Sample records for ambient aerosols collected

  1. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers 

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01

    particle size but also wind speed and direction (2), and to a limited extent upon air sampling rate. In field applications, characterizat1on of aerosol concentrat1on 1s difficult when the upper size 11mit of the sampler is variable. Also, since the Hi... multistage 1mpin- ger, and an Andersen cascade impactor. Watson (9) developed a semi-empir1cal theory of the errors due to anisokinetic sampling of aerosols. 0uantitative sampling of an aerosol in a moving stream was assumed to be obtained for isokinetic...

  2. Elemental Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ambient Aerosol Collections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher B. Kidwell; John M. Ondov

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous multielement graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn in ambient air sampled at 170 L·min for 30 min and collected as a slurry after dynamic preconcentration. In PM20 samples collected at College Park, MD, results were > 2? above system blank in > 95%

  3. CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACTABLE ORGANIC MATTER FROM AMBIENT AEROSOLS COLLECTED IN BOISE, ID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine fraction (2.5 micron) ambient air aerosols were collected in Boise, ID between November, 1986, and February, 1987. wo composite samples of extractable organic matter (EOM) were prepared with partial resolution of chemicals from Boise's wood smoke (WS) and mobile source (MS) ...

  4. A 113 L/min ambient aerosol sampler for collection of thoracic and respirable fractions

    E-print Network

    Rue, Clayton Matthew

    1981-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A 113 L/min AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR COLLECTION OF THORACIC AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS A Thesis by Clayton Matthew Rue Approved as to style arid content by: A. R. McFarland (C. E... were performed with mono- disperse aerosols in size range of I to 10 um aerodynam1c diameter. ~F1o S litt The purpose of the flow splitter 1s to equally divide the volumet- ric flow rate of the stream without affect1ng the s1ze d1stribut1on...

  5. FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry has been evaluated as a method for determining the concentration of selected species present in ambient aerosols collected on Teflon filters. The filters are analyzed by transmission measurements after collection of the fine fraction...

  6. A 113 L/min ambient aerosol sampler for collection of thoracic and respirable fractions 

    E-print Network

    Rue, Clayton Matthew

    1981-01-01

    in which the cyclone was removed from, and then replaced into, the RSP flow stream. The relative concentrat1ons of aerosol with and without the cyclone were obtained and the penetration of the cyclone deter m1ned. C clone Mod1ficat1on After the test... penetration for a given particle size. A bushing, the length of wh1ch was est1mated by Stokes . correlation, was used'--to reduce the gap length and a removable vane was used to assure unidirect1onal air flow into the inlet. The bushing was inserted...

  7. FTIR transmission spectrometry for the nondestructive determination of ammonium and sulfate in ambient aerosols collected on teflon filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcclenny, W. A.; Childers, J. W.; R?hl, R.; Palmer, R. A.

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission spectrometry has been used to determine ammonium and sulfate in ambient aerosol particles collected on Teflon filters. Integrated absorbance as well as maximum absorbance values for ammonium and sulfate are linearly related to X-ray fluorescence measurements of total sulfur. Apparent detection limits of 1.4 ?g m -3 for sulfate and 0.5 ?g m -3 for ammonium (for sample volumes of 21.6 m 3) were estimated for samples from Topeka, Kansas; Portage, Wisconsin; Steubenville, Ohio; and Charlottesville, Virginia. The apparent detection limits were essentially independent of sample loading over the range of 0-20 ?g m -3 of total sulfur. The FTIR transmission measurements of these samples are very precise e.g. repetitive measurements vary ± 0.2% and blank variability is 0.13 ?g m -3 and 0.20 ?g m -3 in terms of sulfate and ammonium, respectively. Contributions to analytical uncertainty include 5-8% uncertainties in X-ray fluorescence measurements for total sulfur and the influence of unspecified site-dependent sample characteristics. The method offers the significant advantages of nondestructive analysis, no sample preparation, molecular speciation and rapid analysis.

  8. Multielement electrothermal AAS determination of 11 marker elements in fine ambient aerosol slurry samples collected with SEAS-II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Patrick Pancras; John M. Ondov; Rolf Zeisler

    2005-01-01

    Multi-element simultaneous electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) methods were developed for determining 11 elements, in three analytical groups (group-1, predominately crustal elements, Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Cr; group-2, tracers of coal and oil combustion as well as other anthropogenic sources, Se, As, Pb, and Ni; and group-3, tracers of municipal incinerator aerosol–Zn and Cd), in aqueous slurry of ambient

  9. Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose L. Jimenez; John T. Jayne; Quan Shi; Charles E. Kolb; Douglas R. Worsnop; Ivan Yourshaw; John H. Seinfeld; Richard C. Flagan; Xuefeng Zhang; Kenneth A. Smith; James W. Morris; Paul Davidovits

    2003-01-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) has been designed to measure size-resolved mass distributions and total mass loadings of volatile and semivolatile chemical species in\\/on submicron particles. This paper describes the application of this instrument to ambient aerosol sampling. The AMS uses an aerodynamic lens to focus the particles into a narrow beam, a roughened cartridge heater to vaporize them

  10. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  11. Response of optically trapped aerosol droplets to changes in the ambient relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. W.; Knox, K. J.; Chasovskikh, E.; Restivo, A. D.; Signorell, R.

    2012-12-01

    The evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol droplets in response to changes in ambient relative humidity affect aerosol solute concentration and chemical composition. Recent studies suggest that some aerosols can, below the glass transition relative humidity, exist in a glassy state, thus limiting the rates of water mass transfer within the droplets. We explore these processes by using two counter-propagating Bessel beams to optically capture and confine individual aerosol droplets. Single aerosols exposed to varying relative humidity conditions are characterized by collection and analysis of elastically scattered light at the trapping wavelength (532 nm). In this study, aerosols of radii between 800 and 4000 nm were investigated; the size of the aerosols isolated was controlled by varying the size of the Bessel beam core in the trapping region. The evaluation of the droplet response to changes in ambient relative humidity is expected to contribute to an increased understanding of the mass transfer behavior of aerosols and aerosol chemical composition.

  12. Analysis of Anions in Ambient Aerosols by Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 µM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 µM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  13. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01

    and subjected to 41 Ioo o ~ 80 UJ C 3 60 IJJ ) 40 I- D UJ ~~ 20 0 2 Km/hr ~ 8 Km/hr 24 Km/hr 0 I 5 5 7 IO 50 AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE DIAMETER, gm Figure 14. Sampling effectiveness for g. 38 m x p. 38 m Hi-Vol 42 IOO z 80 IJJ C 3 60 ) 40 I...? C 3 LJJ 20 O 2 Krn/hr ~ 8 Km/hr 24 Km/hr 0 I 5 7 IO 30 AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE DIAMETER, gm Figure 16. Sampling effectiveness for 0. 29 m x 0. 36 m Hi-Vol 43 IOO I- & 80 IJJ C 3 IZ IJJ CL 60 CO IJJ ~OO I? C 3 IJJ IL h 20 0 0. 5...

  14. GC/MS ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT AIR AEROSOLS IN THE HOUSTON, TEXAS AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air aerosols and vapor samples were collected by Radian Corp., Austin, TX. in the Houston, Texas area using three different samplers. A High Volume sampler and dichotomous sampler were used for the collection of particulate matter; vapor-phase organic samples were collect...

  15. Ambient Observations of Aerosols, Novel Aerosol Structures, And Their Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, Nicholas D.

    The role of atmospheric aerosols remains a crucial issue in understanding and mitigating climate change in our world today. These particles influence the Earth by altering the Earth's delicate radiation balance, human health, and visibility. In particular, black carbon particulate matter remains the key driver in positive radiative forcing (i.e., warming) due to aerosols. Produced from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons, these compounds can be found in many different forms around the globe. This thesis provides an overview of three research topics: (1) the ambient characterization of aerosols in the Northern Indian Ocean, measurement techniques used, and how these aerosols influence local, regional, and global climate; (2) the exploration of novel soot superaggregate particles collected in the Northern Indian Ocean and around the globe and how the properties of these particles relate to human health and climate forcing; and (3) how aerogelated soot can be produced in a novel, one-step method utilizing an inverted flame reactor and how this material could be used in industrial settings.

  16. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  17. Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water

    E-print Network

    Weber, Rodney

    . [1] A method employing size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with Total Organic Carbon detection and hydrophobic fractions using XAD-8 resin with Total Organic Carbon (TOC) detection is reported by Sullivan is developed to isolate and quantify the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component of ambient aerosol

  18. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  19. Transport and characterization of ambient biological aerosol near Laurel, MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarpia, J. L.; Cunningham, D.; Gilberry, J.; Kim, S.; Smith, E. E.; Ratnesar-Shumate, S.; Quizon, J.

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial aerosol have been observed and studied in the ambient environment since the mid nineteenth century. These studies have sought to provide a better understanding of the diversity, variability and factors that control the biological aerosol population. In this study, we show comparisons between diversity of culturable bacteria and fungi, using culture and clinical biochemical tests, and 16S rRNA diversity using Affymetrix PhyloChips. Comparing the culturable fraction and surveying the total 16S rRNA of each sample provides a comprehensive look at the bacterial population studied and allows comparison with previous studies. Thirty-six hour back-trajectories of the air parcels sampled, over the two day period beginning 4 November 2008, provide information on the sources of aerosol sampled on the campus of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, MD. This study indicates that back-trajectory modeling of air parcels may provide insights into the observed diversity of biological aerosol.

  20. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol <0.1 ?m aerodynamic equivalent diameter were collected, elutriated and used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter ? (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than ?chem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  1. ISS Ambient Air Quality: Updated Inventory of Known Aerosol Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft cabin air quality is of fundamental importance to crew health, with concerns encompassing both gaseous contaminants and particulate matter. Little opportunity exists for direct measurement of aerosol concentrations on the International Space Station (ISS), however, an aerosol source model was developed for the purpose of filtration and ventilation systems design. This model has successfully been applied, however, since the initial effort, an increase in the number of crewmembers from 3 to 6 and new processes on board the ISS necessitate an updated aerosol inventory to accurately reflect the current ambient aerosol conditions. Results from recent analyses of dust samples from ISS, combined with a literature review provide new predicted aerosol emission rates in terms of size-segregated mass and number concentration. Some new aerosol sources have been considered and added to the existing array of materials. The goal of this work is to provide updated filtration model inputs which can verify that the current ISS filtration system is adequate and filter lifetime targets are met. This inventory of aerosol sources is applicable to other spacecraft, and becomes more important as NASA considers future long term exploration missions, which will preclude the opportunity for resupply of filtration products.

  2. A high-flow humidograph for testing the water uptake by ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, Harry M.; Khlystov, Andrey; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Tuch, Thomas; Roth, Christa; Kreyling, Wolfgang

    A "humidograph" with an air flow rate of 0.4 m 3 s -1 was built to investigate the uptake of water and its effect on sizing, collection and light scattering of ambient aerosol. In the humidograph the relative humidity (RH) can be scanned over a large RH trajectory. Its performance was assessed with laboratory particles of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride that are the major hygroscopic components of ambient aerosol. The increase in size at the deliquescence points, which ideally is a stepwise function of RH, occurs over a range of 3% RH units. This is shown to be an optimum value in a system of such large dimensions. Because the vapor pressure of ammonium nitrate increases significantly with temperature, its evaporative loss was investigated as a function of heating/drying temperature. The loss of pure test aerosol, with a mass distribution similar to that in the ambient atmosphere, was found to be acceptable for drying temperatures of up to 40°C. The sizing of deliquesced aerosol by LAS-X monitors was tested and found to be a complex function of RH. In Berner low-pressure impactors growth of hygroscopic aerosol was not observed, not even at an RH approaching saturation.

  3. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  4. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  5. An analysis of the meteorological parameters affecting ambient concentrations of acid aerosols in Uniontown, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, Michael P.

    Ambient concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H +) that were collected in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1990 were evaluated to determine the relationships between meteorology and the magnitude of the H + concentrations. An extensive database containing 17 meteorological parameters was compiled for the Uniontown - Pittsburgh region. The database included both surface and upper air meteorological parameters. Concentrations of ambient acid sulfate aerosols collected in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in the summer of 1990 were greatly affected by both local and regional meteorological conditions. Seven distinct meteorological synoptic types or regimes were identified for the summer months. A clear association was shown between episodic events of elevated ambient H + concentrations and one of the regimes, referred to here as synoptic type 5, which occurred when an anticyclone set up to the east of the mid-Atlantic states. Much of the variability (approximately 45%) in H + concentrations for the overall model was explained by the surface air temperature. Approximately 10% of the H' variability was explained by westerly winds as expressed by the U components of the morning 850 mb wind and the mean daily surface wind at Uniontown. Results showed that for days under the influence of synoptic type 5, which was associated with the highest levels of ambient H', the surface temperature explained approximately one-third of the variability in H' concentrations. The height of the mixing layer also affected the variability in H + concentrations, accounting for nearly a quarter of the variance. These results show that an analysis of the surface wind speed and direction alone will not adequately explain the variability in the concentrations of ambient acid aerosols. Analyses of the meteorological parameters affecting ambient concentrations of acid aerosols should include the mixing height, as well as the temperature, wind speed, and wind direction; both at the surface and for an upper level of the atmosphere that facilitates regional transport of pollutants.

  6. Spectral analysis of ambient aerosol and trace gas measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, R.J.; Brock, J.R.; Kuhn, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    An electronic cascade impactor was used in aircraft flights to study fluctuations in the size distribution of the ambient aerosol and to relate these fluctuations to those of trace gas concentrations and light scattering coefficient over Buffalo, New York, and Houston, Texas. Spectral analysis of data from crosswind flights remote from major localized industrial and urban sources in Buffalo indicate that most of the observed fluctuations were associated with atmospheric turbulence. Spectral analysis of data from Houston suggests secondary aerosol formation associated with ozone. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Separating hazardous aerosols from ambient aerosols: role of fluorescence-spectral determination, aerodynamic deflector and pulse aerodynamic localizer (PAL)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Le Pan; Patrick J. Cobler; Scott A. Rhodes; Justin Halverson; Richard K. Chang

    2005-01-01

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol\\/hazardous-aerosol sensor\\/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 um in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that

  8. Direct measurement of the hydration state of ambient aerosol populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarpia, Joshua L.; Li, Runjun; Collins, Don R.

    2004-09-01

    During the summer of 2002 a modified tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) was used to examine the size-resolved hydration state of the ambient aerosol in southeast Texas. Throughout the study period the sampled aerosol had been exposed to a relative humidity (RH) greater than 80% before or soon after sunrise, while the ambient RH during sampling ranged from about 50 to 70%. To examine any possible size dependence, while also maximizing time resolution, 160 and 320 nm particles were analyzed. To assist in the interpretation of these data, a second, RH-scanning, TDMA was concurrently operated to directly characterize the deliquescence and crystallization properties of the aerosol. The hygroscopic growth of the more hygroscopic population of 160 and 320 nm particles was below that predicted for pure inorganics such as ammonium sulfate, suggesting the sampled particles were composed of mixtures of soluble and insoluble compounds. Although there were slight variations in the measured properties over the course of the study, those particles that were observed to exhibit hygroscopic growth hysteresis were almost always present as metastable aqueous solutions.

  9. REDOX AND ELECTROPHILIC PROPERTIES OF VAPOR- AND PARTICLE-PHASE COMPONENTS OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    PubMed Central

    Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Shinyashiki, Masaru; Schmitz, Debra A.; DiStefano, Emma; Hinds, William; Kumagai, Yoshito; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) has been the primary focus of studies aiming to understand the relationship between the chemical properties of ambient aerosols and adverse health effects. Size and chemical composition of PM have been linked to their oxidative capacity which has been postulated to promote or exacerbate pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. But in the last few years, new studies have suggested that volatile and semivolatile components may also contribute to many adverse health effects. The objectives of this study were: i) assess for the first time the redox and electrophilic potential of vapor-phase components of ambient aerosols, and ii) evaluate the relative contributions of particle- and vapor-fractions to the hazard of a given aerosol. To achieve these objectives vapor- and particle-phase samples collected in Riverside (CA) were subjected to three chemical assays to determine their redox and electrophilic capacities. The results indicate that redox active components are mainly associated with the particle-phase, while electrophilic compounds are found primarily in the vapor-phase. Vapor-phase organic extracts were also capable of inducing the stress responding protein, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. These results demonstrate the importance of volatile components in the overall oxidative and electrophilic capacity of aerosols, and point out the need for inclusion of vapors in future health and risk assessment studies. PMID:20152964

  10. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute volume fraction, showing that measurable aging of the aerosol population occurs during the day, on the timescale of a few hours. The mixing state of the aerosol, also showing a consistent diurnal pattern, clearly correlates with a chemical tracer for local combustion sources. Chapter 4 describes results from the GoMACCS field study, in which the CCNc was subsequently deployed on an airborne field campaign in Houston, Texas during August-September, 2006. GoMACCS tested our ability to predict CCN for highly polluted conditions with limited chemical information. Assuming the particles were composed purely of ammonium sulfate, CCN closure was obtained with a 10% overprediction bias on average for CCN concentrations ranging from less than 100 cm-3 to over 10,000 cm-3, but with on average 50% variability. Assuming measured concentrations of organics to be internally mixed and insoluble tended to reduce the overprediction bias for less polluted conditions, but led to underprediction bias in the most polluted conditions. A likely explanation is that the high organic concentrations in the polluted environments depress the surface tension of the droplets, thereby enabling activation at lower soluble fractions.

  11. Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-08-15

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

  12. Direct Observations of the Composition of Sub20 Nanometer Ambient Aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. F. Moore; J. N. Smith; F. L. Eisele; P. H. McMurry

    2002-01-01

    Understanding new particle formation in the atmosphere depends upon many factors including detailed knowledge of their chemical composition. The chemical composition of sub-20 nanometer ambient aerosol particles, however, is typically inferred from observations of the aerosol behavior when subjected to varying conditions during sampling. Direct observations of aerosol chemical composition are usually limited to or dominated by larger particles of

  13. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. E. Yttri; C. Dye; G. Kiss

    2007-01-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC\\/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in

  14. On-line analysis of ambient air aerosols using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Carranza; B. T. Fisher; G. D. Yoder; D. W. Hahn

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is developed for the detection of aerosols in ambient air, including quantitative mass concentration measurements and size\\/composition measurements of individual aerosol particles. Data are reported for ambient air aerosols containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium and sodium for a 6-week sampling period spanning the Fourth of July holiday period. Measured mass concentrations for these four elements ranged from 1.7

  15. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  16. EQUILIBRIUM SIZE OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL SULFATES AS A FUNCTION OF PARTICLE ACIDITY AND AMBIENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid aerosol events in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, were studied during the summer of 1990. ize-fractionated acid aerosols were collected using a microorifice cascade impactor. he collected samples were analyzed for hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion concentrations. hese me...

  17. Semi-quantitative characterisation of ambient ultrafine aerosols resulting from emissions of coal fired power stations.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, J T; Bridgman, H A; Buhre, B J P; Gupta, R P; Nelson, P F; Wall, T F

    2008-02-25

    Emissions from coal fired power stations are known to be a significant anthropogenic source of fine atmospheric particles, both through direct primary emissions and secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate from emissions of gaseous precursors. However, there is relatively little information available in the literature regarding the contribution emissions make to the ambient aerosol, particularly in the ultrafine size range. In this study, the contribution of emissions to particles smaller than 0.3 mum in the ambient aerosol was examined at a sampling site 7 km from two large Australian coal fired power stations equipped with fabric filters. A novel approach was employed using conditional sampling based on sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) as an indicator species, and a relatively new sampler, the TSI Nanometer Aerosol Sampler. Samples were collected on transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids and examined using a combination of TEM imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis for qualitative chemical analysis. The ultrafine aerosol in low SO(2) conditions was dominated by diesel soot from vehicle emissions, while significant quantities of particles, which were unstable under the electron beam, were observed in the high SO(2) samples. The behaviour of these particles was consistent with literature accounts of sulfate and nitrate species, believed to have been derived from precursor emissions from the power stations. A significant carbon peak was noted in the residues from the evaporated particles, suggesting that some secondary organic aerosol formation may also have been catalysed by these acid seed particles. No primary particulate material was observed in the minus 0.3 mum fraction. The results of this study indicate the contribution of species more commonly associated with gas to particle conversion may be more significant than expected, even close to source. PMID:18054995

  18. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-04-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction (WSOC), and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  19. Bias in Filter-Based Aerosol Light Absorption Measurements Due to Organic Aerosol Loading: Evidence from Ambient Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Lack; Christopher D. Cappa; Tahllee Baynard; Paola Massoli; Berko Sierau; Timothy S. Bates; Patricia K. Quinn; Edward R. Lovejoy; A. R. Ravishankara

    2008-01-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study\\/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS\\/GoMACCS 2006) a filter-based (Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, or PSAP) and a photoacoustic-based aerosol light absorption technique were deployed and here the data are compared. The level of agreement between the two techniques with ambient aerosol depended on the abundance of organic aerosol (OA), with the

  20. Calculation of aerosol collection in fluidized filter beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ushiki; Chi Tien

    1984-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculating aerosol collection in fluidized filter beds. The method employs the bubble assembly model of fluidization and considers the bed to be a series of compartments, each of which comprises two or three phases. Aerosol collection is assumed to occur in these phases in accordance with existing theories of particle deposition. The validity of the

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *South...

  2. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  3. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  4. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    E-print Network

    Hohaus, T.

    In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

  5. Collection of Aerosolized Human Cytokines Using Teflon® Filters

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Jennifer H.; McDevitt, James J.; Fabian, M. Patricia; Hwang, Grace M.; Milton, Donald K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Collection of exhaled breath samples for the analysis of inflammatory biomarkers is an important area of research aimed at improving our ability to diagnose, treat and understand the mechanisms of chronic pulmonary disease. Current collection methods based on condensation of water vapor from exhaled breath yield biomarker levels at or near the detection limits of immunoassays contributing to problems with reproducibility and validity of biomarker measurements. In this study, we compare the collection efficiency of two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices to a filter-based collection method for recovery of dilute laboratory generated aerosols of human cytokines so as to identify potential alternatives to exhaled breath condensate collection. Methodology/Principal Findings Two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices, the SKC® Biosampler and Omni 3000™, as well as Teflon® filters were used to collect aerosols of human cytokines generated using a HEART nebulizer and single-pass aerosol chamber setup in order to compare the collection efficiencies of these sampling methods. Additionally, methods for the use of Teflon® filters to collect and measure cytokines recovered from aerosols were developed and evaluated through use of a high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay. Our results show successful collection of cytokines from pg/m3 aerosol concentrations using Teflon® filters and measurement of cytokine levels in the sub-picogram/mL concentration range using a multiplex immunoassay with sampling times less than 30 minutes. Significant degradation of cytokines was observed due to storage of cytokines in concentrated filter extract solutions as compared to storage of dry filters. Conclusions Use of filter collection methods resulted in significantly higher efficiency of collection than the two aerosol-to-liquid samplers evaluated in our study. The results of this study provide the foundation for a potential new technique to evaluate biomarkers of inflammation in exhaled breath samples. PMID:22574123

  6. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-08-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM>sub>10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and the dimeric sugar trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory (38°28'15''N, 28°24'14''W; 2225 m amsl) on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic ~3900 km east and downwind of North America. Filter-collected aerosol during summer 2012 was analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ?g m-3. Organic aerosol contributed the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol was positively correlated with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from 9/24 and 9/25 aerosol samples collected during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the air masses were very aged (> 12 days). About 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra between m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. WSOC have an average O/C ratio of ~0.45, relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol which might be the result of evaporation and fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplumes and MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with WSOC biomass burning markers and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at Pico had undergone cloud processing. The air masses on 9/25 were more aged (~15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and species characteristic for marine aerosol (e.g. fatty acids). The change in air masses for the two samples was corroborated by the changes in ozone, ethane, propane, morphology of particles, as well as by the FLEXPART retroplumes. In this presentation we will report the first detailed molecular characterization of free tropospheric aged aerosol intercepted at the Pico Mountain Observatory.

  8. A novel Aerosol-Into-Liquid Collector for online measurements of trace metal and elements in ambient particulate matter (PM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbin; Shafer, Martin; Schauer, James; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    A novel monitor for online, in-situ measurement of several important metal species (i.e. Fe, Mn and Cr) in ambient fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is developed based on a recent published high flow rate Aerosol-Into-Liquid Collector. This Aerosol-Into-Liquid Collector collects particles directly as highly concentrated slurry samples, and the concentrations of target metals in slurry samples are subsequently determined in a Micro Volume Flow Cell (MVFC) coupled with absorbance spectrophotometry to detect colored complexes coming from the reactions between target metals and specific reagents. Laboratory tests are conducted to evaluate the performance of the MVFC-absorbance system. The calibration curves of the system are determined using standard solutions prepared by serial dilution. As part of the evaluation, the effects of reaction time, reagent amount and interference on the system are also evaluated. Field evaluations of the online monitor will be performed to validate the ability of this new online sampler in near-continuous collection and measurements. Both laboratory and field evaluations of the novel monitor will indicate that it is an effective and valuable technology for PM collection and characterization of important metal species in ambient aerosols.

  9. Ambient aerosol and its carbon content in Gainesville, a mid-scale city in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chuaybamroong, Paradee; Cayse, Kimberleigh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lundgren, Dale A

    2007-05-01

    Ambient aerosols were collected during 2000-2001 in Gainesville, Florida, using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to study mass size distribution and carbon composition. A bimodal mass distribution was found in every sample with major peaks for aerosols ranging from 0.32 to 0.56 microm, and 3.2 to 5.6 microm in diameter. The two distributions represent the fine mode (<2.5 microm) and the coarse mode (>2.5 microm) of particle size. Averaged over all sites and seasons, coarse particles consisted of 15% carbon while fine particles consisted of 22% carbon. Considerable variation was noted between winter and summer seasons. Smoke from fireplaces in winter appeared to be an important factor for the carbon, especially the elemental carbon contribution. In summer, organic carbon was more abundant. The maximum secondary organic carbon was also found in this season (7.0 microg m(-3)), and the concentration is between those observed in urban areas (15-20 microg m(-3)) and in rural areas (4-5 microg m(-3)). However, unlike in large cities where photochemical activity of anthropogenic emissions are determinants of carbon composition, biogenic sources were likely the key factor in Gainesville. Other critical factors that affect the distribution, shape and concentration were precipitation, brushfire and wind. PMID:17160439

  10. Aqueous photooxidation of ambient Po Valley Italy air samples: Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Sullivan, A. P.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.; Collett, J. L.; Keutsch, F. N.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we conducted aqueous photooxidation experiments with ambient samples in order to develop insights concerning the formation of secondary organic aerosol through gas followed by aqueous chemistry (SOAaq). Water-soluble organics (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone) are formed through gas phase oxidation of alkene and aromatic emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. Their further oxidation in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols can form lower volatility products (e.g., oligomers, organic acids) that remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, thus producing SOA. The aqueous OH radical oxidation of several individual potentially important precursors has been studied in the laboratory. In this work, we used a mist-chamber apparatus to collect atmospheric mixtures of water-soluble gases from the ambient air at San Pietro Capofiume, Italy during the PEGASOS field campaign. We measured the concentration dynamics after addition of OH radicals, in order to develop new insights regarding formation of SOA through aqueous chemistry. Specifically, batch aqueous reactions were conducted with 33 ml mist-chamber samples (TOC ~ 50-100?M) and OH radicals (~10-12M) in a new low-volume aqueous reaction vessel. OH radicals were formed in-situ, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS +/-), and ESI-MS with IC pre-separation (IC/ESI-MS-). Reproducible formation of pyruvate and oxalate were observed both by IC and ESI-MS. These compounds are known to form from aldehyde oxidation in the aqueous phase. New insights regarding the aqueous chemistry of these "more atmospherically-realistic" experiments will be discussed.

  11. Direct observations of N2O5 reactivity on ambient aerosol particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy H. Bertram; Joel A. Thornton; Theran P. Riedel; Ann M. Middlebrook; Roya Bahreini; Timothy S. Bates; Patricia K. Quinn; Derek J. Coffman

    2009-01-01

    N2O5 reactivity has been measured directly for the first time on ambient aerosol particles using an entrained aerosol flow reactor coupled to a custom-built chemical ionization mass spectrometer at two urban locations during summer. The observed N2O5 reactivity is a strong function of both relative humidity (RH) and particle chemical composition. We show that particulate organic mass loadings, together with

  12. SingleParticle Fluorescence Spectrometer for Ambient Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Le Pan; Justin Hartings; Ronald G. Pinnick; Steven C. Hill; Justin Halverson; Richard K. Chang

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence particle spectrometer (FPS) for real-time measurement of the fluorescence spectra of aerosol particles in the size range 1-10 w m diameter is reported. The prototype FPS has a sufficiently high sample rate (from 5 to 28 l\\/min for 3.5 w m to 11 w m diameter particles) to measure aerosol within buildings at practical rates (from 1 up

  13. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duane C. Carlson; John J. DeGange; Paula Cable-Dunlap

    2005-01-01

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  14. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC); DeGange, John J. (Aiken, SC); Cable-Dunlap, Paula (Waynesville, NC)

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF WOODSMOKE AND MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS TO AMBIENT AEROSOL MUTAGENICITY (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity is frequently considered as a screening test for the carcinogenicity of compounds to which humans are exposed. Past estimates of the mutagenicity of ambient aerosol have depended on measurements of the mutagenic potency (refertants/microg) of the extractable organic ...

  16. Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS) 

    E-print Network

    Osborn, Robert John

    2007-09-17

    Separator (DScS) is designed to supply one or more particle size and/or composition analyzers to permit the direct examination of the factors that influence the activation properties of ambient aerosols. The DScS consists of two coupled parallel plate...

  17. Real-time detection of ambient aerosols using photothermal interferometry: Folded Jamin interferometer

    E-print Network

    Real-time detection of ambient aerosols using photothermal interferometry: Folded Jamin, a folded Jamin interferometer design has replaced both the traditional Mach-Zehnder and unfolded Jamin- tional inside an aircraft, low-tech method, and relatively fast response time , these filter

  18. Identification and Characterization of Biogenic SOA Component in Ambient Aerosols Based on Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Q. Zhang; J. Jimenez; J. D. Allan; A. Kiendler-Scharr; J. Tian; M. R. Canagaratna; B. Williams; D. R. Worsnop; H. Coe; A. Goldstein; T. F. Mentel

    2008-01-01

    Recently studies have shown that multivariate factor analysis of the highly time-resolved mass spectral data obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) may allow the classification and simplification of complex organic aerosol (OA) mixtures into components that are chemically meaningful and can be related to different sources and transformation processes. Two factor analysis techniques, including the Multiple Component Analysis

  19. Technical Note: The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.-B.; Zeng, L.-M.; Hu, M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Slanina, J.; Zheng, M.; Wang, Z.-F.; Jansen, R.

    2012-03-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98%) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5%). When applied in two major field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) in China, the GAC-IC system provided high-quality data in ambient conditions even under high loadings of pollutants. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer (43c, Thermo-Fisher, USA; R2 as 0.96), the HONO analyzer (LOPAP, Germany; R2 as 0.91 for nighttime samples), a filter sampler (Tianhong, China; R2 as 0.86 for SO42-), and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne, USA; R2 above 0.77 for major species) over a wide range of concentrations. Through the application of the GAC-IC system, it was identified that 70% of chloride and nitrate by the filter method could be lost during daytime sampling due to high temperature in the rural site of Kaiping. In Changdao field campaign (coastal site) the comparison with the measurements by the GAC-IC suggested that the collection efficiency of AMS might be greatly influenced by high relative humidity (RH) especially in coastal or marine environment. Through laboratory and field studies, this instrument is proved highly reliable, which is particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study various environmental issues such as secondary aerosol and haze formation, as well as climate change.

  20. The application of size- resolved hygroscopicity measurements to understand the physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosol 

    E-print Network

    Santarpia, Joshua Lee

    2005-08-29

    During the summer of 2002, a modified tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) was used to examine the size-resolved hydration state of the ambient aerosol in Southeast Texas. Although there were slight variations in the measured properties over...

  1. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the HR-ToF-AMS. The measurements are interpreted in the context of the measurements over tropical rain forest at Danum and aircraft measurements across Sabah.

  2. Technical Note: The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.-B.; Zeng, L.-M.; Hu, M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Slanina, J.; Zheng, M.; Wang, Z.-F.; Jansen, R.

    2012-11-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98%) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5%). An inter-comparison between the GAC-IC system and the filter-pack method was performed and the results indicated that the GAC-IC system could supply reliable particulate sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and ammonium data in field measurement with a much wider range of ambient concentrations. When applied in two major field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) in China, the GAC-IC system provided high-quality data in ambient conditions even under high loadings of pollutants. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer (43c, Thermo-Fisher, USA; R2 as 0.96), the HONO analyzer (LOPAP, Germany; R2 as 0.91 for samples from 15:00 to 07:00), a filter sampler (Tianhong, China; R2 as 0.86 for SO42-), and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne, USA; R2 above 0.77 for major species) over a wide range of concentrations. Through the application of the GAC-IC system, it was identified that 70% of chloride and nitrate by the filter method could be lost during daytime sampling due to high temperature in the rural site of Kaiping. In Changdao field campaign (coastal site), though a particle dryer was applied, its drying efficiency was not well considered for the collection efficiency of AMS seemed still interfered a bit by local high relative humidity. If the inter-comparison was done with relative humidity below 50%, the correlations ranged from 0.81 to 0.94 for major species. Through laboratory and field studies, this instrument is proved particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study various environmental issues such as secondary aerosol and haze formation, as well as climate change.

  3. Aerosol Optical Properties and Black Carbon Measurements (Ambient and Thermally-Denuded) from Detling, UK During the ClearfLo IOP in Winter 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkowski, K.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Freedman, A.; Ng, N. L.; Allan, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Continuous direct online aerosol and trace gas measurements were made in Delting, UK over the course of four weeks during the winter of 2012 as a part of the ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign. Aerosols were sampled from the London plume (~33 miles WNW), fresh highway (~0.15 mi and 1.5 mi S, A249 and M20), urban (Maidstone; ~3 mi SW), power station (~8 mi N), and Continental European outflow (~50+ mi E/SE). LANL measurements include aerosol absorption and scattering at four wavelengths (375, 405, 532, 781 nm; PASS), aerosol extinction at 450 nm (CAPS), single particle black carbon (BC) number and mass concentrations (SP2), aerosol size distributions (LAS and SMPS), ambient and thermally-denuded aerosol filter samples for SEM and EDS analysis, PM10 C-13 aerosol filter samples, gas-phase CO2, H2O, and CH4 (Picarro). The SP2, PASS, and CAPS were located behind a valve-switching set-up to enable ambient and thermally-denuded (TD) samples to be collected at 10 minute intervals during the campaign, cycling between four temperature settings of 50, 120, 180, and 250C. Absorption from organics and coatings on BC are characterized by comparing the ambient data with the TD samples for the different aerosol sources that were sampled. Measurements from the SP2 are combined with absorption measurements from the three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm to determine wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MACs) and absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs). Extinction measurements from the CAPS compare well with the PASS using extinction angstrom exponents calculated from the PASS. BC increases with CO/CO2, a marker for inefficient combustion. We examine the mixing state of BC in the aged aerosol plumes by using the time lag between the scattering and incandescence signals measured by the SP2 and SEM analysis as a function of denuding temperature. The Detling/ClearfLo dataset is one of the most comprehensive in situ sets of aerosol optical properties to date in terms of the aerosol sources sampled and the number of measurements.

  4. A Novel Method for Direct In Situ Measurements of N2O5 Reactivity on Ambient Aerosol Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Thornton; T. H. Bertram; T. P. Riedel

    2009-01-01

    An experimental approach for the direct measurement of trace gas reactivity on ambient aerosol particles has been developed. The method utilizes a newly designed entrained aerosol flow reactor coupled to a custom- built chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The experimental method is described via application to the measurement of N2O5 reactivity, gamma(N2O5). Laboratory calibration on well characterized aerosol particles show that

  5. Photoacoustic and filter-based ambient aerosol light absorption measurements: Instrument comparisons and the role of relative humidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Arnott; H. Moosmüller; P. J. Sheridan; J. A. Ogren; R. Raspet; W. V. Slaton; J. L. Hand; S. M. Kreidenweis; J. L. Collett

    2003-01-01

    Ambient measurements are reported of aerosol light absorption from photoacoustic and filter-based instruments (aethalometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP)) to provide insight on the measurement science. Measurements were obtained during the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study at the Big Bend National Park in South Texas. The aethalometer measurements of black carbon concentration at this site

  6. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhu S. Gyawali; W. Patrick Arnott; Rahul A. Zaveri; Chen Song; H. Moosmuller; Li Liu; M. Mishchenko; L-W A. Chen; M. Green; J. G. Watson; J. C. Chow

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory

  7. Measurement of organic mass to organic carbon ratio in ambient aerosol samples using a gravimetric technique in combination with chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Yu, Jian Zhen

    Organic materials make up a significant fraction of ambient particulate mass. It is important to quantify their contributions to the total aerosol mass for the identification of aerosol sources and subsequently formulating effective control measures. The organic carbon (OC) mass can be determined by an aerosol carbon analyzer; however, there is no direct method for the determination of the mass of organic compounds, which also contain N, H, and O atoms in addition to C. The often-adopted approach is to estimate the organic mass (OM) from OC multiplying by a factor. However, this OC-to-OM multiplier was rarely measured for a lack of appropriate methods for OM. We report here a top-down approach to determine OM by coupling thermal gravimetric and chemical analyses. OM is taken to be the mass difference of a filter before and after heating at 550 °C in air for 4 h minus mass losses due to elemental carbon (EC), volatile inorganic compounds (e.g., NH 4NO 3), and loss of aerosol-associated water that arise from the heating treatment. The losses of EC and inorganic compounds are determined through chemical analysis of the filter before and after the heating treatment. We analyzed 37 ambient aerosol samples collected in Hong Kong during the winter of 2003, spring of 2004, and summer of 2005. A value of 2.1±0.3 was found to be the appropriate factor to convert OC to OM in these Hong Kong aerosol samples. If the dominant air mass is classified into two categories, then an OM-to-OC ratio of 2.2 was applicable to aerosols dominated by continent-originated air mass, and 1.9 was applicable to aerosols dominated by marine air mass.

  8. Comparison of aerosol and bioaerosol collection on air filters.

    PubMed

    Miaskiewicz-Peska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Air filters efficiency is usually determined by non-biological test aerosols, such as potassium chloride particles, Arizona dust or di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) oily liquid. This research was undertaken to asses, if application of non-biological aerosols reflects air filters capacity to collect particles of biological origin. The collection efficiency for non-biological aerosol was tested with the PALAS set and ISO Fine Test Dust. Flow rate during the filtration process was 720 l/h, and particles size ranged 0.246-17.165 ?m. The upstream and downstream concentration of the aerosol was measured with a laser particle counter PCS-2010. Tested bioaerosol contained 4 bacterial strains of different shape and size: Micrococcus luteus,Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. Number of the biological particles was estimated with a culture-based method. Results obtained with bioaerosol did not confirmed 100% filters efficiency noted for the mineral test dust of the same aerodynamic diameter. Maximum efficiency tested with bacterial cells was 99.8%. Additionally, cells reemission from filters into air was also studied. Bioaerosol contained 3 bacterial strains: Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. It was proved that the highest intensity of the reemission process was during the first 5 min. and reached maximum 0.63% of total number of bacteria retained in filters. Spherical cells adhered stronger to the filter fibres than cylindrical ones. It was concluded that non-biological aerosol containing particles of the same shape and surface characteristics (like DEHS spherical particles) can not give representative results for all particles present in the filtered air. PMID:22523449

  9. Hourly Measurement of the Concentration and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Oxygenated Organic Tracers in Ambient Aerosol: First Results from Berkeley, CA and Rural Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L.; Chan, A.; Worton, D. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Hourly and bi-hourly time-resolved measurements of organic tracer compounds in ambient aerosols have been successfully used to elucidate sources and formation pathways of atmospheric particulate matter. Here we extend the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG), a custom in-situ instrument that collects, desorbs, and analyzes ambient aerosol and semi-volatile compounds with hourly time resolution, to include on-line derivatization and a second, parallel collection cell that provides simultaneous collection of both particle-phase and particle-plus-gas-phase organic compounds. By introducing a silylating agent upon desorption, SVTAG can measure highly oxygenated compounds that are not easily detected using traditional gas chromatography including most of the previously reported oxygenated tracers for biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol. The use of a pair of matched collection cells with parallel sampling and serial analysis provides direct gas-particle partitioning information. One cell collects the total organic fraction of compounds with volatilities lower than a C13 hydrocarbon, while the other cell samples through an activated carbon denuder to selectively remove the gas-phase components. Taken together these provide a direct measurement of gas-particle partitioning to yield a check on classical absorption based partitioning theory while deviations from this theory provide constraints on other driving factors in aerosol formation chemistry, such as oligomerization, salt formation, and acidity. We present here the capabilities and utility of the dual cell SVTAG with derivatization, with chemical insights gained from initial tests on ambient Berkeley air and the first results from a rural site in Alabama obtained during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Tracers for varying isoprene oxidation pathways are used to explore the influence of anthropogenic emissions; concentrations of 2-methyltetrols and 2-methyl glyceric acid provide constraints on the relative importance of NOx and HO2 as the fate of the alkylperoxy (RO2) radical. Measuring these and other known biogenic tracers with hourly time resolution yields detailed diurnal variability patterns of these compounds, elucidating formation timescales and pathways. Gas-particle partitioning of these biogenic oxygenated compounds, as well as oxygenated tracers common in urban environments, are found in many cases to be well-modeled by absorptive partitioning theory. However, for many compounds, the particle-phase fraction is greatly under-predicted by simple absorption. Several commonly used biogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers that are typically considered to exist primarily in the particle phase, such as 2-methyltetrols, are shown to be 20-80% in the gas phase.

  10. Collection of ambient air phenols using an anion exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, M.; Burkholder, H. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Reynolds, S.; Burdick, N. [South Carolina Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States); Pleil, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of collecting vapor phase ambient air phenols by reversible chemical reaction with a solid sorbent. The authors report here enhanced detection limits for ambient phenols using an anion exchange membrane that allows high collection efficiency at 10 L/min sampling rate. The membrane consists of 5 {micro}m particles of the anion exchange resin enmeshed in a Teflon microfibril matrix. This membrane is similar to Empore membranes, with the addition of the anion exchange capacity. Sampling is accomplished using a 10.5 cm (diameter) membrane and a General Metal Works PS-1 sampler. A Teflon-coated glass fiber filter, spiked with deutered phenols, and placed ahead of the membrane, is used to deliver these surrogate recovery standards to the membrane during the sampling. Following sampling, membranes are shaken gently in an acidified mixture of methanol and dichloromethane. The extract is derivatized with BSTFA and analyzed using either GC/FID or EI GC/MS. Analytical methodology allows detection at the 0.02 ppbv level for 12 hrs of sampling ({approximately} 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}).

  11. Temporal variability in Chemical and Stable isotopic characteristics of ambient bulk aerosols over a coastal environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, R.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Sarma, V. V.; Praveen, P.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols are known to influence regional biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in addition to regional radiation budgets. Owing to multiplicity of primary sources of natural and anthropogenic origin, their detailed chemical and isotopic characterization can greatly help in source apportionment and identifying secondary processes. From the roof of NIO-Goa (India) [15.46?N, 73.8oE; at ~55.8 MASL], atmospheric bulk aerosols (n=22) were collected on Quartz filters, from 2009 December to January 2011 covering entire 2010 (except monsoon period) to investigate temporal variability in their chemical and isotopic characteristics of the carbonaceous fraction i.e. TC, TOC and TN mass concentrations and their stable isotopic ratios (?13CTC, ?13CTOC and ?15NTN). Both ?13CTC and ?13CTOC varied in narrow ranges (-24.9±1.1‰, -25.7±0.9‰ respectively), but significant differences were observed between the two during pre-monsoon months (as high as 2.3‰), possibly due to mixing of inorganic mineral dust. ?15NTN values showed a wide range of variability (average = 13.6±7.2‰), with significantly lower values (~2-5‰; as reported earlier by Agnihotri et al. 2011) during pre-monsoon period compared to those during winter (as high as ~26‰). Using ?13CTC values and two end-member mixing model (assuming ?13C of marine and continental carbon as -21 and -27‰ respectively), the average marine carbon fraction for Goa aerosols was estimated as 36±18.5%, significantly higher than reported for Chennai aerosols (~19%) (Pavuluri et al., 2011), but close to the reported average for marine aerosols at Bermuda (38%) (Turekian et al., 2003). Chemical and isotopic characteristics of ambient aerosols over Goa along with contemporaneous meteorological data indicate that winter aerosols contain significant proportion of carbonaceous fraction originated from biomass burning and other anthropogenic activities carried out in northern parts of India, while local marine sources and mineral dust appear to dominate chemical composition of aerosols during pre-monsoon period. References: Agnihotri, R., Mandal, T. K., Karapurkar, S., Naja, M., Gadi, R., Ahammed, Y. N., Kumar, A., Saud, T., and Saxena, M. (2011) Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk aerosols over India and Northern Indian Ocean, Atmos. Environ., 45, 2828-2835, 2011 Pavuluri, C. M., K. Kawamura, T. Swaminathan, and E. Tachibana (2011), Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D18307, doi:10.1029/2011JD015617 Turekian, V. C., S. A. Macko, and W. C. Keene (2003), Concentrations, isotopic compositions, and sources of size-resolved, particulate organic carbon and oxalate in near-surface marine air at Bermuda during spring, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4157, doi:10.1029/2002JD002053

  12. A molecular-level approach for characterizing water-insoluble components of ambient organic aerosol particulates using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willoughby, A. S.; Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-04-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols in the atmosphere is strongly influenced by human emissions, and the effect these have on the environment, human health, and climate change is determined by the molecular nature of these chemical species. The complexity of organic aerosol samples limits the ability to study the chemical composition, and, therefore, the associated properties and the impacts they have. Many studies address the water-soluble fraction of organic aerosols, and have had much success in identifying specific molecular formulas for thousands of compounds present. However, little attention is given to the water-insoluble portion, which can contain most of the fossil material that is emitted through human activity. Here we compare the organic aerosols present in water extracts and organic solvent extracts (pyridine and acetonitrile) of an ambient aerosol sample collected in a rural location that is impacted by natural and anthropogenic emission sources. A semi-quantitative method was developed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine that the amount of organic matter extracted by pyridine is comparable to that of water. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra show that pyridine extracts a molecularly unique fraction of organic matter compared to water or acetonitrile, which extract chemically similar organic matter components. The molecular formulas unique to pyridine were less polar, more aliphatic, and reveal formulas containing sulfur to be an important component of insoluble aerosol organic matter.

  13. A molecular-level approach for characterizing water-insoluble components of ambient organic aerosol particulates using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willoughby, A. S.; Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols in the atmosphere is strongly influenced by human emissions. The effect these have on the environment, human health, and climate change is determined by the molecular nature of these chemical species. The complexity of organic aerosol samples limits the ability to study the chemical composition, and therefore the associated properties and the impacts they have. Many studies have addressed the water-soluble fraction of organic aerosols and have had much success in identifying specific molecular formulas for thousands of compounds present. However, little attention is given to the water-insoluble portion, which can contain most of the fossil material that is emitted through human activity. Here we compare the organic aerosols present in water extracts and organic solvent extracts (pyridine and acetonitrile) of an ambient aerosol sample collected in a rural location that is impacted by natural and anthropogenic emission sources. A semiquantitative method was developed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine that the amount of organic matter extracted by pyridine is comparable to that of water. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra show that pyridine extracts a molecularly unique fraction of organic matter compared to water or acetonitrile, which extract chemically similar organic matter components. The molecular formulas unique to pyridine were less polar, more aliphatic, and reveal formulas containing sulfur to be an important component of insoluble aerosol organic matter.

  14. Characterization of organic ambient aerosol during MIRAGE 2006 on three platforms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gilardoni; S. Liu; S. Takahama; L. M. Russell; J. D. Allan; R. Steinbrecher; J. L. Jimenez; P. F. de Carlo; E. J. Dunlea; D. Baumgardner

    2009-01-01

    Submicron atmospheric aerosol particles were collected during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observation (MILAGRO) in March 2006 at three platforms located in the Mexico City urban area (at the Mexico City Atmospheric Monitoring System building - SIMAT), at about 60 km south-east of the metropolitan area (Altzomoni in the Cortes Pass), and on board the NCAR C130 aircraft.

  15. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from the Photooxidation of Complex Hydrocarbon Mixtures: Composition, effect of SO2, and Relevance to Ambient Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Gao, S.; Knipping, E.; Edgerton, E.; Shahgoli, M.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Edney, E.; Kleindiesnt, T.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J.; Jaoui, M.

    2005-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from single hydrocarbon precursors is commonly studied in smog chamber experiments to obtain SOA yield and organic composition data. However, very few complex air mixture experiments have been conducted to simulate possible conditions in ambient atmospheres. A six-phase experiment involving various combinations of alpha-pinene, toluene, isoprene, and SO2 were irradiated in the EPA's dynamic smog chamber at the National Exposure Research Laboratory in Raleigh, NC. Glass fiber filters and impactor plates were collected for each phase of the experiment to identify and quantify the nature of the SOA composition. The following suite of analytical techniques analyzed the resultant polar organic compounds and the high molecular weight species: liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ESI-ion trap mass spectrometry, matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI)-time of flight mass spectrometry, and high-resolution mass spectrometry. When SO2 is present in the chamber, increases in the gravimetric aerosol mass concentration and in the abundance of polar organic compounds are observed, likely suggesting an acid catalysis effect stemming from the conversion of SO2 to H2SO4 that condenses onto aerosol formed. The addition of isoprene to a alpha-pinene/toluene mixture is found to lower the amount of aerosol produced and is also found to lower the abundance of organic compounds identified by the various analytical techniques. Lastly, many of the polar organic compounds identified and quantified here are also seen in the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network during the summer of 2004. In particular, a sulfur and nitrogen containing organic species (MW = 295 gmol) is found to be the most abundant polar organic species identified in this field study (~28 % on average of the total identified organic mass). This species is also detected in the chamber experiment only when alpha-pinene and SO2 are both present in the chamber, suggesting that this abundant species is likely formed from monoterpene photooxidation. High-resolution mass spectrometry suggests the molecular formula for this species is C10H16NO7S.

  16. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  17. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmüller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 ?m and 10 ?m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA), and Ångström exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  18. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  19. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  20. The Collection 6 'dark-target' MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Patadia, Falguni; Gupta, Pawan; Remer, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms are applied to Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on both Terra and Aqua, creating two streams of decade-plus aerosol information. Products of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size are used for many applications, but the primary concern is that these global products are comprehensive and consistent enough for use in climate studies. One of our major customers is the international modeling comparison study known as AEROCOM, which relies on the MODIS data as a benchmark. In order to keep up with the needs of AEROCOM and other MODIS data users, while utilizing new science and tools, we have improved the algorithms and products. The code, and the associated products, will be known as Collection 6 (C6). While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. In its entirety, the C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties over different surfaces: These include the dark-target DT algorithms to retrieve over (1) ocean and (2) vegetated-dark-soiled land, plus the (3) Deep Blue (DB) algorithm, originally developed to retrieve over desert-arid land. Focusing on the two DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to 84) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such as topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time as we have introduced algorithm changes, we have also accounted for upstream changes including: new instrument calibration, revised land-sea masking, and changed cloud masking. Upstream changes also impact the coverage and global statistics of the retrieved AOD. Although our responsibility is to the DT code and products, we have also added a product that merges DT and DB product over semi-arid land surfaces to provide a more gap-free dataset, primarily for visualization purposes. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6, Level 2 (along swath) DT-products compare at least as well as those from C5. C6 will include new diagnostic information about clouds in the aerosol field, including an aerosol cloud mask at 500 m resolution, and calculations of the distance to the nearest cloud from clear pixels. Finally, we have revised the strategy for aggregating and averaging the Level 2 (swath) data to become Level 3 (gridded) data. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms will result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.02) over land, along with changes in spatial coverage. Changes in calibration will have more impact to Terras time series, especially over land. This will result in a significant reduction in artificial differences in the Terra and Aqua datasets, and will stabilize the MODIS data as a target for AEROCOM studie

  1. Characterization of primary organic aerosol emissions from meat cooking, trash burning, and motor vehicles with high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and comparison with ambient and chamber observations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Claudia; Huffman, Alex; Cubison, Michael J; Aiken, Allison C; Docherty, Kenneth S; Kimmel, Joel R; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; Hannigan, Michael; Jimenez, Jose L

    2009-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emissions from motor vehicles, meat-cooking and trash burning are analyzed here using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). High resolution data show that aerosols emitted by combustion engines and plastic burning are dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic compounds. Meat cooking and especially paper burning emissions contain significant fractions of oxygenated organic compounds; however, their unit-resolution mass spectral signatures are very similar to those from ambient hydrocarbon-like OA, and very different from the mass spectra of ambient secondary or oxygenated OA (OOA). Thus, primary OA from these sources is unlikelyto be a significant direct source of ambient OOA. There are significant differences in high-resolution tracer m/zs that may be useful for differentiating some of these sources. Unlike in most ambient spectra, all of these sources have low total m/z 44 and this signal is not dominated by the CO2+ ion. All sources have high m/z 57, which is low during high OOA ambient periods. Spectra from paper burning are similar to some types of biomass burning OA, with elevated m/z 60. Meat cooking aerosols also have slightly elevated m/z 60, whereas motor vehicle emissions have very low signal at this m/z. PMID:19452899

  2. Characterization of ambient aerosol at a remote site and twin cities of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghauri, B.; Lodhi, A.

    The pollution controls have significantly decreased pollutant concentrations in the industrialized nations in the west while the concentrations are expected to grow in developing countries. In this study the concentrations of major ions i.e SO4 2 -, NO3 -, NO2 -, Cl- , NH4 + and trace metals i.e. Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, Ti and Pb were determined in aerosols at a remote site of Northern Pakistan in July 1996. Later in May 1998, a comparative study of aerosols in two size fractions (bulk &PM10) at 14 sites enabled to understand the anomalous distribution of several constituents present in the ambient air of the twin cities, Islamabad / Rawalpindi 90 km from South East of earlier site. The suspended particulate matter concentrations (bulk and PM10) were 475 ug/m3, 175 ug/m3 respectively. For urban areas Pb, Cd, Zn and Ni are obviously contributed by steel and other allied industries besides vehicle's contribution of lead and cadmium. In Northern area concentrations of Al, K, Ca, and Fe exceeded 1000 ng/m3. The SO2 concentrations varied from 0.03 to 1.2 ppb. Mean SO4 2- and NO3 - concentrations were 5.2 ug/m3 and 3.6 ug/m3 respectively. Concentrations of Se, Ti, Pb, Cd, Sb, Zn and As in all aerosol samples were highly enriched relative to average crustal abundances indicating significant anthropogenic contributions. As the dominant flow pattern from the Arabian Sea through India (monsoon air pattern) this may transport pollution derived aerosol and moisture from distant sources in China or India. Key word index: Aerosol, trace metals , enrichment, anions, air pollution, Islamabad/Rawalpindi, remote site.

  3. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could reflect differences in their viscosity.

  4. Effects of SO2 oxidation on ambient aerosol growth in water and ethanol vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hämeri, K.; Vaattovaara, P.; Joutsensaari, J.; Junkermann, W.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2005-03-01

    Hygroscopicity (i.e. water vapour affinity) of atmospheric aerosol particles is one of the key factors in defining their impacts on climate. Condensation of sulphuric acid onto less hygroscopic particles is expected to increase their hygrocopicity and hence their cloud condensation nuclei formation potential. In this study, differences in the hygroscopic and ethanol uptake properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the Arctic air masses with a different exposure to anthropogenic sulfur pollution were examined. The main discovery was that Aitken mode particles having been exposed to polluted air were more hygroscopic and less soluble to ethanol than after transport in clean air. This aging process was attributed to sulphur dioxide oxidation and subsequent condensation during the transport of these particle to our measurement site. The hygroscopicity of nucleation mode aerosol particles, on the other hand, was approximately the same in all the cases, being indicative of a relatively similar chemical composition despite the differences in air mass transport routes. These particles had also been produced closer to the observation site typically 3-8 h prior to sampling. Apparently, these particles did not have an opportunity to accumulate sulphuric acid on their way to the site, but instead their chemical composition (hygroscopicity and ethanol solubility) resembled that of particles produced in the local or semi-regional ambient conditions.

  5. Effects of SO2 oxidation on ambient aerosol growth in water and ethanol vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hämeri, K.; Vaattovaara, P.; Joutsensaari, J.; Junkermann, W.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-11-01

    Hygroscopicity (i.e. water vapour affinity) of atmospheric aerosol particles is one of the key factors in defining their impacts on climate. Condensation of sulphuric acid onto less hygroscopic particles is expected to increase their hygrocopicity and hence their cloud condensation nuclei formation potential. In this study, differences in the hygroscopic and ethanol uptake properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the Arctic air masses with a different exposure to anthropogenic sulfur pollution were examined. The main discovery was that Aitken mode particles having been exposed to polluted air were more hygroscopic and less soluble to ethanol than after transport in clean air. This aging process was attributed to sulfur dioxide oxidation and subsequent condensation during the transport of these particle to our measurement site. The hygroscopicity of nucleation mode aerosol particles, on the other hand, was approximately the same in all the cases, being indicative of a relatively similar chemical composition despite the differences in air mass transport routes. These particles had also been produced closer to the observation site typically 3-8 h prior to sampling. Apparently, these particles did not have an opportunity to accumulate sulphuric acid on their way to the site, but instead their chemical composition (hygroscopicity and ethanol solubility) resembled that of particles produced in the local or semi-regional ambient conditions.

  6. Phenols and hydroxy-PAHs (arylphenols) as tracers for coal smoke particulate matter: source tests and ambient aerosol assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd R.T. Simoneit; Xinhui Bi; Daniel R. Oros; Patricia M. Medeiros; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Environmental Sciences Program

    2007-11-01

    Source tests were conducted to analyze and characterize diagnostic key tracers for emissions from burning of coals with various ranks. Coal samples included lignite from Germany, semibituminous coal from Arizona, USA, bituminous coal from Wales, UK and sample from briquettes of semibituminous coal, bituminous coal and anthracite from China. Ambient aerosol particulate matter was also collected in three areas of China and a background area in Corvallis, OR (U.S.) to confirm the presence of tracers specific for coal smoke. The results showed a series of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, including PAHs and hydroxy-PAHs as the major tracers, as well as a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of compounds. The tracers that were found characteristic of coal combustion processes included hydroxy-PAHs and PAHs. Atmospheric ambient samples from Beijing and Taiyuan, cities where coal is burned in northern China, revealed that the hydroxy-PAH tracers were present during the wintertime, but not in cities where coal is not commonly used (e.g., Guangzhou, South China). Thus, the mass of hydroxy-PAHs can be apportioned to coal smoke and the source strength modeled by summing the proportional contents of EC (elemental carbon), PAHs, UCM and alkanes with the hydroxy-PAHs. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. HOUSTON URBAN PLUME STUDY, 1974. MICROSCOPICAL IDENTIFICATION OF COLLECTED AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An urban plume study was conducted in Houston during July 1974 to gain preliminary data on the concentration and composition of primary and secondary aerosols contributing to Houston's air pollution problem. Selected membrane filter samples containing urban aerosols were analyzed...

  8. WIDE RANGE AEROSOL CLASSIFIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to design, construct, calibrate, and field test a mobile ambient particulate matter sampler (Wide Range Aerosol Classifier) to collect size-classified samples of large aerosol particles. The sampler design was based on a similar stationary sampling...

  9. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0.1, were obtained. For all samples, the fine PM 1--2.5 fraction accounts for the largest WSOC content (from 37% to 47%), while the ultrafine particles in PM<0.1 contribute the least to the WSOC content (19% to 29%). Spectroscopic measurements (UV-VIS and fluorescence) confirmed structural similarities with aquatic fulvic and hulic acids. However, absorption and emission maxima were shifted to lower wavelengths compared to aquatic standards, indicating the presence of lower MW species and a lower degree of aromaticity. Results showed that the samples collected during September and especially in October had higher MW and higher percentage of aromatic carbon when compared with samples collected during summer months (July/August). Spectroscopy results were confirmed with ESI/MS analysis. That analysis also confirmed presence of four different classes of compounds in ambient aerosols: carboxylic acids, poly-carboxylic acids, organosulfates, and organonitrates.

  10. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx): a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by Ångström Exponents). Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  11. DROPLET PHASE (HETEROGENEOUS) AND GAS PHASE (HOMOGENEOUS) CONTRIBUTIONS TO SECONDARY AMBIENT AEROSOL FORMATION AS FUNCTIONS OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In previous publications (McMurry and Wilson, 1982; McMurry et al., 1981), techniques for determining the relative contributions of gas phase and liquid phase reactions to secondary ambient aerosol formation have been described. In this paper these methods are applied to more rec...

  12. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmüller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    We present the first laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (i.e. 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA';s acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Exact T-matrix method calculations were used to model the absorption and scattering characteristics of fractal-like agglomerates of different compactness and varying number of monomers. With these calculations, we attempted to estimate the number of monomers and fractal dimension of laboratory generated kerosene soot. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009, and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 ?m and 10 ?m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA), and Ångström exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  13. Levoglucosan enhancement in ambient aerosol during springtime transport events of biomass burning smoke to Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xue-Fang; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Engling, Guenter; Chan, Lo-Yin; Wang, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Shi, Si; Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Ming

    2011-02-01

    An intensive field experiment was conducted at an urban and a rural site in Hong Kong to identify the influence of biomass burning emissions transported from distinct regions on ambient aerosol in coastal southeast China. Water-soluble ionic and carbonaceous species, specifically the biomass burning tracer levoglucosan, were analysed. Elevated levoglucosan concentrations with maxima of 91.5 and 133.7 ng m-3 and overall average concentrations of 30 and 36 ng m-3 were observed at the rural and urban sites, respectively. By combining the analysed meteorological data, backward trajectories, fire counts and Aerosol Index from the Earth Probe satellite, southwest China and the northern Philippines, together with the southeast China coast, were identified for the first time as source regions of the transported biomass burning particles at the surface level in rural Hong Kong. Occasional levoglucosan enhancements observed at urban Hong Kong were attributed to local incense and joss paper burning during the Ching-Ming festival period. The contributions of transported biomass burning emissions, especially from the northern Philippines, were estimated to account for 7.5% and 2.9% of OC and PM2.5, respectively.

  14. Atmospheric 7Be in ambient aerosols: Implications to Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Kirpa; Sarin, Manmohan

    2012-07-01

    The environmental radionuclides of natural and anthropogenic origin serve as a robust tool to study various atmospheric processes. Among several of the applications, the most relevant is their ability to serve as tracers for the long-range transport of aerosols and their residence time. In this context, ^{7}Be and ^{210}Pb are of immense use for the atmospheric vertical mixing and transport of Ozone under Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) programme. The ^{7}Be is a cosmogenic nuclide, produced in the atmosphere by spallation of oxygen and nitrogen with high-energy cosmic rays. The production of ^{7}Be is mainly confined to the lower stratosphere. Soon after its production, ^{7}Be gets attached to sub-micron size particles and transported to the lower troposphere via vertical mixing when the atmosphere is relatively thin. It is estimated that stratospheric transport contributes nearly 60% in the spring (March-April) and decreases to ˜25% in the autumn. In contrast, atmospheric ^{210}Pb (t _{1/2} = 22.3 yrs) is formed in the lower atmosphere from the radioactive decay of ^{222}Rn (t _{1/2} = 3.8 days) emanated from the Earth's surface. The relatively short half-life of ^{7}Be (t _{1/2} = 53.3 days) and its constant production serves as an efficient tracer for studying the stratosphere--troposphere exchange (STE). The downward intrusion of O _{3} by STE increases the tropospheric O _{3} concentration. The observations made on ^{7}Be from European high-altitude sites suggest that lower tropospheric O _{3} concentration is influenced by the transport of ozone from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. However, there is lack of systematic measurements of ^{7}Be from high-altitude sites in India. We report here on the long-term (2001-2007) measurements of ^{210}Pb and ^{7}Be in ambient aerosols (n=155) from a high-altitude site (Mt Abu; 24.6 °N and 72.7 °E; ˜1700 m asl) in western India. Bulk-aerosol samples were collected (once every week) from a high-altitude site, Mt Abu (˜1700 m asl) using a high-volume sampler. The sampler was operated at a flow rate of 1.0±0.1 m ^{3} min ^{-1} for ˜24 hrs to filter about 1500 m ^{3} of air through quartz microfiber filters (20 x 25 cm ^{2}). The ^{7}Be activities were assessed by gamma counting of 477.5 keV photo-peak on a low background high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector; whereas ^{210}Pb activities were determined via ^{210}Po (E?= 5.33 MeV) by alpha-spectrometry using silicon surface barrier detectors. The ^{210}Pb activity ranges from (0.19±0.01) to (2.62±0.12) mBq m ^{-3} and that of ^{7}Be from (1.0±0.5) to (19.1±1.0) mBq m ^{-3}. The ^{7}Be/ ^{210}Pb activity ratios vary from 2.7 to 29.1 during the measurement period. In general, ^{7}Be activities and ^{7}Be/ ^{210}Pb ratios (˜10-14) are relatively high during March-June (spring and summer months). The relatively high ^{7}Be/ ^{210}Pb ratios are attributed to the downwelling of stratospheric air masses, enriched in ^{7}Be, when the troposphere is relatively thin and less stable. The surface air-temperature is high in the summer and lighter air-parcel moves vertically upward and drier and dense air (enriched in ^{7}Be) from the stratosphere descends to the lower troposphere. However, the S-T exchange is not observed during post-monsoon and winter months when the atmosphere is stable and stagnant. In contrast to relatively high ^{210}Pb activities, ^{7}Be activity and ^{7}Be/ ^{210}Pb ratio are lower during the post-monsoon and winter seasons (September-December). These results demonstrate the usefulness of ^{7}Be and ^{7}Be/ ^{210}Pb ratio for the S-T exchange and have implications to assess temporal variability in the tropospheric O _{3} in tropical regions.

  15. A method to quantify organic functional groups and inorganic compounds in ambient aerosols using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate chemometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coury, Charity; Dillner, Ann M.

    An attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique and a multivariate calibration method were developed to quantify ambient aerosol organic functional groups and inorganic compounds. These methods were applied to size-resolved particulate matter samples collected in winter and summer of 2004 at three sites: a downtown Phoenix, Arizona location, a rural site near Phoenix, and an urban fringe site between the urban and rural site. Ten organic compound classes, including four classes which contain a carbonyl functional group, and three inorganic species were identified in the ambient samples. A partial least squares calibration was developed and applied to the ambient spectra, and 13 functional groups related to organic compounds (aliphatic and aromatic CH, methylene, methyl, alkene, aldehydes/ketones, carboxylic acids, esters/lactones, acid anhydrides, carbohydrate hydroxyl and ethers, amino acids, and amines) as well as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate were quantified. Comparison of the sum of the mass measured by the ATR-FTIR technique and gravimetric mass indicates that this method can quantify nearly all of the aerosol mass on sub-micrometer size-segregated samples. Analysis of sample results shows that differences in organic functional group and inorganic compound concentrations at the three sampling sites can be measured with these methods. Future work will analyze the quantified data from these three sites in detail.

  16. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2007-12-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converted) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average = 0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation = 0.46 ng/m3) were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  17. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-03-01

    A photo-electric aerosol sensor, a diffusion charger, an Aethalometer, and a continuous particle counter were used along with other real-time instruments to characterize the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (p-PAH) content, and the physical/chemical characteristics of aerosols collected a) in Wilmington (CA) near the Los Angeles port and close to 2 major freeways, and b) at a dynamometer testing facility in downtown Los Angeles (CA), where 3 diesel trucks were tested. In Wilmington, the p-PAH, surface area, particle number, and "black" carbon concentrations were 4-8 times higher at 09:00-11:00 a.m. than between 17:00 and 18:00 p.m., suggesting that during rush hour traffic people living in that area are exposed to a higher number of diesel combustion particles enriched in p-PAH coatings. Dynamometer tests revealed that the p-PAH emissions from the "baseline" truck (no catalytic converter) were up to 200 times higher than those from the 2 vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies, and increased when the truck was accelerating. In Wilmington, integrated filter samples were collected and analyzed to determine the concentrations of the most abundant p-PAHs. A correlation between the total p-PAH concentration (?g/m3) and the measured photo-electric aerosol sensor signal (fA) was also established. Estimated ambient p-PAH concentrations (Average=0.64 ng/m3; Standard deviation=0.46 ng/m3 were in good agreement with those reported in previous studies conducted in Los Angeles during a similar time period. Finally, we calculated the approximate theoretical lifetime (70 years per 24-h/day) lung-cancer risk in the Wilmington area due to inhalation of multi-component p-PAHs and "black" carbon. Our results indicate that the lung-cancer risk is highest during rush hour traffic and lowest in the afternoon, and that the genotoxic risk of the considered p-PAHs does not seem to contribute to a significant part of the total lung-cancer risk attributable to "black" carbon.

  18. Flattening coefficient of aerosols collected on treated slides 

    E-print Network

    Olan-Figueroa, Excel

    1981-01-01

    in all phases of life. In fact, a fundamental property of air appears to be that it contains aerosols. Even in thoroughly filtered air, aerosols will soontaneously form from trace gases under the influence of radiant energy. A great interest exists... PIEZOELECTRIC CERAMIC HOLDER POROUS PLATE ~ DISP E RSED DROPLETS ~ ORIFICE / PLATE 0-RING MONODISPERSE AEROSOL OUT Kr -85 RADIOACTIVE SOURCE DISPERSION AIR PLUG LIQUID ELEC 7IIC: ROPLET GENERATOR DETAIL COMPRESSED AIR DISPERSION AIR...

  19. Elemental composition of organic aerosol: The gap between ambient and laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Heald, Colette L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Zhang, Qi; He, Ling-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Palm, Brett B.; Poulain, Laurent; Kuwata, Mikinori; Martin, Scot T.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.; Liggio, John

    2015-05-01

    A large data set including surface, aircraft, and laboratory observations of the atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios of organic aerosol (OA) is synthesized and corrected using a recently reported method. The whole data set indicates a wide range of OA oxidation and a trajectory in the Van Krevelen diagram, characterized by a slope of -0.6, with variation across campaigns. We show that laboratory OA including both source and aged types explains some of the key differences in OA observed across different environments. However, the laboratory data typically fall below the mean line defined by ambient observations, and little laboratory data extend to the highest O:C ratios commonly observed in remote conditions. OA having both high O:C and high H:C are required to bridge the gaps. Aqueous-phase oxidation may produce such OA, but experiments under realistic ambient conditions are needed to constrain the relative importance of this pathway.

  20. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from the Photooxidation of Complex Hydrocarbon Mixtures: Composition, effect of SO2, and Relevance to Ambient Aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Surratt; S. Gao; E. Knipping; E. Edgerton; M. Shahgoli; J. H. Seinfeld; E. Edney; T. Kleindiesnt; M. Lewandowski; J. Offenberg; M. Jaoui

    2005-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from single hydrocarbon precursors is commonly studied in smog chamber experiments to obtain SOA yield and organic composition data. However, very few complex air mixture experiments have been conducted to simulate possible conditions in ambient atmospheres. A six-phase experiment involving various combinations of alpha-pinene, toluene, isoprene, and SO2 were irradiated in the EPA's dynamic smog

  1. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  2. Theoretical study of collective modes in DNA at ambient temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simona Cocco; Rémi Monasson

    2000-01-01

    The instantaneous normal modes corresponding to radial hydrogen bonds vibrations, torsion, and axial compression fluctuations of a DNA molecule model at ambient temperature are theoretically investigated. Due to thermal disorder, normal modes are not plane waves with a single wave number q but have a finite and frequency dependent damping width. The density of modes rho(nu), the average dispersion relation

  3. COLLECTION, CHEMICAL FRACTIONATION, AND MUTAGENICITY BIOASSAY OF AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of industrialization and consequent increased concentration of urban particulate matter on the incidence of cancer has long been a concern. The first bioassays used to evaluate complex ambient air samples were whole-animal carcinogenesis bioassays. In these studies,...

  4. Determination of Secondary Organic Aerosol Products from the Photooxidation of Toluene and their Implications in Ambient PM 2.5

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Kleindienst; T. S. Conver; C. D. McIver; E. O. Edney

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic aerosol products from photooxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. The laboratory experiments consisted of irradiating toluene\\/propylene\\/NOx\\/air mixtures in a smog chamber operated inthe dynamic mode and collecting submicron secondary organic aerosol samples through a sampling train that consisted of an XAD denuder and a ZefluorTM filter. Oxidation products in

  5. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, in press. 2) Shelley, J. T.; Wiley, J. S.; Hieftje, G. M. Ultrasensitive Ambient Mass Spectrometric Analysis with a Pin-to-Capillary Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow Source. Anal. Chem. 2011, 83(14), 5741-5748; DOI 10.1021/Ac201053q. 3) Albert, A.; Shelley, J.; Engelhard, C. Plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: state-of-the-art in qualitative and quantitative analysis. Anal Bioanal Chem 2014, 406(25), 6111-6127; DOI 10.1007/s00216-014-7989-z.

  6. Seasonal variations and sources of ambient fossil and biogenic-derived carbonaceous aerosols based on 14C measurements in Lhasa, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Shen, Chengde; Cong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Kexin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lichao

    2010-06-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in Lhasa, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. The fractions of contemporary carbon ( fc) in total carbon (TC) of ambient aerosols are presented using radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements. The value of fc represents the biogenic contribution to TC, as the biosphere releases organic compounds with the present 14C/ 12C level ( fc = 1), whereas 14C has become extinct in anthropogenic emissions of fossil carbon ( fc = 0). The fc values in Lhasa ranging from 0.357 to 0.702, are higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but clearly lower than the rural region of Launceston, which indicates a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Seasonal variations of fc values corresponded well with variations of pollutants concentrations (e.g. NO 2). Higher fc values appeared in winter indicating carbonaceous aerosol is more dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes within this season. The lower fc values in summer and autumn may be caused by increased diesel and petroleum emissions related to tourism in Lhasa. ?13C values ranged from - 26.40‰ to - 25.10‰, with relative higher values in spring and summer, reflecting the increment of fossil carbon emissions.

  7. Speciation of Water-Soluble Organic Carbons in Aerosols from two collecting methods: PILS and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, H.; Ahn, Y.; Shin, J.; Lee, M.; Park, M.

    2013-12-01

    Total suspended particles aerosol sampling for collection of 24 h by high volume air sampler at Campus of Korea University in metropolitan city Seoul. To measure WSOC, an aliquot (2 cm2) of quartz fiber filter ( 20.3 × 25.4 cm) was extracted 5 mL Milli-Q water with hot water (80 °C) and room temperature water (25 °C) under ultrasonication (10 min, three times). Hot water extracted method was comparison with PILS samples. WSOC was quantified using a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. For speciation analysis of organic compounds, the extracts were concentrated to dryness using freeze dryer and then derivatized with MSTFA (N-Methyl-N-trimethy- silyltrifluoroacetamide+1% trimethylchlorosilane) and analyzed with GC-MS scan mode. In extracted with hot water, total carbon concentrations were higher than room temperature extracts. Organic compounds widely recognized to be generated from anthropogenic sources with a low solubility at ambient temperature organic were detected in both samples obtained from PILS and hot water extraction. It is demonstrating that difference between total carbon concentration and composition of sampling obtain from two different systems (i.e. PILS and filter) in analytical procedure of WSOCs. Acknowledgement This research was susported by Center for Women In Science, Engineering Technology(WISET) commissioned by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and the National Research Foundation of korea. The authors also acknowledge the support made by a grant from the Korea Basic Science Institute.

  8. Relationship between indoor and outdoor bioaerosols collected with a button inhalable aerosol sampler in urban homes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T.; Grinshpun, S. A.; Martuzevicius, D.; Adhikari, A.; Crawford, C. M.; Luo, J.; Reponen, T.

    2007-01-01

    This field study investigated the relationship between indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne actinomycetes, fungal spores, and pollen. Air samples were collected for 24 h with a button inhalable aerosol sampler inside and outside of six single-family homes located in the Cincinnati area (overall, 15 pairs of samples were taken in each home). The measurements were conducted during three seasons – spring and fall 2004, and winter 2005. The concentration of culturable actinomycetes was mostly below the detection limit. The median indoor/outdoor ratio (I/O) for actinomycetes was the highest: 2.857. The indoor of fungal and pollen concentrations followed the outdoor concentrations while indoor levels were mostly lower than the outdoor ones. The I/O ratio of total fungal spores (median = 0.345) in six homes was greater than that of pollen grains (median = 0.025). The low I/O ratios obtained for pollen during the peak ambient pollination season (spring) suggest that only a small fraction penetrated from outdoor to indoor environment. This is attributed to the larger size of pollen grains. Higher indoor concentration levels and variability in the I/O ratio observed for airborne fungi may be associated with indoor sources and/or higher outdoor-to-indoor penetration of fungal spores compared to pollen grains. PMID:16420496

  9. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam P. Bateman; Sergey A. Nizkorodov; Julia Laskin; Alexander Laskin

    2010-01-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a

  10. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Reactions of HO2 Radical with Inorganic Aerosol Particles under the Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Akimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    The HO2 uptake coefficient for aerosol particles ((NH4)2SO4 and NaCl) under ambient conditions (760Torr and 296K) was measured using an aerosol flow tube(AFT) coupled with a chemical conversion/laser-induced fluorescence(CC/LIF) technique. The CC/LIF technique enabled experiments to be performed at almost the same HO2 radical concentration as that in the atmosphere(~108 molecules cm-3). HO2 radicals were injected into the AFT through a vertically movable Pyrex tube. Injector position dependent profiles of LIF intensity were measured as a function of aerosol concentration at various relative humilities(RH). The uptake coefficients of dry aerosol (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4) particles were < 0.05, while the uptake coefficients of wet particles of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 were estimated to be 0.10 and 0.15, respectively, which suggested that heterogeneous loss was enhanced by the particle containing water. To estimate the contribution of heterogeneous loss of HO2 by aerosol, the diurnal variation of HO2 using a box-model calculation was demonstrated. As a result, the daytime maximum concentrations of HO2 were changed to 95 and 70 %, relative to an absence of heterogeneous loss for marine and urban areas, respectively.

  11. The ambient organic aerosol soluble in water: Measurements, chemical characterization, and an investigation of sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Amy P.

    This thesis characterizes the ambient fine organic carbon (OC) aerosol and investigates its sources through the development and deployment of new analytical measurement techniques. Recognizing that OC is highly chemically complex, the approach was to develop methods capable of quantitatively measuring a large chemical fraction of the aerosol instead of specific chemical speciation. The focus is on organic compounds that are soluble in water (WSOC) since little is known about its chemical nature. The results from this thesis show that WSOC has mainly two sources: biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In urban areas, WSOC increases with plume age, and tracks other photochemically produced compounds. Chemical analysis of WSOC suggests that in urban Atlanta, the SOA is mainly small-chain aliphatic compounds indirectly linked to vehicle emissions. A method was first developed for quantitative on-line measurements of WSOC by extending the application of the Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) from inorganic to organic aerosol measurements. In this approach a PILS captures ambient particles into a flow of purified water, which is then forced through a liquid filter and the carbonaceous content quantified on-line by a Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzer. An instrument was first developed for ground-based measurements and then modified for airborne deployment. Ground-based measurements at the St. Louis - Midwest Supersite during the summer of 2003 showed that the fraction of OC that is water-soluble can have a highly diurnal pattern with WSOC to OC ratios reaching 0.80 during the day and lows of 0.40 during the night. During extended periods under stagnation pollution events, this pattern was well correlated with ozone concentrations. The results are consistent with formation of SOA. Airborne PILS-TOC measurements from the NOAA WP-3D during the New England Air Quality Study/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS/ITCT) 2004 program investigated WSOC sources over the northeastern U.S. and Canada. Two main sources were identified: biomass burning emissions from fires in the Alaska/Yukon region and emissions emanating from urban centers. Biomass burning WSOC was correlated with carbon monoxide (CO) and acetonitrile (R 2 > 0.88). Apart from the biomass burning influence, the highest concentrations were at low altitudes in distinct plumes of enhanced particle concentrations from urban centers. WSOC and CO were highly correlated (R2 > 0.78) in these urban plumes. The ratio of the enhancement in WSOC relative to that of CO was found to be low (˜ 3 microg C/m3/ppmv) in plumes that had been in transit for a short time, and increased with plume age, but appeared to level off at ˜32 microg C/m3/ppmv after approximately one day of transport from the sources. The results suggest WSOC in fine particles is produced from compounds co-emitted with CO and that these emissions are rapidly converted to organic particulate matter within ˜1 day following emission. To further chemically investigate the organic constituents of WSOC, a method for group speciation of the WSOC into hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions has been developed using a XAD-8 resin column. XAD-8 resin coupled with a TOC analyzer allows for direct quantification. Based on laboratory calibrations with atmospherically relevant standards and 13C-NMR ( 13Carbon-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) analysis, the hydrophilic fraction (compounds that penetrate the XAD-8 with near 100% efficiency at pH 2) is composed of short-chain carboxylic acids and carbonyls and saccharides. The fraction of WSOC retained by XAD-8, termed the hydrophobic fraction, includes aromatic acids, phenols, organic nitrates, cyclic acids, and carbonyls and mono-/dicarboxylic acids with greater than 3 or 4 carbons. Only aromatic compounds (or aromatic-like compounds with similar properties) can subsequently be extracted from XAD-8 with high efficiency and are referred to as the recovered hydrophobic fraction. By coupling a PILS with this technique, on-line measurements of WSO

  12. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  13. Aerosol collection of the (Bladewerx Corporation) breathing zone monitor and portable workplace monitor.

    PubMed

    Moore, Murray E; Kennedy, Trevor J; Dimmerling, Paul J

    2007-11-01

    The Radiation Protection Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has a wind tunnel capable of measuring the aerosol collection efficiencies of air sampling devices. In the fall of 2005, the group received an internal Los Alamos request to perform aerosol collection efficiency tests on two air samplers manufactured by the Bladewerx Corporation (Rio Rancho, NM). This paper presents the results from tests performed in the wind tunnel facility at a test velocity of 0.5 m s. The SabreAlert (Portable Workplace Monitor) and the SabreBZM (Breathing Zone Monitor) are both designed to detect and measure the presence of alpha emitting isotopes in atmospheres. The SabreAlert was operated at two test air flow rates of 6 and 45 liters per minute (LPM), and the SabreBZM was operated at two test air flow rates of 3 and 19 LPM. The aerosol collection efficiencies of both samplers were evaluated with oleic acid (monodisperse) liquid droplet aerosols tagged with sodium fluorescein tracer. These test aerosols varied in size from about 2.3 to 17.2 microns (aerodynamic equivalent diameter). The SabreAlert was roughly 100% efficient in aerosol collection at a flow rate of 6 LPM, and had an aerodynamic cutpoint diameter of 11.3 microns at the 45 LPM flow rate. The SabreBZM had an aerodynamic cutpoint diameter of 6.7 microns at the 3 LPM flow rate, but the SabreBZM aerosol collection efficiency never exceeded 13.6% at the 19 LPM test flow rate condition. PMID:18049245

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 AEROSOL AT A SOUTHEASTERN US SITE: FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED ANALYSIS OR PARTICLE PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a field study in the summer of 2000 in the Research Triangle Park (RTP), aerosol samples were collected using a five stage cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The impaction surfaces were stainless steel disks....

  15. Nano-sized aerosol classification, collection and analysis--method development using dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Axel; Buckett, Mary I; Japuntich, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a methodical approach for generating, collecting, and analyzing nano-size (1-100 nm) aerosol from abraded dental composite materials. Existing aerosol sampling instruments were combined with a custom-made sampling chamber to create and sample a fresh, steady-state aerosol size distribution before significant Brownian coagulation. Morphological, size, and compositional information was obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). To create samples sizes suitable for TEM analysis, aerosol concentrations in the test chamber had to be much higher than one would typically expect in a dental office, and therefore, these results do not represent patient or dental personnel exposures. Results show that nano-size aerosol was produced by the dental drill alone, with and without cooling water drip, prior to abrasion of dental composite. During abrasion, aerosol generation seemed independent of the percent filler load of the restorative material and the operator who generated the test aerosol. TEM investigation showed that "chunks" of filler and resin were generated in the nano-size range; however, free nano-size filler particles were not observed. The majority of observed particles consisted of oil droplets, ash, and graphitic structures. PMID:24433286

  16. Improved Aerosol Collection by Combined Impaction and Centrifugal Motion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus willeke; Xuejun Lin; Sergey A. Grinshpun

    1998-01-01

    A new principle for collecting airborne particles, including microorganisms, has been introduced by injecting the particles into a swirling airflow from where they are removed onto a collection surface. A dry surface, a surface coated with an adhesive substance or a surface wetted by a liquid swirled onto the collection surface from a reservoir below can be used in the

  17. Collection of ambient particulate matter by porous vegetation barriers: Sampling and characterization methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhishek Tiwary; Adam Reff; Jeremy J. Colls

    2008-01-01

    Sampling and characterization methods for assessing the effect of vegetative barriers on particulate matter (PM10) concentrations and functional group composition were developed and applied in a case study. Ambient PM10 was concurrently sampled upwind and downwind of a hawthorn hedge at a rural location in the UK. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of PM10 samples were collected to characterize the

  18. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K.; Kelly, T.; Hanft, E.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Walker, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the U.S. EPA's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The U.S. EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to examine ecosystem exposure to nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution and with greater accuracy than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC from September 8th-October 8th, 2010. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by comparing duplicate units and accuracy was evaluated by comparing duplicate MARGAs to duplicate reference denuder/filter packs. The MARGA utilizes a Wet Rotating Denuder (WRD) to collect gases, while aerosols are collected by a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC). Both the WRD and the SJAC produce aqueous sample streams, which are analyzed by online ion chromatography for anions and cations. The reference denuder/filter pack consisted of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and phosphorous acid (H3PO3) coated denuders followed by a Teflon filter, a nylon filter, and a citric acid coated cellulose filter. The assessment of the MARGA units focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3 and NH3 and aerosol SO4-, NO3- and NH4+. To evaluate accuracy, hourly MARGA concentrations were averaged over 12 hours to match with 12-hour integrated concentrations from the reference system. The concentrations were compared using linear regression with performance goals of slope between 0.8-1.2 and y-intercept between -10 ppb and 10 ppb. Accuracy was further quantified as the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between 12-hour MARGA and reference concentrations, with a performance goal of ? 40%. The precision of the MARGA units was evaluated by calculating the MARPD between the corresponding 1 hour concentrations from the two MARGA units, also with a performance goal of ? 40%. The MARGA units performed well for SO2, SO4-, NH3 and NH4+, with these compounds meeting the accuracy and precision goals. The MARGA units did not perform as well for HNO3 and NO3-, with both species linear regression slopes not achieving the accuracy target. Furthermore, for NO3-, the MARPD between both MARGA units and the reference filter pack was greater than 40%. Comparison of total nitrate (HNO3 + NO3-) suggests that the lesser performance of the MARGA units for these compounds likely results from aerosol volatility in the MARGA inlet/tubing or the reference filter pack and exchange of HNO3 with tubing walls. In addition, the NO3- concentrations were low (<0.5 ug m-3) for significant periods of the ETV assessment. Details of the comparison will be examined and suggested instrument improvements will be discussed.

  19. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  20. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol. PMID:19204482

  1. Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Thomas D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Hoover, Mark D.

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post-impact, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the vehicle commander, loader, gunner, and driver. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for depleted uranium concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol.

  2. Using Thermal-Optical Analysis to Examine the OC-EC Split that Characterizes Ambient and Source Emissions Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, B.; Hays, M. D.; Geron, C.; Jetter, J.

    2010-12-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure OC-EC (organic carbon-elemental carbon) ratio in atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a single dual-optics carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of temperature-programming and optics on the OC-EC ratios. The OC-EC ratios for a variety of atmospheric and source emissions aerosols were measured using a National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health method (NIOSH 5040), the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments method (IMPROVE), and a modified NIOSH 5040 method (referred in this paper as NIST-EPA). Use of the dual-optics instrument allowed simultaneous monitoring of the reflectance (TOR) and transmission (TOT) during each thermal protocol. Results showed no statistical difference between NIST-EPA and NIOSH OC-EC ratios for residential cookstove emissions and for an urban aerosol collected in Nairobi, Kenya. However, the OC-EC ratios for diesel exhaust (NIST [TOT and TOR]) and for a denuded rural North Carolina forest aerosol (NIST [TOT]) were significantly greater than the corresponding NIOSH values. Significantly lower IMPROVE (TOT and TOR) OC-EC ratios, compared to NIST-EPA and NIOSH, may be ascribed to the lower temperature protocol of this method. The ratio of TOT-to-TOR for the OC-EC ratio ranged between 1.37 - 1.71 (residential cookstoves), 1.05 - 1.24 (diesel exhaust), 1.63 - 2.23 (rural), and 0.80 - 1.12 (urban) for the three methods. Aerosols containing components susceptible to charring (such as water soluble organic compounds typical of rural and cookstove aerosols) tend to show the higher OC-EC variability among the methods when compared to diesel-impacted aerosols, which showed little to no detectable pyrolyzed carbon (PyC). Different sample types, due to their various chemical compositions, behave differently under dissimilar thermal and optical conditions, such that the search for a “universal” thermal-optical method for all sample types remain indeterminate until a suitable standard for OC and EC particulate in atmospheric aerosols can be developed.

  3. Heavy Metals in the Aerosols Collected at Two Stations in Mallorca (Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mateu; F. Bauzá de Mirabó; R. Forteza; V. Cerdà; M. Colom; M. Oms

    1999-01-01

    An extensive study of the different heavy metals (Fe, Mn Ni, Cr, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu) present in the atmospheric aerosols collected at two stations in Mallorca located in the evirons of a new incinerator plant has been carried out. The aim of this study is to establish the quality of the air surrounding this new MSW (Municipal Solid Waste)

  4. Efficient Collection of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Particle Concentrator—Electrostatic Precipitator Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bangwoo Han; Neelakshi Hudda; Zhi Ning; Yong-Jin Kim; Constantinos Sioutas

    2009-01-01

    A novel particle sampling methodology developed recently by our group (Han et al. 2008) has been extended in this article to collect atmospheric particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) for chemical and biological–toxicological analysis. Particles are grown to super-micron droplets via condensation of ultrapure deionized water, and concentrated by virtual impaction in the versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES). The grown

  5. Ambient sulfate aerosol deposition in man: modeling the influence of hygroscopicity.

    PubMed Central

    Martonen, T B; Barnett, A E; Miller, F J

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfate aerosols [H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4] are of international concern because of their global prevalence and potential irritant or toxic effects on humans. To assess hazards following inhalation exposure, the total dose delivered to the human respiratory tract and its regional distribution must be determined. The mass median aerodynamic diameter of the inhaled aerosol will influence the sites of deposition in the respiratory tract. Atmospheric sulfate aerosols are hygroscopic and will have changing particle sizes and densities as they absorb water vapor in the humid environment of the human respiratory tract. Experimental and theoretical data that describe particle size as a function of temperature and relative humidity were used in computer subroutines of an aerosol deposition model in order to calculate the dose dispersion of H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4 aerosols in man. Different temperature and relative humidity environments that approximately correspond to nasal and oral breathing were studied. The predicted deposition patterns are very different from those of nonhygroscopic aerosols with identical inhaled mass median aerodynamic diameter values. PMID:4076076

  6. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  7. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  8. Photoacoustic and filter-based ambient aerosol light absorption measurements: Instrument comparisons and the role of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmüller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.; Raspet, R.; Slaton, W. V.; Hand, J. L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Ambient measurements are reported of aerosol light absorption from photoacoustic and filter-based instruments (aethalometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP)) to provide insight on the measurement science. Measurements were obtained during the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study at the Big Bend National Park in South Texas. The aethalometer measurements of black carbon concentration at this site correlate reasonably well with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption, with a slope of 8.1 m2/g and a small offset. Light absorption at this site never exceeded 2.1 Mm-1 during the month of collocated measurements. Measurements were also obtained, as a function of controlled relative humidity between 40% and 90%, during the Photoacoustic IOP in 2000 at the Department of Energy Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site (SGP). PSAP measurements of aerosol light absorption correlated very well with photoacoustic measurements, but the slope of the correlation indicated the PSAP values were larger by a factor of 1.61. The photoacoustic measurements of light absorption exhibited a systematic decrease when the RH increased beyond 70%. This apparent decrease in light absorption with RH may be due to the contribution of mass transfer to the photoacoustic signal. Model results for the limiting case of full water saturation are used to evaluate this hypothesis. A second PSAP measured the light absorption for the same humidified samples, and indicated very erratic response as the RH changed, suggesting caution when interpreting PSAP data under conditions of rapid relative humidity change.

  9. Thermophoresis and Its Thermal Parameters for Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara

    2007-08-01

    The particle collection efficiency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25mu m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  10. THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, M.; Gundel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler’s heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25?m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  11. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ?g m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ? 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in WSOC species and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory had undergone cloud processing before reaching the site. Finally, the air masses on 9/25 were more aged (∼15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and other species characteristic for marine aerosol such as fatty acids. The change in air masses for the two samples was corroborated by the changes in ozone and the non-methane hydrocarbons ethane and propane, morphology of particles, as well as by the FLEXPART retroplume simulations. This manuscript presents the first detailed molecular characterization of free tropospheric aged aerosol intercepted at a lower free troposphere remote location in the North Atlantic.

  12. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using bioaerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Paul T.; McJimpsey, Erica L.; Coffee, Keith R.; Fergenson, David P.; Riot, Vincent J.; Tobias, Herbert J.; Woods, Bruce W.; Gard, Eric E.; Frank, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  13. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (?) of 10-4, and both ?PAA and ?H2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of ?PAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas ?H2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar ? value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This indicates that at high OH radical concentrations, photochemical formation or removal of nitrophenols can be faster than exchange between the two phases. The dependence between the concentrations and isotope ratios of the nitrophenols and meteorological conditions as well as pollution levels (NO2, O3, SO2 and CO) demonstrate that the influence of precursor concentrations on nitrophenol concentrations is far more important than the extent of photochemical processing.

  15. Characterization of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Ryu, J.; Maskey, S.; Jung, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2010-11-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon that leads to low visibility, and is mostly due to elevated levels of fine particulate matter. It can have effects on cloud formation, public health, agriculture, and even the global climate. Although urban haze has been increasing in occurrence over the past several years over the Seoul-Incheon metropolis, Korea, studies of the morphology and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles by single-particle analysis during haze episodes have rarely been conducted. Herein, a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyze individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13-18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October). Overall, 3600 particles in 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were measured by low-Z particle EPMA. Based on quantitative X-ray analysis, together with secondary electron images of individual particles, we successfully identified the aerosol particle types as follows: elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, genuine (fresh) and reacted (aged) sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMg(CO3)2, etc.), and K-containing, Fe-rich, and fly ash particles. By analyzing the relative abundances of different particle types, it was concluded that (a) on non-haze days, reacted sea-salts and reacted mineral dust particles were abundant in both the PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5 fractions (with relative abundances of 65.0% and 57.7%, respectively); whereas on haze days, the relative abundances of OC and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles were significantly elevated, indicating that organic matter and secondary aerosols were abundant in the atmosphere when haze occurred. (b) in PM2.5-10 fractions, sea-salt and mineral dust particles reacted with NOx/HNO3 significantly outnumbered those reacted with SO2/H2SO4, no matter whether they were collected on haze or non-haze days; but in PM1.0-2.5 fractions on non-haze days, the nitrate-containing reacted particles significantly outnumbered the sulfate-containing ones, whereas it was the reverse on haze days, implying that on haze days there were special sources or formation mechanisms for the reacted fine aerosol particles (aerodynamic diameter<2.5 ?m). It is hypothesized that motor vehicles, biomass burning from the areas surrounding Incheon, and haze transported from Eastern China are the major contributors to urban haze formation in Incheon under stagnant meteorological conditions such as low wind speed, high relative humidity, etc.

  16. Direct measurement of the impact of the reactive uptake of ammonia and alkylamines on the CCN activity of ambient aerosol sampled during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Ryder, O. S.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Surratt, J. D.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Bairai, S. T.; Hicks, W.; Renfro, J.; Brady, J.; Schill, S.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The neutralization of condensed-phase organic acids via reaction with gas-phase ammonia or alkylamines to form ammonium and amminium salts, respectively, has been shown to change the supersaturated hygroscopicity (CCN activity) of laboratory generated organic aerosol (1). Understanding the extent to which CCN activity is perturbed by the reactive uptake of reduced nitrogen gases permits us to assess the sensitivity of current models of hygroscopicity to future changes in the concentration of ammonia and alkylamines. Data presented will focus on the measurement of ambient aerosol CCN activity during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign at Look Rock, TN, as well as changes in CCN activity following the reactive uptake of gas-phase methylamine, dimethylamine, and ammonia. Ambient CCN measurements are compared with literature values from laboratory studies focusing on SOA formed via isoprene oxidation. Implications for the effect of these multi-phase reactions on the cloud formation properties of ambient aerosols and the comparison of field measurements with laboratory-based studies of model compounds will be discussed. References: 1. Dinar, E. et al., CCN Activity and Hygroscopic growth of organic aerosols following reactive uptake of ammonia, Environ. Sci. Technol., 42, 793-799, 2008.

  17. Ambient particle characterization by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry in an urban area of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of aerosol particles in Beijing urban area, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from April 22 to May 4, 2011. 510,341 particles out of 2,953,200 sized particles were characterized by SPAMS in combination with the ART-2a neural network algorithm. The particles were classified as rich-K (39.79%), carbonaceous species (32.7%), industry metal (19.2%), dust (5.7%), and rich-Na (1.76%). Industrial emissions related particles, rich-Fe, rich-Pb, and K-nitrate, were the major components of aerosol particles during haze periods, which were mainly from the steel plants and metal smelting processes around Beijing. Under stagnant meterological conditions, these regional emissions have a vital effect on haze formation. Organic carbon (OC) particles were attributed to biomass burning. NaK-EC was likely to come from local traffic emissions. Internally mixed organic and elemental carbon (OCEC) was found to be from possible sources of local traffic emission and biomass burning. It was found that coarse dust particles were mainly composed of four different types of dust particles, dust-Si, dust-Ca, dust-Al, and dust-Ti. It is the first time that SPAMS was used to study a dust storm in Beijing. Our results showed that SPAMS could be a powerful tool in the identification and apportionment of aerosol sources in Beijing, providing useful reference information for environmental control and management.

  18. AMBIENT SULFATE AEROSOL DEPOSITION IN MAN: MODELING THE INFLUENCE OF HYGROSCOPICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric sulfate aerosols (H2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4HSO4) are of international concern because of their global prevalence and potential irritant or toxic effects on humans. To assess hazards following inhalation exposure, the total dose delivered to the human respiratory tract...

  19. From molecular clusters to nanoparticles: Role of ambient ionization in tropospheric aerosol formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fangqun Yu; Richard P. Turco

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the role of background ionization, associated mainly with galactic cosmic radiation, in the generation and evolution of ultrafine particles in the marine boundary layer. We follow the entire course of aerosol evolution, from the initial buildup of molecular clusters (charged and uncharged) through their growth into stable nanoparticles. The model used for this purpose is based on a

  20. SMOG CHAMBER STUDIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM IRRADIATED HYDROCARBONS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the physics and chemistry of aerosols is fundamental to evaluating health risks and developing and evaluating atmospheric models. However, as noted in a recent NRC report only about 10% of the organics in PM2.5 have been identified. A significant portion of the un...

  1. PASSIVE AEROSOL SAMPLER FOR CHARACTERIZATION, AMBIENT CONCENTRATION, AND PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an extended abstract of a presentation made at the Air and Waste Management Association's Symposium on Air Quality Measurement Methods and Technology, Durham, NC, May 9-11, 2006. The abstract describes the theory, design, and initial testing of a passive aerosol sampler f...

  2. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  3. A method for on-line measurement of water-soluble organic carbon in ambient aerosol particles: Results from an urban site

    E-print Network

    Weber, Rodney

    and the carbon content quantified by a Total Organic Carbon analyzer providing continuous six-minute integralA method for on-line measurement of water-soluble organic carbon in ambient aerosol particles July 2004. [1] An instrument for on-line continuous measurement of the water-soluble organic carbon

  4. Contribution of wood combustion in winter submicron ambient aerosols over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulas, Iasonas; Fourtziou, Luciana; Zarmpas, Pavlos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Liakakou, Eleni; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    Given that a smog pollution problem, mostly attributed to wood burning in fireplaces and stoves, is currently emerging in the Athens metropolitan area, several monitoring instruments were deployed at the National Observatory of Athens facilities in the region of Thissio, downtown Athens . These included an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor with 30 minute time resolution and a Particle Into Liquid Sampler coupled with Ion Chromatography with 15 minute time resolution. The campaign duration was from December 2013 to February 2014 and the aim was to investigate the chemical composition of ultrafine aerosols connected to biomass burning.. Many events of high particulate matter concentrations (exceeding the 50 ?g/m3 daily limit) were observed during night-time, with maximum concentrations occurring when stagnant atmospheric conditions prevailed. Potassium measured by the PILS - IC, and the m/z = 60 fragment measured by the ACSM, was initially used as a tracer of biomass burning events. A good correlation was determined for those two factors, allowing for safe conclusions concerning the identification of these aforementioned biomass burning events. For utmost certainty, Black Carbon measurements coming from three different instruments, was also used. As a second step, Positive Matrix Factorization analysis was performed, using the SoFi interface, which utilizes the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) (Canonaco et Al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 3649-3661, 2013), for the source apportionment of the organic particulate matter, determined by the ACSM. This analysis revealed a very important Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) factor with a clear diurnal cycle, showing maxima in the time interval from 21:00 in the evening to 02:00 in the morning. A Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA) factor is also present with a maximum during the same time interval, attributed to fossil fuel used in central heating systems, and a secondary maximum during the day, attributed to city traffic. Two more factors were determined, an Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA) factor implying processing in the atmosphere and a minor Cooking Organic Aerosol (COA) factor.¬

  5. Ambient gas/particle partitioning. 2: The influence of particle source and temperature on sorption to dry terrestrial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Schwarzenbach, René P; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2008-08-15

    In a companion paper we reported that, for apolar and most polar compounds, the dominating sorption mechanism governing ambient gas/particle partitioning under dry conditions is absorption into a water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase, whereas under moist conditions, polar and ionized compounds can partition additionally into a mixed-aqueous phase. In order to understand how sorption into the WIOM varies for particles from diverse terrestrial locations, we looked at over 500 equilibrium gas/particle partitioning constants, Kip, measured at a specific temperature and relative humidity (15 degrees C, 50% RH), covering aerosol samples from all seasons and various locations. The data indicate that for every sample the WIOM exhibits similar intermolecular interactions with gas-phase organic compounds. For a given compound, the Kip values usually vary within a factor 3 for different aerosol samples, though they could vary by up to an order of magnitude. This is most likely due to variations in the WIOM weight fraction. Fitted poly parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs) were validated by giving good predictions of Kip values for many SVOCs in the literature, including n-alkanes, organochlorines, PCBs, though not PAHs as much of the particle-bound PAHs are likely nonexchangeable with the air phase. This study also investigated the influence of temperature on partitioning to WIOM, and found thatthe temperature dependence of Kip values can be reasonably predicted using the pure compound's enthalpy of vaporization. PMID:18767650

  6. Ambient measurements of light-absorption by agricultural waste burning organic aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Favez; Stéphane C. Alfaro; Jean Sciare; Hélène Cachier; Magdy M. Abdelwahab

    2009-01-01

    Absorption properties (absorption Ångstrom exponent and mass absorption efficiency) of agricultural waste burning organic aerosols (AWB-OA) and their impact on total absorption were investigated in Cairo (Egypt) during the post-harvest rice straw burning autumn season. At 370nm, AWB-OA were found to account for more than 25% of total absorption on average for the period of study (and for ?50% during

  7. Evaluation of Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy Applied to an Ambient Urban Aerosol Sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaacov Mamane; Robert Willis; Teri Conner

    2001-01-01

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) allows automated analysis of particle size, chemistry, and particle classification. In combination with manual SEM and bulk analytical techniques

  8. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 ?m), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 ?m) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  9. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I, fractioned concentrations are still under investigation, and will be reported and discussed during the meeting. For seasonal variation, in general, concentrations of halogens were the lowest in summer and higher in fall and winter, reflecting air mass movement and wind speed around Okinawa, Japan.

  10. Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications 

    E-print Network

    Irshad, Hammad

    2002-01-01

    Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded...

  11. Detection of Ambient Ultrafine Aerosols by Single Particle Techniques During the SOAR 2005 Campaign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura G. Shields; Xueying Qin; Stephen M. Toner; Kimberly A. Prather

    2008-01-01

    The significant and largely unregulated presence of ultrafine particles in the atmosphere is a growing environmental concern. Understanding the formation and sources of ambient ultrafine particles represents a major goal, but analyzing such small particles is a considerable analytical challenge. This study demonstrates how real-time measurements of particle size and chemistry, coupled with gas-phase measurements, can provide unique insight into

  12. COMPARISON OF TWO PARTICLE-SIZE SPECTROMETERS FOR AMBIENT AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS. (R827354C002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an ongoing debate on the question which size fraction of particles in ambient air may be responsible for human health effects observed in epidemiological studies. Since there is no single instrument available for the measurement of the particle-size distribution over ...

  13. Inflammatory Cytokine Response to Ambient Particles Varies due to Field Collection Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weidong; Berhane, Kiros; Liu, Feifei; Verma, Gaurav; Peden, David; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Fruin, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In vitro assays of biological activity induced by particulate matter (PM) are a tool for investigating mechanisms of PM health effects. They have potential application to exposure assessment in chronic disease epidemiology. However, there has been little reporting of the impact of real-world PM collection techniques on assay results. Therefore, we examined the effect of sampling duration and postsampling delays in freezing on PM-induced biological activity. Duplicate samples of respirable ambient Los Angeles PM were collected on polyurethane foam filters during 17 days and during three contemporaneous consecutive shorter periods. After collection, one duplicate was stored at ambient temperature for 24 hours before freezing; the other was frozen immediately. Cytokine response (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) to PM aqueous extract was assessed in THP-1 cells, a model for evaluating monocyte/macrophage lineage cell responses. There was consistent 3- to 4-fold variation in PM-induced cytokine levels across the three collection intervals. Compared with levels induced by PM pooled across the three periods, continuously collected PM-induced levels were reduced by 25% (IL-6) to 39% (IL-8). The pattern of cytokine gene expression response was similar. Cytokine level variation by time to freezing was not statistically significant. PM-induced inflammatory response varied substantially over a weekly time scale. We conclude that long PM sampling interval induced less activity than the average of equivalent shorter consecutive sampling intervals. Time to freezing was less important. Implications for development of metrics of long-term spatial variation in biological exposure metrics for study of chronic disease merit further investigation. PMID:23306836

  14. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt-containing boundary layer. Sea salt-cored aggregates could form when ash particles travel over a maritime environment and sea salt aerosol could easily be incorporated in the plume from the surrounding atmosphere. When the particles are sampled, pressure drops within the DRUM impactor cause the water in the droplet to evaporate, leaving behind ash aggregated with salt

  15. Evaporation Kinetics and Phase of Laboratory and Ambient Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan G.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense efforts to find additional SOA sources but leaving the assumption of rapid SOA evaporation unchallenged. We characterized room-temperature evaporation of pure SOA and SOA formed in the presence of spectator organic vapors with and without aging. We find that it takes ~24 hrs for pure SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ~10 minutes timescales predicted by models. The presence of spectator organic vapors and aging dramatically reduces the evaporation, and in some cases nearly stops it. For all cases, SOA evaporation behavior is size independent and does not follow the liquid droplet evaporation kinetics assumed by models.

  16. Ambient aerosol chlorine concentrations and artefacts during the MEGAPOLI Paris campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furger, Markus; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay; Crippa, Monica; Poulain, Laurent; Sciare, Jean; Flechsig, Uwe; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements, especially those that are toxic, can affect the environment in significant ways. Studying them is advantageous with respect to a refinement of source apportionment when measured with high time resolution and appropriate size segregation. This approach is especially useful in urban environments with numerous time-variant emission sources distributed across a relatively narrow space. Two field campaigns took place in the framework of the MEGAPOLI project in Paris, France: one in the summer of 2009 (1-31 July), the other in the winter of 2010 (11 Jan - 10 Feb). Rotating drum impactors (RDI) were operated at an urban and a suburban site in each campaign. The RDI segregated the aerosols into three size ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3) and sampled with 2-hour time resolution. The samples were analyzed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS), where a broad range of elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn) was analyzed for each size range. Time series of the analyzed elements for the different sites and campaigns were prepared to characterize the aerosol trace element composition and temporal behavior for different weather situations and urban environments. Quality assurance was performed partly by intercomparison with independent measurements. An exceptional behavior was observed for chlorine (Cl), where periods with zero RDI concentration alternated with periods of normal load. Zero concentrations were not observed in particle-into-liquid (PILS) measurements. This identifies the observed behavior as a RDI sampling artefact. Nevertheless, the non-zero periods of Cl concentrations are still a gain in information compared to conventional sampling techniques, mainly due to the high time resolution.

  17. A new direct thermal desorption-GC/MS method: Organic speciation of ambient particulate matter collected in Golden, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Luyi C.; Ke, Fu; Wang, Daniel K. W.; Dann, Tom; Austin, Claire C.

    Particulate matter having an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) is thought to be implicated in a number of medical conditions, including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart attack, and aging. However, very little chemical speciation data is available for the organic fraction of ambient aerosols. A new direct thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) method was developed for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM2.5. Samples were collected in Golden, British Columbia, over a 15-month period. n-Alkanes constituted 33-98% by mass of the organic compounds identified. PAHs accounted for 1-65% and biomarkers (hopanes and steranes) 1-8% of the organic mass. Annual mean concentrations were: n-alkanes (0.07-1.55 ng m -3), 16 PAHs (0.02-1.83 ng m -3), and biomarkers (0.02-0.18 ng m -3). Daily levels of these organics were 4.89-74.38 ng m -3, 0.27-100.24 ng m -3, 0.14-4.39 ng m -3, respectively. Ratios of organic carbon to elemental carbon (OC/EC) and trends over time were similar to those observed for PM2.5. There was no clear seasonal variation in the distribution of petroleum biomarkers, but elevated levels of other organic species were observed during the winter. Strong correlations between PAHs and EC, and between petroleum biomarkers and EC, suggest a common emission source - most likely motor vehicles and space heating.

  18. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART II: FIELD EVALUATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents results from a field evaluation of a mobile versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES), designed to enhance the ambient concentrations of ultrafine (less than 0.18 ...

  19. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN-VIVO AND IN-VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART II. FIELD EVALUATION. (R826232)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract This study presents results from a field evaluation of a mobile versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES), designed to enhance the ambient concentrations of ultrafine (less than 0.18 ...

  20. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 ?m were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular dicarboxylic acids as well as sugars and sugar related compounds. Additionally fatty acids were analyzed to investigate surface active substances. Usually, the highest PM1 concentrations were observed during periods with prevailing wind directions from southern areas, while northern wind directions led to significantly lower concentrations. The main components of the fine particles are inorganic ions like the secondary formed ammonium nitrate und ammonium sulphate, as well as carbonaceous material. The organic carbon fraction is mostly dominated by water soluble organic carbon (80% in average). High concentrations of tracers like the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (Iinuma et al., 2007) suggest biomass burning emissions as a dominant source of organic particles in the area. A significant fraction of PM1 remains unidentified and most likely consists of crust material like dust as well as water. Iinuma, Y., E. Brüggemann, T. Gnauk, K. Müller, M. O. Andreae, G. Helas, R. Parmar, and H. Herrmann (2007), Source characterization of biomass burning particles: The combustion of selected European conifers, African hardwood, savanna grass, and German and Indonesian peat, J. Geophys. Res. [Atmos.], 112(D8), Doi 10.1029/2006jd007120.

  1. A method for on-line measurement of water-soluble organic carbon in ambient aerosol particles: Results from an urban site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Sullivan; R. J. Weber; A. L. Clements; J. R. Turner; M. S. Bae; J. J. Schauer

    2004-01-01

    An instrument for on-line continuous measurement of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component of aerosol particles is described and results from an urban site in St. Louis are presented. A Particle-into-Liquid Sampler impacts ambient particles, grown to large water droplets, onto a plate and then washes them into a flow of purified water. The resulting liquid is filtered and the

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols: Theory, techniques, and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Daniel Weis

    1998-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere is filled with a variety of suspended solid and liquid particles of widely varying size, composition, and structure. The particles, and the surrounding gases, are collectively referred to as aerosols. Here, infrared (IR) extinction spectroscopy has been applied to study laboratory-generated aerosols under ambient conditions (300 K, 1 bar). The dissertation begins with reviews of the importance

  3. Organic analysis of ambient samples collected near Tank 241-C-103: Results from samples collected on May 12, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Lucke, R.B.; Young, J.S.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes organic analyses results from ambient samples collected both upwind and through the vapor sampling system (VSS) near Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-103 (referred to as Tank C-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed. Quantitative results were obtained for organic compounds. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. We observed 39. Of these, only one was observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrument detection limit. Dichloromethane was above the detection limits using both methods, but the result from the TO-14 method is traceable to a standard gas mixture and is considered more accurate. Organic analytes were found only in the sample collected through the VSS, suggesting that these compounds were residual contamination from a previous sampling job. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text.

  4. OM/OC Ratio and Specific Attenuation Coefficient in Ambient Particulate Matter at a Rural Site in Southern Ontario: Implications for Aerosol Aging and Emission Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. W.; Huang, L.; Leaitch, R.; Sharma, S.; Brook, J.; Slowik, J.; Abbatt, J.

    2008-05-01

    Carbonaceous species (organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC)) contribute a large portion of atmospheric fine particle mass and influence air quality, human health, and climate forcing. However, their emission sources and atmospheric aging processes are not well understood. The OM/OC ratio, defined as the organic mass per unit OC mass, is useful to understand the degree of oxidation of aerosol particles in atmospheric processes. We define the modified BC/EC (mod BC/EC) ratio as the ratio of the non-scattering corrected absorption coefficient per unit mass of EC. The mod BC/EC ratio has a similar meaning as the site specific attenuation coefficient, which is an important parameter used to convert light absorption measurements to black carbon mass. The mod BC/EC ratio can vary due to light scattering effect on absorption measurements, in which the oxygenated organics may play a role. The pyrolysis organic carbon (POC) is defined as the carbon mass fraction obtained at T= 870°C under a pure helium environment using the thermal separation method [Huang et al., 2006]. Since POC mass is generally proportional to the amount of oxygenated OC, studying the relationships among OC, EC, POC, as well as OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios may help us understand the mechanisms of aerosol aging from different emission sources. Two 1-month field studies were conducted at a rural site in southern Ontario (NW of Toronto) during fall 2005 and spring 2007. Quartz filter samples were collected and analyzed for OC, POC, and EC concentrations using a thermal/optical method [Huang et al., 2006]. Together with the total organic matter measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the absorption coefficient obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), the OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios for ambient aerosols were obtained. Our results show that when air mass was mainly from south, OC, POC, and EC were relatively high, with average ratios of OC/EC, OM/OC, and POC/EC as 1.94, 1.41, and 0.52, respectively; this indicates significant anthropogenic impacts and relatively large portion of oxygenated OC, which might be due to either primary emissions or photo-chemical reactions occurred in a short period of time. When air mass was mainly from north, OC, POC, and EC were much lower, with average ratios of OC/EC, OM/OC, and POC/EC as 3.10, 1.20, and 0.79, respectively; this suggests less influence from anthropogenic emissions and relatively aged air mass from biogenic-source dominated clean air. Using POC, we estimate the specific attenuation at the site to be 5.8 m2 g-1 independent of the air mass origin. The relationships among OM/OC, mod BC/EC, and POC will be further discussed. References: Huang, L., Brook, J.R., Zhang, W., Li, S.M., Graham, L., Ernst, D., Chivulescu, A., and Lu, G. (2006) Stable isotope measurements of carbon fractions (OC/EC) in airborne particulate: a new dimension for source characterization and apportionment, Atmospheric Environment, 40, 2690-2705.

  5. Spectral light absorption by ambient aerosols influenced by biomass burning in the Amazon Basin. I: Comparison and field calibration of absorption measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, O.; Artaxo, P.; Arnott, W. P.; Chand, D.; Gatti, L. V.; Frank, G. P.; Hoffer, A.; Schnaiter, M.; Andreae, M. O.

    2006-08-01

    Spectral aerosol light absorption is an important parameter for the assessment of the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Although on-line measurement techniques for aerosol light absorption, such as the Aethalometer and the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), have been available for two decades, they are limited in accuracy and spectral resolution because of the need to deposit the aerosol on a filter substrate before measurement. Recently, a 7-wavelength (?) Aethalometer became commercially available, which covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range (?=450-950 nm), and laboratory calibration studies improved the degree of confidence in these measurement techniques. However, the applicability of the laboratory calibration factors to ambient conditions has not been investigated thoroughly yet. As part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large scale Biosphere atmosphere experiment in Amazonia - SMOke aerosols, Clouds, rainfall and Climate) campaign from September to November 2002 in the Amazon basin we performed an extensive field calibration of a 1-? PSAP and a 7-? Aethalometer utilizing a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS, 532 nm) as reference device. Especially during the dry period of the campaign, the aerosol population was dominated by pyrogenic emissions. The most pronounced artifact of integrating-plate type attenuation techniques (e.g. Aethalometer, PSAP) is due to multiple scattering effects within the filter matrix. For the PSAP, we essentially confirmed the laboratory calibration factor by Bond et al. (1999). On the other hand, for the Aethalometer we found a multiple scattering enhancement of 5.23 (or 4.55, if corrected for aerosol scattering), which is significantly larger than the factors previously reported (~2) for laboratory calibrations. While the exact reason for this discrepancy is unknown, the available data from the present and previous studies suggest aerosol mixing (internal versus external) as a likely cause. For Amazonian aerosol, we found no absorption enhancement due to hygroscopic particle growth in the relative humidity (RH) range between 40% and 80%. However, a substantial bias in PSAP sensitivity that correlated with both RH and temperature (T) was observed for 20%ambient sampling based on the data from the present and previous studies. For this study, the estimated accuracies of the absorption coefficients determined by the PAS, PSAP and Aethalometer were 10, 15 and 20% (95% confidence level), respectively.

  6. Spectral light absorption by ambient aerosols influenced by biomass burning in the Amazon Basin I. Comparison and field calibration of absorption measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, O.; Artaxo, P.; Arnott, W. P.; Chand, D.; Gatti, L. V.; Frank, G. P.; Hoffer, A.; Schnaiter, M.; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-09-01

    Spectral aerosol light absorption is an important parameter for the assessment of the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Although on-line measurement techniques for aerosol light absorption, such as the Aethalometer and the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), have been available for two decades, they are limited in accuracy and spectral resolution because of the need to deposit the aerosol on a filter substrate before measurement. Recently, a 7-wavelength (?) Aethalometer became commercially available, which covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range (?=450-950 nm), and laboratory calibration studies improved the degree of confidence in these measurement techniques. However, the applicability of the laboratory calibration factors to ambient conditions has not been investigated thoroughly yet. As part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large scale Biosphere atmosphere experiment in Amazonia - SMOke aerosols, Clouds, rainfall and Climate) campaign from September to November 2002 in the Amazon basin we performed an extensive field calibration of a 1-? PSAP and a 7-? Aethalometer utilizing a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS, 532 nm) as reference device. Especially during the dry period of the campaign, the aerosol population was dominated by pyrogenic emissions. The most pronounced artifact of integrating-plate type attenuation techniques is due to multiple scattering effects within the filter matrix. For the PSAP, we essentially confirmed the laboratory calibration factor by Bond (1999). On the other hand, for the Aethalometer we found a multiple scattering enhancement of 5.23 (or 4.55, if corrected for aerosol scattering), which is significantly larger than the factors previously reported (~2). While the exact reason for this discrepancy is unknown, the available data from the present and previous studies suggest aerosol mixing (internal versus external) as a likely cause. While it is well-known that RH may (moderately) affect aerosol absorption, we found no dependence of either PSAP or Aethalometer on relative humidity (RH) for 30%ambient sampling based on the data from the present and previous studies. For this study, the estimated accuracies of the absorption coefficients determined by the PAS, PSAP and Aethalometer were 10, 15 and 20%, respectively.

  7. COMPOSITION AND ORIGINS OF AEROSOL AT A FORESTED MOUNTAIN IN SOVIET GEORGIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient aerosol particles were collected by means of dichotomous samplers during July, 1979, at Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, which is in a remote forested area of Georgia, USSR. Samples were analyzed for mass, elemental, crystalline, and ionic species concentrations and ...

  8. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-27

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  9. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 ?g, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 ?g m-3, concentration value based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.03 ?g m-3) and reasonable normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. Only the normalized error is higher for the FT-IR EC measurements than for collocated TOR. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by the ratios OC/EC and ammonium/EC to determine the impact of OC and ammonium on EC prediction. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with partial least squares regression is a robust method for accurately predicting TOR EC in IMPROVE network samples; providing complementary information to TOR OC predictions (Dillner and Takahama, 2015) and the organic functional group composition and organic matter (OM) estimated previously from the same set of sample spectra (Ruthenburg et al., 2014).

  10. Integrated chemical species analysis with source-receptor modeling results to characterize the effects of terrain and monsoon on ambient aerosols in a basin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fan; Liang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-05-01

    This study integrated estimated oxidation ratio of sulfur (SOR) and oxidation ratio of nitrogen (NOR) with source-receptor modeling results to identify the effects of terrain and monsoons on ambient aerosols in an urban area (north basin) and a rural area (south basin) of the Taichung Basin. The estimated results indicate that the conversion of sulfur mainly occurs in fine particles (PM?.?), whereas the conversion of nitrogen occurs in approximately equal quantities of PM?.? and coarse particles (PM?.?-??). The results show a direct relationship for PM?.? between the modeling results with SOR and NOR. The high PM?.? SOR, NOR, and secondary aerosol values all occurred in the upwind area during both monsoons; this shows that the photochemical reaction and the terrain effect on the pollutant transmission were significant in the basin. Additionally, the urban heat island effect on the urban area and the valley effect on the rural area were significant. The results show that secondary aerosol in PM?.?-?? contributed approximately 10 % during both monsoons, and the difference in the contribution from secondary aerosol between both areas was small. Vehicle exhaust emissions and wind-borne dust were two crucial PM2.5-10 contributors during both monsoons; their average contributions in both areas were higher than 34 and 32 %, respectively. PMID:22996820

  11. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for ?18O and ?15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean ?18O values were within 0.5‰ of the ?18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the ?15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean ?15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean ?18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean ?15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the ?15N and ?18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in ?15N and ?18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic sources of atmospheric nitric acid accounted for 58% of the atmospheric nitric acid at the high deposition sites and 36.5% of the atmospheric nitric acid at the low deposition sites. The nylon filters proved to be an effective means of collecting isotopologues of HNO3 consistent with atmospheric concentrations. A length of the exposure of two weeks stabilizes isotopologue composition and minimizes the chance of variable weather events altering atmospheric values.

  12. A shrouded probe aerosol sampling cyclone 

    E-print Network

    Little, Stewart Craig

    1992-01-01

    and sizes, ambient aerosol sampling at high wind speeds can 7 be a difficult problem . Typically, attempts to obtain a representative sample involve placing the probe inlet area normal to the direction of the air flow and adjusting the sampler flow rate... the air stream. In the present design, three concentric shrouds and a probe will be attached to the entrance of the cyclone. The shroud concept was first used in an aircraft-horne sampling device for collecting tropospheric aerosol particles...

  13. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system 

    E-print Network

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01

    - Emitting Aerosol Particles. Health Physics: 400-406 (1992). 8. Chan, T. and M. Lippmann: Particle Collection Efficiencies of Air Sampling Cyclones: An Empirical Theory. Environ. Sci. ck Technol. 11:377-382 (1977). 9. John, W. and G. Reiscbl: A Cyclone.... McFarland A fractionation system has been developed to determine the aerodynamic size distribution of ambient plutonium aerosol. This system consists of an inlet section, and a flow splitter to separate the inlet air stream into four separate...

  14. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN AMBIENT AIR COLLECTED ON GLASS-FIBER FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic with 25 other elements are simultaneously determined in ambient air samples collected on glass-fiber filter composites at 250 United States sites. The instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique combined with the power of a dedicated mini-computer resulted in...

  15. Aerosols Collected at a Tropical Marine Environment: Size-Resolved Chemical Composition Using IC, TOC, and Thermal-Optical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-García, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Repollet-Pedrosa, M.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-05-01

    Size-resolved chemical characterization was performed on aerosol samples collected at two different marine sites in the tropics: Dian Point (DP), Antigua and Cape San Juan (CSJ), Puerto Rico. A 13-stage Dekati low- pressure impactor (Dp 0.1 to 10 ?m), a 10-stage micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (Dp 0.054 to 18 ?m), and stacked-filter units (Dp < 1.7 ?m) were used to collect the samples. Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate were determined using ion chromatography (IC). Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) was used to determine the concentrations of aerosol total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC). Five-day back trajectories calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model identified air masses coming from the North Atlantic (maritime air), Northwest Africa (desert dust), and North America (anthropogenic pollution). Size-resolved chemical characterization of aerosol samples using IC and TOA confirmed that aerosols become aged as they are transported to the Caribbean and their composition depends on the air mass origin. Gravimetric analyses showed that average fine mass concentrations for CSJ station were higher than for DP station (CSJ: 1.9 ?g m-3; DP: 1.2 ?g m-3). The aerosol chemical composition changed with air masses of different origin and with different pollution levels. In both locations the predominant water-soluble ions in the fine aerosol fraction were Cl-, Na+, and SO42-. Sulphate was observed in higher concentrations during the polluted case and particulate organic matter concentrations were higher for the maritime case. During desert dust events an increase in Ca2+ and Mg2+ of 4 and 2 times, respectively, was observed mainly in the coarse mode. Results for the size-resolved chemical composition and complete aerosol chemical apportionment including the residual mass will be presented.

  16. Source-Receptor Modeling Using Trace Metals in Aerosols Collected at Three Rural Canadian Great Lakes Sampling Stations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven R. Biegalski; Sheldon Landsberger; Raymond M. Hoff

    1998-01-01

    High-volume air samplers were used to collect aerosol samples on Whatman 41 air filters at the Canadian air sampling stations Burnt Island, Egbert, and Point Petre. The samples were analyzed for trace elements by neutron activation analysis. Air concentrations of over 30 trace elements were determined. Factor analysis, elemental ratios, and enrichment factor analysis were used to determine source-receptor relationships

  17. Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size-exclusion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Amy P.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2006-03-01

    A method employing size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with Total Organic Carbon detection is developed to isolate and quantify the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component of ambient aerosol particles by acid, neutral, and basic functional groups. The method provides unique quantitative insights into the characteristics and possible sources of a large fraction of the organic aerosol. The SEC is combined with a XAD-8 method that separates WSOC into hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions. Calibrations show the hydrophilic fraction separates into short-chain aliphatic acids (WSOCxp_a), neutrals (WSOCxp_n, e.g., saccharides, polyols, and short-chain carbonyls), and organic bases. Recovered hydrophobic fractions are separated into acids (WSOCxrr_a, e.g., aromatic) and neutrals (WSOCxrr_n, e.g., phenols). 13Carbon-nuclear magnetic resonance on ambient samples support the calibration-based conclusions; however, calibrations only provide a guide to the type of ambient organic compounds expected in each group. Comparisons are made between XAD-8/SEC results from urban Atlanta summer and winter and biomass burning samples. The largest isolated fraction of Atlanta summer WSOC is WSOCxp_a (29% ?g C/?g C), suggesting aliphatic acids of less than C4 or C5 are the dominant secondary organic aerosol product. Combined with WSOCxrr_a, these acid groups are a higher fraction of summer organic carbon (20%) than winter (14%). They are correlated with each other (R2 = 0.74), with WSOCxp_n (R2 = 0.61 and 0.52), and with gaseous 24-hour averaged volatile organic compounds linked to mobile sources. In biomass burning samples, neutrals (WSOCxp_n and WSOCxrr_n) dominate the WSOC. Atlanta winter samples have characteristics that appear to be a combination of summer and biomass samples.

  18. Influence of collecting substrates on the characterization of hygroscopic properties of inorganic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Li, Xue; Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2014-03-01

    The influence of six collecting substrates with different physical properties on the hygroscopicity measurement of inorganic aerosol particle surrogates and the potential applications of these substrates were examined experimentally. Laboratory-generated single salt particles, such as NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4, 1-5 ?m in size, were deposited on transmission electron microscopy grids (TEM grids), parafilm-M, Al foil, Ag foil, silicon wafer, and cover glass. The particle hygroscopic properties were examined by optical microscopy. Contact angle measurements showed that parafilm-M is hydrophobic, and cover glass, silicon wafer, Al foil, and Ag foil substrates are hydrophilic. The observed deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) values for NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4 on the TEM grids and parafilm-M substrates agreed well with the literature values, whereas the DRHs obtained on the hydrophilic substrates were consistently ?1-2% lower, compared to those on the hydrophobic substrates. The water layer adsorbed on the salt crystals prior to deliquescence increases the Gibb's free energy of the salt crystal-substrate system compared to the free energy of the salt droplet-substrate system, which in turn reduces the DRHs. The hydrophilic nature of the substrate does not affect the measured efflorescence RH (ERH) values. However, the Cl(-) or SO4(2-) ions in aqueous salt droplets seem to have reacted with Ag foil to form AgCl or Ag2SO4, respectively, which in turn acts as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation of the original salts, leading to higher ERHs. The TEM grids were found to be most suitable for the hygroscopic measurements of individual inorganic aerosol particles by optical microscopy and when multiple analytical techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and/or Raman microspectrometry, are applied to the same individual particles. PMID:24506470

  19. Contributions of modern and dead organic carbon to individual fatty acid homologues in spring aerosols collected from northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kohei; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) and stable carbon isotope ratios (?13C) have been used as proxies to evaluate the contributions of modern/fossil carbon and marine/terrestrial organic matter, respectively, in geochemical samples. However, there are few such studies in atmospheric aerosols. Here, we measured 14C contents and ?13C of individual n-fatty acids in an aerosol sample collected from northern Japan in spring 2001 during Asian dust season. Our results show that the distribution of fatty acids in the spring aerosols was characterized by a strong even/odd carbon number predominance with two maxima at C16 and C26. Their ?13C (range: -30.6 to -20.5‰) showed higher values (average: -24.5‰) for lower molecular weight (LMW) fatty acids (C16 - C19) and lower values (average: -29.7‰) for higher MW (HMW) fatty acids (C20 - C32). This difference suggests that LMW acids are mainly derived from lacustrine and/or marine algal sources whereas HMW acids are predominantly from terrestrial C3 higher plants. ?14C values of fatty acids were found to range from -96.9 to +122.9‰ with lower values for HMW acids and higher values for LMW acids. LMW acids in the aerosols contain only modern carbon. In contrast, HMW acids ?C24 were found to contain up to 9.7 wt% dead carbon, although their major portion (up to 92.3%) is composed of modern carbon. Backward trajectory analyses indicated that the source regions of the spring aerosols were dominated by central and north China (62%). This study suggests that the old fatty acids in the spring aerosols are most likely originated from the loess deposits in China via long-range atmospheric transport over the western North Pacific, although their contribution to the aerosols was relatively small.

  20. Effects of aerosol collection and extraction procedures on the optical properties of water-soluble organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Olmo Reyes, F. J.; Reche, I.

    2009-12-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) are routinely collected using active and passive aerosol samplers and, after extraction in water, analyzed using UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence techniques. These analyses provide important information regarding the chemical character and sources of aerosols worldwide. To evaluate the effects of various aerosol collection and processing methods on the optical properties of WSOC, two-dimensional absorption spectra from 200 to 900 nm and three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) from 240 to 450 nm excitation and 300 to 560 nm emission were analyzed in samples obtained simultaneously with different procedures. Samples included: milli-Q purified water passed through 140 mm diameter glass fiber and quartz fiber filters used in high volume PM10 aerosol samplers, 47 mm glass fiber filters used for organic matter analyses, and mixed cellulose 0.2 micron and 0.015 micron filters used for bacterial and viral filtration, respectively; milli-Q purified water rinsed in plastic buckets used for passive wet and dry deposition collection; and WSOC samples extracted from filters by soaking, sonication, and agitation. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of WSOC was performed to quantify the influence of various collection and extraction procedures on fluorescence signatures. All filters examined were found to leach some amount of fluorescent compounds (Figure 1). Mixed cellulose filters, especially those with small pore size, leached substantially more amino acid-like and humic-like material than other filters, whereas leaching from quartz fiber filters used for high volume aerosol collection was minimal (Figure 1). Fluorescence intensities of filter leachates decreased with increased rinsing of filters, indicating that rinsing with purified water prior to filtration is advisable, even for pre-combusted filters. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations of WSOC extracted from filters by sonication, agitation, and soaking techniques were not statistically different. The WSOC of aerosol samples collected passively (as deposition) and actively (on filters) had similar fluorescence spectra. Our results suggest that WSOC studies may be highly comparable irrespective of collection procedures, but that methodological differences related to filter use can be significant and should be reported in detail in the literature. Figure 1. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of a WSOC sample extracted from a pre-combusted quartz fiber filter (left) by agitation in 60 mL milli-Q purified water and a 100 mL sample of milli-Q purified water filtered through a 0.015 ?m pore size mixed cellulose ester filter (right).

  1. Aerosol-Assisted Solid Debris Collection for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Ivanov, V V; Astanovitskiy, A L; Lewis, L A; Rundberg, R S

    2010-05-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and has made its first shots on-target. While upcoming experiments will be focused on achieving ignition, a variety of subsequent experiments are planned for the facility, including measurement of cross sections, astrophysical measurements, and investigation of hydrodynamic instability in the target capsule. In order to successfully execute several of these planned experiments, the ability to collect solid debris following a NIF capsule shot will be required. The ability to collect and analyze solid debris generated in a shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will greatly expand the number of nuclear reactions studied for diagnostic purposes. Currently, reactions are limited to only those producing noble gases for cryogenic collection and counting with the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS). The radchem solid collection diagnostic has already been identified by NIF to be valuable for the determination and understanding of mix generated in the target capsule's ablation. LLNL is currently developing this solid debris collection capability at NIF, and is in the stage of testing credible designs. Some of these designs explore the use of x-ray generated aerosols to assist in collection of solid debris. However, the variety of harsh experimental conditions this solid collection device will encounter in NIF are challenging to replicate. Experiments performed by Gary Grim et al. at Sandia National Laboratory's RHEPP1 facility have shown that ablation causes a cloud of material removed from an exposed surface to move normal to and away from the surface. This ablation is certain to be a concern in the NIF target chamber from the prompt x-rays, gamma rays, etc. generated in the shot. The cloud of ablated material could interfere with the collection of the desired reaction debris by slowing down the debris so that the kinetic energy is too low to allow implantation, or by stopping the debris from reaching the collection device entirely. Our goal is to use this primary ablation wave to our advantage, by the creation of ionized alkali metal halide salt aerosols. This technique is similar to that used by many particle accelerator groups for gas-jet transport. Ideally the salt would be ablated from a substrate, encounter the reaction debris, agglomerate, and be collected for further study. We have done studies at laser and pulsed-power facilities (Titan laser at LLNL, Trident laser at LANL, Zebra z-pinch at Nevada Terawatt Facility) evaluating the hardiness of materials for placement in the NIF target chamber, as well as testing aerosol generation by the incident x-rays generated in device shots. To test this method's potential success in the NIF environment, we have tested KCl, KI, RbI, and CsI films of 1 and 2 um linear thickness on aluminum and silicon wafer substrates in these aforementioned facilities, at varied distances. These salts do ablate in the presence of sufficient x-ray fluence. Further analysis to quantify the final ablation depth as a function of x-ray fluence is ongoing. Half of each sample was masked with a thick tungsten foil for photon opacity. KCl was the most difficult salt to ablate, from comparing the tungsten-masked side of the samples to the unmasked side of the samples. This is likely due to KCl's absorbance peak being at lower wavelengths than that of KI, {approx}160 nm vs. {approx}220 nm, respectively. Samples with and without collimation were tested to identify if any condensation of these ablated salts occurred after ablation. Visual inspection of the silicon wafer witness plates placed parallel to the direction of the incident photons showed that a vapor was deposited on the wafers next to the collimators. Further analysis with EDS in the case of the collimated samples conclusively identified the vapor as CsI. We also intend to examine samples of bare substrate exposed to the same experimental conditions for post-shot change via SEM images, optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, tests with separated isotopes

  2. Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas D. Holmes; Raymond A. Guilmette; Yung-Sung Cheng; MaryAnn Parkhurst; Mark D. Hoover

    2009-01-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by

  3. Contrasting online MSn spectra of organic acids in ambient aerosol from the boreal forest at Hyytiälä, Finland and from the mixed forest at the Taunus observatory, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alexander L.; Äijälä, Mikko; Ehn, Mikael; Junninen, Heikki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku; Williams, Jonathan; Schneider, Johannes; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) by the vegetation and subsequent atmospheric oxidation leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Therefore, forests are a main source of aerosols which have significant impact on the earth's climate.[1] The oxidation of BVOCs results in a variety of mostly unidentified organic species in trace level concentrations, which partition between gas- and particle-phase. Organic acids are of particular importance for the particle-phase fraction, since the higher oxidation state and molecular mass, compared to the corresponding precursors, is accompanied by a much lower volatility. Until now, only limited instrumentation exists for the simultaneous online analysis of organic acids in gas- and particle-phase. Here we show the first field application of an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) in combination with a miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) for measuring organic acids in gas- and particle-phase[2]. The benefits of the online APCI-IT-MS are soft ionization with low fragmentation, high time resolution and less sampling artifacts than in the common procedure of taking filter samples, extraction and subsequent detection with LC-MS. Furthermore, the capability to perform online MSn of isolated m/z ratios from ambient and laboratory generated aerosol leads to an improved understanding of the composition of secondary organic aerosol. The here described measurements were conducted during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 campaign at Hyytiälä, Finland and during the INUIT campaign 2012 on Mt. Kleiner Feldberg, Germany. By merging APCI-IT-MS data with data from the Aerodyné C-ToF-AMS, it can be observed that the gas- to particle-partitioning of organic acids strongly depends on the fraction of aerosol which is organic matter, as it is predicted by a partitioning model[3]. High observed gas-phase concentrations of organic acids at Hyytiälä are a strong hint for unidentified species. This can be supported by MSn observations, where the fragmentation pattern from Hyytiälä show different signals compared to the fragmentation pattern from the same m/z ratio at the Taunus Observatory and from chamber terpene ozonolysis. Literature: [1] Tunved, P. et al. (2006) Science 312, 261-263. [2] Vogel, A. L. et al. (2012) Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss. 5, 6147-6182. [3] Pankow, J. F. (1994) Atmos. Env. 28, 189-193.

  4. A wintertime study of atmospheric aerosols collected in São Paulo, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, P. C.; Ogura, L.; Lopes, W.; Pereira, P. A.; Andrade, J. B.; Sanchez-Ccoyllo, O.

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution has become a significant problem for urban areas worldwide. In megacities aerosols are released by different emissions sources. These sources can emit particles in a large variety of sizes. Size distributions provide information on the sources and the sources processes of particles or species (Maenhaut et al. 2002). In the wintertime (2005) twenty PM10 samples were collected in São Paulo city using hi-vol sampler and fine particles (from 6 to 18,000 nm) were collected using NanoMoudi impactor. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) recognised as mutagen and carcinogen compounds were identified in PM10 samples and gravimetric concentrations were calculated for fine particles. The results showed PAH total concentrations ranged from 0.27 to 43.8 ng m-3. Phenanthrene (7.3 ng m-3) and anthracene (2.2 ng m-3), lighter compounds were the most abundant PAH; benz(a)pyrene (1.4 ng m-3) mutagenic compound was found in higher concentration than previous work. For PM10 concentrations, 60% of the samples (n=12) are higher than WHO standards (50 ?g m-3). Three modes can be found in the particles with mean diameter: 44 nm, 440 nm and 14000 nm. It is in agreement with the fact this site is located inside a large green area (campus of the University of São Paulo), which can be source of particles between 25 and 440 nm. We conclude that at this urban site vehicular emissions are indicated as being the most important PAH emitters. For fine particles, soil resuspension and biogenic emissions seem to be the most important sources.

  5. Retrieval of effective complex refractive index from intensive measurements of characteristics of ambient aerosols in the boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Huang, Yinbo; Rao, Ruizhong; Wang, Zhien

    2013-07-29

    Aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) has attracted intensive attentions due to its significance in modeling aerosol radiative effects. Determinations of ACRI from surface measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as well as number size distributions during June, 2008 based on an iterative Mie algorithm were performed. The aim of our study was to introduce an inversion approach with the merits of high time-resolutions to retrieve the optically effective ACRI, especially its imaginary part. Based on simultaneous measurements of aerosol characteristics, mean ACRI value of 1.50 ( ± 0.34)-i0.025 ( ± 0.015) at 550 nm in Hefei in summer was deducted. The lower imaginary parts with higher single scattering albedos and lower scattering Angstrom exponents were obtained for haze periods compared with nonhaze conditions with similar air-mass back-trajectories, indicating more large and scattering particles contributing to the formation of haze episodes. The derived imaginary parts of ACRI related to agricultural biomass burning were in the range from 0.013 to 0.029 at 550 nm. Significant negative correlations between retrieved imaginary parts of ACRI and measured single scattering albedos indicate that our retrieval approach is a reasonable method for determining the imaginary parts of complex refractive indices of aerosol particles. PMID:23938658

  6. Daily long-term monitoring of organic compounds in ambient aerosol based on direct thermal desorption (DTD) and gas chromatography coupled to fast time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-resolved source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Sklorz, M.

    2006-12-01

    Epidemiological studies show that serious health effects are associated with the immission of anthropogenic fine and ultra-fine particles. It is likely that semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) are at least partly responsible for the observed health effects. Therefore a better characterization of particle associated SVOC is needed. A newly developed direct-thermal-desorption gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry method (DTD-GC-TOFMS) was applied for characterization of PM2.5 filters. A day-by-day analysis of SVOC in PM2.5 was performed for more than 3 years (ca. 1100 samples). The particles were collected in Augsburg, where the GSF research centre (Institute of Epidemiology and Institute of Ecological Chemistry) is operating a large aerosol measurement site in cooperation with the University of Augsburg (WZU), the school of applied sciences (FH) Augsburg and the BIfA GmbH. More than 1500 compounds are separable by the GC-TOFMS method. Selected compounds (ca. 200) are semi-quantified and used for further analysis. An additional aim is to use the data on organic constituents in epidemiological studies. The 3 year continuous monitoring data set shows long term variations (e.g. seasonal trends) as well as prominent daily fluctuations (i.e. influenced by meteorology and emission). The data set furthermore is used for a day-resolved source apportionment based on source-specific organic indicator compounds and statistical methods. A large fraction of the particle-bound SVOC, however, can not be resolved by conventional GC methods. This is due to the enormous chemical complexity of ambient particulate matter. The comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is a novel GC method which resolves a sample according to two chromatographic dimensions. Due to the two- dimensional chromatography the separation power is considerably increased. In a typical Augsburg PM2.5 aerosol sample, e.g., by far more than 10.000 compounds are detectable by GCxGC-TOFMS. In the contribution recent results on GCxGC-TOFMS ambient aerosol monitoring are presented and discussed.

  7. Hygroscopic and Chemical Properties of Aerosols collected near a Copper Smelter: Implications for Public and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples collected near an active copper smelter were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g. arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18–0.55 µm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10–0.32 µm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  8. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the Collection Efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Water droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with a radius of ~20 ?m fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer Polystyrene Latex Sphere (PSL) particles of variable size and concentrations. Two RH conditions, ~15 and ~88%, hereafter termed "Low" and "High", respectively, were varied with different particles size and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single particle basis. Coagulated droplets had mass spectra that contain signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 5.7 × 10-3 to 4.6 × 10-2 for the Low RH and from 6.4 × 10-3 to 2.2 × 10-2 for the High RH cases. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this work were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first coagulation experiment performed on a single droplet basis.

  9. MONITORING SYSTEM FOR COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT ETHYLENE DICHLORIDE (EDC) LEVELS IN THE URBAN ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the measurement of ambient levels of ethylene dichloride (EDC) was developed and field tested. A 24-hour integrated sample is taken with an activated charcoal tube, followed by desorption of the EDC with carbon disulfide. The carbon disulfide solution is then analyze...

  10. Behavior of Particulate Mercury in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at 2 Sites in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Oshiro, Y.; Tsuhako, A.; Murayama, H.; Tanahara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is toxic to animals. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere mainly from two sources; natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include volcanic eruption, forest fire and so on. Anthropogenic sources include fossil fuel combustion, metal and cement production and so on. There are three forms of mercury in the atmosphere: gaseous elemental mercury, reactive gaseous mercury and particulate mercury. Gaseous elemental mercury is the most abundant form in the atmosphere, and has long atmospheric lifetime, ca. a few years. This study focuses on particulate mercury, which has a relatively short lifetime, ca. a few days, in the atmosphere because it reflects characteristics of nearby emission sources. Objectives of this study were to elucidate the behavior of particulate mercury in aerosols and to understand relationships between mercury and other metals and water-soluble anions. Aerosol samples were collected at two sites; Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Jan.2008-Nov.2012), northern tip of Okinawa island, and University of the Ryukyus (UR, Jan.2008-Nov.2012), central and more populated area of Okinawa island. They were collected by using identical high-volume air samplers on quartz filters. Concentrations of particulate mercury in aerosols were determined by using a MA-3000 (Nippon Instruments Corporation). The results showed that particulate Hg concentrations were mostly higher for the aerosols collected at UR site than those at CHAAMS site, suggesting locally emitted Hg. Samples collected at UR showed clear seasonal variation, the lowest in summer and the highest winter. On the other hand, the CHAAMS samples showed lower concentration in winter and higher concentration in summer, but the difference was relatively small. Both UR and CHAAMS samples had similar concentration levels in summer season. Back trajectory analysis showed that particulate Hg at CHAAMS site during summer was not from Asian continent. Since samples collected at UR site are affected by locally emitted Hg and summer time Hg at CHAAMS and UR sites were similar, indicating that Hg at CHAAMS during summer was probably originated from locally emitted Hg, e.g. power plants located at south-east of CHAAMS. Particulate Hg concentrations did not show strong correlation with other metal ions.

  11. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the development and bench-testing of a versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES) capable of simultaneously concentrating ambient particles of the coarse, fine and ultrafine size fractions for conducting in vivo and in vitro studies. The VACE...

  12. Comparison Between NPP-VIIRS Aerosol Data Products and the MODIS AQUA Deep Blue Collection 6 Dataset Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Kondragunta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are small particles suspended in the atmosphere and have a variety of natural and man-made sources. Knowledge of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a measure of the amount of aerosol in the atmosphere, and its change over time, is important for multiple reasons. These include climate change, air quality (pollution) monitoring, monitoring hazards such as dust storms and volcanic ash, monitoring smoke from biomass burning, determining potential energy yields from solar plants, determining visibility at sea, estimating fertilization of oceans and rainforests by transported mineral dust, understanding changes in weather brought upon by the interaction of aerosols and clouds, and more. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine AOD. This study compares the VIIRS dataset to ground-based measurements of AOD, along with a state-of-the-art satellite AOD dataset (the new version of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Deep Blue algorithm) to assess its reliability. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011, carrying several instruments designed to continue the biogeophysical data records of current and previous satellite sensors. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD), and related activities since launch have been focused towards validating and understanding this new dataset through comparisons with other satellite and ground-based products. The operational VIIRS AOD product is compared over land with AOD derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations using the Deep Blue (DB) algorithm from the forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS data

  13. Total potential source contribution function analysis of trace elements determined in aerosol samples collected near Lake Huron.

    PubMed

    Biegalski, S R; Hopke, P K

    2004-08-15

    Aerosol samples were collected at the rural Burnt Island Ontario Integrated Air Deposition Network air sampling station on the northern shore of Lake Huron from 1992 through 1994. The samples were analyzed for trace elements by neutron activation analysis, and the air concentrations of over 30 elements were determined. Total potential source contribution function analysis (TPSCF) was used to determine the most probable geographical location of these aerosols' origin. The TPSCF results for As, In, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn are highlighted in this paper. Source regions for these elements ranged from Alma, Quebec, Canada to Carrollton, GA. Because of large seasonal variations in the concentrations of the atmospheric concentrations of these elements, TPSCFvalues were calculated for the summer and winter halves of the year as well as the entire year. PMID:15382853

  14. Impacts of Long-Range Transport of Metals from East Asia in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Okinawa Archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sotaro; S, Yuka; I, Moriaki; N, Fumiya; H, Daishi; A, Takemitsu; T, Akira

    2010-05-01

    Economy of East Asia has been growing rapidly, and atmospheric aerosols discharged from this region have been transported to Japan. Okinawa island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km of south Korea. Its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same type of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of acid-digested metals using atomic absorption spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of metals in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island during June, 2008 to June 2009. We also determined 'background' concentration of metals in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island to elucidate the influence of the transport processes and distances from Asian continent on metal concentrations.

  15. The application of size- resolved hygroscopicity measurements to understand the physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosol

    E-print Network

    Santarpia, Joshua Lee

    2005-08-29

    and density were represented by empirical fits described by Tang and Munkelwitz (1994) for ammonium sulfate. A more detailed description of the technique used to ascribe the soluble fraction of the aerosol based on hygroscopic growth is provided... in Gasparini et al. (2004). The calculated fractions are somewhat dependent upon the salt assumed to represent the soluble component. For example, 160 nm dry particles that have a growth factor of 1.4 could be composed of 53.3% ammonium bisulfate, 56...

  16. Evidence for organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Jason D; Kroll, Jesse H; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O; Claeys, Magda; Sorooshian, Armin; Ng, Nga L; Offenberg, John H; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-01-15

    Recent work has shown that particle-phase reactions contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), with enhancements of SOA yields in the presence of acidic seed aerosol. In this study, the chemical composition of SOA from the photooxidations of alpha-pinene and isoprene, in the presence or absence of sulfate seed aerosol, is investigated through a series of controlled chamber experiments in two separate laboratories. By using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, sulfate esters in SOA produced in laboratory photooxidation experiments are identified for the first time. Sulfate esters are found to account for a larger fraction of the SOA mass when the acidity of seed aerosol is increased, a result consistent with aerosol acidity increasing SOA formation. Many of the isoprene and alpha-pinene sulfate esters identified in these chamber experiments are also found in ambient aerosol collected at several locations in the southeastern U.S. It is likely that this pathway is important for other biogenic terpenes, and may be important in the formation of humic-like substances (HULIS) in ambient aerosol. PMID:17310716

  17. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K. A.; Walker, J. T.; Kelly, T. J.; Hanft, E. A.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Beachley, G. M.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Otjes, R. P.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The US EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to characterize atmospheric chemistry and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at an hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the US EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, from 8 September to 8 October 2010 and focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3, and NH3 and aerosol SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between paired hourly results from duplicate MARGA units (MUs), with a performance goal of ? 25%. The accuracy of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the MARPD for each MU relative to the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations, with a performance goal of ? 40%. Accuracy was also evaluated by using linear regression, where MU concentrations were plotted against the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations. From this, a linear least squares line of best fit was applied. The goal was for the slope of the line of best fit to be between 0.8 and 1.2. The MARGA performed well in comparison to the denuder/filter pack for SO2, SO42-, and NH4+, with all three compounds passing the accuracy and precision goals by a significant margin. The performance of the MARGA in measuring NO3- could not be evaluated due to the different sampling efficiency of coarse NO3- by the MUs and the filter pack. Estimates of "fine" NO3- were calculated for the MUs and the filter pack. Using this and results from a previous study, it is concluded that if the MUs and the filter pack were sampling the same particle size, the MUs would have good agreement in terms of precision and accuracy. The MARGA performed moderately well in measuring HNO3 and NH3, though neither met the linear regression slope goals. However, recommendations for improving the measurement of HNO3 and NH3 are discussed. It is concluded that SO42-, SO2, NO3-, HNO3, NH4+, and NH3 concentrations can be measured with acceptable accuracy and precision when the MARGA is operated in conjunction with the recommendations outlined in the manuscript.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  19. Elevated nitrogen-containing particles observed in Asian dust aerosol samples collected at the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Park, Y.; Hwang, H.; Kang, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2009-09-01

    Low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) shows powerful advantages for the characterization of ambient particulate matter in environmental and geological applications. By the application of the low-Z particle EPMA single particle analysis, an overall examination of 1800 coarse and fine particles (aerodynamic diameters: 2.5-10 ?m and 1.0-2.5 ?m, respectively) in six samples collected on 28 April-1 May 2006 in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea was conducted. Three samples (D1, D2, and D3) were collected along the Bohai Bay, Bohai Straits, and Yellow Sea near Korea during an Asian dust storm event while the other three samples (N3, N2, and N1) were collected on non-Asian dust (NAD) days. Based on X-ray spectral and secondary electron image data, 15 different types of particles were identified, in which soil-derived particles were encountered with the largest frequency, followed by (C, N, O)-rich droplets (likely the mixture of organic matter and NH4NO3), particles of marine origin, and carbonaceous, Fe-rich, fly ash, and (C, N, O, S)-rich droplet particles. Results show that during the Asian dust storm event relative abundances of the (C, N, O)-rich droplets and the nitrate-containing secondary soil-derived particles were markedly increased (on average by a factor of 4.5 and 2, respectively in PM2.5-10 fraction and by a factor of 1.9 and 1.5, respectively in PM1.0-2.5 fraction) in the MBL of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea, implying that Asian dust aerosols in springtime are an important carrier of gaseous inorganic nitrogen species, especially NOx (or HNO3) and NH3.

  20. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4 samples induced deposition ice nucleation below 230 K as low as 120% RHice, took up water at about 80% RH, and nucleated subsequently via condensation freezing above 230 K at mean RH of 88-94% and 89-100%, respectively. Experimentally derived ice nucleation rate coefficients and activated IN fractions for estimation of ice crystal production rates are presented. Particles sampled in the L.A. area can induce ice formation at conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds and exhibit significantly different ice nucleation efficiencies than particles sampled in and around Mexico City.

  1. Comprehensive characterization of ambient nanoparticles collected near an industrial science park: particle size distributions and relationships with environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhjeen; Hsu, Lingyen; Chang, Yunghsun

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of ambient particles and their relationships with various environmental factors, including gaseous pollutants (CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), total hydrocarbons (THC), NOx, CO, SO2), meteorological parameters (humidity, temperature), and time (day/night, workday/weekend). We used an electrical low-pressure cascade impactor to measure the number and size distributions of ambient particles (0.007-10 tm) that were collected approximately 1 km northwest of Hsinchu Science Park in Taiwan between February and May 2007. The number concentrations of particles were enhanced through photochemical reactions during the day. In addition, high traffic flow during workdays increased the formation of particulates. Except for SO2, all of the gaseous pollutants we studied (CH4, NMHC, THC, NOx, CO) correlated positively with the total number concentrations of ambient particles during daytime, indicating that they might contribute to the particulate burden. The poorer relationship between the SO2 level and the total number concentration of particles suggests that SO2 might participate indirectly in the nucleation process during particle formation, The high enrichment factors for Zn, Pb, Cu, and Mn, which mostly comprised the ultrafine particles (diameter: < 0.1 microm) and fine particles (diameter: 0.1-1 microm), presumably arose from emissions from traffic and high technology factories. Heterogeneous reactions on solid particles might play a role in the removal of SOx and NOx from the atmosphere. Sulfides and nitrides can further react with these local pollutants, forming specific Cu-containing compounds: CuO (39%), CuSO4 (34%), and Cu(NO3)2 (27%), within the ambient particles in this industrial area. PMID:22128541

  2. Comparison between NPP-VIIRS aerosol data products and the MODIS Aqua 'Deep Blue' Collection 6 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011, carrying several instruments designed to continue the biogeophysical data records of current and previous satellite sensors. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD), and related activities since launch have been focussed towards validating and understanding this new dataset through comparisons with other satellite and ground-based products. We present a comparison of the operational VIIRS AOD product with that derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations using the 'Deep Blue' algorithm from the forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS data.

  3. Seasonal variations of sulfate, carbonaceous species (black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and trace elements in fine atmospheric aerosols collected at subtropical islands in the East China Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Kaneyasu; Hideshige Takada

    2004-01-01

    In order to characterize the outflow of pollution derived aerosols from the Asian Pacific rim to the North Pacific Ocean, seasonal variations of fine aerosol components (aerodynamic diameter <2 ?m) were collected at two islands (Amami Island and Miyako Island) that surround the East China Sea. Monthly averaged concentrations of non-sea-salt SO42? (nss.SO42?) and black carbon (BC) at Amami and

  4. Organosulfate formation in biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Jason D; Gómez-González, Yadian; Chan, Arthur W H; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Shahgholi, Mona; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O; Offenberg, John H; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Maenhaut, Willy; Claeys, Magda; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2008-09-11

    Organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive series of laboratory photooxidation (i.e., OH-initiated oxidation) and nighttime oxidation (i.e., NO3-initiated oxidation under dark conditions) experiments using nine monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, l-limonene, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, Delta(3)-carene, and beta-phellandrene) and three monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, d-limonene, and l-limonene), respectively. Organosulfates were characterized using liquid chromatographic techniques coupled to electrospray ionization combined with both linear ion trap and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Organosulfates are formed only when monoterpenes are oxidized in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol, a result consistent with prior work. Archived laboratory-generated isoprene SOA and ambient filter samples collected from the southeastern U.S. were reexamined for organosulfates. By comparing the tandem mass spectrometric and accurate mass measurements collected for both the laboratory-generated and ambient aerosol, previously uncharacterized ambient organic aerosol components are found to be organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and limonene-like monoterpenes (e.g., myrcene), demonstrating the ubiquity of organosulfate formation in ambient SOA. Several of the organosulfates of isoprene and of the monoterpenes characterized in this study are ambient tracer compounds for the occurrence of biogenic SOA formation under acidic conditions. Furthermore, the nighttime oxidation experiments conducted under highly acidic conditions reveal a viable mechanism for the formation of previously identified nitrooxy organosulfates found in ambient nighttime aerosol samples. We estimate that the organosulfate contribution to the total organic mass fraction of ambient aerosol collected from K-puszta, Hungary, a field site with a similar organosulfate composition as that found in the present study for the southeastern U.S., can be as high as 30%. PMID:18710205

  5. Functionalization and fragmentation during ambient organic aerosol aging: application of the 2-D volatility basis set to field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Dall'Osto, M.; O'Dowd, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Pandis, S. N.

    2012-11-01

    Multigenerational oxidation chemistry of atmospheric organic compounds and its effects on aerosol loadings and chemical composition is investigated by implementing the Two-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2-D-VBS) in a Lagrangian host chemical transport model. Three model formulations were chosen to explore the complex interactions between functionalization and fragmentation processes during gas-phase oxidation of organic compounds by the hydroxyl radical. The base case model employs a conservative transformation by assuming a reduction of one order of magnitude in effective saturation concentration and an increase of oxygen content by one or two oxygen atoms per oxidation generation. A second scheme simulates functionalization in more detail using group contribution theory to estimate the effects of oxygen addition to the carbon backbone on the compound volatility. Finally, a fragmentation scheme is added to the detailed functionalization scheme to create a functionalization-fragmentation parameterization. Two condensed-phase chemistry pathways are also implemented as additional sensitivity tests to simulate (1) heterogeneous oxidation via OH uptake to the particle-phase and (2) aqueous-phase chemistry of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The model is applied to summer and winter periods at three sites where observations of organic aerosol (OA) mass and O:C were obtained during the European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaigns. The base case model reproduces observed mass concentrations and O:C well, with fractional errors (FE) lower than 55% and 25%, respectively. The detailed functionalization scheme tends to overpredict OA concentrations, especially in the summertime, and also underpredicts O:C by approximately a factor of 2. The detailed functionalization model with fragmentation agrees well with the observations for OA concentration, but still underpredicts O:C. Both heterogeneous oxidation and aqueous-phase processing have small effects on OA levels but heterogeneous oxidation, as implemented here, does enhance O:C by about 0.1. The different schemes result in very different fractional attribution for OA between anthropogenic and biogenic sources.

  6. Functionalization and fragmentation during ambient organic aerosol aging: application of the 2-D volatility basis set to field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Dall'Osto, M.; O'Dowd, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Pandis, S. N.

    2012-04-01

    Multigenerational oxidation chemistry of atmospheric organic compounds and its effects on aerosol loadings and chemical composition is investigated by implementing the Two-Dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2-D-VBS) in a Lagrangian host chemical transport model. Three model formulations were chosen to explore the complex interactions between functionalization and fragmentation processes during gas-phase oxidation of organic compounds by the hydroxyl radical. The base case model employs a conservative transformation by assuming a reduction of one order of magnitude in effective saturation concentration and an increase of oxygen content by one or two oxygen atoms per oxidation generation. A second scheme simulates functionalization in more detail using group contribution theory to estimate the effects of oxygen addition to the carbon backbone on the compound volatility. Finally, a fragmentation scheme is added to the detailed functionalization scheme to create a functionalization-fragmentation parameterization. Two condensed-phase chemistry pathways are also implemented as additional sensitivity tests to simulate (1) heterogeneous oxidation via OH uptake to the particle-phase and (2) aqueous-phase chemistry of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The model is applied to summer and winter periods at three sites where observations of organic aerosol (OA) mass and O:C were obtained during the European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaigns. The base case model reproduces observed mass concentrations and O:C well, with fractional errors (FE) lower than 55% and 25%, respectively. The detailed functionalization scheme tends to overpredict OA concentrations, especially in the summertime, and also underpredicts O:C by approximately a factor of 2. The detailed functionalization model with fragmentation agrees well with the observations for OA concentration, but still underpredicts O:C. Both heterogeneous oxidation and aqueous-phase processing have small effects on OA levels but heterogeneous oxidation, as implemented here, does enhance O:C by about 0.1. The different schemes result in very different fractional attribution for OA between anthropogenic and biogenic sources.

  7. Global Estimates of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations from Satellite-Based Aerosol Optical Depth: Development and Application

    PubMed Central

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Kahn, Ralph; Levy, Robert; Verduzco, Carolyn; Villeneuve, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic and health impact studies of fine particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) are limited by the lack of monitoring data, especially in developing countries. Satellite observations offer valuable global information about PM2.5 concentrations. Objective In this study, we developed a technique for estimating surface PM2.5 concentrations from satellite observations. Methods We mapped global ground-level PM2.5 concentrations using total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite instruments and coincident aerosol vertical profiles from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Results We determined that global estimates of long-term average (1 January 2001 to 31 December 2006) PM2.5 concentrations at approximately 10 km × 10 km resolution indicate a global population-weighted geometric mean PM2.5 concentration of 20 ?g/m3. The World Health Organization Air Quality PM2.5 Interim Target-1 (35 ?g/m3 annual average) is exceeded over central and eastern Asia for 38% and for 50% of the population, respectively. Annual mean PM2.5 concentrations exceed 80 ?g/m3 over eastern China. Our evaluation of the satellite-derived estimate with ground-based in situ measurements indicates significant spatial agreement with North American measurements (r = 0.77; slope = 1.07; n = 1057) and with noncoincident measurements elsewhere (r = 0.83; slope = 0.86; n = 244). The 1 SD of uncertainty in the satellite-derived PM2.5 is 25%, which is inferred from the AOD retrieval and from aerosol vertical profile errors and sampling. The global population-weighted mean uncertainty is 6.7 ?g/m3. Conclusions Satellite-derived total-column AOD, when combined with a chemical transport model, provides estimates of global long-term average PM2.5 concentrations. PMID:20519161

  8. Aerosolization of fungi, (1?3)-?-D glucan, and endotoxin from flood-affected materials collected in New Orleans homes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Atin; Jung, Jaehee; Reponen, Tiina; Lewis, Jocelyn Suzanne; DeGrasse, Enjoli C.; Grimsley, L. Faye; Chew, Ginger L.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Standing water and sediments remaining on flood-affected materials were the breeding ground for many microorganisms in flooded homes following Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this laboratory study was to examine the aerosolization of culturable and total fungi, (1?3)-?-D glucan, and endotoxin from eight flood-affected floor and bedding materials collected in New Orleans homes, following Hurricane Katrina. Aerosolization was examined using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) connected to a BioSampler. Dust samples were collected by vacuuming. A two-stage cyclone sampler was used for size-selective analysis of aerosolized glucan and endotoxin. On average, levels of culturable fungi ranged from undetectable (lower limit = 8.3×104) to 2.6×105 CFU/m2; total fungi ranged from 2.07×105 to 1.6×106 spores/m2; (1?3)-?-D glucan and endotoxin were 2.0×103 – 2.9×104 ng/m2 and 7.0×102 – 9.3×104 EU/m2, respectively. The results showed that 5–15 min sampling is sufficient for detecting aerosolizable biocontaminants with the FSSST. Smaller particle size fractions (<1.0 ?m and <1.8 ?m) have levels of glucan and endotoxin comparable to larger (>1.8 ?m) fractions, which raises additional exposure concerns. Vacuuming was found to overestimate inhalation exposure risks by a factor of approximately 102 for (1?3)-?-D glucan and by 103 to 104 for endotoxin as detected by the FSSST. The information generated from this study is important with respect to restoration and rejuvenation of the flood-affected areas in New Orleans. We believe the findings will be significant during similar disasters in other regions of the world including major coastal floods from tsunamis. PMID:19201399

  9. Measurements of the timescales for the mass transfer of water in glassy aerosol at low relative humidity and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.-J.; Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Luo, B. P.; Krieger, U. K.

    2011-02-01

    The influence of glassy states and highly viscous solution phases on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with water vapour is examined. In particular, the kinetics of mass transfer of water between the condensed and gas phases has been studied for sucrose solution droplets under conditions above and below the glass transition relative humidity (RH). At RHs above the glass transition, sucrose droplets are shown to equilibrate on a timescale comparable to the change in environmental conditions. Below the glass transition, the timescale for mass transfer is shown to be extremely slow, with particles remaining in a state of disequilibrium even after timescales of more than 10000 s. A phenomenological approach for quantifying the time response of particle size is used to illustrate the influence of the glassy aerosol state on the kinetics of mass transfer of water: the time is estimated for the droplet to reach the halfway point from an initial state towards a disequilibrium state at which the rate of size change decreases below 1 nm every 10000 s. This half-time increases above 1000 s once the particle can be assumed to have formed a glass. The measurements are shown to be consistent with kinetic simulations of the slow diffusion of water within the particle bulk. Similar behaviour is observed for binary aqueous raffinose solution droplets consistent with the influence of a glass transition on mass transfer. Mixed component droplets of sucrose/sodium chloride/water also show slow equilibration at low RH, illustrating the importance of understanding the role of the bulk solution viscosity on the rate of mass transfer with the gas phase, even under conditions that may not lead to the formation of a glass.

  10. RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System for detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from aerosol collection samples: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Ted; Ryan, Valorie; Spaulding, Usha K; Clemens, Kristine M; Ota, Irene M; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    The RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System was validated in a collaborative study for the detection of Bacillus anthracis in aerosol collection buffer. Phosphate-buffered saline was charged with 1 mg/mL standardized dust to simulate an authentic aerosol collection sample. The dust-charged buffer was spiked with either B. anthracis Ames at 2000 spores/mL or Bacillus cereus at 20 000 spores/mL. Twelve collaborators participated in the study, with four collaborators at each of three sites. Each collaborator tested 12 replicates of B. anthracis in dust-charged buffer and 12 replicates of B. cereus in dust-charged buffer. All samples sets were randomized and blind-coded. All collaborators produced valid data sets (no collaborators displayed systematic errors) and there was only one invalid data point. After unblinding, the analysis revealed a cross-collaborator probability of detection (CPOD) of 1.00 (144 positive results from 144 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.975-1.00) for the B. anthracis samples and a CPOD of 0.00 (0 positive results from 143 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.00-0.0262) for the B. cereus samples. These data meet the requirements of AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement 2010.003, developed by the Stakeholder Panel on Agent Detection Assays. PMID:23767365

  11. Distributions of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols collected over the Arctic Ocean during late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ono, K.; Tachibana, E.; Charriére, B.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-11-01

    Oxalic and other small dicarboxylic acids have been reported as important water-soluble organic constituents of atmospheric aerosols from different environments. Their molecular distributions are generally characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) and/or succinic (C4) acids. In this study, we collected marine aerosols from the Arctic Ocean during late summer in 2009 when sea ice was retreating. The marine aerosols were analyzed for the molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids as well as ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyls to better understand the source of water-soluble organics and their photochemical processes in the high Arctic marine atmosphere. We found that diacids are more abundant than ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls, but their concentrations are generally low (< 30 ng m-3), except for one sample (up to 70 ng m-3) that was collected near the mouth of Mackenzie River during clear sky condition. Although the molecular compositions of diacids are in general characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid, a depletion of C2 was found in two samples in which C4 became the most abundant. Similar depletion of oxalic acid has previously been reported in the Arctic aerosols collected at Alert after polar sunrise and in the summer aerosols from the coast of Antarctica. Because the marine aerosols that showed a depletion of C2 were collected under the overcast and/or foggy conditions, we suggest that a photochemical decomposition of oxalic acid may have occurred in aqueous phase of aerosols over the Arctic Ocean via the photo dissociation of oxalate-Fe (III) complex. We also determined stable carbon isotopic compositions (?13C) of bulk aerosol carbon and individual diacids. The ?13C of bulk aerosols showed -26.5‰ (range: -29.7 to -24.7‰, suggesting that marine aerosol carbon is derived from both terrestrial and marine organic materials. In contrast, oxalic acid showed much larger ?13C values (average: -20.9‰, range: -24.7‰ to -17.0‰) than those of bulk aerosol carbon. Interestingly, ?13C values of oxalic acid were higher than C3 (av. -26.6‰) and C4 (-25.8‰) diacids, suggesting that oxalic acid is enriched with 13C due to its photochemical processing (aging) in the marine atmosphere.

  12. Summertime carbonaceous aerosols collected in the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhouqing Xie; Joel D. Blum; Satoshi Utsunomiya; R. C. Ewing; Xinming Wang; Liguang Sun

    2007-01-01

    The chemistry, morphology, and microscale to nanoscale structures of carbonaceous aerosols from the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean were investigated by a variety of electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The relative levels of particles of black carbon (BC) were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  13. Trace elements in tropical African savanna biomass burning aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Gaudichet; F. Echalar; B. Chatenet; J. P. Quisefit; G. Malingre; H. Cachier; P. Buat-Menard; P. Artaxo; W. Maenhaut

    1995-01-01

    As a part of the FOS\\/DECAFE experiment, aerosol particles emitted during prescribed savanna fires were collected in January 1991 at Lamto (Ivory Coast), either close to the emission or in ambient air. Analytical transmission electron microscopy pointed out the presence of sub-micrometer soots, salt condensates, vegetation relicts and soil derived particles. The samples were also analyzed for their total particulate

  14. EFFECTS OF METEOROLOGY ON CONCENTRATIONS OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air samples of strong acid aerosol (H+), sulfate (So=4), ammonia (NH3), and ammonium (NH+4) were collected in Pittsburgh and Uniontown, Pennsylvania during the summer of 1990. igh correlations were found for both + and SO=4 concentrations between Pittsburgh and the semi-r...

  15. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, Monica A.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    During the boreal forest burn studied, the ambient concentrations for the particle carbon smoke aerosol are highest for the full-fire burn conditions and vary significantly throughout the burn. Collection strategies must accordingly define ranges in the smoke aerosol concentrations produced. While the highest elemental C concentrations are observed during full-fire conditions, the great majority of smoke aerosol particles are in the form of organic C particles irrespective of fire temperature. The formation of organic C light-scattering particles was a significant process in the burn studied.

  16. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  17. Evaluation of a solid matrix for collection and ambient storage of RNA from whole blood

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole blood gene expression-based molecular diagnostic tests are becoming increasingly available. Conventional tube-based methods for obtaining RNA from whole blood can be limited by phlebotomy, volume requirements, and RNA stability during transport and storage. A dried blood spot matrix for collecting high-quality RNA, called RNA Stabilizing Matrix (RSM), was evaluated against PAXgene® blood collection tubes. Methods Whole blood was collected from 25 individuals and subjected to 3 sample storage conditions: 18 hours at either room temperature (baseline arm) or 37°C, and 6 days at room temperature. RNA was extracted and assessed for integrity by Agilent Bioanalyzer, and gene expression was compared by RT-qPCR across 23 mRNAs comprising a clinical test for obstructive coronary artery disease. Results RSM produced RNA of relatively high integrity across the various tested conditions (mean RIN?±?95% CI: baseline arm, 6.92?±?0.24; 37°C arm, 5.98?±?0.48; 6-day arm, 6.72?±?0.23). PAXgene samples showed comparable RNA integrity in both baseline and 37°C arms (8.42?±?0.17; 7.92?±?0.1 respectively) however significant degradation was observed in the 6-day arm (3.19?±?1.32). Gene expression scores on RSM were highly correlated between the baseline and 37°C and 6-day study arms (median r?=?0.96, 0.95 respectively), as was the correlation to PAXgene tubes (median r?=?0.95, p?collecting, shipping, and storing RNA for gene expression assays. PMID:24855452

  18. Measurements of the timescales for the mass transfer of water in glassy aerosol at low relative humidity and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.-J.; Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Luo, B. P.; Krieger, U. K.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of glassy states and highly viscous solution phases on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with water vapour is examined. In particular, the kinetics of mass transfer of water between the condensed and gas phases has been studied for sucrose solution droplets under conditions above and below the glass transition relative humidity (RH). Above the glass transition, sucrose droplets are shown to equilibrate on a timescale comparable to the change in RH. Below the glass transition, the timescale for mass transfer is shown to be extremely slow, with particles remaining in a state of disequilibrium even after timescales of more than 10 000 s. A phenomenological approach for quantifying the time response of particle size is used to illustrate the influence of the glassy aerosol state on the kinetics of mass transfer of water: the time is estimated for the droplet to reach the halfway point from an initial state towards a disequilibrium state at which the rate of size change decreases below 1 nm every 10 000 s. This half-time increases above 1000 s once the particle can be assumed to have formed a glass. The measurements are shown to be consistent with kinetic simulations of the slow diffusion of water within the particle bulk. When increasing the RH from below to above the glass transition, a particle can return to equilibrium with the gas phase on a timescale of 10's to 100's of seconds, once again forming a solution droplet. This is considerably shorter than the timescale for the size change of the particle when glassy and suggests that the dissolution of the glassy core can proceed rapidly, at least at room temperature. Similar behaviour in the slowing of the mass transfer rate below the glass transition RH is observed for binary aqueous raffinose solution droplets. Mixed component droplets of sucrose/sodium chloride/water also show slow equilibration at low RH, illustrating the importance of understanding the role of the bulk solution viscosity on the rate of mass transfer with the gas phase, even under conditions that may not lead to the formation of a glass.

  19. Distributions of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols collected over the Arctic Ocean during late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ono, K.; Tachibana, E.; Charriére, B.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-08-01

    Oxalic and other small dicarboxylic acids have been reported as important water-soluble organic constituents of atmospheric aerosols from different environments. Their molecular distributions are generally characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) and/or succinic (C4) acids. In this study, we collected marine aerosols from the Arctic Ocean during late summer in 2009 when sea ice is retreated. The marine aerosols were analyzed for the molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids as well as ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyls to better understand the source of water-soluble organics and their photochemical processes in the high Arctic marine atmosphere. We found that diacids are more abundant than ketoacids and ?-dicarbonyls, but their concentrations are generally low (< 30 ng m-3), except for one sample (up to 70 ng m-3) that was collected near the mouth of Mackenzie River during clear sky condition. Although the molecular compositions of diacids are in general characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid, a depletion of C2 was found in two samples in which C4 became the most abundant. Similar depletion of oxalic acid has previously been reported in the Arctic aerosols collected at Alert after polar sunrise and in the summer aerosols from the coastal Antarctica. Because the marine aerosols that showed a depletion of C2 were observed under the overcast and/or foggy conditions, we suggest that a photochemical decomposition of oxalic acid may have occurred in aqueous phase of aerosols over the Arctic Ocean via the photo dissociation of oxalate-Fe (III) complex. We also determined stable carbon isotopic compositions (?13C) of bulk aerosol carbon and individual diacids. The ?13C of bulk aerosols showed -26.5‰ (range: -29.7‰ to -24.7‰), suggesting that marine aerosol carbon is derived from both terrestrial and marine organic materials. In contrast, oxalic acid showed much larger ?13C values (average: -20.9‰, range: -24.7‰ to -17.0‰) than those of bulk aerosol carbon. Interestingly, ?13C values of oxalic acid were higher than C3 (av. -26.6‰) and C4 (-25.8‰) diacids, suggesting that oxalic acid is enriched with 13C due to its photochemical processing (aging) in the marine atmosphere.

  20. a Study of the Origin of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildemann, Lynn Mary

    1990-01-01

    The sources of ambient organic particulate matter in urban areas are investigated through a program of emission source measurements, atmospheric measurements, and mathematical modeling of source/receptor relationships. A dilution sampler intended to collect fine organic aerosol from combustion sources is designed to simulate atmospheric cooling and dilution processes, so that organic vapors which condense under ambient conditions will be collected as particulate matter. This system is used to measure the emissions from a boiler burning distillate oil, a home fireplace, catalyst and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternate techniques are used to sample the particulate matter emitted from cigarette smoking, a roofing tar pot, paved road dust, brake lining wear, tire wear, and vegetative detritus. The bulk chemical characteristics of the fine aerosol fraction are presented for each source. Over half of the fine aerosol mass emitted from automobiles, wood burning, meat cooking, home appliances, cigarettes, and tar pots is shown to consist of organic compounds. The organic material collected from these sources is analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography. Using a simple analytical protocol, a quantitative, 50-parameter characterization of the elutable fine organic aerosol emitted from each source type is obtained, which proves to be a unique fingerprint that can be used to distinguish most sources from each other. A mathematical model is used to predict the characteristics of fine ambient organic aerosol in the Los Angeles area that would prevail if the primary organic emissions are transported without chemical reaction. The model is found to track the seasonal variations observed in the ambient aerosol at the three sites studied. Emissions from vehicles and fireplaces are identified as significant sources of solvent-extractable organic aerosol. Differences between the model predictions and ambient concentrations that could be due to atmospheric chemical reaction are discussed. An upper limit on the amount of secondary organic aerosol present is estimated based on the difference between the acidic organic aerosol present in ambient samples versus that due to primary emissions as computed by the model. Finally, several hypotheses concerning the origin of the organic aerosol are proposed.

  1. Spectral light absorption by ambient aerosols influenced by biomass burning in the Amazon Basin I. Comparison and field calibration of absorption measurement techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Schmid; P. Artaxo; W. P. Arnott; D. Chand; L. V. Gatti; G. P. Frank; A. Hoffer; M. Schnaiter; M. O. Andreae

    2005-01-01

    Spectral aerosol light absorption is an important parameter for the assessment of the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Although on-line measurement techniques for aerosol light absorption, such as the Aethalometer and the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), have been available for two decades, they are limited in accuracy and spectral resolution because of the need to deposit the aerosol on

  2. Spectral light absorption by ambient aerosols influenced by biomass burning in the Amazon Basin. I: Comparison and field calibration of absorption measurement techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Schmid; P. Artaxo; W. P. Arnott; D. Chand; L. V. Gatti; G. P. Frank; A. Hoffer; M. Schnaiter; M. O. Andreae

    2006-01-01

    Spectral aerosol light absorption is an important parameter for the assessment of the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Although on-line measurement techniques for aerosol light absorption, such as the Aethalometer and the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), have been available for two decades, they are limited in accuracy and spectral resolution because of the need to deposit the aerosol on

  3. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO SUMMERTIME PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL IN NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements performed on PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, TN from June 21 to July 13, 1999, showed high levels of modern carbon, ranging from 56 to 80% of the total carbon in the samples. Radiocarbon measurements performed on dichloromethane extracts of...

  4. Use of a modified walkley-black method to determine the organic and elemental carbon content of urban aerosols collected on glass fibre filters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. C. Chan; P. D. Vowles; G. H. McTainsh; R. W. Simpson; D. D. Cohen; G. M. Bailey

    1995-01-01

    An analysis based on the Walkley-Black method is a rapid and effective means for determining the organic carbon, elemental carbon and total organic carbon content of urban aerosol samples collected on glass fibre and teflon-backed glass fibre filters. The estimated accuracy of the method is + 18%, ?33% and ?8% for OC, EC and TOC, respectively, the precision is ±7%,

  5. Recent Rainfall and Aerosol Chemistry From Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R.; Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This project was devoted to testing the use of Be-7 as a tracer for quantifying trace element fluxes from the atmosphere to the oceans. Rainfall and aerosol samples were collected between June 15, 2011 and July 27, 2013 at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) located near the eastern end of the island of Bermuda. Collectors were situated near ground level, clear of surrounding vegetation, at a meteorological monitoring station in front of the BIOS laboratory, about 10 m above sea level. This is a Bermuda Air Quality Program site used for ambient air quality monitoring. To quantify the atmospheric deposition of Be-7, plastic buckets were deployed for collection of fallout over ~3 week periods. Wet deposition was collected for trace element analysis using a specially modified "GEOTRACES" N-CON automated wet deposition collector. Aerosol samples were collected with a Tisch TE-5170V-BL high volume aerosol sampler, modified to collect 12 replicate samples on acid-washed 47mm diameter Whatman-41 filters, using procedures identical to those used for the US GEOTRACES aerosol program (Morton et al., 2013). Aerosol and rainfall samples were analyzed for total Na, Mg, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, and U using ICPMS. Confirming earlier data from Bermuda, strong seasonality in rainfall and aerosol loading and chemistry was observed, particularly for aerosol and rainfall Fe concentrations when Saharan dust arrives in July/August with SE trajectories.

  6. Source indicators of biomass burning associated with inorganic salts and carboxylates in dry season ambient aerosol in Chiang Mai Basin, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chotruksa, Auranee; Wu, Hsin-Ching; Kuo, Su-Ching

    2013-10-01

    PM10 aerosol was collected between February and April 2010 at an urban site (CMU) and an industrial site (TOT) in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and characteristics and provenance of water-soluble inorganic species, carboxylates, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols were investigated with particular reference to air quality, framed as episodic or non-episodic pollution. Sulfate, a product of secondary photochemical reactions, was the major inorganic salt in PM10, comprising 25.9% and 22.3% of inorganic species at CMU and TOT, respectively. Acetate was the most abundant monocarboxylate, followed by formate. Oxalate was the dominant dicarboxylate. A high acetate/formate mass ratio indicated that primary traffic-related and biomass-burning emissions contributed to Chiang Mai aerosols during episodic and non-episodic pollution. During episodic pollution carboxylate peaks indicated sourcing from photochemical reactions and/or directly from traffic-related and biomass burning processes and concentrations of specific biomarkers of biomass burning including water-soluble potassium, glutarate, oxalate and levoglucosan dramatically increased. Levoglucosan, the dominant anhydrosugar, was highly associated with water-soluble potassium (r = 0.75-0.79) and accounted for 93.4% and 93.7% of anhydrosugars at CMU and TOT, respectively, during episodic pollution. Moreover, levoglucosan during episodic pollution was 14.2-21.8 times non-episodic lows, showing clearly that emissions from biomass burning are the major cause of PM10 episodic pollution in Chiang Mai. Additionally, the average levoglucosan/mannosan mass ratio during episodic pollution was 14.1-14.9, higher than the 5.73-7.69 during non-episodic pollution, indicating that there was more hardwood burning during episodic pollution. Higher concentrations of glycerol and erythritol during episodic pollution further indicate that biomass burning activities released soil biota from forest and farmland soils.

  7. HOUSTON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field study of ambient aerosols was conducted in Houston between September 14 and October 14, 1978. Measurements at 12 sites were made using (1) two relocatable monitoring systems instrumented for aerosol and gaseous pollutants, (2) a network of high volume samplers ...

  8. Summertime carbonaceous aerosols collected in the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhouqing; Blum, Joel D.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ewing, R. C.; Wang, Xinming; Sun, Liguang

    2007-01-01

    The chemistry, morphology, and microscale to nanoscale structures of carbonaceous aerosols from the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean were investigated by a variety of electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The relative levels of particles of black carbon (BC) were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorbed onto BC particles were extracted by the soxhlet extraction method and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results show that the dominant particles of BC are char particles with spherical shape, porous structure, and high sulfur content, which are typically derived from residual oil combustion on ships. The spatial distribution of BC from ship emissions was found to be concentrated around the periphery of the Arctic Ocean, suggesting relatively intensive contamination by ships in the Russian and Canadian Arctic. The abundance of PAHs on BC particles ranges from 142 to 2672 pg/m3 (mean = 702 pg/m3), which is significantly higher than values previously measured by land-based observation. Thus we find that ship emissions are a potentially important contributor to the PAH levels at some locations in the Arctic Ocean during the summer.

  9. Aerosol size distributions of elemental and organic carbon in urban and over-water atmospheres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H Offenberg; Joel E Baker

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol mass size distributions of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were measured to determine the extent to which carbon speciations within ambient aerosols differ between urban and over-water atmospheres. Samples were collected during twenty-one 12-h periods in urban Chicago and over Lake Michigan during the July 1994 and January 1995 sampling intensives. Total particle bound concentrations (sum of

  10. Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-08-11

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

  11. AUTORAMP - an automatic unit for unattended aerosol collection, gamma-ray analysis and data transmission from remote locations

    SciTech Connect

    Latner, N.; Sanderson, C.G.; Negro, V.C. [and others

    1997-12-31

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has designed, developed and field tested a fully automated and completely unattended multisample, surface-air monitoring system. This system, AUTORAMP, collects large-volume aerosol samples on discrete pleated cartridge filters, measures these samples in a near ideal geometry with a refrigerator-cooled Germanium gamma-ray detector, and immediately transmits the resulting spectra through a telephone/modem connection or a satellite link. Using a sample tray loaded with 31 filters, the system will allow for more than six months of unattended operation with weekly sampling, or one month of daily sampling. Remote control of all operating functions is possible through the communications link. For a 24-h collection, at 12,000 m{sup 3} d{sup -1} and a 18-h gamma-ray count, this system can detect as little as 2.7 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of the short-lived {sup 140}Ba and 5.4 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of {sup 137}Cs.

  12. High sensitivity sensor for continuous direct measurement of bipolar charged aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Karen; Jones, Chris; Fletcher-Wood, Guy

    2008-12-01

    The disruptive generation of aerosols is known to cause particles to carry electrostatic charges. Anthropogenic aerosol may have a standard deviation of charges when generated that is different to other sources or equilibrated aerosols. A simple, low cost 'Bipolar Charged Aerosol Sensor' (BCAS) has been developed to continuously measure charged aerosol in the ambient environment in real-time. Direct measurement of the current released from the charged aerosol particles when they deposit onto an electrode in a DC field is achieved using custom designed, sensitive electrometers. The mobility range of particles collected is defined by the DC field strength, air flow rate through the instrument and the electrode geometry. The mobility range of interest has been selected based on measurements made previously with a complex Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) based instrument. The BCAS has been assessed in laboratory. The sensor design and initial measurement data will be discussed.

  13. Evidence of high PM 2.5 strong acidity in ammonia-rich atmosphere of Guangzhou, China: Transition in pathways of ambient ammonia to form aerosol ammonium at [NH 4 +]\\/[SO 4 2–] = 1.5

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Huang; R. Qiu; Chak K. Chan; Pathak Ravi Kant

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected using Harvard Honeycomb denuder\\/filter-pack system during different seasons in 2006 and 2007 at an urban site in Guangzhou, China. The particles collected in this study were generally acidic (average strong acidity ([H+]) ~70nmol m?3). Interestingly, aerosol sulfate was not fully neutralized in the ammonia-rich atmosphere (NH3~30ppb) and even when NH4+]\\/[SO42?] was larger

  14. Mass spectroscopy of single aerosols from field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.S.; Murphy, D.M. [NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We are developing an aircraft instrument for the chemical analysis of individual ambient aerosols in real time. In order to test the laboratory version of this instrument, we participated in a field campaign near the continental divide in Colorado in September, 1993. During this campaign, over 5000 mass spectra of ambient aerosols were collected. Analysis of the negative ion spectra shows that sulfate was the most commonly seen component of smaller particles, while nitrate was more common in larger particles. Organic compounds are present in most particles, and we believe we can distinguish inorganic carbon in some particles. Although numerous distinct classes of particles were observed, indicating external mixtures, almost all of these particle types were themselves mixtures of several compounds. Finally, we note that although the field site experienced distinct polluted and unpolluted episodes, aerosol composition did not correlate with gas phase chemistry.

  15. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Profile of Electronic and Tobacco Cigarettes, Smokeless Tobacco and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products: E-Liquids, Extracts and Collected Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Manoj; Leverette, Robert D.; Cooper, Bethany T.; Bennett, Melanee B.; Brown, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT) products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic. PMID:25361047

  16. Use of spaceborne lidar for the evaluation of thin cirrus contamination and screening in the Aqua MODIS Collection 5 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Liu, Zhaoyan; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Lee, Jaehwa

    2013-06-01

    Cloud contamination from subvisual thin cirrus clouds is still a challenging issue for operational satellite aerosol retrievals. In the A-Train constellation, concurrent high-sensitivity cirrus observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol retrievals to thin cirrus contamination and to evaluate the robustness of various cirrus screening techniques. Quantitative evaluations indicate that the current cirrus screening schemes in the MODIS Dark Target and Deep Blue Collection 5 aerosol retrievals can effectively remove most cirrus signals while some residual thin cirrus signals still exist with strong spatial and seasonal variability. Results also show significant linkage between thin cirrus occurrence frequency and the susceptibility of aerosol retrievals to thin cirrus contamination. Using the CALIPSO cirrus observations as a reference, we also examined the effectiveness and robustness of eight MODIS-derived cirrus screening parameters. These parameters include apparent reflectance at 1.38 µm (R1.38), cirrus reflectance at 0.66 µm (CR0.66), CR0.66 cirrus flag (CF), reflectance ratio between 1.38 µm and 0.66 µm (RR1.38/0.66), reflectance ratio between 1.38 µm and 1.24 µm (RR1.38/1.24), brightness temperature difference between 8.6 µm and 11 µm (BTD8.6-11), brightness temperature difference between 11 µm and 12 µm (BTD11-12), and cloud phase infrared approach (CPIR). Among these parameters, RR1.38/0.66 achieves the best overall performance, followed by the BTD11-12. Results from several test cases suggest that the cirrus screening schemes in the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithms can be further improved to reduce thin cirrus contamination.

  17. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and ?-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  18. Physical and chemical characterization of ambient aerosol by HR-ToF-AMS at a suburban site in Hong Kong during springtime 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Berto P.; Li, Yong Jie; Yu, Jian Zhen; Louie, Peter K. K.; Chan, Chak K.

    2013-08-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) has been employed in a field sampling campaign at a suburban coastal site in Hong Kong in springtime 2011 to provide insights into the size-resolved chemical composition of nonrefractory submicron aerosol species. This is the first time that such detailed real-time measurements have been made in Hong Kong. The total nonrefractory PM1 was dominated by sulfate (51.0%) and organics (28.2%) with considerable acidity (average in situ pH = 0.95) and a characteristic bimodal particle size distribution with peaks at 200 and 570 nm of vacuum aerodynamic diameter (Dva). Source apportionment of organic aerosol yielded three characteristic aerosol fractions (hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, semivolatile organic aerosol and low-volatile organic aerosol) with distinct temporal patterns and distributions in different particle size regions. The influence of air mass origin on species concentrations, particle size distributions and elemental ratios was investigated using backtrajectory analysis. Larger particle diameters, greater fractions of oxygenated organic aerosol and higher organic-to-carbon ratios were observed during coastal and continental air mass influence. Three major pollution events with elevated nonrefractory PM1 concentrations were observed in the sampling period, which were related to distinct meteorological and circulatory conditions. Accumulation and redistribution of local and regional pollutants were notable in a period of strong land-sea breeze over the Pearl River Delta region, with considerable photochemical activity and particle aging. Increased fractions of oxygenated organic aerosol were apparent in foggy conditions, illustrating the importance of aqueous phase oxidation processes in a cooler and more humid time period.

  19. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF PHOENIX PM2.5 AEROSOL WITH THE UNMIX RECEPTOR MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multivariate receptor model Unmix has been used to analyze a 3-yr PM2.5 ambient aerosol data set collected in Phoenix, AZ, beginning in 1995. The analysis generated source profiles and overall percentage source contribution estimates (SCE) for five source categories: ga...

  20. Size-Resolved Anhydrosugar Composition in Smoke Aerosol from Controlled Field Burning of Rice Straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guenter Engling; James J. Lee; Yi-Wen Tsai; Shih-Chun C. Lung; Charles C.-K. Chou; Chuen-Yu Chan

    2009-01-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the effects of ambient conditions and burning practices of rice fields in Taiwan on the chemical and physical characteristics of the smoke aerosol. Rice straw was burned on an actual rice field under typical conditions and smoke particles were collected immediately downwind of the field over the full particle size spectrum. Here we

  1. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brigmon, Robin L. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilson, Christina A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Yeager, Chris [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Polson, Shawn W. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Hollings Marine Lab.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. One isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.

  2. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brigmon, Robin L.; Wilson, Christina A.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. Onemore »isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.« less

  3. Comparison between XRF and IBA techniques in analysis of fine aerosols collected in Rijeka, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivoševi?, Tatjana; Mandi?, Luka; Orli?, Ivica; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David D.

    2014-10-01

    The new system for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been installed at the Laboratory for Elemental Micro-Analysis (LEMA) at the University of Rijeka. Currently the key application of this new XRF system is in the field of environmental science, i.e. in the analysis of fine airborne particles. In this work, results of initial multi-elemental analysis of PM2.5 fraction is reported for the first time in the region of Rijeka, Croatia. Sampling was performed at the Rijeka City center, during a continuous 9-day period in February/March 2012. All samples were collected on stretched Teflon filters in 12 h periods. To check the reliability of the new XRF system, results of XRF analysis are compared with the results obtained by the well-established Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) laboratory at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The concentrations of H, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb were determined. In addition, black carbon was determined by Laser Integrating Plate Method (LIPM). Very good agreement between XRF and IBA techniques is obtained for all elements detected by both techniques. Elemental concentrations were correlated with the traffic volume and wind speed and direction. The summary of our findings is presented and discussed in this paper.

  4. Characteristics of regional aerosols: Southern Arizona and eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Gouri

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the quality of our life in many direct and indirect ways. Inhalation of aerosols can have harmful effects on human health. Aerosols also have climatic impacts by absorbing or scattering solar radiation, or more indirectly through their interactions with clouds. Despite a better understanding of several relevant aerosol properties and processes in the past years, they remain the largest uncertainty in the estimate of global radiative forcing. The uncertainties arise because although aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere they are highly variable in space, time and their physicochemical properties. This makes in-situ measurements of aerosols vital in our effort towards reducing uncertainties in the estimate of global radiative forcing due to aerosols. This study is an effort to characterize atmospheric aerosols at a regional scale, in southern Arizona and eastern Pacific Ocean, based on ground and airborne observations of aerosols. Metals and metalloids in particles with aerodynamic diameter (Dp) smaller than 2.5 ?m are found to be ubiquitous in southern Arizona. The major sources of the elements considered in the study are identified to be crustal dust, smelting/mining activities and fuel combustion. The spatial and temporal variability in the mass concentrations of these elements depend both on the source strength and meteorological conditions. Aircraft measurements of aerosol and cloud properties collected during various field campaigns over the eastern Pacific Ocean are used to study the sources of nitrate in stratocumulus cloud water and the relevant processes. The major sources of nitrate in cloud water in the region are emissions from ships and wildfires. Different pathways for nitrate to enter cloud water and the role of meteorology in these processes are examined. Observations of microphysical properties of ambient aerosols in ship plumes are examined. The study shows that there is an enhancement in the number concentration of giant cloud condensation nuclei (Dp > 2 microm) in ship plumes relative to the unperturbed background regions over the ocean.

  5. Semi-automated bacterial spore detection system with micro-fluidic chips for aerosol collection, spore treatment and ICAN DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Inami, Hisao; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Matsuzawa, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Yasuhiko; Togashi, Shigenori; Komano, Asuka; Seto, Yasuo

    2009-07-15

    A semi-automated bacterial spore detection system (BSDS) was developed to detect biological threat agents (e.g., Bacillus anthracis) on-site. The system comprised an aerosol sampler, micro-fluidic chip-A (for spore germination and cell lysis), micro-fluidic chip-B (for extraction and detection of genomic DNA) and an analyzer. An aerosol with bacterial spores was first collected in the collection chamber of chip-A with a velocity of 300 l/min, and the chip-A was taken off from the aerosol sampler and loaded into the analyzer. Reagents packaged in the chip-A were sequentially applied into the chamber. The genomic DNA extract from spore lyzate was manually transferred from chip-A to chip-B and loaded into the analyzer. Genomic DNA in chip-B was first trapped on a glass bead column, washed with various reagents, and eluted to the detection chamber by sequential auto-dispensing. Isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) with fluorescent measurement was adopted to amplify and detect target DNA. Bacillus subtilis was the stimulant of biological warfare agent in this experiment. Pretreatment conditions were optimized by examining bacterial target DNA recovery in the respective steps (aerosol collection, spore germination, cell lysis, and DNA extraction), by an off-chip experiment using a real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification method. Without the germination step, B. subtilis spores did not demonstrate amplification of target DNA. The detection of 10(4) spores was achieved within 2h throughout the micro-fluidic process. PMID:19450964

  6. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BOISE, IDAHO, AMBIENT AIR FINE PARTICLE SAMPLES USING THE PLATE AND MICROSUSPENSION SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to characterize the genotoxic potential of the ambient air aerosols collected within an air shed impacted primarily by wood smoke and automotive emissions. The study also examines the relative merits of a microsuspension assay and the standa...

  7. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  8. QUARTZ CONTENT AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF AEROSOLS FROM SELECTED SITES OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) INHALABLE PARTICULATE NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The elemental composition and concentration of quartz in ambient aerosols collected on dichotomous filters from the EPA Inhalable Particulate Network (IPN) in 1980 have been determined by x-ray fluorescence and mass calibration methods of x-ray diffraction (XRD). Quartz concentra...

  9. Speciation of major heavy metals in ambient fine particles collected in the atmospheres of Xuanwei, Yunan, a higher lung incidence area in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Yi, Fei; Lin, Jun; Ren, Jingjing; Hao, Xiaojie

    2013-04-01

    Xuan Wei area, Yunnan province of China, has one of the highest lung cancer mortality rates in China. Heavy metals in the aerosol are potential facts that might attribute to the cause of lung cancer, and speciation of heavy metals could play a key role in toxicity of heavy metals. Therefore, we try to reveal speciation of major heavy metals by using of synchrotron radiation techniques in this study. Mass concentration of chemical elements in ambient particles were analyzed by PIXE (Proton induced X-ray emission), and speciation of Cu was investigated by XAFS (X-ray absorption near-edge structure). Our results demonstrated that mass levels of heavy metals ranked as Fe (791.62 ng/m3) >Zn (479.49 ng/m3) >Pb(154.76 ng/m3) >Cu(28.51 ng/m3) >Co (11.79 ng/m3) >Ni (8.20 ng/m3). The Cu speciation in the different size fraction was different. Speciation of Cu in fine particles (PM0.56~0.32) is present as Cu (I), and significant amount of Cu is present as Cu (II) in the ultrafine particles (PM0.1).

  10. Elevated nitrogen-containing particles observed in Asian dust aerosol samples collected at the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Geng; Y.-M. Park; H.-J. Hwang; S. Kang; C.-U. Ro

    2009-01-01

    Low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) shows powerful advantages for the characterization of ambient particulate matter in environmental and geological applications. By the application of the low-Z particle EPMA single particle analysis, an overall examination of 1800 coarse and fine particles (aerodynamic diameters: 2.5-10 mum and 1.0-2.5 mum, respectively) in six samples collected on 28 April-1 May

  11. In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-07-31

    Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

  12. A comparison of the sampling efficiencies of a range of atmosphere samplers when collecting polymeric diphenylmethane di-isocyanate (MDI) aerosols.

    PubMed

    Hext, P M; Booth, K; Dharmarajan, V; Karoly, W J; Parekh, P P; Spence, M

    2003-05-01

    Polymeric diphenylmethane di-isocyanate (PMDI) is a precursor or an intermediate in the manufacture of pure MDI and is used in many industrial applications. Potential health effects of diisocyanates are generally considered to include irritation and respiratory sensitization, dictating the need for low occupational hygiene standards and robust hygiene monitoring methods. A wide range of methods has been developed or adopted for this purpose but questions concerning their ability to accurately sample MDI aerosols in the occupational environment have often been raised. In order to provide such information, studies have been conducted to compare several MDI sampling systems: the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) 25-mm open-faced inhalable dust sampler; the 13-mm Millipore Swinnex Cassette sampler; the 37-mm open-face Millipore cassette; the midget-impinger, the glass tube containing glass wool, and two direct reading paper tape monitors. The program was comprised of two phases, the first being a preliminary comparison of the collection efficiencies of the IOM, 13 mm and midget-impinger at a range of orientations to air flow, aerosol particle sizes, and sampling flow rates, using inert polyethylene glycol aerosols. The second phase compared all samplers operating according to each manufacturer's recommendations and sampling PMDI aerosols at a range of particle sizes and concentrations. All studies were conducted in a wind tunnel. All filter methods performed well in atmospheres containing small particles except impingers that required a filter backup. In general, the variability of all the samplers was high for larger particle size ranges. Direct reading monitors showed low efficiencies. PMID:12746078

  13. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment. The high-time resolution data shows that rapid concentration changes of a common individual species can be lost with traditional bulk sampling, and a time resolution of 30 minutes is suggested to accurately represent these changes. Using the mass spectra collected from the extended sampling campaign, source apportionment was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF). The resulting model features six factors either correlated to specific sources (meat cooking, car emissions/road dust, diesel exhaust) or types of compounds (phthalates, alkanes/alkanoic acids, PAHs). The high-time resolution data allowed for the observation of specific trends in each factor's behavior as a function of time and wind direction relative to the receptor site. Elemental carbon/organic carbon (EC/OC) data is used to calculate the percentages of primary and secondary organic aerosol. Primary organic aerosol (POA) constituted the vast majority of the total carbon at 91% (an average of 2.8 +/- 1.1mug/m 3); 30% of which came from combustion, and 70% from non-combustion sources. These results can be explained by the PIAMS data: the diesel factor contributes to the combustion-related POA; the car/road dust, meat cooking, and alkane/alkanoic acid factors contribute the majority of non-combustion POA. The remaining factors represent <5% of the remaining OC. Considering the compatibility of data from the EC/OC and PIAMS, the ability of PIAMS to yield molecular species information to further define the primary and secondary organic aerosol factions is a distinct advantage in describing the behavior of the Wilmington organic aerosol. PIAMS was also applied to laboratory experiments. These experiments simulated complex environmental processes in order to focus on answering a central question. By mixing cholesterol aerosol with ozone in a smog chamber, and monitoring the concentration of cholesterol with PIAMS, the rate of reaction was determined. This rate indicates that cholesterol aerosol, which is a suggested source tracer, will remain in the ambient air for a few days under norma

  14. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  15. Optical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol in Maritime Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Smirnov; Brent N. Holben; Yoram J. Kaufman; Oleg Dubovik; Thomas F. Eck; Ilya Slutsker; Christophe Pietras; Rangasayi N. Halthore

    2002-01-01

    Systematic characterization of aerosol over the oceans is needed to understand the aerosol effect on climate and on transport of pollutants between continents. Reported are the results of a comprehensive optical and physical characterization of ambient aerosol in five key island locations of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sun and sky radiometers, spanning over 2-5 yr. The results are

  16. Characterization of submicron aerosol particles collected during the MEGAPOLI experiment aboard the ATR-42 in Paris, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Barbet, C.; Pichon, J.; Borbon, A.; Colomb, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical and physical properties of submicron aerosol particles were analyzed during the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) campaign onboard the French ATR-42 aircraft. A total of 11 research flights (RF) were performed from July 9 to 29, 2009. The ATR-42 was equipped with a Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ToF-AMS), a Proton Transfer Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS), as well as measurements of ozone (O_3), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO, NOy, and NOx). Meteorology measurements of temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, and liquid water content were also performed for each flight. Using the ToF-AMS, size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron particles (NR-PM1) were obtained at 1-min resolution. The average composition of NR-PM1 during this study was 53% organics, 27% sulfate, 7% nitrate, 12% ammonium, and 2% chloride. Strong contributions from SO_4 bearing particles are observed outside of the pollution plume, whereas Org-bearing particles are high within the plume. The mass concentrations of SO_4 bearing particles decrease as they encounter the pollution plume and at the same time there is an increase in organic mass concentration. These patterns suggest that there is competition between the formation of SO_4 and organic- bearing particles around the Paris pollution plume. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed on the ToF-AMS organic mass spectra. Three substantial organic components were resolved. Two of the components contain substantial organic oxygen and are associated with semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol particles (SV-OOA) and low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). Primary hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol particles (HOA) are also resolved. The LV-OOA component is highly aged and is normally detected outside of the main pollution plume, however SV-OOA and HOA have higher mass concentrations in the pollution plume rather than outside. We observe that mass concentrations of SV-OOA increase with both photochemical age and distance from the center of Paris within the pollution plume showing that there is significant formation of secondary organic aerosols within the plume. Similarly, combining these measurements with gas-phase measurements of NOx and volatile organic carbon (VOC) allows us to associate anthropogenic precursor VOCs to the formation of secondary organic aerosols.

  17. An assessment of the performance of Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA?s) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The U.S. EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuou...

  18. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  19. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and ketocarboxylic acids in the aerosols collected during ACE-Asia/C-130 aircraft campaign 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Mochida, M.; Uemoto, N.; Bertram, T.; Huebert, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the ACE-Asia campaign with C-130 aircraft, aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific, East China Sea, and Japan Sea, as well as over Japanese Islands and Korean Peninsula in 8 April to 3 May 2001. The filter samples (N=15) were extracted with organic-free pure water to separate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds. The extracts were reacted with 14% BF3 in n-butanol and the dibutyl esters and other derivatives were determined using a capillary GC and GC/MS. The results showed that 14 species of diacids (C2-C11) and 4 species of ketoacids (C2-C4) were detected in the aerosols over the East Asia. Total concentrations of the diacids were 113-500 (av. 330) ng/m3 whereas those of ketoacids were 43-260 (av. 103) ng/m3. The concentrations are equivalent to or more abundant than those reported for the urban Tokyo atmosphere in this season on the ground level. All the samples showed that oxalic acid (C2) is the most abundant diacid, which accounted for 58-83% of total diacids. These values are greater than that (ca. 50%) reported in the urban air near the ground, suggesting that oxalic acid is preferentially produced and/or longer diacids are selectively decomposed in the upper troposphere. Malonic (C3) acid is the second most abundant species followed by succinic (C4) acid. Longer diacids are less abundant, but azelaic (C9) acid is generally more abundant than C6-C8 diacids. Glyoxylic acid (C2) is the most abundant ketoacid followed by pyruvic acid. However, C3 and C4 omega-oxoacids were found as minor species. Although oxalic acid is the dominant component in the aerosols, few samples showed the predominance of glyoxylic acid over oxalic acid. This feature has not been reported for the urban aerosols collected near the ground level. We will discuss a potential photochemical production of water-soluble organic acids in the upper troposphere over the eastern ridge of the Asian continent.

  20. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  1. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  2. Aerosol light scattering properties at Cape Grim, Tasmania, during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian M. Carrico; Mark J. Rood; John A. Ogren

    1998-01-01

    Large uncertainties remain in understanding the effects of ambient aerosols on climate. As part of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1, November 15 to December 15, 1995), the total light scattering and backscattering coefficients by particles (cysp and CYbsp) were measured at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Such measurements were made to characterize aerosol radiative forcing relevant to climate change at

  3. Aerosol Analysis via Electrostatic Precipitation-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Siqin; Li, Lin; Duan, Hongxu; Naqwi, Amir; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the preferred mode of ion generation for mass analysis of many organic species, as alternative ionization techniques can lead to appreciable analyte fragmentation. For this reason, ESI is an ideal method for the analysis of species within aerosol particles. However, because of their low concentrations (?10 ?g/m(3)) in most environments, ESI has been applied sparingly in aerosol particle analysis; aerosol mass spectrometers typically employ analyte volatilization followed by electron ionization or chemical ionization, which can lead to a considerable degree of analyte fragmentation. Here, we describe an approach to apply ESI to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles, which utilizes unipolar ionization to charge particles, electrostatic precipitation to collect particles on the tip of a Tungsten rod, and subsequently, by flowing liquid over the rod, ESI and mass analysis of the species composing collected particles. This technique, which we term electrostatic precipitation-ESI-MS (EP-ESI-MS), is shown to enable analysis of nanogram quantities of collected particles (from aerosol phase concentrations as low as 10(2) ng m(-3)) composed of cesium iodide, levoglucosan, and levoglucosan within a carbon nanoparticle matrix. With EP-ESI-MS, the integrated mass spectrometric signals are found to be a monotonic function of the mass concentration of analyte in the aerosol phase. We additionally show that EP-ESI-MS has a dynamic range of close to 5 orders of magnitude in mass, making it suitable for molecular analysis of aerosol particles in laboratory settings with upstream particle size classification, as well as analysis of PM 2.5 particles in ambient air. PMID:26024017

  4. Urban/peri-urban aerosol survey by determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of Pb collected by transplanted lichen Hypogymnia physodes.

    PubMed

    Cloquet, C; De Muynck, D; Signoret, J; Vanhaecke, F

    2009-02-01

    In the northeastern part of France, around the city of Metz, lichens (Hypogymnia physodes) have been transplanted from a single reference site to five different sites: (i) the reference site itself, (ii and iii) two peri-urban sites, (iv) a site in the proximity of a highway, and (v) a final one close to an industrial site. The dynamics of two different system set-ups (one covered and one uncovered) were evaluated. Samples have been collected 14, 34, and 68 days after transplantation. Lead concentrations already accumulated in the thallus, and the corresponding Pb isotopic compositions have been measured by quadrupole-based ICP-mass spectrometry. A systematic difference between the two setups is found for Pb concentrations, with the higher concentrations measured in lichens from the uncovered devices. Lead concentrations in lichens from the covered devices were found to be lower than or equal to the original concentration. Also the Pb isotopic compositions show a systematic difference between the devices, with the Pb isotopic composition present in lichens from the uncovered device being more radiogenic. Substantial changes in the isotopic composition of Pb are recorded for lichens from the uncovered device (from about 1.15 up to 1.22 for the 206Pb/207Pb ratio), in some cases already after only 34 days of exposure. The increases in the Pb concentration and the 206pb/207Pb ratio and the differences between the devices are explained by hypothesizing that (i) different Pb sources give rise to a different size distribution of aerosol particles and (ii) in the lichens present in the covered setup, a part of the aerosol particles cannot be incorporated. Also the influence of the source of the aerosols to lichens after transplantation is evaluated and the potential influence of biological reactions is discussed. PMID:19244993

  5. Laboratory development and field evaluation of a new diffusive sampler to collect nitrogen oxides in the ambient air.

    PubMed

    De Santis, F; Dogeroglu, T; Fino, A; Menichelli, S; Vazzana, C; Allegrini, I

    2002-04-01

    Diffusive samplers for the determination of NO(x) and NO2 based on collection on a coated carbon paper filter have been developed. NO is first oxidized to NO2 and then collected on the reactive surface. When NO2 and NOx samplers are exposed simultaneously, NO can be calculated by difference. The sampler has been derived from a Palmes design as recently modified by Bertoni et al. for the determination of BTX (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Laboratory tests were conducted in controlled atmosphere to evaluate linearity, uptake rate, face velocity effects, sample stability, influence of relative humidity, precision and accuracy. The samplers are capable of reliable measurements of the two species at common levels of a polluted atmosphere in urban settings yielding average concentration levels over 1 month and beyond. The uptake rate of NO2 was found to be 11.7 mL/min in a very good agreement (within 5%) with the value calculated from theory. The measured uptake rate for NO(x) was determined in experiments involving sampling at different concentration levels in comparison to chemiluminescence (CL) measurements. The precision of the measurements for co-located passive samplers was better than 5%. The accuracy of the data collected is within +/-20% of the actual value measured by CL. The laboratory and field results show that the NO(x) and NO2 samplers meet the data quality goal requested by the first EU Directive 1999/30/EU for these pollutants. PMID:12240650

  6. AEROSOL CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTION ON BOARD THE DOE G1 AIRCRAFT USING A PARTICLE INTO LIQUID SAMPLER DURING THE TEXAQS 2000 EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    LEE,Y.N.; SONG,Z.; LIU,Y.; DAUM,P.; WEBER,R.; ORSINI,D.; LAULAINEN,N.; HUBBE,J.; MORRIS,V.

    2001-01-13

    Knowledge of aerosol chemical composition is key to understanding a number of properties of ambient aerosol particles including sources, size/number distribution, chemical evolution, optical properties and human health effects. Although filter based techniques have been widely used to determine aerosol chemical constituents, they generally cannot provide sufficiently fast time resolution needed to investigate sources and chemical evolution that effect aerosol chemical, size and number changes. In order to gain an ability to describe and predict the life cycles of ambient aerosols as a basis for ambient air quality control, fast and sensitive determination of the aerosol chemical composition must be made available. To help to achieve this goal, we deployed a newly developed technique, referred to as PILS (particle-into-liquid-sampler), on the DOE G1 aircraft during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) to characterize the major ionic species of aerosol particles with aerodynamic size smaller than 2.5 {micro}m (PM 2.5). The results obtained are examined in the context of other simultaneously collected data for insights into the measurement capability of the PILS system.

  7. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the tropospheric aerosols collected over east Asia and western North Pacific by ACE-Asia C-130 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Umemoto, N.; Mochida, M.; Bertram, T.; Howell, S.; Huebert, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols were collected during C-130 aircraft campaign over the east Asia/Pacific region in April to May 2001 and were analyzed for low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids. Homologous series of C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids were detected, for the first time, in the polluted troposphere in the Asian region using aircraft. Oxalic acid (C2) was found to be the most abundant species followed by malonic (C3) or succinic (C4) acid. Total concentrations of C2-C5 diacids (44-870 ng m-3, average 310 ng m-3) are similar to those reported in urban Tokyo near the ground level. Concentrations of oxalic acid showed a positive correlation (r2 = 0.70) with total organic carbon (TOC), although other diacids showed weaker positive correlation. These results suggest that water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and TOC were emitted from similar sources on the ground in the Asian continent and/or produced by the photochemical oxidation of anthropogenic organic compounds in the atmosphere. The diacid-carbons were found to comprise 0.2-3.3% (average 1.8%) of TOC. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids may play an important role in controlling the chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols in the polluted troposphere over the east Asia and the western Pacific.

  8. Lignin-derived phenols in Houston aerosols: implications for natural background sources.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Kabindra M; Louchouarn, Patrick; Griffin, Robert J

    2011-10-01

    Solvent-extractable monomeric methoxyphenols in aerosol samples conventionally have been used to indicate the influence of biomass combustion. In addition, the presence of lignin oxidation products (LOP), derived from the CuO oxidation of vascular plant organic matter, can help trace the source and inputs of primary biological particles in aerosols. Ambient aerosols (coarse and fine) collected in Houston during summer 2010 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize monomeric and polymeric sources of LOPs. This is the first time polymeric forms of the LOPs have been characterized in ambient aerosols. The absence or small concentrations of solvent-extractable monomeric LOPs and levoglucosan isomers point to the limited influence of biomass burning during the sampling period. The trace levels of anhydrosugar concentrations most likely result from long-range transport. This observation is supported by the absence of co-occurring lignin monomers that undergo photochemical degradation during transport. The larger concentration (142 ng m(-3)) of lignin polymers in coarse aerosols shows the relative importance of primary biological aerosol particles, even in the urban atmosphere. The LOP parameters suggest a predominant influence from woody tissue of angiosperms, with minor influence from soft tissues, gymnosperms, and soil organic matter. PMID:21877739

  9. A novel method to aerosolize powder for short inhalation exposures at high concentrations: isolated rat lungs exposed to respirable diesel soot.

    PubMed

    Gerde, Per; Ewing, Pär; Låstbom, Lena; Ryrfeldt, Ake; Waher, Juri; Lidén, Göran

    2004-01-01

    More efficient methods are needed to aerosolize dry powders for short-duration inhalation exposures at high concentrations. There is an increasing need to reach the peripheral lung with dry powder medications as well as with collected ambient aerosol particulates in environmental research projects. In a novel aerosol generator, a fixed volume of compressed air was used to create a short burst of a highly concentrated aerosol in a 300-ml holding chamber. Collected diesel soot was deagglomerated to a fine aerosol with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 0.55 microm, not much larger than the 0.25 microm MMAD of diesel exhaust particles measured in air. A fine powder such as 3-microm silica particles was completely deagglomerated to an aerosol with a MMAD of 3.5 microm. Immediately after generation, the aerosol was available for exposure at a chosen flow rate by the use of an automated valve system. Tritium-labeled diesel soot was thus used to expose the isolated perfused rat lung at an air concentration of approximately 3 mg/L and a flow rate of 370 ml/min in a 1-min-long exposure. The lungs were ventilated at 75 breaths/min and a tidal volume of 1.13 +/- 0.11 ml (SD, n = 3). Results showed that 19.8 +/- 1.1 microg (SD, n = 3) soot was deposited in the lungs. This amount constitutes 9.5% of the amount inhaled and is close to literature data on deposition of similar sized particles in the rat lung. More than 97% of the deposited soot was located distal to the extrapulmonary bronchi, indicating that the system delivers a highly respirable aerosol. The aerosol system is particularly useful for peripheral lung delivery of collected ambient aerosols or dry powder pharmaceuticals following a minimal effort in formulation of the powder. PMID:14744664

  10. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MaryAnn Parkhurst; Yung-Sung Cheng; Judson L. Kenoyer; Richard J. Traub

    2009-01-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol

  11. Modeling urban and regional aerosols—Application of the CMAQ-UCD Aerosol Model to Tampa, a coastal urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Christopher G.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Arnold, Jeff R.; Dennis, Robin L.; Zhang, K. Max; Wexler, Anthony S.

    The University of California at Davis (UCD) aerosol module, an internally mixed, sectional aerosol model with dynamic mass transfer between the gas and particle phases, has been coupled to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This paper describes the application of the CMAQ-UCD model to simulate air quality in Tampa, a large city with a population of 2M on the west coast of Florida, USA. Modeled aerosol size and composition distributions are evaluated against size-segregated ambient measurements of SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, Na+, and Cl- collected at three Tampa-area sites during May 2002, and against semi-continuous HNO 3 and total aerosol SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, and Cl- measurements collected at a single site. Sea-salt emissions over the open ocean and the surf zone are parameterized as a function of modeled wind speed and relative humidity. Modeled total aerosol sulfate and ammonium concentrations and size distributions agree with measurements, with an overall normalized mean bias (NMB) of 2% and -23% and normalized mean error (NME) of 46% and 38%, respectively, and correctly identifying the size bin in which the peak concentration is observed. Sea-salt size distributions are also simulated well, with the distribution dominated by the coarse mode and total aerosol sodium and chloride NMB of -2% and 17% and NME of 32% and 38%. Though the model correctly identifies that nitrate is predominantly in the coarse (Dp>2.5?m) size sections, aerosol nitrate concentrations are underpredicted by a factor of two. The availability of highly time-resolved measurements provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the model's partitioning of total nitrate and the simulation of chloride depletion as a function of particle size.

  12. The steam-jet aerosol collector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Khlystov; G. P. Wyers; J. Slanina

    1995-01-01

    A new principle of sampling aerosol particles by means of steam injection with the consequent collection of grown droplets has been established. An air stream free of water-soluble gases is rapidly mixed with steam. The resulting supersaturation causes aerosol particles to grow into droplets. The droplets containing dissolved aerosol species are then collected by two cyclones in series. The solution

  13. Chemical characterization of individual particles and residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals collected on board research aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Glen, A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    Ambient particles and the dry residuals of mixed-phase cloud droplets and ice crystals were collected during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) near Barrow, Alaska, in spring of 2008. The collected particles were analyzed using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to identify physico-chemical properties that differentiate cloud-nucleating particles from the total aerosol population. A wide range of individually mixed components was identified in the ambient particles and residuals including organic carbon compounds, inorganics, carbonates, and black carbon. Our results show that cloud droplet residuals differ from the ambient particles in both size and composition, suggesting that both properties may impact the cloud-nucleating ability of aerosols in mixed-phase clouds. The percentage of residual particles which contained carbonates (47%) was almost four times higher than those in ambient samples. Residual populations were also enhanced in sea salt and black carbon and reduced in organic compounds relative to the ambient particles. Further, our measurements suggest that chemical processing of aerosols may improve their cloud-nucleating ability. Comparison of results for various time periods within ISDAC suggests that the number and composition of cloud-nucleating particles over Alaska can be influenced by episodic events bringing aerosols from both the local vicinity and as far away as Siberia.

  14. Identification of source contributions to visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H.; Salmon, L.G.; Winner, D.A.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science

    1993-06-01

    Sulfates and carbonaceous aerosols are the largest contributors to the fine particle burden in the atmosphere near Grand Canyon National Park. While the effects of sulfate particles on visibility at the Grand Canyon has been extensively studied, much less is known about the nature and origin of the carbonaceous aerosols that are present. This disparity in understanding arises from at least two causes: aerosol carbon data for the region are less plentiful and many of the sources that could contribute to that organic aerosol are both diverse and not well characterized. The objective of this present study is to examine the origin of the carbonaceous aerosol at Grand Canyon National Park during the summer season based on molecular tracer techniques applied to source and ambient samples collected specifically for this purpose.

  15. Thermal relaxation and collective dynamics of interacting aerosol-generated hexagonal NiFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortega, D; Kuznetsov, M V; Morozov, Yu G; Belousova, O V; Parkin, I P

    2013-12-28

    This article reports on the magnetic properties of interacting uncoated nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles synthesized through an aerosol levitation-jet technique. A comprehensive set of samples with different compositions of background gas and metal precursors, as well as applied electric field intensities, has been studied. Nanoparticles prepared under a field of 210 kV m(-1) show moderately high-field irreversibility and shifted hysteresis loops after field-cooling, also exhibiting a joint temperature decrease of the exchange field and coercivity. The appearance of memory effects has been checked using the genuine ZFC protocol and the observed behavior cannot be fully explained in terms of thermal relaxation. Although dipolar interactions prevail, exchange interactions occur to a certain extent within a narrow range of applied fields. The origin of the slow dynamics in the system is found to be given by the interplay of the distribution of energy barriers due to size dispersion and the cooperative dynamics associated with frustrated interactions. PMID:24196451

  16. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data. PMID:16398350

  17. Hygroscopicity frequency distributions of secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, S. R.; Petters, M. D.; Matsunaga, A.; Sullivan, R. C.; Ziemann, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2012-02-01

    Secondary organic compounds are an important component of ambient aerosol and potentially lower the supersaturation that is required for individual particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from the oxidation of a single precursor can be composed of many different compounds and their overall CCN efficiency has been reported for many different SOA systems. An aerosol's CCN efficiency can be described by a single hygroscopicity parameter, ?. However, this ? comprises an unknown distribution of underlying ?-values resulting from each individual compound in the SOA mixture. Here we report on a new technique for characterizing this distribution of?. Precursor hydrocarbons were oxidized in an environmental chamber to form SOA, which was collected on filters and extracted using ethyl acetate. Extracts were then fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using gradient elution with acetonitrile and water. The eluate was atomized, the solvent was removed by evaporation, and the residual aerosol particles were analyzed as a function of retention time using scanning flow CCN analysis. Kappa-values generally decreased with component retention time, consistent with expected decreasing polarity. Averaged SOA?-values reconstructed by integrating over the chromatogram agreed well with values measured for SOA sampled directly from the environmental chamber, suggesting that?for SOA represents the volume-weighted average of the constituent compounds'?-values. We anticipate that our measured hygroscopicity distributions will serve as validation points for mechanistic models that seek to predict the generation and evolution of organic aerosol composition and properties in the atmosphere.

  18. Microwave-assisted Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Petroleum Refining Catalysts and Ambient Fine Aerosols Prior to Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of a certified reference material, a robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5). High temperature (200 C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO3, HF, and H3BO3) with 20 minute dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst, and PM2.5. This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb, and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using 115In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu, and Dy in ambient PM2.5 in an industrial area of Houston, TX.

  19. Microwave-assisted extraction of rare earth elements from petroleum refining catalysts and ambient fine aerosols prior to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman; Mittlefehldt, David W

    2007-01-01

    A robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)). High temperature (200 degrees C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO(3), HF and H(3)BO(3)) with 20 min dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst and PM(2.5). This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using (115)In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu and Dy in ambient PM(2.5) in an industrial area of Houston, TX. PMID:17386451

  20. Influences of traffic volumes and wind speeds on ambient ultrafine particle levels—Observations at a highway electronic toll collection (ETC) lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Yi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and their size distributions on a highway electronic toll collection (ETC) lane were measured from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. The hourly UFP levels measured at the highway ETC lane were 1.3 × 10 4-1.9 × 10 5 particles cm -3 (mean = 9.4 × 10 4 particles cm -3). Compared with urban UFP levels, average UFP levels at the highway ETC lane were about 5-10 times higher than those previously measured in urban areas, indicating that a considerable amount of UFPs were exhausted from vehicles. At the highway ETC lane, the average UFP number size distribution had a dominant mode at about 10 nm and a minor mode at about 33 nm. Measurement results indicate that nucleation mode particles remained at relatively high levels compared to Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles at the highway ETC lane. This study identifies the impacts of traffic volumes and wind speeds on ambient UFP levels. Measurement results show that the elevated UFP levels resulting from traffic volume decreased exponentially as wind speed increased on the highway when wind speed was <2.0 m s -1. However, the elevated UFP levels resulting from traffic volume increased slightly when wind speed was >2.0 m s -1 due to local turbulent mixing causes UFPs at high wind speeds. According to measurement results, high levels of UFP were observed at low wind speeds and under high traffic volumes.

  1. Updated study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element data collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project, October 2009-March 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater samples have been collected in California as part of statewide investigations of groundwater quality conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP is being conducted in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Quality-control samples (source-solution blanks, equipment blanks, and field blanks) were collected in order to ensure the quality of the groundwater sample results. Olsen and others (2010) previously determined study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element results based primarily on field blanks collected in California from May 2004 through January 2008. SRLs are raised reporting levels used to reduce the likelihood of reporting false detections attributable to contamination bias. The purpose of this report is to identify any changes in the frequency and concentrations of detections in field blanks since the last evaluation and update the SRLs for more recent data accordingly. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), strontium (Sr), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Data from 179 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from March 2006 through March 2013 by the GAMA-PBP indicated that for trace elements that had a change in detection frequency and concentration since the previous review, the shift occurred near October 2009, in conjunction with a change in the capsule filters used by the study. Results for 89 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from October 2009 through March 2013 were evaluated for potential contamination bias by using the same approach developed by Olsen and others (2010). Some data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program for the Southern California Coastal Drainages study unit were included to supplement the GAMA-PBP data. The detection frequency and upper threshold of potential contamination bias (BD-90/90) were determined from field-blank and equipment-blank data for each trace element. The BD-90/90 is the 90th percentile concentration of potential extrinsic contamination calculated by using the binomial probability distribution for greater than 90 percent confidence. Additionally, data from laboratory blanks and blind blanks analyzed by the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) during water years 2010 through 2013, and compiled by the USGS Branch of Quality Systems (BQS), were considered for each trace element. These results were compared to each constituent’s reporting level to determine whether an SRL was necessary to minimize the potential for detections in the groundwater samples, attributed principally to contamination bias. Results of the evaluation were used to set SRLs for trace-element data for about 1,135 samples of groundwater collected by the GAMA-PBP between October 2009 and March 2013. Ten trace elements analyzed (Sb, As, Be, B, Cd, Li, Se, Ag, Tl, and U) had blank results that did not necessitate establishing SRLs during this review or the review by Olsen and others (2010). Five trace elements analyzed (Al, Ba, Cr, Sr, and V) had blank results that necessitated establishing an SRL during the previous review but did not need an SRL starting October 2009. One trace element (Fe) had field and laboratory-blank results that necessitated keeping the previous SRL (6 micrograms per liter [?g/L]). Two trace elements (Ni and W) had quality-control results that warranted decreasing the previous SRL, and five trace elements (Cu, Pb, Mn, Mo, and Zn) had field, laboratory, or blind blank results that warranted establishing an SRL for the first time or increasing the previous SRL. SRLs fo

  2. Effect of particle loading on the collection performance of an electret cabin air filter for submicron aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Ji; G. N. Bae; S. H. Kang; J. Hwang

    2003-01-01

    Electret filters are composed of permanently charged electret fibers and are widely used in applications requiring high collection efficiency and low-pressure drop. We tested electret filter media used in manufacturing cabin air filters by applying two different charging states to the test particles. These charging states were achieved by spray electrification through the atomization process and by bipolar ionization with

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT\\/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2012-01-01

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from

  4. Apportionment of Primary and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California During the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside (SOAR-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient sampling was conducted in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside to characterize the composition and sources of organic aerosol using a variety of state-of-the-art instrumentation and source apportionment techniques....

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols: Theory, techniques, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, David Daniel

    1998-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere is filled with a variety of suspended solid and liquid particles of widely varying size, composition, and structure. The particles, and the surrounding gases, are collectively referred to as aerosols. Here, infrared (IR) extinction spectroscopy has been applied to study laboratory-generated aerosols under ambient conditions (300 K, 1 bar). The dissertation begins with reviews of the importance of aerosols in the atmosphere, the structure of the atmosphere, the sources and abundances of atmospheric aerosol particles, and of some of the experimental techniques which have been applied to the study of aerosol particles. Chapter 2 explores the effectiveness of the technique of scaled absorption subtraction for the removal of interfering absorption by water vapor. In Chapter 3, IR spectroscopy is used to distinguish between crystalline and supersaturated ammonium sulfate particles; and a numerical formulation is developed which applies Mie theory to a lognormal distribution of particle sizes. Chapter 4 explores the use of Mie theory to determine the particle size distribution. The results indicate that the size distribution may be determined if there is a significant scattering component in the extinction spectrum. The structure and water content of sodium chloride aerosol is the subject of Chapter 5. Here, the spectroscopic evidence indicates that even in an arid atmosphere (less than 25% relative humidity), sodium chloride particles contain an anomalously large amount of liquid water. The spectroscopic evidence is most consistent with a model of the particle morphology in which the liquid water is trapped in small pockets in a polycrystalline sodium chloride matrix. Chapter 6 is a preliminary report of a spectroscopic study of the reaction of nitrogen dioxide with sea salt aerosols. Dramatic changes in both the particle and gas compositions are observed, but there is insufficient evidence to determine the exact chemical reactions involved. An appendix contains the FORTRAN programs MIECALC and MIEMAP which are described in Chapters 3 through 6.

  6. Determination of Water Soluble Organic Carbon Collected ~1 km above the Earth's Surface during a Mid-Atlantic Air Quality Episode and Comparison to Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Arkinson, H. L.; Stehr, J. W.; Ring, A.; Marufu, L.; Reiner, J.; Sander, L. C.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Routine, light aircraft air-monitoring conducted in MD provides insight into atmospheric photochemical processing as a function of altitude in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere. We present correlations between the optical properties and chemical composition of aerosols at ~1 km altitude over Maryland. Data were collected during the peak smog day and a dissipation day during an air quality episode studied in DISCOVER-AQ, July 2011. Post flight filter sample analysis shows a positive trend between measurable carboxylate concentrations and particle size with a recirculating, aged, urban air mass influenced with southeasterly marine winds (peak day). A westerly influx of air from the Ohio River Valley on the dissipation day was depleted in carboxylates compared with samples collected over the same location two days prior. These samples contained quantifiable concentrations of cis-pinonic acid, a reaction product of pinene after ozonation and photochemical oxidation. New techniques were developed to improve airborne data collection and analysis of water soluble organic acids (WSOA), a frequently dominant fraction of particulate matter (PM). An ion chromatographic mass spectrometric method was developed using NIST Standard Referencing Material 1649b, Urban Dust, as a surrogate material to achieve separation and resolution of at least 34 organic acids. Analysis of aircraft filter samples resulted in detection of 16 organic acids of which 12 were quantified. Eight inorganic species were also quantified. Aged, re-circulated metropolitan air showed a greater number of dicarboxylic acids than new transport air from the west and may provide a useful test of SOA formation theory.

  7. Los Angeles summer midday particulate carbon: Primary and secondary aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara J. Turpin; James J. Huntzicker; Susan M. Larson; Glen R. Cass

    1991-01-01

    Aerosol sampling during photochemically active times across the Los Angeles Basin has provided evidence of secondary formation of organic aerosol from gas-phase precursors at midday. Ambient organic carbon\\/elemental carbon ratios exceeded the estimated ratio of organic carbon\\/elemental carbon in primary source emissions on most sampling days at all sites. The concentration of secondary organic aerosol was calculated by using ambient

  8. The use of multi-band transmission data collected at Scripps pier in November 2006 for the investigation of aerosol characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arie N. de Jong; Alexander M. J. van Eijk; Peter J. Fritz; Leo H. Cohen; Marcel M. Moerman

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol characteristics is of great importance for the range performance of Infrared and Electro-Optical sensor systems. The composition, the concentration and the size distribution of aerosols determine their scattering behavior as function of wavelength and thus their attenuation of light beams. When studies are made on this attenuation, it is considered to be very useful

  9. Comparison of Oxidative Properties, Light Absorbance, and Total and Elemental Mass Concentration of Ambient PM2.5 Collected at 20 European Sites

    PubMed Central

    Künzli, Nino; Mudway, Ian S.; Götschi, Thomas; Shi, Tingming; Kelly, Frank J.; Cook, Sarah; Burney, Peter; Forsberg, Bertil; Gauderman, James W.; Hazenkamp, Marianne E.; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvis, Deborah; Norbäck, Dan; Payo-Losa, Felix; Poli, Albino; Sunyer, Jordi; Borm, Paul J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective It has been proposed that the redox activity of particles may represent a major determinant of their toxicity. We measured the in vitro ability of ambient fine particles [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ?2.5 ?m (PM2.5)] to form hydroxyl radicals (•OH) in an oxidant environment, as well as to deplete physiologic antioxidants (ascorbic acid, glutathione) in the naturally reducing environment of the respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF). The objective was to examine how these toxicologically relevant measures were related to other PM characteristics, such as total and elemental mass concentration and light absorbance. Design Gravimetric PM2.5 samples (n = 716) collected over 1 year from 20 centers participating in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey were available. Light absorbance of these filters was measured with reflectometry. PM suspensions were recovered from filters by vortexing and sonication before dilution to a standard concentration. The oxidative activity of these particle suspensions was then assessed by measuring their ability to generate •OH in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, using electron spin resonance and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as spin trap, or by establishing their capacity to deplete antioxidants from a synthetic model of the RTLF. Results and Conclusion PM oxidative activity varied significantly among European sampling sites. Correlations between oxidative activity and all other characteristics of PM were low, both within centers (temporal correlation) and across communities (annual mean). Thus, no single surrogate measure of PM redox activity could be identified. Because these novel measures are suggested to reflect crucial biologic mechanisms of PM, their use may be pertinent in epidemiologic studies. Therefore, it is important to define the appropriate methods to determine oxidative activity of PM. PMID:16675421

  10. Studies of organic aerosol and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hanh To

    Atmospheric aerosols can influence society and the environment in many ways including altering the planet's energy budget, the hydrologic cycle, and public health. However, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates that the anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with aerosol effects on clouds has the highest uncertainty in the future climate predictions. This thesis focuses on the nature of the organic fraction of ambient particles and how particles interact with clouds using a combination of tools including aircraft and ground measurements, models, and satellite data. Fine aerosol particles typically contain between 20 - 90% organic matter by mass and a major component of this fraction includes water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Consequently, water-soluble organic species can strongly influence aerosol water-uptake and optical properties. However, the chemical composition of this fraction is not well-understood. PILS-TOC was used to characterize WSOC in ambient aerosol in Los Angeles, California. The spatial distribution of WSOC was found to be influenced by (i) a wide range of aerosol sources within this urban metropolitan area, (ii) transport of pollutants by the characteristic daytime sea breeze trajectory, (iii) topography, and (iv) secondary production during transport. Meteorology is linked with the strength of many of these various processes. Many methods and instruments have been used to study aerosol-cloud interactions. Each observational platform is characterized by different temporal/spatial resolutions and operational principles, and thus there are disagreements between different studies for the magnitude of mathematical constructs used to represent the strength of aerosol-cloud interactions. This work points to the sensitivity of the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interactions to cloud lifetime and spatial resolution of measurements and model simulations. Failure to account for above-cloud aerosol layers and wet scavenging are also shown to cause biases in the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interaction metrics. Air mass source origin and meteorology are also shown to be important factors that influence aerosol-cloud interactions. The results from this work contribute towards a better understanding of atmospheric aerosols and are meant to improve parameterizations that can be embedded in models that treat aerosol affects on clouds, precipitation, air quality, and public health.

  11. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  12. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  13. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Estimating aerosol concentration and spectral backscatter with multi-wavelength range-resolved lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.

    2005-11-01

    Algorithm development for detecting and discriminating atmospheric aerosols using range-resolved lidar is a straightforward, if non-trivial, application of well-established techniques of statistical signal processing assuming the aerosol backscatter coefficients are known as a function of wavelength. Unfortunately, in contrast to the analogous case of vapors, in most aerosol applications those coefficients are rarely known accurately. This is due to a combination of factors: (1) unknown refractive index dependence on wavelength, particularly for bioaerosols; (2) unknown particle size distribution; and (3) lack of particle sphericity making M e calculations unreliable. Uncertainties in any of these factors can distort the backscatter cross-section spectral dependence to the extent that aerosol identification becomes impossible. This paper presents a sequential algorithm for estimating both the aerosol concentration dependence on range and time and backscatter coefficient spectral signatures for a set of materials using M wavelengths with data available prior to the aerosol release for estimating the ambient lidar return. The rangedependence of the aerosol is modeled as an expansion of the concentration in an orthonormal basis set whose coefficients carry the time dependence. The basic idea is to run two estimators in parallel: a Kalman filter for the expansion coefficients, and a maximum likelihood estimator for the set of aerosol backscatter coefficients. These algorithms exchange information continuously over the data processing stream. The approach is illustrated on atmospheric backscatter lidar data collected by the U.S. Army multi-wavelength lidar from aerosol releases at the recent JBSDS trials at Dugway Proving Ground, UT.

  15. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for ?-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for ?-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  16. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Dreyfus

    2008-01-01

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this

  17. Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances Szrom; Gerald A. Falo; MaryAnn Parkhurst; Jeffrey J. Whicker; David P. Alberth

    2009-01-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols.

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center)

    1990-10-01

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m{sup {minus}1} (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC).

  19. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the ?-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  20. In-injection port thermal desorption and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2004-12-01

    The traditional approach for analysis of aerosol organics is to extract aerosol materials collected on filter substrates with organic solvents followed by solvent evaporation and analytical separation and detection. This approach has the weaknesses of being labor intensive and being prone to contamination from the extracting solvents. We describe here an alternative approach for the analysis of aerosol alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that obviates the use of solvents. In our approach, small strips of aerosol-laden filter materials are packed into a GC split/splitless injector liner. Alkanes and PAHs on the filter are thermally desorbed in the injection port and focused onto the head of a GC column for subsequent separation and detection. No instrument modification is necessary to accommodate the introduction of the aerosol organics into the GC-MS system. Comparison studies were carried out on a set of 16 ambient aerosol samples using our in-injection port thermal desorption (TD) method and the traditional solvent extraction method. Reasonably good agreement of individual alkanes and PAHs by the two methods was demonstrated for the ambient samples. The in-injection port thermal desorption method requires much less filter material for detecting the same air concentrations of alkanes and PAHs. PMID:15628132

  1. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  2. Design criteria for centripeter aerosol samplers 

    E-print Network

    King, Connie Hazel

    1977-01-01

    Aerosol Samplers. (August, 1977) Connie Hazel King, B. S. , Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andrew R. McFarland Aerosol of uniformly sized particles produced by a monodisperse vibrating orifice aerosol generator was sampled...- lection efficiency. The Stokes number corresponding to the particle size for which collection efficiency of the sampler is 50K, (Stk0 5), ranged from 0. 388 to 0, 398 for the three nozzle shapes tested. An increase in acceleration nozzle to collection...

  3. Natural abundance 13C and 14C analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Elena N; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-10-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constitutes a large fraction of climate-forcing organic aerosols in the atmosphere, yet the sources of WSOC are poorly constrained. A method was developed to measure the stable carbon isotope (?(13)C) and radiocarbon (?(14)C) composition of WSOC for apportionment between fossil fuel and different biogenic sources. Synthetic WSOC test substances and ambient aerosols were employed to investigate the effect of both modern and fossil carbon contamination and any method-induced isotope fractionation. The method includes extraction of aerosols collected on quartz filters followed by purification and preparation for off-line ?(13)C and ?(14)C determination. The preparative freeze-drying step for isotope analysis yielded recoveries of only ?70% for ambient aerosols and WSOC probes. However, the ?(13)C of the WSOC isolates were in agreement with the ?(13)C of the unprocessed starting material, even for the volatile oxalic acid probe (6.59 ± 0.37‰ vs 6.33 ± 0.31‰; 2 sd). A (14)C-fossil phthalic acid WSOC probe returned a fraction modern biomass of <0.008 whereas a (14)C-modern sucrose standard yielded a fraction modern of >0.999, indicating the ?(14)C-WSOC method to be free of both fossil and contemporary carbon contamination. Application of the ?(13)C/?(14)C-WSOC method to source apportion climate-affecting aerosols was illustrated be constraining that WSOC in ambient Stockholm aerosols were 88% of contemporary biogenic C3 plant origin. PMID:20843053

  4. Acid aerosols in the Pittsburgh Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, Thomas; Zelenka, Michael P.; Lawrence, Philip M.; Houston, Robert M.; Burton, Robert

    This article presents data on ambient concentrations of selected acidic aerosols at four existing monitoring sites in the Pittsburgh PA metropolitan area. The data were collected by staff of the Allegheny County Health Department, Division of Air Quality during the summer and fall of 1993. The sampling protocol was focused on obtaining 24 h-average ammonia, ammonium, acidic sulfates, and particle strong acids data on a 2 to 3 day cycle. The data were obtained using Harvard University School of Public Health's "Short-HEADS" annular denuder sampling train. The Pittsburgh area is of interest because it is downwind of a major regional source of sulfur and nitrogen emissions from coal-burning power plants: the Ohio River Valley. The data presented here indicate that ground-level concentrations of acidic aerosols in Pittsburgh are highly correlated spatially and that many pollutants are higher on days when ground-level wind direction vectors indicate that wind is coming from the southwest rather than from the Pittsburgh source area itself. The monitoring site that is most upwind of the Pittsburgh source area - South Fayette - has particle strong acid levels about twice those of sites closer in to the Pittsburgh central business district.

  5. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  6. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  7. Comparison Between Lidar and Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopicity at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlow, M.; Feingold, G.; Jefferson, A.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J. A.; Wang, J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopicity has a significant effect on radiative properties of aerosols. Here a lidar method, applicable to cloud-capped, well-mixed atmospheric boundary layers, is employed to determine the hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) under unperturbed, ambient atmospheric conditions. The data used for the analysis were collected under a wide range of atmospheric aerosol levels during both routine measurement periods and during the intensive operations period (IOP) in May 2003 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. There is a good correlation (approx. 0.7) between a lidar-derived growth factor (measured over the range 85% RH to 96% RH) with a nephelometer-derived growth factor measured over the RH range 40% to 85%. For these RH ranges, the slope of the lidar-derived growth factor is much steeper than that of the nephelometer-derived growth factor, reflecting the rapid increase in particle size with increasing RH. The results are corroborated by aerosol model calculations of lidar and nephelometer equivalent f(RH) based on in situ aerosol size and composition measurements during the IOP. It is suggested that the lidar method can provide useful measurements of the dependence of aerosol optical properties on relative humidity, and under conditions closer to saturation than can currently be achieved with humidified nephelometers.

  8. Biomass burning contribution to Beijing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Engling, G.; He, K. B.; Duan, F. K.; Ma, Y. L.; Du, Z. Y.; Liu, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    Biomass burning, the largest global source of elemental carbon (EC) and primary organic carbon (OC), is strongly associated with many subjects of great scientific concern, such as secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon which exert important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. This study investigated the relationships between levoglucosan and other biomass burning tracers (i.e. water soluble potassium and mannosan) based on both ambient samples collected in Beijing and source samples. Compared with North America and Europe, Beijing was characterized by high ambient levoglucosan concentrations and low winter to summer ratios of levoglucosan, indicating significant impact of biomass burning activities throughout the year in Beijing. Comparison of levoglucosan and water soluble potassium (K+) levels suggested that it was acceptable to use K+ as a biomass burning tracer during summer in Beijing, while the contribution of fireworks to K+ could be significant during winter. Moreover, the levoglucosan to K+ ratio was found to be lower during the typical summer period (0.21±0.16) compared with the typical winter period (0.51±0.15). On the other hand, levoglucosan correlated strongly with mannosan (R2=0.97) throughout the winter and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 9.49±1.63, whereas levoglucosan and mannosan exhibited relatively weak correlation (R2=0.73) during the typical summer period when the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 12.65±3.38. Results from PMF model analysis showed that about 50% of the OC and EC in Beijing were associated with biomass burning processes. In addition, a new source-identification method was developed based on the comparison of the levoglucosan to K+ ratio and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio among different types of biomass. Using this method, the major source of biomass burning aerosol in Beijing was suggested to be the combustion of crop residuals, while the contribution from softwood burning was also non-negligible, especially in winter.

  9. Biomass burning contribution to Beijing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Engling, G.; He, K.-B.; Duan, F.-K.; Ma, Y.-L.; Du, Z.-Y.; Liu, J.-M.; Zheng, M.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-08-01

    Biomass burning, the largest global source of elemental carbon (EC) and primary organic carbon (OC), is strongly associated with many subjects of great scientific concern, such as secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon which exert important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. This study investigated the relationships between levoglucosan and other biomass burning tracers (i.e., water soluble potassium and mannosan) based on both ambient samples collected in Beijing and source samples. Compared with North America and Europe, Beijing was characterized by high ambient levoglucosan concentrations and low winter to summer ratios of levoglucosan, indicating significant impact of biomass burning activities throughout the year in Beijing. Comparison of levoglucosan and water soluble potassium (K+) levels suggested that it was acceptable to use K+ as a biomass burning tracer during summer in Beijing, while the contribution of fireworks to K+ could be significant during winter. Moreover, the levoglucosan to K+ ratio was found to be lower during the typical summer period (0.21 ± 0.16) compared with the typical winter period (0.51 ± 0.15). Levoglucosan correlated strongly with mannosan (R2 = 0.97) throughout the winter and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 9.49 ± 1.63, whereas levoglucosan and mannosan exhibited relatively weak correlation (R2 = 0.73) during the typical summer period when the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 12.65 ± 3.38. Results from positive matrix factorization (PMF) model analysis showed that about 50% of the OC and EC in Beijing were associated with biomass burning processes. In addition, a new source identification method was developed based on the comparison of the levoglucosan to K+ ratio and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio among different types of biomass. Using this method, the major source of biomass burning aerosol in Beijing was suggested to be the combustion of crop residuals, while the contribution from softwood burning was also non-negligible, especially in winter.

  10. Mobile Ambients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Cardelli; Andrew D. Gordon

    1998-01-01

    There are two distinct areas of work in mobility: mobile computing, concerning computation that is carried out in mobile devices (laptops, personal digital assistants, etc.), and mobile computation, concerning mobile code that moves between devices (applets, agents, etc.). We aim to describe all these aspects of mobility within a single framework that encompasses mobile agents, the ambients where agents interact

  11. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 ?m) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as well as a droplet freezing method on aerosol particles either collected in a suspension or on PM10-filters to obtain atmospheric IN concentrations based on the measured ambient aerosol. Investigation of physical properties (number and size distribution) and chemical composition as well as the meteorological conditions provide supplementary information that help to understand the nature of particles and air masses that contribute to immersion freezing. Acknowledgements We thank Hannes Wydler and Hansjörg Frei from ETH Zurich for their technical support. Furthermore, the authors want thank Franz Conen from the University of Basel for sharing equipment and training in the drop freezing experiment. References [1] Chou et al. (2011), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4725-4738. [2] Nicolet et al. (2010), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 313-325. [3] Conen et al. (2012), Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 321-327. [4] Stopelli et al. (2014), Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 129-134.

  12. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  13. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?m, PM2.5=0.3 ?g m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10 ?m, PM10=1.1 ?g m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, ?ep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 ?g m-3; PM10=83.4 ?g m-3; estimated ?ep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by anthropogenic aerosols are thought to be of comparable magnitude to the posi

  14. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  15. Remote Sensing of Aerosol and Non-Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B. N.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol from the new satellite instruments (e.g. MODIS from Terra) and ground based radiometers (e.g. the AERONET) provides the opportunity to measure the absorption characteristics of the ambient undisturbed aerosol in the entire atmospheric column. For example Landsat and AERONET data are used to measure spectral absorption of sunlight by dust from West Africa. Both Application of the Landsat and AERONET data demonstrate that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is several times smaller than the current international standards. This is due to difficulties of measuring dust absorption in situ, and due to the often contamination of dust properties by the presence of air pollution or smoke. We use the remotely sensed aerosol absorption properties described by the spectral sin le scattering albedo, together with statistics of the monthly optical thickness for the fine and coarse aerosol derived from the MODIS data. The result is an estimate of the flux of solar radiation absorbed by the aerosol layer in different regions around the globe where aerosol is prevalent. If this aerosol forcing through absorption is not included in global circulation models, it may be interpreted as anomalous absorption in these regions. In a preliminary exercise we also use the absorption measurements by AERONET, to derive the non-aerosol absorption of the atmosphere in cloud free conditions. The results are obtained for the atmospheric windows: 0.44 microns, 0.66 microns, 0.86 microns and 1.05 microns. In all the locations over the land and ocean that were tested no anomalous absorption in these wavelengths, was found within absorption optical thickness of +/- 0.005.

  16. Behavioral-physiological effects of red phosphorous smoke inhalation on two wildlife species. Task 1. Inhalation equipment development/ambient CO evaluation/aerosol distribution and air-quality study. Final report, March 1985-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sterner, R.T.; Shumake, S.A.; Johns, B.E.; Thompson, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    Tests to evaluate the spatial and temporal uniformity of red phosphorous - butyl rubber smoke produced in a commercial 1-CuM inhalation chamber are described. Several modifications to the inhalation exposure system aimed at improving air filtration, relative humidity, and temperature control for the conduct of animal studies are also presented. Smoke generation involved the use of a system for the continuous generation of phosphoric acid aerosols. Assessments of spatial and temporal uniformity of smoke were based upon measurements of aerosol mass concentration (gravimetric analysis), phosphoric acid deposition (titration analysis), aerosol opacity (infrared sensor), and particle size (cascade impactor); assessments of air quality and combustion products within the chamber involved checks for oxygen, carbon dioxide, phosphine, hexane, and carbon monoxide using either gas chromatography or industrial-hygiene-analyzer tubes. Results for aerosol mass, phosphoric acid, and particle size showed that the within-chamber smoke was highly uniform among burns. Although a number of statistically significant effects were obtained, further inspection showed these to be limited to specific sampling locations and within a priori criteria established to define acceptable uniformity.

  17. Chemical characteristics of size-resolved aerosols in winter in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Qu, Yu; Wu, Qiong; Han, Tingting; Gu, Jianwei; Zhao, Jingjing; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Gao, Ziqi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanhang; Lu, Keding; Nordmann, Stephan; Cheng, Yafang; Hou, Li; Ge, Hui; Furuuchi, Masami; Hata, Mitsuhiko; Liu, Xingang

    2014-08-01

    Size-resolved aerosols were continuously collected by a Nano Sampler for 13 days at an urban site in Beijing during winter 2012 to measure the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles. Data collected by the Nano Sampler and an ACSM (Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor) were compared. Between the data sets, similar trends and strong correlations were observed, demonstrating the validity of the Nano Sampler. PM?? and PM?.? concentrations during the measurement were 150.5 ± 96.0 ?g/m³ (mean ± standard variation) and 106.9 ± 71.6 ?g/m³, respectively. The PM?.?/PM?? ratio was 0.70 ± 0.10, indicating that PM?.? dominated PM??. The aerosol size distributions showed that three size bins of 0.5-1, 1-2.5 and 2.5-10 ?m contributed 21.8%, 23.3% and 26.0% to the total mass concentration (TMC), respectively. OM (organic matter) and SIA (secondary ionic aerosol, mainly SO?(2-), NO?(-) and NH?(+)) were major components of PM?.?. Secondary compounds (SIA and secondary organic carbon) accounted for half of TMC (about 49.8%) in PM?.?, and suggested that secondary aerosols significantly contributed to the serious particulate matter pollution observed in winter. Coal burning, biomass combustion, vehicle emissions and SIA were found to be the main sources of PM?.?. Mass concentrations of water-soluble ions and undetected materials, as well as their fractions in TMC, strikingly increased with deteriorating particle pollution conditions, while OM and EC (elemental carbon) exhibited different variations, with mass concentrations slightly increasing but fractions in TMC decreasing. PMID:25108720

  18. Wintertime measurements of aerosol acidity and trace elements in Wuhan, a city in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, J. M.; Lioy, P. J.; Zelenka, M.; Jing, L.; Lin, Y. N.; He, Q. C.; Qian, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Wilson, W. E.

    A 2-week intensive ambient aerosol study was conducted in December 1988 in Wuhan (Hubei Province), a city of nearly 2 million located on the Yangtze River in central China (P.R.C.). This is an industrial region where soft coal burning is widespread, and emission controls for vehicles and industrial facilities are minimal. The sampling site was located in one of the civic centers where residential and commercial density is highest. An Andersen dichotomous sampler was operated with Teflon membrane filters to collect fine ( dp < 2.5 ?mad) and coarse (2.5 ? dp < 10 ?mad) particles for total mass and element determinations. An annular denuder system (ADS) was used to collect fine fraction aerosols for analyses of ionic species including strong acidity (H +). The study was conducted between 18 and 30 December, which was rainless, consistently cool (3-10°C) and overcast, but without fog or acute stagnation. Fine particulate mass (PM, as ? m -3) averaged 139 (range 54-207); coarse PM averaged 86 (range 29-179). Trace element concentrations were also high. Crustal elements (Si, Al, Ca and Fe) were found primarily in the coarse fraction, while elements associated with combustion (S, K, Cl, Zn and Se) were enriched in the fine fraction. The concentrations of arsenic and selenium were evidence of a large source of coal burning, while vanadium levels (associated with fuel oil use) were not especially enriched. Despite the seemingly high PM loadings, ionic concentrations were not especially high. The average composition of soluble fine aerosol species (in neq m -3) were SO 42-: 520 (range 180-980), NO 3-: 225 (range 50-470), Cl -: 215 (range 20-640), and NH 4+: 760 (range 280-1660). A deficit in accountable FP components (total mass compared to the total of ionic plus element masses) as well as the black appearance of collected materials indicate an abundance of carbonaceous aerosol, as high as 100 ? m -3. (total mass compared to the total of ionic plus element masses) as well as the black appearance of collected materials indicate an abundance of carbonaceous aerosol, as high as 100 ? m -3 Aerosol acidity was negligible during most monitoring periods, H +: 14 (range 0-50 neq m -3, equivalent to 0-2.5 ?m m -3 as H 2SO 4). Sulfur dioxide, measured by the West-Gaeke method for part of the study, concentrations were low. Although not directly measured, the aerosol measurments suggested that gaseous HCl (from refuse incineration) and NH 3 (animal wastes) concentrations might have been high. Higher aerosol acidity might be expected if HCl sources were more prominent and not neutralized by local ammonia or other base components.

  19. Overview of submicron aerosol characterization in China using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; He, L.; Gong, Z.; Hu, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    China is one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world, but in the meantime it is suffering from severe air pollution due to heavy industrial/metropolitan emissions. Most previous aerosol studies in China were based on filter sampling followed by laboratory analysis, which provided datasets at a coarse time resolution like a day. The coarse time resolution of the aerosol datasets cannot match the actual faster variation of aerosol properties in the real atmosphere, which strongly favors highly time-resolved on-line measurement techniques. In recent years, our group deployed an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) in different ambient atmospheres in China, including Beijing (urban), Shanghai (urban), Shenzhen (urban), Jiaxing (suburban), and Kaiping (rural). In this presentation, we will overview these on-line AMS measurement results to characterize the properties of submicron particles in China atmosphere, such as chemical composition, size distribution, diurnal variation, elemental composition, primary and secondary organic aerosol constitution, etc. The newly-developed AMS-PMF modeling techniques were utilized to quantitatively differentiate the contributions from fossil fuel combustion, cooking emissions, biomass burning, as well as secondary organic aerosol to ambient organic aerosol loadings in China. These AMS results have provided new outlook of the formation mechanisms of high aerosol pollution in China.

  20. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously. PMID:25478945

  1. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S. M.

    2000-09-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the development of a simplified method to routinely calculate gas/aerosol partitioning of multicomponent aerosols and aerosol associated water within global atmospheric chemistry and climate models. Atmospheric aerosols are usually multicomponent mixtures, partly composed of acids (e.g. H2SO4, HNO3), their salts (e.g. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, respectively), and water. Because these acids and salts are highly hygroscopic, water, that is associated with aerosols in humid environments, often exceeds the total dry aerosol mass. Both the total dry aerosol mass and the aerosol associated water are important for the role of atmospheric aerosols in climate change simulations. Still, multicomponent aerosols are not yet routinely calculated within global atmospheric chemistry or climate models. The reason is that these particles, especially volatile aerosol compounds, require a complex and computationally expensive thermodynamical treatment. For instance, the aerosol associated water depends on the composition of the aerosol, which is determined by the gas/liquid/solid partitioning, in turn strongly dependent on temperature, relative humidity, and the presence of pre-existing aerosol particles. Based on thermodynamical relations such a simplified method has been derived. This method is based on the assumptions generally made by the modeling of multicomponent aerosols, but uses an alternative approach for the calculation of the aerosol activity and activity coefficients. This alternative approach relates activity coefficients to the ambient relative humidity, according to the vapor pressure reduction and the generalization of Raoult s law. This relationship, or simplification, is a consequence of the assumption that the aerosol composition and the aerosol associated water are in thermodynamic equilibrium with the ambient relative humidity, which determines the solute activity and, hence, activity coefficients of a multicomponent aerosol mixture. Thus, the necessary equilibrium equations can be solved analytically, so that numerical and therefore expensive iterative calculations are avoided. Subsequently, a new thermodynamic gas/aerosol partitioning model has been developed, called EQSAM (Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model). EQSAM has been compared with various other thermodynamical models presently in use, which shows that the results of EQSAM are well within the range produced by these more complex models. The application to global modeling further shows that EQSAM is indeed sufficiently fast and accurate. Especially the results of the global gas/aerosol partitioning calculations show that differences resulting from the thermodynamical treatment affect much less the aerosol composition compared to other, non-thermodynamical parameters, such as the model resolution or the boundary layer mixing scheme used. This indicates that the gas/aerosol partitioning calculations in atmospheric chemistry models are largely governed by transport processes, including meteorology, emission sources, as well as wet and dry deposition processes. Modeling results further indicate that gas/aerosol partitioning, especially at lower temperatures (during winter and nights), is of great importance for both the gas phase concentrations and the aerosol composition, including aerosol associated water. For instance, the mean surface gaseous nitric acid concentration is predicted to partition almost completely into the aerosol phase during winter and summer nights. This considerably increases the predicted aerosol load, compared to model calculations excluding gas/aerosol partitioning. This consequently affects the aerosol associated water (because the aerosol water is proportional to the amount of dissolved matter). Additionally, aerosol mass from gas/aerosol partitioning, such as ammonium nitrate, has a longer residence time than the precursor gases (NH3 and HNO3) and might, therefore, be subject to long-range transport from the sources. This is, for example, the case for ammonium nitrate originating from gas-to-particle conversio

  2. Emission Rates of PM Constituents from Highly Time-Resolved Ambient Concentration Measurements: A New Paradigm in Air Pollution Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondov, J.; Pancras, P.; Park, S. S.; Poor, N.

    2003-12-01

    Highly-time resolved metals measurements were made in the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment and at four other urban locations using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler. Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-minute intervals, i.e., at periods short relative to changes in wind direction, and analyzed off-line by mutli-element graphite furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for up to 12 elements useful as markers of primary particle emissions of high-temperature combustion sources. At this resolution, the plumes of individual sources, including coal- and oil-fired power plants, and a battery recycling plant, were readily observed as excursions in time series profiles of the concentrations of the various marker elements. Over the scale of 40 km, wind and source angles are nearly identical when the former are relatively constant during the time required for plume transport. Herein, ambient data collected at the Sydney site were combined with available stack emission measurements of SO2, along with meteorological data in a pseudo deterministic least squares model in which ambient concentrations are reconclied with the products of emission rates and dispersion factors for known sources. The model encompasses horrizontal and vertical gaussian dispersion terms as constraints and is used to estimate estimate emission rates of the various species from the known sources. Ambient ground-level measurements made in the vicinity of the Sydney site will be presented along with some the model estimates of emission rates from various sources.

  3. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Simpson, D.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Kristensen, K.; Genberg, J.; Stenström, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Hillamo, R.; Aurela, M.; Bauer, H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Dye, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Glasius, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp) and elemental carbon (EC) have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 ?m) collected at four Nordic rural background sites [Birkenes (Norway), Hyytiälä (Finland), Vavihill (Sweden), Lille Valby, (Denmark)] during late summer (5 August-2 September 2009). Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC), have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach. The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC) was totally dominated by natural sources (69-86%), with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) being the single most important source (48-57%). Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) were the second most important source (20-32%). The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff) (10-24%), whereas no more than 3-7% was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb) in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, which accounted for 4-12% of TCp, whereas <1.5% of EC was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources. Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural background environment are reported for the first time in the present study. The most abundant organosulphate compounds were an organosulphate of isoprene and nitrooxy-organosulphates of ?- and ?-pinene and limonene.

  4. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Simpson, D.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Kristensen, K.; Genberg, J.; Stenström, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Hillamo, R.; Aurela, M.; Bauer, H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Dye, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Glasius, M.

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp) and elemental carbon (EC) have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 collected at four Nordic rural background sites (Birkenes (Norway), Hyytiälä (Finland) Vavihill (Sweden), Lille Valby (Denmark)) during late summer (5 August-2 September 2009). Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC), have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach. The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC) was totally dominated by natural sources (69-86 %), with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) being the single most important source (48-57 %). Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) were the second most important source (20-32 %). The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff (10-24 %), whereas no more than 3-7 % was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, accounting for 4-12 % of TCp, whereas <1.5 % was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources. Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural background environment are reported for the first time in the present study. The most abundant organosulphate compounds were an organosulphate of isoprene and nitrooxy-organosulphates of ?- and ?-pinene and limonene.

  5. A comparison between PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of metals in aerosol particulate collected in urban and marine sites in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.

    2014-01-01

    PIXE and ICP-AES techniques are largely used in atmospheric aerosol studies. Since PIXE is able to provide the total elemental concentrations, while ICP-AES results depend on the extraction conditions, parallel PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of Fe, Al, Cu, Pb, Mn, Cr, Ni, V, As on PM10 and PM2.5 samples were compared. Two extraction procedures were applied to samples from 5 sites at different anthropization level in Italy: a "weak" extraction (HNO3 at pH = 1.5) and a "strong" extraction (micro-wave oven in HNO3 and H2O2 - following EU rules).

  6. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of organic nitrogen compounds, with an average N/C ratio ~3.8 times that of OOA. Most strikingly is the enhancement of the CxHyN2+ family ions in FOM spectra, indicating the presence of imidazole compounds, which commonly result from the aqueous phase reactions of tropospheric aldehyde such as glyoxal, formaldehyde or acetaldehyde with amino compounds. The results of this study demonstrate that aqueous phase reactions in fog water lead to the formation of some oxidized and nitrogen-containing compounds. Details and the environmental implications of results will be discussed.

  7. METHODS OF CALCULATINAG LUNG DELIVERY AND DEPOSITION OF AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung deposition of aerosol is measured by a variety of methods. Total lung deposition can be measured by monitoring inhaled and exhaled aerosols in situ by laser photometry or by collecting the aerosols on filters. The measurements can be performed accurately for stable monod...

  8. Particle Charge Distribution Measurement for Commonly Generated Laboratory Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Forsyth; Benjamin Y. H. Liu; Francisco J. Romay

    1998-01-01

    An improved particle charge analyzer system has been developed to measure the absolute charge distribution of common generated laboratory aerosols. The charge analyzer system consists of an integral cylindrical mobility analyzer used in conjunction with an optical aerosol spectrometer, with computer assisted operation and data reduction. The charge analyzer collects aerosol particles over an absolute electrical mobility range from 4.2*10

  9. Beijing aerosol: Atmospheric interactions and new trends

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Guinot; Hélène Cachier; Jean Sciare; Yu Tong; Wang Xin; Yu Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Beijing aerosols are scrutinized as a case study for atmospheric interactions in a complex multisource situation. For the first time, fine (2 ?m) aerosols were continuously collected during a time period (20 months) long enough to capture seasonal trends of sources and interactions. Weekly samples were obtained from January 2003 to August 2004 downtown and during 9 months at two

  10. Remote sensing of aerosol properties over oceans using the MODIS\\/EOS spectral radiances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Tanré; Y. J. Kaufman; M. Herman; S. Mattoo

    1997-01-01

    Spectral radiances measured at the top of the atmosphere in a wide spectral range (0.55-2.13mum) are used to monitor the aerosol optical thickness and the aerosol size distribution (integrated on the vertical column) of the ambient (undisturbed) aerosol over the oceans. Even for the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) wide spectral range, only three parameters that describe the aerosol loading

  11. Chemical Characterization of Water Soluble Organic Aerosol during SOAS Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Cerully, K. M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R.; Ng, N.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have important impacts on climate, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric aqueous-phase chemistry is a substantial source of SOA, but this process is poorly understood. During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), various properties of water-soluble organic aerosols were investigated by a novel system. In this system, a Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS), High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectrometer (CCN), and Thermal Denuder were coupled to continuously measure the chemical composition, CCN properties, and volatilities of water-soluble organic aerosols. This presentation will focus on chemical composition of water-soluble organic aerosol measured by the HR-ToF-AMS. During the six week campaign, HR-ToF-AMS was set up to automatically switch sample flow between ambient or PILS-nebulizer sample line every 30min. Our measurements show that the majority of organic aerosols were water soluble. The mass spectra of water-soluble organic aerosol had a more prominent peak at m/z 29 (CHO+), which is a characteristic peak associated with glyoxal SOA formed in chamber experiments. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on water-soluble organic aerosol data and in addition to the oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA), it also resolved a factor with a distinctive peak at m/z 29, which may be a factor indicative of aqueous-phase glyoxal SOA. Further, elemental analyses are being carried out to determine the oxygen/ carbon (O/C) and hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratios of water-soluble organic aerosols, which are indications of the degree of oxidation of aerosols. Detailed comparisons between total organic aerosol and water-soluble organic aerosol will be discussed to reveal the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on SOA formation.

  12. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1995-05-01

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

  13. A 12 year observation of water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-03-01

    In order to characterize the long term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12 year observation was conducted for water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected from 2001-2012 in the Asian outflow region at a Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007-2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001-2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are increasingly more transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific.

  14. Evaluation of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol products at two Aerosol Robotic Network stations in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen Mi; Zhanqing Li; Xiangao Xia; Brent Holben; Robert Levy; Fengsheng Zhao; Hongbin Chen; Maureen Cribb

    2007-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been used to address aerosol climatic issues in many parts of the world, but their quality has yet to be determined over China. This paper presents a thorough evaluation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from MODIS collections 4 (C004) and 5 (C005) at two AERONET sites in northern and southeastern

  15. Prediction Of Organic Aerosol Volatility And Unidentified Functional Group Concentrations From Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Shipley, S.; Henderson, B. H.; Takahama, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to measure the functional group composition of organic aerosols (Russell et al., 2011). However, certain functional groups are not directly detected by FTIR spectroscopy, either due to fundamental limitations of the technique (e.g. tertiary carbons), or specific limitations of commonly employed methods of sample collection and analysis (e.g. ester and ether groups, Takahama et al., 2013). In addition, FTIR does not probe the size of molecules comprising an organic aerosol mixture, which prevents the direct calculation of organic aerosol volatility from FTIR measurements. In this study, primary organic aerosol concentrations in mixtures corresponding to different ambient scenarios have been extracted from previous GC-MS studies (Rogge et al., 1993). Secondary organic aerosol concentrations for different scenarios are simulated with an explicit chemistry model (Master Chemical Mechanism, http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCM ; Jerkin et al. 1997; Saunders et al., 2003; Jerkin et al., 2003) and partitioning model (SIMPOL.1, Pankow et al., 2008). For each of the different scenarios the concentrations of functional groups that are typically accessible by FTIR are calculated and analyzed in relation to the extra information not easily accessible by FTIR (e.g. volatility, tertiary carbons, ester and ether). The ability to predict the unknown quantities from FTIR measurements and thereby reduce the uncertainty in OM concentrations and OM/OC ratios measured by FTIR is examined and discussed.

  16. On-line analysis of organic components in fine and ultrafine particles by photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Berk; Tolocka, Michael P; Johnston, Murray V

    2004-01-15

    A new method, photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry (PIAMS), is described for real-time analysis of organic components in airborne particles below approximately 300 nm in diameter. Particles are focused through an aerodynamic lens assembly into the mass spectrometer where they are collected on a probe in the source region. After a sufficient amount of sample has been collected, the probe is irradiated with a pulsed infrared laser beam to vaporize organic components, which are then softly ionized with coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118 nm (10.5 eV). Since the photon energy is close to the ionization energies of most organic compounds, fragmentation is minimized. Both aliphatic and aromatic compounds of atmospheric relevance are detected and quantified in the low- to midpicogram range. The photoionization signal intensity increases linearly with the amount of material sampled and is independent of particle size. The fragmentation induced by laser desorption is greater than that observed with thermal vaporization, suggesting that the internal energy imparted by the former is greater. Although some molecular fragmentation is observed, mass spectra from common sources of ambient organic aerosol are distinguishable and consistent with previous off-line measurements by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These results illustrate the potential of PIAMS for molecular characterization of organic aerosols in ambient and smog chamber measurements. PMID:14719868

  17. AERODYNAMIC CLASSIFICATION OF FIBERS WITH AEROSOL CENTRIFUGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constituent particles of many ambient and workplace aerosols of health effects concerns are of fibrous and aggregate geometric shapes. he sites of deposition in the human respiratory system are primarily related to the mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhaled particle siz...

  18. Organosulfate Formation in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organosulfates of isoprene, a-pinene, and ß-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive seri...

  19. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  20. Contributions of isoprene, monoterpenes, ?-caryophyllene, and toluene to secondary organic aerosols in Hong Kong during the summer of 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Bian, Qijing; Li, Teresa W. Y.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2008-11-01

    Isoprene, monoterpenes, ?-caryophyllene, and toluene are known to be important secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors. In this study, characteristic SOA tracers of these precursors were quantified in ambient samples of PM2.5 taken in Hong Kong and their contributions to SOA were estimated using a tracer-based method. Samples were collected every other day from four sampling sites during a field measurement campaign in the summer of 2006. Fourteen SOA tracers, along with 24 other polar oxygenated compounds, were identified and quantified using gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry with prior trimethylsilylation. Concentrations of the individual tracers ranged from a few tenths to a few hundreds ng m-3. The tracer concentrations were found to be 1 order of magnitude higher on days under regional transport influences due to elevated oxidant levels than on days under mainly local emissions influences. Using the measured SOA tracer concentrations in the ambient aerosols and laboratory-derived tracer mass fractions reported by Kleindienst et al. (2007), we estimated that the average SOA attributable to isoprene, monoterpenes, ?-caryophyllene, and toluene was 8.83 ?g m-3 on days under regional transport influences versus 0.99 ?g m-3 on days under mainly local emissions influences, accounting for approximately 49% and 21%, respectively, of the ambient OC concentrations. The tracer-based estimates indicate that monoterpenes and ?-caryophyllene are significant contributors to ambient PM2.5 in the summer, which may be due to the high emissions of these biogenic hydrocarbons in Hong Kong.

  1. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ?ijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed during spring and autumn 2008. Results from the aerosol mass spectrometry indicate that the non-volatile residual consists of nitrate and organic compounds, especially during autumn. These compounds may be low-volatile organic nitrates or salts. During winter and spring the non-volatile core (black carbon removed) correlated markedly with carbon monoxide, which is a tracer of anthropogenic emissions. Due to this, the non-volatile residual may also contain other pollutants in addition to black carbon. Thus, it seems that the amount of different compounds in submicron aerosol particles varies with season and as a result the chemical composition of the non-volatile residual changes within a year. This work was supported by University of Helsinki three-year research grant No 490082 and Maj and Tor Nessling Foundation grant No 2010143. Aalto et al., (2001). Physical characterization of aerosol particles during nucleation events. Tellus B, 53, 344-358. Jayne, et al., (2000). Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Sci. Technol., 33(1-2), 49-70. Kalberer et al., (2004). Identification of Polymers as Major Components of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols. Science, 303, 1659-1662. Smith et al., (2010). Observations of aminium salts in atmospheric nanoparticles and possible climatic implications. P. Natl. Acad. Sci., 107(15). Vesala et al., (1998). Long-term field measurements of atmosphere-surface interactions in boreal forest combining forest ecology, micrometeorology, aerosol physics and atmospheric chemistry. Trends Heat, Mass Mom. Trans., 4, 17-35. Wehner et al., (2002). Design and calibration of a thermodenuder with an improved heating unit to measure the size-dependent volatile fraction of aerosol particles. J. Aerosol Sci., 33, 1087-1093.

  2. Primary and secondary organics in the tropical Amazonian rainforest aerosols: chiral analysis of 2-methyltetraols.

    PubMed

    González, N J D; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Artaxo, P; Guenther, A; Krejci, R; Nozière, B; Noone, K

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the application of a new method to facilitate the distinction between biologically produced (primary) and atmospherically produced (secondary) organic compounds in ambient aerosols based on their chirality. The compounds chosen for this analysis were the stereomers of 2-methyltetraols, (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)-methylerythritol, (l- and d-form, respectively), and (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)-methylthreitol (l- and d-form), shown previously to display some enantiomeric excesses in atmospheric aerosols, thus to have at least a partial biological origin. In this work PM10 aerosol fractions were collected in a remote tropical rainforest environment near Manaus, Brazil, between June 2008 and June 2009 and analysed. Both 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol displayed a net excess of one enantiomer (either the l- or the d-form) in 60 to 72% of these samples. These net enantiomeric excesses corresponded to compounds entirely biological but accounted for only about 5% of the total 2-methyltetrol mass in all the samples. Further analysis showed that, in addition, a large mass of the racemic fractions (equal mixtures of d- and l-forms) was also biological. Estimating the contribution of secondary reactions from the isomeric ratios measured in the samples (=ratios 2-methylthreitol over 2-methylerythritol), the mass fraction of secondary methyltetrols in these samples was estimated to a maximum of 31% and their primary fraction to a minimum of 69%. Such large primary fractions could have been expected in PM10 aerosols, largely influenced by biological emissions, and would now need to be investigated in finer aerosols. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of chiral and isomeric analyses as the first direct tool to assess the primary and secondary fractions of organic aerosols. PMID:24777436

  3. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1990-10-01

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m{sup {minus}1} (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m{sup {minus}3} (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC).

  4. Analysis of the Effects of Chemical Composition and Humidity on Visibility using Highly Time Resolved Aerosol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunden, M. M.; Brown, N. J.; Liu, D.; Tonse, S.

    2005-12-01

    Transported aerosols from populated and industrial areas result in regional haze that causes visibility degradation in areas valued for their scenic beauty, such as the National Parks. These areas are designated as Class I Areas in the United States, and there are specific visibility goals put forth to ultimately return these areas to natural conditions. To both understand current conditions and chart progress towards meeting these goals requires measurement of important aerosol species and an understanding of how these different aerosol species affect light attenuation to allow for predictive modeling capabilities. The current investigation seeks to understand if more highly time resolved measurements of chemically speciated particle mass, relative humidity, scattering, and absorption would enable a better estimation of extinction as the relationship between these variables is non-linear. Our particular objective is to explore the contributions of the aerosol species mentioned above to visibility degradation, and the role played by relative humidity. We performed analyses on a data set collected in Central California from the intensive ambient aerosol sampling campaign conducted from 2000 summer-2001 winter1. The data include PM-2.5 mass concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon aerosol, as well as simultaneous measurements on light scattering, ambient temperature and relative humidity. The dataset is highly time-resolved, allowing the affect of temporal variations of particle chemical composition and meteorological features to be considered. The final results provide response curves that allow calculation of light scattering given aerosol concentrations and relative humidity. Our results are compared with those obtained using formulae suggested for analysis of IMPROVE (a regional haze monitoring network2) data collected under lower temporal resolution to understand the effects of temporal resolution on the characteristics of the relationships among extinction, aerosol loading and type, and relative humidity. References 1. Lunden, M.M., T.L. Thatcher, S.V. Hering, and N.J. Brown (2003). The Use of Time- and Chemically-Resolved Particulate Data to Characterize the Infiltration of Outdoor PM-2.5 into a Residence in the San Joaquin Valley. Environmental Science and Technology 37, pp 4724-4732. 2. Malm, W.C., 'IMPROVE, Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments,' ISSN: 0737-5352-47, Colorado State University, May 2000.

  5. COMPOSITION OF AEROSOLS OVER LOS ANGELES FREEWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In October of 1976, aerosol particulate samples were collected while driving on Los Angeles freeways and were analyzed for sulfate, nitrate, and elemental composition. The measurements indicate that neither nitrate nor sulfate concentrations increased significantly over the roadw...

  6. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ?), the ratio between the scattering (?scat) and extinction (?ext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to characterize the aerosol optical properties in the Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area (HOPE-J3A) during Nov. 2014 - Jan. 2015 and the primary measurement results will be presented.

  7. Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols during CARDEX 2012: an Instrument Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Praveen, P. S.; Arnold, I. J.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Schauer, J. J.; Gustafsson, O.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-12-01

    Quantification of black carbon (BC) aerosol in the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important due to its role in radiative forcing. As advances in measurement techniques continue, BC measurements can be performed using a variety of instruments, employing optical, thermal, and photoacoustic methods. However, the relationship between data obtained with these methods is dependent on multiple properties of the ambient air sampled (e.g., aerosol composition, wavelength-dependence of light- and mass-absorbing efficiencies) and on the instruments and their data analysis algorithms (e.g., scattering correction factors for aethalometer data). Previous studies have utilized theoretical corrections to estimate BC concentrations and their corresponding radiative properties, but with limited confidence. In this study, we present comparisons of in-situ and filter-based measurements of aerosol light absorption, black carbon (BC) concentration, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) from the 2012 CARDEX (Clouds, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, and Dynamics EXperiment) campaign based on the island of Hanimaadhoo in the Republic of Maldives. The instruments used for this comparison study include two photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS, ? = 870 and 405 nm), a 7-wavelength aethalometer (? = 370, 430, 470, 520, 590, 700, and 880 nm), and independent 12- and 24-hour integrated filter samples, analyzed for EC - OC using the NIOSH thermal evolution protocol. During the dry monsoon season (December to April), anthropogenic aerosols from India and Southeast Asia are characteristically transported to the Maldives at surface level. Data shown here were collected between February and April of 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory-Hanimaadhoo (MCOH). Using correction factors adopted from Corrigan et al., (2006), we show reasonable agreement between absorption coefficients obtained with the aethalometer and the photoacoustic spectrometer and between BC mass concentrations obtained with the aethalometer and EC mass concentrations obtained with NIOSH analysis of filter samples. Additionally, we attempt to further develop site-specific correction methods by altering the mass-absorption efficiency values used in the Corrigan et al. (2006) study. REFERENCES: Corrigan, C. E., V. Ramanathan, and J. J. Schauer (2006). Impact of Monsoon Transitions on the Physical and Optical Properties of Aerosols. J. Geophys. Res., 111, doi:10.1029/2005JD006370.

  8. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of particle sizes, down to at least 55 nm in size, act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 ?m size ranges was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius, and the effect is statistically significant. The impact of aerosol pollutants was to increase droplet number and decrease droplet size within a region extending about 1000 km offshore. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. However, MODIS satellite measurements were used to show that despite the smaller droplets near shore, cloud albedo is not higher near shore than offshore. This is due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water path near shore.

  9. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data analysis procedures in which the collection of BCA is modeled as a fractal aggregate. The new analysis results in an increase in BCA surface area of approximately 24 and an increase in mass of 7-10 from the previous method. For the current study, BCA surface area is used in computer models that attempt to predict measured NOx/NOy ratios and O3 depletion rates. Inclusion of the HNO3 reaction with BCA in one model tends to improve the agreement of calculated to measured NOx/NOy ratio. However, it was found that these trends are viable only if the reactions are catalytic.

  10. Observations of OM/OC and specific attenuation coefficients (SAC) in ambient fine PM at a rural site in central Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. W.; Huang, L.; Leaitch, W. R.; Sharma, S.; Brook, J. R.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brickell, P. C.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.; Moosmüller, H.

    2010-03-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected on quartz filters at a rural site in central Ontario during an intensive study in 2007. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), pyrolysis organic carbon (POC), and elemental carbon (EC) were determined by thermal analysis. The concentrations are compared to the organic aerosol mass concentration (OM) measured with an Aerodyne C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and to the particle absorption coefficient (basp) obtained from a Radiance Research Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). The total organic mass to organic carbon ratios (OM/OC) and specific attenuation coefficients (SAC=basp/EC) are derived. Proportionality of the POC mass with the oxygen mass in the aerosols estimated from the AMS offers a potential means to estimate OM/OC from thermal measurements only. The mean SAC for the study is 3.8±0.3 m2 g-1. It is found that the SAC is independent of or decrease with increasing particle mass loading, depending on whether or not the data are separated between aerosols dominated by more recent anthropogenic input and aerosols dominated by longer residence time or biogenic components. There is no evidence to support an enhancement of light absorption by the condensation of secondary material to particles, suggesting that present model simulations built on such an assumption may overestimate atmospheric warming by BC.

  11. Continuous bio-aerosol monitoring in a tropical environment using a UV fluorescence and light scattering instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warren R. Stanley; Paul H. Kaye; Virginia E. Foot; Stephen J. Barrington; Martin Gallagher; Andrew Gabey

    This paper describes an instrument designed to achieve the continuous monitoring of ambient bio-aerosol concentrations. The instrument is a compact, relatively low-cost, UV aerosol spectrometer that monitors and classifies the ambient aerosol by simultaneously recording from individual airborne particles both a 2×2 fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and multi-angle spatial elastic scattering data. The former can indicate the possible presence of specific

  12. Selected water-soluble organic compounds found in size-resolved aerosols collected from urban, mountain and marine atmospheres over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Cao, Junji; An, Zhisheng

    2011-07-01

    Primary (i.e. sugars and sugar-alcohols) and secondary (i.e. carboxylic acids) water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) in size-segregated aerosols from the urban and mountain atmosphere of China and from the marine atmosphere in the outflow region of East Asia were characterized on a molecular level. Levoglucosan is the most abundant compound among the quantified WSOCs in the urban and mountain atmosphere, whose concentration at the urban site was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that at the mountain and marine sites. In contrast, malic, succinic and phthalic acids were dominant among the measured WSOCs at the marine site. In the urban air, sugars except levoglucosan gave a bimodal size distribution with a large peak in fine range (<2.1 ?m) and a small peak in coarse range (?2.1 ?m) during winter, being opposite to those in spring. In contrast, these WSOCs at the mountain and marine sites dominated in the coarse range but diminished and even disappeared in the fine range. Geometric mean diameters (GMDs) of the measured WSOCs in the fine mode at the urban site were larger in winter than in spring. Levoglucosan and carboxylic acids except for azelaic and benzoic acids showed a larger GMD in the coarse mode at the marine site probably due to an increased hygroscopic growth.

  13. Ultrafine particles are not major carriers of carcinogenic PAHs and their genotoxicity in size-segregated aerosols.

    PubMed

    Topinka, Jan; Milcova, Alena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Krouzek, Jiri; Hovorka, Jan

    2013-06-14

    Some studies suggest that genotoxic effects of combustion-related aerosols are induced by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) and their derivatives, which are part of the organic fraction of the particulate matter (PM) in ambient air. The proportion of the organic fraction in PM is known to vary with particle size. The ultrafine fraction is hypothesized to be the most important carrier of c-PAHs, since it possesses the highest specific surface area of PM. To test this hypothesis, the distribution of c-PAHs in organic extracts (EOMs) was compared for four size fractions of ambient-air aerosols: coarse (1aerosol particles and ultrafine particles (dae<0.17). High-volume aerosol samples were collected consecutively in four localities that differed in the level of environmental pollution. The genotoxicity of EOMs was measured by analysis of DNA adducts induced in an a cellular assay consisting of calf thymus DNA with/without rat liver microsomal S9 fraction coupled with (32)P-postlabelling. The upper accumulation fraction was the major size fraction in all four localities, forming 37-46% of the total PM mass. Per m(3) of sampled air, this fraction also bound the largest amount of c-PAHs. Correspondingly, the upper accumulation fraction induced the highest DNA-adduct levels. Per PM mass itself, the lower accumulation fraction is seen to be the most efficient in binding DNA-reactive organic compounds. Interestingly, the results suggest that the fraction of ultrafine particles of various ambient-air samples is neither a major carrier of c-PAHs, nor a major inducer of their genotoxicity, which is an important finding that is relevant to the toxicity and health effects of ultrafine particles, which are so extensively discussed these days. PMID:23466560

  14. An experimental technique for the direct measurement of N2O5 reactivity on ambient particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Bertram; J. A. Thornton; T. P. Riedel

    2009-01-01

    An experimental approach for the direct measurement of trace gas reactivity on ambient aerosol particles has been developed. The method utilizes a newly designed entrained aerosol flow reactor coupled to a custom-built chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The experimental method is described via application to the measurement of the N2O5 reaction probability, gamma(N2O5). Laboratory investigations on well characterized aerosol particles show

  15. A 12-year observation of water-soluble ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-06-01

    In order to characterize the long-term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12-year observation was conducted for water-soluble ions in TSP (total suspended particulate) aerosols collected from 2001 to 2012 in the Asian outflow region at Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of non-sea salt (nss-) SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- (methanesulfonate) exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007 to 2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001 to 2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are being increasingly transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific. This study also demonstrates that Asian dusts can act as an important source of nutrients for phytoplankton and thus sea-to-air emission of dimethyl sulfide over the western North Pacific.

  16. Particulates and aerosols characterized in real time for harsh environments using the UMR mobile aerosol sampling system (MASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Trueblood, Max B.; Lilenfeld, Harvey V.

    1993-06-01

    Over the past 10 years a compact mobile aerosol sampling and characterization facility has been developed and operated by the Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Laboratory at UMR. In this presentation its measurement capabilities which include: total number density, size distribution and hydration property determination in real time for aerosols/particles greater than 0.007 micron, and operational methodology will be described. Its application in harsh environments will be evidenced with data from recent measurement campaigns where the system was used to (1) sample and characterize particulates from the supersonic reacting flow of a high energy chemical laser, (2) detect the presence of an invisible jet engine exhaust plume minutes after the aircraft had passed and discriminate the recently generated jet engine aerosol from ambient background carbonaceous aerosol, and (3) characterize engine and fuel specific aerosol sampled during jet engine testing.

  17. Characterization and sources assignation of PM2.5 organic aerosol in a rural area of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindado, Oscar; Pérez, Rosa M. a.; García, Susana; Sánchez, Miguel; Galán, Pilar; Fernández, Marta

    The results from a year-long study of the organic composition of PM2.5 aerosol collected in a rural area influenced by a highway of Spain are reported. The lack of prior information related to the organic composition of PM2.5 aerosol in Spain, concretely in rural areas, led definition of the goals of this study. As a result, this work has been able to characterize the main organic components of atmospheric aerosols, including several compounds of SOA, and has conducted a multivariate analysis in order to assign sources of particulate matter. A total of 89 samples were taken between April 2004 and April 2005 using a high-volume sampler. Features and abundance of n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alcohols and acids were separately determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography analysis. The ? n-alkane and ?PAHs ranged from 3 to 81 ng m -3 and 0.1 to 6 ng m -3 respectively, with higher concentrations during colder months. Ambient concentrations of ?alcohols and ?acids ranged from 21 to 184 ng m -3 and 39 to 733 ng m -3, respectively. Also, several components of secondary organic aerosol have been quantified, confirming the biogenic contribution to ambient aerosol. In addition, factor analysis was used to reveal origin of organic compounds associated to particulate matter. Eight factors were extracted accounting more than 83% of the variability in the original data. These factors were assigned to a typical high pollution episode by anthropogenic particles, crustal material, plant waxes, fossil fuel combustion, temperature, microbiological emissions, SOA and dispersion of pollutants by wind action. Finally, a cluster analysis was used to compare the organic composition between the four seasons.

  18. Discrimination of aerosol types and absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Prats, Natalia; Mogo, Sandra I.; Toledano, Carlos; Berjon, Alberto J.; Montilla, Elena; Torres, Benjamin; Rodrigo, Ruben; Fuertes, David; Gonzalez, Ramiro; Bennouna, Yasmine S.; de Frutos, Angel

    Aerosol particles are one of the most variable components in the Earth's atmosphere, affecting the radiative balance and influencing the climate system by direct and indirect effects. To evaluate these two effects the optical-radiative properties of aerosols are the key elements and hence the necessity of their retrieval. Many detailed campaigns of measurements have been carried out in the past and will continue in the future at different sites in the world to assess all these aerosol properties which are relevant to evaluate the aerosol climate forcing ARF. Otherwise worldwide aerosol networks, as AERONET, are also a potential tool for the aerosol characterization and evaluation of ARF. The most relevant aerosol parameters involved are the aerosol optical depth AOD, the Angstrom exponent AE, and the single scattering albedo SSA or the absorption aerosol optical depth AAOD. Working with remote sensing aerosol data, like those provided by sun-photometer or spectroradiometers, requires inverse radiative transfer algorithms to retrieve the earlier men-tioned optical properties. For instance, AERONET provide sufficient parameters for the aerosol type discrimination, allowing differentiate continental, marine, desert, smoke, etc. aerosol types. Traditionally, AOD-AE plots allow a good discrimination which is enriched with air masses in-formation. Although aerosol types determined in this way gives some insights about aerosol composition this is not sufficient. SSA or AAOD gives the required additional information which is also improved if the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is added. Thus, taking spectral information of all of these parameters can help us to identify some features or signa-tures about aerosol composition. In this framework and in the near future we will work in the link or connexion between columnar AERONET aerosol properties and those given by "in situ" aerosol information data.

  19. A comparison of lidar and balloon-borne particle counter measurements of the stratospheric aerosol 1974-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swissler, T. J.; Hamill, P.; Osborn, M.; Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    The optical radar measurements considered in the present investigation are those which have been obtained routinely at Hampton, VA (37.1 deg N, 76.3 deg W) since 1974. The dustsonde measurements are those made monthly at Laramie, WY (41.2 deg N, 105 deg W). The extensive data sets acquired with these two instruments during the time period 1974-80 permit a long-term comparison of the two different measurement techniques. The balloon-borne dustsonde pumps ambient air in a well-defined stream through an illuminated chamber where individual aerosol particles scatter light into photodetectors. The optical radar system used in the studies has a ruby laser with a 48-inch Cassegrainian configured telescope mounted on a mobile platform to collect the backscattered laser light. The investigation shows that optical radar measurements, dustsonde measurements, and realistic optical models together give a very consistent picture of stratospheric aerosol behavior.

  20. Understanding the Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Mexico City Airshed in 2002, 2003 and 2006 using Positive Matrix Factorization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Ulbrich; K. Dzepina; M. Canagaratna; Q. Zhang; P. Decarlo; D. Salcedo; A. C. Aiken; T. B. Onasch; J. Allan; L. M. Russell; R. Grivicke; B. Lamb; M. L. Alexander; D. R. Worsnop; J. Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol mass spectrometric measurements yield spectra of ambient aerosols that are a mix of various primary and secondary sources. Organic aerosol (OA) datasets acquired using Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, C-ToF-AMS, and HR-ToF-AMS) deployed in 2002, 2003, and 2006 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) at multiple ground locations and from aircraft flights are analyzed with Positive Matrix Factorization

  1. O3 oxidation of SO2 in sea-salt aerosol water: Size distribution of non-sea-salt sulfate during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Sievering; B. Lerner; J. Slavich; J. Anderson; M. Posfai; J. Cainey

    1999-01-01

    Non sea-salt sulfate (NSS) of 2.2-2.3 nmolm-3 total magnitude in aerosols observed during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-1) at Cape Grim, Tasmania, was trimodally distributed with ~1-nmol NSS m-3 in >0.7 mum ambient diameter (diam) coarse sea-salt mode aerosols; despite this low NSS concentration, [H2SO4(g)] was so low that <1% of this NSS could have been due to H2SO4

  2. Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols over South and East Asia using dual carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, O.; Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.-; Kruså, M.; Sheesley, R. J.; Tiwari, S.-; Lee, M.; Chen, B.; Du, K.

    2012-12-01

    Emissions of black carbon (BC) and other components of carbonaceous aerosols affect both climate and health in South and East Asia, yet substantial uncertainties exist regarding their sources. The relative contribution to atmospheric BC from fossil fuel versus biomass combustion is important to constrain both to direct mitigation and as their different properties make their effects on climate forcing and respiratory health different. This study approached the sourcing challenge by applying microscale radiocarbon measurements to aerosol particles collected in both source regions and at regional receptor observatories of both S Asia (New Delhi and the Maldives Climate Observatory) and of E Asia (Beijing, Shanghai, South China Coastal Observatory and the Korea Climate Observatory - Gosan, KCO-G, Jeju Island). The radiocarbon approach is ideally suited to this task as fossil sources are void of 14C whereas biomass combustion products hold a contemporary 14C signal. For S Asia, the 14C-based observations suggest that biomass combustion contributes half to two-thirds of the BC loading. In contrast, for E Asia, fossil fuel combustion account for four-fifths of the BC emitted from China. This source-diagnostic radiocarbon signal in the ambient aerosol over East Asia establishes a much larger role for fossil fuel combustion than suggested by all fifteen BC emission inventory models. There are also poor constraints on the sources of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), a large hydrophilic component of carbonaceous aerosols that enhances the propensity of aerosols to form clouds. In a 15-mo continuous campaign in S Asia, radiocarbon-based source apportionment of WSOC shows the dominance of biogenic/biomass combustion sources but also a substantial anthropogenic fossil-fuel contribution (about 20%). WSOC in E Asia reaching KCO-G were 50% from fossil sources. Aerosols reaching the Maldives after long-range over-ocean transport were enriched by 3-4‰ in ?13C-WSOC. This is contrary to the isotopic gradient expected for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and instead suggests that WSOC in the South Asian regional receptor atmosphere stems largely from chemically-aged POA. The year-round dual-isotope data suggests that a key contribution to S Asian WSOC may be ageing of POA from incomplete biomass combustion. These top-down isotope-based observational constraints is favorably combined with bottom-up emission inventories to iteratively produce an improved understanding of both anthropogenic sources and atmospheric behavior of climate- and health-afflicting carbonaceous aerosols in the air of South and East Asia.

  3. Organic compounds in aerosols from selected European sites - Biogenic versus anthropogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Célia; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro; Kiss, Gyula; Hoffer, Andras; Decesari, Stefano; Prevôt, André S. H.; Minguillón, María Cruz; Querol, Xavier; Hillamo, Risto; Spindler, Gerald; Swietlicki, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples from a boreal forest (Hyytiälä, April 2007), a rural site in Hungary (K-puszta, summer 2008), a polluted rural area in Italy (San Pietro Capofiume, Po Valley, April 2008), a moderately polluted rural site in Germany located on a meadow (Melpitz, May 2008), a natural park in Spain (Montseny, March 2009) and two urban background locations (Zurich, December 2008, and Barcelona, February/March 2009) were collected. Aliphatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbonyls, sterols, n-alkanols, acids, phenolic compounds and anhydrosugars in aerosols were chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, along with source attribution based on the carbon preference index (CPI), the ratios between the unresolved and the chromatographically resolved aliphatics, the contribution of wax n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids from plants, diagnostic ratios of individual target compounds and source-specific markers to organic carbon ratios. In spite of transboundary pollution episodes, Hyytiälä registered the lowest levels among all locations. CPI values close to 1 for the aliphatic fraction of the Montseny aerosol suggest that the anthropogenic input may be associated with the transport of aged air masses from the surrounding industrial/urban areas, which superimpose the locally originated hydrocarbons with biogenic origin. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in samples from San Pietro Capofiume reveal that fossil fuel combustion is a major source influencing the diel pattern of concentrations. This source contributed to 25-45% of the ambient organic carbon (OC) at the Po Valley site. Aerosols from the German meadow presented variable contributions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The highest levels of vegetation wax components and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products were observed at K-puszta, while anthropogenic SOA compounds predominated in Barcelona. The primary vehicular emissions in the Spanish city accounted for around 25-30% of the OC in aerosols. Besides the traffic input (10% of OC), residential wood burning was found to be another dominant emission source contributing to the atmospheric aerosol (up to 38% of OC) at the Swiss urban location. It was estimated that around 10% of the OC mass in the urban sites originates from cooking emissions. Aerosols from the urban area of Zurich presented a much higher PAH content, and benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations sometimes exceeding the mandatory limit.

  4. Raman Microspectroscopic Analysis of Size-Resolved Atmospheric Aerosol Particle Samples Collected with an ELPI: Soot, Humic-Like Substances, and Inorganic Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. P. Ivleva; U. McKeon; R. Niessner; U. Pöschl

    2007-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy and mapping have been applied for the analysis of soot, humic-like substances (HULIS) and inorganic compounds in size resolved samples of air particulate matter collected with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). Using several reference materials, we found that spectral parameters determined by curve fitting with five bands (G, D1-D4) enable a discrimination of soot and HULIS and

  5. Aerosol composition and size versus altitude measured from the C-130 during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Huebert, B.; Howell, S.; Blomquist, B.; Zhuang, J.; Bertram, T.; Carrillo, J.

    2004-10-01

    During the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) intensive experiment in the spring of 2001 we used a total aerosol sampler (TAS) and a micro-orifice impactor (MOI) to collect dust and pollution aerosols for ion chromatographic analysis. An aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) was used to estimate the total coarse-mode volume. We conducted postexperiment passing efficiency measurements on the APS, the MOI, and their delivery tubing to constrain the inevitable (and sometimes large) artifacts associated with sampling supermicron particles from an aircraft. We have combined TAS and corrected MOI data to estimate ambient coarse and fine sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, calcium, sodium, chloride, potassium, magnesium, and oxalate. We found significant differences between aerosol composition in the free troposphere (FT) and boundary layer (BL). The molar ratio of nitrate to soluble calcium averaged 1.8 in the BL, but only 0.2 in the FT. Nitrate and calcium frequently had identical coarse size distributions, while sulfate and ammonium often had identical fine distributions. Dust clearly directs NOy toward coarse-mode nitrate. Sulfate in the FT was closest to ammonium bisulfate (half neutralized), while non-sea-salt sulfate (NSS) in the BL was usually completely neutralized to ammonium sulfate. In the presence of dust, up to half the NSS was found in the coarse mode, probably the result of SO2 uptake by CaCO3 in the dust. Soluble calcium averaged 5-8% of the coarse dust mass inferred from the APS. BL aerosol chemistry was seldom a good indicator of ionic composition in the FT.

  6. Simultaneous online monitoring of inorganic compounds in aerosols and gases in an industrialized area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khezri, Bahareh; Mo, Huan; Yan, Zhen; Chong, Shey-Ling; Heng, Aik Kian; Webster, Richard D.

    2013-12-01

    The automatic MARGA (monitor for aerosols and gases in ambient air) sampling system was used to measure the inorganic ions Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ in the PM2.5 aerosol phase and the corresponding inorganic gases HCl, HNO2, SO2, HNO3 and NH3 present in the gas phase. Samples were collected and analyzed hourly for 3 months between April and June, 2011, from a sampling site in Singapore close to a heavy industrial area containing extensive petrochemical refineries. The data (hourly and daily average) were analyzed, compared and discussed based on the ratios of HNO2/HNO3 and NH3/NH4+, the levels of nitrate and sulfate, the total nitrogen, the distribution of particulate matter and gaseous compounds, and the acidity of the aerosols. SO2 was the most abundant gas that appeared in an order of magnitude higher concentration than the other trace gases, and correspondingly SO42- was found to be at least 3-10 times higher than other anionic aerosol species. The concentration of major ions in aerosol samples and the related gaseous compounds followed the order of: SO42- > NH4+ > NO3- > K+ > Na+ > Cl- > Ca2+ > Mg2+ and SO2 > NH3 > HNO2 > HNO3, respectively. The maximum values for many of the target analytes occurred during the hazy period in May when there was significant contamination from regional fires. The elevated levels of HNO2 compared to HNO3 and high levels of HNO3 were rationalized based on artifacts in the denuder sampling methodology.

  7. Size Distributions of Ambient Organic and Elemental Carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. H. McMurry; X. Q. Zhang

    1989-01-01

    A microorifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) was used to measure size distributions of organic and elemental carbon in ambient aerosols in remote and polluted atmospheres. The most striking observation resulting from these measurements was the consistently large proportion of the organic carbon (40%–70%) on the Pallflex quartz (QAO and QAST) afterfilters. A variety of possible explanations for the high organic

  8. Atmospheric oxalic acid and related secondary organic aerosols in Qinghai Lake, a continental background site in Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji

    2013-11-01

    Summertime PM2.5 aerosols collected from Qinghai Lake (3200 m a.s.l.), a remote continental site in the northeastern part of Tibetan Plateau, were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ketocarboxylic acids and ?-dicarbonyals. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant dicarboxylic acid in the samples, followed by malonic, succinic and azelaic acids. Total dicarboxylic acids (231 ± 119 ng m-3), ketocarboxylic acids (8.4 ± 4.3 ng m-3), and ?-dicarbonyls (2.7 ± 2.1 ng m-3) at the Tibetan background site are 2-5 times less than those detected in lowland areas such as 14 Chinese megacities. Compared to those in other urban and marine areas enhancements in relative abundances of C2/total diacids and diacids-C/WSOC of the PM2.5 samples suggest that organic aerosols in the region are more oxidized due to strong solar radiation. Molecular compositions and air mass trajectories demonstrate that the above secondary organic aerosols in the Qinghai Lake atmosphere are largely derived from long-range transport. Ratios of oxalic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal to levoglucosan in PM2.5 aerosols emitted from household burning of yak dung, a major energy source for Tibetan in the region, are 30-400 times lower than those in the ambient air, which further indicates that primary emission from biomass burning is a negligible source of atmospheric oxalic acid and ?-dicarbonyls at this background site.

  9. Average chemical properties and potential formation pathways of highly oxidized organic aerosol

    E-print Network

    Kessler, Sean H.

    Measurements of ambient organic aerosol indicate that a substantial fraction is highly oxidized and low in volatility, but this fraction is generally not reproduced well in either laboratory studies or models. Here we ...

  10. The Evolution of the Physicochemical Properties of Aerosols in the Atmosphere 

    E-print Network

    Tomlinson, Jason

    2011-02-22

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) system was used to measure simultaneously the size distribution and hygroscopicity of the ambient aerosol population. The system was operated aboard the National...

  11. Measurements of Optical Properties of Aerosols by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in Mega-City Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Hagino, R.; Matsumi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Kudo, R.; Uchiyama, A.; Tonokura, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawasaki, M.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol particles have an important role in radiation balance in the atmosphere by scattering and absorbing incident light. Therefore, accurate determination of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential. There are two components to aerosol optical extinction: scattering and absorption. Extinction coefficients of atmospheric aerosol have commonly been determined by measuring scattering coefficients using nephelometer (Neph) and absorption coefficients using an aethalometer or particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Both the aethalometer and PSAP rely on collection of the aerosol particles onto a filter substrate followed by a measurement of light reflectance and/or transmittance. Because of the temporal variations of the conversion parameter, these techniques may have relatively large uncertainties. Extinction coefficients can also be measured using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). In this work, simultaneous measurements of extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients of the ambient aerosols were performed in central Tokyo from 14 August to 2 September 2007 using a newly developed CRDS instrument, Neph and PSAP, respectively. Gas phase ozone concentrations were also measured using a commercial instrument. Extinction coefficients measured using CRDS were compared with those determined from the sum of scattering and absorption coefficients measured by nephelometer and PSAP. By comparing the single scattering albedo (SSA) calculated by three different combinations from extinction, scattering, and absorption, it is suggested that the PSAP overestimates absorption coefficients by a factor of 2. By taking the overestimation of the PSAP into account, the extinction coefficients measured by CRDS were in excellent agreement with those for Neph+PSAP with the ratio of (Neph+PSAP)/CRDS = 1.02, except for the data on days when high concentrations of ozone (more than 130 ppbv) were observed. For the data when high concentrations of ozone were observed, extinction coefficients for Neph+PSAP were 15-30 % larger than those for CRDS. Using the corrected data, SSA values during summertime in central Tokyo are estimated.

  12. Volatility and composition of aerosols in tropical stratosphere and TTL over Biak, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, T.; Hara, K.; Hasebe, F.

    2014-12-01

    Number concentration and volatility of aerosols in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) over Biak (1.2 oS, 136.1 oE) were observed using balloon-borne dual optical particle counters (OPC) in January 2011, 2012, and 2013. One OPC observed number concentration of ambient aerosols and another OPC had an inlet with a thermo denuder, whose temperature were set at 100 to 300 oC, in order to observe volatility. The results suggest that major composition of aerosol change with altitude, from sulfate in upper troposphere to sulfuric acid in stratosphere through TTL region. The ratios of number concentrations of un-volatile aerosol, to those of ambient aerosol in sub-micrometer size range are few percent in stratosphere and several percent in TTL. In addition, un-volatile aerosol concentrations were similar to the concentration of ice particle in sub-visible cirrus.

  13. Formation and characterization of fission-product aerosols under postulated HTGR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.; Munkelwitz, H.R.

    1982-07-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the formation mechanism and physical characterization of simulated nuclear aerosols that could likely be released during an HTGR core heat-up accident. Experiments were carried out in a high-temperature flow system consisting essentially of an inductively heated release source, a vapor deposition tube, and a filter assembly for collecting particulate matter. Simulated fission products Sr and Ba as oxides are separately impregnated in H451 graphite wafers and released at elevated temperatures into a dry helium flow. In the presence of graphite, the oxides are quantitatively reduced to metals, which subsequently vaporize at temperatures much lower than required for the oxides alone to vaporize in the absence of graphite. A substantial fraction of the released material is associated with particulate matter, which is collected on filters located downstream at ambient temperature. The release and transport of simulated fission product Ag as metal are also investigated.

  14. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  15. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

    2012-08-14

    Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

  16. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Korolev, Alexei V.; Earle, Michael E.; Liu, Peter S. K.; Lawson, R. Paul; Brooks, Sarah; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matt

    2012-08-01

    Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the thermodynamic indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R = 0.78 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant vertical profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud for 2 flight dates combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The lower Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the thermodynamic indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

  17. Instrument Busy Time and Mass Measurement using Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan O. Allen; Prakash V. Bhave; Jeffrey R. Whiteaker; Kimberly A. Prather

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) instruments have been used widely to measure the size and composition of single ambient aerosol particles. ATOFMS data do not directly and quantitatively represent aerosol composition because the instruments exhibit non-linear response to particle concentration, size, and composition. Our approach is to analyze separately the components of non-linear ATOFMS response using field sampling data in

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE LIQUID WATER CONTENT OF SUMMERTIME AEROSOL IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of aerosol liquid water mass represents an important parameter for understanding the physical properties of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. Increases in ambient relative humidity can increase aerosol liquid water and thus the composite particle mass and particle volu...

  19. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 µm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  20. Synthesis of satellite (MODIS), aircraft (ICARTT), and surface (IMPROVE, EPA-AQS, AERONET) aerosol observations over eastern North America to improve MODIS aerosol retrievals and constrain surface aerosol concentrations and sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Easan Drury; Daniel J. Jacob; Robert J. D. Spurr; Jun Wang; Yohei Shinozuka; Bruce E. Anderson; Antony D. Clarke; Jack Dibb; Cameron McNaughton; Rodney Weber

    2010-01-01

    We use an ensemble of satellite (MODIS), aircraft, and ground-based aerosol observations during the ICARTT field campaign over eastern North America in summer 2004 to (1) examine the consistency between different aerosol measurements, (2) evaluate a new retrieval of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and inferred surface aerosol concentrations (PM2.5) from the MODIS satellite instrument, and (3) apply this collective information

  1. A Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Device (?PAD) for Aerosol Oxidative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Panymeesamer, Pantila; Supalakorn, Natcha; Koehler, Kirsten; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S.; Volckens, John

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution has been linked with respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, in addition to various cancers. Consistent among all of these associations is the hypothesis that PM induces inflammation and oxidative stress in the affected tissue. Consequently, a variety of assays have been developed to quantify the oxidative activity of PM as a means to characterize its ability to induced oxidative stress. The vast majority of these assays rely on high-volume, fixed-location sampling methods due to limitations in assay sensitivity and detection limit. As a result, our understanding of how personal exposure contributes to the intake of oxidative air pollution is limited. To further this understanding, we present a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (?PAD) for measuring PM oxidative activity on filters collected by personal sampling. The ?PAD is inexpensive to fabricate and provides fast and sensitive analysis of aerosol oxidative activity. The oxidative activity measurement is based on the dithiothreitol assay (DTT assay), uses colorimetric detection, and can be completed in the field within 30 min following sample collection. The ?PAD assay was validated against the traditional DTT assay using 13 extracted aerosol samples including urban aerosols, biomass burning PM, cigarette smoke and incense smoke. The results showed no significant differences in DTT consumption rate measured by the two methods. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, personal samples were collected to estimate human exposures to PM from indoor air, outdoor air on a clean day, and outdoor air on a wildfire-impacted day in Fort Collins, CO. Filter samples collected on the wildfire day gave the highest oxidative activity on a mass normalized basis, whereas typical ambient background air showed the lowest oxidative activity. PMID:23227907

  2. Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, ?-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid in PM2.5 aerosol collected during CAREBeijing-2007: an effect of traffic restriction on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Huang, R.-J.; Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, S. S. H.; Zhu, T.; Tian, L.

    2014-06-01

    Thirty water-soluble organic species, including dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, ?-dicarbonyls, fatty acids, and benzoic acid were determined as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 samples collected during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing 2007 (CAREBeijing-2007) in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing. The objective of this study is to identify the influence of traffic emissions and regional transport to the atmosphere in Beijing during summer. PM2.5 samples collected with or without traffic restriction in Beijing are selected to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measure on air pollution reduction. The average concentrations of the total quantified bifunctional organic compounds (TQBOC), total fatty acids and benzoic acid during the entire sampling period were 1184 ± 241 ng m-3, 597 ± 159 ng m-3 and 1496 ± 511ng m-3 in PKU, and 1050 ± 303 ng m-3, 475 ± 114 ng m-3 and 1278 ± 372 ng m-3 in Yufa. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid at PKU and Yufa, followed by phthalic acid (Ph). A strong even carbon number predominance with the highest level at palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by stearic acid (C18:0) was found for fatty acids. According to the back trajectories modeling results, the air masses were found to originate mainly from northeast, passing over southeast or south of Beijing (heavily populated, urbanized and industrialized areas), during heavier pollution events, whereas they are mainly from north or northwest sector (mountain areas without serious anthropogenic pollution sources) during cleaner events. The data with wind only from the same sector (minimizing the difference from regional contribution) but with and without traffic restriction in Beijing were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measure on the reduction of local air pollution in Beijing. The results suggested that the "traffic restriction" measure can reduce the air pollutants, but the decrease of pollutants is generally smaller in Yufa compared to that in PKU. Moreover, an enhancement of elemental carbon (EC) value indicates elevated primary emissions in Yufa during restriction period than non-restriction period. This study demonstrates that even when primary exhaust was controlled by traffic restriction, the contribution of secondary organic species formed from photochemical processes was critical with long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants.

  3. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  4. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

  5. A global view on aerosol micro- and macrophysical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols are not only emitted from and deposited to the Earth's surface but are modified during their transport. The processes for these modifications include nucleation of H2SO4 gas into new aerosol, coagulation with other aerosol and condensation of H2SO4 unto existing aerosol. As a result of these processes, aerosol grow in size and change their chemical composition, often becoming hydrophilic where they were hydrophobic before. This affects their characteristics for various deposition processes (sedimentation, dry or wet deposition) as well as their radiative properties and hence climate forcing by aerosol. Although budgets for aerosol emission and deposition (macrophysical fluxes) have been studied before, much less is known about the budgets of e.g. nucleation, coagulation and condensation (microphysical fluxes). A better understanding of their relative importance would help understand aerosol model structural errors and imply simplifications for faster, leaner aerosol models that allow climate simulations with interactive aerosol at reduced cost. We present a complete budget of all aerosol processes in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM including the M7 microphysics. This model treats aerosol as 7 distinct but interacting two-moment modes of mixed species (soot, organic carbons, sulfate, sea salt and dust). We will show both global budgets as well as regional variations in dominant processes. Some of our conclusions are: 1) coagulation only matters when nucleation or Aitken mode particles are involved; 2) coagulation is important for the formation of accumulation mode particles; 3) microphysics particularly affects number densities and hence aerosol sizes; 4) aging due to sulfate collection is an important process but hydrophilic number densities typically dwarf hydrophobic number densities; 5) lifetime of the nucleation mode is very short (0.4d); 6) these conclusions are robust for pre-industrial and modern emission scenarios. Our results provide an objective way of complexity analysis in a global aerosol model and will be used in future work where we will reduce this complexity in ECHAM-HAM.

  6. Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala

    E-print Network

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación sistemática Guatemala, 2004 UNIVERSIDAD RAFAEL LANDÍVAR Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales y Agrícolas Instituto de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación sistemática ISBN: 99922

  7. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures containing ammonium salts (e.g., (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3) and dicarboxylic acids (e.g., malonic, glutaric, and maleic acid) as well as important mimic compounds such as sucrose - water systems.

  8. Trace elemental characteristics of aerosols emitted from municipal incinerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a continuing investigation of high temperature combustion aerosols, elemental composition of size differentiated aerosols emitted from a local municipal incinerator was studied. Aerosols were aerodynamically separated into eight diameter groups ranging from 0.43 mm to 20 mm, collected, and analyzed by charged particle induced X-ray emission technique. On line data collection and reduction codes generated aerial densities for elements from Na to U with sensitivities in the ng/cu m range for most elements. From the total weights of aerosols collected per stage, their size distribution was determined to be bimodal, with one group centered at a diameter of 0.54 mm and the other at a diameter of 5.6 mm. Measured elemental concentrations in various size ranges indicate that K and S show a strong tendency to concentrate on aerosol surfaces. A weaker trend for surface preference was also observed for Mn and Ni, but other elements show no such trend.

  9. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

  10. Trends in aerosol abundances and distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Clancy, R. T.; Curran, R.; Deluisi, J.; Hamill, P.; Kent, G.; Rosen, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Yue, G.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of aerosols that reside in the upper atmosphere are described. Special emphasis is given to the influence these aerosols have on ozone observation systems, mainly through radiative effects, and on ambient ozone concentrations, mainly through chemical effects. It has long been appreciated that stratospheric particles can interfere with the remote sensing of ozone distribution. The mechanism and magnitude of this interference are evaluated. Separate sections deal with the optical properties of upper atmospheric aerosols, long-term trends in stratospheric aerosols, perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions, and estimates of the impacts that such particles have on remotely measured ozone concentrations. Another section is devoted to a discussion of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). These unique clouds, recently discovered by satellite observation, are now thought to be intimately connected with the Antarctic ozone hole. Accordingly, interest in PSC's has grown considerably in recent years. This chapter describes what we know about the morphology, physical chemistry, and microphysics of PSC's.

  11. Characterization of aerosols containing microcystin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 mum. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  12. Characterization of Aerosols Containing Microcystin

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C. Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 ?m. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  13. Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is affected by organic carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas W. Kirchstetter; T. Novakov; Peter V. Hobbs

    2004-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of light absorption by aerosols collected on filters is investigated throughout the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral region. Measurements were made using an optical transmission method. Aerosols produced by biomass combustion, including wood and savanna burning, and by motor vehicles, including diesel trucks, are included in the analysis. These aerosol types were distinguished by different wavelength (?) dependences

  14. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of tar balls observed during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Hand; W. C. Malm; A. Laskin; D. Day; T. Lee; C. Wang; C. Carrico; J. Carrillo; J. P. Cowin; J. Collett; M. J. Iedema

    2005-01-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western United States and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field-collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or “tar balls,”

  15. Characterization of aerosol over the Northern South China Sea during two cruises in 2003

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingying Zhang; Guoshun Zhuang; Jinghua Guo; Kedong Yine; Peng Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric transport of trace elements has been found to be an important pathway for their input to the ocean. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected over the Northern South China Sea in two cruises in 2003 to estimate the input of aerosol from continent to the ocean. About 23 elements and 14 soluble ions in aerosol samples were

  16. NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF INERTIAL ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased sampling of airborne particulate from a flowing stream requires that the size distribution and concentration of aerosol collected be identical to that of the aerosol in the free stream. ampling errors occur during aspiration of the aerosol from the free stream to he face...

  17. Partitioning of the organic aerosol component between fog droplets and interstitial air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Cristina Facchini; Sandro Fuzzi; Sergio Zappoli; Antonella Andracchio; András Gelencsér; Gyula Kiss; Zoltán Krivácsy; Ernô Mészáros; Hans-Christen Hansson; Tomas Alsberg; Yngve Zebühr

    1999-01-01

    Limited information is available on the nature of organic compounds in the tropospheric aerosol and their effect on aerosol hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) ability. Here we analyze samples of liquid droplets and interstitial aerosol, concurrently collected during fog episodes, to determine how the organic compounds are partitioned between the two reservoirs. By comparing the nature and concentration

  18. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  19. Intensity and polarization of dust aerosols over polarized anisotropic surfaces

    E-print Network

    Takano, Yoshihide

    of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article aerosol layer is investigated by means of the adding principle for vector radiative transfer in which instrument, referred to as Aerosol Polarimetric Sensor (APS), to collect polarimetric measurements along

  20. Airborne measurements of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols during ACE-Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian T. Mader; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld

    2002-01-01

    Airborne levels of carbonaceous aerosols were measured using the Twin Otter aircraft during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia. Particles were collected using a newly developed honeycomb denuder sampler and organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and carbonate (CC) carbon levels determined using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. During some flights, atmospheric layers could be identified as marine boundary, pollution dominated, or

  1. Airborne measurements of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols during ACE-Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian T. Mader; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld

    2002-01-01

    Airborne levels of carbonaceous aerosols were measured using the Twin Otter aircraft during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia. Particles were collected using a newly developed honeycomb denuder sampler and organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and carbonate (CC) carbon levels determined using a thermal–optical carbon analyzer. During some flights, atmospheric layers could be identified as marine boundary, pollution dominated, or

  2. URBAN AEROSOL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate numerical schemes have been developed for simulation of the condensation/evaporation processes with vapor conservation for a single component aerosol. These have been incorporated in modules which allow simulation of aerosol dynamics in models for dispersion and transpor...

  3. AEROSOL CHARACTERISTICS AND VISIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes progress in measuring the optical properties of aerosols and in relating aerosol characteristics to visibility reduction made in the author's laboratory during the period 1965-1971. An instrument, the integrating nephelometer, which measures the scattering ...

  4. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  5. Methods for Real-Time, In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Light Absorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Moosmüller; W. P. Arnott; C. F. Rogers

    1997-01-01

    Light extinction by aerosols is due to scattering and absorption. The anthropogenic contribution is generally dominated by light scattering by sulfate particles and light absorption by elemental carbon. While real-time, in situ instrumentation for the measurement of ambient light scattering exists and is widely used (i.e., nephelometers), no such instrumentation is currently in use for the sensitive measurement of ambient

  6. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN HUMANS UPON EXPOSURE TO SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL AND EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 18 human subjects were exposed to ambient air for four hours on the first day of exposure and to four hours of 100 micrograms/cu. m. (0.033 micromole) sulfuric acid aerosol exposed to four hours of ambient air on both exposure days. Six biochemical blood parameters wer...

  7. Intercomparison of Capture and Standard Vaporizers in the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Croteau, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (ACSM) commercialized by Aerodyne Research Inc. are used widely to measure mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory species in submicron particles. With the "standard" vaporizer that is installed in all commercial instruments to date, the quantification of ambient aerosol mass requires the use of collection efficiency (CE) for correcting the loss of particles due to bounce on the vaporizer. However, CE depends on aerosol phase, and thus can vary with location, airmass, and season, and typically contributes the most uncertainty to quantification. To address this limitation, a new "capture" vaporizer has been designed to reduce or eliminate particle bounce and thus the CE correction. To test the performance of the capture vaporizer, two AMS, one with the standard vaporizer and one with the capture vaporizer were operated side by side in the lab and field during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in Alabama, 2013. Scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) size distribution measurements were made in parallel. Good agreement was observed between the time series of mass concentration of the main species between the capture (without use of CE) and standard vaporizers (with the composition-dependent CE correction), verifying that CE~1 in the capture vaporizer. However, compared to the standard vaporizer, fragmentation of organic and inorganic species was shifted to smaller fragments on the capture vaporizer, suggesting additional thermal decomposition arising from the increased residence time and surface collisions of molecules in the vaporize and also consistent with the observed longer particle vaporization times which lead to artificially broadened particle size distribution measurements. The impact of the size distribution broadening is significant for lab studies using monodisperse particles, but limited in field studies since ambient distributions are typically quite broad. The influence of vaporizer temperature on the shape of the size distributions was also investigated. Relative ionization efficiencies were recalibrated in the capture vaporizer. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed on both data sets to compare the results of this source apportionment technique.

  8. How well can we Measure the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (MOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(sub ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instuments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and 2 ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in-situ measured sigma(sub ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002 - 0.004 K/m equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(sub ep)(lambda) are higher. An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system looking at the collective results from 6 field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(sub ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(sub ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(sub ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths and potentially larger in the UV and near-infrared.

  9. AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DETERMINED ON BOARD THE DOE G1 AIRCRAFT DURING MAX-MEX IN MARCH 2006

    E-print Network

    AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DETERMINED ON BOARD THE DOE G1 AIRCRAFT DURING MAX-MEX IN MARCH 2006 Y-IC showed a general agreement with the former using a collection efficiency (CE) of 0.5, (2) the aerosol

  10. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  11. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  12. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  13. MODAL AEROSOL DYNAMICS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modal Aerosol Dynamics (MAD) model is a computationally efficient model for solving the General Dynamics Equation of Aerosols (GDE) (Friedlander, 1977). The simplifying assumption in the model is that aerosol size distributions can be approximated by overlapping modes, each r...

  14. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Weiss, R.E. (Radiance Research, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Optical properties and cross-sections of biological aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Thrush; D. M. Brown; N. Salciccioli; J. Gomes; A. Brown; K. Siegrist; M. E. Thomas; N. T. Boggs; C. C. Carter

    2010-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop standoff sensing of biological agents in aerosolized clouds. In support of the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System (JBSDS) program, lidar systems have been a dominant technology and have shown significant capability in field tests conducted in the Joint Ambient Breeze Tunnel (JABT) at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). The release of biological agents in

  16. Deliquescence properties and particle size change of hygroscopic aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1979-01-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large proportions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as sulfates and nitrates, which may induce adverse health effects upon inhalation. The inhaled salt particles are invariably exposed to a humid environment; their deposition along the respiratory tract will necessarily depend upon the size change resulting from water vapor condensation. This paper discusses the deliquescent properties of pure

  17. Laser Ionization Mass Spectroscopy of Single Aerosol Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Murphy; D. S. Thomson

    1995-01-01

    We describe an instrument that measures the chemical composition of single aerosol particles. To facilitate detection of volatile species, particles are analyzed less than 0.5 ms after leaving ambient conditions and without touching any surfaces. Particles are introduced into a vacuum through a differentially pumped nozzle, then cross a He-Ne laser beam. The scattered light provides both size information and

  18. ORIGINS OF CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL IN DENVER AND ALBUQUERQUE DURING WINTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient aerosol measurements in wintertime Denver and Albuquerque show that volatile and elemental carbon constitute more than half of the observed total fine particle mass. A multiple linear regression method has been used to estimate the contribution to these carbonaceous mater...

  19. Discrimination of aerosol types and absorbing aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria E. Cachorro; Natalia Prats; Sandra I. Mogo; Carlos Toledano; Alberto J. Berjon; Elena Montilla; Benjamin Torres; Ruben Rodrigo; David Fuertes; Ramiro Gonzalez; Yasmine S. Bennouna; Angel de Frutos

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol particles are one of the most variable components in the Earth's atmosphere, affecting the radiative balance and influencing the climate system by direct and indirect effects. To evaluate these two effects the optical-radiative properties of aerosols are the key elements and hence the necessity of their retrieval. Many detailed campaigns of measurements have been carried out in the past

  20. A single-particle characterization of a mobile Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System for exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    Freney, Evelyn J; Heal, Mathew R; Donovan, Robert J; Mills, Nicholas L; Donaldson, Kenneth; Newby, David E; Fokkens, Paul HB; Cassee, Flemming R

    2006-01-01

    Background An Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to investigate the size and chemical composition of fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in the size range 0.2–2.6 ?m produced by a Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES) contained within the Mobile Ambient Particle Concentrator Exposure Laboratory (MAPCEL). The data were collected during a study of human exposure to CAPs, in Edinburgh (UK), in February-March 2004. The air flow prior to, and post, concentration in the VACES was sampled in turn into the ATOFMS, which provides simultaneous size and positive and negative mass spectral data on individual fine particles. Results The particle size distribution was unaltered by the concentrator over the size range 0.2–2.6 ?m, with an average enrichment factor during this study of ~5 (after dilution of the final air stream). The mass spectra from single particles were objectively grouped into 20 clusters using the multivariate K-means algorithm and then further grouped manually, according to similarity in composition and time sequence, into 8 main clusters. The particle ensemble was dominated by pure and reacted sea salt and other coarse inorganic dusts (as a consequence of the prevailing maritime-source climatology during the study), with relatively minor contributions from carbonaceous and secondary material. Very minor variations in particle composition were noted pre- and post-particle concentration, but overall there was no evidence of any significant change in particle composition. Conclusion These results confirm, via single particle analysis, the preservation of the size distribution and chemical composition of fine ambient PM in the size range 0.2–2.6 ?m after passage through the VACES concentration instrumentation. PMID:16723024

  1. Development, enhancement, and evaluation of aircraft measurement techniques for national ambient air quality standard criteria pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, Lacey Cluff

    The atmospheric contaminants most harmful to human health are designated Criteria Pollutants. To help Maryland attain the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for Criteria Pollutants, and to improve our fundamental understanding of atmospheric chemistry, I conducted aircraft measurements in the Regional Atmospheric Measurement Modeling Prediction Program (RAMMPP). These data are used to evaluate model simulations and satellite observations. I developed techniques for improving airborne observation of two NAAQS pollutants, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). While structure and composition of organic aerosol are important for understanding PM formation, the molecular speciation of organic ambient aerosol remains largely unknown. The spatial distribution of reactive nitrogen is likewise poorly constrained. To examine water-soluble organic aerosol (WSOA) during an air pollution episode, I designed and implemented a shrouded aerosol inlet system to collect PM onto quartz fiber filters from a Cessna 402 research aircraft. Inlet evaluation conducted during a side-by-side flight with the NASA P3 demonstrated agreement to within 30%. An ion chromatographic mass spectrometric method developed using the NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649b Urban Dust, as a surrogate material resulted in acidic class separation and resolution of at least 34 organic acids; detection limits approach pg/g concentrations. Analysis of aircraft filter samples resulted in detection of 8 inorganic species and 16 organic acids of which 12 were quantified. Aged, re-circulated metropolitan air showed a greater number of dicarboxylic acids compared to air recently transported from the west. While the NAAQS for NO2 is rarely exceeded, it is a precursor molecule for ozone, America's most recalcitrant pollutant. Using cavity ringdown spectroscopy employing a light emitting diode (LED), I measured vertical profiles of NO2 (surface to 2.5 km) west (upwind) of the Baltimore/Washington, area in the morning, and east (downwind) in the afternoon. Column contents (altitude integrals of concentration) were remarkably similar (?3x1015 molecules cm-2 ). These measurements indicate that NO2 is widely distributed over the eastern US and help quantify the regional nature of smog events and prove extensive interstate transport of pollutants. These results were used to help shape air pollution control policy based on solid science.

  2. Retrievals of Profiles of Fine and Coarse Aerosols Using Lidar and Radiometric Space Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoram J. Kaufman; Didier Tanré; Jean-François Léon; Jacques Pelon

    2003-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spaceborne lidar, expected to be launched in 2004, will collect profiles of the lidar attenuated backscattering coefficients of aerosol and clouds at 0.53 and 1.06 m. The measurements are sensitive to the vertical distri- bution of aerosols. However, the information is insufficient to be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties and

  3. Retrievals of profiles of fine and coarse aerosols using lidar and radiometric space measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoram J. Kaufman; Didier Tanré; Jean-François Léon; Jacques Pelon

    2003-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spaceborne lidar, expected to be launched in 2004, will collect profiles of the lidar attenuated backscattering coefficients of aerosol and clouds at 0.53 and 1.06 ?m. The measurements are sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols. However, the information is insufficient to be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties and vertical

  4. Relationships among aerosol constituents from Asia and the North Pacific during PEM-West A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Arimoto; R. A. Duce; D. L. Savoie; J. M. Prospero; R. Talbot; J. D. Cullen; U. Tomza; N. F. Lewis; B. J. Ray

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol particle samples collected from Asia and the North Pacific were analyzed to investigate the relationships among atmospheric sea salt, mineral aerosol, biogenic emissions (methanesulfonate (MSA)), and several anthropogenic substances (sulfate, nitrate, and various trace elements). These studies specifically focused on the sources for aerosol SO=4 and on the long-range transport of continental materials to the North Pacific. Ground-based aerosol

  5. CCN activity of size-selected aerosol at a Pacific coastal location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Ladino, L. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Huffman, J. A.; Jones, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Mason, R. H.; Schiller, C. L.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Wong, J. P. S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-11-01

    As one aspect of the NETwork on Climate and Aerosols: addressing key uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments (NETCARE), measurements of the cloud condensation nucleation properties of 50 and 100 nm aerosol particles were conducted at Ucluelet on the west coast of Vancouver Island in August 2013. The overall hygroscopicity parameter of the aerosol (?ambient) exhibited a wide variation, ranging from 0.14 ± 0.05 to 1.08 ± 0.40 (where the uncertainty represents the systematic error). The highest ? values arose when the organic-to-sulfate ratio of the aerosol was lowest and when winds arrived from the west after transport through the marine boundary layer. The average ?ambient during this time was 0.57 ± 0.16, where the uncertainty represents the standard deviation. At most other times, the air was predominantly influenced by both marine and continental emissions, which had lower average PM1 ?ambient values (max value, 0.41 ± 0.08). The two-day average aerosol ionic composition also showed variation, but was consistently acidic and dominated by ammonium (18-56% by mole) and sulfate (19-41% by mole), with only minor levels of sodium or chloride. Average ?org (hygroscopicity parameter for the aerosol's organic component) values were estimated using PM1 aerosol composition data and by assuming that the ratio of aerosol organic to sulfate mass is related directly to the composition of the size-selected particles.

  6. New sensitive and quantitative analysis method for organic nitrogen compounds in urban aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Özel, Mustafa Z; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Lewis, Alastair C

    2011-02-15

    Atmospheric aerosols contain a highly complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds; however, as a chemical class relatively little is known about organic nitrogen (ON) content, with few satisfactory methods for speciated analysis. In this paper we report a sensitive and quantitative method for the speciation of ON within ambient atmospheric aerosol. Aerosol samples, collected on quartz microfiber filters, were extracted in water followed by solid phase extraction, elution, and concentration before analysis by comprehensive gas chromatography with a nitrogen chemiluminescence detection system (GCxGC-NCD). The NCD detection method was optimized using liquid standards. The GCxGC-NCD method showed high selectivity, sensitivity, and equimolarity in its response to individual organic compounds. Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantitation (LOQ) for four ON standards (1-nitropentane, o-toluidine, nonanenitrile, and quinoline) were determined to be in the range 0.16-0.27 pgN and 0.71-1.19 pgN, respectively. Between 21 and 57 different ON compounds were found in urban aerosol, (including 10 nitriles, 9 alkyl nitro compounds, 4 nitro-phenols, 4 amides, 3 nitrosamines, and 2 nitro-PAHs) on different dates from a city center location. Pyrrole (8.26-39.21 ngN m(-3) air) and N-butyl-benzenesulfonamide (6.23-20.87 ngN m(-3) air) were the most abundant ON compounds observed in all samples analyzed. The average mass loading of the total identified ON was 532.51 ngON m(-3) air. The sensitivity, selectivity, and relative ease of quantitation of unknown ON components makes the technique a significant improvement over previous laboratory methods. PMID:21210660

  7. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  8. The future is 'ambient'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugmayr, Artur

    2006-02-01

    The research field of ambient media starts to spread rapidly and first applications for consumer homes are on the way. Ambient media is the logical continuation of research around media. Media has been evolving from old media (e.g. print media), to integrated presentation in one form (multimedia - or new media), to generating a synthetic world (virtual reality), to the natural environment is the user-interface (ambient media), and will be evolving towards real/synthetic undistinguishable media (bio-media or bio-multimedia). After the IT bubble was bursting, multimedia was lacking a vision of potential future scenarios and applications. Within this research paper the potentials, applications, and market available solutions of mobile ambient multimedia are studied. The different features of ambient mobile multimedia are manifold and include wearable computers, adaptive software, context awareness, ubiquitous computers, middleware, and wireless networks. The paper especially focuses on algorithms and methods that can be utilized to realize modern mobile ambient systems.

  9. A semi-automated system for quantifying the oxidative potential of ambient particles in aqueous extracts using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay: results from the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Guo, H.; King, L. E.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    A variety of methods are used to measure the capability of particulate matter (PM) to catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo, also defined as the aerosol oxidative potential. A widely used measure of aerosol oxidative potential is the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay, which monitors the depletion of DTT (a surrogate for cellular antioxidants) as catalyzed by the redox-active species in PM. However, a major constraint in the routine use of the DTT assay for integrating it with the large-scale health studies is its labor-intensive and time-consuming protocol. To specifically address this concern, we have developed a semi-automated system for quantifying the oxidative potential of aerosol liquid extracts using the DTT assay. The system, capable of unattended analysis at one sample per hour, has a high analytical precision (Coefficient of Variation of 12% for standards, 4% for ambient samples), and reasonably low limit of detection (0.31 nmol min-1). Comparison of the automated approach with the manual method conducted on ambient samples yielded good agreement (slope = 1.08 ± 0.12, r2 = 0.92, N = 9). The system was utilized for the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) to generate an extensive data set on DTT activity of ambient particles collected from contrasting environments (urban, road-side, and rural) in the southeastern US. We find that water-soluble PM2.5 DTT activity on a per air volume basis was spatially uniform and often well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r = 0.49 to 0.88), suggesting regional sources contributing to the PM oxidative potential in southeast US. However, the greater heterogeneity in the intrinsic DTT activity (per PM mass basis) across seasons indicates variability in the DTT activity associated with aerosols from sources that vary with season. Although developed for the DTT assay, the instrument can also be used to determine oxidative potential with other acellular assays.

  10. Comparison of LIDAR and Cavity Ring-Down Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Study of Inferred Aerosol Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, W. L.; Massoli, P.; McCarty, B. J.; Machol, J. L.; Tucker, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    A LIDAR and a Cavity Ring-Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD) instrument simultaneously measured aerosol extinction at 355-nm wavelength from aboard the Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown during the Texas Air Quality Study II campaign. The CRD measured air sampled from the top of the common mast used by several in situ aerosol optical and chemical instruments. The LIDAR's scan sequence included near-horizontal stares (2° elevation angle) with pointing corrected for ship's roll. Aerosol extinction was retrieved using a variant of the slope method. The LIDAR therefore sampled air over a short vertical extent with midpoint higher above the surface than the CRD intake and at a horizontal distance of as much as a few kilometers. The CRD measured aerosol extinction at dry and at high (near-ambient) relative humidity (RH) levels, which were used to scale the measurements to ambient RH for the comparisons. Data from the two instruments for well-mixed conditions (supported by turbulence and atmospheric stability data) are compared to evaluate the degree of agreement between the two methods and reasons for differences. For instances of larger differences, the aerosol gradient below approximately 100 m altitude is inferred and examined in context of low-level meteorological parameters and LIDAR measurements at higher angles.

  11. Aerosol Optical and Chemical Properties Within and Without Clouds During an Airborne Field Campaign in Central Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, E.; Lee, Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Hubbe, J. M.; Ogren, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are one of the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles' lifetime in the atmosphere. Here we present preliminary results showing aerosol optical and chemical properties obtained during the CHAPS field campaign within cloud drops and outside of clouds. The Cumulis Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program (ASP), took place in the vicinity of Oklahoma City in June, 2007. The intention of the study was to investigate the influence of clouds on aerosols and of aerosol on clouds. Duplicate sets of in-situ aerosol optical instruments were deployed on the ASP G-1 aircraft during the CHAPS campaign. One set of instruments was downstream of an isokinetic inlet designed to sample the ambient aerosol, the other set was downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) designed to sample and dry cloud droplets so that the cloud drop nuclei could be studied. Each instrument set comprised a 3-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and integrating nephelometer to provide spectral aerosol absorption, scattering and back-scattering and a particle counter to obtain aerosol number concentration. In addition, a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) was able to sample on either inlet to provide information about the non-refractory chemical composition of the aerosol and cloud drop residuals. The data presented here will describe both how aerosol optical properties change upstream and downstream of a mid-size conurbation (Oklahoma City) and how ambient aerosol optical properties differ from those of the cloud drop nuclei. These changes in aerosol optical properties will be placed in the context of differences in chemical composition derived from the ToF-AMS.

  12. Lidar observations of aerosols near clouds during CHAPS/CLASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R.; Clayton, M.; Turner, D.; Newsom, R.; Sivaraman, C.; Hostetler, C.; Hair, J.; Obland, M.; Rogers, R.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Su, W.; Jonsson, H.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, B.; Berg, L.

    2008-12-01

    Data collected by two lidar systems during the CHAPS/CLASIC missions are used to examine the behavior of aerosols in "transition zones" of a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers away from clouds. The lidar measurements are unaffected by cloud adjacency effects, are less susceptible to cloud contamination than passive satellite measurements, and possess high vertical and temporal resolution to capture variations in aerosol optical properties near clouds. The ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Raman lidar provides a detailed view of the variability of aerosols and water vapor near clouds at or near the top of the Planetary Boundary Layer. Aerosol and water vapor properties in the vicinity of clouds at the top of the daytime boundary layer are examined using 10 second profiles of aerosol backscattering, water vapor mixing ratio, and relative humidity, and 1 minute profiles of aerosol extinction in conjunction with continuous Total Sky Imager images of cloud cover. Data from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) collected during CHAPS/CLASIC are also used to examine the variability of aerosol optical properties near clouds. The LaRC airborne HSRL measures aerosol backscatter and depolarization at 532 and 1064 nm and aerosol extinction at 532 nm. Preliminary results using these Raman lidar and HSRL data show that aerosol backscatter and extinction 1-2 km from clouds were approximately 25-40% smaller than immediately adjacent to clouds. The variations in aerosol optical thickness are smaller, typically around 10-15%, since the changes in aerosol backscatter and extinction were generally confined to the top of the boundary layer. Variations in the Raman lidar aerosol backscatter and extinction measurements were typically confined to the altitude range between 200-400 m below cloud base and 200 m above cloud base. Raman lidar observations show relative humidity decreased by 5-15% within this same region suggesting that variations in backscatter and extinction near clouds were caused in part by hygroscopic aerosol growth. The HSRL aerosol depolarization measurements also suggest that aerosol nonsphericity changed in response to variations in relative humidity. This presentation will discuss the use of these lidar measurements as well as airborne in situ measurements to study the behavior of aerosols near clouds.

  13. Climate forcing by stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko

    1992-01-01

    It is illustrated how climate forcing by stratospheric aerosols depends on aerosol properties. The climate forcing is a function of aerosols size distribution, but the size dependence can be described well by a single parameter: the area-weighted mean radius, r(eff). If r(eff) is greater than about 2 microns, the global average greenhouse effect of the aerosols exceeds the albedo effect, causing a surface heating. The aerosol climate forcing is less sensitive to other characteristics of the size distribution, the aerosol composition, and the altitude of the aerosols. Thus stratospheric aerosol forcing can be defined accurately from measurements of aerosol extinction over a broad wavelength range.

  14. Effects of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate and OH Radical Scavengers on Aerosol Formation from Reactions of ?-Pinene with O 3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth S. Docherty; Paul J. Ziemann

    2003-01-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from reactions of O 3 with g -pinene, an exocyclic monoterpene prominent in the ambient atmosphere, was studied in an environmental chamber using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer for chemical analysis and a scanning mobility particle sizer for aerosol yield measurements. Potential reaction pathways for SOA formation were investigated in a

  15. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Analysis of Tropospheric Aerosol Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen J. Hansen

    1995-01-01

    An integrated sampling and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) cell has been designed for whole-sample analysis of organic compounds on tropospheric aerosol particles. The low-volume extraction cell has been interfaced with a sampling manifold for aerosol particle collection in the field. After sample collection, the entire SFE cell was coupled to a gas chromatograph; after on-line extraction, the cryogenically -focused sample

  16. Sun photometer aerosol retrievals during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, Carlos; Torres, Benjamin; Althausen, Dietrich; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Gasteiger, Josef; Ansmann, Albert; Wiegner, Matthias; González, Ramiro; Cachorro, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE), aims at investigating the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean. A large set of ground-based and airborne aerosol and meteorological instrumentation was used for this purpose during a 5-week campaign that took place during June-July 2013. Several Sun photometers were deployed at Barbados Island during this campaign. Two Cimels included in AERONET and the Sun and Sky Automatic Radiometer (SSARA) were co-located with the ground-based lidars BERTHA and POLIS. A set of optical and microphysical aerosol properties derived from Sun and Sky spectral observations (principal plane and almucantar configurations) in the range 340-1640nm are analyzed, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), volume size distribution, complex refractive index, sphericity and single scattering albedo. The Sun photometers include polarization capabilities, therefore apart from the inversion of sky radiances as it is routinely done in AERONET, polarized radiances are also inverted. Several dust events are clearly identified in the measurement period, with moderated AOD (500nm) in the range 0.3 to 0.6. The clean marine background was also observed during short periods. The retrieved aerosol properties are compared with the lidar and in-situ observations carried out within SALTRACE, as well as with data collected during the SAMUM campaigns in Morocco and Cape Verde, in order to investigate possible changes in the dust plume during the transport.

  17. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min-Zong Huang; Cheng-Hui Yuan; Sy-Chyi Cheng; Yi-Tzu Cho; Jentaie Shiea

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing

  18. UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS frequencies and mode shapes based on ambient vibration measurements collected from a wireless mobile measuring for structural health monitoring purposes. KEYWORDS: Structural dynamics, Modal estimation, Bayesian inference

  19. INDOOR CONCENTRATION MODELING OF AEROSOL STRONG ACIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. he model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aer...

  20. Performance Characteristics of the Multicyclone Aerosol Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARVIN W. BLACHMAN; MORTON LIPPMANN

    1974-01-01

    The multicyclone aerosol sampler of Lippmann and Kydonieus has been redesigned for use in underground coal mines. It now includes an intrinsically safe battery-powered brushless dc motor coupled to a vane pump. Particles are collected by seven parallel samplers which surround a common inlet. Six samplers consist of a 10-mm nylon cyclone and a filter in series. Each cyclone operates

  1. Sulfate radical-initiated formation of isoprene-derived organosulfates in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Schindelka, J; Iinuma, Y; Hoffmann, D; Herrmann, H

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that isoprene-derived organosulfates are an important fraction of ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA), adding up to 20% to the organic mass. Organosulfates with m/z of 199 and 183 relating to C4 compounds are found in ambient and laboratory generated SOA and a sulfate radical induced oxidation of methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) has been shown to be a possible formation mechanism. In the present study, experiments on the sulfate radical-induced oxidation of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone were performed in bulk aqueous phase, as well as in an aerosol chamber, and finally compared with ambient PM10 samples collected at a rural East German village during the summer 2008, to investigate their relevance in aqueous phase SOA formation. Samples from aqueous phase experiments and extracts from filters were analysed with UPLC/(-)ESI-IMS-QTOFMS. All the samples showed the abundance of highly oxidised organosulfates with m/z 153, 155, 167, 183 and 199 corresponding to the species found in ambient particle samples. In the bulk phase studies with laser-induced sulfate radical formation, the signal intensities increased with increasing number of laser pulses, indicating the sulfate radical-induced formation of these organosulfates. Additionally, the chamber experiments showed a particle mass growth of about 10 microg m(-3) and 4 microg m(-3) for experiments on the reactive uptake of MACR and MVK with a sulfate radical precursor (K2S2O8) in the seed particles. Correlations of the C2 to C5 organosulfate species (including the m/z 215, C5H11O7S-), detected in the ambient samples were found to be very strong (r > 0.8), indicating that these compounds are formed from similar mechanisms and under equal environmental conditions. This study shows that sulfate radical-induced oxidation in the aqueous particle phase provides a reasonable explanation for the formation of these organosulfates from methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. PMID:24601005

  2. Annual cycle of Antarctic Baseline Aerosol: A Benchmark for Natural Aerosol Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, Markus; Hirdman, David; Lunder, Chris R.; Ogren, John A.; Solberg, Sverre; Thompson, Rona L.; Stohl, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    An ongoing challenge in attributing anthropogenic climate change is to distinguish anthropogenic and natural changes of atmospheric composition, e.g. concerning atmospheric aerosol and its climate effects. Aerosol properties measured at pristine locations, to the extend they still exist, can serve as a climate model benchmark for verifying the representation of natural aerosol processes in the model. To this end, a recent study (Fiebig et al., 2013) investigates the annual cycle of the baseline aerosol observed at the atmospheric observatory of the Norwegian Antarctic research station Troll (Queen Maud Land, 72.0166 S, 2.5333 E, 1309 m a.s.l.). The aerosol monitoring program at Troll observatory includes the aerosol scattering coefficient at 450, 550, and 700 nm wavelength, and the particle number size distribution (PNSD, 0.03 ?m < Dp < 0.8 ?m) (Hansen et al., 2009). The time series of both instruments, collected since Feb. 2007, show a distinct annual cycle of the aerosol properties associated with baseline air masses, i.e. those not corresponding to peaks of any origin. Comparison of the aerosol scattering coefficient measured by nephelometer and calculated from the DMPS measurements by Mie-theory assuming an (NH4)2SO4 composition show a correlation coefficient of ~ 0.8, confirming a common origin of both annual cycles. The same annual cycle in baseline aerosol scattering coefficient and particle number concentration / size distribution as found at Troll can be detected in corresponding data collected at South Pole and Dome C atmospheric observatories. This shows that the annual cycle of baseline aerosol properties at Troll isn't a local phenomenon, but common to Central Antarctic baseline air masses. Using backward plume calculation by the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART, as well as ground-level ozone data collected at Troll, it is demonstrated that the air masses associated with baseline aerosol loadings at Troll originate from the free troposphere an lower stratospheric region and descend over the Antarctic continent. The Antarctic summer PNSD is dominated by particles with diameters

  3. Bioaerosol collection and concentration for microseparations-based detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ellis, C. R. Bowe (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Rader, Daniel John; Wally, Karl (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    The ability to detect Weapons of Mass Destruction biological agents rapidly and sensitively is vital to homeland security, spurring development of compact detection systems at Sandia and elsewhere. One such system is Sandia's microseparations-based pChemLab. Many bio-agents are serious health threats even at extremely low concentrations. Therefore, a universal challenge for detection systems is the efficient collection and selective transport of highly diffuse bio-agents against the enormous background of benign particles and species ever present in the ambient environment. We have investigated development of a ''front end'' system for the collection, preconcentration, and selective transport of aerosolized biological agents from dilute (1-10 active particles per liter of air) atmospheric samples, to ultimate concentrations of {approx}20 active particles per microliter of liquid, for interface with microfluidic-based analyses and detection systems. Our approach employs a Sandia-developed aerosol particle-focusing microseparator array to focus size-selected particles into a mating microimpinger array of open microfluidic transport channels. Upon collection (i.e., impingement, submergence, and liquid suspension), microfluidic dielectrophoretic particle concentrators and sorters can be employed to further concentrate and selectively transport bio-agent particles to the sample preparation stages of microfluidic analyses and detection systems. This report documents results in experimental testing, modeling and analysis, component design, and materials fabrication critical to establishing proof-of-principle for this collection ''front end''. Outstanding results have been achieved for the aerodynamic microseparator, and for the post-collection dielectrophoretic concentrator and sorter. Results have been obtained for the microimpinger, too, but issues of particle-trapping by surface tension in liquid surfaces have proven difficult. Subsequent particle submergence into liquid suspension for microfluidic transport has been demonstrated only inefficiently despite significant and varied effort. Importantly, the separate technologies whose development is described, (inertial microseparator, dielectrophoretic corduroy concentrator/sorter) should each, independently, prove greatly useful in a variety of additional applications.

  4. MISR UAE2 Aerosol Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-21

    ... UAE 2  Aerosol Versioning MISR-retrieved aerosol optical depths are "Stage-2 Validated," whereas the MISR ... . Kahn , R., B. Gaitley, J. Martonchik, D. Diner, K. Crean, and B. Holben, 2005a, MISR global aerosol optical depth validation ...

  5. Observational Study and Parameterization of Aerosol-fog Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Guo, X.; Liu, Y.; Fang, C.; Su, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that human activities such as increased aerosols affect fog occurrence and properties significantly, and accurate numerical fog forecasting depends on, to a large extent, parameterization of fog microphysics and aerosol-fog interactions. Furthermore, fogs can be considered as clouds near the ground, and enjoy an advantage of permitting comprehensive long-term in-situ measurements that clouds do not. Knowledge learned from studying aerosol-fog interactions will provide useful insights into aerosol-cloud interactions. To serve the twofold objectives of understanding and improving parameterizations of aerosol-fog interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions, this study examines the data collected from fogs, with a focus but not limited to the data collected in Beijing, China. Data examined include aerosol particle size distributions measured by a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X), fog droplet size distributions measured by a Fog Monitor (FM-120), Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), liquid water path measured by radiometers and visibility sensors, along with meteorological variables measured by a Tethered Balloon Sounding System (XLS-?) and Automatic Weather Station (AWS). The results will be compared with low-level clouds for similarities and differences between fogs and clouds.

  6. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics, including their significance, from eight flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number that influence droplet concentration. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were smaller in regions of enhanced particles near shore. However, physically thinner clouds, and not just higher droplet number concentrations from pollution, both contributed to the smaller droplets. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually slightly lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths there. Thus, larger scale forcings that impact cloud macrophysical properties, as well as enhanced aerosol particles, are important in determining cloud droplet size and cloud albedo. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, some of which may initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. Geometric mean diameters of droplet residual particles were larger than those of the below-cloud and above cloud distributions. However, a wide range of particle sizes can act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show that this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition of cloud-nucleating particles.

  7. Night-time ground hyperspectral imaging for urban-scale remote sensing of ambient PM--modal concentrations retrieval.

    PubMed

    Etzion, Yael; Kolatt, Tsafrir; Shoshany, Maxim; Broday, David M

    2014-02-01

    Retrieval of aerosol loading in vertical atmospheric columns is a common product of satellite and ground instruments that measure spectral extinction of solar radiation throughout the entire atmosphere. Here we study ground hyperspectral imaging of artificial light sources as a complementary method for retrieving fine aerosol concentrations along quazi-horizontal ambient open paths. Previously, we reported hyperspectral measurements of the aerosol optical thickness in the 500-900 nm range over urban-scale distances (180 m to 4 km), measuring the extinction of radiation emitted from a halogen source. Here we confirm in a laboratory-setup the basic premise that different accumulation-size aerosols generate distinct hyperspectral signatures in this spectral range. Measured hyperspectral attenuation signatures of fine aerosols were comparable to calculated Mie scattering signatures, suggesting that modal aerosol concentrations can be retrieved. A genetic algorithm was adapted to estimate the aerosol modal concentrations from its hyperspectral extinction signature. Retrievals of aerosol concentrations from measured and synthetic hyperspectral signatures indicated a robust algorithm, with an expected retrieval error of 0.2-22% for typical ambient concentrations along an urban-scale open path. The retrieval accuracy was found to depend on the relative aerosol modal concentrations, especially when there is a substantial overlap between the modal spectral signatures. PMID:24404989

  8. CUESTIONARIO DE AUDITORA AMBIENTAL INTERNA

    E-print Network

    Fraguela, Basilio B.

    CUESTIONARIO DE AUDITORÍA AMBIENTAL INTERNA PARA FACULTADES, ESCOLAS E CENTROS UNIVERSITARIOS #12;Páxina 2 de 14 CUESTIONARIO DE AUDITORÍA AMBIENTAL INTERNA PARA FACULTADES, ESCOLAS E CENTROS UNIVERSITARIOS A Auditoría Ambiental é un instrumento para coñecer a realidade

  9. Assessment of the Suomi NPP/VIIRS aerosol products using the collocated Aqua/MODIS aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.; Cureton, G. P.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Huang, J.; Remer, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Following the successful launch of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft, the VIIRS sensor collects daily global aerosol coverage to provide aerosol Intermediate Products (IPs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to the user community. We validate the IPs and EDRs of the VIIRS Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and Angström Exponent (AE) against the collocated well-characterized MODIS aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. Both sensors are on the early afternoon orbit, which provides us an excellent opportunity to cross validate these operational satellite aerosol observations. Qualitative and quantitative assessments are conducted to characterize the VIIRS aerosol products. In the direct comparison, global aerosol maps of the collocated VIIRS-MODIS aerosol products are presented based on various match-up criteria based on quality flags, viewing geometries, AOT and AE data ranges etc. VIIRS AOT appears to match MODIS well over ocean, but is biased high against MODIS over land, except in desert regions. VIIRS AOT appears to correlate best with MODIS for high AE, and less well for coarse particle sizes. These results are based on a very limited analysis period of one month, and could change seasonally. The similarities and differences of the collocated VIIRS and MODIS aerosol products are discussed in details. Statistics of VIIRS vs. MODIS AOT where ?? = ?VIIRS -?MODIS;

  10. Aerosol characteristics at a rural station in southern peninsular India during CAIPEEX-IGOC: physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Bisht, D S; Srivastava, A K; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, M K; Pandey, A K; Tiwari, S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-04-01

    To understand the boundary layer characteristics and pathways of aerosol-cloud interaction, an Integrated Ground Observational Campaign, concurrent with Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment, was conducted by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, under Ministry of Earth Sciences at Mahabubnagar (a rural environment, which is ~100 km away from an urban city Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh), during the period of July-November 2011. Collected samples of PM2.5 and PM10 were analyzed for water-soluble ionic species along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). During study period, the average mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were about 50(±10) and 69(±14)??g m(-3), respectively, which are significantly higher than the prescribed Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards values. The chemical species such as sum of anions and cations from measured chemical constituents were contributed to be 31.27 and 38.49% in PM2.5 and 6.35 and 5.65% to the PM10, whereas carbonaceous species contributed ~17.3 and 20.47% for OC and ~3.0 and 3.10% for EC, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 during study period was ~0.73(±0.2), indicating that the dominance of fine size particles. Carbonaceous analysis results showed that the average concentration of OC was 14 and 8.7 ?g m(-3), while EC was 2.1 and 1.5 ?g m(-3) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. The ratios between OC and EC were estimated, which were 6.6 and 5.7 for PM10 and PM2.5, suggesting the presence of secondary organic aerosol. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounts 23% of PM10 in which the contribution of OC is 20% and EC is 3%, while 20% of PM2.5 mass in which the contribution of OC is 17% and EC is 3%. Out of the total aerosols mass, water-soluble constituents contributed an average of 45% in PM10 and 38% in PM2.5 including about 39% anions and 6% cations in PM10, while 31% anions and 7% cations in PM2.5 aerosol mass collectively at study site. PMID:25416502

  11. Chemical composition of emissions from urban sources of fine organic aerosol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn M. Hildemann; Gregory R. Markowski; Glen R. Cass

    1991-01-01

    A dilution source sampling system was used to collect primary fine aerosol emissions from important sources of urban organic aerosol, including a boiler burning No. 2 fuel oil, a home fireplace, a fleet of catalyst-equipped and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternative dilution sampling techniques were used to collect emissions from cigarette

  12. ANALYSIS OF HOUSTON AEROSOL SAMPLES BY GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY) METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis procedure developed to give a qualitative and quantitative analysis for organic compounds adsorbed on aerosols collected by Hi-Vol filters was adapted and applied to a similar analysis of aerosols collected by dichotomous filters. Analysis was conducted for five dicho...

  13. A simple method for estimation of coagulation efficiency in mixed aerosols. [environmental pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Boyd, A.; Wolochow, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aerosols of KBr and AgNO3 were mixed, exposed to light in a glass tube and collected in the dark. About 15% of the collected material was reduced to silver upon development. Thus, two aerosols of particles that react to form a photo-reducible compound can be used to measure coagulation efficiency.

  14. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  15. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2010-10-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03)+0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01)+0.04i(±0.01) compared to m=1.49(±0.01)+0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  16. High bromine aerosol concentrations near Lake Huron from long-range transport from the Arctic during polar sunrise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Biegalski; S. Landsberger; R. Hoff

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol samples were collected at the Burnt Island sampling station in the northern part of Lake Huron, Canada. These samples were analyzed for trace elements via neutron activation analysis and aerosol concentrations were determined for the time period from 1992 through 1994. The seasonal trends of these aerosols were investigated and the results for bromine indicated seasonal highs in the

  17. Water-soluble organic components in aerosols associated with savanna fires in southern Africa: Identification, evolution, and distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Song Gao; Dean A. Hegg; Peter V. Hobbs; Thomas W. Kirchstetter; Brian I. Magi; Martin Sadilek

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion

  18. An Aerosol Wind Tunnel for Evaluation of Massive-Flow Air Samplers and Calibration of Snow White Sampler

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. S. Cheng; H. Irshad; A. R. McFarland; W. C. Su; Y. Zhou; D. Barringer

    2004-01-01

    Massive-flow air samplers are being deployed around the world to collect aerosol samples for analysis of radioactivity as a result of nuclear tests and nuclear accidents. An aerosol wind tunnel capable of an 1100 m min flow rate was built at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) to test the sampling efficiency of these samplers. This aerosol wind tunnel uses a

  19. THE MEASUREMENT OF CARCINOGENIC VAPORS IN AMBIENT ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical techniques and instrumentation, which had been developed during the previous contract years, were further evaluated for the collection and analysis of carcinogenic and mutagenic vapors occurring in ambient air. The areas of investigation included (a) the development of...

  20. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed mean AAE by ~±0.1 for all aerosol types using SSA; AAE had negligible deviations for coarse mode aerosol categories within the uncertainty estimates of AOD but AAE varied by ~±0.05 from the unperturbed mean AAE for fine mode aerosol categories; and the increase/decrease in spectral AOD or SSA decreased/increased mean AAE for fine mode aerosols. In addition, AOD and SSA input parameters were varied to assess the impact on wavelength pairs (e.g., 440 and 870 nm) and the effects of non-linearity. The AAE and aerosol size [AE (440-870 nm) and FMF of AOD (500 nm)] relationships showed partitioning among dust and mixed aerosol types with significant overlap between urban/industrial and biomass burning categories. The SSA (440 nm) to the FMF of AOD (550 nm) relationship showed good consistency and partitioning with respect to the expected aerosol types/mixtures. Furthermore, aerosol identification techniques will be compared to results from recent field campaigns (e.g., DISCOVER-AQ).

  1. Flame-driven aerosol synthesis of copper-nickel nanopowders and conductive nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish K; Qi, Di; Buchner, Raymond D; Scharmach, William J; Papavassiliou, Vasilis; Swihart, Mark T

    2014-08-27

    We report the continuous one-step synthesis of bimetallic copper-nickel nanostructured coatings by deposition and sintering of metal nanoparticles produced as an aerosol using a flame driven high temperature reducing jet (HTRJ) process. The HTRJ process allows gas-phase (aerosol) formation of metal nanoparticles from low-cost metal salt precursors. These can be collected as discrete powders for subsequent use in formulating conductive inks or for other applications. However, direct deposition of nanoparticles to form coatings allows measurements of electrical conductivity of films of deposited nanoparticles as a function of composition and sintering temperature, without actually formulating and printing inks. This is the approach taken here for the purpose of screening nanoparticle compositions quickly. We characterized the microstructure and composition of both nanopowders and films and found that their composition consistently matched the ratio of metals in the precursor solution. The electrical conductivity was highest (?10(4) S/m) for films with 60:40 and 40:60 copper-to-nickel mass ratios. These films maintained their conductivity during extended storage (1 month) under ambient conditions. The oxidation resistance and high conductivity observed here suggest that 60:40 and 40:60 Cu:Ni nanoparticles have promise as lower cost replacements for silver nanoparticles in conductive ink formulations. PMID:25075968

  2. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M.; Michalsky, J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Barnard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state-of-the-art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths and potentially larger in the UV and near-infrared.

  3. Simulation Procedure for Optical Wave Propagation through Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nairat, Mazen; Voelz, David

    2012-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric aerosols on optical propagation have been studied primarily for a homogeneous medium and in a time-averaged sense. We describe an approach for including the effects of aerosol scatter in the wave optics simulation format. The aerosol medium is modeled using a series of phase screens placed along the propagation path in such a way that their distribution depends on the aerosol's density. The aerosol scattering point spread function is translated into a collection of phase screen realizations. The results obtained emphasize that the simulation procedure is applicable in non homogenous medium with varying scatter phase functions. Indeed, the procedure can be combined with other wave optics simulation procedures such as the propagation through turbulence.

  4. Aerosol can puncture device test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-10-01

    This test report documents the evaluation of an aerosol can puncture device to replace a system currently identified for use in the WRAP-1 facility. The new system is based upon a commercially available puncture device, as recommended by WHC Fire Protection. With modifications found necessary through the testing program, the Aerosol Can Puncture Device was found able to puncture and drain aerosol cans without incident. Modifications include the addition of a secondary collection bottle and the modification of the can puncture needle. In the course of testing, a variety of absorbents were tested to determine their performance in immobilizing drained fluids. The visibility of the puncture with Non-Destructive Examination techniques were also reviewed.

  5. Studies of aerosols advected to coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Strzalkowska, A.; Ponczkowska, A.; Drozdowska, V.; Gutowska, D.; Kowalczyk, J.; Darecki, M.; Piskozub, J.

    2012-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensingmaking them highly relevant for the ocean color atmospheric correction. This paper presents the results of the studies of aerosol optical properties measured using lidars and sun photometers. We describe two case studies of the combined measurements made in two coastal zones, in Crete in 2006and in Rozewie on the Baltic Sea in 2009. The combination of lidar and sun photometer measurements provides comprehensive information on both the total aerosol optical thickness in the entire atmosphere as well as the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties. Combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides complete picture of the aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. We show that such combined studies are especially important in the coastal areas. Additionally, aerosol particle direct and indirect radiative effects have been identified as key uncertainties for the prediction of the future global climate. This research has been made within the framework of the NASA/AERONET Program and Polish National Grants 1276/B/P01/2010/38, PBW 1283/B/P01/2010/38, POLAR-AOD, NN 306315536 and Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBa?tyk funded by the European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract no. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09.

  6. Tropical Atlantic Aerosols

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rex Roettger

    Students will use real satellite data to determine 1) where the greatest concentrations of aerosols are located during the course of a year in the tropical Atlantic region and 2) their source of origin. This is an inquiry-style lesson where students pull real aerosol data and attempt to identify trends among data sets.

  7. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  8. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  9. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... across the deserts of Mali, Niger and Chad, while in southern Africa, this is the least hazy time of year. During June through ... and November thick aerosol cover is limited to portions of southern Africa and the Congo, but moderately high aerosol optical thickness ...

  10. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  11. Spaceborne Observations of Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanre; J. A. Coakley; R. S. Fraser

    2005-01-01

    As early as 1963, photographs of the twilight horizon from the Vostok-6 spaceship were used by G. V. Rozenberg and V. V. Nikolaeva-Tereshkova to derive profiles of stratospheric aerosols. The launch of the ATS III satellite in 1967 sparked interest in using satellites to observe aerosol emission, transport, and their effects on climate, precipitation and health. The first use of

  12. Oxidative Evolution of Organic Aerosol during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. J.; Martinez, R.; Hagan, D.; Zhang, Y.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hering, S. V.; Isaacman, G. A.; Yee, L.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies on the formation mechanisms and atmospheric evolution of ambient organic aerosol (OA) have largely focused on individual biogenic or anthropogenic precursor sources. More recently, it has been shown that chemical reaction mechanisms and resulting oxidative evolution of OA behaves differently when there is a mixture of both biogenic and anthropogenic precursor gases. Addressing the need for improved understanding of this mixed source chemistry and a general improvement of OA chemical analysis, we deployed the Volatility and Polarity Separator (VAPS), capable of hourly (to half-hourly) measurements of volatility and polarity resolved OA, to the Centerville, AL ground site during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study, a region impacted by both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The VAPS instrument increases the mass throughput of ambient OA in comparison to traditional GC due to shorter transfer paths and passivated coatings, and utilizes high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry to obtain aerosol elemental composition. VAPS data is explored to provide new insight into the underlying chemistry and chemical evolution of anthropogenically influenced biogenic se