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Sample records for ambulatory care clinics

  1. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    This conference serves to further the state of the art in the application of computers to medical care via a forum for the intercommunication of ideas. Papers discuss the experiences of diverse research projects. It is the purpose of this article to review the major developments in ambulatory care decision support. From this vantage point, the major impediments to broad applicability of information systems are discussed. The DUCHESS Medical Information Management System is then described as a step towards overcoming these obstacles. Two distinct but often overlapping issues are the representation of the data and its subsequent manipulation: records vs. knowledge. The complexity of the medical record requires state-of-the-art computer science. Clinical decision support requires flexible means for representing medical knowledge and the ability to input “rules.” Artificial intelligence has provided tools for simulating the decision making processes. A sample of the major systems are contrasted and compared. In the realm of medical records COSTAR, TMR, SCAMP, HELP, and STOR are considered. In clinical decision support CADEUCUS, REGENSTRIEF, PKC, and DUCHESS are reviewed.

  2. Managing service capacity in an ambulatory care clinic.

    PubMed

    Antle, D W; Reid, R A

    1988-01-01

    Capacity management seeks to improve organizational effectiveness by increasing operational efficiency and reducing patient congestion. A framework for capacity management, including demand-smoothing and supply-matching strategies, provides structure for a manager's approach to effective ambulatory care. A patient flow study of 108 patients at an outpatient medical oncology clinic identified several inefficient patient services. Rather than increase the clinical resource base, a balanced set of relevant, low-cost strategies was proposed to improve performance. PMID:10302492

  3. Development and Qualitative Evaluation of Rural Ambulatory Care Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raisch, Dennis W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A University of New Mexico pharmacy clerkship in Indian Health Service rural ambulatory clinics is described and its results compared with an urban hospital clerkship. Unique benefits to participants included improved skills in patient counseling and chart screening, more hands-on experience, extensive individual physician consultations, and…

  4. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  5. Preparing for the primary care clinic: an ambulatory boot camp for internal medicine interns

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Lindsay M.; Bird, Amber-Nicole; Oyler, Julie L.; Lee, Wei Wei; Shah, Sachin D.; Pincavage, Amber T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal medicine (IM) interns start continuity clinic with variable ambulatory training. Multiple other specialties have utilized a boot camp style curriculum to improve surgical and procedural skills, but boot camps have not been used to improve interns’ ambulatory knowledge and confidence. The authors implemented and assessed the impact of an intern ambulatory boot camp pilot on primary care knowledge, confidence, and curricular satisfaction. Methods During July 2014, IM interns attended ambulatory boot camp. It included clinically focused case-based didactic sessions on common ambulatory topics as well as orientation to the clinic and electronic medical records. Interns anonymously completed a 15-question pre-test on topics covered in the boot camp as well as an identical post-test after the boot camp. The interns were surveyed regarding their confidence and satisfaction. Results Thirty-eight interns participated in the boot camp. Prior to the boot camp, few interns reported confidence managing common outpatient conditions. The average pre-test knowledge score was 46.3%. The average post-test knowledge score significantly improved to 76.1% (p<0.001). All interns reported that the boot camp was good preparation for clinics and 97% felt that the boot camp boosted their confidence. Conclusions The ambulatory boot camp pilot improved primary care knowledge, and interns thought it was good preparation for clinic. The ambulatory boot camp was well received and may be an effective way to improve the preparation of interns for primary care clinic. Further assessment of clinical performance and expansion to other programs and specialties should be considered. PMID:26609962

  6. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  7. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  8. Optimizing Management and Financial Performance of the Teaching Ambulatory Care Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, James E; Roberts, Mark S; Gazelle, Scott

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine how to optimize teaching ambulatory care clinics performance with regard to access to care, access to teaching, and financial viability. DESIGN Optimization analysis using computer simulation. METHODS A discrete-event simulation model of the teaching ambulatory clinic setting was developed. This method captures flow time, waiting time, competition for resources, and the interdependency of events, providing insight into system dynamics. Sensitivity analyses were performed on staffing levels, room availability, patient characteristics such as “new” versus “established” status, and clinical complexity and pertinent probabilities. MAIN RESULTS In the base-case, 4 trainees:preceptor, patient flow time (registration to check out) was 148 minutes (SD 5), wait time was 20.6 minutes (SD 4.4), the wait for precepting was 6.2 minutes (SD 1.2), and average daily net clinic income was $1,413. Utilization rates were preceptors (59%), trainees (61%), medical assistants (64%), and room (68%). Flow time and the wait times remained relatively constant for strategies with trainee:preceptor ratios <4:1 but increased with number of trainees steadily thereafter. Maximum revenue occurred with 3 preceptors and 5 trainees per preceptor. The model was relatively insensitive to the proportion of patients presenting who were new, and relatively sensitive to average evaluation and management (E/M) level. Flow and wait times rose on average by 0.05 minutes and 0.01 minutes per percent new patient, respectively. For each increase in average E/M level, flow time increased 8.4 minutes, wait time 1.2 minutes, wait for precepting 0.8 minutes, and net income increased by $490. CONCLUSION Teaching ambulatory care clinics appear to operate optimally, minimizing flow time and waiting time while maximizing revenue, with trainee-to-preceptor ratios between 3 and 7 to 1. PMID:12709093

  9. The Role of Rural Health Clinics in Hospitalization Due to Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: A Study in Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mueller, Keith J.; Chen, Li-Wu; Conway, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitalization due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) is often used as an indicator for measuring access to primary care. Rural health clinics (RHCs) provide basic primary care services for rural residents in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). The relationship between RHCs and ACSCs is unclear. Purpose: The purpose…

  10. Centers Speak Up: The Clinical Context for Health Information Technology in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming; Webster, Tashonna R.; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Fifield, Judith; Burstin, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinicians in ambulatory care settings are increasingly called upon to use health information technology (health IT) to improve practice efficiency and performance. Successful adoption of health IT requires an understanding of how clinical tasks and workflows will be affected; yet this has not been well described. Objective To describe how health IT functions within a clinical context. Design Qualitative study, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Participants Executives and staff at 4 community health centers, 3 health center networks, and 1 large primary care organization. Approach Transcribed audio-recorded interviews, analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Systematic characterization of clinical context identified 6 primary clinical domains. These included results management, intra-clinic communication, patient education and outreach, inter-clinic coordination, medication management, and provider education and feedback. We generated clinical process diagrams to characterize these domains. Participants suggested that underlying workflows for these domains must be fully operational to ensure successful deployment of health IT. Conclusions Understanding the clinical context is a necessary precursor to successful deployment of health IT. Process diagrams can serve as the basis for EHR certification, to identify challenges, to measure health IT adoption, or to develop curricular content regarding the role of health IT in clinical practice. PMID:18373132

  11. Trends and initiatives in hospital ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A

    1982-05-01

    Changes in the financing and delivery of hospital ambulatory care are discussed. Ambulatory care encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical services provided to patients who are not confined overnight to an institutional bed as inpatients. There are a large and growing number of ways hospitals and physicians cooperate to provide ambulatory-care services. Technological advancements, which have spurred changes in other sectors of medicine, have also changed patterns of medical practice in ambulatory care. Some of the reasons why hospitals develop and expand ambulatory-care programs relate to the changing demand for health services, the shifting preferences of third-party payers and regulators, competitive influences, diversification of risk, and use of such programs as feeders for inpatient services and as teaching and research settings. Although outpatient revenues are a small portion of total hospital revenues, they are growing more rapidly than inpatient revenues. Changes in the health industry that offer opportunities to hospitals are described, such as the increasing physician supply and the formation of group practices, the climate of cost consciousness and price competition, and the trend toward new corporate structures for hospitals. These changes portend changes for hospital pharmacists and give them the opportunity to increase their clinical roles in providing ambulatory care. PMID:7081250

  12. Did Weir Mitchell anticipate important concepts in ambulatory care and clinical epidemiology?

    PubMed

    Biderman, Aya; Herman, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    During the decade from 1977 to 1986, four models of care pertaining to ambulatory medicine and certain aspects of clinical epidemiology were proposed. All were concerned with the frequently heard accusation that medicine was becoming dehumanized by being overly dependent on powerful new technologies. Some of the authors went so far as to suggest that the view, according to which medical science must restrict itself to "hard" data of the kind provided by the serum multichannel analyzer, should be considered outdated and, in fact, unscientific. Their plea was to develop a science of the clinical encounter that would shift the emphasis from explication to prediction and management, the latter term being virtually synonymous with decision making. For this change to come about, they wrote, it would be necessary to collect "soft" data on such subjects as family relationships, psychic traits and states, perceptions of life quality, patient expectations and many others. We believe that some of these subjects as well as the models themselves were anticipated in the writings, both medical and fictional, of Weir Mitchell, nearly a century earlier. This paper, after presenting a brief overview of the career of a colorful and commanding figure from the annals of American medicine, will seek to illustrate his extraordinary farsightedness as a practitioner of primary care and his relevance for some aspects of clinical epidemiology. Because the attempts to link his ideas to modern concepts are ours, we accept the possibility that, here and there, we may have read things into his writings that he did not intend. PMID:11927212

  13. Internet patient care applications in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D G; Stenzel, C

    2001-10-01

    Over the next decade, the Internet and related technologies will revolutionize the administrative and clinical practices of ambulatory care, enhancing the ability of physicians to provide quality care, enabling "virtual care teams" to help patients deal effectively with acute episodes and chronic conditions, and reducing the cost of care. Like any major paradigm shift, this change will not happen overnight. Nor will it be without cost. The explosion of venture capital and meteoric rise of the Nasdaq in 1999 reflected the promise of the Internet to revolutionize many aspects of American business. The Nasdaq's equally rapid descent in 2000 reflected a growing realization that this change will not be free--that "creative destruction," to use Schumpeter's term, will inevitably require significant investment and produce substantial losses. This article takes a longer term view than the ups and downs in the stock market. We believe the forces unleashed by the Internet are inexorable and that 10 years from now we will look back at the millennium's first decade as a period when the practice of ambulatory medicine was transformed by communication technology. PMID:11680237

  14. Big Data and Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an overview of the legal framework governing health information, dispels misconceptions about privacy regulations, and highlights how ambulatory care providers in particular can maximize the utility of big data to improve care. PMID:25401945

  15. Clinical hypertension in Native Americans: a comparison of 1987 and 1992 rates from ambulatory care data.

    PubMed Central

    Acton, K J; Preston, S; Rith-Najarian, S

    1996-01-01

    THE AUTHORS EXAMINED THE PREVALENCE of clinically diagnosed hypertension among all American Indian and Alaska Native outpatients served in Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities in fiscal year 1992, and compared these rates with a similar analysis done in 1987. In this report they provided data on that analysis as well as on the association between hypertension and diabetes. The 1992 overall estimated age-adjusted prevalence of clinically diagnosed hypertension in adults older than age 15 was 10.4%, compared with 10.9% in 1987, a small but significant decrease. Considerable variation exists in hypertension prevalence rates in American Indian communities as analyzed by IHS service area. This report represents an attempt to use ambulatory patient care data to demonstrate a means for ongoing surveillance of a chronic disease for the entire service population of the IHS. This comprehensive data set represents approximately 60% of the entire U.S. American Indian and Alaska Native population. Based on the ongoing nature of this ambulatory patient care data system, this model for hypertension surveillance permits a unique opportunity for longitudinal evaluation of quality improvement efforts for the American Indian and Alaska Native populations served by the IHS. PMID:8898769

  16. Finding falls in ambulatory care clinical documents using statistical text mining

    PubMed Central

    McCart, James A; Berndt, Donald J; Jarman, Jay; Finch, Dezon K; Luther, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how well statistical text mining (STM) models can identify falls within clinical text associated with an ambulatory encounter. Materials and Methods 2241 patients were selected with a fall-related ICD-9-CM E-code or matched injury diagnosis code while being treated as an outpatient at one of four sites within the Veterans Health Administration. All clinical documents within a 48-h window of the recorded E-code or injury diagnosis code for each patient were obtained (n=26 010; 611 distinct document titles) and annotated for falls. Logistic regression, support vector machine, and cost-sensitive support vector machine (SVM-cost) models were trained on a stratified sample of 70% of documents from one location (dataset Atrain) and then applied to the remaining unseen documents (datasets Atest–D). Results All three STM models obtained area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) scores above 0.950 on the four test datasets (Atest–D). The SVM-cost model obtained the highest AUC scores, ranging from 0.953 to 0.978. The SVM-cost model also achieved F-measure values ranging from 0.745 to 0.853, sensitivity from 0.890 to 0.931, and specificity from 0.877 to 0.944. Discussion The STM models performed well across a large heterogeneous collection of document titles. In addition, the models also generalized across other sites, including a traditionally bilingual site that had distinctly different grammatical patterns. Conclusions The results of this study suggest STM-based models have the potential to improve surveillance of falls. Furthermore, the encouraging evidence shown here that STM is a robust technique for mining clinical documents bodes well for other surveillance-related topics. PMID:23242765

  17. Improving Clinical Workflow in Ambulatory Care: Implemented Recommendations in an Innovation Prototype for the Veteran’s Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily S.; Lowry, Svetlana Z.; Ramaiah, Mala; Gibbons, Michael C.; Brick, David; Calco, Robert; Matton, Greg; Miller, Anne; Makar, Ellen; Ferrer, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    NIST recommendations to improve workflow in ambulatory care using an EHR provide a first step in moving from a billing-centered perspective on how to maintain accurate, comprehensive, and up-to-date information about a group of patients to a clinician-centered perspective. These recommendations point the way towards a “patient visit management system,” which incorporates broader notions of supporting workload management, supporting flexible flow of patients and tasks, enabling accountable distributed work across members of the clinical team, and supporting dynamic tracking of steps in tasks that have longer time distributions. PMID:26290887

  18. Helping You Choose Quality Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping you choose: Quality ambulatory care When you need ambulatory care, you should find out some information to help you choose the best ... the center follows rules for patient safety and quality. Go to Quality Check ® at www. qualitycheck. org ...

  19. Making nursing-sensitive quality indicators real in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Swan, Beth Ann

    2008-01-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives are changing the quality landscape. Gaps exist in quantifying and linking ambulatory care quality indicators to care provided by nurses in ambulatory care. Ambulatory care quality indicators that are sensitive to nursing care, standardized, and tested need to be identified and adopted by ambulatory care nurses, ambulatory care provider organizations, professional organizations, and endorsed by a consensus organization. PMID:18616060

  20. Virtual ambulatory care. Computer simulation applications.

    PubMed

    Zilm, Frank; Culp, Kristyna; Dorney, Beverley

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulation modeling has evolved during the past twenty years into an effective tool for analyzing and planning ambulatory care facilities. This article explains the use of this tool in three case-study, ambulatory care settings--a GI lab, holding beds for a cardiac catheterization laboratory, and in emergency services. These examples also illustrate the use of three software packages currently available: MedModel, Simul8, and WITNESS. PMID:12545512

  1. Teaching interdisciplinary geriatrics ambulatory care: a case study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Remington, Tami L; Foulk, Mariko A; Whall, Ann L

    2006-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care training is advocated by numerous government and philanthropic organizations. Educators in the health professions are increasingly offering training in interdisciplinary health care in a variety of contexts, including ambulatory settings. This paper describes a three-year program to teach skills in interdisciplinary care to learners from internal medicine, social work, pharmacy, and nursing in a geriatrics clinic at a major academic institution in the United States. Framed in a critical review of existing evidence for the effectiveness of interdisciplinary training and health care and expert recommendations, specific recommendations are made to educators interested in interdisciplinary training in ambulatory settings. PMID:16446270

  2. Influenza-Like-Illness and Clinically Diagnosed Flu: Disease Burden, Costs and Quality of Life for Patients Seeking Ambulatory Care or No Professional Care at All

    PubMed Central

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011–2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5–6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86–91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51–€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  3. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    PubMed

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  4. Designing appointment scheduling systems for ambulatory care services.

    PubMed

    Cayirli, Tugba; Veral, Emre; Rosen, Harry

    2006-02-01

    The current climate in the health care industry demands efficiency and patient satisfaction in medical care delivery. These two demands intersect in scheduling of ambulatory care visits. This paper uses patient and doctor-related measures to assess ambulatory care performance and investigates the interactions among appointment system elements and patient panel characteristics. Analysis methodology involves simulation modeling of clinic sessions where empirical data forms the basis of model design and assumptions. Results indicate that patient sequencing has a greater effect on ambulatory care performance than the choice of an appointment rule, and that panel characteristics such as walk-ins, no-shows, punctuality and overall session volume, influence the effectiveness of appointment systems. PMID:16613016

  5. Clinical Considerations for Insulin Pharmacotherapy in Ambulatory Care, Part Two: Review of Primary Literature and an Evidence-Based Approach for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Bourg, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF This article reinforces the dosing guidance from the package inserts of available insulin products and supplemental information provided by the manufacturers of insulin products. It reviews and evaluates pertinent primary literature detailing algorithms for the initiation and titration of insulin therapy that have helped to shape current clinical practice guidelines. The article discusses the clinical applicability of the evidence on insulin pharmacotherapy and offers recommendations for initiation and titration of various insulin products for insulin-requiring people with type 2 diabetes in the ambulatory care setting. PMID:25653469

  6. Educational Strategies in Ambulatory Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Lee R.

    1978-01-01

    In 1974 an ambulatory practice was developed for the house staff in the Department of Medicine at Baltimore City Hospital and integrated into the traditional residency program, which is based upon block rotations in inpatient services, emergency service, and subspeciality electives. The goals and strategies of this program are described. (LB H)

  7. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting. PMID:26938183

  8. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  9. Faculty Development for Ambulatory Care Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.; Carline, Jan D.; Ambrozy, Donna M.; Irby, David M.

    1997-01-01

    A study documented the practices of 14 peer-nominated medical educators who conduct faculty development programs in ambulatory care settings. Results indicate the programs were delivered almost exclusively in workshop format, with great similarities in topics and strategies. Evaluation was generally limited to satisfaction ratings. Makes…

  10. Memo to: Ambulatory Health Care Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    Planning for changing types of health professions and a changing clientele necessitates designing flexible facilities. Findings from a recently completed analysis of ambulatory care facilities are directed to planners in the form of 16 memos. Approaches to planning and design considerations are made that attempt to humanize these facilities.…

  11. [Redesigning Swiss ambulatory health care system].

    PubMed

    Bays, J-M; Ninane, F; Morin, D; Héritier, F; Cassis, I; Cornuz, J

    2012-11-28

    Primary care medicine is first in line to meet the necessary changes in our health care system. Innovations in this field pursue three types of objectives: accessibility, quality and continuity of care. The Department of ambulatory care and community medicine of the University of Lausanne (Policlinique médicale universitaire) is committed to this path, emphasizing interprofessional collaboration. The doctor, nurse and medical assistant coordinate their activities to contribute efficiently to meet the needs of patients today and tomorrow. This paper also addresses how our department, as a public and academic institution, might play a major role as a health care network actor. A master degree dissertation in health management has started to identify the critical success factors and the strategic core competencies needed to achieve this development. PMID:23240239

  12. Clinical Considerations for Insulin Pharmacotherapy in Ambulatory Care, Part One: Introduction and Review of Current Products and Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Galdo, John A.; Thurston, Maria Miller; Bourg, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief This article describes available insulin products and published guidelines to aid clinicians in making treatment decisions for insulin-dependent patients with type 2 diabetes. It establishes the need for a thorough evaluation of the literature regarding ambulatory insulin dosing to further inform providers who manage insulin therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26130864

  13. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    PubMed

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing. PMID:17665821

  14. Management competencies required in ambulatory care settings.

    PubMed

    Brooke, P P; Hudak, R P; Finstuen, K; Trounson, J

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the most important competencies physician executives in medical groups and other ambulatory settings will need to have in the next five years. The specific job skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKA) that physician executives will need to acquire these competencies were also explored. The Delphi techniques were used to analyze responses from two surveys from members of the American College of Medical Practice Executives. The most important competencies were grouped into 13 management domains, each with specific SKAs. "Managing health care resources to create quality and value" and "fundamentals of business and finance" were rated as the most important competencies. The most frequently rated SKA was the "ability to build and maintain credibility and trust." PMID:10185642

  15. An Agenda for Residency Training in Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Kurt; Buchsbaum, David

    1984-01-01

    Some of the differences between in-hospital and ambulatory medicine and their implications for the teaching and practice of ambulatory care are explored. The availability of time, the role of patient cooperation, and the decision-making process differ in the two settings. (MLW)

  16. Satisfaction with ambulatory care and compliance in older patients.

    PubMed

    Linn, M W; Linn, B S; Stein, S R

    1982-06-01

    Predictors of satisfaction with ambulatory care and compliance in 267 older and 581 younger patients were determined. Each patient rated a 45-item satisfaction-with-care-scale. Race, SES, marital status, distance from clinic, severity of illness (as measured by physician ratings, self-health assessment, number of medications, number of diagnoses, and number of clinic visits and hospitalizations in the prior year), and physician expectations of improvement were entered as predictors into stepwise multiple regression analyses for the elderly and the young. Predictors of better satisfaction in the young were less severe conditions, being nearer to the clinic and having fewer prior clinic visits over the year. In the elderly, having fewer visits to the clinic, more expectation of improvement by the physician and less severe conditions were associated with better satisfaction. Severity and clinic visits were predictors in each age group. The young, however, were also influenced by distance from the clinic. The elderly were influenced separately by the physician's prognosis. Thus, when the more impaired elderly are seen frequently without expecting a benefit, their satisfaction with care is poor. Further, satisfaction with care was correlated significantly with compliance in the elderly but not in the young. Findings suggest that improving satisfaction with care might also improve rates of compliance with the medical regimen in older patients. PMID:7109743

  17. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    PubMed

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues. PMID:20050492

  18. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  19. Developing a service excellence system for ambulatory care pharmacy services.

    PubMed

    Craig, S; Crane, V S; Hayman, J N; Hoffman, R; Hatwig, C A

    2001-09-01

    A service excellence system for ambulatory care pharmacy services is described. An interview was designed to measure the needs, expectations, and priorities of a random sample of ambulatory care patients at a 964-bed county teaching hospital and its clinics to determine trends in patient service and satisfaction. The interviews were conducted by the same interviewers with the same script, and follow-up was continuous for two years. Information was summarized for each question and pharmacy site. In defining "service excellence" from a patient's perspective, it was determined that patients wanted a continuation of low-cost prescriptions, decreased waiting time, a friendlier, more caring staff, and environmental modifications. A service excellence system with key performance indicators was then designed and implemented. This effort included recruiting employees with behaviors that support service excellence, training employees to deliver service excellence, creating an environment that promotes patient satisfaction, and designing an ongoing monitoring system. Next, it was imperative to change the attitudes of staff and existing processes to meet or exceed patients' expectations. This phase addressed such issues as patient waiting time, staff-patient interaction, patients' environmental concerns, and staff ideas for service improvement. Finally, changes in service levels were measured. Overall patient satisfaction increased from 72% to 93% at the maincampus pharmacies. Satisfaction at the smaller sites rose from 85% to 95%, while turnaround time and number of pharmacist full-time-equivalents remained stable. A service excellence program was effective in addressing the service issues of ambulatory care patients at a large teaching hospital. PMID:11556653

  20. Implementing University Hospital Ambulatory Care Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, George A.

    1975-01-01

    Impediments to implementing quality assurance programs include the condition of clinic records and individual charts, lack of established criteria for care, communication problems during evaluations, manpower availability, choice of evaluation methods, and methods of implementing corrective action. (Editor/PG)

  1. Redesigning the Regulatory Framework for Ambulatory Care Services in New York

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Dave A; Rugge, John; Shah, Nirav R

    2014-01-01

    Context While hospitals remain important centers of gravity in the health system, services are increasingly being delivered through ambulatory care. This shift to ambulatory care is giving rise to new delivery structures, such as retail clinics and urgent care centers, as well as reinventing existing ambulatory care capacity, as seen with the patient-centered medical home model and the movement toward team-based care. To protect the public's interests, oversight of ambulatory care services must keep pace with these rapid changes. With this purpose, in January 2013 the New York Public Health and Health Planning Council undertook a redesign of the regulatory framework for the state's ambulatory care services. This article describes the principles undergirding the framework as well as the regulatory recommendations themselves. Methods We explored and analyzed the regulation of ambulatory care services in New York in accordance with the available gray and peer-reviewed literature and legislative documents. The deliberations of the Public Health and Health Planning Council informed our review. Findings The vision of high-performing ambulatory care should be rooted in the Triple Aim (better health, higher-quality care, lower costs), with a particular emphasis on continuity of care for patients. There is a pressing need to better define the taxonomy of ambulatory care services. From the state government's perspective, this clarification requires better reporting from new health care entities (eg, retail clinics), connections with regional and state health information technology hubs, and coordination among state agencies. A uniform nomenclature also would improve consumers’ understanding of rights and responsibilities. Finally, the regulatory mechanisms employed—from mandatory reporting to licensure to regional planning to the certificate of need—should remain flexible and match the degree of consensus regarding the appropriate regulatory path. Conclusions Few other

  2. Computer networking in an ambulatory health care setting.

    PubMed

    Alger, R; Berkowitz, L L; Bergeron, B; Buskett, D

    1999-01-01

    Computers are a ubiquitous part of the ambulatory health care environment. Although stand-alone computers may be adequate for a small practice, networked computers can create much more powerful and cost-effective computerized systems. Local area networks allow groups of computers to share peripheral devices and computerized information within an office or cluster of offices. Wide area networks allow computers to securely share devices and information across a large geographical area. Either singly or in combination, these networks can be used to create robust systems to help physicians automate their practices and improve their access to important clinical information. In this article, we will examine common network configurations, explain how they function, and provide examples of real-world implementations of networking technology in health care. PMID:10662271

  3. [The shift towards ambulatory care, from wishful thinking to practice].

    PubMed

    Pierru, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    For several years, there has been a distinct political will for the development of home care. However, this shift to ambulatory care, a source of financial savings for the health system and comfort for the patient, requires sociological debate. Notable issues for discussion are the social inequalities caused by this evolution and the role of the family in the care. PMID:27393979

  4. Impact of clinical preventive services in the ambulatory setting

    PubMed Central

    Ogola, Gerald; Mercer, Quay; Fong, Jaclyn; DeVol, Edward; Couch, Carl E.; Ballard, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Indicators of the performance of clinical preventive services (CPS) have been adopted in the ambulatory setting to improve quality of care. The impact of CPS was evaluated in a network of 49 primary care practices providing care to an estimated 245,000 adults in the Dallas–Fort Worth area through a sample chart review to determine delivery of recommended evidence-based CPS combined with medical literature estimates of the effectiveness of CPS. In this population in 2005, CPS were estimated to have prevented 36 deaths and 97 incident cases of cancer; 420 coronary heart disease events (including 66 sudden deaths) and 118 strokes; 816 cases of influenza and pneumonia (including 24 hospital admissions); and 87 osteoporosis-related fractures. Thus, CPS have substantial benefits in preventing deaths and illness episodes. PMID:18628969

  5. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  6. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kelli D; Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students' perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  7. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students’ perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  8. [Ambulatory procedures to replace inpatient care. Background and applications].

    PubMed

    Hensen, P; Bunzemeier, H; Fürstenberg, T; Luger, T A; Rochell, B; Roeder, N

    2004-07-01

    Since January 2004, German hospitals and specialists in private practice have equal rights to provide and to charge for ambulatory surgeries according to paragraph 115b, 5th Code of Social Law. The current agreement between the German self-governing bodies replaces the existing contracts from 1993. In contrast to the previous version, the revised catalogue contains additional non-operative procedures. Some procedures may be provided either in an ambulatory or inpatient setting. However, for the hospitals it is of particular importance that some specified procedures should be performed on an ambulatory basis. If these particular services are delivered in an inpatient setting at least one stipulated criteria of exception has to be fulfilled. From the perspective of dermatology, not only opportunities but also obligations for ambulatory care arise from the new conditions. The critical facts and aspects with special relevance to dermatology are reviewed in detail. PMID:15168028

  9. Teaching Interdisciplinary Geriatrics Ambulatory Care: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Whall, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care training is advocated by numerous government and philanthropic organizations. Educators in the health professions are increasingly offering training in interdisciplinary health care in a variety of contexts, including ambulatory settings. This paper describes a three-year program to teach skills in interdisciplinary…

  10. Clinical Implications of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Because blood pressure (BP) is an ever changing hemodynamic phenomenon, a BP value, once measured at a physician's office (Office BP), is often unrepresentative of an individual's true BP status. Both ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) provide more accurate and reproducible estimate of BP, and produce stronger predictive ability for cardiovascular outcome than conventional office BP. Two BP measuring techniques, ABPM and HBPM have been widely in clinical use for the detection and management of hypertension. However, they have different advantages and limitations in practice. At present, it has become crucial to understand the characteristics and clinical implications of these BP measuring techniques for those responsible for the care of hypertensive patients. PMID:20967142

  11. [Hospital Costs of Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions in Germany].

    PubMed

    Fischbach, D

    2016-03-01

    Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) are defined as conditions that lead to a hospital admission of which the onset could have been prevented through a more easily accessible ambulatory sector or one that provides better quality care. They are used by health-care systems as a quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. The definition for ACSC varies internationally. Sets of conditions have been defined and evaluated already in various countries, e. g., USA, England, New Zealand and Canada, but not yet for Germany. Therefore this study aims to evaluate the hospital costs of ACSC in Germany using the National Health Service's set of ACSC. In order to calculate these costs a model has been set up for the time period between 2003 and 2010. It is based on G-DRG browsers issued by the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System as required by German law. Within these browsers all relevant DRG-ICD combinations have been extracted. The number of cases per combination was then multiplied by their corresponding cost weights and the average effective base rates. The results were then aggregated into their corresponding ICD groups and then into their respective conditions which lead to the costs per condition and the total costs. The total number of cases and total costs were then compared to another second source. These calculations resulted in 11.7 million cases, of which 10.7% were defined as ambulatory care-sensitive. Within the analysed time period the number of ambulatory care-sensitive cases increased by 6% in total and had a 0.9% CAGR. The corresponding costs amounted to a total of EUR 37.6B and to EUR 3.3B for ACSC. 60% of the costs were caused by three of the 19 ACSC. These results validate that it is worthwhile to further investigate this quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. PMID:25918929

  12. Method of evaluating and improving ambulatory medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, B C; Lyons, T F; Neuhaus, E; Kolton, M; Dwarshius, L

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of an action-research model is demonstrated in the evaluation and improvement of ambulatory medical care in a variety of settings: solo office practice, prepaid capitation multiple-specialty group practice, and medical school hospital-based outpatient clinic practice. Improvements in the process of medical care are found to relate directly to the intensity and duration of planned interventions by the study group and are demonstrated to follow organizational changes in the participating sites--primarily managerial and support services initiated by policy decisions in each study site. Improvement in performance approaching one standard deviation results from the most intense intervention, about one-half standard deviation at the next level of intervention, and virtually no change from a simple feedback of performance measures. On the basis of these findings and other operational and research efforts to improve physician performance, it is unlikely that simple feedback of performance measures will elicit a change in behavior. However, noncoercive methods involving health care providers in problem identification, problem solving, and solution implementation are demonstrated to be effective. PMID:6735736

  13. Expenditures for ambulatory episodes of care: The Michigan Medicaid experience

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Roland D.; Dutton, Benson

    1989-01-01

    It is widely accepted that ambulatory care furnished in hospital outpatient department (OPD) settings is more costly than similar care furnished in office settings, but few researchers have explored whether practice patterns differ between the two settings. Differences in practice patterns may account for differences in the overall cost of care associated with these settings. Diagnosis-specific episodes of care were used to compare the costs of treating disease episodes in OPDs and offices. The findings suggest that OPD care is more costly not only because of price, but also because continuity of care is less common and the likelihood of hospital admission is substantially greater. PMID:10313457

  14. A Guide to Health Education in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    This report outlines ways in which health education strategies can be developed within an ambulatory care center and how they can be implemented to optimize their effectiveness and efficiency. Section 1 describes a program planning model for use in the development of health education programs. Sections 2 through 5 trace the consumer through four…

  15. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  16. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  17. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  18. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    PubMed

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges. PMID:27259130

  19. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Release Archives learn more » For Patients Your health care choices matter. Whether you're anticipating a surgical ... certificate of accreditation is a sign that a health care organization meets or exceeds nationally-recognized Standards. Learn ...

  20. Studies in the Delivery of Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert; And Others

    A primary reason for increased government involvement in health care delivery resides in the acknowledged difficulty of the poor in obtaining adequate care. However, in the absence of knowledge about how health, health care, socio-economic status, race, ethnicity, and geographic location are related, policies aimed at implementing right to health…

  1. Applying the clinical adoption framework to evaluate the impact of an ambulatory electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis; Partridge, Colin; Randhawa, Gurprit; Bowen, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Clinical Adoption (CA) Framework to evaluate the impact of a recently deployed electronic medical record (EMR) in a Canadian healthcare organization. The CA Framework dimensions evaluated were EMR quality, use and net benefits at the micro level; and people, organization and implementation at the meso level. The study involved clinical and support staff from two ambulatory care clinics, and managers and technical staff from the organization. A number of issues were identified at both levels of the CA Framework that had affected EMR adoption in the two clinics. Some perceived benefits in care coordination and efficiency were reported despite challenges that arose from early deployment decisions. There were five lessons that could be applied to other ambulatory care settings. The CA Framework has proved useful in making sense of ways that EMR can add value to the organization. PMID:23388247

  2. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  3. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs. PMID:19265856

  4. Embracing the Insulin Revolution in the Ambulatory Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Bzowyckyj, Andrew S

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Recent additions of various new formulations of insulin to the U.S. marketplace have increased the number of treatment options available to people living with diabetes. However, it is important to take into consideration the implications of these new insulins in terms of patient safety and medication errors, integration with electronic medical records, and financial considerations. This review outlines several considerations for practitioners regarding the implications of these new insulin products for ambulatory care practice. PMID:27574367

  5. Palliative care in the ambulatory geriatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Nirmalasari, Olivia; Graham, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Geriatrics and palliative care often overlap. This article focuses on 2 areas where the disciplines may differ in their approach. The first is planning for extreme illness and death, with explicit acknowledgment that limiting therapy might be a good idea. This situation is likely to have a different impact in the course of a routine geriatrics visit than in a palliative care context. The second is pain management, especially chronic pain. In patients with sharply limited life expectancy, the risk/benefit equation tilts easily toward narcotic use. In frail elders working to remain independent, the calculus may be quite different. PMID:25920055

  6. The role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A

    1997-09-01

    The introduction of noninvasive techniques for the repetitive measurement of blood pressure in ambulant subjects has permitted improved precision in the assessment of hypertension during normal daily life. The traditional clinic (or "office") method of blood pressure measurement has the advantages of simplicity and low cost, and forms the basis of the current operational definitions of hypertension, but it is limited by the normal variability of blood pressure and the "white coat effect." By contrast, ambulatory blood pressure provides information on circadian variations in blood pressure and alterations due to changes in behavior, and may, therefore, be more appropriate for diagnosing hypertension. However, it is important to note that the values used to define normotension and hypertension for clinic blood pressure are not appropriate for ambulatory blood pressure. Recent population studies have proposed that the upper limit for 24-h ambulatory pressure should be 119 to 126/75 to 80 mm Hg, and failure to recognize this may account for at least some cases of "white-coat hypertension." There is increasing evidence that ambulatory blood pressure is more effective than clinic blood pressure in predicting the organ damage associated with hypertension, whereas data from intervention studies indicate that a reduction in ambulatory pressure is correlated with a reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurements may provide a number of advantages in the development of antihypertensive therapies: by permitting better identification of trough and peak effects, by confirming that the efficacy of formulations for once-daily dosing is maintained throughout the 24-h period, and by minimizing the placebo effect. PMID:9324116

  7. Care of the pediatric patient in ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, K A

    1997-06-01

    Caring for the pediatric and adolescent patient in the ambulatory surgery unit is challenging for several reasons. The first 18 years are a period of rapid physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth. Psychological preparation is very important to ensure the readiness of the child and family for surgery; however, the efficacy of the different methods of preparation varies. Teaching should be geared to the developmental level of the child, and specific information on the process, sights, smells, and sensations the child will experience should be given to allay parental anxiety and fears. Appropriate tools must be available for the nurse to assess and implement the physical plan of care. PMID:9115488

  8. Ambulatory Care Nurse-Sensitive Indicators Series: Reaching for the Tipping Point in Measuring Nurse-Sensitive Quality in the Ambulatory Surgical and Procedure Environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, Diane Storer; Aronow, Harriet Udin

    2016-01-01

    The value of the ambulatory care nurse remains undocumented from a quality and patient safety measurement perspective and the practice is at risk of being highly variable and of unknown quality. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and the Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes propose nurse leaders create a tipping point to measure the value of nursing across the continuum of nursing care, moving from inpatient to ambulatory care. As care continues to shift into the ambulatory care environment, the quality imperative must also shift to assure highly reliable, safe, and effective health care. PMID:27439252

  9. The emerging role of cell phone technology in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Boland, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Three factors are coinciding to reshape the ambulatory care market: chronic disease prevalence, workforce shortages, and the availability of cell phone technology with very high consumer penetration. These factors will disproportionately drive the business strategies and practices of ambulatory care providers, payers, and delivery systems this decade. Market dynamics are driving the healthcare industry to adopt new strategies to deal with the swelling prevalence of chronic disease. Healthcare organizations are constrained by money and inadequate tools to systematically manage chronic care patients. As a result, traditional notions of ambulatory care are changing from being provider-centered to becoming more patient-centric. A host of new remote monitoring and communication technologies are available so that providers can now interact with patients "anywhere, anytime." The traditional care setting is shifting to where the patient is rather than where the physician is located. Patients are the most underutilized resource in healthcare, and patient engagement is the key to managing chronic illness. Cell phones are particularly suited for leveraging the time and expertise of providers while engaging patients in their own self-care. To demonstrate this concept, data are presented that illustrate how cell phone applications significantly reduced the cost of treating severely asthmatic children and teens in 2 ways: through more frequent communication between patients and their medical teams, and by motivating patients to become more engaged and knowledgeable about their care. The healthcare industry can support consumer choice by making available as many options as possible for engaging patients in their care. Consumers like having choices and patients are no different: they are not all one type. This suggests an emerging role for cell phone applications and platforms that enable both Internet and medical device connectivity where appropriate for managing chronic

  10. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  11. The rural - urban divide in ambulatory care of gastrointestinal diseases in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The utilization of medical care for gastrointestinal diseases increased over the past decade worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the difference between rural and urban patients in seeking medical service for gastrointestinal diseases at ambulatory sector in Taiwan. Methods From the one-million-people cohort datasets of the National Health Insurance Research Database, the utilization of ambulatory visits for gastrointestinal diseases in 2009 was analyzed. Rural patients were compared with urban and suburban patients as to diagnosis, locality of visits and choice of specialists. Results Among 295,056 patients who had ambulatory visits for gastrointestinal diseases in 2009, rural patients sought medical care for gastrointestinal diseases more frequently than urban and suburban patients (1.60 ± 3.90 vs. 1.17 ± 3.02 and 1.39 ± 3.47). 83.4% of rural patients with gastrointestinal diseases were treated by non-gastroenterologists in rural areas. Rural people had lower accessibility of specialist care, especially for hepatitis, esophageal disorders and gastroduodenal ulcer. Conclusion The rural–urban disparity of medical care for gastrointestinal diseases in Taiwan highlighted the importance of the well communication between rural physicians and gastroenterologists. Besides the establishment of the referral system, the medical teleconsultation system and the arrangement of specialist outreach clinics in rural areas might be helpful. PMID:23497027

  12. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P.

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  13. [The availability and quality of the ambulatory polyclinic care].

    PubMed

    Guseva, N K; Sokolov, V A; Sokolova, I A; Doiutova, M V

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the results of the study of complex of medical demographic and social economic indicators of Nizhny Novgorod oblast during 1989-2010. The results are as follows. The policlinics' net reduced by 2.25 times, including by 10.6 times in rural area and by 12.6 times of ambulatories of community hospitals. The indicators of physicians' supply of oblast population decreased too especially in urban area. The annual number of visits to physicians per capita decreased by 1.36 times. The number of calls of out-patients to physicians of emergency medical care increased by 1.5 times. The morbidity with temporarily disability and primary registration as a disabled person decreased by 1.45 times, including able-bodied citizen by 1.54 times. In Nizhny Novgorod oblast, the rate of decrease of indicators of primary disability during 2006-2009 overpassed the corresponding federal indicators by 1.45 times. The population mortality increased by 1.43 times. The accessibility and quality of ambulatory polyclinic care significantly impacts on the levels of mortality and social security of population and can be used as an indicator of social risks in the region. PMID:23808035

  14. [Current clinical aspects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Sauza-Sosa, Julio César; Cuéllar-Álvarez, José; Villegas-Herrera, Karla Montserrat; Sierra-Galán, Lilia Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension is the prevalentest disease worldwide that significantly increases cardiovascular risk. An early diagnosis together to achieve goals decreases the risk of complications significatly. Recently have been updated the diagnostic criteria for hypertension and the introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The introduction into clinical practice of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was to assist the diagnosis of «white coat hypertension» and «masked hypertension». Today has also shown that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is better than the traditional method of recording blood pressure in the office, to the diagnosis and to adequate control and adjustment of drug treatment. Also there have been introduced important new concepts such as isloted nocturnal hypertension, morning blood pressure elevation altered and altered patterns of nocturnal dip in blood pressure; which have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown significant prognostic value in some stocks. There are still other concepts on which further study is needed to properly establish their introduction to clinical practice as hypertensive load variability, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition to setting values according to further clinical studies in populations such as elderly and children. PMID:26794338

  15. Technical and clinical view on ambulatory assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hobert, M A; Maetzler, W; Aminian, K; Chiari, L

    2014-09-01

    With the progress of technologies of recent years, methods have become available that use wearable sensors and ambulatory systems to measure aspects of--particular axial--motor function. As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a model disorder for motor impairment, a significant number of studies have already been performed with these patients using such techniques. In general, motion sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes are used, in combination with lightweight electronics that do not interfere with normal human motion. A fundamental advantage in comparison with usual clinical assessment is that these sensors allow a more quantitative, objective, and reliable evaluation of symptoms; they have also significant advantages compared to in-lab technologies (e.g., optoelectronic motion capture) as they allow long-term monitoring under real-life conditions. In addition, based on recent findings particularly from studies using functional imaging, we learned that non-motor symptoms, specifically cognitive aspects, may be at least indirectly assessable. It is hypothesized that ambulatory quantitative assessment strategies will allow users, clinicians, and scientists in the future to gain more quantitative, unobtrusive, and everyday relevant data out of their clinical evaluation and can also be designed as pervasive (everywhere) and intensive (anytime) tools for ambulatory assessment and even rehabilitation of motor and (partly) non-motor symptoms in PD. PMID:24689772

  16. Restructuring VA ambulatory care and medical education: the PACE model of primary care.

    PubMed

    Cope, D W; Sherman, S; Robbins, A S

    1996-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Western Region and associated medical schools formulated a set of recommendations for an improved ambulatory health care delivery system during a 1988 strategic planning conference. As a result, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Sepulveda, California, initiated the Pilot (now Primary) Ambulatory Care and Education (PACE) program in 1990 to implement and evaluate a model program. The PACE program represents a significant departure from traditional VA and non-VA academic medical center care, shifting the focus of care from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. From its inception, the PACE program has used an interdisciplinary team approach with three independent global care firms. Each firm is interdisciplinary in composition, with a matrix management structure that expands role function and empowers team members. Emphasis is on managed primary care, stressing a biopsychosocial approach and cost-effective comprehensive care emphasizing prevention and health maintenance. Information management is provided through a network of personal computers that serve as a front end to the VHA Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) mainframe. In addition to providing comprehensive and cost-effective care, the PACE program educates trainees in all health care disciplines, conducts research, and disseminates information about important procedures and outcomes. Undergraduate and graduate trainees from 11 health care disciplines rotate through the PACE program to learn an integrated approach to managed ambulatory care delivery. All trainees are involved in a problem-based approach to learning that emphasizes shared training experiences among health care disciplines. This paper describes the transitional phases of the PACE program (strategic planning, reorganization, and quality improvement) that are relevant for other institutions that are shifting to training programs emphasizing primary and ambulatory care

  17. The Ambulatory Care Medical Audit Demonstration Project. Research design.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R H; Hargraves, J L

    1996-09-01

    The authors describe the design of and statistical analyses involved in the Ambulatory Care Medical Audit Demonstration Project, which tested feasibility, cost, and effectiveness of cycles that met quality assurance requirements in eight pediatric and eight general medicine group practices at four teaching hospitals and six health centers. The authors used a concurrent crossover design using randomized cycles of quality assurance so that a practice was a control site for one guideline and an experimental site for another. For 12 months before and 18 months during and after quality assurance experimental interventions, the authors measured practitioner conformance to review criteria for patient-care guidelines believed to improve outcomes, including four internal medicine patient-care guidelines (ie, follow-up of low hematocrit, cancer screening for women, follow-up of high serum glucose, and monitoring of patients treated with digoxin) and four pediatric patient-care guidelines (ie, follow-up of positive urine cultures, screening for disease and immunizing infants, management of acute gastroenteritis, and management of acute ear infection). The authors distinguished review criteria whose performance depended on personal efforts of practitioners from those that concerned performance dependent on the practice's system for reporting test results and calling patients to return for care. PMID:8792786

  18. Ambulatory Care Nurse-Sensitive Indicators Series: Capturing the Role of Nursing in Ambulatory Care--The Case for Meaningful Nurse-Sensitive Measurement.

    PubMed

    Mastal, Margaret; Matlock, Ann Marie; Start, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The nation has been on a quest to advance quality in providing health care services and improving patient outcomes. The challenge has been to identify and define metrics that will demonstrate improvement. Acute care settings have a fairly well-established system of quality measurement, but ambulatory care systems are in less-developed stages. Imperative to accurate quality measurement in ambulatory care is to identify and define metrics that reflect the value of registered nurses to improved patient care and outcomes as well as to the organization. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN) established a task force to determine appropriate measures of nursing quality. The task force spent 2 years investigating measures and produced an Industry Report that addresses measures of nursing quality. This article is the first in a series of articles that will reveal and discuss the contents of the Industry Report. PMID:27265952

  19. Development and application of a population-oriented measure of ambulatory care case-mix.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J P; Starfield, B H; Steinwachs, D M; Mumford, L M

    1991-05-01

    This article describes a new case-mix methodology applicable primarily to the ambulatory care sector. The Ambulatory Care Group (ACG) system provides a conceptually simple, statistically valid, and clinically relevant measure useful in predicting the utilization of ambulatory health services within a particular population group. ACGs are based on a person's demographic characteristics and their pattern of disease over an extended period of time, such as a year. Specifically, the ACG system is driven by a person's age, sex, and ICD-9-CM diagnoses assigned during patient-provider encounters; it does not require any special data beyond those collected routinely by insurance claims systems or encounter forms. The categorization scheme does not depend on the presence of specific diagnoses that may change over time; rather it is based on broad clusters of diagnoses and conditions. The presence or absence of each disease cluster, along with age and sex, are used to classify a person into one of 51 ACG categories. The ACG system has been developed and tested using computerized encounter and claims data from more than 160,000 continuous enrollees at four large HMOs and a state's Medicaid program. The ACG system can explain more than 50% of the variance in ambulatory resource use if used retrospectively and more than 20% if applied prospectively. This compares with 6% when age and sex alone are used. In addition to describing ACG development and validation, this article also explores some potential applications of the system for provider payment, quality assurance, utilization review, and health services research, particularly as it relates to capitated settings. PMID:1902278

  20. The Ambulatory Diagnostic and Treatment Center: A Unique Model for Educating Medical Trainees and Providing Expedited Care.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Richard A; Orlander, Jay D

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the authors reexamine the Ambulatory Diagnostic and Treatment Center (ADTC) model, which uniquely combines the education of trainees with the care of referred patients at one Veterans Affairs medical center. As an ambulatory clinic with an inpatient mind-set, the ADTC uses a series of closely spaced outpatient appointments that are longer than typical ambulatory visits, offering a VIP-level of evaluation with the patient-centered goal of expedited diagnosis and treatment. Faculty triage patients by weighing factors such as urgency, educational value, complexity, and instability of diseases in conjunction with the resources, availability, and appropriateness of other services within the medical center.The ADTC's unique focus on the education of trainees in comparison with other clinical rotations is evident in the ratio of learning to patient care. This intensive training environment expects postgraduate year 2 and 3 internal medicine residents and fourth-year medical students to read, reflect, and review literature daily. This mix of education and care delivery is ripe for reexploration in light of recent calls for curriculum reform amidst headlines exposing delays in veterans' access to care.A low-volume, high-intensity clinic like the ADTC can augment the clinical services provided by a busy primary care and subspecialty workforce without losing its emphasis on education. Other academic health centers can learn from this model and adapt its structure in settings where accountable care organizations and education meet. PMID:26839944

  1. Evaluation of a career ladder program in an ambulatory care environment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Joan M; Cook, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Clinical ladders, or career advancement systems, were designed to enhance professional development, provide a reward system for quality clinical performance, promote quality nursing practice, and improve job satisfaction among nurses. Most of the literature on RN clinical ladder programs is related to the acute care setting, where these programs originated; not much is known about their effectiveness in the ambulatory care environment. The RN Career Ladder at Kaiser Permanente of Colorado was begun by a Labor Management Partnership Committee in 2003, and awards financial incentives to RNs who demonstrate a commitment to continuing education, leadership activities, and program development on a local and regional level. In this study significantly more involvement in leadership, interdisciplinary, and quality improvement activities were found among career ladder nurses than non-career ladder nurses, regardless of their job role. It is not clear whether nursing leaders gravitate toward a career ladder or whether career ladder participation encourages increased participation in leadership activities. PMID:19330969

  2. Analysis of Patient Service Time in Ambulatory Clinics: Patient Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zerbe, Tony R.; Zerbe, Shirleen D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, analysis of patient service time (patient tracking) in ambulatory clinics has been performed manually. A case study of Eye and Ear Clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, revealed that this approach to patient data collection was prone to clerical error and did not satisfy the clinic's information-processing needs. Initial attempts at automation identified the features required of a successful computerized scheduling and patient tracking system. These essential features are being designed into a prototype system using a local area network platform. The software for this system employs bar code technology to log patients' movement. The resultant data permits analysis of clinic operation and rapid response to unforseen events. Patient information is presented in a color-coded format to permit-at-a-glance comprehension of data on multiple patients (up to 76) simultaneously. A scheduling module projects patients' arrival time and ensures availability of critical resources.

  3. What Ambulatory Care Managers Need to Know About Examination Room Utilization Measurement and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Klarich, Mark J; Rea, Ronald W; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Garcia, Angel L; Steffens, Fay L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for ambulatory care visits is projected to increase 22% between 2008 and 2025. Given this growth, ambulatory care managers need to proactively plan for efficient use of scarce resources (ie, space, equipment, and staff). One important component of ambulatory care space (the number of examination rooms) is dependent on multiple factors, including variation in demand, hours of operation, scheduling, and staff. The authors (1) outline common data collection methods, (2) highlight analysis and reporting considerations for examination room utilization, and (3) provide a strategic framework for short- and long-term decision making for facility design or renovation. PMID:27232683

  4. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  5. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... works by rules that make sure that patient safety and quality standards are followed. P articipate in all decisions about your treatment. You are the center of the health care team. • You and your doctor should agree on ...

  6. Clinic Design and Continuity in Internal Medicine Resident Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Wieland, Mark L.; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Julian, Katherine A.; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Rosenblum, Michael; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Thomas, Kris; Varney, Andrew; Warm, Eric; Wininger, David; Francis, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine (IM) programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve trainees' ambulatory experience. Downstream effects on continuity of care and other clinical and educational metrics are unclear. Methods This multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 713 IM residents from 12 programs. Continuity was measured using the usual provider of care method (UPC) and the continuity for physician method (PHY). Three clinic models (traditional, block, and combination) were compared using analysis of covariance. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of practice metrics and clinic model on continuity. Results UPC, reflecting continuity from the patient perspective, was significantly different, and was highest in the block model, midrange in combination model, and lowest in the traditional model programs. PHY, reflecting continuity from the perspective of the resident provider, was significantly lower in the block model than in combination and traditional programs. Panel size, ambulatory workload, utilization, number of clinics attended in the study period, and clinic model together accounted for 62% of the variation found in UPC and 26% of the variation found in PHY. Conclusions Clinic model appeared to have a significant effect on continuity measured from both the patient and resident perspectives. Continuity requires balance between provider availability and demand for services. Optimizing this balance to maximize resident education, and the health of the population served, will require consideration of relevant local factors and priorities in addition to the clinic model. PMID:26217420

  7. Associations Between the Continuity of Ambulatory Care of Adult Diabetes Patients in Korea and the Incidence of Macrovascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seo, Hyeyoung; Kim, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to identify association between the continuity of ambulatory care of diabetes patients in South Korea (hereafter Korea) and the incidence of macrovascular complications of diabetes, using claims data compiled by the National Health Insurance Services of Korea. Methods: This study was conducted retrospectively. The subjects of the study were 43 002 patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2007, who were over 30 years of age, and had insurance claim data from 2008. The macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus were limited to ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. We compared the characteristics of the patients in whom macrovascular complications occurred from 2009 to 2012 to the characteristics of the patients who had no such complications. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effects of continuity of ambulatory care on diabetic macrovascular complications. The continuity of ambulatory diabetes care was estimated by metrics such as the medication possession ratio, the quarterly continuity of care and the number of clinics that were visited. Results: Patients with macrovascular complications showed statistically significant differences regarding sex, age, comorbidities, hypertension, dyslipidemia and continuity of ambulatory diabetes care. Visiting a lower number of clinics reduced the odds ratio for macrovascular complications of diabetes. A medication possession ratio below 80% was associated with an increased odds ratio for macrovascular complications, but this result was of borderline statistical significance. Conclusions: Diabetes care by regular health care providers was found to be associated with a lower occurrence of diabetic macrovascular complications. This result has policy implications for the Korean health care system, in which the delivery system does not work properly. PMID:26265664

  8. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research. PMID:26380108

  9. Ibuprofen timing for hand surgery in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Enrico; Bianchi, Anna; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Landi, Antonio; Barbieri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of pre-operative administration of ibuprofen on post-operative pain control vs. early post-operative administration for hand surgery procedures performed under local anaesthesia in ambulatory care. METHODS: Candidates to trigger finger release by De Quervain tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel operation under local anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Group A received 400 mg ibuprofen before the operation and placebo after the procedure; group B received placebo before the operation and ibuprofen 400 mg at the end of the procedure; both groups received ibuprofen 400 mg every 6h thereafter. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was measured at fixed times before and every 6h after surgery, for a total follow-up of 18h. RESULTS: Groups were similar according to age, gender and type of surgery. Median VAS values did not produce any statistical significance, while there was a statistically significant difference on pre-operative and early post-operative VAS values between groups (A -8.53 mm vs. B 3.36 mm, p=0.0085). CONCLUSION: Average pain levels were well controlled by local anesthesia and post-operative ibuprofen analgesia. Pre-operative ibuprofen administration can contribute to improve early pain management. Level of Evidence II, Therapeutic Studies. PMID:26327799

  10. Sleep disturbances in the demented elderly: treatment in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Stoppe, G; Sandholzer, H; Staedt, J; Winter, S; Kiefer, J; Rüther, E

    1995-12-01

    We report the results of a representative survey in Lower Saxony, Germany, that focused on the treatment of sleep disturbances in the moderately demented elderly. Two written sample case histories (vignettes) described either a vascular demented patient suffering from nocturnal wandering or an Alzheimer's-type demented patient without apparent psychotic or behavioral (sleep) disorder. These were randomly assigned and presented to 145 family physicians and 14 neuropsychiatrists working in private practice by a trained investigator, who then conducted a standardized interview with the physicians. The study was representative of physicians (response rate: 83.2%). In response to the question concerning how they would treat the patient's sleep disturbances, about 20% of the physicians (with respect to both versions) answered that they would not choose drugs. More than 40% considered neuroleptics to be the drugs of choice. Benzodiazepines, antidepressants and other substances were seldom considered. No significant difference was noted in the response to the two different case histories. The results allow for the conclusion that non-drug treatments, which (at least initially) should be the treatment of choice, are mainly disregarded by the majority of the ambulatory care physicians. The reason for this seems to be a lack of education in sleep medicine and also in geriatric medicine. PMID:8746390

  11. Worksite Physical Activity Intervention for Ambulatory Clinic Nursing Staff.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon; Farrington, Michele; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M; Clark, M Kathleen; Dawson, Cindy; Quinn, Geralyn J; Laffoon, Trudy; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviors, including physical activity (PA), of registered nurses (RNs) and medical assistants (MAs) are suboptimal but may improve with worksite programs. Using a repeated-measures crossover design, the authors explored if integrating a 6-month worksite non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) intervention, with and without personalized health coaching via text messaging into workflow could positively affect sedentary time, PA, and body composition of nursing staff without jeopardizing work productivity. Two ambulatory clinics were randomly assigned to an environmental NEAT intervention plus a mobile text message coaching for either the first 3 months (early texting group, n = 27) or the last 3 months (delayed texting group, n = 13), with baseline 3-month and 6-month measurements. Sedentary and PA levels, fat mass, and weight improved for both groups, significantly only for the early text group. Productivity did not decline for either group. This worksite intervention is feasible and may benefit nursing staff. PMID:27143144

  12. Implementation and Evaluation of a Computerized Reminder System in Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Naomi J.; Palmer, R. Heather; Kane, Nancy M.; Braun, Peter; Feldstein, Michael L.; Harrington, Alesandra M.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed and are testing computerized reminders for providers to determine whether automated systems can improve patient care in ambulatory settings. The reminder system is based on stepwise clinical protocols, and is entirely controlled by the provider. It does not require clinic use of computerized medical records. A randomized controlled trial will assess provider compliance with protocols, detection of serious pathology, and volume of service usage. Preliminary findings suggest that providers who receive reminders to work up a low hematocrit are more likely to order appropriate diagnostic tests than those not receiving reminders. Incremental costs for implementation of a reminder system are consistent with expenses for other new computer services at the study site. Provider use of the system varies greatly.

  13. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in Persons with an Intellectual Disability--Development of a Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Robert S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Brownell, Marni; Colantonio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that the primary care provided for persons with an intellectual disability living in the community has been inadequate. Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are considered an indicator for access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of this research was to identify ACS…

  14. New concepts and technologies in home care and ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, A; Axisa, F; Delhomme, G; Gehin, C

    2004-01-01

    The world is becoming more and more health conscious. Society, health policy and patients' needs are all changing dramatically. The challenges society is currently facing are related to the increase in the aging population, changes in lifestyle, the need for healthcare cost containment and the need for improvement and monitoring of healthcare quality. The emphasis is put on prevention rather than on treatment. In addition, patients and health consumers are waiting for non-invasive or minimally-invasive diagnosis and treatment methods, for home care, short stays in hospital, enhancement of rehabilitation, information and involvement in their own treatment. Progress in science and technology offers, today, miniaturization, speed, intelligence, sophistication and new materials at lower cost. In this new landscape, microtechnologies, information technologies and telecommunications are key factors. Telemedicine has also evolved. Used initially to exchange patients' files, radiographic data and other information between health providers, today telemedicine contributes to new trends in "hospital extension" through all-day monitoring of vital signs, professional activities, entertainment and home-based activities. The new possibilities for home care and ambulatory monitoring are provided at 4 levels: a) Microsensors. Microtechnologies offer the possibility of small size, but also of intelligent, active devices, working with low energy, wireless and non-invasive or minimally-invasive; b) Wrist devices are particularly user friendly and combine sensors, circuits, supply, display and wireless transmission in a single box, very convenient for common physical activities; c) Health smart clothes make contact with 90 % of the skin and offer many possibilities for the location of sensors. These sensors have to be thin, flexible and compatible with textiles, or made using textile technologies, such as new fibers with specific (mechanical, electrical and optical) properties; d

  15. The clinical utility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM): a review.

    PubMed

    Harianto, Harry; Valente, Michael; Hoetomo, Soenarno; Anpalahan, Mahesan

    2014-01-01

    The current evidence suggests that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) should be an integral part of the diagnosis and management of hypertension. However, its uptake in routine clinical practice has been variable. This paper reviews the current evidence for the role of ABPM in clinical practice, including in hypotensive disorders and in specific comorbidities. It further discusses the clinical significance of abnormal ambulatory blood pressure patterns and hypertensive syndromes such as white coat, masked and resistant hypertension. PMID:25801624

  16. Multistakeholder perspectives on composite measures of ambulatory care quality: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, Grant R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Christianson, Jon B

    2013-08-01

    The development of composite measures of ambulatory care quality is an area of growing practice and policy interest. Using 29 semistructured interviews, this study describes the opinions of stakeholders related to the use and development of composite measures in a multistakeholder setting. Research experts working in multistakeholder settings need to understand the perspective of various stakeholders, many of whom have varying levels of research expertise, in order to develop useful and acceptable composite measures. Findings from this study suggest that to achieve maximal stakeholder buy-in, research experts should focus on clinical area-specific composites that are designed and constructed in a simple and transparent manner. However, composite measures are not a panacea for improving the utility of public reporting. Performance measure and report card creators should continue to investigate other ways to improve the user-friendliness of their reports and to address other barriers that prevent more extensive use of reports. PMID:23625664

  17. Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil, 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Bastos, Rita Maria; Campos, Estela Márcia Saraiva; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio; Bastos, Mauro Gomes; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze hospitalization rates and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations and to characterize them according to coverage by the Family Health Strategy, a primary health care guidance program. METHODS An ecological study comprising 853 municipalities in the state of Minas Gerais, under the purview of 28 regional health care units, was conducted. We used data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations in 2000 and 2010 were compared. Population data were obtained from the demographic censuses. RESULTS The number of ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations declined from 20.75/1,000 inhabitants [standard deviation (SD) = 10.42) in 2000 to 14.92/thousand inhabitants (SD = 10.04) in 2010 Heart failure was the most frequent cause in both years. Hospitalizations rates for hypertension, asthma, and diabetes mellitus, decreased, whereas those for angina pectoris, prenatal and birth disorders, kidney and urinary tract infections, and other acute infections increased. Hospitalization durations and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS Mean hospitalization rates for sensitive conditions were significantly lower in 2010 than in 2000, but no correlation was found with regard to the expansion of the population coverage of the Family Health Strategy. Hospitalization rates and proportion of deaths were different between the various health care regions in the years evaluated, indicating a need to prioritize the primary health care with high efficiency and quality. PMID:26039399

  18. Psychometric analysis of the ambulatory care learning education environment measure (ACLEEM) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naghizadeh Moogari, Zahra; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Roff, Susanne; Montazeri, Ali; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyyed Kamran; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Moosavi, Maryam; Azaminejad, Faranak; Tavousi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Examining educational environment (academic and clinical) by means of a valid, reliable and comprehensive questionnaire is a major key in achieving a highly qualified student – oriented curricula. The Persian translation of Ambulatory Care Learning Education Environment Measure-ACLEEM questionnaire has been developed to support this goal, and its psychometrics has been explored in this administration in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive – analytical study involved medical residents in four major clinics. In this study, the ACLEEM Questionnaire was conducted after translating and retranslating the questionnaire and examine the face and content validity, construct validity, test retest reliability and internal consistency coefficient. Results: In this study, 157 out of 192 residents completed the questionnaire (response rate 82%). The mean age of the residents was 31.81 years .The final mean of the questionnaire was calculated as 110.91 out of 200 (with 95% confidence interval). Test – retest stability of the questionnaire was between 0.322 and 0.968. The face validity of the questionnaire was confirmed. The content validity ratio was 0.64; and content validity Index was 0.78. In Exploratory factor analysis, eight factors were confirmatory that changed the orientation of some questions. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the whole questionnaire was 0.936. Conclusion: According to the data, the Persian version of the ACLEEM questionnaire has sufficient psychometric reliability and validity to be used for conducting research, teaching and practicing the educational learning environment in ambulatory care in Iran. PMID:26913262

  19. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    PubMed

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  20. Exploring the link between ambulatory care and avoidable hospitalizations at the Veteran Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Pracht, Etienne E; Bass, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the link between utilization of ambulatory care and the likelihood of rehospitalization for an avoidable reason in veterans served by the Veteran Health Administration (VA). The analysis used administrative data containing healthcare utilization and patient characteristics stored at the national VA data warehouse, the Corporate Franchise Data Center. The study sample consisted of 284 veterans residing in Florida who had been hospitalized at least once for an avoidable reason. A bivariate probit model with instrumental variables was used to estimate the probability of rehospitalization. Veterans who had at least 1 ambulatory care visit per month experienced a significant reduction in the probability of rehospitalization for the same avoidable hospitalization condition. The findings suggest that ambulatory care can serve as an important substitute for more expensive hospitalization for the conditions characterized as avoidable. PMID:21385280

  1. Design of a Prospective Payment Patient Classification System for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Richard F.; Goldfield, Norbert I.; Wynn, Mark E.; McGuire, Thomas E.; Mullin, Robert L.; Gregg, Laurence W.; Bender, Judith A.

    1993-01-01

    The Ambulatory Patient Groups (APGs) are a patient classification system that was developed to be used as the basis of a prospective payment system (PPS) for the facility cost of outpatient care. This article will review the key characteristics of a patient classification system for ambulatory care, describe the APG development process, and describe a payment model based on the APGs. We present the results of simulating the use of APGs in a prospective payment system, and conclude with a discussion of the implementation issues associated with an outpatient PPS. PMID:10133711

  2. Ambulatory tuberculosis treatment in post-Semashko health care systems needs supportive financing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S; Asadov, D A; Bründer, A; Healy, S; Khamraev, A K; Sergeeva, N; Tinnemann, P

    2014-12-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) control strategy in the Republic of Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan, is being changed to decentralised out-patient care for most TB patients by the Government of Uzbekistan, in collaboration with the international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Ambulatory treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB from the first day of treatment has been recommended since 2011. Out-patient treatment of TB from the beginning of treatment was previously prohibited. However, the current Uzbek health financing system, which evolved from the Soviet Semashko model, offers incentives that work against the adoption of ambulatory TB treatment. Based on the 'Comprehensive TB Care for All' programme implemented in Karakalpakstan, we describe how existing policies for the allocation of health funds complicate the scale-up of ambulatory-based management of TB. PMID:25517802

  3. Rural Ambulatory Access for Semi-Urgent Care and the Relationship of Distance to an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Ashley; Hoegh, Andy; Kuehl, Damon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Availability of timely access to ambulatory care for semi-urgent medical concerns in rural and suburban locales is unknown. Further distance to an emergency department (ED) may require rural clinics to serve as surrogate EDs in their region, and make it more likely for these clinics to offer timely appointments. We determined the availability of urgent (within 48 hours) access to ambulatory care for non-established visiting patients, and assessed the effect of insurance and ability to pay cash on a patient’s success in scheduling an appointment in rural and suburban Eastern United States. We also assessed how proximity to EDs and urgent care (UC) facilities influenced access to semi-urgent ambulatory appointments at primary care facilities. Methods The Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine, was used as a transect to select 190 rural and suburban primary care clinics located along its entire length. We calculated their location and distance to the nearest hospital-based ED or UC via Google Earth. A sham patient representing a non-established visiting patient called each clinic over a four-month period (2013), requesting an appointment in the next 48 hours for one of three scripted clinical vignettes representing common semi-urgent ambulatory concerns. We randomized the scenarios and insurance statuses (insured vs. uninsured). Each clinic was contacted twice, once with the caller representing an insured patient, once with the caller representing an uninsured patient. When the caller was representing an uninsured patient, any required upfront payment was requested from each clinic. One hundred dollars was used as a cutoff between the uninsured as a distinction between those able to afford substantial upfront sums and those who could not. To determine if proximity to other sources of care impacted a clinic’s ability to grant an appointment, distance to the nearest ED or UC was modeled as a dichotomous variable using 30 miles as the

  4. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Spinal Cord Injury: Clinical Practicability

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Trauma to the spinal cord often results not only in sensorimotor but also autonomic impairments. The loss of autonomic control over the cardiovascular system can cause profound blood pressure (BP) derangements in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and may therefore lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this population. The use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows insights into circadian BP profiles, which have been shown to be of good prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in able-bodied subjects. Past studies in SCI subjects using ABPM have shown that alterations in circadian BP patterns are dependent on the spinal lesion level. Tetraplegic subjects with sensorimotor complete lesions have a decreased daytime arterial BP, loss of the physiological nocturnal BP dip, and higher circadian BP variability, including potentially life-threatening hypertensive episodes known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD), compared with paraplegic and able-bodied subjects. The proposed underlying mechanisms of these adverse BP alterations mainly are attributed to a lost or decreased central drive to sympathetic spinal preganglionic neurons controlling the heart and blood vessels. In addition, several maladaptive anatomical changes within the spinal cord and the periphery, as well as the general decrease of physical daily activity in SCI subjects, account for adverse BP changes. ABPM enables the identification of adverse BP profiles and the associated increased risk for CVD in SCI subjects. Concurrently, it also might provide a useful clinical tool to monitor improvements of AD and lost nocturnal dip after appropriate treatments in the SCI population. PMID:24175653

  5. Referral criteria for assessment and treatment in an ambulatory dysphagia clinic.

    PubMed

    Lorinczi, Klara; Denheyer, Vanessa; Pickard, Amanda; Lee, Alice; Mager, Diana R

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic neurological disorders and can increase the risk for comorbidities such as aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. Treatment includes timely access to interdisciplinary health care teams with specialized skills in dysphagia management. A retrospective chart review (n=99 of 125 charts screened) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of referral criteria to identify and triage patients with suspected dysphagia to an ambulatory dysphagia clinic. Variables collected included demographic information (age), anthropometric information (body mass index [BMI], each patient's sex), reason for referral, primary medical diagnosis, symptomatology (e.g., pneumonia, chest congestion), nutrition and swallowing interventions, clinic wait times, missed/cancelled appointments, and referring health care professional. The mean age and mean BMI ± standard deviation of patients reviewed were 68.7 years ± 18.4 years and 25.2 kg/m² ± 6.7 kg/m², respectively. Average clinic wait times were 158 days (13 to 368 days) for routine and 52 days (0 to 344 days) for urgent assessments (p<0.001). The most common reason(s) for referral was/were related to dysphagia (n=83), surgery (n=50), and/or gastrointestinal symptomatology (n=28); 80% to 90% of patients received varying diagnostic and treatment services for dysphagia. Development of effective referral criteria is critical to ensure that clients with dysphagia receive timely diagnostic, treatment, and nutrition interventions by interdisciplinary health care teams specializing in dysphagia. PMID:23217446

  6. Mathematical Modeling and the Redesign of a Teaching Ambulatory Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Duke H.; Mamlin, Joseph

    1976-01-01

    Mathematical modeling was utilized in the planning and decision-making process involved in reorganizing a teaching clinic to effect continuity of care. The model interrelated physicians, time, and space, facilitating value judgments and decisions. The reorganization was successful and the outcomes remarkably similar to model predictions.…

  7. Using ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations to analyse the effectiveness of primary care services in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Palacios, David G; Cairns, John

    2015-11-01

    Ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations (ACSH) have been widely used to study the quality and effectiveness of primary care. Using data from 248 general hospitals in Mexico during 2001-2011 we identify 926,769 ACSHs in 188 health jurisdictions before and during the health insurance expansion that took place in this period, and estimate a fixed effects model to explain the association of the jurisdiction ACSH rate with patient and community factors. National ACSH rate increased by 50%, but trends and magnitude varied at the jurisdiction and state level. We find strong associations of the ACSH rate with socioeconomic conditions, health care supply and health insurance coverage even after controlling for potential endogeneity in the rolling out of the insurance programme. We argue that the traditional focus on the increase/decrease of the ACSH rate might not be a valid indicator to assess the effectiveness of primary care in a health insurance expansion setting, but that the ACSH rate is useful when compared between and within states once the variation in insurance coverage is taken into account as it allows the identification of differences in the provision of primary care. The high heterogeneity found in the ACSH rates suggests important state and jurisdiction differences in the quality and effectiveness of primary care in Mexico. PMID:26387080

  8. Strategies for Efficient and Effective Teaching in the Ambulatory Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferenchick, Gary; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five strategies for teaching medical students in the ambulatory care setting are described: wave scheduling; orienting learners to patients; having learners do case presentations in the examination room; using the "one-minute preceptor"; and reflecting on teaching to develop effective teaching scripts. The techniques are based on research in…

  9. Technical Limitations of Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers: Implications on Ambulatory Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    Research objectives: This dissertation examines the state of development of each of the eight core electronic health record (EHR) functionalities as described by the IOM and describes how the current state of these functionalities limit quality improvement efforts in ambulatory care settings. There is a great deal of literature describing both the…

  10. Big data and ambulatory care: breaking down legal barriers to support effective use.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an overview of the legal framework governing health information, dispels misconceptions about privacy regulations, and highlights how ambulatory care providers in particular can maximize the utility of big data to improve care. PMID:25401945

  11. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling-Yu; Lynn, An-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717) of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40–49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7%) and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking. PMID:26540064

  12. Validating a decision tree for serious infection: diagnostic accuracy in acutely ill children in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Verbakel, Jan Y; Lemiengre, Marieke B; De Burghgraeve, Tine; De Sutter, An; Aertgeerts, Bert; Bullens, Dominique M A; Shinkins, Bethany; Van den Bruel, Ann; Buntinx, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute infection is the most common presentation of children in primary care with only few having a serious infection (eg, sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia). To avoid complications or death, early recognition and adequate referral are essential. Clinical prediction rules have the potential to improve diagnostic decision-making for rare but serious conditions. In this study, we aimed to validate a recently developed decision tree in a new but similar population. Design Diagnostic accuracy study validating a clinical prediction rule. Setting and participants Acutely ill children presenting to ambulatory care in Flanders, Belgium, consisting of general practice and paediatric assessment in outpatient clinics or the emergency department. Intervention Physicians were asked to score the decision tree in every child. Primary outcome measures The outcome of interest was hospital admission for at least 24 h with a serious infection within 5 days after initial presentation. We report the diagnostic accuracy of the decision tree in sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values. Results In total, 8962 acute illness episodes were included, of which 283 lead to admission to hospital with a serious infection. Sensitivity of the decision tree was 100% (95% CI 71.5% to 100%) at a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI 82.3% to 84.9%) in the general practitioner setting with 17% of children testing positive. In the paediatric outpatient and emergency department setting, sensitivities were below 92%, with specificities below 44.8%. Conclusions In an independent validation cohort, this clinical prediction rule has shown to be extremely sensitive to identify children at risk of hospital admission for a serious infection in general practice, making it suitable for ruling out. Trial registration number NCT02024282. PMID:26254472

  13. The employee-safety and infection-control manual: guidelines for the ambulatory health care center.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1991-04-01

    The ambulatory health care center has an empirical need to maintain adequate policies and procedures designed to safeguard the health and physical safety of both clients and employees. Of particular concern is the health care worker's risk of injury or exposure to infection. This article discusses the development of a comprehensive employee-safety and infection-control manual. Such a manual can assist in the accreditation of an ambulatory health care center by a national accrediting organization, and can also serve as a risk-management tool. An example of a manual's table of contents, a specific policy/procedure, a waiver form regarding human immunodeficiency virus exposure, and a hepatitis B virus "vaccination status" form are provided. Additionally, two "quick-look" texts are presented as examples of fast reference guides for common safety practices and the treatment of the employee with a health-threatening exposure. PMID:1905791

  14. Explanation of inequality in utilization of ambulatory care before and after universal health insurance in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yiengprugsawan, V; Carmichael, Ga; Lim, Ll-Y; Seubsman, S; Sleigh, Ac

    2011-03-01

    Thailand implemented a Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) of national health insurance in April 2001 to finance equitable access to health care. This paper compares inequalities in health service use before and after the UCS, and analyses the trend and determinants of inequality. The national Health and Welfare Surveys of 2001 and 2005 are used for this study. The concentration index for use of ambulatory care among the population reporting a recent illness is used as a measure of health inequality, decomposed into contributing demographic, socio-economic, geographic and health insurance determinants. As a result of the UCS, the uninsured group fell from 24% in 2001 to 3% in 2005 and health service patterns changed. Use of public primary health care facilities such as health centres became more concentrated among the poor, while use of provincial/general hospitals became more concentrated among the better-off. Decomposition analysis shows that the increasingly common use of health centres among the poor in 2005 was substantially associated with those with lower income, residence in the rural northeast and the introduction of the UCS. The increasing use of provincial/general hospitals and private clinics among the better-off in 2005 was substantially associated with the government and private employee insurance schemes. Although the UCS scheme has achieved its objective in increasing insurance coverage and utilization of primary health services, our findings point to the need for future policies to focus on the quality of this primary care and equitable referrals to secondary and tertiary health facilities when required. PMID:20736414

  15. The use of ambulatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, James A; Tucker, Katherine L; Martin, Una; Beesley, Louise; McManus, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of ambulatory blood pressure is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension in the UK. This article describes the use of ambulatory devices, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of their use in clinical practice. PMID:26551492

  16. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings [UPDATED

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sanchita; Bowen, Jane F.; Ganetsky, Valerie S.; Hadley, Diane; Melody, Karleen; Otsuka, Shelley; Vanmali, Radha; Thomas, Tyan

    Objective To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC) models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications.[a sentence was deleted] Conclusion Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  17. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sanchita; Bowen, Jane F.; Ganetsky, Valerie S.; Hadley, Diane; Melody, Karleen; Otsuka, Shelley; Vanmali, Radha; Thomas, Tyan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC) models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care. PMID:25035721

  18. Effective change management in a regional Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce W

    2012-02-01

    Government policies and community expectations in Australia continually lead to calls for healthcare change. These changes are often met with resistance from clinicians and managers. Making change happen requires consideration of the way policies, culture, context, shared vision and leadership can drive or impede change. This reflective case study critically investigates one change process; the evolution of a Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services (SACS) program in an Australian regional hospital over a 3-year period. The new Community Rehabilitation Services (CRS) program evolved from a merger of Centre and Home Based Rehabilitation (CBR and HBR). Hospital amalgamations, closures and privatisation, and the Department of Health policy relating to SACS, ambulatory care and rehabilitation were some of the key elements explored in this paper. PMID:22513018

  19. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Cindy Leslie A.; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation’s impact on students’ perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students’ perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  20. Manager's leadership is the main skill for ambulatory health care plan success.

    PubMed

    Marin, Gustavo Horacio; Silberman, Martin; Colombo, Maria Virginia; Ozaeta, Belen; Henen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate effectiveness of ambulatory health care plan implementation among institutions and variables associated with the differences observed. Randomized selection of primary health care (PHC) centers was done. Leadership ability of the plan manager was explored. Univariate/bivariate analyses were performed to observe correlation between variables. Two groups of PHC centers were established according to the efficacy of plan implementation: high and low performance. Differences between groups were observed (592%-1023% more efficacy in controls and practices; P < .001). Leadership was responsible for the main differences observed. Leadership of manager for implementation of the health care plan was the major important variable to reach the best efficacy standards. PMID:25469579

  1. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A.; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Methods Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Results Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin < 8% was positively correlated with number of visits, knowledge of medical history, perception of respect, and higher scores for recommending the physician to others. The percentage of diabetic patients with low density lipoprotein < 100 mg/dL was positively correlated with the physician showing respect. Conclusions Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction. PMID:26279771

  2. Standardizing Assessment of Competences and Competencies of Oncology Nurses Working in Ambulatory Care.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Clara; Magnan, Morris A; Henderson, Denise; DeRose, Patricia; Carolin, Kathleen; Bepler, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A nursing quality consortium standardized nursing practice across 17 independently functioning ambulatory oncology sites. Programs were developed to validate both competences and competencies. One program assessed nine competences needed to develop systems of care to detect and treat treatment-related side effects. A second program was developed to assess competencies needed to prevent harm to oncology patients. This manuscript describes a successful approach to standardizing nursing practice across geographically distant academic and community sites. PMID:26985750

  3. Experts Foresee a Major Shift From Inpatient to Ambulatory Care.

    PubMed

    Beans, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    An American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation report predicts trends in health care delivery and financing, drug development and therapeutics, pharmaceutical marketplace, pharmacy workforce, and more. PMID:27069342

  4. Strategic response by providers to specialty hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, and retail clinics.

    PubMed

    Burns, Lawton R; David, Guy; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2011-04-01

    Radical innovation and disruptive technologies are frequently heralded as a solution to delivering higher quality, lower cost health care. According to the literature on disruption, local hospitals and physicians (incumbent providers) may be unable to competitively respond to such "creative destruction" and alter their business models for a host of reasons, thus threatening their future survival. However, strategic management theory and research suggest that, under certain conditions, incumbent providers may be able to weather the discontinuities posed by the disrupters. This article analyzes 3 disruptive innovations in service delivery: single-specialty hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and retail clinics. We first discuss the features of these innovations to assess how disruptive they are. We then draw on the literature on strategic adaptation to suggest how incumbents develop competitive responses to these disruptive innovations that assure their continued survival. These arguments are then evaluated in a field study of several urban markets based on interviews with both incumbents and entrants. The interviews indicate that entrants have failed to disrupt incumbent providers primarily as a result of strategies pursued by the incumbents. The findings cast doubt on the prospects for these disruptive innovations to transform health care. PMID:21091376

  5. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in daily clinical practice - the Spanish ABPM Registry experience.

    PubMed

    Gorostidi, Manuel; Banegas, José R; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Vinyoles, Ernest; Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Many patients are hypertensive at the medical settings but show normal blood pressure out of the doctor's office, and are classified as white-coat hypertensives. On the other hand, many patients with controlled hypertension at the clinic show ambulatory blood pressure levels above the thresholds considered for an adequate blood pressure control, known as having masked hypertension. Using data from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry (Spanish ABPM Registry), a national program developed to promote the use of the ambulatory technique for hypertension management in daily practice, we have reviewed the main strengths of this approach, that is the ability to detect discrepancies of blood pressure status with respect to office blood pressure measurement, and to better assess accurate rates of hypertension control. White-coat hypertension within patients with elevated office blood pressure, and masked hypertension within office-controlled patients affected one of three patients in each office status. On the other hand, rates of ambulatory blood pressure control (50%) doubled those of office blood pressure control (25%), still remaining half the patients uncontrolled. We think that a systematic use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and strategies to improve blood pressure control constitute key priorities in hypertension management. PMID:26541761

  6. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient. PMID:27439249

  7. Just One More Patient: Optimizing EMR Documentation in Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Mark; Toscos, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) in primary care settings is on the rise in the United States and many are feeling the stress. The introduction of the EMR or transition to a new EMR is known to create workflow challenges for primary care providers and their office staff, as was the case in our health system. This study evolved out of an attempt to alleviate stress by defining the best practice or most optimal way to document office visits, allowing providers to see just one more patient each day. We leveraged a change management model that encourages looking for what is working vs. throwing resources at problem areas. By doing so we identified several distinguishing behaviors among providers who were doing exceptionally well with the EMR. We deployed an intervention aimed at enhancing the identified behaviors in a group of providers and it resulted marked improvement in efficiency. PMID:26958242

  8. Just One More Patient: Optimizing EMR Documentation in Ambulatory Care.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Mark; Toscos, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) in primary care settings is on the rise in the United States and many are feeling the stress. The introduction of the EMR or transition to a new EMR is known to create workflow challenges for primary care providers and their office staff, as was the case in our health system. This study evolved out of an attempt to alleviate stress by defining the best practice or most optimal way to document office visits, allowing providers to see just one more patient each day. We leveraged a change management model that encourages looking for what is working vs. throwing resources at problem areas. By doing so we identified several distinguishing behaviors among providers who were doing exceptionally well with the EMR. We deployed an intervention aimed at enhancing the identified behaviors in a group of providers and it resulted marked improvement in efficiency. PMID:26958242

  9. Hospitalisation Rates for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions for Persons with and without an Intellectual Disability--A Population Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, R.; Brownell, M.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Colantonio, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that persons with an intellectual disability (ID) face barriers to primary care; however, this has not been extensively studied at the population level. Rates of hospitalisation for ambulatory care sensitive conditions are used as an indicator of access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of the study was…

  10. Role of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Recording in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Nimrta; Campbell, Patrick; White, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Due to shortcomings of the office blood pressure (BP) in individuals with hypertension, including white coat and masked hypertension effects, terminal digit bias and large variability in BP among a small number of readings, the utilization of out-of-office blood pressure measurements has become much more common in clinical practice. The presence of the syndromes of white coat and masked hypertension creates the concern that the office BP measurements are not reflective of an individual patient's true BP values. Home (or self) and ambulatory BP assessments have been used in numerous types of clinical trials and have demonstrated their usefulness as reliable research and clinical tools. In this article, we review the recent literature on the benefits and limitations of home (self) and ambulatory monitoring of the BP in clinical practice, particularly how it relates to diagnosis of patients with various presentations of hypertension and to cardiovascular outcomes with long-term follow-ups of population cohorts. PMID:19863865

  11. Application of three different sets of explicit criteria for assessing inappropriate prescribing in older patients: a nationwide prevalence study of ambulatory care visits in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chirn-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu; Lai, Hsiu-Yun; Wu, Ru-Shu; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chan, Ding-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the national prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) prescribed in ambulatory care clinics in Taiwan according to three different sets of regional criteria and the correlates of PIM use. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This analysis included older patients who visited ambulatory care clinics in 2009 and represented half of the older population included on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants We identified 1 164 701 subjects who visited ambulatory care clinics and were over 65 years old in 2009. Primary and secondary outcome measures PIM prevalence according to the 2012 Beers criteria, the PIM-Taiwan criteria and the PRISCUS criteria was estimated separately, and characteristics of PIM users were explored. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient factors associated with the use of at least one PIM. Leading PIMs for each set of criteria were also listed. Results The prevalence of having at least one PIM at the patient level was highest with the Beers criteria (86.2%), followed by the PIM-Taiwan criteria (73.3%) and the PRISCUS criteria (66.9%). Polypharmacy and younger age were associated with PIM use for all three sets of criteria. The leading PIMs detected by the PIM-Taiwan and PRISCUS criteria were all included in the 2012 Beers criteria. Non-COX-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the Beers criteria and benzodiazepines in the PIM-Taiwan and PRISCUS criteria accounted for most leading PIMs. Conclusions The prevalence of PIMs was high among older Taiwanese patients receiving ambulatory care visits. The prevalence of PIM and its associated factors varied according to three sets of criteria at the population level. PMID:26546136

  12. Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic.

    PubMed

    Carroll, K C; Hale, D C; Von Boerum, D H; Reich, G C; Hamilton, L T; Matsen, J M

    1994-01-01

    A 4-month evaluation of ambulatory patients with a suspicion of a urinary tract infection was performed. Specific objectives included assessment of five urinary screening methods, reevaluation of the necessity of the phenylethyl alcohol plate (PEA), and cost-effectiveness of screening for low colony count bacteriuria. Urine samples were collected as midstream, clean-caught specimens. A total of 142 samples, 87 from 79 symptomatic patients and 55 negative controls, were evaluated. All urine specimens were cultured using a 0.01 mL loop and a 0.001 mL loop onto Columbia sheep blood agar, MacConkey agar, and PEA agar. Twenty-four specimens (17%) were sterile, 64 (45%) were contaminated, and 54 (38%) were infected. Five urine screening methods were performed. These tests and their associated sensitivity and specificity are as follows. The Chemstrip 9 (Behring, Inc., Somerville, NJ) for leukocyte esterase and nitrate, 67%, 98%; microscopic analysis on spun urine, 79%, 93%; methylene blue stain for pyuria, 60%, 99%; Gram stain for pyuria, 45%, 93%; Gram stain for bacteriuria, 65%, 75%; and the URISCREEN (Analytab Products, Plainview, NY), 92%, 89%. Inclusion of a PEA plate for isolation of gram-positive organisms provided no additional information. Routine culture of urine samples at 10(-2) mL increased the contamination rate by 19%. PMID:7506476

  13. Ambulatory Training for Primary Care General Internists: Innovation With the Affordable Care Act in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Rieselbach, Richard E.; Feldstein, David A.; Lee, Patrick T.; Nasca, Thomas J.; Rockey, Paul H.; Steinmann, Alwin F.; Stone, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although primary care general internists (PCGIs) are essential to the physician workforce and the success of the Affordable Care Act, they are becoming an endangered species. Objective We describe an expanded program to educate PCGIs to meet the needs of a reformed health care system and detail the competencies PCGIs will need for their roles in team-based care. Intervention We recommended 5 initiatives to stabilize and expand the PCGI workforce: (1) caring for a defined patient population, (2) leading and serving as members of multidisciplinary health care teams, (3) participating in a medical neighborhood, (4) improving capacity for serving complex patients in group practices and accountable care organizations, and (5) finding an academic role for PCGIs, including clinical, population health, and health services research. A revamped approach to PCGI education based in teaching health centers formed by community health center and academic medical center partnerships would facilitate these curricular innovations. Anticipated Outcomes New approaches to primary care education would include multispecialty group practices facilitated by electronic consultation and clinical decision-support systems provided by the academic medical center partner. Multiprofessional and multidisciplinary education would prepare PCGI trainees with relevant skills for 21st century practice. The centers would also serve as sites for state and federal Medicaid graduate medical education (GME) expansion funding, making this funding more accountable to national health workforce priorities. Conclusions The proposed innovative approach to PCGI training would provide an innovative educational environment, enhance general internist recruitment, provide team-based care for underserved patients, and ensure accountability of GME funds. PMID:24949177

  14. Building for ambulatory care: Children's Hospital grows with the times. Interview by Karen Gardner.

    PubMed

    Colley, R

    1992-02-01

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a 294-bed regional referral center, was the first dedicated children's hospital established in the United States in 1855. Although 39 percent of its beds are designated for intensive care, in 1985 the hospital's board recognized the necessity of expanding its ambulatory care capacity. Much of the credit for implementation of this vision goes to Roger Colley--a trustee recruited in 1983 for his business acumen. At the time he joined the board, Colley had been president of Betz Laboratories Inc., Philadelphia. In 1988, Colley started his own company--Envirogen--a company dedicated to finding new, innovative and lower-cost technologies for treating toxic and hazardous industrial waste. He is president and CEO of Envirogen, Lawrenceville, NJ. Colley was one of the original members of the hospital's long-range planning committee and served as chairman of the board's building and grounds committee during construction (from 1987-89) of the six-story Richard D. Wood Ambulatory Care Center. He recently spoke with Trustee editor Karen Gardner about the process of building this new facility, which opened in September 1989. PMID:10116268

  15. Community Health Centers and Private Practice Performance on Ambulatory Care Measures

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Chu, Philip W.; Tran, Huong; Stafford, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The 2010 Affordable Care Act relies on Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) and FQHC look-alikes (look-alikes) to provide care for newly insured patients, but ties increased funding to demonstrated quality and efficiency. Purpose To compare FQHC and look-alike physician performance with private practice primary care physicians (PCPs) on ambulatory care quality measures. Methods The study was a cross-sectional analysis of visits in the 2006–2008 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Performance of FQHCs and Look-alikes on 18 quality measures was compared with private practice PCPs. Data analysis was completed in 2011. Results Compared to private practice PCPs, FQHCs and look-alikes performed better on 6 measures (p<0.05), worse on diet counseling in at-risk adolescents (26 % vs. 36%, p=0.05), and no differently on 11 measures. Higher performance occurred in: ACE inhibitors use for congestive heart failure (51% vs. 37%, p=0.004); aspirin use in coronary artery disease (CAD) (57% vs. 44%, p=0.004); beta blocker use for CAD (59% vs. 47%, p=0.01); no use of benzodiazepines in depression (91% vs. 84%, p=0.008); blood pressure screening (90% vs. 86%, p<0.001); and screening electrocardiogram (EKG) avoidance in low-risk patients (99% vs. 93%, p<0.001). Adjusting for patient characteristics yielded similar results except private practice PCPs no longer performed better on any measures. Conclusions FQHCs and look-alikes demonstrated equal or better performance than private practice primary care physicians on select quality measures despite serving patients with more chronic disease and socioeconomic complexity. These findings can provide policymakers with some reassurance as to the quality of chronic disease and preventive care at Federally Qualified Health Centers and Federally Qualified Health Center look-alikes, as they plan to use these health centers to serve 20 million newly insured individuals. PMID:22813678

  16. Identifying consumer segments in health services markets: an application of conjoint and cluster analyses to the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

    PubMed

    Carrol, N V; Gagon, J P

    1983-01-01

    Because of increasing competition, it is becoming more important that health care providers pursue consumer-based market segmentation strategies. This paper presents a methodology for identifying and describing consumer segments in health service markets, and demonstrates the use of the methodology by presenting a study of consumer segments in the ambulatory care pharmacy market. PMID:10262855

  17. Clinical Interest of Ambulatory Assessment of Physical Activity and Walking Capacity in Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    de Müllenheim, P-Y; Chaudru, S; Mahé, G; Prioux, J; Le Faucheur, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present review was to provide, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of the available studies that highlighted the clinical interest of the ambulatory assessment of either physical activity (PA) or walking capacity in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). We identified 96 related articles published up to March 2015 through a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases. Ambulatory-measured PA or related energy expenditure (EE) in PAD patients was performed in 87 of the 96 included studies. The main clinical interests of these measurements were (a) the assessment of PA/EE pattern; (b) the characterization of walking pattern; and (c) the control of training load during home-based walking programs. Ambulatory-measured walking capacity was performed in the remaining studies, using either Global Positioning System receivers or the Peripheral Arterial Disease Holter Control device. Highlighted clinical interests were (a) the assessment of community-based walking capacity; (b) the use of new outcomes to characterize walking capacity, besides the conventional absolute claudication distance; and (c) the association with the patient's self-perception of walking capacity. This review also provides for the clinicians step-by-step recommendations to specifically assess PA or walking capacity in PAD patients. PMID:26173488

  18. The cultivation of prognostic awareness through the provision of early palliative care in the ambulatory setting: a communication guide.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Vicki A; Jacobsen, Juliet; Greer, Joseph A; Pirl, William F; Temel, Jennifer S; Back, Anthony L

    2013-08-01

    Early, integrated palliative care delivered in the ambulatory setting has been associated with improved quality of life, lower rates of depression, and even prolonged survival. We outline an expert practice that provides a step-wise approach to cultivating prognostic awareness in patients cared for by a palliative care clinician early in the course of the patient's disease. This approach can be used by both novice and more experienced palliative care clinicians. PMID:23786425

  19. Comparing Team-Based and Mixed Active-Learning Methods in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Andrea S.; Guirguis, Alexander B.; George, Christa M.; Howard-Thompson, Amanda; Heidel, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess students' performance and perceptions of team-based and mixed active-learning methods in 2 ambulatory care elective courses, and to describe faculty members' perceptions of team-based learning. Methods Using the 2 teaching methods, students' grades were compared. Students' perceptions were assessed through 2 anonymous course evaluation instruments. Faculty members who taught courses using the team-based learning method were surveyed regarding their impressions of team-based learning. Results The ambulatory care course was offered to 64 students using team-based learning (n = 37) and mixed active learning (n = 27) formats. The mean quality points earned were 3.7 (team-based learning) and 3.3 (mixed active learning), p < 0.001. Course evaluations for both courses were favorable. All faculty members who used the team-based learning method reported that they would consider using team-based learning in another course. Conclusions Students were satisfied with both teaching methods; however, student grades were significantly higher in the team-based learning course. Faculty members recognized team-based learning as an effective teaching strategy for small-group active learning. PMID:21301594

  20. Does Ambulatory Process of Care Predict Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Katherine L; Tisnado, Diana M; Adams, John L; Liu, Honghu; Chen, Wen-Pin; Hu, Fang Ashlee; Mangione, Carol M; Hays, Ronald D; Damberg, Cheryl L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The validity of quality of care measurement has important implications for practicing clinicians, their patients, and all involved with health care delivery. We used empirical data from managed care patients enrolled in west coast physician organizations to test the hypothesis that observed changes in health-related quality of life across a 2.5-year window reflecting process of care. Data Sources/Study Setting Patient self-report data as well as clinically detailed medical record review regarding 963 patients with chronic disease associated with managed care from three west coast states. Study Design Prospective cohort study of change in health-related quality of life scores across 30 months as measured by change in SF-12 physical component scores. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Patient self-report and medical record abstraction. Principal Findings We found a positive relationship between better process scores and higher burden of illness (p<.05). After adjustment for burden of illness, using an instrumental variables approach revealed better process is associated with smaller declines in SF-12 scores across a 30-month observation window (p =.014). The application of the best quartile of process of care to patients currently receiving poor process is associated with a 4.24 increment in δ SF-12-physical component summary scores. Conclusions The use of instrumental variables allowed us to demonstrate a significant relationship between better ambulatory process of care and better health-related quality of life. This finding underscores the importance of efforts to improve the process of care. PMID:17355582

  1. A Qualitative Study of Resident Learning in Ambulatory Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Scott; Morris, Magdalena; Francovich, Chris; Hill, William; Gieselman, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative analysis of a large ethnographic database from observations of a resident teaching clinic revealed three important findings. The first finding was that breakdown, a situation where an "actor" (such as a person or the group) is not achieving expected effectiveness, was the most important category because of its frequency and explanatory…

  2. Marketing strategy adjustments in the ambulatory care center industry: implications for community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J H

    1989-01-01

    Each stage of a product's life cycle requires marketing strategy modifications in response to changing demand levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in ambulatory care center (ACC) operational characteristics indicative of product, market, and distribution channel adjustments that could have a competitive impact upon community pharmacy practice. A questionnaire was mailed to a national sample of 325 ACC managers. Evidence of new product feature additions includes increased emphasis on continued care and increased prevalence of prescription drug dispensing. Expansion into new market segments and distribution channels was demonstrated by increased participation in HMO and employer relationships. The observed adjustments in ACC marketing strategies present obvious challenges as well as less obvious opportunities for community pharmacy practice. PMID:10295634

  3. Assessing the Functional Status of Older Cancer Patients in an Ambulatory Care Visit

    PubMed Central

    Overcash, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Functional status assessment is a useful and essential component of the complete history and physical exam of the older patient diagnosed with cancer. Functional status is the ability to conduct activities that are necessary for independence and more executive activities, such as money management, cooking, and transportation. Assessment of functional status creates a portal into interpreting the health of in older persons. Understanding limitations and physical abilities can help in developing cancer treatment strategies, patient/family teaching needs, and in-home services that enhance patient/family care. This article will review the benefits of functional assessment, instruments that can be used during an ambulatory care visit, and interventions that can address potential limitations. PMID:27417801

  4. Addressing Pediatric Obesity in Ambulatory Care: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed

    Lenders, Carine M; Manders, Aaron J; Perdomo, Joanna E; Ireland, Kathy A; Barlow, Sarah E

    2016-06-01

    Since the "2007 summary report of child and adolescent overweight and obesity treatment" published by Barlow, many obesity intervention studies have been conducted in pediatric ambulatory care. Although several meta-analyses have been published in the interim, many studies were excluded because of the focus and criteria of these meta-analyses. Therefore, the primary goal of this article was to identify randomized case-control trials conducted in the primary care setting and to report on treatment approaches, challenges, and successes. We have developed four themes for our discussion and provide a brief summary of our findings. Finally, we identified major gaps and potential solutions and describe several urgent key action items. PMID:27048522

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System in Improving Medication Safety Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Sara H.; Hepp, Zsolt; Roth, Joshua A.; Wirtz, Heidi S.; Devine, Emily Beth

    2014-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) is the process of entering physician orders directly into an electronic health record. Although CPOE has been shown to improve medication safety and reduce health care costs, these improvements have been demonstrated largely in the inpatient setting; the cost-effectiveness in the ambulatory setting remains uncertain. Objective The objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in reducing medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) in the ambulatory setting. Methods We created a decision-analytic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in a midsized (400 providers) multidisciplinary medical group over a 5-year time horizon— 2010 to 2014— the time frame during which health systems are implementing CPOE to meet Meaningful Use criteria. We adopted the medical group’s perspective and utilized their costs, changes in efficiency, and actual number of medication errors and ADEs. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Scenario analyses were explored. Results In the base case, CPOE dominated paper prescribing, that is, CPOE cost $18 million less than paper prescribing, and was associated with 1.5 million and 14,500 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years. In the scenario that reflected a practice group of five providers, CPOE cost $265,000 less than paper prescribing, was associated with 3875 and 39 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years, and was dominant in 80% of the simulations. Conclusions Our model suggests that the adoption of CPOE in the ambulatory setting provides excellent value for the investment, and is a cost-effective strategy to improve medication safety over a wide range of practice sizes. PMID:24968993

  6. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Wayne; Nicol, Kelly; Anderson, David; Brownell, Brenda; Chiasson, Meredith; Burge, Frederick I.; Flowerdew, Gordon; Cox, Jafna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients not taking warfarin who had risk factors that made anticoagulation appropriate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients removed from the care gap; reasons given for not giving the remainder anticoagulants. RESULTS: Half the patients thought to be in the care gap had previously unknown contraindications to anticoagulation, lacked a clear indication for anticoagulation, or were taking warfarin. Patients' refusal and anticipated problems with compliance and monitoring were among the reasons for not giving patients anticoagulants. CONCLUSION: Adding data from primary care physicians significantly narrowed the care gap. Attention should focus on the remaining reasons for not giving eligible patients anticoagulants. PMID:15508374

  7. Characteristics of ambulatory care visits to family medicine specialists in Taiwan: a nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, An-Min; Shih, Tzu-Chien; Hung, Cheng-Hao; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Although family medicine (FM) is the most commonly practiced specialty among all the medical specialties, its practice patterns have seldom been analyzed. Looking at data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, the current study analyzed ambulatory visits to FM specialists nationwide. From a sample dataset that randomly sampled one out of every 500 cases among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012, it was found that 18.8% (n = 116, 551) of the 619,760 visits in the dataset were made to FM specialists. Most of the FM services were performed by male FM physicians. Elderly patients above 80 years of age accounted for only 7.1% of FM visits. The most frequent diagnoses (22.8%) were associated acute upper respiratory infections (including ICD 460, 465 and 466). Anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 25.6% of FM visits. Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were the causes of 20.7% of the ambulatory visits made to FM specialists of all types, while those conditions accounted for only 10.6% of visits to FM clinics. The study demonstrated the relatively low proportion of chronic diseases that was managed in FM clinics in Taiwan, and our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on healthcare policymaking and residency training. PMID:26290798

  8. Medical Students' Education in the Ambulatory Care Setting: Background Paper 1 of the Medical School Objectives Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Carl E.; Kallenberg, Gene A.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on strategies being developed by medical schools to carry out education in the ambulatory care setting, based on studies of 38 institutions. Highlights three main strategies: longitudinal preceptorships; multi-specialty clerkships; and community-oriented and population-based activities that provide relevant educational experiences for…

  9. Studies in Ambulatory Care Quality Assessment in the Indian Health Service. Volume I: Overview of the Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutting, Paul A.; And Others

    Describing the methodology by which the quality of ambulatory health care in the Indian Health Service (IHS) might be measured, this report presents a brief review of the literature; discusses design decisions basic to the methodology; presents a pilot study; and presents examples of process maps, indicators and adult criteria, and data collection…

  10. 42 CFR 410.165 - Payment for rural health clinic services and ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for rural health clinic services and... (SMI) BENEFITS Payment of SMI Benefits § 410.165 Payment for rural health clinic services and ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for covered rural health clinic...

  11. 42 CFR 410.165 - Payment for rural health clinic services and ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for rural health clinic services and... (SMI) BENEFITS Payment of SMI Benefits § 410.165 Payment for rural health clinic services and ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for covered rural health clinic...

  12. Dietary recommendations in ambulatory care: evaluation of the Southern Remedy Healthy Eating Plate.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda K; Minor, Deborah S; Tillman, Lindsey E; DeShazo, Richard D; Replogle, William H

    2012-10-01

    There are few useful tools to provide dietary health education including calorie and portion control to patients, particularly in a busy ambulatory health care setting. In this report, we provide results of the evaluation of an adaptation of the recent US Department of Agriculture dietary recommendations modified for the southern diet and individuals with limited knowledge of healthy eating. Using standardized methods, we found that the "Southern Remedy Healthy Eating Plate" was well accepted by patients and can be used quickly and effectively in the outpatient setting. Moreover, the review of this placemat with easy to understand instructions for meals and snacks was associated with acceptable levels of data retention after a single visit averaging 5 minutes. Although the need for some modification of instruction techniques was identified, the Southern Remedy Healthy Eating Plate appears to be a practical and useful format for providing structured dietary counseling and education in this setting and others. PMID:23210229

  13. Quality of Private and Public Ambulatory Health Care in Low and Middle Income Countries: Systematic Review of Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Berendes, Sima; Heywood, Peter; Oliver, Sandy; Garner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background In developing countries, the private sector provides a substantial proportion of primary health care to low income groups for communicable and non-communicable diseases. These providers are therefore central to improving health outcomes. We need to know how their services compare to those of the public sector to inform policy options. Methods and Findings We summarised reliable research comparing the quality of formal private versus public ambulatory health care in low and middle income countries. We selected studies against inclusion criteria following a comprehensive search, yielding 80 studies. We compared quality under standard categories, converted values to a linear 100% scale, calculated differences between providers within studies, and summarised median values of the differences across studies. As the results for for-profit and not-for-profit providers were similar, we combined them. Overall, median values indicated that many services, irrespective of whether public or private, scored low on infrastructure, clinical competence, and practice. Overall, the private sector performed better in relation to drug supply, responsiveness, and effort. No difference between provider groups was detected for patient satisfaction or competence. Synthesis of qualitative components indicates the private sector is more client centred. Conclusions Although data are limited, quality in both provider groups seems poor, with the private sector performing better in drug availability and aspects of delivery of care, including responsiveness and effort, and possibly being more client orientated. Strategies seeking to influence quality in both groups are needed to improve care delivery and outcomes for the poor, including managing the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21532746

  14. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients’ lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we present the treatment of a patient with Type III FGM/C in an ambulatory urology clinic in the United States. PMID:27333917

  15. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients' lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we present the treatment of a patient with Type III FGM/C in an ambulatory urology clinic in the United States. PMID:27333917

  16. Application of Porter's generic strategies in ambulatory health care: a comparison of managerial perceptions in two Israeli sick funds.

    PubMed

    Torgovicky, Refael; Goldberg, Avishay; Shvarts, Shifra; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Onn, Erez; Levi, Yehezkel; BarDayan, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    A number of typologies have been developed in the strategic management literature to categorize strategies that an organization can pursue at the business level. Extensive research has established Porter's generic strategies of (1) cost leadership, (2) differentiation, (3) differentiation focus, (4) cost focus, and (5) stuck-in-the-middle as the dominant paradigm in the literature. The purpose of the current study was to research competitive strategies in the Israeli ambulatory health care system, by comparing managerial perceptions of present and ideal business strategies in two Israeli sick funds. We developed a unique research tool, which reliably examines the gap between the present and ideal status managerial views. We found a relation between the business strategy and performance measures, thus strengthening Porter's original theory about the nonviability of the stuck-in-the-middle strategy, and suggesting the applicability Porter's generic strategies to not-for-profit institutes in an ambulatory health care system. PMID:15773250

  17. Patient-as-observer approach: an alternative method for hand hygiene auditing in an ambulatory care setting.

    PubMed

    Le-Abuyen, Sheila; Ng, Jessica; Kim, Susie; De La Franier, Anne; Khan, Bibi; Mosley, Jane; Gardam, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A survey pilot asked patients to observe the hand hygiene compliance of their health care providers. Patients returned 75.1% of the survey cards distributed, and the overall hand hygiene compliance was 96.8%. Survey results and patient commentary were used to motivate hand hygiene compliance. The patient-as-observer approach appeared to be a viable alternative for hand hygiene auditing in an ambulatory care setting because it educated, engaged, and empowered patients to play a more active role in their own health care. PMID:24679574

  18. Depression and Ambulatory Care Sensitive Hospitalizations among Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Physical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the association between depression and hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (H-ACSC) among Medicare beneficiaries with chronic physical conditions. Methods We used a retrospective longitudinal design using multiple years (2002-2009) of linked fee-for-service Medicare claims and survey data from Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) data to create six longitudinal panels. We followed individuals in each panel for a period of three years; first year served as the baseline and subsequent two years served as the follow-up. We measured depression, chronic physical conditions and other characteristics at baseline and examined H-ACSC at two follow-up. We identified chronic physical conditions from survey data and H-ACSC and depression from fee-for-service Medicare claims.. We analyzed unadjusted and adjusted relationships between depression and the risk of H-ACSC with chi-square tests and logistic regressions. Results Among all Medicare beneficiaries, 9.3% had diagnosed depression. Medicare beneficiaries with depression had higher rates of any H-ACSC as compared to those without depression (13.6% vs 7.7%). Multivariable regression indicated that compared to those without depression, Medicare beneficiaries with depression were more likely to experience any H-ACSC. Conclusions Depression was associated with greater risk of H-ACSC, suggesting that healthcare quality measures may need to include depression as a risk-adjustment variable. PMID:24999083

  19. Electronic Prescribing: Improving the Efficiency and Accuracy of Prescribing in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Amber; Engelbert, Kate; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) is an important part of the nation's push to enhance the safety and quality of the prescribing process. E-prescribing allows providers in the ambulatory care setting to send prescriptions electronically to the pharmacy and can be a stand-alone system or part of an integrated electronic health record system. The methodology for this study followed the basic principles of a systematic review. A total of 47 sources were referenced. Results of this research study suggest that e-prescribing reduces prescribing errors, increases efficiency, and helps to save on healthcare costs. Medication errors have been reduced to as little as a seventh of their previous level, and cost savings due to improved patient outcomes and decreased patient visits are estimated to be between $140 billion and $240 billion over 10 years for practices that implement e-prescribing. However, there have been significant barriers to implementation including cost, lack of provider support, patient privacy, system errors, and legal issues. PMID:24808808

  20. Comparative evaluation of an ambulatory EEG platform vs. clinical gold standard.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gregory; Radhu, Natasha; Sun, Yinming; Tallevi, Kevin; Ritvo, Paul; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Grundlehner, Bernard; Penders, Julien; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) testing in clinical labs makes use of large amplifiers and complex software for data acquisition. While there are new ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG) systems, few have been directly compared to a gold standard system. Here, an ultra-low power wireless EEG system designed by Imec is tested against the gold standard Neuroscan SynAmps2 EEG system, recording simultaneously from the same laboratory cap prepared with electrode gel. The data was analyzed using correlation analysis for both time domain and frequency domain data. The analysis indicated a high Pearson's correlation coefficient (mean=0.957, median=0.985) with high confidence (mean P=0.002) for 10-second sets of data transformed to the frequency domain. The time domain results had acceptable Pearson's coefficient (mean=0.580, median =0.706) with high confidence (mean P=0.008). PMID:24109914

  1. Prevalence of Polyherbacy in Ambulatory Visits to Traditional Chinese Medicine Clinics in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Tu, Chun-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a polyherbal prescription are more likely to receive duplicate medications and thus suffer from adverse drug reactions. We conducted a population-based retrospective study to examine the items of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) per prescription in the ambulatory care of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Taiwan. We retrieved complete TCM ambulatory visit datasets for 2010 from the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. A total of 59,790 patients who received 313,482 CHM prescriptions were analyzed. Drug prescriptions containing more than five drugs were classified as polyherbal prescriptions; 41.6% of patients were given a polyherbal prescription. There were on average 5.2 ± 2.5 CHMs: 2.3 ± 1.1 compound herbal formula items, and 3.0 ± 2.5 single Chinese herb items in a single prescription. Approximately 4.6% of patients were prescribed 10 CHMs or more. Men had a lower odds ratio (OR) among polyherbal prescriptions (OR = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92–0.99), and middle-aged patients (35–49 years) had the highest frequency of polyherbal prescription (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13–1.26). Patients with neoplasm, skin and subcutaneous tissue disease, or genitourinary system disease were more likely to have a polyherbal prescription; OR = 2.20 (1.81–2.67), 1.65 (1.50–1.80), and 1.52 (1.40–1.64), respectively. Polyherbal prescription is widespread in TCM in Taiwan. Potential herb interactions and iatrogenic risks associated with polyherbal prescriptions should be monitored. PMID:26287228

  2. Trends in physician diagnosed gout and gout therapies in the US: results from the national ambulatory health care surveys 1993 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gouty arthritis (gout) is primarily cared for in ambulatory care settings. Although the prevalence of gout in the US is thought to be increasing, there have been few data on this as well as temporal changes in gout medication use. Methods We analyzed annual visit and drug utilization data from national sample surveys of physician practices and hospital outpatient clinics in the US from 1993 to 2009. Gout diagnosis was recorded by individual physicians. Result The frequency of visits for gout increased three-fold from 1993 through 2009; most of the increases were observed from 2003 onwards. The increase was only partly explained by changes in age and gender composition of the surveys over time. A concomitant increase in prescriptions for allopurinol and colchicine and decrease in prescriptions for anti-inflammatories was observed. Aspirin use, a putative risk factor for gout and gout flares, increased substantially over this period. Probenecid use was negligible. Frequency of systemic steroid use has not changed over time. Conclusions The number of ambulatory visits for gout has increased almost three-fold in the first decade of the millennium coinciding with increases in physician and patient awareness. This increase was primarily due to visits among the elderly. Uricosuric use remained negligible whereas the uses of allopurinol and colchicine have increased rapidly. Use of traditional non-steroidals has declined, possibly due to safety concerns whereas glucocorticoid use remains unchanged. PMID:24286510

  3. Potential collaboration with the private sector for the provision of ambulatory care in the Mekong region, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Duc, Ha Anh; Sabin, Lora L.; Cuong, Le Quang; Thien, Duong Duc; Feeley, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past two decades, health insurance in Vietnam has expanded nationwide. Concurrently, Vietnam's private health sector has developed rapidly and become an increasingly integral part of the health system. To date, however, little is understood regarding the potential for expanding public-private partnerships to improve health care access and outcomes in Vietnam. Objective To explore possibilities for public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in the Mekong region, Vietnam. Design We employed a mixed methods research approach. Qualitative methods included focus group discussions with health officials and in-depth interviews with managers of private health facilities. Quantitative methods encompassed facility assessments, and exit surveys of clients at the same private facilities. Results Discussions with health officials indicated generally favorable attitudes towards partnerships with private providers. Concerns were also voiced, regarding the over- and irrational use of antibiotics, and in terms of limited capacity for regulation, monitoring, and quality assurance. Private facility managers expressed a willingness to collaborate in the provision of ambulatory care, and private providers facilites were relatively well staffed and equipped. The client surveys indicated that 80% of clients first sought treatment at a private facility, even though most lived closer to a public provider. This choice was motivated mainly by perceptions of quality of care. Clients who reported seeking care at both a public and private facility were more satisfied with the latter. Conclusions Public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in Vietnam has substantial potential for improving access to quality services. We recommend that such collaboration be explored by Vietnamese policy-makers. If implemented, we strongly urge attention to effectively managing such partnerships, establishing a

  4. Usefulness of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in daily clinical practice: Data from the Spanish ABPM registry.

    PubMed

    Segura, Julian; Banegas, Jose R; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    1. Hypertension is one of the most important challenges for public health systems because of its high prevalence and its association with the risk of cardiovascular and renal diseases. 2. Adequate control of hypertension is low in population and medical settings, with physicians frequently misclassifying patients' blood pressure status based on readings taken in the clinic rather than ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM). 3. Data from the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM registry support ABPM as a feasible option in the primary care setting, providing valuable information for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. By using ABPM rather than office BP monitoring, BP control can be doubled. This is an encouraging message to clinicians, although there is still a relatively large degree of undetected controlled and uncontrolled hypertension. 4. This short review describes the design, development and main results of the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM registry, a project based on a large-scale network of Spanish physicians trained in ABPM. PMID:23710883

  5. Longitudinal Study of Left Ventricular Mass Growth: Comparative Study of Clinic and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is an established cardiovascular risk factor, yet little is known about its trajectory in people with chronic kidney disease. The goal of this prospective research study was to describe the trajectory of LV mass index, its relationship with blood pressure (BP), and specifically to compare the relationship of BP measured in the clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring with LV mass index. Among 274 veterans with chronic kidney disease followed for over ≤ 4 years, the rate of growth of log LV mass index was inversely related to baseline LV mass index; it was rapid in the first 2 years, and plateaued subsequently. Systolic BP also significantly increased, but linearly, 1.7 mm Hg/y by clinic measurements and 1.8 mm Hg/y by 24-hour ambulatory BP. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of both clinic BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP with LV mass index were similar; both BP recording methods were associated with LV mass index and its growth over time. Controlled hypertension, masked uncontrolled hypertension, and uncontrolled hypertension categories had increasing LV mass index when diagnosed by 24-hour ambulatory and awake BP (P<0.05 for linear trend) but not sleep BP. After accounting for clinic BP both at baseline and longitudinally, LV mass index among individuals was additionally predicted by the difference in sleep systolic BP and clinic systolic BP (P=0.032). In conclusion, among people with chronic kidney disease, the growth of LV mass index is rapid. Research-grade clinic BP is useful to assess LV mass index and its growth over time. PMID:26831191

  6. A Break-Even Analysis of Optimum Faculty Assignment for Ambulatory Primary Care Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xakellis, George C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation was developed to estimate the number of medical residents one or two faculty teachers could supervise in a university-based primary medical care teaching clinic. With no non-teaching tasks, it was shown that two teachers could supervise 11 residents, while one teacher was able to supervise only three residents under similar…

  7. Ambulatory Care in Medical Residency: Integration of Private Practitioner's Office with Traditional Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bane, Susan; Criscione, Teri

    1983-01-01

    An Albany Medical College program utilizes private internists' offices as sites for resident ambulatory education. The private practitioner is perceived as an excellent teacher and role model who provides a positive effect on the long-term career goals of residents. (MLW)

  8. Ambulatory medical care in the People's Republic of China: an exploratory study.

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, D; Kleinman, A

    1980-01-01

    One hundred thirty-eight persons in varying outpatient settings in the People's Republic of China were interviewed briefly. Hospital outpatient utilization appeared to reflect not only severity of illness, but also patients' attitudes and beliefs, illness behavior patterns, and convenience, modifying the formal system of care to some extent. Traditional clinics in commune and county hospitals were typically used to treat psychiatric disorders (defined as physical conditions), chronic illness, and other conditions for which Western medicine offers only symptomatic treatment. PMID:7350824

  9. Determining Primary Care Physician Information Needs to Inform Ambulatory Visit Note Display

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, M.A.; Steege, L.M.; Moore, J.L.; Koopman, R.J.; Belden, J.L.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background With the increase in the adoption of electronic health records (EHR) across the US, primary care physicians are experiencing information overload. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the information needs of primary care physicians (PCPs) as they review clinic visit notes to inform EHR display. Method Data collection was conducted with 15 primary care physicians during semi-structured interviews, including a third party observer to control bias. Physicians reviewed major sections of an artificial but typical acute and chronic care visit note to identify the note sections that were relevant to their information needs. Statistical methods used were McNemar-Mosteller’s and Cochran Q. Results Physicians identified History of Present Illness (HPI), Assessment, and Plan (A&P) as the most important sections of a visit note. In contrast, they largely judged the Review of Systems (ROS) to be superfluous. There was also a statistical difference in physicians’ highlighting among all seven major note sections in acute (p = 0.00) and chronic (p = 0.00) care visit notes. Conclusion A&P and HPI sections were most frequently identified as important which suggests that physicians may have to identify a few key sections out of a long, unnecessarily verbose visit note. ROS is viewed by doctors as mostly “not needed,” but can have relevant information. The ROS can contain information needed for patient care when other sections of the Visit note, such as the HPI, lack the relevant information. Future studies should include producing a display that provides only relevant information to increase physician efficiency at the point of care. Also, research on moving A&P to the top of visit notes instead of having A&P at the bottom of the page is needed, since those are usually the first sections physicians refer to and reviewing from top to bottom may cause cognitive load. PMID:24734131

  10. Patient Education: A Better Way to Achieve Compliance in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, May 29, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings consist of the texts of eight papers presented at a conference on patient education. Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "An Educational Framework in the Ambulatory Care Setting," by Jeannette J. Simmons; "The Status of Education in Ambulatory Care: A Report of the American Hospital Association," by…

  11. Bringing PROMIS to practice: Brief and precise symptom screening in ambulatory cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Lynne I.; Schink, Julian; Bass, Michael; Patel, Shalini; Diaz, Maria Varela; Rothrock, Nan; Pearman, Timothy; Gershon, Richard; Penedo, Frank J.; Rosen, Steven; Cella, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Supportive oncology practice can be enhanced by integrating brief and validated electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) assessment into the electronic health record (EHR) and clinical workflow. Methods 636 women receiving gynecologic oncology outpatient care received instructions to complete clinical assessments through Epic MyChart, the EHR patient communication portal. PROMIS computer adaptive tests (CATs) were administered to assess fatigue, pain interference, physical function, depression, and anxiety. Checklists identified psychosocial concerns, informational and nutritional needs, and risk factors for inadequate nutrition. Assessment results, including PROMIS T-scores with documented severity thresholds, were immediately populated in the EHR. Clinicians were notified of clinically elevated symptoms through EHR messages. EHR integration was designed to provide automated triage to social work providers for psychosocial concerns, health educators for information, and dietitians for nutrition-related concerns. Results Of 4,042 MyChart messages sent, 3,203 (79%) were reviewed by patients. The assessment was started by 1,493 (37%) patients, and once started 93% completed (1,386 patients). Using first assessments only, 49.8% of patients who reviewed the MyChart message completed the assessment. Mean PROMIS CAT T-scores indicated a lower level of physical function and elevated anxiety compared to the general population. Fatigue, pain, and depression scores were comparable to the general population. Impaired physical functioning was the most common basis for clinical alerts, occurring in 4% of patients. Conclusions We used PROMIS CATs to measure common cancer symptoms in routine oncology outpatient care. Immediate EHR integration facilitated the use of symptom reporting as the basis for referral to psychosocial and supportive care. PMID:25376427

  12. Discordance between ambulatory versus clinic blood pressure according to global cardiovascular risk group

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jinho; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Ju Han; Ihm, Sang Hyun; Kim, Kwang-il; Kim, Woo Shik; Pyun, Wook Bum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Choi, Sung-il; Kim, Soon Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: The detection of white coat hypertension (WCH), treated normalized hypertension, and masked hypertension (MH) is important to improve the effectiveness of hypertension management. However, whether global cardiovascular risk (GCR) profile has any effect on the discordance between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and clinic blood pressure (CBP) is unknown. Methods: Data from 1,916 subjects, taken from the Korean Multicenter Registry for ABP monitoring, were grouped according to diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds for CBP and ABP (140/90 and 135/85 mmHg, respectively). GCR was assessed using European Society of Hypertension 2007 guidelines. Results: The mean subject age was 54.1 ± 14.9 years, and 48.9% of patients were female. The discordancy rate between ABP and CBP in the untreated and treated patients was 32.5% and 26.5%, respectively (p = 0.02). The prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension and MH was 14.4% and 16.0%, respectively. Discordance between ABP and CBP was lower in the very high added-risk group compared to the moderate added-risk group (odds ratio [OR], 0.649; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.487 to 0.863; p = 0.003). The prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension was also lower in the very high added-risk group (OR, 0.451; 95% CI, 0.311 to 0.655). Conclusions: Discordance between ABP and CBP was observed more frequently in untreated subjects than in treated subjects, and less frequently in the very high added-risk group, which was due mainly to the lower prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension. PMID:26354055

  13. Why do patients seek care at retail clinics, and what alternatives did they consider?

    PubMed

    Wang, Margaret C; Ryan, Gery; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2010-01-01

    Retail clinics are an increasingly popular new model of ambulatory care. To understand why patients seek care at these clinics and what their experiences were like, the authors interviewed 61 patients at 6 retail clinics. Patients were satisfied with the overall experience and were attracted to retail clinics because of their convenient locations and fixed, transparent pricing. Patients who had a primary care physician (PCP) sought care at these clinics primarily because their PCPs were not available in a timely manner. If retail clinics had not been available, a quarter of patients report they would have gone to the emergency department. Retail clinics appear to be responding to the need for convenient, affordable, and consumer-centered care. PMID:20142442

  14. Ambulatory Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory assessment (AA) covers a wide range of assessment methods to study people in their natural environment, including self-report, observational, and biological/physiological/behavioral. AA methods minimize retrospective biases while gathering ecologically valid data from patients’ everyday life in real time or near real time. Here, we report on the major characteristics of AA, and we provide examples of applications of AA in clinical psychology (a) to investigate mechanisms and dynamics of symptoms, (b) to predict the future recurrence or onset of symptoms, (c) to monitor treatment effects, (d) to predict treatment success, (e) to prevent relapse, and (f) as interventions. In addition, we present and discuss the most pressing and compelling future AA applications: technological developments (the smartphone), improved ecological validity of laboratory results by combined lab-field studies, and investigating gene-environment interactions. We conclude with a discussion of acceptability, compliance, privacy, and ethical issues. PMID:23157450

  15. Studies in Ambulatory Care Quality Assessment in the Indian Health Service. Volume III: Comparison of Rural Private Practice, Health Maintenance Organizations, and the Indian Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutting, Paul A.; And Others

    Utilizing a quality assessment methodology for ambulatory patient care currently under development by the Indian Health Service's (IHS) Office of Research and Development, comparisons were made between results derived from a pilot test in IHS service units, 2 metropolitan Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), and 3 rural private practices.…

  16. Factors associated with pneumonia in Yanomami children hospitalized for Ambulatory Care sensitive conditions in the north of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Caldart, Raquel Voges; Marrero, Lihsieh; Basta, Paulo Cesar; Orellana, Jesem Douglas Yamall

    2016-05-01

    In developing countries, pneumonia is the leading cause of sickness and mortality in childhood, especially among vulnerable groups. The scope of this study was to analyze the factors associated with pneumonia in Yanomami children hospitalized for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC). Hospital admissions were divided into two groups: i) pneumonia; and ii) other causes, according to the Brazilian ACSC list. Adjusted hospitalization rates were estimated and unconditional logistic regression was used to analyze factors associated with pneumonia. Over 90% of the registered cases were considered ACSC. The adjusted rate of ACSC was 18.6/1000. The odds ratio of hospitalization for pneumonia was 2.7 (CI: 1.3-5.4) times higher in children aged between 0.1 and 5.9 months; 1.9 (CI: 1.1-3.3) times higher in children who were hospitalized for 8-14 days; and three (CI: 1.2-7.5) times higher in children with a secondary diagnosis of malnutrition. The excess of avoidable hospitalizations is a clear indication of the low quality of care and limited accessibility to primary health care in indigenous territories, which is contrary to the assistance model proposed by the indigenous healthcare subsystem in Brazil, which should in theory focus on welfare technologies based on primary health care. PMID:27166907

  17. The 'offset effect' of mental health treatment on ambulatory medical care utilization and charges. Month-by-month and grouped-month analyses of a five-year study.

    PubMed

    Borus, J F; Olendzki, M C; Kessler, L; Burns, B J; Brandt, U C; Broverman, C A; Henderson, P R

    1985-06-01

    The five-year ambulatory medical care experience of 400 patients with mental disorders was studied to test the "offset" hypothesis that patients receiving timely mental health specialist treatment have lower subsequent utilization of, and charges for, care than patients not receiving such specialist treatment. Specialist treatment was associated with significant offset savings in utilization and charges for the non-psychiatric medical care of treated patients with either severe or less severe mental disorders. However, the visits and charges for such specialist treatment boosted the overall (nonpsychiatric plus mental health specialist) care utilization and charges of the specialist-treated patients above those of patients treated solely by their nonpsychiatric physicians; this overall increase was especially pronounced for patients with severe mental disorders. The findings suggest the need for randomized prospective offset studies comparing utilization, cost, and clinical outcomes. PMID:4004499

  18. The Cleveland Clinic Experience with Supraclavicular and Popliteal Ambulatory Nerve Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Gharabawy, Ramez; Eid, Gamal; Mendoza, Maria; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Ali Sakr Esa, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications. PMID:25535627

  19. Relative effectiveness of clinic and home blood pressure monitoring compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in diagnosis of hypertension: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, J; Mant, J; Martin, U; Guo, B; Hobbs, F D R; Deeks, J J; Heneghan, C; Roberts, N

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative accuracy of clinic measurements and home blood pressure monitoring compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a reference standard for the diagnosis of hypertension. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis with hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic models. Methodological quality was appraised, including evidence of validation of blood pressure measurement equipment. Data sources Medline (from 1966), Embase (from 1980), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, Medion, ARIF, and TRIP up to May 2010. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Eligible studies examined diagnosis of hypertension in adults of all ages using home and/or clinic blood pressure measurement compared with those made using ambulatory monitoring that clearly defined thresholds to diagnose hypertension. Results The 20 eligible studies used various thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension, and only seven studies (clinic) and three studies (home) could be directly compared with ambulatory monitoring. Compared with ambulatory monitoring thresholds of 135/85 mm Hg, clinic measurements over 140/90 mm Hg had mean sensitivity and specificity of 74.6% (95% confidence interval 60.7% to 84.8%) and 74.6% (47.9% to 90.4%), respectively, whereas home measurements over 135/85 mm Hg had mean sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% (78.0% to 91.0%) and 62.4% (48.0% to 75.0%). Conclusions Neither clinic nor home measurement had sufficient sensitivity or specificity to be recommended as a single diagnostic test. If ambulatory monitoring is taken as the reference standard, then treatment decisions based on clinic or home blood pressure alone might result in substantial overdiagnosis. Ambulatory monitoring before the start of lifelong drug treatment might lead to more appropriate targeting of treatment, particularly around the diagnostic threshold. PMID:21705406

  20. Understanding utilization of outpatient clinics for children with special health care needs in southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Peres, Hagit; Glazer, Yael; Landau, Daniella; Marks, Kyla; Abokaf, Hana'a; Belmaker, Ilana; Cohen, Arnon; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana

    2014-10-01

    To understand the pattern of utilization of ambulatory care by parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and to explore parental challenges in coping with health maintenance of their infants after discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). CSHCN require frequent utilization of outpatient ambulatory clinics especially in their first years of life. Multiple barriers are faced by families in disadvantaged populations which might affect adherence to medical referrals. Our study attempts to go beyond quantitative assessment of adherence rates, and capture the influence of parental agency as a critical factor ensuring optimal utilization of healthcare for CSHCN. A prospective, mixed-methods, cohort study followed 158 Jewish and Bedouin-Arab infants in the first year post discharge from NICU in southern Israel. Rates of utilization of ambulatory clinics were obtained from medical records, and quantitative assessment of factors affecting it was based on structured interviews with parents at baseline. Qualitative analysis was based on home visits or telephone in-depth interviews conducted about 1 year post-discharge, to obtain a rich, multilayered, experiential perspectives and explained perceptions by parents. Adherence to post-discharge referrals was generally good, but environmental, cultural, and financial obstacles to healthcare, magnified by communication barriers, forced parents with limited resources to make difficult choices affecting utilization of healthcare services. Improving concordance between primary caregivers and health care providers is crucial, and further development of supportive healthcare for CSHCN in concordance with parental limitations and preferences is needed. PMID:24414986

  1. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  2. Quality of care in sickle cell disease: Cross-sectional study and development of a measure for adults reporting on ambulatory and emergency department care.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Christian T; Treadwell, Marsha J; Keller, San; Levine, Roger; Hassell, Kathryn L; Werner, Ellen M; Smith, Wally R

    2016-08-01

    Documented deficiencies in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) care include poor access to knowledgeable providers and inadequate treatment in emergency departments (EDs).The aim of this study was to create patient-reported outcome measures of the quality of ambulatory and ED care for adults with SCD.We developed and pilot tested SCD quality of care questions consistent with Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys. We applied psychometric methods to develop scores and evaluate reliability and validity.The participants of this study were adults with SCD (n = 556)-63% aged 18 to 34 years; 64% female; 64% SCD-SS-at 7 US sites.The measure used was Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement information system Quality of Care survey.Most participants (90%) reported at least 1 severe pain episode (pain intensity 7.8 ± 2.3, 0-10 scale) in the past year. Most (81%) chose to manage pain at home rather than the ED, citing negative ED experiences (83%). Using factor analysis, we identified Access, Provider Interaction, and ED Care composites with reliable scores (Cronbach α 0.70-0.83) and construct validity (r = 0.32-0.83 correlations with global care ratings). Compared to general adult Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores, adults with SCD had worse care, adjusted for age, education, and general health.Results were consistent with other research reflecting deficiencies in ED care for adults with SCD. The Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement Quality of Care measure is a useful self-report measure for documenting and tracking disparities in quality of SCD care. PMID:27583862

  3. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care. PMID:7787486

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Proper Robot-Assisted Gait Training Group in Non-ambulatory Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Hwang, Seung Won; Pyo, Hannah; Yang, Sung Phil; Lim, Mun-Hee; Park, Gyu Lee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the clinical characteristics of proper robot-assisted gait training group using exoskeletal locomotor devices in non-ambulatory subacute stroke patients. Methods A total of 38 stroke patients were enrolled in a 4-week robotic training protocol (2 sessions/day, 5 times/week). All subjects were evaluated for their general characteristics, Functional Ambulatory Classification (FAC), Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Modified Rankin Scale (MRS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) at 0, 2, and 4 weeks. Statistical analysis were performed to determine significant clinical characteristics for improvement of gait function after robot-assisted gait training. Results Paired t-test showed that all functional parameters except MMSE were improved significantly (p<0.05). The duration of disease and baseline BBS score were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with FAC score in multiple regression models. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that a baseline BBS score of '9' was a cutoff value (AUC, 0.966; sensitivity, 91%–100%; specificity, 85%). By repeated-measures ANOVA, the differences in improved walking ability according to time were significant between group of patients who had baseline BBS score of '9' and those who did not have baseline BBS score of '9' Conclusion Our results showed that a baseline BBS score above '9' and a short duration of disease were highly correlated with improved walking ability after robot-assisted gait training. Therefore, baseline BBS and duration of disease should be considered clinically for gaining walking ability in robot-assisted training group. PMID:27152266

  5. National observatory on the therapeutic management in ambulatory care patients aged 65 and over, with type 2 diabetes, chronic pain or atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Becquemont, Laurent; Benattar-Zibi, Linda; Bertin, Philippe; Berrut, Gilles; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Danchin, Nicolas; Delespierre, Tiba; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Falissard, Bruno; Forette, Francoise; Hanon, Olivier; Pasquier, Florence; Pinget, Michel; Ourabah, Rissane; Piedvache, Céline

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of the S.AGES cohort is to describe the real-life therapeutic care of elderly patients. Patients and methods. This is a prospective observational cohort study of 3 700 non-institutionalized patients over the age of 65 years with either type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), chronic pain or atrial fibrillation (AF) recruited by French general practitioners (GPs). Follow-up is planned for 3 years. Baseline characteristics. In the chronic pain sub-cohort, 33% of patients are treated with only grade 1 analgesics, 29% with grade 2 analgesics and 3% with grade 3 analgesics, and 22% have no pain treatment. In the T2DM sub-cohort, 61% of patients have well-controlled diabetes (Hb1c<7%) and 18% are treated with insulin. In the AF sub-cohort, 65% of patients have a CHADS2 score greater than 2, 77% are treated with oral anticoagulants, 17% with platelet inhibitors, 40% with antiarrhythmic drugs and 56% with rate slowing medications. Conclusion. The S.AGES cohort presents a unique opportunity to clarify the real-life therapeutic management of ambulatory elderly subjects and will help to identify the factors associated with the occurrence of major clinical events. PMID:23981265

  6. Secure e-mailing between physicians and patients: transformational change in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J; Palen, Ted E; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization. PMID:24887522

  7. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  8. Prescription Practices for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Findings from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Earl S.; Mannino, David M.; Giles, Wayne H.; Wheaton, Anne G.; Liu, Yong; Croft, Janet B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent trends in prescriptions for medicines used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States have received little attention. Our objective was to examine trends in prescribing practices for medications used to treat COPD. We examined data from surveys of national samples of office visits to non-federal employed office-based physicians in the United States by patients aged ≥40 years with COPD recorded by the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1999 to 2010. From three diagnostic codes, office visits by patients with COPD were identified. Prescribed medications were identified from up to 8 recorded medications. The percentage of these visits during which a prescription for any medication used to treat COPD was issued increased from 27.0% in 1999 to 49.1% in 2010 (p trend < 0.001). Strong increases were noted for short-acting beta-2 agonists (17.6% in 1999 to 24.7% in 2010; p trend < 0.001), long-acting beta-2 agonists as single agents or combination products (6.2% in 1999 to 28.3% in 2010; p trend < 0.001), inhaled corticosteroids as single agents or combination products (10.9% in 1999 to 30.9% in 2010; p trend < 0.001), and tiotropium (3.8% in 2004 to 17.2% in 2010; p trend < 0.001). Since 1999, prescription patterns for medicines used to treat COPD have changed profoundly in the United States. PMID:24568285

  9. A comparison of kangaroo mother care and conventional incubator care for thermal regulation of infants < 2000 g in Nigeria using continuous ambulatory temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ibe, O E; Austin, T; Sullivan, K; Fabanwo, O; Disu, E; Costello, A M de L

    2004-09-01

    Although skin-to-skin contact (or kangaroo mother care, KMC) for preterm infants is a practical alternative to incubator care, no studies have compared these methods using continuous ambulatory temperature monitoring. To compare thermal regulation in low birthweight infants (< 2000 g) managed by KMC alternating with conventional care (CC) and to determine the acceptability to mothers of KMC, an experimental study with a crossover design with observational and qualitative data collected on temperature patterns and mothers attitudes to skin-to-skin care was conducted in the neonatal wards of three hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria. Thirteen eligible infants were nursed by their mothers or surrogates in 38 4-hour sessions of KMC and the results compared with 38 sessions of incubator care. The risk of hypothermia was reduced by > 90% when nursed by KMC rather than conventional care, relative risk (RR) 0.09 (0.03-0.25). More cases of hyperthermia (> 37.5 degrees C) occurred with KMC, and coreperiphery temperature differences were widened, but the risk of hyperthermia > 37.9 degrees C (RR 1.3, 0.9-1.7) was not significant. Micro-ambient temperatures were higher during KMC, although the average room temperatures during both procedures did not differ significantly. Mothers felt that KMC was safe, and preferred the method to CC because it did not separate them from their infants, although some had problems adjusting to this method of care. Where equipment for thermal regulation is lacking or unreliable, KMC is a preferable method for managing stable low birthweight infants. PMID:15479575

  10. Ambulatory Diagnosis and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Screening Questionnaires, Diagnostic Tests, and the Care Team.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, R Doug; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Antic, Nick A

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea has increased in prevalence in recent years and despite the expansion in sleep medicine services there is a significant unmet burden of disease. This burden presents a challenge to specialists and requires a reappraisal of service delivery, including a move toward lower-cost, simplified methods of diagnosis and treatment, an expansion of the sleep apnea workforce to include suitably trained and equipped primary care physicians and nurses, and the incorporation of chronic disease management principles that link patients to relevant community resources and empower them through new technologies to engage more fully in their own care. PMID:27542873

  11. Problems in Comprehensive Ambulatory Health Care for High-Risk Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Jon E., Ed.

    This volume contains 21 articles on aspects held to be important for delivering comprehensive health care to young adults who are at higher than average risk levels for a number of health and health-related problems; choice of topics for the articles is based on experience gained in directing the health program for the Job Corps. Most of the…

  12. Role of local health departments in the delivery of ambulatory care.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Moos, M K; Kotch, J B; Brown, M L; Brainard, M P

    1981-01-01

    Many people (40 per cent) receive each year some personal health service provided by local health departments. A substantial number of poor children (50 per cent) look to public agencies including health departments for all or part of their medical care. A number of departments including those represented in this study come close to serving as the guarantor of basic medical care for entire constituent populations, reaching those people who are not reached by other provider systems. Health departments over the past decade have increased their involvement as providers of medical care, in part assisted by such federal initiatives as WIC, and Medicaid. Health departments have institutionalized many of the innovations generated by federal demonstration projects of the 1960s, and continue a tradition as centers of important innovation in styles and continuity of health care. The health departments studied are notable in many respects, not the least of which is their constructive relationship with private providers. Some health departments appear to function at high levels of effectiveness in a dual fashion alongside private provider systems. Other departments interact or accommodate with private providers in ways that appear beneficial to the populations they serve. It would appear that both public and private provider systems are essential, and that they need not compete; they can provide mutual reinforcement for achieving universal and equitable health services in the public interest. PMID:7457670

  13. A force field evaluation tool for telephone service in ambulatory health care.

    PubMed

    da Silva, V L; Steinberg, B

    1991-10-01

    The tool presented here is useful in analyzing the constraints and capabilities of a health care telephone service. It also provides a systematic method for assessing systems problems. As part of our analysis, we recommended that the manager implement the following steps. First, the manager determines whether the driving force on the unit is continuity of care by an individual provider or consistency of response. This focus directly affects how the unit's telephone service can be best organized (i.e., decentralized or centralized) and clarifies the factors most needed for success. For example, to function effectively and efficiently, a centralized phone service needs strong provider-endorsed protocols. Second, the manager should carefully examine neutral constraint factors to determine methods to transform these constraints into capabilities, such as planning for extra staff or office hours (or both) during influenza season. Planning for extra hours or staff depends largely on whether budget and resource planning is done in advance and whether value is placed on customer access and satisfaction during peak demand periods. The manager must next determine whether the service delivery format (centralized or decentralized) is consistent with the force field analysis findings. If the findings are not consistent, can the analysis present a compelling argument for using the opposite approach? Finally, the manager must create a plan of action for minimizing the constraints revealed and maximizing existing capabilities to achieve the overall goal of excellent phone service. The process of analysis and creating a plan of action is an excellent opportunity to involve staff, providers, and administrators in efforts to achieve better health care telephone service for all customers. PMID:10112997

  14. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke. Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed. Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients’ ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery. Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1–3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4–6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores. Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  15. 77 FR 37680 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory... Association for Ambulatory Health Care for continued recognition as a national accrediting organization for... 6 years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care...

  16. Investigating the epidemiology of medication errors and error-related adverse drug events (ADEs) in primary care, ambulatory care and home settings: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Ghadah Asaad; Grant, Liz; Aljadhey, Hisham; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a need to better understand the epidemiology of medication errors and error-related adverse events in community care contexts. Methods and analysis We will systematically search the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office of the WHO (EMRO), MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science. In addition, we will search Google Scholar and contact an international panel of experts to search for unpublished and in progress work. The searches will cover the time period January 1990–December 2015 and will yield data on the incidence or prevalence of and risk factors for medication errors and error-related adverse drug events in adults living in community settings (ie, primary care, ambulatory and home). Study quality will be assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program quality assessment tool for cohort and case–control studies, and cross-sectional studies will be assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Descriptive Studies. Meta-analyses will be undertaken using random-effects modelling using STATA (V.14) statistical software. Ethics and dissemination This protocol will be registered with PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews, and the systematic review will be reported in the peer-reviewed literature using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. PMID:27580826

  17. Factors affecting the choice of hospital-based ambulatory care by the urban poor.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, T J; Price, B S; Scott, D W; Gorry, G A

    1977-01-01

    This study of patients in the outpatient department at an urban hospital revealed that almost all could have reached a neighborhood center in less time and only a small number came to the hospital rather than a neighborhood center out of medical necessity. When the patients were asked about their willingness to obtain treatment at a neighborhood center, 48 per cent were willing, 52 per cent were not. These responses did not vary by demographic or medical characteristics but rather by the patients' stated priorities regarding medical care. Eighty per cent of those willing to change sites stressed convenience of access as a first priority compared with only 17 per ccent of those not willing to change. Emphasis on quality of care (45 per cent) or on familarity with the site (37 per cent) distinguished the group not willing to change. The findings suggest that successful efforts to persuade patients to utilize a neighborhood center must base their appeal on patients' individual priorities. PMID:857686

  18. Health Care of Adolescents by Office-Based Physicians: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cypress, Beulah K.

    1984-01-01

    This report examines the nature of the conditions presented by adolescents and the health care provided by office-based physicians. The characteristics of patients are noted and the reason for the visit to the doctor and the length of the visit are summarized. Tables present information on: (1) average annual rate of office visits of adolescents…

  19. Electronic Clinical Surveillance to Improve Outpatient Care: Diverse Applications within an Integrated Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, Kim N.; Smith, Andrea E.; Loo, Ronald K.; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Mittman, Brian S.; Kanter, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to improve patient safety have largely focused on inpatient or emergency settings, but the importance of patient safety in ambulatory care is increasingly being recognized as a key component of overall health care quality. Care gaps in outpatient settings may include missed diagnoses, medication errors, or insufficient monitoring of patients with chronic conditions or on certain medications. Further, care gaps may occur across a wide range of clinical conditions. We report here an innovative approach to improve patient safety in ambulatory settings – the Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) Outpatient Safety Net Program – which leverages electronic health information to efficiently identify and address a variety of potential care gaps across different clinical conditions. Between 2006 and 2012, the KPSC Outpatient Safety Net Program implemented 24 distinct electronic clinical surveillance programs, which routinely scan the electronic health record to identify patients with a particular condition or event. For example, electronic clinical surveillance may be used to scan for harmful medication interactions or potentially missed diagnoses (e.g., abnormal test results without evidence of subsequent care). Keys to the success of the program include strong leadership support, a proactive clinical culture, the blame-free nature of the program, and the availability of electronic health information. The Outpatient Safety Net Program framework may be adopted by other organizations, including those who have electronic health information but not an electronic health record. In the future, the creation of a forum to share electronic clinical surveillance programs across organizations may facilitate more rapid improvements in outpatient safety. PMID:25848588

  20. Ambulatory polysomnography using a new programmable amplifier system with on-line digitization of data: technical and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Drewes, A M; Nielsen, K D; Taagholt, S J; Svendsen, L; Bjerregård, K; Nielsson, L; Kristensen, L

    1996-05-01

    A new system for polysomnographic recording at home is presented. It consists of a 12 to 24-channel amplifier system with direct digitization of the polygraph signals using a portable computer. Sampling frequency, amplification and filter settings can be defined by the user, and the signals are evaluated at bedside. Technical testing proved a high signal/noise ratio, linear amplification and a good signal quality. Clinical testing of the first 100 recordings showed that they were acceptable for conventional sleep scoring in 98 cases. A comparison of two consecutive recordings was done in 9 healthy subjects and 11 patients with rheumatic disorders. Using conventional sleep staging, only a slight "first night effect" (FNE) was demonstrated in the sleep architecture. Power spectral analysis using autoregressive modeling demonstrated only a difference of power between the 2 nights in the beta (14.5-25 Hz) band. In conclusion, the usability and technical advantages make the system very suitable for ambulatory recordings and only a minimal FNE should be considered when results are evaluated. PMID:8776794

  1. The NorthStar Ambulatory Assessment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: considerations for the design of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ricotti, Valeria; Ridout, Deborah A; Pane, Marika; Main, Marion; Mayhew, Anna; Mercuri, Eugenio; Manzur, Adnan Y; Muntoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Objective With the emergence of experimental therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), it is fundamental to understand the natural history of this disorder to properly design clinical trials. The aims of this study were to assess the effects produced on motor function by different DMD genotypes and early initiation of glucocorticoids. Methods Through the NorthStar Network, standardised clinical data including the NorthStar Ambulatory Assessment score (NSAA) on 513 ambulant UK boys with DMD were analysed from 2004 to 2012. For the analysis of the genetic subpopulation, we also included data from 172 Italian boys with DMD. NSAA raw scores were converted into linear scores. Results On the linearised NSAA, we observed an average decline of 8 units/year (4 units on raw NSAA analysis) after age 7. The median age at loss of ambulation (LOA) was 13 years (95% CI 12.1 to 13.5); 2 years prior to LOA, the estimated mean linearised NSAA score was 42/100 (13/34 raw scale). Starting glucocorticoids between 3 and 5 years conferred an additional gain in motor function of 3 units/year (1.3 raw units) up to age 7. When analysing the effect of genotype in the UK and Italian cumulative cohorts, individuals with deletions amenable to exons 44 and 46 skipping declined at a slower rate over 2 years (9 units (4 raw units), p<0.001), while 53 and 51 skippable deletions showed a faster decline of 14 (4.5; p<0.001) and 5 linearised units (2.4 NSAA units; p=0.02), respectively. Conclusions Our study provides a novel insight on the current natural history of DMD, which will be instrumental for the design of future clinical trials. PMID:25733532

  2. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  3. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  4. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  5. “My Favourite Day Is Sunday”: Community Perceptions of (Drug-Resistant) Tuberculosis and Ambulatory Tuberculosis Care in Kara Suu District, Osh Province, Kyrgyzstan

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Doris; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Toktosunov, Ulan; Angmo, Nilza; Samieva, Nazgul; Rocillo Arechaga, Eva P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Kyrgyzstan is one of the 27 high multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) burden countries listed by the WHO. In 2012, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started a drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) project in Kara Suu District. A qualitative study was undertaken to understand the perception of TB and DR-TB in order to improve the effectiveness and acceptance of the MSF intervention and to support advocacy strategies for an ambulatory model of care. Methods This paper reports findings from 63 interviews with patients, caregivers, health care providers and members of communities. Data was analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Validation was ensured by triangulation and a ‘thick’ description of the research context, and by presenting deviant cases. Results Findings show that the general population interprets TB as the ‘lungs having a cold’ or as a ‘family disease’ rather than as an infectious illness. From their perspective, individuals facing poor living conditions are more likely to get TB than wealthier people. Vulnerable groups such as drug and alcohol users, homeless persons, ethnic minorities and young women face barriers in accessing health care. As also reported in other publications, TB is highly stigmatised and possible side effects of the long treatment course are seen as unbearable; therefore, people only turn to public health care quite late. Most patients prefer ambulatory treatment because of the much needed emotional support from their social environment, which positively impacts treatment concordance. Health care providers favour inpatient treatment only for a better monitoring of side effects. Health staff increasingly acknowledges the central role they play in supporting DR-TB patients, and the importance of assuming a more empathic attitude. Conclusions Health promotion activities should aim at improving knowledge on TB and DR-TB, reducing stigma, and fostering the inclusion of vulnerable populations. Health seeking

  6. Nurse-Physician Relationships in Ambulatory Oncology Settings

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Manojlovich, Milisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ perceptions of nurse-physician relationships in ambulatory oncology settings, which are linked to patient safety. Design This cross-sectional, descriptive study analyzed survey data collected in 2010 from oncology nurses employed in ambulatory settings. The sampling frame was the nurse licensure database in one state in the Southeastern United States. Nurses completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), reported on the quality of care in their setting, and commented on factors that promoted or inhibited high-quality care delivery. Methods Data analysis used three study variables: empirically-derived values from the PES-NWI, a scale of nurse-reported quality of care in their setting, and open-text comments about features in their workplace that promoted or hindered high-quality care. After categorizing open-text comments, ANOVA was used to evaluate differences in PES-NWI subscales by comment category. Chi-square test statistics were calculated to examine differences in overall practice environment and quality of care by comment category. Results Nurses reported their relationships with physicians as generally favorable. Qualitative findings suggest two themes that influence how nurses characterize their working relationships with physicians: 1) physician behaviors and 2) structural factors. Both PES-NWI scores and quality of care were rated significantly higher by nurses who wrote favorably about physicians. Conclusions Favorable nurse-physician relationships in ambulatory settings may reflect positive workplaces and promote high-quality care. Clinical Relevance Consistent with findings from inpatient units, nurse-physician relationships are important to the quality of ambulatory oncology care. Systematic measurement and attention to reported deficits in these relationships may promote higher quality care. PMID:22812518

  7. Approach to fever assessment in ambulatory cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Walker-Dilks, C.; Atzema, C.; Morris, A.; Gupta, R.; Halligan, R.; Kouroukis, T.; McCann, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This guideline was prepared by the Fever Assessment Guideline Development Group, a group organized by the Program in Evidence-Based Care at the request of the Cancer Care Ontario Systemic Treatment Program. The mandate was to develop a standardized approach (in terms of definitions, information, and education) for the assessment of fever in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods The guideline development methods included a search for existing guidelines, literature searches in medline and embase for systematic reviews and primary studies, internal review by content and methodology experts, and external review by targeted experts and intended users. Results The search identified eight guidelines that had partial relevance to the topic of the present guideline and thirty-eight primary studies. The studies were mostly noncomparative prospective or retrospective studies. Few studies directly addressed the topic of fever except as one among many symptoms or adverse effects associated with chemotherapy. The recommendations concerning fever definition are supported mainly by other existing guidelines. No evidence was found that directly pertained to the assessment of fever before a diagnosis of febrile neutropenia was made. However, some studies evaluated approaches to symptom management that included fever among the symptoms. Few studies directly addressed information needs and resources for managing fever in cancer patients. Conclusions Fever in patients with cancer who are receiving systemic therapy is a common and potentially serious symptom that requires prompt assessment, but currently, evidence to inform best practices concerning when, where, and by whom that assessment is done is very limited. PMID:27536179

  8. An Assessment of the Mastery of Entry-Level Practice Competencies Using a Primary Care Clerkship Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Arthur A., Jr.; Maddox, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness on entry-level skills of training six pharmacy graduate students in a primary care facility. Required clerkships in medicine, ambulatory care, and geriatrics were combined into a single rotation in a family practice ambulatory care clinic. Results were positive and have implications for improving some…

  9. A web-based simulation of a longitudinal clinic used in a 4-week ambulatory rotation: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rene WG; Lochnan, Heather A

    2009-01-01

    Background Residency training takes place primarily on inpatient wards. In the absence of a resident continuity clinic, internal medicine residents rely on block rotations to learn about continuity of care. Alternate methods to introduce continuity of care are needed. Methods A web-based tool, Continuity of Care Online Simulations (COCOS), was designed for use in a one-month, postgraduate clinical rotation in endocrinology. It is an interactive tool that simulates the continuing care of any patient with a chronic endocrine disease. Twenty-three residents in internal medicine participated in a study to investigate the effects of using COCOS during a clinical rotation in endocrinology on pre-post knowledge test scores and self-assessment of confidence. Results Compared to residents who did the rotation alone, residents who used COCOS during the rotation had significantly higher improvements in test scores (% increase in pre-post test scores +21.6 [standard deviation, SD, 8.0] vs. +5.9 [SD 6.8]; p < .001). Test score improvements were most pronounced for less commonly seen conditions. There were no significant differences in changes in confidence. Residents rated COCOS very highly, recommending its use as a standard part of the rotation and throughout residency. Conclusion A stand-alone web-based tool can be incorporated into an existing clinical rotation to help residents learn about continuity of care. It has the most potential to teach residents about topics that are less commonly seen during a clinical rotation. The adaptable, web-based format allows the creation of cases for most chronic medical conditions. PMID:19187554

  10. [Major ambulatory surgery: organizational models].

    PubMed

    Baldi, R; Lazzarato, M; Masiero, A; Mandini, A

    1992-09-01

    In this essay, the authors provide a definition for those medical care facilities representing a consolidated alternative to traditional hospitalization. These facilities can be basically ascribed to the following patterns: day case surgery; day-hospital activity; home-care. Day case surgery is a complex and, in most cases, interdisciplinary procedure; this type of activity necessitates a pre-hospitalization period and often also a "protected discharge" or even a home-care service. Some specific criteria regarding day surgery activity have been defined as follows: the main criteria have a clinical nature, but they interact with others belonging to a social and structural-organizational order. The Royal College of Surgeons of United Kingdom has officially recognized in 1985 this medical care typology as one of the constituents of surgical care, and has evaluated that at least 1/3 of the overall operations could be carried out as day care surgery. In the United States, besides hospital and ambulatory surgery activity, a new pattern known as "free-standing center" has been promoted; in 1993, 35% of the operations is expected to be carried out in day case surgery centers. As far as Italy is concerned, in 1988 only day-hospital practice has been adequately recognized as an alternative medical care facility to traditional hospitalization. The Emilia Romagna region, in order to increase day case surgery activity, has issued in 1991 a list of 53 DRGs, in which day bed units treatment was possible. Up to now, however, only a small part of these diseases is treated on a day case surgery basis. PMID:1306168

  11. Depression and risk of hospitalisations and rehospitalisations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions in Denmark: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Ribe, Anette Riisgaard; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Prior, Anders; Vedsted, Peter; Unützer, Jürgen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospitalisations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), a group of chronic and acute illnesses considered not to require inpatient treatment if timely and appropriate ambulatory care is received, and early rehospitalisations are common and costly. We sought to determine whether individuals with depression are at increased risk of hospitalisations for ACSCs, and rehospitalisation for the same or another ACSC, within 30 days. Design National, population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants 5 049 353 individuals ≥18 years of age between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2013. Measurements Depression was ascertained via psychiatrist diagnoses in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register or antidepressant prescription redemption from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Hospitalisations for ACSCs and rehospitalisations within 30 days were identified using the Danish National Patient Register. Results Overall, individuals with depression were 2.35 times more likely to be hospitalised for an ACSC (95% CI 2.32 to 2.37) versus those without depression after adjusting for age, sex and calendar period, and 1.45 times more likely after adjusting for socioeconomic factors, comorbidities and primary care utilisation (95% CI 1.43 to 1.46). After adjusting for ACSC-predisposing comorbidity, depression was associated with significantly greater risk of hospitalisations for all chronic (eg, angina, diabetes complications, congestive heart failure exacerbation) and acute ACSCs (eg, pneumonia) compared to those without depression. Compared to those without depression, persons with depression were 1.21 times more likely to be rehospitalised within 30 days for the same ACSC (95% CI 1.18 to 1.24) and 1.19 times more likely to be rehospitalised within 30 days for a different ACSC (95% CI 1.15 to 1.23). Conclusions Individuals with depression are at increased risk of hospitalisations for ACSCs, and once discharged are at elevated risk of

  12. [Home hospice care at a clinic].

    PubMed

    Arai, F; Osako, M; Shimoaraiso, Y; Sakamoto, T; Miyashita, T; Yamanouchi, H; Kadokura, K; Yoshida, K; Dozono, F; Mamitsuka, K; Dozono, H

    1999-12-01

    For the people who want to stay at home until their last day, the primary doctor and clinic where they were diagnosed will be the most reliable supports. We have been operating a 19 bed clinic since 1996. In these three years, we have established what we call a "combination palliative care system." A team composed of two doctors, 13 nurses, 3 care aids, a social worker, and a counselor provides home care services as well as outpatient and inpatient care. From April, 1998 to March, 1999, 59 patients died of cancer. Among them, 25 patients died at home. Their primary cancers were lung (7), colon (3), pancreatic (2), breast (2), ovarian (2), brain (1), stomach (1), hepatoma (1), neck (1) and others. First of all, sufficient consultation with patients and family makes this care successful. Through this, the patient can choose his style of care. The whole staff is involved in this care in turn, so that all of us become acquainted with each patient. Home care includes: 1) medical and nursing service available 24 hours a day, 2) activation of social resources for the support of the patient user, 3) constructive cooperation with relevant institutions, 4) relieving the patient's physical and mental suffering, 5) aroma therapy, oil massage, hair cuts and music therapy, and 6) support by volunteers. In this way, as a neighborhood clinic, the combination palliative care system is valuable. PMID:10630230

  13. [A guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel in ambulatory care facilities].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Henarejos, Ana; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Hernández-Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Carrillo de Gea, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The appearance of electronic health records has led to the need to strengthen the security of personal health data in order to ensure privacy. Despite the large number of technical security measures and recommendations that exist to protect the security of health data, there is an increase in violations of the privacy of patients' personal data in healthcare organizations, which is in many cases caused by the mistakes or oversights of healthcare professionals. In this paper, we present a guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel, drawn from recommendations, regulations and national and international standards. The material presented in this paper can be used in the security audit of health professionals, or as a part of continuing education programs in ambulatory care facilities. PMID:24582808

  14. Exploring Health System Responsiveness in Ambulatory Care and Disease Management and its Relation to Other Dimensions of Health System Performance (RAC) – Study Design and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Röttger, Julia; Blümel, Miriam; Engel, Susanne; Grenz-Farenholtz, Brigitte; Fuchs, Sabine; Linder, Roland; Verheyen, Frank; Busse, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Background: The responsiveness of a health system is considered to be an intrinsic goal of health systems and an essential aspect in performance assessment. Numerous studies have analysed health system responsiveness and related concepts, especially across different countries and health systems. However, fewer studies have applied the concept for the evaluation of specific healthcare delivery structures and thoroughly analysed its determinants within one country. The aims of this study are to assess the level of perceived health system responsiveness to patients with chronic diseases in ambulatory care in Germany and to analyse the determinants of health system responsiveness as well as its distribution across different population groups. Methods and Analysis: The target population consists of chronically ill people in Germany, with a focus on patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and/or from coronary heart disease (CHD). Data comes from two different sources: (i) cross-sectional survey data from a postal survey and (ii) claims data from a German sickness fund. Data from both sources will be linked at an individual-level. The postal survey has the purpose of measuring perceived health system responsiveness, health related quality of life, experiences with disease management programmes (DMPs) and (subjective) socioeconomic background. The claims data consists of information on (co)morbidities, service utilization, enrolment within a DMP and sociodemographic characteristics, including the type of residential area. Discussion: RAC is one of the first projects linking survey data on health system responsiveness at individual level with claims data. With this unique database, it will be possible to comprehensively analyse determinants of health system responsiveness and its relation to other aspects of health system performance assessment. The results of the project will allow German health system decision-makers to assess the performance of nonclinical aspects of

  15. Trends in Outpatient Visits for Insomnia, Sleep Apnea, and Prescriptions for Sleep Medications among US Adults: Findings from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1999-2010

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Earl S.; Wheaton, Anne G.; Cunningham, Timothy J.; Giles, Wayne H.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To examine recent national trends in outpatient visits for sleep related difficulties in the United States and prescriptions for sleep medications. Design: Trend analysis. Setting: Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1999 to 2010. Participants: Patients age 20 y or older. Measurements and Results: The number of office visits with insomnia as the stated reason for visit increased from 4.9 million visits in 1999 to 5.5 million visits in 2010 (13% increase), whereas the number with any sleep disturbance ranged from 6,394,000 visits in 1999 to 8,237,000 visits in 2010 (29% increase). The number of office visits for which a diagnosis of sleep apnea was recorded increased from 1.1 million visits in 1999 to 5.8 million visits in 2010 (442% increase), whereas the number of office visits for which any sleep related diagnosis was recorded ranged from 3.3 million visits in 1999 to 12.1 million visits in 2010 (266% increase). The number of prescriptions for any sleep medication ranged from 5.3 in 1999 to 20.8 million in 2010 (293% increase). Strong increases in the percentage of office visits resulting in a prescription for nonbenzodiazepine sleep medications (∼350%), benzodiazepine receptor agonists (∼430%), and any sleep medication (∼200%) were noted. Conclusions: Striking increases in the number and percentage of office visits for sleep related problems and in the number and percentage of office visits accompanied by a prescription for a sleep medication occurred from 1999-2010. Citation: Ford ES, Wheaton AG, Cunningham TJ, Giles WH, Chapman DP, Croft JB. Trends in outpatient visits for insomnia, sleep apnea, and prescriptions for sleep medications among US adults: findings from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 1999-2010. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1283-1293. PMID:25083008

  16. Ongoing evaluation of ease-of-use and usefulness of wireless tablet computers within an ambulatory care unit.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin C; Wong, Frances L; Martin, Lee Ann; Edmiston, Dave

    2009-01-01

    This ongoing research is to assess user acceptance of wireless convertible tablet portable computers in their support of patient care within the clinic environment and to determine their impact on workload reduction for the information staff. A previous publication described our initial experience with a limited wireless environment. There, we tested the premise that wireless convertible tablet computers were equivalent to desktop computers in their support of user tasks. Feedback from users demonstrated that convertible tablet computers were not able to replace desktop computers. Poor network access was a weakness as well as the "cognitive overhead" encountered due to technical problems. This paper describes our further experience with a centre-wide wireless implementation while using a new wireless device. The new tablets, which have some unique functions that existing desktop computers do not provide, have been well received by the clinicians. PMID:19380977

  17. 77 FR 70783 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) Application for Continuing CMS Approval of Its... Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) for continued recognition as a national accrediting... by CMS. The Ambulatory Health Care's (AAAHC) current term of approval for their ASC...

  18. The patient is the teacher: ambulatory patient-centred student-based interprofessional education where the patient is the teacher who improves patient care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fiddes, P J; Brooks, P M; Komesaroff, P

    2013-07-01

    The patient's role as the key to medical student education was enunciated by Osler in 1903 and remains central to the broader imperative of interprofessional education. Interprofessional education needs to progress from the patient's passive bedside or office role to assume a more active and primary role by his/her participation as the teacher, immersed in student education. To date, the achievements in interprofessional education have been limited, but ambulatory patient-centred learning opportunities involving direct student to patient dialogues and mixed health professional student engagement with patients as teachers are emerging within various interprofessional student clinic formats. There is good evidence that such approaches lead to actual improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:23841759

  19. Representing Critical Care Data Using the Clinical Care Classification

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Damrongsak, Mantana; Gallichio, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Concept-oriented terminologies require the user to combine terms, making them awkward for their direct use as a documentation tool. Therefore, classification systems are needed to serve as interface terminologies between the user and the reference terminology used to organize the computer database system. Whether nursing classification systems provide sufficient granularity to adequately capture nursing practice is controversial. In addition, no nursing classification systems have been designed specifically for or evaluated in the critical care setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) to represent data in an intensive care setting and to provide recommendations for the expansion of this classification for its use in critical care documentation. PMID:16779099

  20. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  1. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  2. Clinical care management and workflow by episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Claus, P. L.; Carpenter, P. C.; Chute, C. G.; Mohr, D. N.; Gibbons, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of clinically defined episodes of care and the introduction of an episode-based summary list of patient problems across Mayo Clinic Rochester in 1996 and 1997. Although Mayo's traditional paper-based system has always relied on a type of 'episode of care' (called the "registration") for patient and history management, a new, more clinically relevant definition of episode of care was put into practice in November 1996. This was done to improve care management and operational processes and to provide a basic construct for the electronic medical record. Also since November 1996, a computer-generated summary list of patient problems, the "Master Sheet Summary Report," organized by episode, has been placed in all patient histories. In the third quarter of 1997, the ability to view the episode-based problem summary online was made available to the 3000+ EMR-capable workstations deployed across the Mayo Rochester campus. In addition, the clinically oriented problem summarization process produces an improved basic "package" of clinical information expected to lead to improved analytic decision support, outcomes analysis and epidemiological research. PMID:9357595

  3. Clinical investigations in primary care.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Sarazin, Marie; Goetz, Celine; Dubois, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that represents the most common form of dementia. The most prominent feature of AD is the decline in cognitive function, with an early impairment of episodic memory. The memory deficit of an AD patient is characterized by the amnestic syndrome of the medial temporal type. As the disease progresses, the condition often manifests in language disorders, visuospatial deficits and executive dysfunctions. Patients often have neuropsychiatric disturbances, as apathy and psychotic symptoms. Loss of autonomy follows cognitive impairment. The clinical diagnosis of AD is based on a complete medical examination with a neuropsychological evaluation. The FCSRT (free and cued selective reminding test) is recommended for the identification of the amnestic syndrome of the medial temporal type, which is defined by: (1) a very poor free recall and (2) a decreased total recall due to an insufficient effect of cueing. The neuropsychological tests should also assess other cognitive functions that may be perturbed in AD, such as executive functions, praxis, visuospatial capacities and language. Neuroimaging and biological exams (genetics, biomarkers) are of great utility in the evaluation. Other medical, neurological, or psychiatric disorders which could account for the impairment in memory and related symptoms must be always investigated. PMID:19182457

  4. Ambulatory health service users' experience of waiting time and expenditure and factors associated with the perception of low quality of care in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A principal reason for low use of public health care services is the perception of inferior quality of care. Studying health service user (HSU) experiences with their care and their perception of health service quality is critical to understanding health service utilization. The aim of this study was to define reference points for some aspects of health care quality and to analyze which HSU experiences resulted in perceptions of overall low quality of care. Methods Data from the National Health Survey 2006 were used to compare the experiences of HSUs with their ambulatory care at Ministry of Health and affiliated institutions (MOH), social security institutions (SSI) and private institutions (PrivI). Reference points of quality of care related to waiting time and expenditure were defined for each of the three types of institutions by analyzing HSU experiences rated as 'acceptable'. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify the principal factors associated with the general perception of low quality of care. Results A total of 11,959 HSUs were included in the analysis, of whom 37.6% (n = 4,500) HSUs received care at MOH facilities; 31.2% (n = 3,730) used SSI and 31.2% (n = 3,729) PrivI. An estimated travel and waiting time of 10 minutes respectively was rated as acceptable by HSUs from all institutions. The differences between the waiting time rated as acceptable and the actual waiting time were the largest for SSI (30 min) in comparison to MoH (20 min) and PrivI (5 min) users. The principal factors associated with an overall perception of low quality of care are type of institution (OR 4.36; 95% CI 2.95-6.44), waiting time (OR 3.20; 95% CI 2.35-4.35), improvement of health after consultation (OR 2.93; CI 2.29-3.76) and consultation length of less than 20 minutes (2.03; 95% CI 1.60-2.57). Conclusions The reference points derived by the HSUs' own ratings are useful in identifying where quality improvements are required. Prioritizing the

  5. Integrating wound care research into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2007-10-01

    The process of integrating wound care research into clinical practice incorporates research methodology--i.e., the standardized practices, procedures, and rules by which research is performed--and an evidence-based approach. Using examples from the literature and clinician experience treating pressure ulcers in a 32-bed regional spinal cord injury unit in a tertiary referral center in Cleveland, Ohio, the authors describe this process and review the challenges faced by an interdisciplinary skin care team tasked with implementing evidence-based care. Additional considerations include determining the amount of current wound care that is evidence-based and whether wound prevention and care outcomes are improved through the use of evidence-based medicine. Five years after establishing the skin care team and implementing evidence-based care, improvements in care processes and short-term outcomes--specifically, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols including documentation--have been realized. Studies to ascertain the effects of these changes on long-term outcomes are planned. PMID:17978411

  6. Communication Tools for End-of-Life Decision-Making in Ambulatory Care Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Han-Oh; Hanvey, Louise; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; You, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with serious illness, and their families, state that better communication and decision-making with healthcare providers is a high priority to improve the quality of end-of-life care. Numerous communication tools to assist patients, family members, and clinicians in end-of-life decision-making have been published, but their effectiveness remains unclear. Objectives To determine, amongst adults in ambulatory care settings, the effect of structured communication tools for end-of-life decision-making on completion of advance care planning. Methods We searched for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or non-randomized intervention studies in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, and the Cochrane Database of Randomized Controlled Trials from database inception until July 2014. Two reviewers independently screened articles for eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for each of the primary and secondary outcomes. Results Sixty-seven studies, including 46 RCTs, were found. The majority evaluated communication tools in older patients (age >50) with no specific medical condition, but many specifically evaluated populations with cancer, lung, heart, neurologic, or renal disease. Most studies compared the use of communication tools against usual care, but several compared the tools to less-intensive advance care planning tools. The use of structured communication tools increased: the frequency of advance care planning discussions/discussions about advance directives (RR 2.31, 95% CI 1.25–4.26, p = 0.007, low quality evidence) and the completion of advance directives (ADs) (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.43–2.59, p<0.001, low quality evidence); concordance between AD preferences and subsequent medical orders for use or non-use of life supporting treatment (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01–1.39, p = 0.028, very low quality evidence, 1

  7. Effect of Intensive Salt-Restriction Education on Clinic, Home, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Levels in Treated Hypertensive Patients During a 3-Month Education Period.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiro; Eguchi, Kazuo; Sato, Toshiko; Onoguchi, Atsuko; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-05-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that low-salt diet education by nutritionists would lower blood pressure (BP) levels in treated hypertensive patients. The amount of urinary salt excretion and clinic, home, and ambulatory BP values at baseline and at 3 months were measured in 95 patients with hypertension. After randomization to a nutritional education group (E group, n=51) or a control group (C group, n=44), the C group received conventional salt-restriction education and the E group received intensive nutritional education aimed at salt restriction to 6 g/d by nutritionists. From baseline to the end of the study, 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was significantly lowered in the E group compared with the C group (6.8±2.9 g/24 h vs 8.6±3.4 g/24 h, P<.01). Morning home systolic BP tended to be lowered in the E group (P=.051), and ambulatory 24-hour systolic BP was significantly lowered in the E group (-4.5±1.3 mm Hg) compared with the C group (2.8±1.3 mm Hg, P<.001). Intensive nutritional education by nutritionists was shown to be effective in lowering BP in treated hypertensive patients. PMID:26732187

  8. Clinical Teaching Strategies for a Caring Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.

    2000-01-01

    Observation of a classroom and clinic and interviews provided information about a nurse educator's ethical and epistemological stance and its expression in teaching. Students' pre- and posttest scores on a cognitive and ethical development instrument were used to reveal ways in which caring can be modeled and taught. (SK)

  9. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  10. Anger in palliative care: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Philip, J; Gold, M; Schwarz, M; Komesaroff, P

    2007-01-01

    Anger in patients and families is a common problem in the care of persons with advanced disease. Whereas it is widely accepted that anger may be a justifiable reaction to significant illness and loss, it frequently creates difficulties for the doctors involved in care. In particular, there is often a personal impact on the doctor at whom anger is directed. This paper examines results of qualitative research with palliative care workers in the context of the broader published literature and the authors' clinical experiences. The ability to interact effectively with angry patients is a skill that is often learned with experience and is extremely useful in both transforming the patients' reaction into a more creative emotion and in developing a therapeutic relationship. Despite conscientious efforts, however, a few patients continue to be angry. A practical approach to anger, useful for the clinician directly involved in care, is outlined along with some strategies to adopt in the face of persistent anger. PMID:17199844

  11. Referral Rates of Senior Family Practice Residents in an Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of patterns in second- and third-year family practice residents' requests for referrals found higher rates for the senior students, suggesting possible differences in approach to case management, lack of experience in referral among younger students, and differences in case mix. (MSE)

  12. Cardiac emergency simulation: drilling for success in the ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Kusler-Jensen, Jane A

    2014-03-01

    The "see one, do one, teach one" method of clinical teaching is no longer practical for preparing perioperative personnel to respond to emergency situations. Teaching with simulation trains team members to respond to unexpected events and enables them to provide care when an emergency situation arises. Simulation drills resemble clinical practice and allow personnel to apply and integrate skills, teamwork, and critical thinking. This article provides information and tools for performing cardiac simulation drills in the ambulatory setting. Tools included are a 10-step guide to simulation drills, a scenario, roles and duties to assign during a drill, and a drill evaluation form. PMID:24581645

  13. From clinical integration to accountable care.

    PubMed

    Shields, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Four key challenges to reforming health care organizations can be addressed by a clinical integration model patterned after Advocate Physician Partners (APP). These challenges are: predominance of small group practices, dominant fee-for-service reimbursement methods, weaknesses of the traditional hospital medical staff structure and a need to partner with commercial insurance companies. APP has demonstrated teamwork between 3800 physicians and hospitals to improve quality, patient safety and cost-effectiveness. Building on this model, an innovative contract with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois serves as a prototype for a commercial Accountable Care Organization. For this contract to succeed, APP must outperform the market competition. To accomplish this, APP has implemented strategies to reduce readmissions, avoid unnecessary admissions and emergency room visits, expand primary care access, and enhance quality and patient safety. PMID:21910315

  14. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  15. The Influence of Primary Care and Hospital Supply on Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Hospitalizations Among Adults in Brazil, 1999–2007

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Veneza B.; Turci, Maria A.; Guanais, Frederico C.; Bonolo, Palmira F.; Lima-Costa, Maria F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the influence of changes in primary care and hospital supply on rates of ambulatory care–sensitive (ACS) hospitalizations among adults in Brazil. Methods. We aggregated data on nearly 60 million public sector hospitalizations between 1999 and 2007 to Brazil's 558 microregions. We modeled adult ACS hospitalization rates as a function of area-level socioeconomic factors, health services supply, Family Health Program (FHP) availability, and health needs by using dynamic panel estimation techniques to control for endogenous explanatory variables. Results. The ACS hospitalization rates declined by more than 5% annually. When we controlled for other factors, FHP availability was associated with lower ACS hospitalization rates, whereas private or nonprofit hospital beds were associated with higher rates. Areas with highest predicted ACS hospitalization rates were those with the highest private or nonprofit hospital bed supply and with low (< 25%) FHP coverage. The lowest predicted rates were seen for areas with high (> 75%) FHP coverage and very few private or nonprofit hospital beds. Conclusions. These results highlight the contribution of the FHP to improved health system performance and reflect the complexity of the health reform processes under way in Brazil. PMID:21330584

  16. Hidradenitis Suppurativa Management in the United States: An Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and MarketScan Medicaid Databases

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott A.; Lin, Hsien-Chang; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To present nationally representative data demonstrating how frequently hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) occurs in specific groups and how it is currently managed. Methods We analyzed data from the 1990–2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the 2003–2007 MarketScan Medicaid databases for patients with a diagnosis of HS (ICD-9-CM code 705.83). Visits per 100,000 population of each race and ethnicity were calculated using the 2000 US Census data for specific demographics. Results There were 164,000 patient visits (95% CI: 128,000–200,000) annually with a diagnosis of HS in the NAMCS, and 17,270 HS patients were found in the MarketScan Medicaid over the 5-year period. Antibiotics were the most common treatment, followed by pain medications, topical steroids, and isotretinoin. Prescriptions of biologics and systemic methotrexate, cyclosporine, and acitretin were not observed in the NAMCS. Physicians prescribed medications in 74% of visits and used procedures in 11% of visits. African Americans, females, and young adults had higher numbers of visits for HS. Conclusions Our data showing a maximum of 0.06% of the population being treated for HS in a given year are consistent with the low estimates of HS prevalence. Compared to the current prescribing patterns, the more frequent prescription of biologics and systemic treatments may yield better outcomes. PMID:27172455

  17. [Interest of ambulatory simplified acute physiology score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in an intensive care unit of an infectious diseases unit in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Dia, N M; Diallo, I; Manga, N M; Diop, S A; Fortes-Deguenonvo, L; Lakhe, N A; Ka, D; Seydi, M; Diop, B M; Sow, P S

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of patients by a scale of gravity allows a better categorization of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Our study had for objective to estimate interest of Ambulatory Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in ICU of infectious diseases department of FANN hospital. It was about a descriptive and analytical retrospective study, made from the data found in patients' files admitted into the USI infectious diseases department of FANN hospital in Dakar, from January 1(st), 2009 till December 31st, 2009.The data of 354 patients' files were analyzed. The sex-ratio was 1.77 with an average age of 37.6 years ± 19.4 years old [5-94 years]. The majority of the patients were unemployed paid (39.6%). The most frequent failures were the following ones: neurological (80.5%), cardio-respiratory (16.7%). The average duration of stay was 6.2 days ± 8.2 days going of less than 24 hours to more than 10 weeks. The deaths arose much more at night (53.1%) than in the daytime (46.9%) and the strongest rate of death was recorded in January (61.5%), most low in October (26.7%). The global mortality was 48.3%. The rate of lethality according to the highest main diagnosis was allocated to the AIDS (80.5%). The average ambulatory simplified acute physiology score was 5.3 ± 3.6 with extremes of 0 and 18. The deaths in our series increased with this index (p = 0.000005). The female patients had a rate of lethality higher than that of the men people, 55.5% against 44.2% (p = 0.03). In spite of a predictive score of a high survival (ASAPS < 8), certain number of patients died (n = 105) that is 61.4% of the deaths. The metabolic disturbances, hyperleukocytosis or leukopenia when realised, the presence of a chronic disease, seemed also to influence this lethality. ASAPS only, although interesting, would not good estimate the gravity of patients, where from the necessity thus of a minimum biological balance sheet. It seems better adapted

  18. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  19. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  20. From Pharmacovigilance to Clinical Care Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Edward; Moses, Christopher; Ryan, Padhraig; Somai, Melek; Stone, David; Tang, Kai-ou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In order to ensure the continued, safe administration of pharmaceuticals, particularly those agents that have been recently introduced into the market, there is a need for improved surveillance after product release. This is particularly so because drugs are used by a variety of patients whose particular characteristics may not have been fully captured in the original market approval studies. Even well-conducted, randomized controlled trials are likely to have excluded a large proportion of individuals because of any number of issues. The digitization of medical care, which yields rich and accessible drug data amenable to analytic techniques, provides an opportunity to capture the required information via observational studies. We propose the development of an open, accessible database containing properly de-identified data, to provide the substrate for the required improvement in pharmacovigilance. A range of stakeholders could use this to identify delayed and low-frequency adverse events. Moreover, its power as a research tool could extend to the detection of complex interactions, potential novel uses, and subtle subpopulation effects. This far-reaching potential is demonstrated by our experience with the open Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care (MIMIC) intensive care unit database. The new database could also inform the development of objective, robust clinical practice guidelines. Careful systematization and deliberate standardization of a fully digitized pharmacovigilance process is likely to save both time and resources for healthcare in general. PMID:26576325

  1. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke.Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed.Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients' ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery.Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1-3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4-6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores.Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  2. Ambulatory oral surgery: 1-year experience with 11 680 patients from Zagreb district, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Jokić, Dražen; Macan, Darko; Perić, Berislav; Tadić, Marinka; Biočić, Josip; Đanić, Petar; Brajdić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the types and frequencies of oral surgery diagnoses and ambulatory oral surgical treatments during one year period at the Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical data on 11 680 ambulatory patients, treated between January 1 and of December 31, 2011 were retrieved from the hospital database using a specific protocol. The obtained data were subsequently analyzed in order to assess the frequency of diagnoses and differences in sex and age. Results The most common ambulatory procedure was tooth extraction (37.67%) and the most common procedure in ambulatory operating room was alveolectomy (57.25%). The test of proportions showed that significantly more extractions (P < 0.001) and intraoral incisions (P < 0.001) were performed among male patients, whereas significantly more alveolectomies and apicoectomies were performed among female patients (P < 0.001). A greater prevalence of periodontal disease was found in patients residing in Zagreb than in patients residing in rural areas. Conclusion The data from this study may be useful for planning of ambulatory oral surgery services, budgeting, and sustaining quality improvement, enhancing oral surgical curricula, training and education of primary health care doctors and oral surgery specialists, and promoting patients’ awareness of the importance of oral health. PMID:23444246

  3. Modifying physician behavior to improve cost-efficiency in safety-net ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Nancy; Gumus, Gulcin; Deckard, Gloria J

    2013-01-01

    Change interventions in one form or another are viewed as important tools to reduce variation in medical services, reduce costs, and improve quality of care. With the current focus on efficient resource use, the successful design and implementation of change strategies are of utmost importance for health care managers. We present a case study in which macro and micro level change strategies were used to modify primary care physicians' practice patterns of prescribing diagnostic services in a safety-net's ambulatory clinics. The findings suggest that health care managers using evidence-based strategies can create a practice environment that reduces barriers and facilitates change. PMID:23448919

  4. Degree of Ambulatory Disability: Effects on Rural Siblings' Social Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Theresa Nowak; Ross-Reynolds, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 22 mothers of children with ambulatory disability and 33 nondisabled siblings showed no differences in sibling's child care responsibilities, general home responsibilities, or independence related to severity of the ambulatory disability. A difference in the amount of social activity, reported by mothers, was not confirmed by…

  5. Studies in Ambulatory Care Quality Assessment in the Indian Health Service. Volume II: Appraisal of System Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutting, Paul A.; And Others

    Six Indian Health Service (IHS) units, chosen in a non-random manner, were evaluated via a quality assessment methodology currently under development by the IHS Office of Research and Development. A set of seven health problems (tracers) was selected to represent major health problems, and clinical algorithms (process maps) were constructed for…

  6. Ambulatory electrogastrography in patients with sclerodermia, delayed gastric emptying, dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Is there any clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    Hocke, M; Seidel, T; Sprott, H; Oelzner, P; Eitner, K; Bosseckert, H

    2001-07-01

    Background: Changes in electrogastrographic parameters are described in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, sclerodermia, dyspepsia, and delayed gastric emptying in static measurements. However, no information is available about changes in ambulatory measurements. The objective of this study was to find parameters that discriminate between these diseases using cutaneous 24-h-electrogastrography. Methods: Cutaneous 24-h electrogastrography (EGG) measurements were taken from 20 patients with dyspepsia, 10 patients with systemic sclerosis (sclerodermia, SSc), 7 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 7 patients with delayed gastric emptying, and 10 healthy volunteers. Measurements were made using a DIGITRAPPER EGG (Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden) and the accompanying computerized data analysis package (ElectroGastroGram Version 6.30, Gastrosoft Inc., Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden). Frequency and power were compared pre- and postprandially, as well as during the entire day of measurement. Results: The 24-h measurements in healthy volunteers revealed 45.00%+/-12.12% normal values (2.4-3.7 cpm), 30.10%+/-7.15% bradygastric values (<2.4 cpm), and 24.20%+/-7.76% tachygastric values (>3.7 cpm). There was no significant change in frequency between rest and motion, but there was a significant increase in power (P<0.05). There was significantly more bradygastria in patients with dyspepsia periprandially as well as after 24 h (P<0.01) than in healthy volunteers. The mean power of patients with dyspepsia was significantly higher than that of patients with IBS (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cutaneous 24-h-EGG may be used as an additional means of differentiating between dyspepsia and IBS. PMID:11395301

  7. Novel description of the 24-hour circadian rhythms of brachial versus central aortic blood pressure and the impact of blood pressure treatment in a randomized controlled clinical trial: The Ambulatory Central Aortic Pressure (AmCAP) Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan; Lacy, Peter S; Baschiera, Fabio; Brunel, Patrick; Düsing, Rainer

    2013-06-01

    Elevated brachial blood pressure (BP) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and predicts morbidity and mortality in humans. Recently, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and assessment of central aortic BP have been introduced to improve BP phenotyping. The Ambulatory Central Aortic Pressure (AmCAP) study combines these approaches and describes, for the first time, the diurnal patterns of simultaneously measured 24-hour ambulatory brachial and central pressures in a prespecified substudy embedded within a clinical trial of BP lowering in patients with hypertension. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory brachial and central pressure measurements were acquired using a tonometer mounted into the articulating strap of a wristwatch-like device (BPro) in 171 participants with hypertension recruited into the ASSERTIVE (AliSkiren Study of profound antihypERtensive efficacy in hyperTensIVE patients) trial. Participants were randomly assigned to BP lowering with either aliskiren 300 mg QD or telmisartan 80 mg QD for 12 weeks. Ambulatory brachial and central BP was measured in all participants both at baseline and at study end. Brachial and central BP both demonstrated typical diurnal patterns with lower pressures at night. However, night time was associated with smaller reductions in central relative to brachial pressure and decreased pulse pressure amplification (P<0.0001 for both). These effects were not modulated after BP lowering and were maintained after adjustment for day and night-time BP and heart rate (P=0.02). This study demonstrates that brachial and central pressure show different diurnal patterns, which are not modulated by BP-lowering therapy, with relatively higher night-time central pressures. These novel data indicate that night-time central BP may provide prognostic importance and warrants further investigation. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00865020. PMID:23630950

  8. Ambulatory Spine Surgery: A Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Evan O.; Brietzke, Sasha C.; Weinberg, Alan D.; McAnany, Steven J.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.; Hecht, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value < 0.25 were entered into a multiple logistic regression model. All statistical analyses were performed using the SAS System software Version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina, United States). Results Overall, 84.2% of respondents performed some manner of ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety. PMID:25083356

  9. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value < 0.25 were entered into a multiple logistic regression model. All statistical analyses were performed using the SAS System software Version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina, United States). Results Overall, 84.2% of respondents performed some manner of ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety. PMID:25083356

  10. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116