against the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations. From this, a linear least squares line of best fit was applied. The goal was for the slope of the line of best fit to be between 0.8 and 1.2. The MARGA performed well in comparison to the denuder/filter pack for SO2, SO42-, and NH4+, with all three compounds passing the accuracy and precision goals by a significant margin. The performance of the MARGA in measuring NO3- could not be evaluated due to the different sampling efficiency of coarse NO3- by the MUs and the filter pack. Estimates of "fine" NO3- were calculated for the MUs and the filter pack. Using this and results from a previous study, it is concluded that if the MUs and the filter pack were sampling the same particle size, the MUs would have good agreement in terms of precision and accuracy. The MARGA performed moderately well in measuring HNO3 and NH3, though neither met the linear regression slope goals. However, recommendations for improving the measurement of HNO3 and NH3 are discussed. It is concluded that SO42-, SO2, NO3-, HNO3, NH4+, and NH3 concentrations can be measured with acceptable accuracy and precision when the MARGA is operated in conjunction with the recommendations outlined in the manuscript.

  11. Comparison Between NPP-VIIRS Aerosol Data Products and the MODIS AQUA Deep Blue Collection 6 Dataset Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Kondragunta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are small particles suspended in the atmosphere and have a variety of natural and man-made sources. Knowledge of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a measure of the amount of aerosol in the atmosphere, and its change over time, is important for multiple reasons. These include climate change, air quality (pollution) monitoring, monitoring hazards such as dust storms and volcanic ash, monitoring smoke from biomass burning, determining potential energy yields from solar plants, determining visibility at sea, estimating fertilization of oceans and rainforests by transported mineral dust, understanding changes in weather brought upon by the interaction of aerosols and clouds, and more. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine AOD. This study compares the VIIRS dataset to ground-based measurements of AOD, along with a state-of-the-art satellite AOD dataset (the new version of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Deep Blue algorithm) to assess its reliability. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011, carrying several instruments designed to continue the biogeophysical data records of current and previous satellite sensors. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD), and related activities since launch have been focused towards validating and understanding this new dataset through comparisons with other satellite and ground-based products. The operational VIIRS AOD product is compared over land with AOD derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations using the Deep Blue (DB) algorithm from the forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS data

  12. Chemical composition and photochemical formation of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous extracts of aerosol particles collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, Takemitsu; Kuroki, Yukiko; Okada, Kouichirou; Nakama, Yoshihide; Ikota, Hirotsugu; Kinjo, Mika; Higuchi, Tomihiko; Uehara, Masaya; Tanahara, Akira

    We investigated the chemical composition and photochemical formation of hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of aerosol particles collected in Okinawa, Japan. Bulk aerosol samples were collected for 2-7 days at a time by a high-volume air sampler over a 3-month period. Major ions present in the WSF solutions were SO 42-, Na +, and Cl -. Sulfate ion concentrations were much higher when Yellow Sand events occurred. The mass-based Cl -/Na + ratio found in the WSF solutions averaged 49.7%, much lower than the ratio in seawater, indicating that chlorine was lost from the aerosol particles. A negative correlation ( R=-0.67) was found between the Cl -/Na + ratio and the concentration of non-sea-salt-SO 42-. We confirmed the photochemical formation of OH radicals in the study samples using illumination experiments at 313 nm. The apparent quantum yields of OH radical photoformation, based on the total absorbance at 313 nm, ranged from ND to 0.0017, with a mean±1 SD of 0.0010±0.0005. Hydroxyl radical photoformation rates from nitrate and nitrite photolyses, estimated based on nitrate and nitrite ion concentrations and our illumination conditions, averaged 32±24% and <10%, respectively, of the total formation rates. Hydroxyl radical photoformation rates were strongly correlated with total dissolved iron concentrations ( R=0.88). A correlation also existed between OH radical photoformation rates and dissolved organic carbon concentrations ( R=0.69).

  13. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  14. Impacts of Long-Range Transport of Metals from East Asia in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Okinawa Archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sotaro; S, Yuka; I, Moriaki; N, Fumiya; H, Daishi; A, Takemitsu; T, Akira

    2010-05-01

    Economy of East Asia has been growing rapidly, and atmospheric aerosols discharged from this region have been transported to Japan. Okinawa island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km of south Korea. Its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same type of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of acid-digested metals using atomic absorption spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of metals in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island during June, 2008 to June 2009. We also determined 'background' concentration of metals in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island to elucidate the influence of the transport processes and distances from Asian continent on metal concentrations.

  15. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Nakajima, H.; Nakaema, F.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2008-12-01

    The economic development and population growth in recent Asia spread air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. The study of the air pollution transported from Asian continent has gained a special attention in Japan. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asian atmospheric aerosols because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. In 2005, Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) was established by the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) at the northern tip of Okinawa Island, Japan to monitor the air quality of Asia. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations and dissolved organic carbon in the bulk aerosols collected at the CHAAMS, using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components showed that the concentrations were relatively low in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian Continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components were much higher compared to the other directions.

  16. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4 samples induced deposition ice nucleation below 230 K as low as 120% RHice, took up water at about 80% RH, and nucleated subsequently via condensation freezing above 230 K at mean RH of 88-94% and 89-100%, respectively. Experimentally derived ice nucleation rate coefficients and activated IN fractions for estimation of ice crystal production rates are presented. Particles sampled in the L.A. area can induce ice formation at conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds and exhibit significantly different ice nucleation efficiencies than particles sampled in and around Mexico City.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  18. Chemotactic Sensing towards Ambient and Secreted Attractant Drives Collective Behaviour of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Curk, Tine; Marenduzzo, Davide; Dobnikar, Jure

    2013-01-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a suspension of bacterial swimmers, which chemotactically sense gradients in either ambient or self-secreted attractants (e.g. nutrient or aspartate respectively), or in both. Unlike previous mean field models based on a set of continuum partial differential equations, our model resolves single swimmers and therefore incorporates stochasticity and effects due to fluctuations in the bacterial density field. The algorithm we use is simple enough that we can follow the evolution of colonies of up to over a million bacteria for timescales relevant to pattern formation for E. coli growing in semisolid medium such as agar, or in confined geometries. Our results confirm previous mean field results that the patterns observed experimentally can be reproduced with a model incorporating chemoattractant secretion, chemotaxis (towards gradients in the chemoattractant field), and bacterial reproduction. They also suggest that further experiments with bacterial strains chemotactically moving up both nutrient and secreted attractant field may yield yet more dynamical patterns. PMID:24098352

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF COLLECTION METHODS FOR SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cartridges containing solid adsorbents between layers of polyurethane foam (PUF) were evaluated for collecting chlorobenzenes, chlorophenols, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), and two-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The 26-sq.cm cross-section glass cartridges, packed with Tenax (5-10 g)...

  20. Functionalization and fragmentation during ambient organic aerosol aging: application of the 2-D volatility basis set to field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Dall'Osto, M.; O'Dowd, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Pandis, S. N.

    2012-11-01

    Multigenerational oxidation chemistry of atmospheric organic compounds and its effects on aerosol loadings and chemical composition is investigated by implementing the Two-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2-D-VBS) in a Lagrangian host chemical transport model. Three model formulations were chosen to explore the complex interactions between functionalization and fragmentation processes during gas-phase oxidation of organic compounds by the hydroxyl radical. The base case model employs a conservative transformation by assuming a reduction of one order of magnitude in effective saturation concentration and an increase of oxygen content by one or two oxygen atoms per oxidation generation. A second scheme simulates functionalization in more detail using group contribution theory to estimate the effects of oxygen addition to the carbon backbone on the compound volatility. Finally, a fragmentation scheme is added to the detailed functionalization scheme to create a functionalization-fragmentation parameterization. Two condensed-phase chemistry pathways are also implemented as additional sensitivity tests to simulate (1) heterogeneous oxidation via OH uptake to the particle-phase and (2) aqueous-phase chemistry of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The model is applied to summer and winter periods at three sites where observations of organic aerosol (OA) mass and O:C were obtained during the European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaigns. The base case model reproduces observed mass concentrations and O:C well, with fractional errors (FE) lower than 55% and 25%, respectively. The detailed functionalization scheme tends to overpredict OA concentrations, especially in the summertime, and also underpredicts O:C by approximately a factor of 2. The detailed functionalization model with fragmentation agrees well with the observations for OA concentration, but still underpredicts O:C. Both heterogeneous oxidation and aqueous-phase processing have small effects on OA levels but heterogeneous oxidation, as implemented here, does enhance O:C by about 0.1. The different schemes result in very different fractional attribution for OA between anthropogenic and biogenic sources.

  1. Functionalization and fragmentation during ambient organic aerosol aging: application of the 2-D volatility basis set to field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Dall'Osto, M.; O'Dowd, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Pandis, S. N.

    2012-04-01

    Multigenerational oxidation chemistry of atmospheric organic compounds and its effects on aerosol loadings and chemical composition is investigated by implementing the Two-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2-D-VBS) in a Lagrangian host chemical transport model. Three model formulations were chosen to explore the complex interactions between functionalization and fragmentation processes during gas-phase oxidation of organic compounds by the hydroxyl radical. The base case model employs a conservative transformation by assuming a reduction of one order of magnitude in effective saturation concentration and an increase of oxygen content by one or two oxygen atoms per oxidation generation. A second scheme simulates functionalization in more detail using group contribution theory to estimate the effects of oxygen addition to the carbon backbone on the compound volatility. Finally, a fragmentation scheme is added to the detailed functionalization scheme to create a functionalization-fragmentation parameterization. Two condensed-phase chemistry pathways are also implemented as additional sensitivity tests to simulate (1) heterogeneous oxidation via OH uptake to the particle-phase and (2) aqueous-phase chemistry of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The model is applied to summer and winter periods at three sites where observations of organic aerosol (OA) mass and O:C were obtained during the European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaigns. The base case model reproduces observed mass concentrations and O:C well, with fractional errors (FE) lower than 55% and 25%, respectively. The detailed functionalization scheme tends to overpredict OA concentrations, especially in the summertime, and also underpredicts O:C by approximately a factor of 2. The detailed functionalization model with fragmentation agrees well with the observations for OA concentration, but still underpredicts O:C. Both heterogeneous oxidation and aqueous-phase processing have small effects on OA levels but heterogeneous oxidation, as implemented here, does enhance O:C by about 0.1. The different schemes result in very different fractional attribution for OA between anthropogenic and biogenic sources.

  2. Global Estimates of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations from Satellite-Based Aerosol Optical Depth: Development and Application

    PubMed Central

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Kahn, Ralph; Levy, Robert; Verduzco, Carolyn; Villeneuve, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic and health impact studies of fine particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) are limited by the lack of monitoring data, especially in developing countries. Satellite observations offer valuable global information about PM2.5 concentrations. Objective In this study, we developed a technique for estimating surface PM2.5 concentrations from satellite observations. Methods We mapped global ground-level PM2.5 concentrations using total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite instruments and coincident aerosol vertical profiles from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Results We determined that global estimates of long-term average (1 January 2001 to 31 December 2006) PM2.5 concentrations at approximately 10 km × 10 km resolution indicate a global population-weighted geometric mean PM2.5 concentration of 20 ?g/m3. The World Health Organization Air Quality PM2.5 Interim Target-1 (35 ?g/m3 annual average) is exceeded over central and eastern Asia for 38% and for 50% of the population, respectively. Annual mean PM2.5 concentrations exceed 80 ?g/m3 over eastern China. Our evaluation of the satellite-derived estimate with ground-based in situ measurements indicates significant spatial agreement with North American measurements (r = 0.77; slope = 1.07; n = 1057) and with noncoincident measurements elsewhere (r = 0.83; slope = 0.86; n = 244). The 1 SD of uncertainty in the satellite-derived PM2.5 is 25%, which is inferred from the AOD retrieval and from aerosol vertical profile errors and sampling. The global population-weighted mean uncertainty is 6.7 ?g/m3. Conclusions Satellite-derived total-column AOD, when combined with a chemical transport model, provides estimates of global long-term average PM2.5 concentrations. PMID:20519161

  3. Analyses of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Okinawa Archipelago, Japan by Using X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2012-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of bulk atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents in the bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (referred to "SRM", NIES No.28 of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies) on quartz filters for calibration curves in two different methods; 1) water-insoluble materials were collected after dispersing SRM in pure water and filtered with the quartz filters ("wet method"), and 2) SRM was dispersed in air in the plastic container and the aerosols were collected by using the low-volume air sampler ("dry method"). Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosols on the filter were seen in the following 9 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, and Pb (with wet method) and 12 metals; K, Ti, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb, Sr, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu (with dry method). Furthermore, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals determined by the XRF method in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at the three islands during June 2008 to June 2010, and for CHAAMS during June 2008 to October 2012.

  4. Observations of OM\\/OC and specific attenuation coefficients (SAC) in ambient fine PM at a rural site in central Ontario, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Chan; L. Huang; W. R. Leaitch; S. Sharma; J. R. Brook; J. G. Slowik; J. P. D. Abbatt; P. C. Brickell; J. Liggio; S.-M. Li; H. Moosmüller

    2010-01-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected on quartz filters at a rural site in central Ontario during an intensive study in 2007. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), pyrolysis organic carbon (POC), and elemental carbon (EC) were determined by thermal analysis. The concentrations are compared to the organic aerosol mass concentration (OM) measured with an Aerodyne C-ToF Aerosol Mass

  5. Multijet and multistage aerosol concentrator: design and performance analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, M C; Kim, D S; Lee, K W; Youn, H J; Choi, K B; Ha, Y C

    2001-01-01

    A multijet and multistage aerosol concentrator was designed and fabricated with two virtual impactors in a series. Collection efficiency, internal loss, and concentration factors were calculated at ambient conditions for each stage. The total inlet flow rate of the aerosol concentrator was set at 1000 L/min(-1), while the minor flow rate for the first stage was at 6.0% of the total inlet flow and the minor flow rate of the second stage was at 6.7% of the first stage minor flow. The aerosol concentrator was calibrated using polystyrene latex particles in aerodynamic sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 microm. Several configurations of the multijet acceleration nozzles and multitube receptors were designed in this study. The effects of the different designs were subsequently evaluated through experimentation. It was found that a properly designed multijet and multistage aerosol concentrator can significantly improve aerosol concentration performance. Results showed that the concentration factor increases from 1 to 240 over the particle size range studied. Applications of the multijet and multistage aerosol concentrator with high-volume flow rate can vary widely, from detection of biological aerosols at low concentration, laboratory aerosol sampling, clean room monitoring, and ambient aerosol measurements. PMID:11681656

  6. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  7. Seasonal variations of sulfate, carbonaceous species (black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and trace elements in fine atmospheric aerosols collected at subtropical islands in the East China Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Kaneyasu; Hideshige Takada

    2004-01-01

    In order to characterize the outflow of pollution derived aerosols from the Asian Pacific rim to the North Pacific Ocean, seasonal variations of fine aerosol components (aerodynamic diameter <2 mum) were collected at two islands (Amami Island and Miyako Island) that surround the East China Sea. Monthly averaged concentrations of non-sea-salt SO42- (nss.SO42-) and black carbon (BC) at Amami and

  8. Seasonal variations of sulfate, carbonaceous species (black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and trace elements in fine atmospheric aerosols collected at subtropical islands in the East China Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Kaneyasu; Hideshige Takada

    2004-01-01

    In order to characterize the outflow of pollution derived aerosols from the Asian Pacific rim to the North Pacific Ocean, seasonal variations of fine aerosol components (aerodynamic diameter <2 ?m) were collected at two islands (Amami Island and Miyako Island) that surround the East China Sea. Monthly averaged concentrations of non-sea-salt SO42? (nss.SO42?) and black carbon (BC) at Amami and

  9. Assessment of primary and secondary ambient particle trends using satellite aerosol optical depth and ground speciation data in the New England region, United States.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Kang, Choong-Min; Coull, Brent A; Bell, Michelle L; Koutrakis, Petros

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of air pollution emission control policies can be evaluated by examining ambient pollutant concentration trends that are observed at a large number of ground monitoring sites over time. In this paper, we used ground monitoring measurements in conjunction with satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) data to investigate fine particulate matter (PM2.5; particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ? 2.5 µm) trends and their spatial patterns over a large U.S. region, New England, during 2000-2008. We examined the trends in rural and urban areas to get a better insight about the trends of regional and local source emissions. Decreases in PM2.5 concentrations (µg/m(3)) were more pronounced in urban areas than in rural ones. In addition, the highest and lowest PM2.5 decreases (µg/m(3)) were observed for winter and summer, respectively. Together, these findings suggest that primary particle concentrations decreased more relative to secondary ones. This is also supported by the analysis of the speciation data which showed that downward trends of primary pollutants including black carbon were stronger than those of secondary pollutants including sulfate. Furthermore, this study found that ambient primary pollutants decreased at the same rate as their respective source emissions. This was not the case for secondary pollutants which decreased at a slower rate than that of their precursor emissions. This indicates that concentrations of secondary pollutants depend not only on the primary emissions but also on the availability of atmospheric oxidants which might not change during the study period. This novel approach of investigating spatially varying concentration trends, in combination with ground PM2.5 species trends, can be of substantial regulatory importance. PMID:24906074

  10. Aerosolization of fungi, (1?3)-?-D glucan, and endotoxin from flood-affected materials collected in New Orleans homes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Atin; Jung, Jaehee; Reponen, Tiina; Lewis, Jocelyn Suzanne; DeGrasse, Enjoli C.; Grimsley, L. Faye; Chew, Ginger L.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Standing water and sediments remaining on flood-affected materials were the breeding ground for many microorganisms in flooded homes following Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this laboratory study was to examine the aerosolization of culturable and total fungi, (1?3)-?-D glucan, and endotoxin from eight flood-affected floor and bedding materials collected in New Orleans homes, following Hurricane Katrina. Aerosolization was examined using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) connected to a BioSampler. Dust samples were collected by vacuuming. A two-stage cyclone sampler was used for size-selective analysis of aerosolized glucan and endotoxin. On average, levels of culturable fungi ranged from undetectable (lower limit = 8.3×104) to 2.6×105 CFU/m2; total fungi ranged from 2.07×105 to 1.6×106 spores/m2; (1?3)-?-D glucan and endotoxin were 2.0×103 – 2.9×104 ng/m2 and 7.0×102 – 9.3×104 EU/m2, respectively. The results showed that 5–15 min sampling is sufficient for detecting aerosolizable biocontaminants with the FSSST. Smaller particle size fractions (<1.0 ?m and <1.8 ?m) have levels of glucan and endotoxin comparable to larger (>1.8 ?m) fractions, which raises additional exposure concerns. Vacuuming was found to overestimate inhalation exposure risks by a factor of approximately 102 for (1?3)-?-D glucan and by 103 to 104 for endotoxin as detected by the FSSST. The information generated from this study is important with respect to restoration and rejuvenation of the flood-affected areas in New Orleans. We believe the findings will be significant during similar disasters in other regions of the world including major coastal floods from tsunamis. PMID:19201399

  11. Data collection platforms: A technique for space telemetry applied to surveying ambient parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoliveira, J. R.

    1980-05-01

    Phenomenon whose value can be determined by a sensor with an electronic output, are monitored with the use of the Data Collection Platform (DCP) concept. The present systems on board polar orbiting meteorolological satellites allow platform location using the Doppler effect with an accuracy of up to 3 km. A DCP was composed of a small transmitter in the 400 MHz band, connected to several sensors through control circuitry. The messages were transmitted in digital form, and each one contained up to 5000 bits of information. The data reception was made by a ground station through a satellite (generally meteorological) as a communications link. The use of satellites allow for the coverage of conventional extensive areas, including points of difficult access not provided with telecommunications means.

  12. Study of aerosols collected in a speleotherapeutic cave situated below Budapest, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Borbély-Kiss, I.; Hunyadi, I.

    1999-04-01

    The Szeml?hegy-cave is one of the well-known hydrothermal caves of the Rózsadomb area of Budapest, which have been used for speleotherapy of respiratory diseases for years. It is known from the periodically changing airborne radon activity concentration data, that airflow of seasonally reversed direction are formed along the cave passages and fissures due to the temperature difference between the surface and cave air. This means that an intensive interaction takes place between the cave and its environment. The pollution of nearby waters and the urban atmospheric air represents a real danger for these caves below Buda, which recently became the part of the UNESCO World Heritage. The study of cave aerosols should be very important from the point of view of either the control possibilities of the environmental impact or speleotherapy, and probably helps in getting acquainted with the cave-forming processes. In this work we applied our standard aerosol sampling method to the high-humidity environment of the caves, and we studied the elemental composition, size fractionation as well as the spatial distribution and the seasonal variation of cave aerosols. Thanks to the sensitivity of PIXE traces of anthropogenic pollution of the Budapest air are shown in the Szeml?hegy-cave. Measured elemental concentrations remained less than one-tenth the air quality standard valid for the increasingly protected areas.

  13. A novel high-resolution small ion spectrometer to study ion nucleation of aerosols in ambient indoor and outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fews, A. P.; Holden, N. K.; Keitch, P. A.; Henshaw, D. L.

    2005-07-01

    An electrically based ion spectrometer is described, capable of measuring particle sizes and mobilities from molecular ions (small ions) to aerosol particles across a size range of ˜0.4 to 30 nm in diameter. It consists of a single cylindrical capacitor divided into three electrically insulated sections. The current arriving at the central section is measured by an electrometer and represents the ion flux over a known range of mobilities determined by the applied voltage. The applied voltage is scanned in steps to measure the ion fluxes over a large number of overlapping mobility ranges. The recorded signal and the response function of the instrument are unfolded using a maximum entropy procedure to give a high-resolution measured mobility spectrum. The maximum entropy approach offers a considerable improvement over traditional aspiration collectors and can approach the resolution of a drift tube system. In this way, the spectrometer successfully overcomes the diffusion limit to small ion resolution. Illustrative spectra are shown, demonstrating for the first time the presence of some resolved structure within the small ion spectrum at the highest mobilities. It is demonstrated that the actual mobility spectrum of small ions falls in the range 0.8-2.0 × 10 -4 m 2 V -1 s -1. This represents a narrower range than that previously measured which is attributed to improved spectral resolution in the present work.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of chemicals in the TSP aerosols simultaneously collected at three islands in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, Takemitsu; Azechi, Sotaro; Somada, Yuka; Ijyu, Moriaki; Nakaema, Fumiya; Hitomi, Yuya; Handa, Daishi; Oshiro, Yoshito; Miyagi, Youichi; Tsuhako, Ai; Murayama, Hitomi; Higaonna, Yumi; Tanahara, Akira; Itoh, Akihide; Fukushima, Soko; Higashi, Kazuaki; Henza, Yui; Nishikawa, Rin; Shinjo, Hibiki; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-11-01

    East Asia's rapid economic growth has led to concerns about the emission of air pollutants. We collected total suspended particle (TSP) aerosol samples simultaneously at three islands in Okinawa, Japan, which are downwind of East Asia, during the Asian dust season, to examine the spatial and temporal variations and chemical transformations of major chemicals in the aerosols. Weekly samples were collected from July 2008 to June 2010, and the concentrations of water-soluble cations, anions, and organic carbon (WSOC) were determined (n = 303). Spatial distribution analysis showed that monthly mean concentrations of non-sea-salt (nss)-SO42- in the spring (Asian dust season) decreased with increasing distance from Asia, while the trend for NO3- was less evident, suggesting that chemical transformation affected the long-range transport of certain chemicals. Temporal variation analysis showed that concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, and WSOC during the spring were about 2.0, 2.4, and 1.8 times those in the summer (cleaner air mass from the Pacific Ocean), respectively. This study demonstrated that air pollutants were transported from the Asian continent to the Okinawa islands and affected the air quality in the region. There may also be impacts on ecosystems, because increased concentrations of particulate NO3- could increase nutrient levels around the Okinawa islands.

  15. Distributions of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols collected over the Arctic Ocean during late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ono, K.; Tachibana, E.; Charriére, B.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-11-01

    Oxalic and other small dicarboxylic acids have been reported as important water-soluble organic constituents of atmospheric aerosols from different environments. Their molecular distributions are generally characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) and/or succinic (C4) acids. In this study, we collected marine aerosols from the Arctic Ocean during late summer in 2009 when sea ice was retreating. The marine aerosols were analyzed for the molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids as well as ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyls to better understand the source of water-soluble organics and their photochemical processes in the high Arctic marine atmosphere. We found that diacids are more abundant than ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls, but their concentrations are generally low (< 30 ng m-3), except for one sample (up to 70 ng m-3) that was collected near the mouth of Mackenzie River during clear sky condition. Although the molecular compositions of diacids are in general characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid, a depletion of C2 was found in two samples in which C4 became the most abundant. Similar depletion of oxalic acid has previously been reported in the Arctic aerosols collected at Alert after polar sunrise and in the summer aerosols from the coast of Antarctica. Because the marine aerosols that showed a depletion of C2 were collected under the overcast and/or foggy conditions, we suggest that a photochemical decomposition of oxalic acid may have occurred in aqueous phase of aerosols over the Arctic Ocean via the photo dissociation of oxalate-Fe (III) complex. We also determined stable carbon isotopic compositions (?13C) of bulk aerosol carbon and individual diacids. The ?13C of bulk aerosols showed -26.5‰ (range: -29.7 to -24.7‰, suggesting that marine aerosol carbon is derived from both terrestrial and marine organic materials. In contrast, oxalic acid showed much larger ?13C values (average: -20.9‰, range: -24.7‰ to -17.0‰) than those of bulk aerosol carbon. Interestingly, ?13C values of oxalic acid were higher than C3 (av. -26.6‰) and C4 (-25.8‰) diacids, suggesting that oxalic acid is enriched with 13C due to its photochemical processing (aging) in the marine atmosphere.

  16. EFFECTS OF METEOROLOGY ON CONCENTRATIONS OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air samples of strong acid aerosol (H+), sulfate (So=4), ammonia (NH3), and ammonium (NH+4) were collected in Pittsburgh and Uniontown, Pennsylvania during the summer of 1990. igh correlations were found for both + and SO=4 concentrations between Pittsburgh and the semi-r...

  17. Trace elements in tropical African savanna biomass burning aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Gaudichet; F. Echalar; B. Chatenet; J. P. Quisefit; G. Malingre; H. Cachier; P. Buat-Menard; P. Artaxo; W. Maenhaut

    1995-01-01

    As a part of the FOS\\/DECAFE experiment, aerosol particles emitted during prescribed savanna fires were collected in January 1991 at Lamto (Ivory Coast), either close to the emission or in ambient air. Analytical transmission electron microscopy pointed out the presence of sub-micrometer soots, salt condensates, vegetation relicts and soil derived particles. The samples were also analyzed for their total particulate

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, Monica A.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    During the boreal forest burn studied, the ambient concentrations for the particle carbon smoke aerosol are highest for the full-fire burn conditions and vary significantly throughout the burn. Collection strategies must accordingly define ranges in the smoke aerosol concentrations produced. While the highest elemental C concentrations are observed during full-fire conditions, the great majority of smoke aerosol particles are in the form of organic C particles irrespective of fire temperature. The formation of organic C light-scattering particles was a significant process in the burn studied.

  19. Distributions of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols collected over the Arctic Ocean during late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ono, K.; Tachibana, E.; Charriére, B.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-08-01

    Oxalic and other small dicarboxylic acids have been reported as important water-soluble organic constituents of atmospheric aerosols from different environments. Their molecular distributions are generally characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) and/or succinic (C4) acids. In this study, we collected marine aerosols from the Arctic Ocean during late summer in 2009 when sea ice is retreated. The marine aerosols were analyzed for the molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids as well as ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyls to better understand the source of water-soluble organics and their photochemical processes in the high Arctic marine atmosphere. We found that diacids are more abundant than ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls, but their concentrations are generally low (< 30 ng m-3), except for one sample (up to 70 ng m-3) that was collected near the mouth of Mackenzie River during clear sky condition. Although the molecular compositions of diacids are in general characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid, a depletion of C2 was found in two samples in which C4 became the most abundant. Similar depletion of oxalic acid has previously been reported in the Arctic aerosols collected at Alert after polar sunrise and in the summer aerosols from the coastal Antarctica. Because the marine aerosols that showed a depletion of C2 were observed under the overcast and/or foggy conditions, we suggest that a photochemical decomposition of oxalic acid may have occurred in aqueous phase of aerosols over the Arctic Ocean via the photo dissociation of oxalate-Fe (III) complex. We also determined stable carbon isotopic compositions (?13C) of bulk aerosol carbon and individual diacids. The ?13C of bulk aerosols showed -26.5‰ (range: -29.7‰ to -24.7‰), suggesting that marine aerosol carbon is derived from both terrestrial and marine organic materials. In contrast, oxalic acid showed much larger ?13C values (average: -20.9‰, range: -24.7‰ to -17.0‰) than those of bulk aerosol carbon. Interestingly, ?13C values of oxalic acid were higher than C3 (av. -26.6‰) and C4 (-25.8‰) diacids, suggesting that oxalic acid is enriched with 13C due to its photochemical processing (aging) in the marine atmosphere.

  20. a Study of the Origin of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildemann, Lynn Mary

    1990-01-01

    The sources of ambient organic particulate matter in urban areas are investigated through a program of emission source measurements, atmospheric measurements, and mathematical modeling of source/receptor relationships. A dilution sampler intended to collect fine organic aerosol from combustion sources is designed to simulate atmospheric cooling and dilution processes, so that organic vapors which condense under ambient conditions will be collected as particulate matter. This system is used to measure the emissions from a boiler burning distillate oil, a home fireplace, catalyst and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternate techniques are used to sample the particulate matter emitted from cigarette smoking, a roofing tar pot, paved road dust, brake lining wear, tire wear, and vegetative detritus. The bulk chemical characteristics of the fine aerosol fraction are presented for each source. Over half of the fine aerosol mass emitted from automobiles, wood burning, meat cooking, home appliances, cigarettes, and tar pots is shown to consist of organic compounds. The organic material collected from these sources is analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography. Using a simple analytical protocol, a quantitative, 50-parameter characterization of the elutable fine organic aerosol emitted from each source type is obtained, which proves to be a unique fingerprint that can be used to distinguish most sources from each other. A mathematical model is used to predict the characteristics of fine ambient organic aerosol in the Los Angeles area that would prevail if the primary organic emissions are transported without chemical reaction. The model is found to track the seasonal variations observed in the ambient aerosol at the three sites studied. Emissions from vehicles and fireplaces are identified as significant sources of solvent-extractable organic aerosol. Differences between the model predictions and ambient concentrations that could be due to atmospheric chemical reaction are discussed. An upper limit on the amount of secondary organic aerosol present is estimated based on the difference between the acidic organic aerosol present in ambient samples versus that due to primary emissions as computed by the model. Finally, several hypotheses concerning the origin of the organic aerosol are proposed.

  1. An investigation into the acid content of aerosols in the ambient air at the Taj Mahal, Agra.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S D; Pandya, G H; Phadke, K M; Tajne, D S; Jain, A K; Gajrani, C P; Yennawar, P K

    1989-01-01

    A chemical analysis of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected near the world famous Taj Mahal monument at Agra has been carried out. SPM samples collected on glass fibre filters were analysed for water-soluble sulphate, nitrate, chloride and ammonium ions. The data were derived from over 200 samples (each of 24 h), collected continuously during the winter periods (October through to March) of 1984-1985 and 1985-1986. The SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) components are acidic in nature causing corrosion and effects on visibility, and so were studied in more detail. Mean values for SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) derived from two-year data are 7.2 microg m(-3) and 8.2 microg m(-3), respectively. The SO(4)(2-)/SO(2) and NO(3)(-)/NO(2) ratiosobserved indicate faster conversion of SO(2) to SO(4)(2-) than NO(2) to NO(3)(-), the maximum levels being in January. Thus, both SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) results appear to offer more promising indices of air quality than do SPM data alone. PMID:15092423

  2. Determination of OM\\/OC ratios and specific attenuation coefficients (SAC) in ambient fine PM at a rural site in southern Ontario: implications for emission sources, particle aging, and radiative forcing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Chan; L. Huang; W. R. Leaitch; S. Sharma; J. R. Brook; J. G. Slowik; J. P. D. Abbatt; P. C. Brickell; J. Liggio; S.-M. Li; H. Moosmüller

    2009-01-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected on quartz filters at a rural site in southern Ontario during intensive studies in 2005 and 2007. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), pyrolysis organic carbon (POC), and elemental carbon (EC) were determined by thermal analysis. These results were compared to the organic aerosol mass concentration (OM) measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass

  3. Aerosol mass spectrometer measurements of organic aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Worsnop; M. Canagaratna; J. Jayne; H. Boudries; T. Onasch; J. Jimenez; J. Slowik; H. Coe

    2003-01-01

    Organic species are known to be ubiquitous and comprise a significant component of ambient aerosols. Identifying the sources, chemical compositions, and loadings of particulate organics remains a difficult, yet important problem as organic components may affect the formation, hygroscopicity, growth, reactivity, and radiative effects of ambient particles. Unraveling this complexity inherently must rely on chemical information (such as off-line filter

  4. Online determination of levoglucosan in ambient aerosols with Particle-into-Liquid Sampler - High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (PILS-HPAEC-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarnio, K.; Teinilä, K.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Timonen, H.; Aurela, M.; Hillamo, R.

    2013-06-01

    Biomass burning, such as domestic heating, agricultural, and wild open-land fires, has a significant influence on the atmosphere at the global and, especially, at the local scale. Levoglucosan has been shown to be a good tracer for biomass burning emissions in atmospheric particulate matter and several analytical techniques have been presented for the determination of levoglucosan from filter samples. In this paper, a novel combination of a Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) to a high-performance anion-exchange chromatograph (HPAEC) with the detection by a mass spectrometer (MS) is presented for the online analysis of levoglucosan in ambient particles. The PILS-HPAEC-MS technique enables a fast online analysis of levoglucosan from the particulate samples. The method was tested at an urban background station in Helsinki, Finland, in winter 2011. A comparison with simultaneous levoglucosan measurements from filter samples by the HPAEC-MS was performed and it showed a good agreement between the online and offline methods. Additionally, the online levoglucosan data were compared with the biomass burning tracer fragments measured by a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). As there were no local biomass burning sources close to the measurement station, online levoglucosan measurements revealed that most of the particles from biomass burning were either regionally distributed or long-range transported in the urban background of Helsinki. The average levoglucosan concentrations were relatively low (average 0.083 ?g m-3) during the measurement campaign. The highest concentration peak measured for levoglucosan (1.4 ?g m-3) seemed to originate from biomass burning in Eastern Europe, likely in Estonia, that was transported to Helsinki.

  5. Online determination of levoglucosan in ambient aerosols with particle-into-liquid sampler - high-performance anion-exchange chromatography - mass spectrometry (PILS-HPAEC-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarnio, K.; Teinilä, K.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Timonen, H.; Aurela, M.; Hillamo, R.

    2013-10-01

    Biomass burning, such as domestic heating, agricultural, and wild open-land fires, has a significant influence on the atmosphere at the global and, especially, at the local scale. Levoglucosan has been shown to be a good tracer for biomass burning emissions in atmospheric particulate matter, and several analytical techniques have been presented for the determination of levoglucosan from filter samples. In this paper, a novel combination of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) to a high-performance anion-exchange chromatograph (HPAEC) with the detection by a mass spectrometer (MS) is presented for the online analysis of levoglucosan in ambient particles. The PILS-HPAEC-MS technique enables a fast online analysis of levoglucosan from the particulate samples. The method was tested at an urban background station in Helsinki, Finland, in winter 2011. A comparison with simultaneous levoglucosan measurements from filter samples by the HPAEC-MS was performed and it showed a good agreement between the online and offline methods. Additionally, the online levoglucosan data were compared with the biomass burning tracer fragments measured by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). As there were no local biomass burning sources close to the measurement station, online levoglucosan measurements revealed that most of the particles from biomass burning were either regionally distributed or long-range transported in the urban background of Helsinki. The average levoglucosan concentrations were relatively low (average 0.083 ?g m-3) during the measurement campaign. The highest concentration peak measured for levoglucosan (1.4 ?g m-3) seemed to originate from biomass burning in the Baltic countries, likely in Estonia, that was transported to Helsinki.

  6. Modelling atmospheric aerosol backscatter at CO2 laser wavelengths. I - Aerosol properties, modeling techniques, and associated problems. II - Modeled values in the atmosphere. III - Effects of changes in wavelength and ambient conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Kent; G. K. Yue; U. O. Farrukh; A. Deepak

    1983-01-01

    The various methods of calculating the atmospheric aerosol backscattering function, beta(CO2), both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, with limits placed on their accuracy. The most significant factor in determining beta(CO2) is found to be the aerosol size distribution and concentration; this should be known accurately for particle radii up

  7. HOUSTON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field study of ambient aerosols was conducted in Houston between September 14 and October 14, 1978. Measurements at 12 sites were made using (1) two relocatable monitoring systems instrumented for aerosol and gaseous pollutants, (2) a network of high volume samplers ...

  8. Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-08-11

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

  9. AUTORAMP - an automatic unit for unattended aerosol collection, gamma-ray analysis and data transmission from remote locations

    SciTech Connect

    Latner, N.; Sanderson, C.G.; Negro, V.C. [and others

    1997-12-31

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has designed, developed and field tested a fully automated and completely unattended multisample, surface-air monitoring system. This system, AUTORAMP, collects large-volume aerosol samples on discrete pleated cartridge filters, measures these samples in a near ideal geometry with a refrigerator-cooled Germanium gamma-ray detector, and immediately transmits the resulting spectra through a telephone/modem connection or a satellite link. Using a sample tray loaded with 31 filters, the system will allow for more than six months of unattended operation with weekly sampling, or one month of daily sampling. Remote control of all operating functions is possible through the communications link. For a 24-h collection, at 12,000 m{sup 3} d{sup -1} and a 18-h gamma-ray count, this system can detect as little as 2.7 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of the short-lived {sup 140}Ba and 5.4 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of {sup 137}Cs.

  10. A New Approach to Speciation of the Organic Component of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longin, T.; Doezema, L.; Cody, W.; Perraud, V. M.; Ezell, M. J.; Dawson, M. L.; Greaves, J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time in situ analysis of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols has been hampered by the lack of analytical techniques that allow molecular speciation. We report here the application of a relatively new ambient ionization method, extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), to probe aerosols from various sources, including secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the reaction of ?-pinene with ozone. The mass spectra are compared to those of the same samples that were first collected on a filter, dissolved in the solvent and then analyzed by conventional ESI-MS. Although EESI-MS has been used to explore other systems such as aerosolized drugs, to the best of our knowledge this is the first instance of applying the technique to atmospherically relevant aerosols. This technique has the advantages of providing mass spectra that are characteristic of individual organic compounds, yet is carried out at ambient pressures and temperatures and does not require prior collection and/or extraction of particles. Results from different aerosol samples will be presented and potential applications to ambient aerosols discussed.

  11. Evidence of high PM 2.5 strong acidity in ammonia-rich atmosphere of Guangzhou, China: Transition in pathways of ambient ammonia to form aerosol ammonium at [NH 4 +]\\/[SO 4 2–] = 1.5

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Huang; R. Qiu; Chak K. Chan; Pathak Ravi Kant

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected using Harvard Honeycomb denuder\\/filter-pack system during different seasons in 2006 and 2007 at an urban site in Guangzhou, China. The particles collected in this study were generally acidic (average strong acidity ([H+]) ~70nmol m?3). Interestingly, aerosol sulfate was not fully neutralized in the ammonia-rich atmosphere (NH3~30ppb) and even when NH4+]\\/[SO42?] was larger

  12. EFFECT OF LOADING WITH AIM OIL AEROSOL ON THE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF AN ELECTRET FILTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. TENNAL; M. K. MAZUMDER; A. SIAG; R. N. REDDY

    1991-01-01

    Loading of an electret filter changes the distribution of electrical field in the filter from its preloading condition, and, therefore, affects the filtration efficiency of the filter. Liquid droplets collected on electret filters cause degradation of the electrostatic enhancement of filtration efficiency because of charge neutralization and the formation of a dielectric coating over die charged fibers. In this study,

  13. A thermal desorption mass spectrometer for freshly nucleated secondary aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, A.; Gonser, S. G.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary aerosol formation in the atmosphere is observed in a large variety of locations worldwide, introducing new particles to the atmosphere which can grow to sizes relevant for health and climate effects of aerosols. The chemical reactions leading to atmospheric secondary aerosol formation are not yet fully understood. At the same time, analyzing the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is still a challenging task. We are currently finishing the development of a field portable aerosol mass spectrometer for nucleation particles with diameters smaller than 30 nm. This instrument consists of a custom-built aerosol sizing and collection unit coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The aerosol sizing and collection unit is composed of three major parts: (1) a unipolar corona aerosol charger, (2) a radial differential mobility analyzer (rDMA) for aerosol size separation, and (3) an electrostatic precipitator for aerosol collection. After collection, the aerosol sample is thermally desorbed, and the resulting gas sample is transferred to the TOF-MS for chemical analysis. The unipolar charger is based on corona discharge from carbon fibres (e.g. Han et al., 2008). This design allows efficient charging at voltages below 2 kV, thus eliminating the potential for ozone production which would interfere with the collected aerosol. With the current configuration the extrinsic charging efficiency for 20 nm particles is 32 %. The compact radial DMA similar to the design of Zhang et al. (1995) is optimized for a diameter range from 1 nm to 100 nm. Preliminary tests show that monodisperse aerosol samples (geometric standard deviation of 1.09) at 10 nm, 20 nm, and 30 nm can easily be separated from the ambient polydisperse aerosol population. Finally, the size-segregated aerosol sample is collected on a high-voltage biased metal filament. The collected sample is protected from contamination using a He sheath counterflow. Resistive heating of the filament allows temperature-controlled desorption of compounds of different volatility. We will present preliminary characterization experiments of the aerosol sizing and collection unit coupled to the mass spectrometer. Funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under grant DFG HE5214/3-1 is gratefully acknowledged. Han, B., Kim, H.J., Kim, Y.J., and Sioutas, C. (2008) Unipolar charging of ultrafine particles using carbon fiber ionizers. Aerosol Sci. Technol, 42, 793-800. Zhang, S.-H., Akutsu, Y., Russell, L.M., Flagan, R.C., and Seinfeld, J.H. (1995) Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer. Aerosol Sci. Technol, 23, 357-372.

  14. FEASIBILITY OF THE AEROSOL-TO-LIQUID PARTICLE EXTRACTION SYSTEM (ALPES) FOR COLLECTION OF VIABLE FRANCISELLA SP.

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M

    2006-08-07

    Several Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area have tested positive for Francisella tularensis and there is a need to determine whether natural occurring Francisella-related microorganism(s) may be responsible for these observed positive reactions. The collection, culturing and characterization of Francisella-related natural microorganisms will provide the knowledge base to improve the future selectivity of Biowatch monitoring for Francisella. The aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPES) is a high-efficiency, dual mechanism collection system that utilizes a liquid collection medium for capture of airborne microorganisms. Since the viability of microorganisms is preserved better in liquid medium than on air filters, this project was undertaken to determine whether Francisella philomiragia and Francisella tularensis LVS maintain acceptable viability in the continuous liquid recirculation, high direct current voltage and residual ozone concentrations which occur during ALPES operation. Throughout a series of preliminary trial runs with representative gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms, several design modifications and improvements to the ALPES optimized liquid handling, electrical stability, sampling and overall performance for biological sampling. Initial testing with Francisella philomiragia showed viability was preserved better in PBS buffer than HBSS buffer. Trial runs at starting cell concentrations of 1.8 x 10{sup 6} and 2.5 x 10{sup 4} CFU/L showed less than a 1-log decrease in viability for F. philomiragia after 24 h in the ALPES. Francisella tularensis LVS (live vaccine strain) was used as a surrogate for virulent F. tularensis in ALPES trial runs conducted at starting cell concentrations of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/L. F. tularensis LVS was slow-growing and required highly selective growth media to prevent overgrowth by collected airborne microorganisms. In addition, one ALPES unit intake was HEPA filtered during the final trial runs with F. tularensis LVS to further reduce the levels of microbial background. Results from trials with F. tularensis LVS showed about a 1-log loss decrease in CFUs after 24 h, but maintained final cell concentrations in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} CFU/L. These results indicate that the ALPES maintains acceptable viability of Francisella sp. in PBS buffer for up to 24 h and is a promising technology for the collection of viable airborne Francisella or Francisella-related cultures which may be observed at Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area and elsewhere.

  15. Introduction to MODIS Collection 6 'Deep Blue' aerosol products and strategy for cirrus-signal correction in AOD retrievals using 1.38 ?m reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Hsu, N. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2012-12-01

    This study shows the characteristics of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products (hereafter, C006 DB products) and a strategy for correcting cirrus-signal in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. The C006 DB products have several changes over the C005, including extended coverage, surface reflectance model, aerosol microphysical model, and cloud screening, etc. One of the new features is the inclusion of pixel-level uncertainty estimates on the retrieved AOD. These uncertainty estimates have been determined based on a validation against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) direct-Sun AOD measurements, and are parameterized as a function of AOD, viewing geometry, and retrieval quality flag. This will provide users with a simple way to assess the uncertainty on Deep Blue AOD data for their particular application of interest. Preliminary results show strong agreement with AERONET, suggesting that the Deep Blue algorithm performs as well as other state-of-the-art satellite AOD datasets. In addition, a strategy for cirrus-signal correction in the retrieved AOD is presented. The cirrus reflectance at each wavelength to be used in the aerosol retrieval algorithms is determined by the relationships between reflectances at 1.38 ?m and the aerosol bands and subtracted from the original TOA reflectance values assuming linear relationship for the optically thin case (?1.38 < 0.05). Since the 1.38 ?m band is located in the strong water vapor absorption band, thus representing cirrus signal only, the slope between the 1.38 ?m reflectance values and minimum reflectance values at each aerosol band for the corresponding values at 1.38 ?m can be used to convert the 1.38 ?m reflectance to the cirrus reflectance at each wavelength. Then, the cirrus-signal-corrected AOD can be retrieved by using the corrected reflectance data as input data into the aerosol retrieval algorithms. The retrieval results show that the AOD values over the cirrus-contaminated areas are reduced and show reasonable homogeneity with the data around the cirrus-corrected area. Validation of the present algorithm is underway by using the space-borne lidar observations from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP).

  16. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Profile of Electronic and Tobacco Cigarettes, Smokeless Tobacco and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products: E-Liquids, Extracts and Collected Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Manoj; Leverette, Robert D.; Cooper, Bethany T.; Bennett, Melanee B.; Brown, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT) products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic. PMID:25361047

  17. Sources of optically active aerosol particles over the Amazon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Pascal; Graham, Bim; Roberts, Gregory C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Maenhaut, Willy; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    Size-fractionated ambient aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site and a primary rainforest site in the Brazilian Amazon Basin during two field campaigns (April-May and September-October 1999), as part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH). The samples were analyzed for up to 19 trace elements by particle-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), for equivalent black carbon (BC e) by a light reflectance technique and for mass concentration by gravimetric analysis. Additionally, we made continuous measurements of absorption and light scattering by aerosol particles. The vertical chemical composition gradients at the forest site have been discussed in a companion article (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres 108 (D18), 4591 (doi:4510.1029/2003JD003465)). In this article, we present the results of a source identification and quantitative apportionment study of the wet and dry season aerosols, including an apportionment of the measured scattering and absorption properties of the total aerosol in terms of the identified aerosol sources. Source apportionments (obtained from absolute principal component analysis) revealed that the wet and dry season aerosols contained the same three main components, but in different (absolute and relative) amounts: the wet season aerosol consisted mainly of a natural biogenic component, whereas pyrogenic aerosols dominated the dry season aerosol mass. The third component identified was soil dust, which was often internally mixed with the biomass-burning aerosol. All three components contributed significantly to light extinction during both seasons. At the pasture site, up to 47% of the light absorption was attributed to biogenic particles during the wet season, and up to 35% at the tower site during the wet-to-dry transition period. The results from the present study suggest that, in addition to pyrogenic particles, biogenic and soil dust aerosols must be taken into account when modeling the physical and optical properties of aerosols in forested regions such the Amazon Basin.

  18. Characterization of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Three Islands in Okinawa, Japan by X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents of bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (NIES No.28) of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies on quartz filters for calibration curves. Then, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosol on filter were seen in the following 10 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb and As. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. Okinawa islands, consisting of many small islands, are situated east of Asian continent, and its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants. Also, in Okinawa islands, maritime air mass prevails during summer, while Asian continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities such as industries and automobiles. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals determined by the XRF method in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at the three islands during June 2008 to June 2010, and for CHAAMS during June 2008 to September 2011.

  19. The effect of temperature on the gas-particle partitioning of reactive mercury in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Andrew P.; Schauer, James J.

    Measurements of gas-particle-partitioning coefficients for reactive mercury in dry urban and laboratory aerosol were found to strongly depend on ambient temperature. Samples of atmospheric and laboratory aerosols (defined as both the gas and particle phases) were collected using filter and absorbent methods and analyzed for reactive mercury using thermal desorption combined with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Synthetic ambient aerosols were generated in the laboratory from ammonium sulfate and adipic acid mixed with mercuric chloride in a purpose-built aerosol reactor. The aerosol reactor was operated in a temperature-controlled laboratory. Linear relationships between the logarithm of inverse gas-particle partitioning and inverse temperature were observed and parameterized for use in the atmospheric modeling of reactive mercury. Reactive mercury was observed to partition from the particle to the gas phase as ambient temperature increased. Good agreement between measurements made using urban and laboratory aerosols was seen after gas-particle-partitioning coefficients were normalized for surface area instead of mass. Thermodynamic analyses of the urban and laboratory gas-particle-partitioning measurements revealed that the strength of interaction between reactive mercury and particle surfaces was suggestive of chemisorption. Gas-particle-partitioning coefficients made with the Tekran ambient mercury analyzer (AMA) also showed a dependence on temperature. However, the Tekran AMA partitioning coefficients did not agree well with partitioning coefficients measured using the filter-based methods. The disagreement is consistent with the 50 °C operational temperature of the Tekran AMA.

  20. ß-CARYOPHYLLINIC ACID: AN ATMOSPHERIC TRACER FOR ß-CARYOPHYLLENE SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of ambient PM2.5 samples, collected in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA, and a sample of secondary organic aerosol, formed by irradiating a mixture of the sesquiterpene, ß-caryophyllene, and oxides of nitrogen in a smog chamber, wer...

  1. Size-Resolved Anhydrosugar Composition in Smoke Aerosol from Controlled Field Burning of Rice Straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guenter Engling; James J. Lee; Yi-Wen Tsai; Shih-Chun C. Lung; Charles C.-K. Chou; Chuen-Yu Chan

    2009-01-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the effects of ambient conditions and burning practices of rice fields in Taiwan on the chemical and physical characteristics of the smoke aerosol. Rice straw was burned on an actual rice field under typical conditions and smoke particles were collected immediately downwind of the field over the full particle size spectrum. Here we

  2. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BOISE, IDAHO, AMBIENT AIR FINE PARTICLE SAMPLES USING THE PLATE AND MICROSUSPENSION SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to characterize the genotoxic potential of the ambient air aerosols collected within an air shed impacted primarily by wood smoke and automotive emissions. The study also examines the relative merits of a microsuspension assay and the standa...

  3. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-01

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam-laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements are used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam-particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.

  4. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam-laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements are used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam-particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.

  5. Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots Collected on Filter Papers from Three Manufacturers Stored at Ambient Temperature for Application in HIV-1 Drug Resistance Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rottinghaus, Erin K.; Beard, R. Suzanne; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2014-01-01

    As more HIV-infected people gain access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), monitoring HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) becomes essential to combat both acquired and transmitted HIVDR. Studies have demonstrated dried blood spots (DBS) are a suitable alternative in HIVDR monitoring using DBS collected on Whatman 903 (W-903). In this study, we sought to evaluate two other commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for HIVDR genotyping following ambient temperature storage. DBS were prepared from remnant blood specimens collected from 334 ART patients and stored at ambient temperature for a median time of 30 days. HIV-1 viral load was determined using NucliSENS EasyQ® HIV-1 v2.0 RUO test kits prior to genotyping of the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the HIV-1 pol gene using an in-house assay. Among the DBS tested, 26 specimens had a viral load ?1000 copies/mL in all three types of filter paper and were included in the genotyping analysis. Genotyping efficiencies were similar between DBS collected on W-903 (92.3%), A-226 (88.5%), and M-TFN (92.3%) filter papers (P?=?1.00). We identified 50 DR-associated mutations in DBS collected on W-903, 33 in DBS collected on A-226, and 48 in DBS collected on M-TFN, resulting in mutation detection sensitivities of 66.0% for A-226 and 88.0% for M-TFN when compared to W-903. Our data indicate that differences among filter papers may exist at this storage condition and warrant further studies evaluating filter paper type for HIVDR monitoring. PMID:25303690

  6. Speciation of major heavy metals in ambient fine particles collected in the atmospheres of Xuanwei, Yunan, a higher lung incidence area in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Yi, Fei; Lin, Jun; Ren, Jingjing; Hao, Xiaojie

    2013-04-01

    Xuan Wei area, Yunnan province of China, has one of the highest lung cancer mortality rates in China. Heavy metals in the aerosol are potential facts that might attribute to the cause of lung cancer, and speciation of heavy metals could play a key role in toxicity of heavy metals. Therefore, we try to reveal speciation of major heavy metals by using of synchrotron radiation techniques in this study. Mass concentration of chemical elements in ambient particles were analyzed by PIXE (Proton induced X-ray emission), and speciation of Cu was investigated by XAFS (X-ray absorption near-edge structure). Our results demonstrated that mass levels of heavy metals ranked as Fe (791.62 ng/m3) >Zn (479.49 ng/m3) >Pb(154.76 ng/m3) >Cu(28.51 ng/m3) >Co (11.79 ng/m3) >Ni (8.20 ng/m3). The Cu speciation in the different size fraction was different. Speciation of Cu in fine particles (PM0.56~0.32) is present as Cu (I), and significant amount of Cu is present as Cu (II) in the ultrafine particles (PM0.1).

  7. In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-07-31

    Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

  8. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  9. The Role of Aerosol Composition in Arctic Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. D.; Hiranuma, N.; Moffet, R.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Glen, A.

    2010-12-01

    While it has been shown that aerosol size has a direct correlation with its ability to act as an ice nucleus, the role of the composition of freshly emitted and evolving aerosol in nucleation is poorly understood. Here we use combined measurements of ice nucleation and high resolution single particle composition to provide insight on the connection between aerosol composition in ice nucleation. These measurements were collected during the Indirect and Semidirect Aerosols Campaign (ISDAC) over Barrow, AK in the springtime of 2008. In-situ ice nucleation measurements were conducted using the Texas Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC). The composition of ambient particles as well as residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals were studied on a particle by particle basis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-Ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFAS). Observed IN concentrations varied from frequent values of 0.01 per liter to more than 10 per liters, depending on conditions and the availability of ice-nucleating aerosols. Ice crystals residuals collected in a fully glaciated cloud demonstrate that both particle chemistry and size requirement must be met for a particle to be an efficient ice nucleus. According to the STXM/NEXAFAS spectral maps, ice crystals residuals are characterized by insoluble cores of either large brown or black carbon (BBC) or carbonates coated by water soluble organics. In contrast, in ambient air samples collected from a biomass burning plume, many organic particles were also observed, but these were smaller and did not have insoluble cores. In-situ ice nucleation measurements show that these biomass particles have inferior ice nuclei ability, relative to those collected in the glaciated cloud. Taken together our measurements suggest that two key elements, a critical size (provided by BBC and/or carbonate) and chemical (organic) component are required for an aerosol to be an effective ice nucleus.

  10. MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products: Comparison between Aqua's e-Deep Blue, Dark Target, and "merged" data sets, and usage recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Munchak, L. A.; Hsu, N. C.; Levy, R. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Atmospheres data product suite includes three algorithms applied to retrieve midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD): the Enhanced Deep Blue (DB) and Dark Target (DT) algorithms over land, and a DT over-water algorithm. All three have been refined in the recent "Collection 6" (C6) MODIS reprocessing. In particular, DB has been expanded to cover vegetated land surfaces as well as brighter desert/urban areas. Additionally, a new "merged" data set which draws from all three algorithms is included in the C6 products. This study is intended to act as a point of reference for new and experienced MODIS data users with which to understand the global and regional characteristics of the C6 DB, DT, and merged data sets, based on MODIS Aqua data. This includes validation against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations at 111 sites, focused toward regional and categorical (surface/aerosol type) analysis. Neither algorithm consistently outperforms the other, although in many cases the retrieved AOD and the level of its agreement with AERONET are very similar. In many regions the DB, DT, and merged data sets are all suitable for quantitative applications, bearing in mind that they cannot be considered independent, while in other cases one algorithm does consistently outperform the other. Usage recommendations and caveats are thus somewhat complicated and regionally dependent.

  11. Water-soluble organic nitrogen in the ambient aerosols and its contribution to the dry deposition of fixed nitrogen species in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) in the aerosols were conducted over three years at two sites; an urban site in Kofu and a forested site in Fujiyoshida, Japan. Our preliminary experiment demonstrated that the adsorption of organic gases on the filter had little effect on the measurement of the WSON. The mean concentration of the WSON in the aerosols at the urban site was 0.221 ?g m-3, which was higher than that of 0.101 ?g m-3 at the forested site. Large portions of the WSON were found in the fine-mode range; 90.3% at the urban site and 86.4% at the forested site. The WSON constituted a significant fraction of the water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) in the aerosols; 11.1% and 16.2% of the WSTN in the coarse and fine particles, respectively, at the urban site, and 11.5% and 13.1% in the coarse and fine particles, respectively, at the forested site. The fine-mode WSON would be derived from the reaction of its basic precursor gases with particulate or gaseous acidic species. Photochemical reactions and combustion emissions could also be important sources of the fine-mode WSON. In the coarse-mode range, on the other hand, vegetation sources could be an important source of the WSON. The mean concentration of urea in the aerosols at the urban site was 1.7 ngN m-3. A large portion (87.2%) of the urea was partitioned into the fine-mode range. Urea is a minor compound in the particulate WSON in this region with contributions to about 1% of the WSON. Approximately 26% of the dry deposition of the WSTN was attributed to the WSON in the cold season. The significant part (96.5%) of the WSON was deposited by coarse aerosols. Coarse-mode WSON is important for discussing the dry deposition fluxes of the WSON and fixed nitrogen.

  12. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  13. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for high throughput analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples: The benefits of synchrotron X-rays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Bukowiecki; Peter Lienemann; Christoph N. Zwicky; Markus Furger; Agnes Richard; Gerald Falkenberg; Karen Rickers; Daniel Grolimund; Camelia Borca; Matthias Hill; Robert Gehrig; Urs Baltensperger

    2008-01-01

    The determination of trace element mass concentrations in ambient air with a time resolution higher than one day represents an urgent need in atmospheric research. It involves the application of a specific technique both for the aerosol sampling and the subsequent analysis of the collected particles. Beside the intrinsic sensitivity of the analytical method, the sampling interval and thus the

  14. QUARTZ CONTENT AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF AEROSOLS FROM SELECTED SITES OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) INHALABLE PARTICULATE NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The elemental composition and concentration of quartz in ambient aerosols collected on dichotomous filters from the EPA Inhalable Particulate Network (IPN) in 1980 have been determined by x-ray fluorescence and mass calibration methods of x-ray diffraction (XRD). Quartz concentra...

  15. An assessment of the performance of Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The U.S. EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with se...

  16. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment. The high-time resolution data shows that rapid concentration changes of a common individual species can be lost with traditional bulk sampling, and a time resolution of 30 minutes is suggested to accurately represent these changes. Using the mass spectra collected from the extended sampling campaign, source apportionment was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF). The resulting model features six factors either correlated to specific sources (meat cooking, car emissions/road dust, diesel exhaust) or types of compounds (phthalates, alkanes/alkanoic acids, PAHs). The high-time resolution data allowed for the observation of specific trends in each factor's behavior as a function of time and wind direction relative to the receptor site. Elemental carbon/organic carbon (EC/OC) data is used to calculate the percentages of primary and secondary organic aerosol. Primary organic aerosol (POA) constituted the vast majority of the total carbon at 91% (an average of 2.8 +/- 1.1mug/m 3); 30% of which came from combustion, and 70% from non-combustion sources. These results can be explained by the PIAMS data: the diesel factor contributes to the combustion-related POA; the car/road dust, meat cooking, and alkane/alkanoic acid factors contribute the majority of non-combustion POA. The remaining factors represent <5% of the remaining OC. Considering the compatibility of data from the EC/OC and PIAMS, the ability of PIAMS to yield molecular species information to further define the primary and secondary organic aerosol factions is a distinct advantage in describing the behavior of the Wilmington organic aerosol. PIAMS was also applied to laboratory experiments. These experiments simulated complex environmental processes in order to focus on answering a central question. By mixing cholesterol aerosol with ozone in a smog chamber, and monitoring the concentration of cholesterol with PIAMS, the rate of reaction was determined. This rate indicates that cholesterol aerosol, which is a suggested source tracer, will remain in the ambient air for a few days under norma

  17. Comparison of Fe(II) Photo-Formation Characteristics Between Aqueous Humic Acid Solutions and Aqueous Extracts of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Okada, K.; Arakaki, T.

    2007-12-01

    Photochemical cycles of Fe(III)-Fe(II) affects the oxidation and the reduction of transient species such as active oxygen species and various transition metals in the atmospheric condensed phases. Although the importance of organic ligands to iron cycling (e.g. ligand-to-metal charge transfer) is becoming clearer, the mechanism by which photochemical reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) are not well understood. Humic acid (HA) is considered as an important organic ligand for Fe(III) complexes in the environment. HA is a collection of organic compounds that exist in nature but whose structures are not well known. Commercially available HAs as received from the manufacturers contain trace amount of iron. Using this residual Fe, we investigated the photochemical formation of Fe(II) in aqueous HA solutions to elucidate the photochemical cycles of Fe(III)-Fe(II) in the atmospheric water drops. We purchased HAs from several different suppliers. We investigated the effects of pH and wavelengths on Fe(II) photo-formation using monochromatic radiations at 313, 334, 366, and 405 nm. Concentrations of photochemically formed Fe(II) were determined by ferrozine-HPLC technique, and the apparent quantum yields were determined based on the total absorbance of the HA solutions. Fe(II) photo-formation characteristics of the aqueous humic acid solutions purchased from different suppliers showed slightly different wavelength dependence. Furthermore, we compared Fe(II) photoformation characteristics observed in aqueous HA solutions with those in the aqueous extracts of atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan. The results showed that the apparent quantum yields of the aerosol extracts were 5-10 times higher than those of the HA solutions. Wavelength-dependence of Fe(II) photo-formation observed in the aqueous extracts of aerosols was similar to that seen in the aqueous HA solutions.

  18. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-30

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  19. Optical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol in Maritime Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Smirnov; Brent N. Holben; Yoram J. Kaufman; Oleg Dubovik; Thomas F. Eck; Ilya Slutsker; Christophe Pietras; Rangasayi N. Halthore

    2002-01-01

    Systematic characterization of aerosol over the oceans is needed to understand the aerosol effect on climate and on transport of pollutants between continents. Reported are the results of a comprehensive optical and physical characterization of ambient aerosol in five key island locations of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sun and sky radiometers, spanning over 2-5 yr. The results are

  20. Selenium Aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baltic Sea

    To determine the atmospheric concentrations and size distributions of particulate selenium (Se), aerosols were collected by air filtration and impactor sampling at the Kap Arkona coastal weather station on the Island of Rugen.Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis was used to determine Se and numerous other elements as well.The dependence of the Se concentration on the wind direction and the results

  1. Single-particle characterization of atmospheric aerosols collected at Gosan, Korea, during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment field campaign using low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong; Cheng, Fangqin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), namely low-Z (atomic number) particle EPMA, was used to characterize the chemical compositions of the individual aerosol particles collected at the Gosan supersite, Jeju Island, Korea, as a part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). On 4-10 April 2001 just before a severe dust storm arrived, seven sets of aerosol samples were obtained by a seven-stage May cascade impactor with a flow rate of 20 L/min. Overall 11,200 particles on stages 1-6 with cutoff diameters of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 microm, respectively, were examined and classified based on their secondary electron images and X-ray spectra. In general, sea salt particles were the most frequently encountered, followed by mineral dust, organic carbon (OC)-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, elemental carbon (EC)-like, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles. Sea salt and mineral dust particles had a higher relative abundance on stages 1-5, whereas OC-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles were relatively abundant on stage 6. The analysis on relative number abundances of various particle types combined with 72-hr backward air mass trajectories indicated that a lot of reacted sea salt and reacted mineral dust (with airborne NOx and SO2 or their acidic products) and OC-like particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Yellow Sea (for sample "10 April") and many NH4HSO4/ (NH4)2SO4-containing particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Sea of Japan and Korea Strait (for samples "4-9 April"). It was concluded that the atmosphere over Jeju Island was influenced by anthropogenic SO2 and NOx, organic compounds, and secondary aerosols when Asian dust was absent. PMID:22168102

  2. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chambers during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Y.; Karakurt Cevik, B.; Hernandez, C.; Griffin, R. J.; Taylor, N.; Matus, J.; Collins, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) represents a large portion of sub-micron particulate matter on a global scale. The composition of SOA and its formation processes are heavily influenced by anthropogenic and biogenic activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted naturally from forests or from human activity serve as precursors to SOA formation. Biogenic SOA (BSOA) is formed from biogenic VOCs and is prevalent in forested regions like the Southeastern United States. The formation and enhancement of BSOA under anthropogenic influences such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and oxygen radicals are still not well understood. The lack of information on anthropogenic BSOA enhancement and the reversibility of SOA formation could explain the underprediction of SOA in current models. To address some of these gaps in knowledge, this study was conducted as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL during the summer of 2013. SOA growth experiments were conducted in two Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) outdoor chambers located at the SEARCH site. Ambient trace gas concentrations were maintained in these chambers using semi-permeable gas-exchange membranes, while studying the growth of injected monodisperse seed aerosol. The control chamber was operated under ambient conditions; the relative humidity and oxidant and NOx levels were perturbed in the second chamber. This design allows experiments to capture the natural BSOA formation processes in the southeastern atmosphere and to study the influence of anthropogenic activity on aerosol chemistry. Chamber experiments were periodically monitored with physical and chemical instrumentation including a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA), and an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The CAGE experiments focused on SOA reversibility and the sensitivity of SOA reactions to oxidant or NOx enhancement and aerosol liquid water content. Available ambient trace gas concentrations include VOCs, NOx, SO2, ozone, peroxyaxyl nitrates, and ammonia. Chamber data will also be compared to ambient aerosol measurements collected by the instruments mentioned above as well as those from other research groups.

  3. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in order to identify the Fe species in aerosols. Fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (?-XRF) showed the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high mineral dust concentrations during spring in East Asia. However, this factor does not contribute to the amount of soluble Fe to a larger degree than the effect of Fe speciation, or more strictly speaking the presence of Fe(III) sulfate. Therefore, based on these results, the most significant factor influencing the amount of soluble Fe in the North Pacific region is the concentration of anthropogenic Fe species such as Fe(III) sulfate that can be emitted from megacities in Eastern Asia.

  4. Using microchip electrophoresis for real-time aerosol composition measurements: Field study results from San Gorgonio Wilderness, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Hecobian, A.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Henry, C. S.; Collett, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    The detrimental impacts of atmospheric aerosol on human and ecosystem health, visibility and climate change have been studied extensively. However, the role of aerosol composition in these issues still needs further investigation due to the variability of aerosol particles over both time and space. The need for better temporal and spatial resolution of aerosol composition measurements is addressed in the development of a real-time instrument using microchip capillary electrophoresis. Termed Aerosol microChip Electrophoresis (ACE), this lab-on-a-chip instrument is inexpensive to manufacture, portable and provides sensitive real-time and semi-continuous aerosol composition measurements. A water condensation growth tube is used to enlarge water soluble aerosol particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?m. The aqueous sample is continuously collected by impaction into a sample reservoir on a custom designed microchip. A rapid separation of select aerosol components is achieved using microchip capillary electrophoresis coupled with conductivity detection. Here we present data from a recent field campaign in the San Gorgonio Wilderness in south western California. This unique high elevation wilderness site located to the east of the heavily populated cities of San Bernardino and Los Angeles provides a contrast of both clean background and aged urban aerosol as dictated by the meteorological conditions at the site. Ambient aerosol particles were continuously collected at a flow rate of 0.7 L/min into a liquid sample with a volume of 16.7 ?L and then analyzed for sulfate, nitrate, chloride and oxalate every 48 seconds. When comparing the ambient concentrations with the meteorological conditions, the most notable trend was high nitrate and sulfate concentrations in ambient aerosol during upslope wind events, with values reaching as high as 34 and 5 ?g/m3, respectively. Comparison aerosol composition measurements from filter samples and a particle-into-liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC) are also presented. This study shows the effectiveness of the ACE instrument in increasing understanding of high temporal variability of ambient aerosol composition.

  5. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and the assumed viewing geometry of the instrument, the simulations suggest that the spectral and angular dependence of the reflectance measured by MISR is not sufficient to distinguish aerosol models with various different combinations of values ror dry composition. y and ambient RH. A similar behavior is observed for MODIS at visible wavelengths. However, the 2100 nm band of MODIS appears to be able to differentiate between at least some aerosol models with different aerosol hygroscopicity given the MODIS calibration error requirements. This result suggests the possibility of retrieval of aerosol hygroscopicity by MODIS.

  6. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the prelaunch estimated precision of the sensors and the assumed viewing geometry of the instrument, the simulations suggest that the spectral and angular dependence of the reflectance measured by MISR is not sufficient to distinguish aerosol models with various different combinations of values for dry composition, gamma and ambient RH. A similar behavior is observed for MODIS at visible wavelengths. However, the 2100 nm band of MODIS appears to be able to differentiate between at least same aerosol models with different aerosol hygroscopicity given the MODIS calibration error requirements. This result suggests the possibility of retrieval of aerosol hygroscopicity by MODIS.

  7. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and ketocarboxylic acids in the aerosols collected during ACE-Asia/C-130 aircraft campaign 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Mochida, M.; Uemoto, N.; Bertram, T.; Huebert, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the ACE-Asia campaign with C-130 aircraft, aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific, East China Sea, and Japan Sea, as well as over Japanese Islands and Korean Peninsula in 8 April to 3 May 2001. The filter samples (N=15) were extracted with organic-free pure water to separate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds. The extracts were reacted with 14% BF3 in n-butanol and the dibutyl esters and other derivatives were determined using a capillary GC and GC/MS. The results showed that 14 species of diacids (C2-C11) and 4 species of ketoacids (C2-C4) were detected in the aerosols over the East Asia. Total concentrations of the diacids were 113-500 (av. 330) ng/m3 whereas those of ketoacids were 43-260 (av. 103) ng/m3. The concentrations are equivalent to or more abundant than those reported for the urban Tokyo atmosphere in this season on the ground level. All the samples showed that oxalic acid (C2) is the most abundant diacid, which accounted for 58-83% of total diacids. These values are greater than that (ca. 50%) reported in the urban air near the ground, suggesting that oxalic acid is preferentially produced and/or longer diacids are selectively decomposed in the upper troposphere. Malonic (C3) acid is the second most abundant species followed by succinic (C4) acid. Longer diacids are less abundant, but azelaic (C9) acid is generally more abundant than C6-C8 diacids. Glyoxylic acid (C2) is the most abundant ketoacid followed by pyruvic acid. However, C3 and C4 omega-oxoacids were found as minor species. Although oxalic acid is the dominant component in the aerosols, few samples showed the predominance of glyoxylic acid over oxalic acid. This feature has not been reported for the urban aerosols collected near the ground level. We will discuss a potential photochemical production of water-soluble organic acids in the upper troposphere over the eastern ridge of the Asian continent.

  8. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  9. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  10. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  11. Using satellite aerosol retrievals to monitor surface particulate air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Chu, D.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Ångstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sunphotometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  12. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  13. Aerosol light scattering properties at Cape Grim, Tasmania, during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian M. Carrico; Mark J. Rood; John A. Ogren

    1998-01-01

    Large uncertainties remain in understanding the effects of ambient aerosols on climate. As part of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1, November 15 to December 15, 1995), the total light scattering and backscattering coefficients by particles (cysp and CYbsp) were measured at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Such measurements were made to characterize aerosol radiative forcing relevant to climate change at

  14. AMS Measurements in National Parks of Aerosol Mass, Size and Composition, Comparison with Filter Samples and Correlation with Particle Hygroscopicity and Optical Extinction Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M.; Taylor, N. F.; Collins, D. R.; Kumar, N.; Allen, J.; Newburn, M.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Zielinska, B.

    2011-12-01

    We report a comparison of results from aerosol studies at Great Smoky Mountain National Park (2006), Mt. Rainier National Park (2009) and Acadia National Park (2011), all class I visibility areas associated with IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) sites. This collaborative study was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and was done with the cooperation of the National Park Service and the EPA. The atmospheric aerosol composition in these sites is influenced by a number of anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources, providing a rich environment for fundamental aerosol studies. The primary purpose of these studies was to add state-of-the-art aerosol instrumentation to the standard light extinction and aerosol measurements at the site, used to determine parameters for the IMPROVE light extinction reconstruction equation, adopted by the EPA to estimate light extinction from atmospheric aerosol concentrations and Rayleigh scattering. The combination of these diverse measurements also provides significant insight into fundamental aerosol properties such as aging and radiative forcing. New instrumentation included a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne Q-AMS-Smoky Mountain Study), a high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS - Mt. Rainier and Acadia studies) for real time measurements that directly address the relationship between sulfate, nitrate, and OC size and concentration, which is related to cloud and dry gas-to-particle conversion as air masses age during transport, the relationship between WSOC hygroscopic growth and oxygenated organic (OOA) composition, the OCM/OC ratio, and the chemical composition that determines the ambient hygroscopic state. The OCM/OC ratio and organic water uptake was addressed with high-volume and medium volume PM2.5 aerosol samples. Aerosols were collected daily on Teflon coated glass fiber filters (TGFF) in four high-volume PM2.5 samplers operated by DRI. These measurements provide the fraction of total OC that is water-soluble. The ambient hydration state was determined by the Don Collins group in the field with an ambient state TDMA (AS-TDMA). Aerosols are classified at ambient RH with an ambient diameter of Da. The sample is then dried to <20%, typically below the crystallization point of most aerosols. The sample is alternately left dry or humidified to 85-95% RH. The dried (path 1) or humidified (path 2) sample is then conditioned back to the original ambient RH, attaining a diameter Df. Continuous measurement of the hydration state over the diurnal cycle will be used to assess the validity of the assumption that hygroscopic growth follows the metastable branch of the ammonium sulfate growth curve.

  15. Hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter extracted from biomass burning aerosols collected at a rural site in Tanzania, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Mkoma, Stelyus; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we present the hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter (WSM) extracted from biomass burning derived particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) aerosols collected at a rural background site in Tanzania during June-August 2011. Hygroscopic growth factors, g(RH), of WSM were measured by hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) with an initial dry particle diameter of 100 nm. We observed that the g(RH) of WSM at 90% relative humidity (RH), g(90%)WSM, ranged from 1.10 to 1.47 with an average of 1.25 ± 0.12. The H-TDMA retrieved hygroscopicity parameter of WSM, ?WSM, ranged from 0.04 to 0.24 with a mean of 0.11 ± 0.07. We found that the observed g(90%)WSM is positively correlated with PM2.5 mass fractions of K+ (R2 = 0.61), Cl- (0.54), and organic carbon (0.58). Moreover, it well correlates with levoglucosan (0.67) and total diacids (0.76), implying that although the inorganic fraction may be the most important factor to control the hygroscopicity; biomass burning organics play a significant role in the hygroscopicity of Tanzanian aerosols. The lower growth factors obtained over the sampling site are probably due to the formation of less water-soluble potassium oxalate (K2C2O4) or less hygroscopic K2SO4 particles during atmospheric aging. We observed a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.33) between PM2.5 mass fraction of WSOC and g(90%)WSM. The retrieved g(90%)WSOM values ranged from 1.0 to 1.25 with a mean of 1.16 ± 0.05. This study demonstrates that the hygroscopicity of Tanzanian aerosols is largely controlled by the emission of biomass burning products and the subsequent chemical aging during atmospheric transport.

  16. Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park: 2. Molecular composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A.; Newman, L.; Daum, P.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as aerosol from two sites located in Grand Canyon National Park during summer ambient conditions. Of special interest are molecular species which serve as tracers for possible sources of the observed aerosol organic matter. Ambient samples were collected from Hopi Point (rim site) and from Indian Gardens (in-canyon site) as fine (dp< 2.1 =B5m) and total particle samples. The samples were grouped into fine particle and total particle monthly composites to provide sufficient material for molecular marker analysis then analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GUMS), The molecular constituents of each aerosol composite were screened for key tracer compounds using a computerized data reduction method that was based on molecular ion fragment identification. Comparisons were made to a reference database that included molecular information obtained from authentic sources of primary organic aerosol emissions. Emission sources studied included vehicular exhaust, as well as local sources at the Grand Canyon which included soil dust, wood smoke, and particles from vegetation indigenous to the two Grand Canyon sampling sites. Our results show that summertime ambient aerosols contain many organic molecular compounds which can be related directly to the local vegetation. Another major component found in all samples consists of highly oxidized organic species which are not emitted directly from local primary organic aerosol source types. These oxidized species are thought to be secondary organic aerosols that originate from photochemical transformations involving either locally emitted primary organic compounds or transported aged emissions from source regions upwind of the Grand Canyon.

  17. Development of a capillary electrophoretic method for the analysis of low-molecular-weight amines from metal working fluid aerosols and ambient air.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Agnes; Frommberger, Moritz; Ping, Guichen; Lahaniatis, Majlinda R; Lintelman, Jutta; Fekete, Jeno; Gebefugi, Istvan; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kettrup, Antonius; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    A method for the determination of low-molecular-weight amines from indoor and ambient air was developed using a concentration device followed by CE coupled with indirect spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric detection that enables a reliable, rapid-response and easy-to-operate method. In indirect detection method, the selected amines were separated from interfering metal ions and amino alcohols present in the samples with an imidazole-based buffer with ethanol and EDTA as modifier. By replacing imidazole with ammonium, the final buffer was applicable for MS detection for the analytes with m/z higher than 50. A novel monolithic polymer material based on poly(methacrylate-acrylate) copolymer was developed for sampling short-chain amines from the gaseous phase. The selected analysis conditions were applied to quantify the selected short-chain amines with detection limits for the whole procedure determined between 1 and 2 microg/filter when 40 L air was sampled with 1 L/min velocity. Improved linearity and precision were obtained when the raw, time-scaled electropherogram data were transformed into mobility-scale applied for the determination of the performance characteristics of the methods. The applicability of the process of data transformation into the mobility scale was demonstrated by studying the matrix effect of water-miscible metal working fluid (stable water-oil emulsion) and of ambient air as real samples. CE-indirect UV and CE-MS, combined with the possibility of rapid air sampling, can be useful for the estimation of short-term exposure of the selected biogenic amines. PMID:16523461

  18. Lignin-derived phenols in Houston aerosols: implications for natural background sources.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Kabindra M; Louchouarn, Patrick; Griffin, Robert J

    2011-10-01

    Solvent-extractable monomeric methoxyphenols in aerosol samples conventionally have been used to indicate the influence of biomass combustion. In addition, the presence of lignin oxidation products (LOP), derived from the CuO oxidation of vascular plant organic matter, can help trace the source and inputs of primary biological particles in aerosols. Ambient aerosols (coarse and fine) collected in Houston during summer 2010 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize monomeric and polymeric sources of LOPs. This is the first time polymeric forms of the LOPs have been characterized in ambient aerosols. The absence or small concentrations of solvent-extractable monomeric LOPs and levoglucosan isomers point to the limited influence of biomass burning during the sampling period. The trace levels of anhydrosugar concentrations most likely result from long-range transport. This observation is supported by the absence of co-occurring lignin monomers that undergo photochemical degradation during transport. The larger concentration (142 ng m(-3)) of lignin polymers in coarse aerosols shows the relative importance of primary biological aerosol particles, even in the urban atmosphere. The LOP parameters suggest a predominant influence from woody tissue of angiosperms, with minor influence from soft tissues, gymnosperms, and soil organic matter. PMID:21877739

  19. In Situ Aerosol Optical Thickness Collected by the SIMBIOS Program (1997-2000): Protocols, and and Data QC and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; Barnes, Robert; McClain, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project Office activities on in situ aerosol optical thickness (i.e., protocols, and data QC and analysis). This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  20. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  1. Characterization of individual submicrometer aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea, by quantitative transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hong; Kang, Sujin; Jung, Hae-Jin; ChoëL, Marie; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-08-01

    For the last decade the Monte Carlo calculation method has been proven to be an excellent tool for accurately simulating electron-solid interactions in atmospheric individual particles of micrometer size. Although it was designed for application to scanning electron microscopy, in the present study it is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo calculation can also be applied in a quantitative single particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an ultrathin window energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer with a high accelerating voltage (200 kV). By utilizing an iterative reverse Monte Carlo simulation combined with successive approximation, atomic elemental concentrations (including low-Z elements) of submicrometer standard particles were determined with high accuracy for electron beam refractory particles such as NaCl, KCl, SiO2, Fe2O3, Na2SO4, K2SO4, CaCO3, and CaSO4. On the basis of quantitative X-ray analysis together with morphological information from TEM images, overall 1638 submicrometer individual particles from 10 sets of aerosol samples collected in Incheon, Korea, were identified. The most frequently encountered particle types are carbonaceous and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles, followed by mineral (e.g., aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3), sea salt, K-rich (e.g., K2SO4 and KCl), Fe-rich, fly ash, and transition or heavy-metal-containing (e.g., ZnSO4, ZnCl2, PbSO4) particles. The relative abundances of the submicrometer particle types vary among samples collected in different seasons and also depend on different air mass transport routes. This study demonstrates that the quantitative TEM-EDX individual particle analysis is a useful and reliable technique in characterizing urban submicrometer aerosol particles.

  2. The effect of nonideal cascade impactor stage collection efficiency curves on the interpretation of the size of inhaler-generated aerosols.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D L; Mitchell, J P

    2013-06-01

    Cascade impactors, operating on the principle of inertial size separation in (ideally) laminar flow, are used to determine aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) of orally inhaled product (OIP) aerosols because aerodynamic diameter can be related to respiratory tract deposition. Each stage is assumed typically to be an ideal size fractionator. Thus, all particles larger than a certain size are considered collected and all finer particles are treated as penetrating to the next stage (a step function stage efficiency curve). In reality, the collection efficiency of a stage smoothly increases with particle size as an "S-shaped" curve, from approximately 0% to 100%. Consequently, in some cases substantial overlap occurs between neighboring stages. The potential for bias associated with the step-function assumption has been explored, taking full resolution and two-stage abbreviated forms of the Andersen eight-stage nonviable impactor (ACI) and the next-generation pharmaceutical impactor (NGI) as example apparatuses. The behavior of unimodal, log-normal APSDs typical of OIP-generated aerosols has been investigated, comparing known input values to calculated values of central tendency (mass median aerodynamic diameter) and spread (geometric standard deviation, GSD). These calculations show that the error introduced by the step change assumption is larger for the ACI than for the NGI. However, the error is sufficiently small to be inconsequential unless the APSD in nearly monodisperse (GSD ?1.2), a condition that is unlikely to occur with realistic OIPs. Account may need to be taken of this source of bias only for the most accurate work with abbreviated ACI systems. PMID:23508617

  3. Microwave-assisted Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Petroleum Refining Catalysts and Ambient Fine Aerosols Prior to Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of a certified reference material, a robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5). High temperature (200 C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO3, HF, and H3BO3) with 20 minute dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst, and PM2.5. This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb, and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using 115In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu, and Dy in ambient PM2.5 in an industrial area of Houston, TX.

  4. Microwave-assisted extraction of rare earth elements from petroleum refining catalysts and ambient fine aerosols prior to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman; Mittlefehldt, David W

    2007-01-01

    A robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)). High temperature (200 degrees C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO(3), HF and H(3)BO(3)) with 20 min dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst and PM(2.5). This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using (115)In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu and Dy in ambient PM(2.5) in an industrial area of Houston, TX. PMID:17386451

  5. Characterization of Ambient Aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 Campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Part II: Overview of the Results at the CENICA Supersite and Comparison to Previous Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Salcedo, D.; Dzepina, K.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.; Johnson, Kirsten S.; Zuberi, Bilal M.; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, YuLong; Jimenez, J. L.

    2005-06-28

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study from March 29-May 4, 2003. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 ?m (NR PM1) with high time and size resolution. Measurements of Black Carbon (BC) using an aethalometer, and estimated soil concentrations from Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis of impactor substrates are also presented and combined with the AMS in order to include refractory material and estimate the total PM??? mass concentration at CENICA during this campaign. In Mexico City, the organic fraction of the estimated PM??? at CENICA represents 55% of the mass, with the rest consisting of inorganic (mainly ammonium nitrate and sulfate/ammonium salts) compounds, BC, and soil. Inorganic compounds represents 27.5% of PM???; BC mass concentration is equivalent to about 11%; while soil represents about 7%. The NR species and BC have diurnal cycles that can be qualitatively interpreted as the interplay of direct emissions, photochemical production in the atmosphere followed by condensation and gas-to-particle partitioning, boundary layer dynamics, and/or advection. Bi and trimodal size distributions are observed, with a small primary organic combustion (likely traffic) particle mode and an accumulation mode that contains mainly organic and secondary inorganic compounds. The AMS and BC mass concentrations, size distributions, and diurnal cycles are found to be qualitatively similar to those from other field measurements in Mexico City.

  6. Chemical characterization of individual particles and residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals collected on board research aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Glen, A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    Ambient particles and the dry residuals of mixed-phase cloud droplets and ice crystals were collected during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) near Barrow, Alaska, in spring of 2008. The collected particles were analyzed using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to identify physico-chemical properties that differentiate cloud-nucleating particles from the total aerosol population. A wide range of individually mixed components was identified in the ambient particles and residuals including organic carbon compounds, inorganics, carbonates, and black carbon. Our results show that cloud droplet residuals differ from the ambient particles in both size and composition, suggesting that both properties may impact the cloud-nucleating ability of aerosols in mixed-phase clouds. The percentage of residual particles which contained carbonates (47%) was almost four times higher than those in ambient samples. Residual populations were also enhanced in sea salt and black carbon and reduced in organic compounds relative to the ambient particles. Further, our measurements suggest that chemical processing of aerosols may improve their cloud-nucleating ability. Comparison of results for various time periods within ISDAC suggests that the number and composition of cloud-nucleating particles over Alaska can be influenced by episodic events bringing aerosols from both the local vicinity and as far away as Siberia.

  7. Updated study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element data collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project, October 2009-March 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater samples have been collected in California as part of statewide investigations of groundwater quality conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP is being conducted in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Quality-control samples (source-solution blanks, equipment blanks, and field blanks) were collected in order to ensure the quality of the groundwater sample results. Olsen and others (2010) previously determined study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element results based primarily on field blanks collected in California from May 2004 through January 2008. SRLs are raised reporting levels used to reduce the likelihood of reporting false detections attributable to contamination bias. The purpose of this report is to identify any changes in the frequency and concentrations of detections in field blanks since the last evaluation and update the SRLs for more recent data accordingly. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), strontium (Sr), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Data from 179 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from March 2006 through March 2013 by the GAMA-PBP indicated that for trace elements that had a change in detection frequency and concentration since the previous review, the shift occurred near October 2009, in conjunction with a change in the capsule filters used by the study. Results for 89 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from October 2009 through March 2013 were evaluated for potential contamination bias by using the same approach developed by Olsen and others (2010). Some data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program for the Southern California Coastal Drainages study unit were included to supplement the GAMA-PBP data. The detection frequency and upper threshold of potential contamination bias (BD-90/90) were determined from field-blank and equipment-blank data for each trace element. The BD-90/90 is the 90th percentile concentration of potential extrinsic contamination calculated by using the binomial probability distribution for greater than 90 percent confidence. Additionally, data from laboratory blanks and blind blanks analyzed by the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) during water years 2010 through 2013, and compiled by the USGS Branch of Quality Systems (BQS), were considered for each trace element. These results were compared to each constituent’s reporting level to determine whether an SRL was necessary to minimize the potential for detections in the groundwater samples, attributed principally to contamination bias. Results of the evaluation were used to set SRLs for trace-element data for about 1,135 samples of groundwater collected by the GAMA-PBP between October 2009 and March 2013. Ten trace elements analyzed (Sb, As, Be, B, Cd, Li, Se, Ag, Tl, and U) had blank results that did not necessitate establishing SRLs during this review or the review by Olsen and others (2010). Five trace elements analyzed (Al, Ba, Cr, Sr, and V) had blank results that necessitated establishing an SRL during the previous review but did not need an SRL starting October 2009. One trace element (Fe) had field and laboratory-blank results that necessitated keeping the previous SRL (6 micrograms per liter [?g/L]). Two trace elements (Ni and W) had quality-control results that warranted decreasing the previous SRL, and five trace elements (Cu, Pb, Mn, Mo, and Zn) had field, laboratory, or blind blank results that warranted establishing an SRL for the first time or increasing the previous SRL. SRLs fo

  8. Aerosol emissions near a coal gasification plant in the Kosovo region, Yugoslavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boueres, Luis Carlos S.; Patterson, Ronald K.

    1981-03-01

    Ambient aerosol samples from the region of Kosovo, Yugoslavia, were collected and analyzed for their elemental composition in order to determine the effect on ambient air quality of Lurgi coal gasification carried out there using low BTU lignite. Low-volume aerosol samples were used to collect air particulate matter during May of 1979. These samplers were deployed at five sites near the Kosovo industrial complex which is comprised of coal gasifier, a coal-fired power plant and a fertilizer plant which uses the waste products from the gasifier and power plant. A total of 126 impactor sets and 10 week-long "streaker" filters were analyzed by PIXE at FSU for 16-18 elements providing a data base of approximately 16 000 elemental concentrations. Preliminary results are reported here with emphasis on the following elements: Si, S, Ca, Fe, Zn and Pb.

  9. Thermal relaxation and collective dynamics of interacting aerosol-generated hexagonal NiFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortega, D; Kuznetsov, M V; Morozov, Yu G; Belousova, O V; Parkin, I P

    2013-12-28

    This article reports on the magnetic properties of interacting uncoated nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles synthesized through an aerosol levitation-jet technique. A comprehensive set of samples with different compositions of background gas and metal precursors, as well as applied electric field intensities, has been studied. Nanoparticles prepared under a field of 210 kV m(-1) show moderately high-field irreversibility and shifted hysteresis loops after field-cooling, also exhibiting a joint temperature decrease of the exchange field and coercivity. The appearance of memory effects has been checked using the genuine ZFC protocol and the observed behavior cannot be fully explained in terms of thermal relaxation. Although dipolar interactions prevail, exchange interactions occur to a certain extent within a narrow range of applied fields. The origin of the slow dynamics in the system is found to be given by the interplay of the distribution of energy barriers due to size dispersion and the cooperative dynamics associated with frustrated interactions. PMID:24196451

  10. Cooling the NGI - an approach to size a nebulised aerosol more accurately.

    PubMed

    Dennis, J; Berg, E; Sandell, D; Ali, A; Lamb, P; Tservistas, M; Karlsson, M; Mitchell, J

    2008-02-01

    The European Pharmaceutical Aerosol Group (EPAG) has undertaken investigations with the aim of developing robust methods for the droplet size analysis of nebuliser-produced aerosols in support of the proposed European Pharmacopeia general chapter 2.9.44 covering preparations for nebulisation. A multi-centre study was designed to investigate the effects of cooling the Next Generation pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) before sample collection, as a means of reducing bias and variability caused by heat transfer-related evaporation. Droplets containing salbutamol were sized from 3 different nebulisers chosen to offer fundamentally different modes of aerosol generation: AeroNeb Go, a vibrating mesh nebuliser; PARI LC Plus, a breath-enhanced jet nebuliser; and MistyMax, a constant-output jet nebuliser. Each laboratory undertook determinations at ambient temperature, using an NGI pre-cooled in a refrigerator (5 degrees C for at least 90 min). The corresponding measurements were made using an ambient NGI as a benchmark. Salbutamol solution 5 mg/2 ml (Teva, Runcorn, UK) was used throughout the study. Analysis of individual and pooled results from 5 of the participants showed a similar trend insofar as the cooled NGI yielded a coarser nebulised aerosol than that obtained by the ambient NGI. Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) was on average reduced by 9.5-21.9 % and the Fine Droplet Fraction < 5 microm (FDF) increased on average by 5.5-17.4 % for all the nebuliser designs when comparing ambient to cooled NGI. Despite the more laborious procedure of cooling the NGI, variability in data was generally similar to that obtained with the ambient NGI. We conclude that it is beneficial to cool the NGI when sizing nebulised aerosol. Furthermore, occasional findings during this study revealed a build-up of solute deposits within the interior of the NGI, and a more rigorous impactor cleaning/drying procedure is therefore recommended. PMID:18430404

  11. Review of Trace-Element Field-Blank Data Collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program, May 2004-January 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Trace-element quality-control samples (for example, source-solution blanks, field blanks, and field replicates) were collected as part of a statewide investigation of groundwater quality in California, known as the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Trace-element field blanks were collected to evaluate potential bias in the corresponding environmental data. Bias in the environmental data could result from contamination in the field during sample collection, from the groundwater coming into contact with contaminants on equipment surfaces or from other sources, or from processing, shipping, or analyzing the samples. Bias affects the interpretation of environmental data, particularly if any constituents are present solely as a result of extrinsic contamination that would have otherwise been absent from the groundwater that was sampled. Field blanks were collected, analyzed, and reviewed to identify and quantify extrinsic contamination bias. Data derived from source-solution blanks and laboratory quality-control samples also were considered in evaluating potential contamination bias. Eighty-six field-blank samples collected from May 2004 to January 2008 were analyzed for the concentrations of 25 trace elements. Results from these field blanks were used to interpret the data for the 816 samples of untreated groundwater collected over the same period. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), strontium (Sr), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). The detection frequency and the 90th percentile concentration at greater than 90 percent confidence were determined from the field-blank data for each trace element, and these results were compared to each constituent's long-term method detection level (LT-MDL) to determine whether a study reporting level (SRL) was necessary to ensure that no more than 10 percent of the detections in groundwater samples could be attributed solely to contamination bias. Only two of the trace elements analyzed, Li and Se, had zero detections in the 86 field blanks. Ten other trace elements (Sb, As, Be, B, Cd, Co, Mo, Ag, Tl, and U) were detected in fewer than 5 percent of the field blanks. The field-blank results for these constituents did not necessitate establishing SRLs. Of the 13 constituents that were detected in more than 5 percent of the field blanks, six (Al, Ba, Cr, Mn, Hg, and V) had field-blank results that indicated a need for SRLs that were at or below the highest laboratory reporting levels (LRL) used during the sampling period; these SRLs were needed for concentrations between the LT-MDLs and LRLs. The other seven constituents with detection frequencies above 5 percent (Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, Sr, W, and Zn) had field-blank results that necessitated SRLs greater than the highest LRLs used during the study period. SRLs for these seven constituents, each set at the 90th percentile of their concentrations in the field blanks, were at least an order of magnitude below the regulatory thresholds established for drinking water for health or aesthetic purposes; therefore, reporting values below the SRLs as less than or equal to (=) the measured value would not prevent the identification of values greater than the drinking-water thresholds. The SRLs and drinking-water thresholds, respectively, for these 7 trace elements are Cu (1.7 ?g/L and 1,300

  12. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data. PMID:16398350

  13. Ambient air quality during wheat and rice crop stubble burning episodes in Patiala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Susheel K.; Singh, Nirankar; Agarwal, Ravinder; Awasthi, Amit; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    Open crop stubble burning events were observed in and around Patiala city, India. A ground level study was deliberated to analyze the contribution of wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and rice ( Oriza sativa) crop stubble burning practices on concentration levels of aerosol, SO 2 and NO 2 in ambient air at five different sites in and around Patiala city covering agricultural, commercial and residential areas. Aerosols were collected on GMF/A and QMF/A (Whatman) sheets for a 24 h period throughout the year in 2007. Simultaneously, sampling of SO 2 and NO 2 was conducted and results obtained during stubble burning periods were compared to the non-stubble burning periods. Results clearly pointed out a distinct increase in aerosol, SO 2 and NO 2 levels during the crop stubble burning periods.

  14. Identification of source contributions to visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H.; Salmon, L.G.; Winner, D.A.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science

    1993-06-01

    Sulfates and carbonaceous aerosols are the largest contributors to the fine particle burden in the atmosphere near Grand Canyon National Park. While the effects of sulfate particles on visibility at the Grand Canyon has been extensively studied, much less is known about the nature and origin of the carbonaceous aerosols that are present. This disparity in understanding arises from at least two causes: aerosol carbon data for the region are less plentiful and many of the sources that could contribute to that organic aerosol are both diverse and not well characterized. The objective of this present study is to examine the origin of the carbonaceous aerosol at Grand Canyon National Park during the summer season based on molecular tracer techniques applied to source and ambient samples collected specifically for this purpose.

  15. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with size-segregated atmospheric aerosols in Massachusetts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan O. Allen; Nameeta M. Dookeran; Kenneth A. Smith; Adel F. Sarofim; Koli Taghizadeh; Arthur L. Lafleur

    1996-01-01

    Size-segregated atmospheric aerosols were collected from urban and rural locations in Massachusetts using a micro-orifice impactor. The samples were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with molecular weight between 178 and 302, using gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry. Fifteen PAH were quantified in the urban samples and nine in the rural samples. The quantification results are in good agreement with available ambient

  16. Ergosterol, arabitol and manitol as tracers for biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Burshtein, N.; Lang-Yona, N.

    2010-12-01

    Airborne fungi can cause a wide array of adverse responses in humans depending on the type and quantity present. Since dose and human response is highly individual, the sensitivity of a person exposed is also an important consideration. The abundance of bioaerosols in the ambient air and their health impacts depend on the season and on the environmental conditions. In order to quantify and identify fungi bioaerosols’ contribution to atmospheric aerosols and the impact to public health, it has been suggested to use chemicals that are typical of bioaerosols as biomarkers in chemical analysis of collected aerosols. An often used biomarker for determining the fungal biomass is ergosterol. Recently, Bauer et al. (2008) found that mannitol and arabitol concentrations are correlated with the fungal spore counts in atmospheric PM10. In this study, ergosterol, arabitol and mannitol were quantified in ambient aerosols collected in the Eastern Mediterranean region for 12 months in order to understand their annual and seasonal behavior and to test whether arabitol and mannitol are good predictors of fungi. Finally, correlations between ergosterol abundances with inorganic ions, humidity, temperature, and synoptic data in order to identify dominant sources of fungal spores were also studied. We will report on the measurements and the observed correlations between the different tracers.

  17. The Juelich large Aerosol Chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Th. Mentel; A. Wahner; M. Folkers

    2003-01-01

    The large Aerosol Chamber is designed for the investigation of nighttime atmospheric chemistry. The Aerosol Chamber is a dark chamber and is operated at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. It is constructed as a double wall system: a fully welded aluminum box (7m x 7m x 5.3m) and an equally sized fully heat sealed Teflon bag hanging from the ceiling.

  18. Effect of particle loading on the collection performance of an electret cabin air filter for submicron aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Ji; G. N. Bae; S. H. Kang; J. Hwang

    2003-01-01

    Electret filters are composed of permanently charged electret fibers and are widely used in applications requiring high collection efficiency and low-pressure drop. We tested electret filter media used in manufacturing cabin air filters by applying two different charging states to the test particles. These charging states were achieved by spray electrification through the atomization process and by bipolar ionization with

  19. Radioactive Aerosols as an Index of Air Pollution in the City of Thessaloniki, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Ioannidou, A.; Papastefanou, C. [Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particle Physics Division, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2010-01-21

    This study summarizes results of an investigation done in order to find out how the radioactive aerosols of {sup 7}Be could serve as indicators of air pollution conditions. Beryllium-7 is a cosmic-ray produced radionuclide with an important fraction of its production to take place in the upper troposphere. Once it is formed is rapidly associated with submicron aerosol particles and participates in the formation and growth of the accumulation mode aerosols, which is a major reservoir of pollutants in the atmosphere. In order to define any influence of AMAD of {sup 7}Be aerosols by air pollution conditions, the aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols was determined by collecting samples at different locations in the suburban area of the city of Thessaloniki, including rural areas, industrial areas, high elevations, marine environment and the airport area. The aerodynamic size distribution of {sup 7}Be aerosols in different locations was obtained by using Andersen 1-ACFM cascade impactors and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) was determined. Some dependency of the AMADs on height has been observed, while in near marine environment the {sup 7}Be activity size distribution was dominant in the upper size range of aerosol particles. Low AMADs as low as 0.62 to 0.74 {mu}m of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at locations characterized with relative low pollution, while it is concluded that in the activity size distribution of ambient aerosols, {sup 7}Be changes to larger particle sizes in the presence of pollutants, since low AMADs of {sup 7}Be aerosols have been observed at low polluted locations. Preliminary data of simultaneous measurements of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 212}Pb with gaseous air pollutants CO, NO, NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and total suspended particulate matter (TSP) show that radon decay products near the ground could be a useful index of air pollution potential conditions and transport processes in the boundary layer.

  20. Eect of particle loading on the collection performance of an electret cabin air %lter for submicron aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Ji; G. N. Bae; S. H. Kanga; J. Hwang

    Electret %lters are composed of permanently charged electret %bers and are widely used in applications requiring high collection e4ciency and low-pressure drop. We tested electret %lter media used in manufactur- ing cabin air %lters by applying two dierent charging states to the test particles. These charging states were achieved by spray electri%cation through the atomization process and by bipolar ionization

  1. Atmospheric aerosol measurement problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The present knowledge of the atmospheric aerosols is summarized briefly with respect to geographical distribution, time variations, optical properties, chemical nature, and natural and artificial sources. The measurement techniques for determining aerosol properties are summarized with the limitations and results from each. The problems resulting from variations in refractive index, shape, composition, volatile constituents, relative humidity and time from collection until measurement are described. Needed measurements on atmospheric aerosols are outlined with some of the latest methods for obtaining them, including the needs and goals of some world-wide programs.

  2. Apportionment of Primary and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California During the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside (SOAR-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient sampling was conducted in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside to characterize the composition and sources of organic aerosol using a variety of state-of-the-art instrumentation and source apportionment techniques....

  3. A New Aerosol Device for Bronchial Provocation Tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heinrich Matthys; Martin Knoch; Reinhard Eltschka

    1993-01-01

    A special new device for diagnostic (bronchoprovocation) and therapeutic aerosol application is described. It consists of a high quality nebulizer system combined with a 10-liter storage bag which serves as an aerosol ‘conditioner’ (saturated ambient temperature and pressure conditions) and as a holding chamber to increase the respirable aerosol fraction and hence pulmonary deposition (Pari Provocation Test I). It allows

  4. Aerosol composition and source apportionment in Santiago de Chile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Artaxo; Pedro Oyola; Roberto Martinez

    1999-01-01

    Santiago de Chile, São Paulo and Mexico City are Latin American urban areas that suffer from heavy air pollution. In order to study air pollution in Santiago area, an aerosol source apportionment study was designed to measure ambient aerosol composition and size distribution for two downtown sampling sites in Santiago. The aerosol monitoring stations were operated in Gotuzo and Las

  5. Aerosolized avian influenza virus by laboratory manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Avian H5N1 influenza viruses present a challenge in the laboratory environment, as they are difficult to collect from the air due to their small size and relatively low concentration. In an effort to generate effective methods of H5N1 air removal and ensure the safety of laboratory personnel, this study was designed to investigate the characteristics of aerosolized H5N1 produced by laboratory manipulations during research studies. Results Normal laboratory procedures used to process the influenza virus were carried out independently and the amount of virus polluting the on-site atmosphere was measured. In particular, zootomy, grinding, centrifugation, pipetting, magnetic stirring, egg inoculation, and experimental zoogenetic infection were performed. In addition, common accidents associated with each process were simulated, including breaking glass containers, syringe injection of influenza virus solution, and rupturing of centrifuge tubes. A micro-cluster sampling ambient air pollution collection device was used to collect air samples. The collected viruses were tested for activity by measuring their ability to induce hemagglutination with chicken red blood cells and to propagate in chicken embryos after direct inoculation, the latter being detected by reverse-transcription PCR and HA test. The results showed that the air samples from the normal centrifugal group and the negative-control group were negative, while all other groups were positive for H5N1. Conclusions Our findings suggest that there are numerous sources of aerosols in laboratory operations involving H5N1. Thus, laboratory personnel should be aware of the exposure risk that accompanies routine procedures involved in H5N1 processing and take proactive measures to prevent accidental infection and decrease the risk of virus aerosol leakage beyond the laboratory. PMID:22866888

  6. A method for sizing submicrometer particles in air collected on Formvar films and imaged by scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher-Barth, E.; Jansson, K.; Leck, C.

    2013-12-01

    A method was developed to systematically investigate individual aerosol particles collected onto a polyvinyl formal (Formvar)-coated copper grid with scanning electron microscopy. At very mild conditions with a low accelerating voltage of 2 kV and Gentle Beam mode aerosol particles down to 20 nm in diameter can be observed. Subsequent processing of the images with digital image analysis provides size resolved and morphological information (elongation, circularity) on the aerosol particle population. Polystyrene nanospheres in the expected size range of the ambient aerosol particles (20-900 nm in diameter) were used to confirm the accuracy of sizing and determination of morphological parameters. The relative standard deviation of the diameters of the spheres was better than ±10% for sizes larger than 40 nm and ±18% for 21 nm particles compared to the manufacturer's certificate. Atmospheric particles were collected during an icebreaker expedition to the high Arctic (north of 80°) in the summer of 2008. Two samples collected during two different meteorological regimes were analyzed. Their size distributions were compared with simultaneously collected size distributions from a Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, which confirmed that a representative fraction of the aerosol particles was imaged under the electron microscope. The size distributions obtained by scanning electron microscopy showed good agreement with the Twin Differential Mobility Sizer in the Aitken mode, whereas in the accumulation mode the size determination was critically dependent on the contrast of the aerosol with the Formvar-coated copper grid. The morphological properties (elongation, circularity) changed with the number of days the air masses spent over the pack-ice area north of 80° before the aerosol particles were collected at the position of the icebreaker and are thus an appropriate measure to characterize transformation processes of ambient aerosol particles.

  7. Studies of organic aerosol and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hanh To

    Atmospheric aerosols can influence society and the environment in many ways including altering the planet's energy budget, the hydrologic cycle, and public health. However, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates that the anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with aerosol effects on clouds has the highest uncertainty in the future climate predictions. This thesis focuses on the nature of the organic fraction of ambient particles and how particles interact with clouds using a combination of tools including aircraft and ground measurements, models, and satellite data. Fine aerosol particles typically contain between 20 - 90% organic matter by mass and a major component of this fraction includes water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Consequently, water-soluble organic species can strongly influence aerosol water-uptake and optical properties. However, the chemical composition of this fraction is not well-understood. PILS-TOC was used to characterize WSOC in ambient aerosol in Los Angeles, California. The spatial distribution of WSOC was found to be influenced by (i) a wide range of aerosol sources within this urban metropolitan area, (ii) transport of pollutants by the characteristic daytime sea breeze trajectory, (iii) topography, and (iv) secondary production during transport. Meteorology is linked with the strength of many of these various processes. Many methods and instruments have been used to study aerosol-cloud interactions. Each observational platform is characterized by different temporal/spatial resolutions and operational principles, and thus there are disagreements between different studies for the magnitude of mathematical constructs used to represent the strength of aerosol-cloud interactions. This work points to the sensitivity of the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interactions to cloud lifetime and spatial resolution of measurements and model simulations. Failure to account for above-cloud aerosol layers and wet scavenging are also shown to cause biases in the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interaction metrics. Air mass source origin and meteorology are also shown to be important factors that influence aerosol-cloud interactions. The results from this work contribute towards a better understanding of atmospheric aerosols and are meant to improve parameterizations that can be embedded in models that treat aerosol affects on clouds, precipitation, air quality, and public health.

  8. AEROSOL SAMPLING INLETS AND INHALABLE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem of sampling aerosols from the ambient atmosphere has been considered from a theoretical point of view. Following a review of the various samplers and inlets used in ambient sampling, the factors contributing to high sampling efficiency for large particles are discusse...

  9. Image processing method to adjust the ELPI distribution: application to the measurement of aerosol density emitted

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in many fields, e.g. particles emitted from diesel engines, ambient aerosols or other aerosols from with an electron microscope, and finally, processing tools were applied: pretreatment (noise and contrast

  10. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  11. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  12. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. R. Oberbeck; N. H. Farlow; K. G. Snetsinger; G. V. Ferry; W. Fong; D. M. Hayes

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  13. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Dreyfus

    2008-01-01

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this

  15. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  16. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center)

    1990-10-01

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m{sup {minus}1} (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC).

  17. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol (MBO) Photooxidation: Evidence for Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake of Epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Zhang, H.; Worton, D. R.; Lewandowski, M.; Ortega, J.; Zhang, Z.; Lin, Y.; Park, J.; Kristensen, K.; Bhathela, N.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jaoui, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Gilman, J. B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Park, C.; Schade, G. W.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Karl, T.; Glasius, M.; Gold, A.; Seinfeld, J.; Guenther, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) is an important biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted by pine trees and a potential precursor of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in forested regions. In the present study, hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of MBO was examined in smog chambers under varied aerosol acidity levels. Results indicate SOA was enhanced with increasing aerosol acidity especially under low-NO conditions. Chemical characterization of laboratory-generated MBO SOA reveals that an organosulfate species (C5H12O6S, MW 200) formed and was substantially enhanced with elevated aerosol acidity. This organosulfate species was also observed and correlated with aerosol acidity from ambient fine aerosol (PM2.5) samples that were collected from different field campaigns where MBO emissions are important, demonstrating that it is a molecular tracer for MBO-initiated SOA in the atmosphere. Importantly, this compound can account for as high as 1% of the total organic aerosol mass in the atmosphere. It is hypothesized that MBO epoxide generated under low-NO conditions is the precursor to MBO SOA based upon the above results. Thus, the MBO epoxide was synthesized in high purity to investigate its potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies. Our results suggest the MBO epoxide substantially forms SOA only in the presence of acidic seed aerosols. The chemical characterization results of the SOA constituents are consistent with field measurements in terms of the major SOA tracers.

  18. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Analysis of Tropospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kristen J.

    An integrated sampling and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) cell has been designed for whole-sample analysis of organic compounds on tropospheric aerosol particles. The low-volume extraction cell has been interfaced with a sampling manifold for aerosol particle collection in the field. After sample collection, the entire SFE cell was coupled to a gas chromatograph; after on-line extraction, the cryogenically -focused sample was separated and the volatile compounds detected with either a mass spectrometer or a flame ionization detector. A 20-minute extraction at 450 atm and 90 ^circC with pure supercritical CO _2 is sufficient for quantitative extraction of most volatile compounds in aerosol particle samples. A comparison between SFE and thermal desorption, the traditional whole-sample technique for analyses of this type, was performed using ambient aerosol particle samples, as well as samples containing known amounts of standard analytes. The results of these studies indicate that SFE of atmospheric aerosol particles provides quantitative measurement of several classes of organic compounds. SFE provides information that is complementary to that gained by the thermal desorption analysis. The results also indicate that SFE with CO _2 can be validated as an alternative to thermal desorption for quantitative recovery of several organic compounds. In 1989, the organic constituents of atmospheric aerosol particles collected at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, along with various physical and meteorological data, were measured during a collaborative field study. Temporal changes in the composition of samples collected during summertime at the rural site were studied. Thermal desorption-GC/FID was used to quantify selected compounds in samples collected during the field study. The statistical analysis of the 1989 Niwot Ridge data set is presented in this work. Principal component analysis was performed on thirty-one variables selected from the data set in order to ascertain different source and process components, and to examine concentration changes in groups of variables with respect to time of day and meteorological conditions. Seven orthogonal groups of variables resulted from the statistical analysis; the groups serve as molecular markers for different biologic and anthropogenic emission sources. In addition, the results of the statistical analysis were used to investigate how several emission source contributions vary with respect to local atmospheric dynamics. Field studies were conducted in the urban environment in and around Boulder, CO. to characterize the dynamics, chemistry, and emission sources which affect the composition and concentration of different size-fractions of aerosol particles in the Boulder air mass. Relationships between different size fractions of particles and some gas-phase pollutants were elucidated. These field studies included an investigation of seasonal variations in the organic content and concentration of aerosol particles, and how these characteristics are related to local meteorology and to the concentration of some gas-phase pollutants. The elemental and organic composition of aerosol particles was investigated according to particle size in preliminary studies of size-differentiated samples of aerosol particles. In order to aid in future studies of urban aerosol particles, samples were collected at a forest fire near Boulder. Molecular markers specific to wood burning processes will be useful indicators of residential wood burning activities in future field studies.

  19. Determination of 40K, 232Th and 238U activity concentrations in ambient PM2.5 aerosols and the associated inhalation effective dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Aburas, Hani M; Abdulsalam, Mohammed I

    2014-03-01

    Natural radioactivity of soil samples has been studied in many countries of the Arabian Peninsula, including Saudi Arabia. Radiological indices based on soil radioactivity have been widely used in these studies. However, there are no available data about natural radioactivity of fine aerosol particles in such countries. The objective of this study is to determine the activity concentrations of (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U in airborne PM2.5 and the associated internal inhalation radiation dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. Twenty-four air samples in four locations throughout Jeddah were collected and analyzed for PM2.5 and the associated K, Th and U. The activity concentrations of the isotopes (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were calculated. High atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations (mean: 50.81 ± 34.02 ?g/m(3)) were found. The natural radioactivity associated with PM2.5 due to the isotopes (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were 301.8 ± 76.1, 11.8 ± 4.2 and 10.8 ± 3.4 Bq/kg, respectively, and the Raeq was calculated as 44.9 ± 14.0 Bq/kg. The inhalation annual effective radiation dose to the public due to natural isotopes of the airborne PM2.5 was in the range 15.03-58.87 nSv/year, depending on the age group. Although these dose values were associated with the PM2.5 fraction only, they were higher than the world references values in air reported in the UNSCEAR, 2000 report. PMID:24462924

  20. Mobile Ambients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Cardelli; Andrew D. Gordon

    1998-01-01

    There are two distinct areas of work in mobility: mobile computing, concerning computation that is carried out in mobile devices (laptops, personal digital assistants, etc.), and mobile computation, concerning mobile code that moves between devices (applets, agents, etc.). We aim to describe all these aspects of mobility within a single framework that encompasses mobile agents, the ambients where agents interact

  1. Aerosol Science and Technology, 39:760770, 2005 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-print Network

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom 5-refractory (vaporized at 600 C under vacuum) submicron aerosols with a time resolution of the order of minutes. Ambient-IC) and a Sunset Laboratory semi-continuous thermal-optical carbon ana- lyzer. The temperature of the AMS inlet

  2. Acid Aerosols Issue Paper: Health effects and aerometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The report evaluates scientific information on direct health effects associated with exposure to acid aerosols. Although the literature up to 1988 has been reviewed thoroughly for information relevant to acid aerosols, the present report is not intended as a complete and detailed review of all literature pertaining to acid aerosols. Rather, an attempt has been made to focus on the evaluation of those studies providing key information on health effects and aerometrics. The report includes discussion of: the physical and chemical properties of acid aerosols; ambient monitoring techniques and ambient concentrations; the toxicology of acid aerosols in experimental animals; respiratory tract deposition and neutralization of acid aerosols; assessment of epidemiological studies of health effects of acid aerosols; assessment of controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effects of acid aerosols; and a summarization of the above information with interpretations and conclusions. Important research needs are identified which are critical to be addressed in order to improve the data base for acid aerosols and associated health effects as a basis for decisions on whether to list acid aerosols as a criteria pollutant for development of criteria and national ambient air quality standards. Lastly, the Report of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) that reviews the document and makes recommendations to EPA and the CASAC Report on Acid Aerosol Research Needs are included as appendices.

  3. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  4. Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Submicron Aerosols in Mexico City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Sterling, K.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2003-12-01

    Natural radionuclides can be useful in evaluating the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. Beryllium-7, which is produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and becomes adsorbed on fine aerosols, can be a useful indicator of upper air transport into a region. Lead-210 is produced by the decay of radon-222 out-gassed into the lower atmosphere from ground-based uranium deposits. Potassium-40, found in soils, can act as a measure of wind-blown dust and also comes from burning of wood and other biomass that is enriched in this natural radioisotope. Thus, both lead-210 and potassium-40 can aid in identification of aerosols sourced in the lower atmosphere. As part of our continuing interest in the lifetimes and sources of aerosols and their radiative effects, we report here measurements of fine aerosol radioactivity in Mexico City, one of the largest megacities in the world. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters by using cascade impactors (Sierra type, Anderson Instruments) and high-volume air samplers from the rooftop of the main laboratory of El Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental (CENICA). By using stage 4 of the impactor and timers, we were able to collect integrated samples of sizes > 1 micrometer and < 1 micrometer over 12-hr time periods daily for approximately one month in April 2003. Samples were counted at the University of Illinois at Chicago by using state-of-the-art gamma counting (beryllium-7, 477.6 keV; potassium-40, 1460.8 keV; lead-210, 46.5 keV). The beryllium-7 data indicate one possible upper-air transport event during April 2003. As expected, the lead-210 data indicate very little soil contribution to the fine aerosol. The potassium-40 data showed an increase in fine aerosol potassium during Holy Week that might be attributed to local combustion of biomass fuels. The data will be presented and discussed in light of future data analysis and comparison with other measurements taken during the study. The authors wish to thank the researchers at CENICA. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Atmospheric Science Program. We also wish to acknowledge Drs. Mario and Luisa Molina for their help in organizing and directing the Mexico City Metropolitan Area 2003 field study, during which these data were collected.

  5. Characterization and source apportionment of aerosol light extinction in Chengdu, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Cao, Junji; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Xia, Xiangao; Zhang, Zhisheng; Lin, Zejian; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renjian

    2014-10-01

    To investigate aerosol properties in the Sichuan Basin of China, field aerosol sampling was carried out in Chengdu, China during four one-month periods, each in a different season in 2011. Aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) at dry (RH<40%) and wet (40% < RH<90%) conditions and aerosol absorption coefficient (bap) were measured. Additionally, daily PM2.5 and PM10 samples were also collected. PM2.5 samples were subject to chemical analysis for various chemical components including major water-soluble ions, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), trace elements, as well as anhydrosugar Levoglucosan (LG) and Mannosan (MN). A multiple linear regression analysis was applied to the measured dry bsp against (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, organic mass (OM), fine soil (FS), and coarse mass (CM, PM2.5-10), and to the measured bap against EC in all the four seasons to evaluate the impact of individual chemical components of PM2.5 and CM on aerosol light extinction (bext = bsp + bap). Mass scattering efficiency (MSE) and mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of the individual chemical components of PM2.5 were estimated based on seasonal regression equations and were then used for estimating bext. The annual bsp, bap and single scattering albedo (SSA) at dry conditions were 456 ± 237 Mm-1, 96 ± 48 Mm-1 and 0.82 ± 0.05, respectively. The annual average bsp at ambient conditions estimated through hygroscopic curve of aerosol (f(RH)) was 763 ± 415 Mm-1, which was 1.7 times of the dry bsp. The annual average SSA at ambient conditions also increased to 0.88 ± 0.04. The estimated dry bext was only 2 ± 9% higher than the measurements and the estimated ambient bext from individual chemical components was only 1 ± 10% lower, on an annual basis, than that estimated from using f(RH). Secondary inorganic aerosols, coal combustion, biomass burning, iron and steel industry, Mo-related industry, soil dust, and CM to bext were estimated to account for 41 ± 19%, 18 ± 12%, 14 ± 13%, 13 ± 11%, 5 ± 4%, 5 ± 7% and 4 ± 3%, respectively, of the estimated ambient bext.

  6. Apportionment of urban aerosol sources in Cork (Ireland) by synergistic measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Hellebust, Stig; Healy, Robert M; O'Connor, Ian P; Kourtchev, Ivan; Sodeau, John R; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin D; Wenger, John C

    2014-09-15

    The sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during wintertime at a background urban location in Cork city (Ireland) have been determined. Aerosol chemical analyses were performed by multiple techniques including on-line high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS), on-line single particle aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TSI ATOFMS), on-line elemental carbon-organic carbon analysis (Sunset_EC-OC), and off-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis of filter samples collected at 6-h resolution. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been carried out to better elucidate aerosol sources not clearly identified when analyzing results from individual aerosol techniques on their own. Two datasets have been considered: on-line measurements averaged over 2-h periods, and both on-line and off-line measurements averaged over 6-h periods. Five aerosol sources were identified by PMF in both datasets, with excellent agreement between the two solutions: (1) regional domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Regional," 24-27%; (2) local urban domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Urban," 22-23%; (3) road vehicle emissions--"Traffic," 15-20%; (4) secondary aerosols from regional anthropogenic sources--"SA_Regional" 9-13%; and (5) secondary aged/processed aerosols related to urban anthropogenic sources--"SA_Urban," 21-26%. The results indicate that, despite regulations for restricting the use of smoky fuels, solid fuel burning is the major source (46-50%) of PM2.5 in wintertime in Cork, and also likely other areas of Ireland. Whilst wood combustion is strongly associated with OC and EC, it was found that peat and coal combustion is linked mainly with OC and the aerosol from these latter sources appears to be more volatile than that produced by wood combustion. Ship emissions from the nearby port were found to be mixed with the SA_Regional factor. The PMF analysis allowed us to link the AMS cooking organic aerosol factor (AMS_PMF_COA) to oxidized organic aerosol, chloride and locally produced nitrate, indicating that AMS_PMF_COA cannot be attributed to primary cooking emissions only. Overall, there are clear benefits from factor analysis applied to results obtained from multiple techniques, which allows better association of aerosols with sources and atmospheric processes. PMID:24950495

  7. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, T.; Kojima, T.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; de la Rosa, J.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2012-09-01

    The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a~pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) and hourly Streaker (PIXE) samples of particulate matter collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa") and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in Western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by PMF analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5-10), As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1-2.5), metalliferous sodic PM interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the more undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  8. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, T.; Kojima, T.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; de la Rosa, J.; Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Chiari, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-02-01

    The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and hourly Streaker with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) samples collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa") and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5-10), As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1-2.5), metalliferous sodic particulate matter (PM) interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  9. AEROSOL SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY IN MIAMI, FLORIDA. MICROSCOPICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 1975 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted an experimental program in the Miami metropolitan area to collect atmospheric aerosols for the purpose of identifying aerosol composition and determing aerosol sources. Samples were collected for mass, trace metals, ...

  10. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  11. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  12. Comparison Between Lidar and Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopicity at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlow, M.; Feingold, G.; Jefferson, A.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J. A.; Wang, J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopicity has a significant effect on radiative properties of aerosols. Here a lidar method, applicable to cloud-capped, well-mixed atmospheric boundary layers, is employed to determine the hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) under unperturbed, ambient atmospheric conditions. The data used for the analysis were collected under a wide range of atmospheric aerosol levels during both routine measurement periods and during the intensive operations period (IOP) in May 2003 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. There is a good correlation (approx. 0.7) between a lidar-derived growth factor (measured over the range 85% RH to 96% RH) with a nephelometer-derived growth factor measured over the RH range 40% to 85%. For these RH ranges, the slope of the lidar-derived growth factor is much steeper than that of the nephelometer-derived growth factor, reflecting the rapid increase in particle size with increasing RH. The results are corroborated by aerosol model calculations of lidar and nephelometer equivalent f(RH) based on in situ aerosol size and composition measurements during the IOP. It is suggested that the lidar method can provide useful measurements of the dependence of aerosol optical properties on relative humidity, and under conditions closer to saturation than can currently be achieved with humidified nephelometers.

  13. Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala

    E-print Network

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación de Agricultura, Recursos Naturales y Ambiente INSTITUTO DE INCIDENCIA AMBIENTAL #12;Perfil ambiental de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación sistemática ISBN: 99922

  14. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?m, PM2.5=0.3 ?g m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10 ?m, PM10=1.1 ?g m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, ?ep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 ?g m-3; PM10=83.4 ?g m-3; estimated ?ep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by anthropogenic aerosols are thought to be of comparable magnitude to the posi

  15. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  16. Remote Sensing of Aerosol and Non-Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B. N.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol from the new satellite instruments (e.g. MODIS from Terra) and ground based radiometers (e.g. the AERONET) provides the opportunity to measure the absorption characteristics of the ambient undisturbed aerosol in the entire atmospheric column. For example Landsat and AERONET data are used to measure spectral absorption of sunlight by dust from West Africa. Both Application of the Landsat and AERONET data demonstrate that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is several times smaller than the current international standards. This is due to difficulties of measuring dust absorption in situ, and due to the often contamination of dust properties by the presence of air pollution or smoke. We use the remotely sensed aerosol absorption properties described by the spectral sin le scattering albedo, together with statistics of the monthly optical thickness for the fine and coarse aerosol derived from the MODIS data. The result is an estimate of the flux of solar radiation absorbed by the aerosol layer in different regions around the globe where aerosol is prevalent. If this aerosol forcing through absorption is not included in global circulation models, it may be interpreted as anomalous absorption in these regions. In a preliminary exercise we also use the absorption measurements by AERONET, to derive the non-aerosol absorption of the atmosphere in cloud free conditions. The results are obtained for the atmospheric windows: 0.44 microns, 0.66 microns, 0.86 microns and 1.05 microns. In all the locations over the land and ocean that were tested no anomalous absorption in these wavelengths, was found within absorption optical thickness of +/- 0.005.

  17. Improving correlations between MODIS aerosol optical thickness and ground-based PM 2.5 observations through 3D spatial analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Keith D.; Faruqui, Shazia J.; Smith, Solar

    The Center for Space Research (CSR) continues to focus on developing methods to improve correlations between satellite-based aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values and ground-based, air pollution observations made at continuous ambient monitoring sites (CAMS) operated by the Texas commission on environmental quality (TCEQ). Strong correlations and improved understanding of the relationships between satellite and ground observations are needed to formulate reliable real-time predictions of air quality using data accessed from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) at the CSR direct-broadcast ground station. In this paper, improvements in these correlations are demonstrated first as a result of the evolution in the MODIS retrieval algorithms. Further improvement is then shown using procedures that compensate for differences in horizontal spatial scales between the nominal 10-km MODIS AOT products and CAMS point measurements. Finally, airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) observations, collected during the Texas Air Quality Study of 2000, are used to examine aerosol profile concentrations, which may vary greatly between aerosol classes as a result of the sources, chemical composition, and meteorological conditions that govern transport processes. Further improvement in correlations is demonstrated with this limited dataset using insights into aerosol profile information inferred from the vertical motion vectors in a trajectory-based forecast model. Analyses are ongoing to verify these procedures on a variety of aerosol classes using data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (Calipso) lidar.

  18. Aging affects the ice-nucleating properties of volcanic ash aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingemer, H.; Klein, H.; Ebert, M.; Haunold, W.; Bundke, U.; Herrmann, T.; Kandler, K.; Müller-Ebert, D.; Weinbruch, S.; Judt, A.; Wéber, A.; Nillius, B.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Levin, Z.; Curtius, J.

    2012-04-01

    The effectiveness of volcanic ash as ice nuclei (IN) has been debated in the past. While some reported enhanced IN concentrations in volcanic plumes, others found no evidence for that. Here we show that "aged" volcanic particles sampled from the atmosphere in central Germany when the ash cloud of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption was present are very effective IN, as compared to particles of aerosolized "fresh" volcanic sediment that had been collected close to the eruption site in Iceland. The number concentration of atmospheric IN was measured with the same method both at the Taunus Observatory in central Germany and at Tel Aviv University, Israel, as well as in laboratory-generated aerosol of volcanic ash. Aerosol was sampled by electrostatic precipitation of particles onto silicon substrates and was subsequently analyzed at - 8° to -18°C (deposition and condensation nucleation modes) in the isothermal static vapor diffusion chamber FRIDGE. The composition of individual atmospheric IN was analyzed by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with EDX. Our daily measurements show a significant enhancement of atmospheric IN when the dispersed ash cloud reached central Europe in April 2010 and the eastern Mediterranean in May 2010. Pure volcanic ash accounts for at least 53-68% of the 239 individual ice nucleating particles that were analyzed by ESEM-EDX in aerosol samples collected at Taunus Observatory during the volcanic peak of April 2010. Volcanic ash samples that had been collected close to the eruption site were aerosolized in the laboratory and measured by FRIDGE. Our analysis confirms the relatively poor ice nucleating efficiency (at -18°C and 119% ice-saturation) of such "fresh" volcanic ash, as it had recently been found by other workers. We find that both the fraction of the aerosol that is active as ice nuclei as well as the density of ice-active sites on the aerosol surface are three orders of magnitude larger in the samples collected from ambient air during the volcanic peaks than in the aerosolized samples from the ash collected close to the eruption site. From this we conclude that the ice-nucleating properties of volcanic ash may be altered substantially by aging and processing during long-range transport in the atmosphere, and that global volcanism deserves further attention as a potential source of atmospheric ice nuclei.

  19. Molecular composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry: comparing laboratory and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, I.; Fuller, S. J.; Giorio, C.; Healy, R. M.; Wilson, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Wenger, J. C.; McLeod, M.; Aalto, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Maenhaut, W.; Jones, R.; Venables, D. S.; Sodeau, J. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2013-11-01

    Numerous laboratory experiments have been performed in an attempt to mimic atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. However, it is still unclear how close the aerosol particles generated in laboratory experiments resemble atmospheric SOA with respect to their detailed chemical composition. In this study, we generated SOA in a simulation chamber from the ozonolysis of ?-pinene and a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) mixture containing ?- and ?-pinene, ?3-carene, and isoprene. The detailed molecular composition of laboratory-generated SOA was compared with that of background ambient aerosol collected at a boreal forest site (Hyytiälä, Finland) and an urban location (Cork, Ireland) using direct infusion nanoelectrospray ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. Kendrick Mass Defect and Van Krevelen approaches were used to identify and compare compound classes and distributions of the detected species. The laboratory-generated SOA contained a distinguishable group of dimers that was not observed in the ambient samples. The presence of dimers was found to be less pronounced in the SOA from the VOC mixtures when compared to the one component precursor system. The elemental composition of the compounds identified in the monomeric region from the ozonolysis of both ?-pinene and VOC mixtures represented the ambient organic composition of particles collected at the boreal forest site reasonably well, with about 70% of common molecular formulae. In contrast, large differences were found between the laboratory-generated BVOC samples and the ambient urban sample. To our knowledge this is the first direct comparison of molecular composition of laboratory-generated SOA from BVOC mixtures and ambient samples.

  20. Humidity effects on the mass spectra of single aerosol particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth R Neubauer; Murray V Johnston; Anthony S Wexler

    1998-01-01

    On-line laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry has developed into a widely used method for chemical characterization of individual aerosol particles. In the present study, the spectra of laboratorygenerated particles were obtained as a function of relative humidity to elucidate potential artifacts associated with ambient measurements. Several anionic electrolytes typically found in marine aerosols were studied, including chloride, nitrate, sulfate and

  1. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  2. Chemical characteristics of size-resolved aerosols in winter in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Qu, Yu; Wu, Qiong; Han, Tingting; Gu, Jianwei; Zhao, Jingjing; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Gao, Ziqi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanhang; Lu, Keding; Nordmann, Stephan; Cheng, Yafang; Hou, Li; Ge, Hui; Furuuchi, Masami; Hata, Mitsuhiko; Liu, Xingang

    2014-08-01

    Size-resolved aerosols were continuously collected by a Nano Sampler for 13 days at an urban site in Beijing during winter 2012 to measure the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles. Data collected by the Nano Sampler and an ACSM (Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor) were compared. Between the data sets, similar trends and strong correlations were observed, demonstrating the validity of the Nano Sampler. PM?? and PM?.? concentrations during the measurement were 150.5 ± 96.0 ?g/m³ (mean ± standard variation) and 106.9 ± 71.6 ?g/m³, respectively. The PM?.?/PM?? ratio was 0.70 ± 0.10, indicating that PM?.? dominated PM??. The aerosol size distributions showed that three size bins of 0.5-1, 1-2.5 and 2.5-10 ?m contributed 21.8%, 23.3% and 26.0% to the total mass concentration (TMC), respectively. OM (organic matter) and SIA (secondary ionic aerosol, mainly SO?(2-), NO?(-) and NH?(+)) were major components of PM?.?. Secondary compounds (SIA and secondary organic carbon) accounted for half of TMC (about 49.8%) in PM?.?, and suggested that secondary aerosols significantly contributed to the serious particulate matter pollution observed in winter. Coal burning, biomass combustion, vehicle emissions and SIA were found to be the main sources of PM?.?. Mass concentrations of water-soluble ions and undetected materials, as well as their fractions in TMC, strikingly increased with deteriorating particle pollution conditions, while OM and EC (elemental carbon) exhibited different variations, with mass concentrations slightly increasing but fractions in TMC decreasing. PMID:25108720

  3. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  4. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-09-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of microphysical properties, such attempts are fraught with high uncertainties.

  5. A comparison between PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of metals in aerosol particulate collected in urban and marine sites in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.

    2014-01-01

    PIXE and ICP-AES techniques are largely used in atmospheric aerosol studies. Since PIXE is able to provide the total elemental concentrations, while ICP-AES results depend on the extraction conditions, parallel PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of Fe, Al, Cu, Pb, Mn, Cr, Ni, V, As on PM10 and PM2.5 samples were compared. Two extraction procedures were applied to samples from 5 sites at different anthropization level in Italy: a "weak" extraction (HNO3 at pH = 1.5) and a "strong" extraction (micro-wave oven in HNO3 and H2O2 - following EU rules).

  6. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Simpson, D.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Kristensen, K.; Genberg, J.; Stenström, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Hillamo, R.; Aurela, M.; Bauer, H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Dye, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Glasius, M.

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp) and elemental carbon (EC) have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 collected at four Nordic rural background sites (Birkenes (Norway), Hyytiälä (Finland) Vavihill (Sweden), Lille Valby (Denmark)) during late summer (5 August-2 September 2009). Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC), have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach. The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC) was totally dominated by natural sources (69-86 %), with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) being the single most important source (48-57 %). Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) were the second most important source (20-32 %). The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff (10-24 %), whereas no more than 3-7 % was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, accounting for 4-12 % of TCp, whereas <1.5 % was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources. Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural background environment are reported for the first time in the present study. The most abundant organosulphate compounds were an organosulphate of isoprene and nitrooxy-organosulphates of ?- and ?-pinene and limonene.

  7. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Simpson, D.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Kristensen, K.; Genberg, J.; Stenström, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Hillamo, R.; Aurela, M.; Bauer, H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Dye, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Glasius, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp) and elemental carbon (EC) have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 ?m) collected at four Nordic rural background sites [Birkenes (Norway), Hyytiälä (Finland), Vavihill (Sweden), Lille Valby, (Denmark)] during late summer (5 August-2 September 2009). Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC), have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach. The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC) was totally dominated by natural sources (69-86%), with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) being the single most important source (48-57%). Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) were the second most important source (20-32%). The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff) (10-24%), whereas no more than 3-7% was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb) in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, which accounted for 4-12% of TCp, whereas <1.5% of EC was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources. Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural background environment are reported for the first time in the present study. The most abundant organosulphate compounds were an organosulphate of isoprene and nitrooxy-organosulphates of ?- and ?-pinene and limonene.

  8. Equilibrium size of atmospheric aerosol sulfates as a function of the relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M.; Spengler, John D.; Stern, Bonnie; Franklin, Claire A.

    1989-05-01

    Size-fractionated acid aerosols were collected, using a microorifice cascade impactor, during the summer of 1986 in Dunnville, Ontario, as part of the Canadian Children Acute Respiratory Effects Study (CARES), sponsored by the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada. Sulfate and hydrogen ions showed similar size distributions. The molar ratio of H+/SO42- varied little with particle size, but there was a considerable time-dependent variation in aerosol acid content. It was also found that there is a distinct relationship between the geometric mean aerodynamic diameter of sulfate, da, and ambient relative humidity (RH). Atmospheric sulfate particle sizes observed in this study were slightly higher than those found in laboratory experiments at corresponding humidities. However, considering the uncertainties involved, the agreement between the field and laboratory data was remarkable.

  9. Modeling of growth and evaporation effects on the extinction of 1.0-micron solar radiation traversing stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of growth and evaporation of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols on the extinction of solar radiation traversing such an aerosol medium are reported for the case of 1.0-micron solar radiation. Modeling results show that aerosol extinction is not very sensitive to the change of ambient water vapor concentration, but is sensitive to ambient temperature changes, especially at low ambient temperatures and high ambient water vapor concentration. A clarification is given of the effects of initial aerosol size distribution and composition on the change of aerosol extinction due to growth and evaporation processes. It is shown that experiments designed to observe solar radiation extinction of aerosols may also be applied to the determination of observed changes in aerosol optical properties, environmental parameters, or the physical and optical characteristics of sulfate aerosols.

  10. A 12 year observation of water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-03-01

    In order to characterize the long term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12 year observation was conducted for water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected from 2001-2012 in the Asian outflow region at a Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007-2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001-2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are increasingly more transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific.

  11. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  12. Consistency of Global Modis Aerosol Optical Depths over Ocean on Terra and Aqua Ceres SSF Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatov, Alexander; Minnis, Patrick; Miller, Walter F.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Remer, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol retrievals over ocean from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Terra and Aqua platforms are available from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) datasets generated at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Two aerosol products are reported side-by-side. The primary M product is generated by sub-setting and remapping the multi-spectral (0.47-2.1 micrometer) MODIS produced oceanic aerosol (MOD04/MYD04 for Terra/Aqua) onto CERES footprints. M*D04 processing uses cloud screening and aerosol algorithms developed by the MODIS science team. The secondary AVHRR-like A product is generated in only two MODIS bands 1 and 6 (on Aqua, bands 1 and 7). The A processing uses the CERES cloud screening algorithm, and NOAA/NESDIS glint identification, and single-channel aerosol retrieval algorithms. The M and A products have been documented elsewhere and preliminarily compared using 2 weeks of global Terra CERES SSF Edition 1A data in which the M product was based on MOD04 collection 3. In this study, the comparisons between the M and A aerosol optical depths (AOD) in MODIS band 1 (0.64 micrometers), tau(sub 1M) and tau(sub 1A) are re-examined using 9 days of global CERES SSF Terra Edition 2A and Aqua Edition 1B data from 13 - 21 October 2002, and extended to include cross-platform comparisons. The M and A products on the new CERES SSF release are generated using the same aerosol algorithms as before, but with different preprocessing and sampling procedures, lending themselves to a simple sensitivity check to non-aerosol factors. Both tau(sub 1M) and tau(sub 1A) generally compare well across platforms. However, the M product shows some differences, which increase with ambient cloud amount and towards the solar side of the orbit. Three types of comparisons conducted in this study - cross-platform, cross-product, and cross-release confirm the previously made observation that the major area for improvement in the current aerosol processing lies in a more formalized and standardized sampling (and most importantly, cloud screening) whereas optimization of the aerosol algorithm is deemed to be an important yet less critical element.

  13. Remote sensing of aerosol properties over oceans using the MODIS\\/EOS spectral radiances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Tanré; Y. J. Kaufman; M. Herman; S. Mattoo

    1997-01-01

    Spectral radiances measured at the top of the atmosphere in a wide spectral range (0.55-2.13mum) are used to monitor the aerosol optical thickness and the aerosol size distribution (integrated on the vertical column) of the ambient (undisturbed) aerosol over the oceans. Even for the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) wide spectral range, only three parameters that describe the aerosol loading

  14. In situ concentration of semi-volatile aerosol using water-condensation technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrey Khlystov; Qi Zhang; Jose L. Jimenez; Charlie Stanier; Spyros N. Pandis; Manjula R. Canagaratna; Philip Fine; Chandan Misra; Constantinos Sioutas

    2005-01-01

    The effect of concentrating semi-volatile aerosols using a water-condensation technology was investigated using the Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES) and the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) during measurements of ambient aerosol in Pittsburgh, PA. It was found that the shape of the sulfate mass-weighed size distribution was approximately preserved during passage through the concentrator for all the experiments performed,

  15. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Adler; M. Flores; S. Borrmann; Y. Rudich

    2010-01-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols of a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day.

  16. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Adler; J. M. Flores; A. Abo Riziq; S. Borrmann; Y. Rudich

    2011-01-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day.

  17. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Adler; J. M. Flores; A. Abo Riziq; S. Borrmann; Y. Rudich

    2010-01-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day.

  18. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1995-05-01

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

  19. Chemical Characterization of Water Soluble Organic Aerosol during SOAS Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Cerully, K. M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R.; Ng, N.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have important impacts on climate, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric aqueous-phase chemistry is a substantial source of SOA, but this process is poorly understood. During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), various properties of water-soluble organic aerosols were investigated by a novel system. In this system, a Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS), High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectrometer (CCN), and Thermal Denuder were coupled to continuously measure the chemical composition, CCN properties, and volatilities of water-soluble organic aerosols. This presentation will focus on chemical composition of water-soluble organic aerosol measured by the HR-ToF-AMS. During the six week campaign, HR-ToF-AMS was set up to automatically switch sample flow between ambient or PILS-nebulizer sample line every 30min. Our measurements show that the majority of organic aerosols were water soluble. The mass spectra of water-soluble organic aerosol had a more prominent peak at m/z 29 (CHO+), which is a characteristic peak associated with glyoxal SOA formed in chamber experiments. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on water-soluble organic aerosol data and in addition to the oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA), it also resolved a factor with a distinctive peak at m/z 29, which may be a factor indicative of aqueous-phase glyoxal SOA. Further, elemental analyses are being carried out to determine the oxygen/ carbon (O/C) and hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratios of water-soluble organic aerosols, which are indications of the degree of oxidation of aerosols. Detailed comparisons between total organic aerosol and water-soluble organic aerosol will be discussed to reveal the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on SOA formation.

  20. Particle Charge Distribution Measurement for Commonly Generated Laboratory Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Forsyth; Benjamin Y. H. Liu; Francisco J. Romay

    1998-01-01

    An improved particle charge analyzer system has been developed to measure the absolute charge distribution of common generated laboratory aerosols. The charge analyzer system consists of an integral cylindrical mobility analyzer used in conjunction with an optical aerosol spectrometer, with computer assisted operation and data reduction. The charge analyzer collects aerosol particles over an absolute electrical mobility range from 4.2*10

  1. METHODS OF CALCULATINAG LUNG DELIVERY AND DEPOSITION OF AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung deposition of aerosol is measured by a variety of methods. Total lung deposition can be measured by monitoring inhaled and exhaled aerosols in situ by laser photometry or by collecting the aerosols on filters. The measurements can be performed accurately for stable monod...

  2. Comparison of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in aerosol samples collected in Xi'an, China during haze and clean periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Wang, Gehui; Zhou, Bianhong; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Jianjun; Cao, Junji; Xiao, Shun

    2013-12-01

    PM10 aerosols from Xi'an, a mega city of China in winter and summer, 2009 were measured for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) (i.e., dicarboxylic acids (DCA), keto-carboxylic acids, and ?-dicarbonyls), water-soluble organic (WSOC) and inorganic carbon (WSIC), elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Molecular compositions of SOA on haze and clean days in both seasons were compared to investigate their sources and formation mechanisms. DCA in the samples were 1843 ± 810 ng m-3 in winter and 1259 ± 781 ng m-3 in summer, respectively, which is similar and even higher than those measured in 2003. Oxalic acid (C2, 1162 ± 570 ng m-3 in winter and 1907 ± 707 ng m-3 in summer) is the predominant species of DCA, followed by t-phthalic (tPh) in winter and phthalic (Ph) in summer. Such a molecular composition is different from those in other Asian cities where succinic acid (C4) or malonic acid (C3) is the second highest species, which is mostly due to significant emissions from household combustion of coal and open burning of waste material in Xi'an. Mass ratios of C2/diacids, diacids/WSOC, WSOC/OC and individual diacid-C/WSOC are higher on the haze days than on the clean days in both seasons, suggesting an enhanced SOA production under the haze condition. We also found that the haze samples are acidic while the clean samples are almost neutral. Such a difference in particle acidity is consistent with the enhanced SOA production, because acid-catalysis is an important aqueous-phase formation pathway of SOA. Gly/mGly mass ratio showed higher values on haze days than on clean day in both seasons. We comprehensively investigated the ratio in literature and found a consistent pattern. Based on our observation results and those documented data we proposed for the first time that concentration ratio of Gly/mGly can be taken as an indicator of aerosol ageing.

  3. AERODYNAMIC CLASSIFICATION OF FIBERS WITH AEROSOL CENTRIFUGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constituent particles of many ambient and workplace aerosols of health effects concerns are of fibrous and aggregate geometric shapes. he sites of deposition in the human respiratory system are primarily related to the mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhaled particle siz...

  4. Molecular composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry: comparing laboratory and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, I.; Fuller, S. J.; Giorio, C.; Healy, R. M.; Wilson, E.; O'Connor, I.; Wenger, J. C.; McLeod, M.; Aalto, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Maenhaut, W.; Jones, R.; Venables, D. S.; Sodeau, J. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-02-01

    Numerous laboratory experiments have been performed in an attempt to mimic atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. However, it is still unclear how close the aerosol particles generated in laboratory experiments resemble atmospheric SOA with respect to their detailed chemical composition. In this study, we generated SOA in a simulation chamber from the ozonolysis of ?-pinene and a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) mixture containing ?- and ?-pinene, ?3-carene, and isoprene. The detailed molecular composition of laboratory-generated SOA was compared with that of background ambient aerosol collected at a boreal forest site (Hyytiälä, Finland) and an urban location (Cork, Ireland) using direct infusion nanoelectrospray ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. Kendrick mass defect and van Krevelen approaches were used to identify and compare compound classes and distributions of the detected species. The laboratory-generated SOA contained a distinguishable group of dimers that was not observed in the ambient samples. The presence of dimers was found to be less pronounced in the SOA from the BVOC mixtures when compared to the one component precursor system. The molecular composition of SOA from both the BVOC mixture and ?-pinene represented the overall composition of the ambient sample from the boreal forest site reasonably well, with 72.3 ± 2.5% (n = 3) and 69.1 ± 3.0% (n = 3) common ions, respectively. In contrast, large differences were found between the laboratory-generated BVOC samples and the ambient urban sample. To our knowledge this is the first direct comparison of molecular composition of laboratory-generated SOA from BVOC mixtures and ambient samples.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient aerosols from Beijing: characterization of low volatile PAHs by positive-ion atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Chunming; Zhang, Jingyi; Hu, Miao; Shi, Quan

    2014-05-01

    Aromatic fractions derived from aerosol samples were characterized by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high temperature simulated distillation (SIMDIS), and positive-ion atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), respectively. It was found that about 27 wt % compounds in aromatic fractions could not be eluted from a GC column and some large molecule PAHs were neglected in GC-MS analysis. APPI FT-ICR MS was proven to be a powerful approach for characterizing the molecular composition of aromatics, especially for the large molecular species. An aromatic sample from Beijing urban aerosol was successfully characterized by APPI FT-ICR MS. Results showed that most abundant aromatic compounds in PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter ? 2.5 ?m) were highly condensed hydrocarbons with 4-8 aromatic rings and their homologues with very short alkyl chains. Furthermore, heteroatom-containing hydrocarbons were found as the significant components of the aromatic fractions: O1, O2, N1, and S1 class species with 10-28 DBEs (double bond equivalents) and 14-38 carbon numbers were identified by APPI FT-ICR MS. The heteroatom PAHs had similar DBEs and carbon number distribution as regular PAHs. PMID:24702199

  6. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  7. Organics, soot, and ambient sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.

    1982-09-01

    Evidence is presented for significant local sulfate formation, the existence of a chemical link between ambient sulfate and organic particulate material is postulated, and a new SO/sub 2/ oxidation process by a reaction between organic products of incomplete combustion and SO/sub 2/ is described. Specifically, results of field studies on the relationship among sulfate, SO/sub 2/, and carbonaceous particles, speciation of sulfate and nitrogenous species, and laboratory results on certain aspects of SO/sub 2/ oxidation are presented. It is concluded that in highly polluted atmospheres, large concentrations of ambient sulfate can be produced by conversion of locally emitted SO/sub 2/ by a process that is largely independent of SO/sub 2/ but proportional to soot concentration. Ambient sulfate from many locations is found as anomalous ammonium sulfate where charged organic nitrogen complexes substitute for ammonium ions. Such sulfate is found when the aerosol is rich in organic constituents. The reaction between pyrolysis products of hydrocarbon fuels and SO/sub 2/ is an efficient mechanism for sulfate ion formation. This reaction is strongly dependent on combustion conditions.

  8. Design and performance evaluation of an aerosol separator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S Kim; K. S Lim; R. B Xiang; K. W Lee

    2002-01-01

    A new aerosol separator (44×40×65mm3) was developed and fabricated in this study. The design of the aerosol separator is based on virtual cyclones and impingers. In addition, the aerosol separator employs two stages to achieve a high collection efficiency. The virtual cyclone, often referred to as an anticyclone, employs nonimpact aerosol separation. In this device, particles are separated from the

  9. Micro-scale (?g) radiocarbon analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-lin; Liu, Jun-wen; Salazar, Gary A.; Li, Jun; Zotter, Peter; Zhang, Gan; Shen, Rong-rong; Schäfer, Klaus; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke

    2014-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurement of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in ambient aerosols is a quantitative tool for unambiguously distinguishing fossil and non-fossil sources. In this study, a fast and reliable method for measuring 14C in micro-scale (?g) WSOC aerosol samples is successfully developed, which includes three steps: (1) extraction (2) freeze drying, and (3) online 14C analysis of CO2 from WSOC combustion. Procedure blanks are carefully assessed by measuring high-purity water and reference materials. Accurate 14C results could be obtained for WSOC with only 10 ?g C, and thus the potential applications are substantially broadened because much less filter material is needed compared to previous reported methods. This method is applied to aerosols samples collected during winter from Switzerland and China. The results demonstrate that non-fossil sources are important if not dominant contributors of WSOC. These non-fossil components are consistently enriched in WSOC compared to bulk OC and water-insoluble OC for all samples, due to high water solubility of primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols. However, the presence of fossil WSOC is still considerable indicating a substantial contribution of secondary OC (SOC) formed from precursors emitted by fossil emissions. Larger fossil contributions to WSOC is found in China than in Switzerland and previously reported values in Europe, USA and South Asia, which may be attributed to higher fossil-derived SOC formation in China.

  10. Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon Nationl Park: 1. Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    During the summer of 1989, an air monitoring program was established within the Grand Canyon and on the South Rim to define summertime organic aerosol concentration and composition as a function of elevation in the canyon. Supporting information was collected on the composition of the inorganic portion of the atmospheric aerosol to help place the relative importance of organics in perspective. The present paper describes the ambient air monitoring experiment, quantifies the bulk chemical composition of the fine (dp< 2.1=135m) and total aerosol components, distinguishes carbonaceous aerosols according to their organic carbon, elemental carbon and carbonate content, and then examines those characteristics of the organic aerosol that can be defined via capillary gas chromatography using flame ionization detection (GC-FID). At both Indian Gardens (in-canyon, IG) and at Hopi Point (South Rim, HP), the largest contributors to the fine aerosol consist of sulfate and associated ammonium ion plus aerosol carbon species. At IG, sulfate and ammonium ion account for 25.5% and 7.5% of the fine aerosol, respectively, nearly equaled by the 29.9% of the sample composed of organic compounds and 1% contributed by elemental carbon. Somewhat more than half of the fine aerosol at HP can be explained by sulfate ion, ammonium ion, organic compounds and elemental carbon, again with roughly equal mass concentrations due to the ionic versus carbonaceous components. Monthly average mass concentrations for fine aerosol organics were 1.1 = B5gm -3(IG) and 1.3 =135gm-3 (HP), while the total organics monthly average mass concentrations were 1.9 =135gm-3 (IG) and 2.1 =135gm-3 (HP). The fraction of aerosol organics that could be evaluated by GC-FID (elutable organics) constituted 27% to 53% of the total organics mass collected as fine or total aerosol. For the fine particle monthly composites, the elutable organics were present in mass concentrations of 0.28 =B5gm-3 (IG) and 0.46 =135gm-3 (HP).

  11. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1990-10-01

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m{sup {minus}1} (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC).

  12. Primary and secondary organics in the tropical Amazonian rainforest aerosols: chiral analysis of 2-methyltetraols.

    PubMed

    González, N J D; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Artaxo, P; Guenther, A; Krejci, R; Nozière, B; Noone, K

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the application of a new method to facilitate the distinction between biologically produced (primary) and atmospherically produced (secondary) organic compounds in ambient aerosols based on their chirality. The compounds chosen for this analysis were the stereomers of 2-methyltetraols, (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)-methylerythritol, (l- and d-form, respectively), and (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)-methylthreitol (l- and d-form), shown previously to display some enantiomeric excesses in atmospheric aerosols, thus to have at least a partial biological origin. In this work PM10 aerosol fractions were collected in a remote tropical rainforest environment near Manaus, Brazil, between June 2008 and June 2009 and analysed. Both 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol displayed a net excess of one enantiomer (either the l- or the d-form) in 60 to 72% of these samples. These net enantiomeric excesses corresponded to compounds entirely biological but accounted for only about 5% of the total 2-methyltetrol mass in all the samples. Further analysis showed that, in addition, a large mass of the racemic fractions (equal mixtures of d- and l-forms) was also biological. Estimating the contribution of secondary reactions from the isomeric ratios measured in the samples (=ratios 2-methylthreitol over 2-methylerythritol), the mass fraction of secondary methyltetrols in these samples was estimated to a maximum of 31% and their primary fraction to a minimum of 69%. Such large primary fractions could have been expected in PM10 aerosols, largely influenced by biological emissions, and would now need to be investigated in finer aerosols. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of chiral and isomeric analyses as the first direct tool to assess the primary and secondary fractions of organic aerosols. PMID:24777436

  13. Analysis of the Effects of Chemical Composition and Humidity on Visibility using Highly Time Resolved Aerosol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunden, M. M.; Brown, N. J.; Liu, D.; Tonse, S.

    2005-12-01

    Transported aerosols from populated and industrial areas result in regional haze that causes visibility degradation in areas valued for their scenic beauty, such as the National Parks. These areas are designated as Class I Areas in the United States, and there are specific visibility goals put forth to ultimately return these areas to natural conditions. To both understand current conditions and chart progress towards meeting these goals requires measurement of important aerosol species and an understanding of how these different aerosol species affect light attenuation to allow for predictive modeling capabilities. The current investigation seeks to understand if more highly time resolved measurements of chemically speciated particle mass, relative humidity, scattering, and absorption would enable a better estimation of extinction as the relationship between these variables is non-linear. Our particular objective is to explore the contributions of the aerosol species mentioned above to visibility degradation, and the role played by relative humidity. We performed analyses on a data set collected in Central California from the intensive ambient aerosol sampling campaign conducted from 2000 summer-2001 winter1. The data include PM-2.5 mass concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon aerosol, as well as simultaneous measurements on light scattering, ambient temperature and relative humidity. The dataset is highly time-resolved, allowing the affect of temporal variations of particle chemical composition and meteorological features to be considered. The final results provide response curves that allow calculation of light scattering given aerosol concentrations and relative humidity. Our results are compared with those obtained using formulae suggested for analysis of IMPROVE (a regional haze monitoring network2) data collected under lower temporal resolution to understand the effects of temporal resolution on the characteristics of the relationships among extinction, aerosol loading and type, and relative humidity. References 1. Lunden, M.M., T.L. Thatcher, S.V. Hering, and N.J. Brown (2003). The Use of Time- and Chemically-Resolved Particulate Data to Characterize the Infiltration of Outdoor PM-2.5 into a Residence in the San Joaquin Valley. Environmental Science and Technology 37, pp 4724-4732. 2. Malm, W.C., 'IMPROVE, Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments,' ISSN: 0737-5352-47, Colorado State University, May 2000.

  14. Maritime Aerosol Network as a component of Aerosol Robotic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.; McClain, C. R.; Eck, T. F.; Sakerin, S. M.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Zibordi, G.; Quinn, P. K.; Sciare, J.; Kinne, S.; Harvey, M.; Smyth, T. J.; Piketh, S.; Zielinski, T.; Proshutinsky, A.; Goes, J. I.; Nelson, N. B.; Larouche, P.; Radionov, V. F.; Goloub, P.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Matarrese, R.; Robertson, E. J.; Jourdin, F.

    2009-03-01

    The paper presents the current status of the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN), which has been developed as a component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). MAN deploys Microtops handheld Sun photometers and utilizes the calibration procedure and data processing (Version 2) traceable to AERONET. A web site dedicated to the MAN activity is described. A brief historical perspective is given to aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements over the oceans. A short summary of the existing data, collected on board ships of opportunity during the NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project is presented. Globally averaged oceanic aerosol optical depth (derived from island-based AERONET measurements) at 500 nm is ˜0.11 and Angstrom parameter (computed within spectral range 440-870 nm) is calculated to be ˜0.6. First results from the cruises contributing to the Maritime Aerosol Network are shown. MAN ship-based aerosol optical depth compares well to simultaneous island and near-coastal AERONET site AOD.

  15. Scanning mobile lidar for aerosol tracking and biological aerosol identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.-Y.; Gao, F.; Stani?, S.; Veberi?, D.; Bergant, K.; Dolžan, A.; Song, X.-Q.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the development of a scanning mobile Mie-fluorescence lidar for the detection and identification of biological and non-biological aerosols in the lower troposphere. Our lidar system has the capability to perform azimuth and elevation angle scans with an angular resolution of 0.1° in both day-time and night-time conditions. As the transmitter, we use a solid state Nd:YAG laser with simultaneous emission of 8 ns light pulses at 1064 nm and 266 nm with a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Scattered light is collected by a Newtonian telescope with a diameter of 300 mm. The receiver consists of three channels for the detection of elastic scattering signals at 1064 nm and 266 nm as well as the fluorescence signal of the amino-acid tryptophan intrinsic to biological substances with a local peak at 295 nm. An important benchmark of the system are the aerosol loading measurements pending the eruption of the Icelandic Eyjafjallajokull volcano on 14 April 2010. Experiments on 20 April 2010 showed an elevated aerosol layer at an altitude of 2500 m a.s.l., which was confirmed as a layer of volcanic ash by other experiments. We also present first two-dimensional measurements of aerosol loading in urban areas, which can be of assistance in locating the aerosol sources, their dispersal trajectories, and simulation results for tryptophan fluorescence signal from biological aerosols.

  16. Characterization of urban aerosol in Cork City (Ireland) using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Martin, D.; Healy, R. M.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.

    2012-11-01

    Ambient wintertime background urban aerosol in Cork City, Ireland, was characterized using aerosol mass spectrometry. During the three-week measurement study in 2009, 93% of the 1 200 000 single particles characterized by an Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TSI ATOFMS) were classified into five organic-rich particle types, internally-mixed to different proportions with Elemental Carbon (EC), sulphate and nitrate while the remaining 7% was predominantly inorganic in nature. Non-refractory PM1 aerosol was also characterized using a High Resolution Time-Of-Flight Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and was also found to comprise organic matter as the most abundant species (62%), followed by nitrate (15%), sulphate (9%) and ammonium (9%), and then chloride (5%). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the HR-ToF-AMS organic matrix and a five-factor solution was found to describe the variance in the data well. Specifically, "Hydrocarbon-like" Organic Aerosol (HOA) comprised 19% of the mass, "Oxygenated low volatility" Organic Aerosols (LV-OOA) comprised 19%, "Biomass wood Burning" Organic Aerosol (BBOA) comprised 23%, non-wood solid-fuel combustion "Peat and Coal" Organic Aerosol (PCOA) comprised 21%, and finally, a species type characterized by primary m/z peaks at 41 and 55, similar to previously-reported "Cooking" Organic Aerosol (COA) but possessing different diurnal variations to what would be expected for cooking activities, contributed 18%. Despite wood, cool and peat being minor fuel types used for domestic space heating in urban areas, their relatively low combustion efficiencies result in a significant contribution to PM1 aerosol mass (44% and 28% of the total organic aerosols mass and non refractory PM1, respectively).

  17. COMPOSITION OF AEROSOLS OVER LOS ANGELES FREEWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In October of 1976, aerosol particulate samples were collected while driving on Los Angeles freeways and were analyzed for sulfate, nitrate, and elemental composition. The measurements indicate that neither nitrate nor sulfate concentrations increased significantly over the roadw...

  18. Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols during CARDEX 2012: an Instrument Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Praveen, P. S.; Arnold, I. J.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Schauer, J. J.; Gustafsson, O.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-12-01

    Quantification of black carbon (BC) aerosol in the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important due to its role in radiative forcing. As advances in measurement techniques continue, BC measurements can be performed using a variety of instruments, employing optical, thermal, and photoacoustic methods. However, the relationship between data obtained with these methods is dependent on multiple properties of the ambient air sampled (e.g., aerosol composition, wavelength-dependence of light- and mass-absorbing efficiencies) and on the instruments and their data analysis algorithms (e.g., scattering correction factors for aethalometer data). Previous studies have utilized theoretical corrections to estimate BC concentrations and their corresponding radiative properties, but with limited confidence. In this study, we present comparisons of in-situ and filter-based measurements of aerosol light absorption, black carbon (BC) concentration, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) from the 2012 CARDEX (Clouds, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, and Dynamics EXperiment) campaign based on the island of Hanimaadhoo in the Republic of Maldives. The instruments used for this comparison study include two photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS, ? = 870 and 405 nm), a 7-wavelength aethalometer (? = 370, 430, 470, 520, 590, 700, and 880 nm), and independent 12- and 24-hour integrated filter samples, analyzed for EC - OC using the NIOSH thermal evolution protocol. During the dry monsoon season (December to April), anthropogenic aerosols from India and Southeast Asia are characteristically transported to the Maldives at surface level. Data shown here were collected between February and April of 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory-Hanimaadhoo (MCOH). Using correction factors adopted from Corrigan et al., (2006), we show reasonable agreement between absorption coefficients obtained with the aethalometer and the photoacoustic spectrometer and between BC mass concentrations obtained with the aethalometer and EC mass concentrations obtained with NIOSH analysis of filter samples. Additionally, we attempt to further develop site-specific correction methods by altering the mass-absorption efficiency values used in the Corrigan et al. (2006) study. REFERENCES: Corrigan, C. E., V. Ramanathan, and J. J. Schauer (2006). Impact of Monsoon Transitions on the Physical and Optical Properties of Aerosols. J. Geophys. Res., 111, doi:10.1029/2005JD006370.

  19. Exposures to acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, J.D.; Keeler, G.J.; Koutrakis, P.; Ryan, P.B.; Raizenne, M.; Franklin, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosols in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. Measurements made in Kingston, TN, and Steubenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m/sup 3/ more than 10 times during summer months. Periods of elevated acidic aerosols occur less frequently in winter months. The H+ determined during episodic conditions in southern Ontario indicates that respiratory tract deposition can exceed the effects level reported in clinical studies. Observed 12-hr H+ concentrations exceeded 550 nmole/m/sup 3/ (approximately 27 micrograms/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The maximum estimated 1-hr concentration exceeded 1500 nmole/m/sup 3/ for H+ ions. At these concentrations, an active child might receive more than 2000 nmole of H+ ion in 12 hr and in excess of 900 nmole during the hour when H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exceeded 50 micrograms/m/sup 3/.

  20. Exposures to acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, J.D.; Keeler, G.J.; Koutrakis, P.; Ryan, P.B.; Raizenne, M.

    1989-01-01

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosols in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. Measurements made in Kingston, TN, and Steubenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H(+) ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/cu m more than 10 times during summer months. Periods of elevated acidic aerosols occur less frequently in winter months. The H(+) determined during episodic conditions in southern Ontario indicates that respiratory tract deposition can exceed the effects level reported in clinical studies. Observed 12-hr (H+) concentrations exceeded 550 nmole/cu m (approximately 27 microgram/cu m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). The maximum estimated 1-hr concentration exceeded 1500 nmole/cu m for H(+) ions. At these concentrations, an active child might receive more than 2000 nmole of H(+) ion in 12 hr and in excess of 900 nmole during the hour when H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} exceeded 50 microgram/cu m.

  1. Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Submicron Aerosols in the Pittsburgh Area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2002-12-01

    Natural radionuclides can be useful in evaluating the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. We have used natural radioactivity to estimate apparent residence times for submicron aerosols in the troposphere by looking at the disequilibrium of lead-210 with its daughters bismuth-210 (5-day half-life) and polonium-210 (138-day half-life). We have also measured the activity of beryllium-7 on fine aerosols to examine potential upper-air transport into the tropospheric boundary layer. Two sites in the Pittsburgh area during the summer of 2001 were sampled for beryllium-7, lead-210, bismuth-210, and polonium-210 on fine aerosols by using a Sierra Impactor (Stage 4) that allowed a nominal 1-micrometer cutoff diameter. One site was located approximately 5 km east of downtown Pittsburgh, on a rooftop next to Schenley Park (40.4395o N latitude and 79.9405o W longitude, elevation 310 m). A second site was located at the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Ambient Air Monitoring Station, approximately 15 km south of downtown Pittsburgh (40.30655 deg N latitude and 79.9794 deg W longitude, elevation 325 m). At both sites, 24-hour samples were collected from July 22 to July 30, 2001. Nine samples were taken at the NETL site, and six were taken at the Schenley Park site. The method for determining the lead-210 and its daughters will be described briefly. Apparent residence times ranged from 10-46 days, with an average of 23 days. Data indicate that little wind-blown soil or dust affected the area during the study. The importance of fine aerosol transport will be emphasized. The authors wish to thank Donald Martello of the NETL and Natalie J. Anderson of Carnegie Mellon University for sample collection. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy, Atmospheric Chemistry Program.

  2. Selected water-soluble organic compounds found in size-resolved aerosols collected from urban, mountain and marine atmospheres over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Cao, Junji; An, Zhisheng

    2011-07-01

    Primary (i.e. sugars and sugar-alcohols) and secondary (i.e. carboxylic acids) water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) in size-segregated aerosols from the urban and mountain atmosphere of China and from the marine atmosphere in the outflow region of East Asia were characterized on a molecular level. Levoglucosan is the most abundant compound among the quantified WSOCs in the urban and mountain atmosphere, whose concentration at the urban site was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that at the mountain and marine sites. In contrast, malic, succinic and phthalic acids were dominant among the measured WSOCs at the marine site. In the urban air, sugars except levoglucosan gave a bimodal size distribution with a large peak in fine range (<2.1 ?m) and a small peak in coarse range (?2.1 ?m) during winter, being opposite to those in spring. In contrast, these WSOCs at the mountain and marine sites dominated in the coarse range but diminished and even disappeared in the fine range. Geometric mean diameters (GMDs) of the measured WSOCs in the fine mode at the urban site were larger in winter than in spring. Levoglucosan and carboxylic acids except for azelaic and benzoic acids showed a larger GMD in the coarse mode at the marine site probably due to an increased hygroscopic growth.

  3. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of particle sizes, down to at least 55 nm in size, act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 ?m size ranges was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius, and the effect is statistically significant. The impact of aerosol pollutants was to increase droplet number and decrease droplet size within a region extending about 1000 km offshore. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. However, MODIS satellite measurements were used to show that despite the smaller droplets near shore, cloud albedo is not higher near shore than offshore. This is due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water path near shore.

  4. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data analysis procedures in which the collection of BCA is modeled as a fractal aggregate. The new analysis results in an increase in BCA surface area of approximately 24 and an increase in mass of 7-10 from the previous method. For the current study, BCA surface area is used in computer models that attempt to predict measured NOx/NOy ratios and O3 depletion rates. Inclusion of the HNO3 reaction with BCA in one model tends to improve the agreement of calculated to measured NOx/NOy ratio. However, it was found that these trends are viable only if the reactions are catalytic.

  5. Design criteria for centripeter aerosol samplers

    E-print Network

    King, Connie Hazel

    1977-01-01

    , and the 47 mm diameter small particle collection filter holder. During sampling, the aerosol entered the system through the acceler- ation nozzle wherein the velocity of both the airstream and particulate 11 WIND TUNNEL FLOW SAMPLE INTAKE F ILTER r...302A Pulse Systems, Inc. television monitor, by a RCA television camera, Model TC1000, which was mounted on the Nikon microscope. A photomicrograph of a collected aerosol sample is shown in Figure 6. The geometric standard deviation of the particle...

  6. Large-scale aerosol source apportionment in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Fernandas, Eduardo T.; Martins, José V.; Yamasoe, MáRcia A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Maenhaut, Willy; Longo, Karla M.; Castanho, Andrea

    1998-12-01

    Aerosol particles were collected aboard two Brazilian Bandeirante EMB 110 planes, and the University of Washington Convair C-131A aircraft during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project in the Amazon Basin in August and September 1995. Aerosols were collected on Nuclepore and Teflon filters. Aerosol size distribution was measured with a MOUDI cascade impactor. Sampling was performed mostly over areas heavily influenced by biomass burning smoke. Particle-induced X ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure concentrations of up to 20 elements (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb). Black carbon (BC) and gravimetric mass analysis were also performed. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) determined the concentrations of about 15 elements on the Teflon filters. Electron probe X ray microanalysis (EPMA) was used to analyze individual aerosol particles. The average aerosol mass concentration was 105 ?g m-3, with a maximum of 297 ?g m-3. Black carbon (BC) averaged 5.49 ?g m-3, or 1-7% of the aerosol mass load. Five aerosol components were revealed by absolute principal factor analysis: (1) a biomass burning component (responsible for 54% of the aerosol mass and associated with BC, K, Cl, Zn, I, S, Br, Rb, aerosol mass concentration, and other elements); (2) a soil dust aerosol component (15.6% of the aerosol mass); (3) a natural biogenic component (18.7% of the aerosol mass and associated with P, K, S, Ca, Sr, Mg, Mn, Cu and Zn); (4) a second soil dust (5.7% of the aerosol mass and enriched in Si, Ti, and Fe); and (5) a NaCl aerosol component (5.9% of the aerosol mass with Na, Cl, Br, and iodine). Electron microscopy analysis of individual aerosol particles confirmed these five aerosol types. Organic material dominated the aerosol mass and the number concentration of airborne particles. Aerosol size distributions show that the fine mode accounts for 78% of the aerosol mass, centered at 0.33 ?m aerodynamic diameter. The coarse mode accounts for 22% of the mass, centered at about 3.2 ?m. Black carbon size distributions show a consistent picture, with a mass median diameter centered at about 0.175-0.33 ?m aerodynamic diameter. This study suggests that for modeling the optical properties of aerosol in the Amazon Basin, it is essential to use a model that includes the optical and physical properties of at least two aerosol components other than the biomass burning aerosol, namely, natural biogenic aerosol and soil dust.

  7. Marine Aerosol Production, Chemical Evolution, and Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Production of primary marine aerosols by bursting bubbles from breaking waves at the ocean surface is a major process in the earth's climate system with important implications for the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere and feedbacks on upper ocean biogeochemistry. Nascent marine aerosol mass and volume are dominated by super-?m-diameter particles comprised primarily of inorganic sea salt and water. Corresponding number concentrations are dominated by hygroscopic sub-?m-diameter particles that are highly enriched in organic carbon. Freshly produced marine aerosols dehydrate into equilibrium with ambient water vapor and undergo rapid chemical transformation involving the photolysis of primary organic compounds, scavenging of gases, aqueous and surface reactions, and volatilization of products including halogen-radical precursors. Associated multi-phase chemical pathways modify oxidation regimes relative to conventional HOx-NOx photochemistry via direct destruction of ozone, accelerating oxidation of NOx, dimethysulfide, alkanes, and mercury in the gas phase; and oxidation of S(IV) in acidic aerosol solutions. The large surface area of marine aerosol also competes effectively with nuclear clusters for condensable, gas-phase reaction products thereby minimizing production of new particles via nucleation and growth pathways and their associated radiative effects. In addition, primary marine aerosols influence radiative transfer directly via scattering and indirectly via modulating cloud microphysics. This paper will review current understanding of marine aerosol production and processing in the context of earth system science and summarize major areas of uncertainty.

  8. Characterization and source apportionment of ambient air particulate matter (PM2.5) in Karachi.

    PubMed

    Mansha, M; Ghauri, Badar; Rahman, Said; Amman, Arif

    2012-05-15

    Concentrations and source apportionment of PM(2.5) monitored at an urban residential site in Karachi Metropolitan, Pakistan have been reported in this paper. PM(2.5) aerosol samples were collected on alternative days (three times per week) for 24-hrs duration on Zefluor(TM) filter papers using Thermo-Electron Corporation Reference Ambient Air Sampler (RAAS). A total of 402 samples were collected from January 2006 to January 2008. According to results high PM(2.5) loads were observed in post monsoon months that is about 2 times than those observed in the summer and monsoon seasons in the yearlong measurements. The collected samples were analyzed using ICP-MS for trace metal concentration. Source apportionment was performed on PM samples using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model. The results derived from PMF model indicated five (05) major contributors to PM(2.5) in Karachi which were: soil/road dust, industrial emissions, vehicular emissions, sea salt originated from Arabian Sea and secondary aerosols. PMID:22154210

  9. Ultrafine particles are not major carriers of carcinogenic PAHs and their genotoxicity in size-segregated aerosols.

    PubMed

    Topinka, Jan; Milcova, Alena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Krouzek, Jiri; Hovorka, Jan

    2013-06-14

    Some studies suggest that genotoxic effects of combustion-related aerosols are induced by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) and their derivatives, which are part of the organic fraction of the particulate matter (PM) in ambient air. The proportion of the organic fraction in PM is known to vary with particle size. The ultrafine fraction is hypothesized to be the most important carrier of c-PAHs, since it possesses the highest specific surface area of PM. To test this hypothesis, the distribution of c-PAHs in organic extracts (EOMs) was compared for four size fractions of ambient-air aerosols: coarse (1aerosol particles and ultrafine particles (dae<0.17). High-volume aerosol samples were collected consecutively in four localities that differed in the level of environmental pollution. The genotoxicity of EOMs was measured by analysis of DNA adducts induced in an a cellular assay consisting of calf thymus DNA with/without rat liver microsomal S9 fraction coupled with (32)P-postlabelling. The upper accumulation fraction was the major size fraction in all four localities, forming 37-46% of the total PM mass. Per m(3) of sampled air, this fraction also bound the largest amount of c-PAHs. Correspondingly, the upper accumulation fraction induced the highest DNA-adduct levels. Per PM mass itself, the lower accumulation fraction is seen to be the most efficient in binding DNA-reactive organic compounds. Interestingly, the results suggest that the fraction of ultrafine particles of various ambient-air samples is neither a major carrier of c-PAHs, nor a major inducer of their genotoxicity, which is an important finding that is relevant to the toxicity and health effects of ultrafine particles, which are so extensively discussed these days. PMID:23466560

  10. Assessment of fine and sub-micrometer aerosols at an urban environment of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Ceppi, Sergio; Palancar, Gustavo G.; Tirao, Germán; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2014-08-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during 2010 and 2011 at one receptor site in Córdoba City, Argentina, have been quantitatively analyzed to determine aerosol elemental composition by using SR-XRF. A receptor model analysis has been applied to ambient PM2.5 measurements. Four sources have been identified being their contributions: traffic: (13 ± 2) ?g m-3, SO2-/combustion processes, including biomass burning: (15 ± 1) ?g m-3, mineral dust: (7 ± 2) ?g m-3 and industry: (8 ± 1) ?g m-3. Source identification was carried out by inspection of key species in source profiles, seasonality of source contributions, comparison with literature data and the knowledge of the city; for the biomass burning contribution the MODIS burned area daily product was used to confirm wildfire events along the year. In addition, from May to August 2011, aerosols were collected in two additional size fractions (PM0.25-0.5, PM0.5-1) to investigate the toxic metal contributions to the finer fractions. An important result of this work is that toxic metals make an important contribution to the finest (PM0.25-0.5) size fraction. The results of the present analysis can help to demonstrate to local and national authorities the urgent need to carry out emission inventories, to implement air quality monitoring systems and to set regulations for PM2.5.

  11. COMBINED RECEPTOR MODEL FOR AMBIENT AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the Combined Receptor Model for Ambient and Personal Exposure Samples analysis will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annual Conference in Austin, Texas (Oct 17 - 21, 2005). Receptor modeling approaches and results from EPA R...

  12. Generation of a monodispersed aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, H.; Mikasa, M.; Devicariis, R.

    1974-01-01

    The identity and laboratory test methods for the generation of a monodispersed aerosol are reported on, and are subjected to the following constraints and parameters; (1) size distribution; (2) specific gravity; (3) scattering properties; (4) costs; (5) production. The procedure called for the collection of information from the literature, commercial available products, and experts working in the field. The following topics were investigated: (1) aerosols; (2) air pollution -- analysis; (3) atomizers; (4) dispersion; (5) particles -- optics, size analysis; (6) smoke -- generators, density measurements; (7) sprays; (8) wind tunnels -- visualization.

  13. Aerosol Chemistry of Furfural and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srithawirat, T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2008-12-01

    Furfural and sugars (as levoglucosan equivalent) are derived from biomass burning and contribute to aerosol composition. This study examined the potential of furfural and levoglucosan to be tracers of biomass burning. Furfural is likely to be oxidized quickly so comparison with levoglucosan may give a sense of the age of the aerosols in forest fire smoke. However, few furfural emissions are available for biomass combustion. Furfural and sugars were determined in coarse aerosols (>2.4?m aerodynamic diameter) and fine aerosols (<2.4?m aerodynamic diameter) collected in 24 hour periods during different seasons in the United Kingdom and PM10 collected from Thailand and Malaysia including haze episodes. Also total suspended particulate matter (TSP) samples were collected from Taiwan. Furfural and sugars dominated in fine fractions, especially in the UK autumn. Sugars were found at 5.96-18.37 nmol m-3 in fine mode and 1.36-5.75 nmol m-3 in coarse mode aerosols in the UK. Furfural was found at 0.18-0.91 nmol m-3 and 0.05-0.51 nmol m-3 respectively in the same aerosols. Sugars were a dominant contributor to aerosol derived from biomass burning. Sugars and furfural were about 10 and 20 times higher during haze episodes in Malaysia. Laboratory experimental simulation suggested furfural is more rapid destroyed by UV and sunlight than levoglucosan.

  14. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian Ocean: impact of continental advection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R Nair; K. Parameswaran; S. V. Sunilkumar; A. Abraham; S. Jacob

    2004-01-01

    The advection of continental aerosols over to the marine environments of Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea during northern hemispheric winter have been studied based on the chemical composition of aerosols collected from these regions. The aerosol samples collected on INDOEX cruise were analysed for anions like SO4, NO3 and Cl and cations of Na, K, Mg, Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu,

  15. Global modeling of nitrate and ammonium aerosols using EQSAM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, particles suspending in air, are important as they affect human health, air quality, and visibility as well as climate. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium are among the most important inorganic aerosol species in the atmosphere. These compounds are hygroscopic and absorb water under almost all ambient environmental conditions. The uptake of water alters the aerosol size, and causes water to become the constituent with the largest atmospheric aerosol mass, especially when the aerosols grow into fog, haze or clouds. Furthermore, several global model studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in nitrogen emissions could produce enough nitrate in aerosols to offset the expected decline in sulfate forcing by 2100 for the extreme IPCC A2 scenario (Bauer et al., 2007). Although nitrate and ammonium were identified as significant anthropogenic sources of aerosols by a number of modeling studies, most global aerosol models still exclude ammonium-nitrate when the direct aerosol forcing is studied. In this study, the computationally efficient equilibrium model, EQSAM3, is incorporated into the UMICH-IMPACT-nitrate model using the hybrid dynamical solution method (Feng and Penner, 2007). The partitioning of nitrate and ammonium along with the corresponding water uptake is evaluated by comparing the model to the EQUISOLVE II method used in Feng and Penner (2007). The model is also evaluated by comparison with the AERONET data base and satellite-based aerosol optical depths.

  16. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Xu, X.; Dong, M.; Chen, W.; Gu, X.; Hu, C.; Huang, Y.; Gao, X.; Huang, W.; Zhang, W.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach and an integrating sphere (IS) for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED) based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolved aerosol optical extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. An integrating sphere nephelometer coupled to the IBBCEAS setup was used for the measurement of aerosol scattering. The scattering signal was measured with a single channel photomultiplier tube (PMT), providing an integrated value over a narrow bandwidth (FWHM ~ 9 nm) in the spectral region of 465-474 nm. A scattering coefficient at a wavelength of 470 nm was deduced as an averaged scattering value and used for data analysis and instrumental performance comparison. Performance evaluation of the albedometer was carried out using laboratory-generated particles and ambient aerosol. The scattering and extinction measurements of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres generated in laboratory proved excellent correlation between two channels of the albedometer. The retrieved refractive index (RI) from the measured scattering and extinction efficiencies agreed well with the values reported in previously published papers. Aerosol light scattering and extinction coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA) and NO2 concentrations in an ambient sample were directly and simultaneously measured using the developed albedometer. The developed instrument was validated via an intercomparison of the measured aerosol scattering coefficient and NO2 trace concentration against a TSI 3563 integrating nephelometer and a chemiluminescence detector, respectively.

  17. EVALUACIN DEL IMPACTO AMBIENTAL

    E-print Network

    Espigares, Tíscar

    EVALUACIÓN DEL IMPACTO AMBIENTAL Grado en Ciencias Ambientales Universidad de Alcalá Curso DEL IMPACTO AMBIENTAL Código: 670020 Titulación en la que se imparte: Grado en Ciencias Ambientales que se imparte: Español 1. PRESENTACIÓN La evaluación de impacto ambiental de proyectos es un

  18. Persuasion in ambient intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maurits Clemens Kaptein; Panos Markopoulos; Boris E. R. de Ruyter; Emile H. L. Aarts

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of persuasive technologies has lately attracted a lot of attention, only recently the notion of ambient persuasive technologies was introduced. Ambient persuasive technologies can be integrated into every aspect of life, and as such have greater persuasive power than the traditional box like machines. This article discusses ambient persuasion and poses a model that structures the knowledge

  19. Biomass-Burning Aerosol Particles in Mexico During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Biomass burning contributes significantly to global radiative forcing through the emission of huge amounts of gaseous and particulate matter to the atmosphere. However, the uncertainty is large when modeling their effects on radiative forcing. The emissions are highly variable and depend on parameters such as vegetation, climate, and the mix of flaming and smoldering combustion. During the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign, which took place during March 2006 in Mexico, we collected smoke samples from 63 biomass fires and adjacent haze throughout south-central Mexico using a Twin Otter aircraft (US Forest Service) and C130 aircraft (NSF/NCAR). We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and associated techniques such as electron tomography (ET), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to analyze the morphologies, mixing states, and compositions of the emission products. Biomass-burning aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters <0.3?m consisted mainly of soot particles, sulfates, nitrates, minerals, and organic matter (OM). Almost all soot particles collected directly from biomass-burning smoke were internally mixed with OM. In contrast, about half the soot particles collected from haze within ~10 km of the biomass fires were internally mixed with OM. Our samples that were collected from biomass plumes at different stages of aging in the ambient environment and characterized by using multiple TEM techniques will help understand the properties of biomass-burning aerosol and its contribution to climate.

  20. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    The SOAS campaign was conducted from June 1 to July 15 of 2013 in order to understand the relationship between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions in the South East US1,2. In this study, the organic and inorganic composition of submicron aerosol in the Centreville SEARCH site was measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Ambient Ion Monitor (AIM; URG Corporation), whereas the aerosol water content was measured with a Dry Ambient Aerosol Size Spectrometer (DAASS)3. Organic functional group analysis was performed on PM1 aerosol selected by cyclone and collected on teflon filters with a time resolution of 4-12 hours, using one inlet heated to 50 °C and the other operated either at ambient temperature or 70 °C 4. The AIM measured both condensed and gas phase composition with a time resolution of 1 hour, providing partitioning behavior of inorganic species such as NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-. These measurements collectively permit calculation of pure-component vapor pressures of candidate organic compounds and activity coefficients of interacting components in the condensed phase, using models such as SIMPOL.15, E-AIM6, and AIOMFAC7. From these results, the water content of the aerosol is predicted, and a comparison between modeled and measured partitioning of inorganic compounds and water vapor are discussed, in addition to organic aerosol volatility prediction based on functional group analysis. [1]- Goldstein, A.H., et al., Biogenic carbon and anthropogenic pollutants combine to form a cooling haze over the southeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2009. 106(22), 8835-8840. [2]- Carlton, A.G., Turpin, B.J., 2013. Particle partitioning potential of organic compounds is highest in the Eastern US and driven by anthropogenic water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions 13, 12743-12770. [3]- Khlystov, A., Stanier, C.O., Takahama, S., Pandis, S.N., 2005. Water content of ambient aerosol during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 110, n/a-n/a. [4]- Takahama, S., Johnson, A., Russell, L.M., 2013. Quantification of Carboxylic and Carbonyl Functional Groups in Organic Aerosol Infrared Absorbance Spectra. Aerosol Science and Technology 47, 310-325. [5]- Pankow, J.F., Asher, W.E., 2008. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2773-2796. [6]- Clegg, S.L., Brimblecombe, P., Wexler, A.S., 1998. Thermodynamic Model of the System H+-NH4+-SO42--NO3--H2O at Tropospheric Temperatures. J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 2137-2154. [7]- Zuend, A., Marcolli, C., Booth, A.M., Lienhard, D.M., Soonsin, V., Krieger, U.K., Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G., Peter, T., Seinfeld, J.H., 2011. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 9155-9206.

  1. Enhancement of contact nucleation by scavenging of charged aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Harrison, R. Giles

    The influence of interparticle electrical forces on the particle collection rates of charged water drops are investigated using a particle-droplet trajectory model. For the charge levels expected naturally on supercooled water drops and aerosol active as contact nuclei, the charge-enhanced collection efficiency leads to an increased capture of ice nuclei (IN), causing the freezing probability by contact nucleation to be increased over neutral collisions. The collection efficiency depends on the aerosol charge, but not on the sign or charge carried by water drops. A threefold increase in the collection efficiency is found for aerosols carrying up to 10 elementary charges, collecting submicron aerosol. Modest charges on aerosol particles (APs) arising from natural asymmetries in ion concentration are sufficient to increase collision rates with suitable freezing nuclei.

  2. Contributions from transport, solid fuel burning and cooking to primary organic aerosols in two UK cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Morgan, W. T.; Martin, C. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Lee, J.; Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Coe, H.

    2010-01-01

    Organic matter frequently represents the single largest fraction of fine particulates in urban environments and yet the exact contributions from different sources and processes remain uncertain, owing in part to its substantial chemical complexity. Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) has recently proved to be a powerful tool for the purposes of source attribution and profiling when applied to ambient organic aerosol data from the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Here we present PMF analysis applied to AMS data from UK cities for the first time. Three datasets are analysed, with the focus on objectivity and consistency. The data were collected in London during the Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment (REPARTEE) intensives and Manchester. These occurred during the autumn and wintertime, such that the primary fraction would be prominent. Ambiguities associated with rotationality within sets of potential solutions are explored and the most appropriate solution sets selected based on comparisons with external data. In addition to secondary organic aerosols, three candidate sources of primary organic aerosol (POA) were identified according to mass spectral and diurnal profiles; traffic emissions, cooking and solid fuel burning (for space heating). Traffic represented, on average, 40% of POA during colder conditions and exhibited a hydrocarbon-like mass spectrum similar to those previously reported. Cooking aerosols represented 34% of POA and through laboratory work, their profile was matched with that sampled from the heating of seed oils, rather than previously-published spectra derived from charbroiling. This suggests that in these locations, oil from frying may have contributed more to the particulate than the meat itself. Solid fuel aerosols represented 26% of POA during cold weather conditions but were not discernable during the first REPARTEE campaign, when conditions were warmer than the other campaigns. This factor showed features associated with biomass burning and occurred mainly at night. Grid-scale emission factors of the combustion aerosols suitable for use in chemical transport models were derived relative to CO and NOx. The traffic aerosols were found to be 20.5 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester and 31.6 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to NOx for London. Solid fuel emissions were derived as 24.7 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester. These correspond to mass emission ratios of 0.018, 0.026 (as NO) and 0.021 respectively and are of a similar order to previously published estimates, derived from other regions or using other approaches.

  3. Contributions from transport, solid fuel burning and cooking to primary organic aerosols in two UK cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Morgan, W. T.; Martin, C. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Lee, J.; Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Coe, H.

    2009-09-01

    Organic matter frequently represents the single largest fraction of fine particulates in urban environments and yet the exact contributions from different sources and processes remain uncertain, owing in part to its substantial chemical complexity. Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) has recently proved to be a powerful tool for the purposes of source attribution and profiling when applied to ambient organic aerosol data from the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Here we present PMF analysis applied to AMS data from UK cities for the first time. Three datasets are analysed, with the focus on objectivity and consistency. The data were collected in London during the Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment (REPARTEE) intensives and Manchester. These occurred during the autumn and wintertime, such that the primary fraction would be prominent. Ambiguities associated with rotationality within sets of potential solutions are explored and the most appropriate solution sets selected based on comparisons with external data. In addition to secondary organic aerosols, three candidate sources of primary organic aerosol (POA) were identified according to mass spectral and diurnal profiles; traffic emissions, cooking and solid fuel burning. Traffic represented, on average, 40% of POA during colder conditions and exhibited a hydrocarbon-like mass spectrum similar to those previously reported. Cooking aerosols represented 34% of POA and through laboratory work, their profile was matched with that sampled from the heating of seed oils, rather than previously-published spectra derived from charbroiling. This suggests that in these locations, oil from frying may have contributed more to the particulate than the meat itself. Solid fuel aerosols represented 26% of POA during cold weather conditions but were not discernable during the first REPARTEE experiment, when conditions were warmer than the other campaigns. This factor showed features associated with biomass burning and occurred mainly at night. Grid-scale emission factors of the combustion aerosols suitable for use in chemical transport models were derived relative to CO and NOx. The traffic aerosols were found to be 14.4 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester and 28 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to NOx for London. Solid fuel emissions were derived as 17.3 ?g m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester. These correspond to mass emission ratios of 0.012, 0.021 (as NO) and 0.014 respectively and are of a similar order to previously published estimates, derived from other regions or using other approaches.

  4. Organic compounds in aerosols from selected European sites - Biogenic versus anthropogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Célia; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro; Kiss, Gyula; Hoffer, Andras; Decesari, Stefano; Prevôt, André S. H.; Minguillón, María Cruz; Querol, Xavier; Hillamo, Risto; Spindler, Gerald; Swietlicki, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples from a boreal forest (Hyytiälä, April 2007), a rural site in Hungary (K-puszta, summer 2008), a polluted rural area in Italy (San Pietro Capofiume, Po Valley, April 2008), a moderately polluted rural site in Germany located on a meadow (Melpitz, May 2008), a natural park in Spain (Montseny, March 2009) and two urban background locations (Zurich, December 2008, and Barcelona, February/March 2009) were collected. Aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbonyls, sterols, n-alkanols, acids, phenolic compounds and anhydrosugars in aerosols were chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, along with source attribution based on the carbon preference index (CPI), the ratios between the unresolved and the chromatographically resolved aliphatics, the contribution of wax n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids from plants, diagnostic ratios of individual target compounds and source-specific markers to organic carbon ratios. In spite of transboundary pollution episodes, Hyytiälä registered the lowest levels among all locations. CPI values close to 1 for the aliphatic fraction of the Montseny aerosol suggest that the anthropogenic input may be associated with the transport of aged air masses from the surrounding industrial/urban areas, which superimpose the locally originated hydrocarbons with biogenic origin. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in samples from San Pietro Capofiume reveal that fossil fuel combustion is a major source influencing the diel pattern of concentrations. This source contributed to 25-45% of the ambient organic carbon (OC) at the Po Valley site. Aerosols from the German meadow presented variable contributions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The highest levels of vegetation wax components and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products were observed at K-puszta, while anthropogenic SOA compounds predominated in Barcelona. The primary vehicular emissions in the Spanish city accounted for around 25-30% of the OC in aerosols. Besides the traffic input (10% of OC), residential wood burning was found to be another dominant emission source contributing to the atmospheric aerosol (up to 38% of OC) at the Swiss urban location. It was estimated that around 10% of the OC mass in the urban sites originates from cooking emissions. Aerosols from the urban area of Zurich presented a much higher PAH content, and benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations sometimes exceeding the mandatory limit.

  5. A Computational Study of Acid Catalyzed Aerosol Reactions of Atmospherically Relevant Epoxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epoxides are important intermediates of atmospheric isoprene oxidation. Their subsequent reactions in the particle phase lead to the production of organic compounds detected in ambient aerosols. We apply density functional theory to determine the important kinetic factors that ...

  6. Characterization of Ice Nuclei in the Arctic during the Indirect Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, A.; Brooks, S. D.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols are important in Polar Regions since they act as nucleation sites for ice crystal growth and cold cloud formation. Aerosol-cloud interactions are not well understood especially in the mixed phase and fully glaciated clouds found in the polar atmosphere. Previous measurements of ice nuclei (IN) concentrations in the Arctic have shown a large variation spatially and seasonally. This presentation will investigate and characterize IN concentrations in the Arctic Spring from the Indirect Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), as measured by the Texas A&M Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC). ISDAC measurements were conducted in April 2008, with instrumented aircraft sorties in the vicinity of the ARM Climate research Facility (ACRF) in Barrow, Alaska. During this campaign the CFDC measured IN concentrations both in and out of stratiform mixed phase and glaciated clouds. Over the ISDAC experimental period the CFDC operated within a temperature range of -10°C to -35°C and a range of supersaturations with respect to ice of 0 to 40 %. Observed IN concentrations ranged from 0.1 L-1 to as high as ? 20 L-1, in extreme cases. One of the flights during the ISDAC campaign was used to investigate the threshold temperature required to initiate homogeneous freezing of ambient aerosol. The conditions, limitations and variability of the CFDC measurements will be discussed. In addition, the sources and trajectories of the aerosols acting as IN will be determined. The IN concentration results from the field campaign will be compared to similar measurements collected in the spring season during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) campaign in 1998, and the fall season during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) in 2004.

  7. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic aerosols (BA), for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and ?-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and ?-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ?-oxooctanoic acid (?C8) that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ?C8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and ?-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  8. Simultaneous online monitoring of inorganic compounds in aerosols and gases in an industrialized area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khezri, Bahareh; Mo, Huan; Yan, Zhen; Chong, Shey-Ling; Heng, Aik Kian; Webster, Richard D.

    2013-12-01

    The automatic MARGA (monitor for aerosols and gases in ambient air) sampling system was used to measure the inorganic ions Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ in the PM2.5 aerosol phase and the corresponding inorganic gases HCl, HNO2, SO2, HNO3 and NH3 present in the gas phase. Samples were collected and analyzed hourly for 3 months between April and June, 2011, from a sampling site in Singapore close to a heavy industrial area containing extensive petrochemical refineries. The data (hourly and daily average) were analyzed, compared and discussed based on the ratios of HNO2/HNO3 and NH3/NH4+, the levels of nitrate and sulfate, the total nitrogen, the distribution of particulate matter and gaseous compounds, and the acidity of the aerosols. SO2 was the most abundant gas that appeared in an order of magnitude higher concentration than the other trace gases, and correspondingly SO42- was found to be at least 3-10 times higher than other anionic aerosol species. The concentration of major ions in aerosol samples and the related gaseous compounds followed the order of: SO42- > NH4+ > NO3- > K+ > Na+ > Cl- > Ca2+ > Mg2+ and SO2 > NH3 > HNO2 > HNO3, respectively. The maximum values for many of the target analytes occurred during the hazy period in May when there was significant contamination from regional fires. The elevated levels of HNO2 compared to HNO3 and high levels of HNO3 were rationalized based on artifacts in the denuder sampling methodology.

  9. Hydrogen chloride partitioning in a Titan III exhaust cloud diluted with ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Wornom, D. E.; Bendura, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements and analysis are presented of the partitioning of HCl between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in a Titan III exhaust cloud, as the cloud is diluted with humid ambient air. Partitioning was determined by measuring the gaseous HCl concentration with a recently developed airborne Gas Filter Correlation detector and simultaneously with a chemiluminescence detector which measures total HCl. Although equilibrium predictions for HCl aerosol formation indicated that no HCl aerosol should exist in the exhaust cloud for the meteorological conditions of this launch, the measurements indicated significant HCl aerosol formation. These measurements will provide verification for advanced modeling programs now under development.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF CARCINOGENIC VAPORS IN AMBIENT ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods and instrumentation were evaluated for collecting and analyzing carcinogenic and mutagenic vapors occurring in ambient air. The areas of investigation included (a) the evaluation of Tenax GC sorbent for in situ reactions that may occur during the collection of ...

  11. Atmospheric oxalic acid and related secondary organic aerosols in Qinghai Lake, a continental background site in Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji

    2013-11-01

    Summertime PM2.5 aerosols collected from Qinghai Lake (3200 m a.s.l.), a remote continental site in the northeastern part of Tibetan Plateau, were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyals. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant dicarboxylic acid in the samples, followed by malonic, succinic and azelaic acids. Total dicarboxylic acids (231 ± 119 ng m-3), ketocarboxylic acids (8.4 ± 4.3 ng m-3), and ?-dicarbonyls (2.7 ± 2.1 ng m-3) at the Tibetan background site are 2-5 times less than those detected in lowland areas such as 14 Chinese megacities. Compared to those in other urban and marine areas enhancements in relative abundances of C2/total diacids and diacids-C/WSOC of the PM2.5 samples suggest that organic aerosols in the region are more oxidized due to strong solar radiation. Molecular compositions and air mass trajectories demonstrate that the above secondary organic aerosols in the Qinghai Lake atmosphere are largely derived from long-range transport. Ratios of oxalic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal to levoglucosan in PM2.5 aerosols emitted from household burning of yak dung, a major energy source for Tibetan in the region, are 30-400 times lower than those in the ambient air, which further indicates that primary emission from biomass burning is a negligible source of atmospheric oxalic acid and ?-dicarbonyls at this background site.

  12. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  13. Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, ?-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid in PM2.5 aerosol collected during CAREBeijing-2007: an effect of traffic restriction on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Huang, R.-J.; Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, S. S. H.; Zhu, T.; Tian, L.

    2015-03-01

    Thirty water-soluble organic species, including dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, ?-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid were determined as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 samples collected during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing 2007 (CAREBeijing-2007) in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing. The objective of this study is to identify the influence of traffic emissions and regional transport to the atmosphere in Beijing during summer. PM2.5 samples collected with or without traffic restriction in Beijing are selected to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measures on air pollution reduction. The average concentrations of the total quantified bifunctional organic compounds (TQBOCs), total fatty acids and benzoic acid during the entire sampling period were 1184±241, 597±159 and 1496±511 ng m-3 in Peking University (PKU), and 1050±303, 475±114 and 1278±372 ng m-3 in Yufa, Beijing. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid at PKU and Yufa followed by phthalic acid (Ph). A strong even carbon number predominance with the highest level at stearic acid (C18:0), followed by palmitic acid (C16:0) was found for fatty acids. According to the back trajectories modeling results, the air masses were found to originate mainly from the northeast, passing over the southeast or south of Beijing (heavily populated, urbanized and industrialized areas), during heavier pollution events, whereas they are mainly from the north or northwest sector (mountain areas without serious anthropogenic pollution sources) during less pollution events. The data with wind only from the same sector (minimizing the difference from regional contribution) but with and without traffic restriction in Beijing were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measures on the reduction of local air pollution in Beijing. The results suggested that the traffic restriction measures can reduce the air pollutants, but the decrease of pollutants is generally smaller in Yufa compared to that in PKU. Moreover, an enhancement of EC value indicates more elevated primary emissions in Yufa during restriction periods than in non-restriction periods. This study demonstrates that even when primary exhaust was controlled by traffic restriction, the contribution of secondary organic species formed from photochemical processes was critical with long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants.

  14. The importance of aerosol water for air pollution effects on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    We apply a new concept to study air pollution effects on weather and climate, which is based on thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - including the required transformation of laboratory based concepts to atmospheric conditions. Under ambient conditions the equilibrium relative humidity (ERH) determines the saturation molality, solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), and the aerosol associated water mass, sine the water content is fixed by ERH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, aerosol water drives the gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning, ambient aerosol size-distributions and directly links aerosol hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds. Various modeling results indicate that a) our new concept is not limited to dilute binary solutions, b) sensitive aerosol properties such as the pH of binary and mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions up to saturation can be computed accurately, and c) that anthropogenic emissions can be directly linked to visibility reduction, cloud formation and climate forcing, if we explicitly account for the aerosol water mass. Our new concept is more explicit than the traditional CCN concept as it abandons the use of ambiguous terms such as "marine" and "continental" aerosols, and refines lumped categories such as mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, organic or sulfate aerosols currently used in atmospheric modeling. Despite, our concept is computationally very efficient as it allows solving the whole gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning analytically without numerical iterations. It is therefore especially suited for regional high resolution, or global climate applications.

  15. Organic Aerosol Formation in the Humid, Photochemically-Active Southeastern US: SOAS Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Lim, Y. B.; Carlton, A. G.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized low volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, health, and the environment. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols) leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify other precursors that are atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere at Brent, Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Four mist chambers in parallel collected ambient gases in a DI water medium at 20-25 LPM with a 4 hr collection time. Total organic carbon (TOC) values in daily composited samples were 64-180 ?M. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments were conducted with these mixtures in a newly designed cuvette chamber to understand the formation of SOA through gas followed by aqueous chemistry. OH radicals (3.5E-2 ?M [OH] s-1) were formed in-situ in the chamber, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Precursors and products of these aqueous OH experiments were characterized using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. ESI-MS results from a June 12th, 2013 sample showed precursors to be primarily odd, positive mode ions, indicative of the presence of non-nitrogen containing alcohols, aldehydes, organic peroxides, or epoxides. Products were seen in the negative mode and included organic acid ions like pyruvate and oxalate. The results from this study will be used to better understand aqueous chemistry in clouds/fogs and to identify precursors for laboratory study of wet aerosol, fog, and cloud chemistry.

  16. Analysis of aerosolized particulates of feedyards located in the southern High Plains of Texas.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The upwind and downwind ambient aerosols of four large feedyards located in the southern High Plains of Texas were analyzed for the concentration of particles (µg/m3 of air), size of particles (µm), and the number of microbes (colony forming units [CFU/m3] in the winter and summer. Aerosol samples w...

  17. Estimates of aerosol species scattering characteristics as a function of relative humidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Malm; Derek E. Day

    2001-01-01

    The absorption of water by ambient aerosols can significantly increase the light scattering coefficient and thereby affect issues such as visibility and climate forcing. Although water absorption by inorganic compounds and mixtures of inorganic compounds can often be modeled with adequate certainty for most applications, modeling water uptake by organic aerosols at present is speculative. In this paper, we present

  18. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 µm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF THE LIQUID WATER CONTENT OF SUMMERTIME AEROSOL IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of aerosol liquid water mass represents an important parameter for understanding the physical properties of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. Increases in ambient relative humidity can increase aerosol liquid water and thus the composite particle mass and particle volu...

  20. Determining aerosol particle size distributions using time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Daun; B. J. Stagg; F. Liu; G. J. Smallwood; D. R. Snelling

    2007-01-01

    The particle size distribution within an aerosol containing refractory nanoparticles can be inferred using time-resolved laser-induced\\u000a incandescence (TR-LII). In this procedure, a small volume of aerosol is heated to incandescent temperatures by a short laser\\u000a pulse, and the incandescence of the aerosol particles is then measured as they return to the ambient gas temperature by conduction\\u000a heat transfer. Although the

  1. Determining aerosol particle size distributions using time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Daun; B. J. Stagg; F. Liu; G. J. Smallwood; D. R. Snelling

    2007-01-01

    The particle size distribution within an aerosol containing refractory nanoparticles can be inferred using time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TR-LII). In this procedure, a small volume of aerosol is heated to incandescent temperatures by a short laser pulse, and the incandescence of the aerosol particles is then measured as they return to the ambient gas temperature by conduction heat transfer. Although the

  2. Quantitative LC-MS for water-soluble heterocyclic amines in fine aerosols (PM2.5) at Duke Forest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, Shar; Hays, Michael D.

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique was developed to measure the concentrations of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds in ambient fine aerosols (PM2.5). Quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) MS technology was used to provide both accurate-mass and MS/MS data for confirmation of chemical formula and nitrogen compound structure. The fine aerosol was collected over the winter and summer seasons at an experimental monitoring station at Duke Forest in North Carolina U.S.A. 3-Hydroxypyridine and two ?-carbolines, harmane, and norharmane, were observed in both campaigns at concentrations lower in summer (sum = 332 pg m-3; N = 27) than winter (554 pg m-3; N = 31). Aminopyridines, dimethylpyrazoles, and hydroxymethyl-pyridines were observed in the winter aerosols with a total estimated average concentration of 779 pg m-3. These results demonstrate the possibility of enhanced speciation and provide a first glance at heterocyclic amines in the water-soluble organic nitrogen (ON) fraction of fine aerosols collected from a forest atmosphere.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of optical scattering and extinction on dispersed aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Dial, Kathy D; Hiemstra, Scott; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2010-10-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of light scattering and extinction by atmospheric particulate matter aid understanding of tropospheric photochemistry and are required for estimates of the direct climate effects of aerosols. In this work, we report on a second generation instrument to simultaneously measure light scattering (b(scat)) and extinction (b(ext)) coefficient by dispersed aerosols. The ratio of scattering to extinction is known as the single scatter albedo (SSA); thus, the instrument is referred to as the albedometer. Extinction is measured with the well-established cavity ring-down (CRD) technique, and the scattering coefficient is determined through collection of light scattered from the CRD beam. The improved instrument allows reduction in sample volume to <1% of the original design, and a reduction in response time by a factor of >30. Through using a commercially available condensation particle counter (CPC), we have measured scattering (?(scat)) and extinction (?(ext)) cross sections for size-selected ammonium sulfate and nigrosin aerosols. In most cases, the measured scattering and extinction cross section were within 1 standard deviation of the accepted values generated from Mie theory suggesting accurate measurements are made. While measurement standard deviations for b(ext) and b(scat) were generally <1 Mm(-1) when the measurement cell was sealed or purged with filtered air, relative standard deviations >0.1 for these variables were observed when the particle number density was low. It is inferred that statistical fluctuations of the absolute number of particles within the probe beam leads to this effect. However, measured relative precision in albedo is always superior to that which would be mathematically propagated assuming independent measurements of b(scat) and b(ext). Thus, this report characterizes the measurement precision achieved, evaluates the potential for systematic error to be introduced through light absorption by gases, presents comparisons with Mie theory, and provides ambient monitoring data collected on a mineral dust dominated aerosol at our location. PMID:20441206

  4. Apportionment of Size Distribution Data from the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer in Pittsburgh and Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, I. M.; Zhang, Q.; Aiken, A. C.; Canagaratna, M.; Ng, N. L.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) collect spectra of ambient aerosols that are a mix of various primary and secondary sources. Many recent studies have reported the identification of sources / components based on factor analysis of total mass spectrum mode (bulk submicron) data (e.g. Zhang et al., ES&T 2005; ACP 2005; GRL 2007; Lanz et al., ACP 2007; Ulbrich et al., ACP 2009; Aiken et al., ACP 2009; Huffman et al., ACP 2009; Slowik et al., ACPD 2009). Data collected in the PToF (particle time-of-flight) mode of the AMS represent chemical composition as a function of particle size (vacuum aerodynamic diameter). We conceptualize these data as a 3-dimensional matrix and discuss the various approaches to their factorization in order to investigate the information content about aerosol sources and processing. Factoring the size distribution data utilizes an additional dimension of information that may allow greater factor separation than using the mass spectral mode data alone. We briefly review previous applications of factor analysis to size distribution data (chemically resolved and not). We use the Multilinear Engine (Paatero, J. Comput. Graph. Stat., 1999) to determine the changing size distribution and concentration of chemical components (e.g., sulphate, nitrate, and types of organic aerosol (OA) including oxidized (OOA), hydrocarbon-like (HOA), and biomass-burning (BBOA)). We demonstrate the method with AMS datasets acquired in Pittsburgh in 2002 (Q-AMS; Zhang et al., ES&T 2005; Ulbrich et al., ACP 2009) and Mexico City in 2006 (HR-ToF-AMS; Aiken et al., ACP 2009). To our knowledge this is the first attempt to factorize highly time- and size-resolved composition data.

  5. Apportionment of Size Distribution Data from the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer in Pittsburgh and Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Zhang, Qi; Aiken, Allison C.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Ng, Nga L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    2010-05-01

    Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) collect spectra of ambient aerosols that are a mix of various primary and secondary sources. Many recent studies have reported the identification of sources / components based on factor analysis of total mass spectrum mode (bulk submicron) data (e.g. Zhang et al., ES&T 2005; ACP 2005; GRL 2007; Lanz et al., ACP 2007; Ulbrich et al., ACP 2009; Aiken et al., ACP 2009; Huffman et al., ACP 2009; Slowik et al., ACPD 2009). Data collected in the PToF (particle time-of-flight) mode of the AMS represent chemical composition as a function of particle size (vacuum aerodynamic diameter). We conceptualize these data as a 3-dimensional matrix and discuss the various approaches to their factorization in order to investigate the information content about aerosol sources and processing. Factoring the size distribution data utilizes an additional dimension of information that may allow greater factor separation than using the mass spectral mode data alone. We briefly review previous applications of factor analysis to size distribution data (chemically resolved and not). We use the Multilinear Engine (Paatero, J. Comput. Graph. Stat., 1999) to determine the changing size distribution and concentration of chemical components (e.g., sulphate, nitrate, and types of organic aerosol (OA) including oxidized (OOA), hydrocarbon-like (HOA), and biomass-burning (BBOA)). We demonstrate the method with AMS datasets acquired in Pittsburgh in 2002 (Q-AMS; Zhang et al., ES&T 2005; Ulbrich et al., ACP 2009) and Mexico City in 2006 (HR-ToF-AMS; Aiken et al., ACP 2009). To our knowledge this is the first attempt to factorize highly time- and size-resolved composition data.

  6. Formation, Transformation, and Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols or particular matter (PM) profoundly impact the Earth-atmosphere system in several distinct ways. Globally, aerosols influence the Earth's energy balance, directly by scattering and absorbing the solar radiation and indirectly by modifying cloud formation and altering the lifetime and albedo of clouds. The lack of understanding of the aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings currently corresponds to the largest uncertainty in climate predictions. On the regional and local scales, aerosols represent a major contributor to air pollution. Adverse effects of fine PM on human health constitute the most important element in formulating the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and increasing evidence has implicated fine PM in exacerbation of existing health symptoms and the development of serious chronic diseases. This presentation will discuss our recent experimental, field, and modeling studies on formation, transformation, and climate impacts of aerosols, focusing on new particle formation and aging of soot particles.

  7. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

    2012-08-14

    Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

  8. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  9. Aerosols Protocol

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this activity is to measure the aerosol optical thickness of the atmosphere (how much of the sun's light is scattered or absorbed by particles suspended in the air). Students point a GLOBE sun photometer at the sun and record the largest voltage reading they obtain on a digital voltmeter connected to the photometer. Students observe sky conditions near the sun, perform the Cloud, Optional Barometric Pressure (optional) and Relative Humidity Protocols, and measure current air temperature. Intended outcomes are that students will understand the concept that the atmosphere prevents all of the sun's light from reaching Earth's surface and they learn what causes hazy skies. Supporting background materials for both student and teacher are included.

  10. A Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Device (?PAD) for Aerosol Oxidative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Panymeesamer, Pantila; Supalakorn, Natcha; Koehler, Kirsten; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S.; Volckens, John

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution has been linked with respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, in addition to various cancers. Consistent among all of these associations is the hypothesis that PM induces inflammation and oxidative stress in the affected tissue. Consequently, a variety of assays have been developed to quantify the oxidative activity of PM as a means to characterize its ability to induced oxidative stress. The vast majority of these assays rely on high-volume, fixed-location sampling methods due to limitations in assay sensitivity and detection limit. As a result, our understanding of how personal exposure contributes to the intake of oxidative air pollution is limited. To further this understanding, we present a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (?PAD) for measuring PM oxidative activity on filters collected by personal sampling. The ?PAD is inexpensive to fabricate and provides fast and sensitive analysis of aerosol oxidative activity. The oxidative activity measurement is based on the dithiothreitol assay (DTT assay), uses colorimetric detection, and can be completed in the field within 30 min following sample collection. The ?PAD assay was validated against the traditional DTT assay using 13 extracted aerosol samples including urban aerosols, biomass burning PM, cigarette smoke and incense smoke. The results showed no significant differences in DTT consumption rate measured by the two methods. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, personal samples were collected to estimate human exposures to PM from indoor air, outdoor air on a clean day, and outdoor air on a wildfire-impacted day in Fort Collins, CO. Filter samples collected on the wildfire day gave the highest oxidative activity on a mass normalized basis, whereas typical ambient background air showed the lowest oxidative activity. PMID:23227907

  11. Synthesis of satellite (MODIS), aircraft (ICARTT), and surface (IMPROVE, EPA-AQS, AERONET) aerosol observations over eastern North America to improve MODIS aerosol retrievals and constrain surface aerosol concentrations and sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Easan Drury; Daniel J. Jacob; Robert J. D. Spurr; Jun Wang; Yohei Shinozuka; Bruce E. Anderson; Antony D. Clarke; Jack Dibb; Cameron McNaughton; Rodney Weber

    2010-01-01

    We use an ensemble of satellite (MODIS), aircraft, and ground-based aerosol observations during the ICARTT field campaign over eastern North America in summer 2004 to (1) examine the consistency between different aerosol measurements, (2) evaluate a new retrieval of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and inferred surface aerosol concentrations (PM2.5) from the MODIS satellite instrument, and (3) apply this collective information

  12. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90%. Compounds with low molecular weight and 3 benzene rings in its composition (phenanthrene and anthracene) amounted to 9-38% of the total PAH. PAH percentage in aerosol samples is characteristic of the warm season. Elevated fraction of low molecular weight PAHs (29-38%) was found in aerosol samples collected on 12-14 August and 18-19 August. High molecular weight PAHs were found in aerosols sampled on 14 and 16 August. Benze(g,h,i)perylene, indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene, and di-benze(?,h)anthracene were found in aerosols on 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, and 20 August, and their fraction of total PAH amounted to 14-30%. These compounds are indicative of automotive emissions. Benze(a)pyrene is the most hazardous cancerogene from the list of the prioritized PAHs. Cases of exceeding benze(a)pyrene maximum permissible concentrations (1 ng/m3) in the air at Station Sain Shand were not recorded.

  13. Particulate Transport During ICARTT-ITCT-2K4: Aerosol Characterization from Time-Resolved and Size-Segregated Continuous Sampling and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliff, S. S.; Perry, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    Continuous aerosol sampling and analysis during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Experiment of 2004 (ITCT-2K4) at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia and Acadia National Park revealed both synoptic-scale particulate transport and evidence of local aerosol transformation processes. These sites are approximately 100 km apart separated by the Bay of Maine. We collected aerosol for approximately 42 days during June-August 2004 at each site using an 8-stage continuously Rotating DRUM Impactor (8-RDI) and subsequently analyzed the samples with synchrotron sourced x-ray fluorescence for elements and beta attenuation analysis for mass. Each analysis technique is capable of at least 3-hour ambient resolution for the 6-week collection period. Analysis of the resultant data indicates periods in early July and mid-August characterized by transport of North American particulate pollution bracketing periods of locally characteristic aerosol behavior (i.e. continental influenced at Acadia and marine influenced at Chebogue Point). Comparison of elemental ratios and statistical compositional association of the sampled aerosol provide evidence of transport during the ITCT-2K4 study. In addition to mass, 18 elements are well quantified (i.e. signal/noise ratio greater than 3) at both sites and are used in the statistical analysis. The Acadia National Park sampling was coincident with the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) site. An approximately 10-year record of aerosol data exists for this site to put the ITCT-2K4 sampling in context. An analysis of historical meteorology and compositional data from Acadia N.P. reveals periods of regional (i.e. North American) and hemispheric-scale pollution transport to the site. Particle characteristics, elemental and mass composition and statistical data analysis of the Acadia N.P. and Chebogue Point samples will be presented.

  14. Estimation of gas-particle partitioning coefficients (Kp) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous aerosols collected at Chiang-Mai, Bangkok and Hat-Yai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Ho, Kin Fai; Cao, Junji

    2013-01-01

    To assess environmental contamination with carcinogens, carbonaceous compounds, water-soluble ionic species and trace gaseous species were identified and quantified every three hours for three days at three different atmospheric layers at the heart of Chiang-Mai, Bangkok and Hat-Yai from December 2006 to February 2007. A DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer with the IMPROVE thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) protocol was used to quantify the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) contents in PM10. Diurnal and vertical variability was also carefully investigated. In general, OC and EC mass concentration showed the highest values at the monitoring period of 21.00-00.00 as consequences of human activities at night bazaar coupled with reduction of mixing layer, decreased wind speed and termination of photolysis at nighttime. Morning peaks of carbonaceous compounds were observed during the sampling period of 06:00-09:00, emphasizing the main contribution of traffic emission in the three cities. The estimation of incremental lifetime particulate matter exposure (ILPE) raises concern of high risk of carbonaceous accumulation over workers and residents living close to the observatory sites. The average values of incremental lifetime particulate matter exposure (ILPE) of total carbon at Baiyoke Suit Hotel and Baiyoke Sky Hotel are approximately ten times higher than those air samples collected at Prince of Songkla University Hat-Yai campus corpse incinerator and fish-can manufacturing factory but only slightly higher than those of rice straw burning in Songkla province. This indicates a high risk of developing lung cancer and other respiratory diseases across workers and residents living in high buildings located in Pratunam area. Using knowledge of carbonaceous fractions in PM10, one can estimate the gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Dachs-Eisenreich model highlights the crucial role of adsorption in gas-particle partitioning of low molecular weight PAHs, whereas both absorption and adsorption tend to account for gas-particle partitioning of high molecular weight PAHs in urban residential zones of Thailand. Interestingly, the absorption mode alone plays a minor role in gas-particle partitioning of PAHs in Chiang-Mai, Bangkok and Hat-Yai. PMID:23725158

  15. Mixing state and spectral absorption of atmospheric aerosols observed at a marine background site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral dust and sea salt particles are portions of atmospheric aerosols in Korea due to the periodic transport of loess dust particles from Gobi and Taklimakan deserts in west China, as well as the sea salt enrichment of atmospheric particles from the seas surrounding the Korean peninsula [Kim et al., 2009; Sahu et al., 2009]. Carbonaceous particles and secondary inorganic aerosols (sulphates and nitrates) are ubiquitous due to the proliferating biomass burning [Ryu et al., 2004], as well as the increasing use of fossil fuels locally and by regional transport from neighbouring countries. Collectively, when these aerosols are transported, their compositions are further modified due to the aging process, impacting their physico-chemical properties including spectral absorption. In order to investigate the spectral response of the absorption under different ambient aerosol conditions, measurements have been conducted at a marine background site in Korea (Deokjeok Island. 37° 13' 33" N, 126° 8' 51" E) during the spring (13 days) and fall (8 days) seasons of 2009 using an aethalometer (Magee AE31), a nephelometer (Optec NGN2a) and other supporting instruments (PILS-IC, PM2.5 cyclone samplers for off-line OC/EC measurements). It has been found that spring aerosols were dominated by sulphate-rich and carbonaceous-rich fractions (21.4%±8.0% and 28.8%±7.9%, respectively), with an Angström exponent of absorption, ?abs = 1.3±0.1 at 370-950 nm. The fall season aerosols were grouped based on their chemical composition as acidic aerosols, dust-enriched, and seasalt-enriched aerosols. Angström exponent of absorption, ?abs for acidic aerosols was obtained to be 1.3±0.2 at 370-950 nm. However, dust enriched aerosols showed increased absorption in the short UV-Vis range (370-590 nm), which can be attributed to their mixing with light absorbing aerosols. Different types of aerosols exhibit different spectral absorption characteristics depending on their composition and mixing state. The effect of mixing state on the enhancement of light absorption in the UV-Vis has been further investigated. Kim, Y. J., Woo, J.-H., Ma, Y.-I., Kim, S., Nam, J. S., Sung, H., Choi, K.-C., Seo, J., Kim, J. S., Kang, C.-H., Lee, G., Ro, C.-U., Chang, D. and Sunwoo (2009), Atmospheric Environment, 43(34), 5556-5566. Ryu, S. Y., Kim, J. E., Zhuanshi, H., Kim, Y. J. and Kang, G. U. (2004). JA&WMA 54. 1124-1137. Sahu, L. K., Y. Kondo, Y. Miyazaki, M. Kuwata, M. Koike, N. Takegawa, H. Tanimoto, H. Matsueda, S. C. Yoon, and Y. J. Kim (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114(D3), D03301.

  16. Thermodesorption of aerosol matter on multiple filters of different materials for a more detailed evaluation of sampling artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus; Keck, Lothar

    Multiple, essentially identical samples of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP aerosol matter were collected on filters of cellulose acetate-nitrate membrane (CA), quartz fiber (QF) and glass fiber (GF) material. The samples were analyzed in terms of the gravimetric mass and the mass of nine inorganic ions. These parameters were also measured after step-wise thermodesorption of