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  1. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living Conditions Caregiver ...

  2. Improving Children's Heart Health: A Report from the American Heart Association's Children's Heart Health Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidding, Samuel S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article presents recommendations developed at the 1994 American Heart Association's Children's Heart Health Conference to promote cardiovascular health in children, particularly regarding public health, lifestyle, and behavior. The recommendations cover the areas of physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco, providing suggestions for schools,…

  3. Continuing Education Programs within the American Heart Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembright, Katherine A.

    1970-01-01

    Because it believes the nurse can and must be a participant in the co-professional health team (doctor, nurse), the American Heart Association has become increasingly concerned with planning and carrying out activities that contribute to the continuing education of nurses. (PT)

  4. Society for melanoma research and american heart association scientific sessions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Among the featured topics: oncolytic immunotherapy, BRAF/MEK inhibition, and a programmed death-1 inhibitor at the Society for Melanoma Research; and anticoagulation therapy, an alternative to statins, and endocarditis in the absence of dental antibiotic prophylaxis at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. PMID:25628510

  5. Heterogeneity in statin indications within the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Lima, João A C; Nallamothu, Brahmajee; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-01-01

    A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden. PMID:25456869

  6. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26534956

  7. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients. PMID:27400984

  8. Summary of the American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article summarizes the recent American Heart Association (AHA) Science Statement, Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations, published in Circulation in the July 4, 2006 issue. Improving diet and lifestyle recommendations is a critical component of the AHA’s strategy for cardiovascular disease risk re...

  9. Workplace wellness recognition for optimizing workplace health: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Calitz, Chris; Arena, Ross; Baase, Catherine; Isaac, Fikry W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Peterson, Eric D; Pronk, Nico; Sanchez, Eduardo; Terry, Paul E; Volpp, Kevin G; Antman, Elliott M

    2015-05-19

    The workplace is an important setting for promoting cardiovascular health and cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention in the United States. Well-designed, comprehensive workplace wellness programs have the potential to improve cardiovascular health and to reduce mortality, morbidity, and disability resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke. Nevertheless, widespread implementation of comprehensive workplace wellness programs is lacking, and program composition and quality vary. Several organizations provide worksite wellness recognition programs; however, there is variation in recognition criteria, and they do not specifically focus on cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention. Although there is limited evidence to suggest that company performance on employer health management scorecards is associated with favorable healthcare cost trends, these data are not currently robust, and further evaluation is needed. As a recognized national leader in evidence-based guidelines, care systems, and quality programs, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is uniquely positioned and committed to promoting the adoption of comprehensive workplace wellness programs, as well as improving program quality and workforce health outcomes. As part of its commitment to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will promote science-based best practices for comprehensive workplace wellness programs and establish benchmarks for a national workplace wellness recognition program to assist employers in applying the best systems and strategies for optimal programming. The recognition program will integrate identification of a workplace culture of health and achievement of rigorous standards for cardiovascular health based on Life's Simple 7 metrics. In addition, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will develop resources that assist employers in meeting these rigorous

  10. Associations between metabolomic compounds and incident heart failure among African Americans: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Yu, Bing; Alexander, Danny; Manolio, Teri A; Aguilar, David; Coresh, Josef; Heiss, Gerardo; Boerwinkle, Eric; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2013-08-15

    Heart failure is more prevalent among African Americans than in the general population. Metabolomic studies among African Americans may efficiently identify novel biomarkers of heart failure. We used untargeted methods to measure 204 stable serum metabolites and evaluated their associations with incident heart failure hospitalization (n = 276) after a median follow-up of 20 years (1987-2008) by using Cox regression in data from 1,744 African Americans aged 45-64 years without heart failure at baseline from the Jackson, Mississippi, field center of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. After adjustment for established risk factors, we found that 16 metabolites (6 named with known structural identities and 10 unnamed with unknown structural identities, the latter denoted by using the format X-12345) were associated with incident heart failure (P < 0.0004 based on a modified Bonferroni procedure). Of the 6 named metabolites, 4 are involved in amino acid metabolism, 1 (prolylhydroxyproline) is a dipeptide, and 1 (erythritol) is a sugar alcohol. After additional adjustment for kidney function, 2 metabolites remained associated with incident heart failure (for metabolite X-11308, hazard ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.86; for metabolite X-11787, hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.37). Further structural analysis revealed X-11308 to be a dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid and X-11787 to be an isoform of either hydroxyleucine or hydroxyisoleucine. Our metabolomic analysis revealed novel biomarkers associated with incident heart failure independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:23788672

  11. Durability of Class I American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Mark D.; Goldstein, Jennifer N.; Cirullo, Michael A.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding the durability of clinical practice guideline recommendations over time. OBJECTIVE To characterize variations in the durability of class I (“procedure/treatment should be performed/administered”) American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline recommendations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Textual analysis by 4 independent reviewers of 11 guidelines published between 1998 and 2007 and revised between 2006 and 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We abstracted all class I recommendations from the first of the 2 most recent versions of each guideline and identified corresponding recommendations in the subsequent version. We classified recommendations replaced by less determinate or contrary recommendations as having been downgraded or reversed; we classified recommendations for which no corresponding item could be identified as having been omitted. We tested for differences in the durability of recommendations according to guideline topic and underlying level of evidence using bivariable hypothesis tests and conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Of 619 index recommendations, 495 (80.0%; 95%CI, 76.6%–83.1%) were retained in the subsequent guideline version, 57 (9.2%; 95%CI, 7.0%–11.8%) were downgraded or reversed, and 67 (10.8%; 95%CI, 8.4%–13.3%) were omitted. The percentage of recommendations retained varied across guidelines from 15.4%(95%CI, 1.9%–45.4%) to 94.1%(95%CI, 80.3%–99.3%; P < .001). Among recommendations with available information on level of evidence, 90.5%(95%CI, 83.2%–95.3%) of recommendations supported by multiple randomized studies were retained, vs 81.0% (95%CI, 74.8%–86.3%) of recommendations supported by 1 randomized trial or observational data and 73.7%(95% CI, 65.8%–80.5%) of recommendations supported by opinion (P = .001). After accounting for guideline-level factors, the probability of being downgraded, reversed, or omitted was greater for

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: New Evidence Since the 2011 American Cardiology of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association Guideline.

    PubMed

    Fraiche, Ariane; Wang, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Since publication of the 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), more recent studies offer greater insights about this condition. With increased recognition of the role of sarcomere protein mutations and myocardial structural abnormalities in the pathophysiology of this disease, new evidence offers potential improvements for the management of patients with HCM. In this review of studies published since 2011, we highlight several studies that may impact diagnostic considerations, risk stratification, and treatment of symptoms in HCM. PMID:27294414

  13. Understanding and Improving Cardiovascular Health: An Update on the American Heart Association's Concept of Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christina M; Gooding, Holly S; Murillo, Rosenda; Foraker, Randi

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association's 2020 Strategic Impact Goal is "By 2020, to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20%." To monitor progress towards this goal, a new construct "ideal cardiovascular health" (iCVH) was defined that includes the simultaneous presence of optimal levels of seven health behaviors (physical activity, smoking, dietary intake, and body mass index) and factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure and fasting blood glucose). In this review, we present a summary of major concepts related to the concept of iCVH and an update of the literature in this area since publication of the 2020 Strategic Impact Goal, including trends in iCVH prevalence, new determinants and outcomes related to iCVH, strategies for maintaining or improving iCVH, policy implications of the iCVH model, and the remaining challenges to reaching the 2020 Strategic Impact Goal. PMID:25958016

  14. Sodium, blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease: further evidence supporting the American Heart Association sodium reduction recommendations.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Paul K; Appel, Lawrence J; Sacco, Ralph L; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Antman, Elliott M; Campbell, Norman; Dunbar, Sandra B; Frohlich, Edward D; Hall, John E; Jessup, Mariell; Labarthe, Darwin R; MacGregor, Graham A; Sacks, Frank M; Stamler, Jeremiah; Vafiadis, Dorothea K; Van Horn, Linda V

    2012-12-11

    Recent reports of selected observational studies and a meta-analysis have stirred controversy and have become the impetus for calls to abandon recommendations for reduced sodium intake by the US general population. A detailed review of these studies documents substantial methodological concerns that limit the usefulness of these studies in setting, much less reversing, dietary recommendations. Indeed, the evidence base supporting recommendations for reduced sodium intake in the general population remains robust and persuasive. The American Heart Association is committed to improving the health of all Americans through implementation of national goals for health promotion and disease prevention, including its recommendation to reduce dietary sodium intake to <1500 mg/d. PMID:23124030

  15. February Is American Heart Month | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Camille Rees, Guest Writer February is American Heart Month, and Feb. 7 was designated “National Wear Red Day” by the American Heart Association. The American Heart Association has sponsored the “Go Red for Women” campaign for 10 years. The message: heart disease is the number one killer of women. Did you know that more women die of heart disease than men?  In fact, it is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. Over the years, the red dress has become the symbol of the fight against heart disease in women.

  16. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2012, Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held for the first time in Los Angeles in 2012, with the most up-to-date basic and clinical science in the field presented and heard by physicians, research scientists, students, and paramedical personnel from 100 countries. Japan accounted for the second highest number of submitted abstracts and the Japanese Circulation Society actively contributed to the success of the AHA Scientific Sessions this year. The Late-Breaking Clinical Trial sessions comprised 27 clinical studies presented in the main hall. The FREEDOM study revealed the superiority of using a coronary artery bypass graft for diabetic multivessel coronary artery diseases over percutaneous coronary intervention using a drug-eluting stent. A new peptide hormone, serelaxin, improved dyspnea in heart failure patients and significantly reduced mortality rates according to the RELAX-AHF study. In the basic sciences, primary necrosis in mitochondria was the hot topic, while genetics, including genome-wide association studies, and epigenetics were strong features of the basic and clinical cardiovascular (CV) science. It was also clear that regenerative medicine is now part of mainstream CV research, with several clinical trials underway and many basic research projects ongoing around the world. Induced pluripotent stem cells in particular have the potential to change CV medicine, and will underpin the next era of regenerative medicine and personal therapies for heart diseases. PMID:23238304

  17. Associations of adiponectin with individual European ancestry in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Choudhry, Shweta; Musani, Solomon K.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Liu, Jiankang; Rotimi, Charles N.; Wilson, James G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compared with European Americans, African Americans (AAs) exhibit lower levels of the cardio-metabolically protective adiponectin even after accounting for adiposity measures. Because few studies have examined in AA the association between adiponectin and genetic admixture, a dense panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) was used to estimate the individual proportions of European ancestry (PEA) for the AAs enrolled in a large community-based cohort, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). We tested the hypothesis that plasma adiponectin and PEA are directly associated and assessed the interaction with a series of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods: Plasma specimens from 1439 JHS participants were analyzed by ELISA for adiponectin levels. Using pseudo-ancestral population genotype data from the HapMap Consortium, PEA was estimated with a panel of up to 1447 genome-wide preselected AIMs by a maximum likelihood approach. Interaction assessment, stepwise linear and cubic multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to analyze the cross-sectional association between adiponectin and PEA. Results: Among the study participants (62% women; mean age 48 ± 12 years), the median (interquartile range) of PEA was 15.8 (9.3)%. Body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04) and insulin resistance (p = 0.0001) modified the association between adiponectin and PEA. Adiponectin was directly and linearly associated with PEA (β = 0.62 ± 0.28, p = 0.03) among non-obese (n = 673) and insulin sensitive participants (n = 1141; β = 0.74 ± 0.23, p = 0.001), but not among those obese or with insulin resistance. No threshold point effect was detected for non-obese participants. Conclusions: In a large AA population, the individual proportion of European ancestry was linearly and directly associated with plasma adiponectin among non-obese and non insulin-resistant participants, pointing to the interaction of genetic and metabolic factors influencing adiponectin levels. PMID:24575123

  18. Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Nutrition Committe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving diet and lifestyle is a critical component of the American Heart Association’s strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in the general population. This document presents recommendations designed to meet this objective. Specific goals are to consume an overall healthy diet; aim fo...

  19. Perceived Discrimination is Associated with Health Behaviors among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study*

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Mario; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Gebreab, Samson Y.; Brenner, Allison; Dubbert, Patricia; Wyatt, Sharon; Bruce, Marino; Hickson, DeMarc; Payne, Tom; Taylor, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Background Using Jackson Heart Study data, we examined associations of multiple measures of perceived discrimination with health behaviors among African Americans (AA). Methods The cross-sectional associations of everyday, lifetime, and burden of discrimination with odds of smoking and mean differences in physical activity, dietary fat, and sleep were examined among 4,939 35–84 year old participants after adjustment for age and socioeconomic status (SES). Results Men reported slightly higher levels of everyday and lifetime discrimination than women and similar levels of burden of discrimination as women. After adjustment for age and SES, everyday discrimination was associated with more smoking and a greater percentage of dietary fat in men and women (OR for smoking: 1.13, 95%CI 1.00,1.28 and 1.19, 95%CI 1.05,1.34; mean difference in dietary fat: 0.37, p<.05 and 0.43, p<.01, in men and women, respectively). Everyday and lifetime discrimination were associated with fewer hours of sleep in men and women (mean difference for everyday discrimination: −0.08, p<.05 and −0.18, p<.001, respectively; and mean difference for lifetime discrimination: −0.08, p<.05, and −0.24, p<.001, respectively). Burden of discrimination was associated with more smoking and fewer hours of sleep in women only. Conclusions Higher levels of perceived discrimination were associated with select health behaviors among men and women. Health behaviors offer a potential mechanism through which perceived discrimination affects health in AA. PMID:26417003

  20. The effect of the American Heart Association step one diet on hyperlipidemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Callahan, M F; Cody, M; Adams, P L; Litchford, M; Buckner, K; Galloway, J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality following renal transplantation. The percentage of deaths due to ischemic cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular accidents nearly equals that caused by infection among patients receiving their first transplant, according to data from the European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease frequently identified following renal transplantation, and diets low in fat and cholesterol have been suggested as treatment. Previous studies have not reported the response of LDL cholesterol to dietary treatment, and it is this form of cholesterol that is most closely related to cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association has provided nutritionists with guidelines for the treatment of hyperlipidemic patients which include the Step One Diet. Previous dietary studies of renal transplant recipients have allowed a slightly higher intake of fat than that currently recommended by the AHA. We wondered if an easily reproducible diet well known to nutritionists such as the AHA Step One Diet would be effective in lowering cholesterol levels in hyperlipidemic renal transplant recipients. The purpose of our study was not to define the mechanisms of posttransplant hyperlipidemia, but rather to assess the effectiveness of dietary intervention on hyperlipidemia following renal transplantation. PMID:2301029

  1. Common genetic variation near the connexin-43 gene is associated with resting heart rate in African Americans: A genome-wide association study of 13,372 participants

    PubMed Central

    Deo, R.; Nalls, M.A.; Avery, C.L.; Smith, J.G.; Evans, D.S.; Keller, M.F.; Butler, A.M.; Buxbaum, S.G.; Li, G.; Quibrera, P. Miguel; Smith, E.N.; Tanaka, T.; Akylbekova, E.L.; Alonso, A.; Arking, D.E.; Benjamin, E.J.; Berenson, G.S.; Bis, J.C.; Chen, L.Y.; Chen, W.; Cummings, S.R.; Ellinor, P.T.; Evans, M.K.; Ferrucci, L.; Fox, E.R.; Heckbert, S.R.; Heiss, G.; Hsueh, W.C.; Kerr, K.F.; Limacher, M.C.; Liu, Y.; Lubitz, S.A.; Magnani, J.W.; Mehra, R.; Marcus, G.M.; Murray, S.S.; Newman, A.B.; Njajou, O.; North, K.E.; Paltoo, D.N.; Psaty, B.M.; Redline, S.S.; Reiner, A.P.; Robinson, J.G.; Rotter, J.I.; Samdarshi, T.E.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schork, N.J.; Singleton, A.B.; Siscovick, D.; Soliman, E.Z.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Srinivasan, S.R.; Taylor, H.A.; Trevisan, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zonderman, A.B.; Newton-Cheh, C.; Whitsel, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci associated with variation in resting heart rate in European and Asian populations. No study has evaluated genetic variants associated with heart rate in African Americans. OBJECTIVE To identify novel genetic variants associated with resting heart rate in African Americans. METHODS Ten cohort studies participating in the Candidate-gene Association Resource and Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network consortia performed genome-wide genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed 2,954,965 SNPs using HapMap YRI and CEU panels in 13,372 participants of African ancestry. Each study measured the RR interval (ms) from 10-second resting 12-lead electrocardiograms and estimated RR-SNP associations using covariate-adjusted linear regression. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to combine cohort-specific measures of association and identify genome-wide significant loci (P ≤ 2.5 × 10−8). RESULTS Fourteen SNPs on chromosome 6q22 exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold. The most significant association was for rs9320841 (+13 ms per minor allele; P = 4.98 × 10−15). This SNP was approximately 350 kb downstream of GJA1, a locus previously identified as harboring SNPs associated with heart rate in Europeans. Adjustment for rs9320841 also attenuated the association between the remaining 13 SNPs in this region and heart rate. In addition, SNPs in MYH6, which have been identified in European genome-wide association study, were associated with similar changes in the resting heart rate as this population of African Americans. CONCLUSIONS An intergenic region downstream of GJA1 (the gene encoding connexin 43, the major protein of the human myocardial gap junction) and an intragenic region within MYH6 are associated with variation in resting heart rate in African Americans as well as in populations of European and Asian origin. PMID:23183192

  2. Evaluation of the American Heart Association 2015 revised Jones criteria versus existing guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Pradeep; Shankar, Binoy; Juneja, Atul; Chandelia, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the diagnostic yield of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) by the American Heart Association/ American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) 2015 revised Jones criteria with the WHO 2004 and Australian guidelines 2012. Methods Retrospective observational study in 93 cases of suspected ARF admitted to the Division of Paediatric Cardiology between January 2012 and December 2014. WHO 2004, Australian guidelines and AHA/ACC 2015 Jones criteria were applied to assess definite and probable ARF. Results Of the 93 cases, 50 were diagnosed as the first episode of ARF and 43 as a recurrence of the condition. Subclinical carditis was a predominant presentation (38%) in the first episode group (p<0.01) whereas in the recurrence group carditis (88%) was the main presentation (p<0.01). Among the joint manifestations, the majority of patients in both the first episode group and the recurrence group presented with arthralgia. Of all the patients with suspected ARF (50), 34% of cases did not fulfil the standard Jones criteria 2004; however, 86% qualified as having ARF on applying the Australian and AHA/ACC 2015 criteria. Surprisingly in the recurrence group only 67% of the patients fulfilled AHA/ACC 2015 despite the modifications incorporated beyond WHO 2004; however, all the patients fulfilled the Australian guidelines either as definite (88.4%) or probable (11.6%). Inclusion of subclinical carditis, polyarthralgia and monoarthritis as major criteria influenced the diagnosis to definite ARF in 20%, 10% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The clinical manifestations of ARF, comprising subclinical carditis and arthralgia, are possibly milder in the Indian population; hence, inclusion of subclinical carditis, polyarthralgia and monoarthritis as major criteria in the newer guidelines has improved the diagnostic yield of ARF. In the absence of a gold standard for the diagnosis of ARF, it is not possible to comment on sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27326228

  3. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  4. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Anne M; Wellenius, Gregory A; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150-299 m, 1161 lived 300-999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  5. Adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction is associated with bone health in older Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share common pathophysiological mechanisms. It is possible that strategies to reduce CVD risk may also benefit bone health. We tested the hypothesis that adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Li...

  6. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M; Jones, Peter H; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M; Virani, Salim S

    2016-06-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used to examine our objectives. PMID:27054163

  7. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on treating blood cholesterol and assessing cardiovascular risk: a busy practitioner's guide.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arpeta; Smith, Donald A

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk were released in mid-November 2013. This article explains the guidelines, the risk equations, and their derivations, and addresses criticisms so that practicing physicians may be more comfortable in using the guidelines and the risk equations to inform patients of their atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk and choices to reduce that risk. The article also addresses patient concerns about statin safety if lifestyle changes have been insufficient to reduce their risk. PMID:25432387

  8. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M.; Jones, Peter H.; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Virani, Salim S.

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used to examine our objectives. PMID:27054163

  9. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  10. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  11. Promoting Physical Activity Through the Shared Use of School Recreational Spaces: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association

    PubMed Central

    Young, Deborah R.; Spengler, John O.; Frost, Natasha; Evenson, Kelly R.; Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Whitsel, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Most Americans are not sufficiently physically active, even though regular physical activity improves health and reduces the risk of many chronic diseases. Those living in rural, non-White, and lower-income communities often have insufficient access to places to be active, which can contribute to their lower level of physical activity. The shared use of school recreational facilities can provide safe and affordable places for communities. Studies suggest that challenges to shared use include additional cost, liability protection, communication among constituencies interested in sharing space, and decision-making about scheduling and space allocation. This American Heart Association policy statement has provided recommendations for federal, state, and local decision-makers to support and expand opportunities for physical activity in communities through the shared use of school spaces. PMID:24134355

  12. Implementation of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Blood Cholesterol Guideline Including Data From the Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial.

    PubMed

    Ziaeian, Boback; Dinkler, John; Watson, Karol

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The management of blood cholesterol through use of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) in at-risk patients is a pillar of medical therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on managing blood cholesterol provides an important framework for the effective implementation of risk-reduction strategies. The guideline identifies four cohorts of patients with proven benefits from statin therapy and streamlines the dosing and monitoring recommendations based on evidence from published, randomized controlled trials. Primary care physicians and cardiologists play key roles in identifying populations at elevated ASCVD risk. In providing a practical management overview of the current blood cholesterol guideline, we facilitate more informed discussions on treatment options between healthcare providers and their patients. PMID:26198559

  13. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  14. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159387.html Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans Better control of risk factors such as smoking, ... new study reports. Federal researchers found that fewer Americans over 40 have coronary heart disease. The rate ...

  15. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  16. New Cholesterol Guidelines for the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Comparison of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines with the 2014 National Lipid Association Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Jacobson, Terry A

    2016-03-01

    This review discusses the 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and compares it with the 2014 National Lipid Association (NLA) Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia. The review discusses some of the distinctions between the guidelines, including how to determine a patient's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, the role of lipoprotein treatment targets, the importance of moderate- and high-intensity statin therapy, and the use of nonstatin therapy in light of the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial. PMID:26892995

  17. Heart Truth for African American Women

    MedlinePlus

    THE HEART TRUTH ® FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: AN ACTION PLAN When you hear the term “heart disease,” what’s your first reaction? Like many women, you may ... in four women dies of heart disease. For African American women, the risk of heart disease is especially ...

  18. Influence of Rescuers' Gender and Body Mass Index on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation according to the American Heart Association 2010 Resuscitation Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Ahmad; Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Al-Hashemi, Eman

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor in determining its overall outcome. This study aims to test the association between rescuers' gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), and the accuracy of chest compressions (CC) as well as ventilation, according to American Heart Association (AHA) 2010 resuscitation guidelines. Methods. The study included 72 participants of both genders. All the participants received CPR training according to AHA 2010 resuscitation guidelines. One week later, an assessment of their CPR was carried out. Moreover, the weight and height of the participants were measured in order to calculate their BMI. Results. Our analysis showed no significant association between gender and the CC depth (P = 0.53) as well as between gender and ventilation (P = 0.42). Females were significantly faster than males in CC (P = 0.000). Regarding BMI, participants with a BMI less than the mean BMI of the study sample tended to perform CC with the correct depth (P = 0.045) and to finish CC faster than those with a BMI more than the mean (P = 0.000). On the other hand, no significant association was found between BMI and ventilation (P = 0.187). Conclusion. CPR can be influenced by factors such as gender and BMI, as such the individual rescuer and CPR training programs should take these into account in order to maximize victims' outcome.

  19. Associations of insulin levels with left ventricular structure and function in American Indians: the strong heart study.

    PubMed

    Ilercil, Arzu; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Paranicas, Mary; O'Grady, Michael J; Lee, Elisa T; Welty, Thomas K; Fabsitz, Richard R; Howard, Barbara V

    2002-05-01

    We evaluated the association of insulin and echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) measurements in 1,388 (45% men) nondiabetic American Indian participants in the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Significant (all P < 0.05) relations were found in men and women between log(10) fasting insulin and LV mass (r = 0.24 and 0.26), left atrial diameter (r = 0.25 and 0.28), posterior wall thickness (r = 0.20 and 0.26), septal thickness (r = 0.19 and 0.24), LV diameter (r = 0.17 and 0.16), and cardiac output (r = 0.20 and 0.24) and in women relative wall thickness (r = 0.11) and peripheral resistance (r = -0.17). In regression analyses, adjusting for BMI, age, height, and systolic pressure, fasting insulin was independently correlated with cardiac output in men and relative wall thickness and septal thickness in women (all P < 0.05). The 97th percentiles of fasting insulin (25 microU/ml for men, and 23 microU/ml for women) in 163 apparently normal (BMI <26; blood pressure <140/90; and absence of diabetes, valvular disease, LV wall motion abnormality, or antihypertensive treatment) SHS participants were used to separate normal from elevated fasting insulin levels. Adjusting for age, BMI, and height, men with elevated insulin levels had larger LV diameters (5.41 vs. 5.16 cm; P = 0.05), higher cardiac output (5.5 vs. 4.9 l/min; P < 0.001), and lower peripheral resistance (1,487 vs. 1,666; P = 0.01), paralleling results of regression analyses. Positive relations between insulin and heart size in nondiabetic adults are largely due to associations with body size; after adjustments for covariates, fasting insulin levels are related to greater LV size and cardiac output in men and more concentric LV geometry in women. PMID:11978654

  20. Gender differences in the association of visceral and subcutaneous adiposity with adiponectin in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adiponectin, paradoxically reduced in obesity and with lower levels in African Americans (AA), modulates several cardiometabolic risk factors. Because abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), known to be reduced in AA, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) compartments may confer differential metabolic risk profiles, we investigated the associations of VAT and SAT with serum adiponectin, separately by gender, with the hypothesis that VAT is more strongly inversely associated with adiponectin than SAT. Methods Participants from the Jackson Heart Study, an ongoing cohort of AA (n = 2,799; 64% women; mean age, 55 ± 11 years) underwent computer tomography assessment of SAT and VAT volumes, and had stored serum specimens analyzed for adiponectin levels. These levels were examined by gender in relation to increments of VAT and SAT. Results Compared to women, men had significantly lower mean levels of adiponectin (3.9 ± 3.0 μg/mL vs. 6.0 ± 4.4 μg/mL; p < 0.01) and mean volume of SAT (1,721 ± 803 cm3 vs. 2,668 ± 968 cm3; p < 0.01) but significantly higher mean volume of VAT (884 ± 416 cm3 vs. 801 ± 363 cm3; p < 0.01). Among women, a one standard deviation increment in VAT was inversely associated with adiponectin (β = − 0.13; p < 0.0001) after controlling for age, systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, education, pack-years of smoking and daily intake of alcohol. The statistically significant inverse association of VAT and adiponectin persisted after additionally adjusting for SAT, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), suggesting that VAT provides significant information above and beyond BMI and WC. Among men, after the same multivariable adjustment, there was a direct association of SAT and adiponectin (β = 0.18; p = 0.002) that persisted when controlling for BMI and WC, supporting a beneficial effect of

  1. More than 10 million steps in the right direction: results from the first American Heart Association scientific sessions walking challenge.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Robert A; Arena, Ross; Després, Jean-Pierre; Ciarochi, Amy; Croll, Elizabeth; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Global Congress theme at the American Heart Association (AHA) Annual Scientific Sessions was Physical Activity (PA). As a key component of the Congress, iHealth working in collaboration with AHA provided a Bluetooth-enabled wireless PA and sleep tracker to up to 2,000 Scientific Sessions attendees. Approximately 1850 Scientific Sessions attendees registered for, received a PA tracker and participated in the Walking Challenge. More than 10 million steps were walked by participants (10,703,504) during the 2.5 days of the Walking Challenge. This translates into almost 6000 miles walked (5976.3 miles) and 656,716 calories burned by participants during the Challenge. The Global Congress of PA held at Scientific Sessions 2013 not only extensively reviewed the science of PA as a powerful/independent and, most importantly, modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, but it also provided evidence from a fun and entertaining challenge that PA as a risk behavior can be assessed and targeted. We just took 10 million steps in the right direction. Join us and make your steps count! PMID:25269063

  2. Mitochondrial Function, Biology, and Role in Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Ardehali, Hossein; Balaban, Robert S; DiLisa, Fabio; Dorn, Gerald W; Kitsis, Richard N; Otsu, Kinya; Ping, Peipei; Rizzuto, Rosario; Sack, Michael N; Wallace, Douglas; Youle, Richard J

    2016-06-10

    Cardiovascular disease is a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and elsewhere. Alterations in mitochondrial function are increasingly being recognized as a contributing factor in myocardial infarction and in patients presenting with cardiomyopathy. Recent understanding of the complex interaction of the mitochondria in regulating metabolism and cell death can provide novel insight and therapeutic targets. The purpose of this statement is to better define the potential role of mitochondria in the genesis of cardiovascular disease such as ischemia and heart failure. To accomplish this, we will define the key mitochondrial processes that play a role in cardiovascular disease that are potential targets for novel therapeutic interventions. This is an exciting time in mitochondrial research. The past decade has provided novel insight into the role of mitochondria function and their importance in complex diseases. This statement will define the key roles that mitochondria play in cardiovascular physiology and disease and provide insight into how mitochondrial defects can contribute to cardiovascular disease; it will also discuss potential biomarkers of mitochondrial disease and suggest potential novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27126807

  3. Heart Attacks Striking Younger, Fatter Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157946.html Heart Attacks Striking Younger, Fatter Americans: Study Doctors, patients need ... 24, 2016 THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack victims in the United States are becoming younger ...

  4. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about African-Americans and stroke at our Power To End Stroke website This content was last reviewed July 2015. ... Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  5. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-01

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  6. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-01

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  7. Atherosclerosis in coronary artery and aorta in a semi-urban population by applying modified American Heart Association classification of atherosclerosis: An autopsy study

    PubMed Central

    Thej, Mothakapalli Jagadish; Kalyani, Raju; Kiran, Jayaramaiah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) following atherosclerosis is a giant killer and the incidence of atherosclerosis in coronary arteries is rapidly increasing among Indians. The study was formulated to assess the histomorphological atherosclerotic changes in aorta and coronary arteries at autopsy by applying the modified American Heart Association classification of atherosclerosis based on morphological descriptions to find out the age and sex related prevalence of atherosclerosis in the semi-urban population of Kolar, a district in Southern India. Materials and Methods: Autopsy was conducted on 113 cases whose age ranged from 8-85 years. Autopsy was conducted by the conventional technique; heart and the aorta were removed and fixed in 10% formalin. The heart was dissected along the direction of flow of blood and aorta along the posterior surface. Microscopic assessment of the three main coronary arteries and aorta was done using the modified American Heart Association classification of atherosclerosis. Proportions were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: The number of males was 78 (69%) and number of females was 35 (31%). Mean age was 37.11 ± 15.69 years. Increased incidence of intermediate lesions was noted in young individuals (15-34 yrs). Atherosclerotic lesions were more in left anterior descending artery compared to other coronary arteries and in abdominal aorta compared to thoracic and ascending aorta. Vulnerable plaques were more in right coronary artery. Conclusion: With cardiovascular disease attaining pandemic proportions, the study of subclinical atherosclerosis is the need of the hour to estimate the disease burden in the asymptomatic population. The increased amount of atherosclerosis (advanced and intermediate lesions) found in the young population in this study gives an indication that anti-atherogenic preventive measures need to be implemented in young individuals, so as to prevent coronary artery disease from causing premature death

  8. Associations of Fast Food Restaurant Availability With Dietary Intake and Weight Among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study, 2000–2004

    PubMed Central

    Diez Roux, Ana V.; Smith, Adam E.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Gore, Larry D.; Zhang, Lei; Wyatt, Sharon B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the associations of fast food restaurant (FFR) availability with dietary intake and weight among African Americans in the southeastern United States. Methods. We investigated cross-sectional associations of FFR availability with dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in 4740 African American Jackson Heart Study participants (55.2 ±12.6 years, 63.3% women). We estimated FFR availability using circular buffers with differing radii centered at each participant's geocoded residential location. Results. We observed no consistent associations between FFR availability and BMI or waist circumference. Greater FFR availability was associated with higher energy intake among men and women younger than 55 years, even after adjustment for individual socioeconomic status. For each standard deviation increase in 5-mile FFR availability, the energy intake increased by 138 kilocalories (confidence interval [CI] = 70.53, 204.75) for men and 58 kilocalories (CI = 8.55, 105.97) for women. We observed similar associations for the 2-mile FFR availability, especially in men. FFR availability was also unexpectedly positively associated with total fiber intake. Conclusions. FFR availability may contribute to greater energy intake in younger African Americans who are also more likely to consume fast food. PMID:21551382

  9. 78 FR 8345 - American Heart Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013 American Heart Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the...

  10. 75 FR 6085 - American Heart Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-2743 Filed 2-4-10... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010 American Heart Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United...

  11. American Association of Suicidology

    MedlinePlus

    ... AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SUICIDOLOGY Suicide Prevention is Everyone's Business AAS is a charitable, nonprofit membership organization ... Signs & Risk Factors Current Projects Mission History Financial Information At ...

  12. Clinical trials update from the American Heart Association meeting 2010: EMPHASIS-HF, RAFT, TIM-HF, Tele-HF, ASCEND-HF, ROCKET-AF, and PROTECT.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Buga, Laszlo; Antony, Renjith; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Freemantle, Nick; Clark, Andrew L

    2011-04-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on key trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association held in Chicago in 2010. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. In patients with mild heart failure (HF), EMPHASIS-HF showed that the addition of eplerenone to standard therapy was well tolerated and reduced both the risk of death and hospitalization. The addition of cardiac resynchronization therapy to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy reduced the incidence of all-cause mortality and HF hospitalizations in patients with NYHA class II-III HF compared with ICD alone in RAFT. Telemonitoring failed to improve outcome compared with a high standard of conventional care in patients with chronic HF (TIM-HF study) and a telephone-based interactive voice response system failed to improve outcome in patients recently hospitalized for HF (Tele-HF study). ASCEND-HF suggested that nesiritide was ineffective but safe in patients with acute decompensated HF. ROCKET-AF suggests that the factor-Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban may be as effective as warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation. The PROTECT study provided more data to suggest that amino-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide guided therapy may be beneficial in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. PMID:21436363

  13. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  14. Genome-wide association study of a heart failure related metabolomic profile among African Americans in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Zheng, Yan; Alexander, Danny; Manolio, Teri A; Alonso, Alvaro; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Both the prevalence and incidence of heart failure (HF) are increasing, especially among African Americans, but no large-scale, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HF-related metabolites has been reported. We sought to identify novel genetic variants that are associated with metabolites previously reported to relate to HF incidence. GWASs of three metabolites identified previously as risk factors for incident HF (pyroglutamine, dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid, and X-11787, being either hydroxy-leucine or hydroxy-isoleucine) were performed in 1,260 African Americans free of HF at the baseline examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. A significant association on chromosome 5q33 (rs10463316, MAF = 0.358, P-value = 1.92 × 10(-10) ) was identified for pyroglutamine. One region on chromosome 2p13 contained a nonsynonymous substitution in N-acetyltransferase 8 (NAT8) was associated with X-11787 (rs13538, MAF = 0.481, P-value = 1.71 × 10(-23) ). The smallest P-value for dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid was rs4006531 on chromosome 8q24 (MAF = 0.400, P-value = 6.98 × 10(-7) ). None of the above SNPs were individually associated with incident HF, but a genetic risk score (GRS) created by summing the most significant risk alleles from each metabolite detected 11% greater risk of HF per allele. In summary, we identified three loci associated with previously reported HF-related metabolites. Further use of metabolomics technology will facilitate replication of these findings in independent samples. PMID:23934736

  15. American Podiatric Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the winners. Learn More about The National Advertisement Advertisement @APMA Tweets by @APMA Follow @APMA Featured Webinars ... plans for his term in office. Watch now! Advertisement © 2016 American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc. All rights ...

  16. American Music Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  17. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form The American Brain Tumor Association was the first and is the only national organization committed to funding brain tumor research and providing ...

  18. American Sleep Apnea Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself ...

  19. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  20. American Osteopathic Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... program A study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association examines communication techniques when caring for patients with infections. READ MORE Building dreams: New COM reflects diversity of surrounding community Located ...

  1. Cardiovascular function and treatment in β-thalassemia major: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Dudley J; Udelson, James E; Arai, Andrew E; Bozkurt, Biykem; Cohen, Alan R; Galanello, Renzo; Hoffman, Timothy M; Kiernan, Michael S; Lerakis, Stamatios; Piga, Antonio; Porter, John B; Walker, John Malcolm; Wood, John

    2013-07-16

    This aim of this statement is to report an expert consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac dysfunction in β-thalassemia major (TM). This consensus statement does not cover other hemoglobinopathies, including thalassemia intermedia and sickle cell anemia, in which a different spectrum of cardiovascular complications is typical. There are considerable uncertainties in this field, with a few randomized controlled trials relating to treatment of chronic myocardial siderosis but none relating to treatment of acute heart failure. The principles of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac iron loading in TM are directly relevant to other iron-overload conditions, including in particular Diamond-Blackfan anemia, sideroblastic anemia, and hereditary hemochromatosis. Heart failure is the most common cause of death in TM and primarily results from cardiac iron accumulation. The diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in TM patients differs from that in nonanemic patients because of the cardiovascular adaptation to chronic anemia in non-cardiac-loaded TM patients, which includes resting tachycardia, low blood pressure, enlarged end-diastolic volume, high ejection fraction, and high cardiac output. Chronic anemia also leads to background symptomatology such as dyspnea, which can mask the clinical diagnosis of cardiac dysfunction. Central to early identification of cardiac iron overload in TM is the estimation of cardiac iron by cardiac T2* magnetic resonance. Cardiac T2* <10 ms is the most important predictor of development of heart failure. Serum ferritin and liver iron concentration are not adequate surrogates for cardiac iron measurement. Assessment of cardiac function by noninvasive techniques can also be valuable clinically, but serial measurements to establish trends are usually required because interpretation of single absolute values is complicated by the abnormal cardiovascular hemodynamics in TM and measurement imprecision. Acute decompensated heart failure is a

  2. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. Treatment of hypertension ...

  3. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... Cardiovascular Nursing; American Heart Association Council on Clinical ... Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, ...

  4. Native American Homeschooling Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozon, Gina

    2000-01-01

    The Native American Home School Association helps Native parents to provide a good education free from the assimilationist tendencies of public school and to transmit Native values and culture. Discusses various home schooling styles, the effectiveness of home schooling in terms of academic achievement and socialization, and the effectiveness of…

  5. A report from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2011 (November 12-16, 2011, Orlando, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle have a direct impact on cardiovascular health and may help improve the condition in many patients suffering from or at risk for cardiac diseases, and remote and in-person behavioral interventions were shown to prompt weight loss in obese individuals (Appel, L.J., Late-Breaking Clinical Trial presentation), thus helping reduce the cardiovascular risk. In that regard, and as an example, kiwifruit was noted to lower 24-hour blood pressure (Svendsen, M. et al., Abst 16175), whereas alcoholic beverages (at least red wine and vodka) were reported to improve the cardiovascular risk by increasing collateral perfusion and, in the case of red wine, to enhance antioxidant cardioprotection (Chu, L.M. et al., Abst 16380), drug therapy is required for treating a vast array of medical conditions affecting the heart and vessels, as well as many cardiovascular risk factors very common in the general population. These issues were widely discussed in the context of new findings with improved therapies tested in clinical or preclinical studies during AHA's scientific sessions in Orlando, as summarized in the following report. PMID:22384460

  6. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  7. Guide to the assessment of physical activity: Clinical and research applications: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Ekelund, Ulf; Freedson, Patty S; Gary, Rebecca A; Richardson, Caroline R; Smith, Derek T; Swartz, Ann M

    2013-11-12

    The deleterious health consequences of physical inactivity are vast, and they are of paramount clinical and research importance. Risk identification, benchmarks, efficacy, and evaluation of physical activity behavior change initiatives for clinicians and researchers all require a clear understanding of how to assess physical activity. In the present report, we have provided a clear rationale for the importance of assessing physical activity levels, and we have documented key concepts in understanding the different dimensions, domains, and terminology associated with physical activity measurement. The assessment methods presented allow for a greater understanding of the vast number of options available to clinicians and researchers when trying to assess physical activity levels in their patients or participants. The primary outcome desired is the main determining factor in the choice of physical activity assessment method. In combination with issues of feasibility/practicality, the availability of resources, and administration considerations, the desired outcome guides the choice of an appropriate assessment tool. The decision matrix, along with the accompanying tables, provides a mechanism for this selection that takes all of these factors into account. Clearly, the assessment method adopted and implemented will vary depending on circumstances, because there is no single best instrument appropriate for every situation. In summary, physical activity assessment should be considered a vital health measure that is tracked regularly over time. All other major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking) are assessed routinely. Physical activity status should also be assessed regularly. Multiple physical activity assessment methods provide reasonably accurate outcome measures, with choices dependent on setting-specific resources and constraints. The present scientific statement provides a guide to

  8. AHA Scientific Statement Population Approaches to Improve Diet, Physical Activity, and Smoking Habits A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Afshin, Ashkan; Benowitz, Neal L.; Bittner, Vera; Daniels, Stephen R.; Franch, Harold A.; Jacobs, David R.; Kraus, William E.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Krummel, Debra A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Whitsel, Laurie P.; Zakai, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor lifestyle, including suboptimal diet, physical inactivity, and tobacco use are leading causes of preventable diseases globally. Although even modest population shifts in risk substantially alter health outcomes, the optimal population-level approaches to improve lifestyle are not well established. Methods and Results For this American Heart Association Scientific Statement, the writing group systematically reviewed and graded the current scientific evidence for effective population approaches to improve dietary habits, increase physical activity, and reduce tobacco use. Strategies were considered in 6 broad domains: (1) media and education campaigns; (2) labeling and consumer information; (3) taxation, subsidies, and other economic incentives; (4) school and workplace approaches; (5) local environmental changes; and (6) direct restrictions and mandates. The writing group also reviewed the potential contributions of healthcare systems and surveillance systems to behavior change efforts. Several specific population interventions that achieved a Class I or IIa recommendation with grade A or B evidence were identified, providing a set of specific evidence-based strategies that deserve close attention and prioritization for wider implementation. Effective interventions included specific approaches in all 6 domains evaluated for improving diet, increasing activity, and reducing tobacco use. The writing group also identified several specific interventions in each of these domains for which current evidence was less robust, as well as other inconsistencies and evidence gaps, informing the need for further rigorous and interdisciplinary approaches to evaluate population programs and policies. Conclusions This systematic review identified and graded the evidence for a range of population-based strategies to promote lifestyle change. The findings provide a framework for policy makers, advocacy groups, researchers, clinicians, communities, and other

  9. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ...

  10. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines ... Surgery. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  11. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  12. Social class and heart disease mortality among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Williams, Carol R; Moore, Latetia; Chen, Fangfei

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine variation in heart disease death rates by the social class of decedents. The term, "social class" refers to a complex set of phenomena such as control over economic resources, social status, and power relative to others in society. The target population for this study was African-American adults aged 35-74 years old who resided in the United States during the years 1996-1997. As a proxy for social class, we examined 5 levels of educational attainment: 0-8 years of school completed (Social Class I), 9-11 years of school completed (Social Class II), high school graduate/12 years of school completed (Social Class III), some college completed (Social Class IV), and college degree completed (Social Class V). Older age, male gender, and lower social class were all independently associated with higher heart disease death rates. For all ages, more disadvantaged social classes had a higher risk of heart disease mortality. The highest relative risks were found for Social Classes I and II among the younger age groups. Many of the "prerequisites" for the "heart healthy lifestyle" are predicated on the benefits of a privileged social class position. For African Americans, there are the additional stressors of segregation, exclusion, and discrimination to overcome, as well as the cumulative physiological toll of lifetime resistance to various forms of racism. For many African Americans in disadvantaged social class positions, the obstacles to reducing the risk for heart disease are very difficult to overcome. PMID:12477160

  13. ACC/AHA classification of care metrics: performance measures and quality metrics: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Masoudi, Frederick A; Rumsfeld, John S; Delong, Elizabeth; Estes, N A Mark; Goff, David C; Grady, Kathleen; Green, Lee A; Loth, Ann R; Peterson, Eric D; Piña, Ileana L; Radford, Martha J; Shahian, David M

    2008-12-01

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have provided leadership in enhancing the quality of cardiovascular care, including the development of clinical performance measures and clinical registries that permit the evaluation of quality of care and stimulate quality improvement. Compliance with ACC/AHA performance measures and metrics encourages the provision of the strongest evidence-based quality of care, including therapies that are life-extending or life-enhancing. Among quality metrics, only a subset should be considered performance measures-that is, those measures specifically suitable for public reporting, external comparisons, and possibly pay-for-performance programs, in addition to quality improvement. These performance measures have been developed using ACC/AHA methodology, often in collaboration with other organizations, and include the process of public comment and peer review. Quality metrics are those measures that have been developed to support self assessment and quality improvement at the provider, hospital, and/or health care system level. These metrics represent valuable tools to aid clinicians and hospitals in improving quality of care and enhancing patient outcomes, but may not meet all specifications of formal performance measures. These quality metrics may also be considered "candidate" measures that with further research or field testing would meet the criteria for formal performance measures in the future. This measure classification is intended to aid providers, hospitals, health systems, and payers in identifying those measures that the ACC and AHA formally endorse as performance measures, while at the same time promoting the broader range of clinical metrics that are useful for quality improvement efforts. PMID:19005092

  14. ACC/AHA classification of care metrics: performance measures and quality metrics: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Masoudi, Frederick A; Rumsfeld, John S; Delong, Elizabeth; Estes, N A Mark; Goff, David C; Grady, Kathleen; Green, Lee A; Loth, Ann R; Peterson, Eric D; Piña, Ileana L; Radford, Martha J; Shahian, David M

    2008-12-01

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have provided leadership in enhancing the quality of cardiovascular care, including the development of clinical performance measures and clinical registries that permit the evaluation of quality of care and stimulate quality improvement. Compliance with ACC/AHA performance measures and metrics encourages the provision of the strongest evidence-based quality of care, including therapies that are life-extending or life-enhancing. Among quality metrics, only a subset should be considered performance measures-that is, those measures specifically suitable for public reporting, external comparisons, and possibly pay-for-performance programs, in addition to quality improvement. These performance measures have been developed using ACC/AHA methodology, often in collaboration with other organizations, and include the process of public comment and peer review. Quality metrics are those measures that have been developed to support self assessment and quality improvement at the provider, hospital, and/or health care system level. These metrics represent valuable tools to aid clinicians and hospitals in improving quality of care and enhancing patient outcomes, but may not meet all specifications of formal performance measures. These quality metrics may also be considered "candidate" measures that with further research of field testing would meet the criteria for formal performance measures in the future. This measure classification is intended to aid providers, hospitals, health systems, and payers in identifying those measures that the ACC and AHA formally endorse as performance measures, while at the same time promoting the broader range of clinical metrics that are useful for quality improvement efforts. PMID:19056002

  15. Plant-Based No Added Fat or American Heart Association Diets, Impact on Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Hypercholesterolemic Children and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Macknin, Michael; Kong, Tammie; Weier, Adam; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne S.; Alkhouri, Naim; Golubic, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform a randomized trial to determine if there is cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction from a plant-based no added fat diet (PB) and the American Heart Association Diet (AHA) in children. Study design Four-week (4/20/2013-5/18/2013) prospective randomized trial in a large Midwestern hospital system’s predominantly middle class outpatient pediatric practices. Thirty children (9–18 years old) parent pairs with a last recorded child BMI >95th percentile and child cholesterol >169 mg/dL were randomized to PB or AHA with weekly 2-hour classes of nutrition education. Results Children on PB had nine and children on AHA had four statistically significant (P<0.05) beneficial changes from baseline (mean decreases): BMI Z-scorePB (−0.14), systolic blood pressurePB (−6.43 mm Hg), total cholesterolPB (−22.5 mg/dL), low density lipoproteinPB (−13.14 mg/dL), hsCRPPB (−2.09 mg/L), insulinPB (−5.42uU/ml), myeloperoxidasePB/AHA (−75.34/69.23 pmol/L), mid-arm circumferencePB/AHA (−2.02/−1.55 cm), weightPB/AHA (−3.05/ −1.14kg) and waist circumferenceAHA (−2.96 cm). Adults on PB and AHA had seven and two respectively statistically significant (P<0.05) beneficial changes. The significant change favoring AHA was a 1% difference in children’s waist circumference. Difficulty shopping for food for the PB was the only statistically significant acceptability barrier. Conclusions PB and the AHA in both children and adults demonstrated potentially beneficial changes from baseline in risk factors for CVD. Future larger, long-term randomized trials with easily accessible PB foods will further define the role of the PB in preventing CVD. PMID:25684089

  16. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  17. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram

  18. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Maps Social Determinants of Health Maps Poverty Unemployment High School Education Health Insurance Million Hearts® ... percent have a bachelor's degree or higher. The poverty rate of people who report American Indian and ...

  19. American College Health Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan, build new facilities, increase utilization, evaluate health programming, and more. Learn More >> ACHF The American College ... STI Survey Benchmarking Vision Into Action Jobline Classifieds Networks By Region (affiliates) By Interest (committees/coalitions) By ...

  20. American Pharmacists Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... THE APhA FOUNDATION PHARMACY LIBRARY BUYERS GUIDE 2215 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037 © 2016 American Pharmacists ... NEW PRACTITIONER NETWORK ELECTIONS ANNUAL MEETING & EXPOSITION JOINT FEDERAL PHARMACY SEMINAR AWARDS JOIN APhA WHY JOIN APhA? ...

  1. Macro- and micronutrients in African-Americans with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Ahokas, Robert A; Carbone, Laura D; Newman, Kevin P; Gerling, Ivan C; Sun, Yao; Weber, Karl T

    2006-03-01

    An emerging body of evidence suggests secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) may be an important covariant of congestive heart failure (CHF), especially in African-Americans (AA) where hypovitaminosis D is prevalent given that melanin, a natural sunscreen, mandates prolonged exposure of skin to sunlight and where a housebound lifestyle imposed by symptomatic CHF limits outdoor activities and hence sunlight exposure. In addition to the role of hypovitaminosis D in contributing to SHPT is the increased urinary and fecal losses of macronutrients Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) associated with the aldosteronism of CHF and their heightened urinary losses with furosemide treatment of CHF. Thus, a precarious Ca(2+) balance seen with reduced serum 25(OH)D is further compromised when AA develop CHF with circulating RAAS activation and are then treated with a loop diuretic. SHPT accounts for a paradoxical Ca(2+) overloading of diverse tissues and the induction of oxidative stress at these sites which spills over to the systemic circulation. In addition to SHPT, hypozincemia and hyposelenemia have been found in AA with compensated and decompensated heart failure and where an insufficiency of these micronutrients may have its origins in inadequate dietary intake, altered rates of absorption or excretion and/or tissue redistribution, and treatment with an ACE inhibitor or AT(1) receptor antagonist. Zn and Se deficiencies, which compromise the activity of several endogenous antioxidant defenses, could prove contributory to the severity of heart failure and its progressive nature. These findings call into question the need for nutriceutical treatment of heart failure and which is complementary to today's pharmaceuticals, especially in AA. PMID:16819577

  2. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  3. Depression and coronary heart disease: recommendations for screening, referral, and treatment: a science advisory from the American Heart Association Prevention Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research: endorsed by the American Psychiatric Association.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, Judith H; Bigger, J Thomas; Blumenthal, James A; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Kaufmann, Peter G; Lespérance, François; Mark, Daniel B; Sheps, David S; Taylor, C Barr; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2008-10-21

    Depression is commonly present in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening tests for depressive symptoms should be applied to identify patients who may require further assessment and treatment. This multispecialty consensus document reviews the evidence linking depression with CHD and provides recommendations for healthcare providers for the assessment, referral, and treatment of depression. PMID:18824640

  4. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  5. American Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Network JAMA JAMA Cardiology JAMA Dermatology JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery JAMA Internal Medicine JAMA Neurology JAMA Oncology ... Medical Association) JAMA Cardiology JAMA Dermatology JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery JAMA Internal Medicine JAMA Neurology JAMA Oncology ...

  6. Being active after your heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines ( ... Infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ...

  7. American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Shah, Amil M.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L.; Miedema, Michael D.; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 guidelines -- on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose -- is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. METHODS We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults aged 45-64 years in 1987-89. From the 1987-89 risk factor measurements, we created a Life’s Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2,218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4,855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-13, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score compared with an inadequate score. CONCLUSIONS Greater achievement of American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 in middle-age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:25908393

  8. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology: Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-03-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  9. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization : a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Brindis, Ralph G; Beckman, Karen J; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Peterson, Eric D

    2009-02-15

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  10. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: a report by the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-02-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  11. 76 FR 6303 - American Heart Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... addressing the factors that contribute to childhood obesity and its serious health consequences. The National... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011... that can lead to heart disease, including: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes,...

  12. 77 FR 5373 - American Heart Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... heart health and end childhood obesity within a generation, First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012... disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, physical inactivity, obesity, tobacco use, and...

  13. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  14. American Lung Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule September 7, 2016 In response to today’s ... to finalize an update to the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule to reduce ozone pollution, Harold P. Wimmer... ...

  15. Use of isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine in African-Americans with heart failure 9 years after the African-American Heart Failure Trial.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith Copelin; Elkayam, Uri; Mancini, Donna; Ofili, Elizabeth; Piña, Ileana; Anand, Inder; Feldman, Arthur Michael; McNamara, Dennis; Leggett, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines recommend combined isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) and hydralazine to reduce mortality and morbidity for African-Americans with symptomatic heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction, currently receiving optimal medical therapy (class I, level A). Nitrates can alleviate HF symptoms, but continuous use is limited by tolerance. Hydralazine may mitigate nitrate tolerance, and the ISDN-hydralazine combination in the Vasodilators in Heart Failure Trial (V-HeFT) I improved survival and exercise tolerance in men with dilated cardiomyopathy or HF with reduced ejection fraction, most notably in self-identified black participants. In the subsequent V-HeFT II, survival was greater with enalapril than with ISDN-hydralazine in the overall cohort, but mortality rate was similar in the enalapril and ISDN-hydralazine groups in the self-identified black patients. Consequently, in the African-American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) in self-identified black patients with symptomatic HF, adding a fixed-dose combination ISDN-hydralazine to modern guideline-based care improved outcomes versus placebo, including all-cause mortality, and led to early trial termination. Hypertension underlies HF, especially in African-Americans; the A-HeFT and its substudies demonstrated not only improvements in echocardiographic parameters, morbidity, and mortality but also a decrease in hospitalizations, potentially affecting burgeoning HF health-care costs. Genetic characteristics may, therefore, determine response to ISDN-hydralazine, and the Genetic Risk Assessment in Heart Failure substudy demonstrated important hypothesis-generating pharmacogenetic data. PMID:24846808

  16. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ...

  17. MedlinePlus: Heart Diseases--Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Tests Cholesterol Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Heart-Health Screenings (American Heart Association) hs-CRP Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease ...

  18. ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR 2011 Appropriate Use Criteria for Echocardiography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance American College of Chest Physicians.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Garcia, Mario J; Haines, David E; Lai, Wyman W; Manning, Warren J; Patel, Ayan R; Picard, Michael H; Polk, Donna M; Ragosta, Michael; Parker Ward, R; Weiner, Rory B

    2011-03-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where echocardiography is frequently considered. This document combines and updates the original transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2007 (1) and the original stress echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2008 (2). This revision reflects new clinical data, reflects changes in test utilization patterns,and clarifies echocardiography use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria.The indications (clinical scenarios)were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC).The 202 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9,to designate appropriate use(median 7 to 9), uncertain use(median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Ninety-seven indications were rated as appropriate, 34 were rated as uncertain, and 71 were rated as inappropriate. In general,the use of echocardiography for initial diagnosis when there is a change in clinical status or when the results of the echocardiogram are anticipated to change patient management were rated appropriate. Routine testing when there was no change in clinical status or when results of testing were unlikely to modify management were more likely to be inappropriate than appropriate/uncertain.The AUC for echocardiography have the potential to impact physician decision making,healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore,recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID

  19. Healthy Lifestyle Interventions to Combat Noncommunicable Disease—A Novel Nonhierarchical Connectivity Model for Key Stakeholders: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale. PMID:26143646

  20. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  1. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2012-02-28

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  2. Sexual counselling for individuals with cardiovascular disease and their partners: a consensus document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny; Barnason, Susan A; Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Dougherty, Cynthia M; Fridlund, Bengt; Kautz, Donald D; Mårtensson, Jan; Mosack, Victoria; Moser, Debra K

    2013-11-01

    After a cardiovascular event, patients and their families often cope with numerous changes in their lives, including dealing with consequences of the disease or its treatment on their daily lives and functioning. Coping poorly with both physical and psychological challenges may lead to impaired quality of life. Sexuality is one aspect of quality of life that is important for many patients and partners that may be adversely affected by a cardiac event. The World Health Organization defines sexual health as '… a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences ….'(1(p4)) The safety and timing of return to sexual activity after a cardiac event have been well addressed in an American Heart Association scientific statement, and decreased sexual activity among cardiac patients is frequently reported.(2) Rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among men with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are twice as high as those in the general population, with similar rates of sexual dysfunction in females with CVD.(3) ED and vaginal dryness may also be presenting signs of heart disease and may appear 1-3 years before the onset of angina pectoris. Estimates reflect that only a small percentage of those with sexual dysfunction seek medical care;(4) therefore, routine assessment of sexual problems and sexual counselling may be of benefit as part of effective management by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers. PMID:23900695

  3. 3 CFR 8344 - Proclamation 8344 of February 2, 2009. American Heart Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Heart Month, 2009 8344 Proclamation 8344 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8344 of February 2, 2009 Proc. 8344 American Heart Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Together, we can turn the tide on the number one killer of American women and men. Heart...

  4. 3 CFR 8929 - Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013. American Heart Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Heart Month, 2013 8929 Proclamation 8929 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013 Proc. 8929 American Heart Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American men and women, claiming well over...

  5. Predictive Validity of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Pooled Cohort Equations in Predicting All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease-Specific Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study of Adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-06-01

    The predictive validity of the Pooled Cohort risk (PCR) equations for cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific and all-cause mortality among a national sample of US adults has yet to be evaluated, which was this study's purpose. Data from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, with participants followed up through December 31, 2011, to ascertain mortality status via the National Death Index probabilistic algorithm. The analyzed sample included 11,171 CVD-free adults (40-79 years of age). The 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event was determined from the PCR equations. For the entire sample encompassing 849,202 person-months, we found an incidence rate of 1.00 (95% CI, 0.93-1.07) all-cause deaths per 1000 person-months and an incidence rate of 0.15 (95% CI, 0.12-0.17) CVD-specific deaths per 1000 person-months. The unweighted median follow-up duration was 72 months. For nearly all analyses (unadjusted and adjusted models with ASCVD expressed as a continuous variable as well as dichotomized at 7.5% and 20%), the ASCVD risk score was significantly associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality (P<.05). In the adjusted model, the increased all-cause mortality risk ranged from 47% to 77% based on an ASCVD risk of 20% or higher and 7.5% or higher, respectively. Those with an ASCVD score of 7.5% or higher had a 3-fold increased risk of CVD-specific mortality. The 10-year predicted risk of a first ASCVD event via the PCR equations was associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality among those free of CVD at baseline. In this American adult sample, the PCR equations provide evidence of predictive validity. PMID:27180122

  6. 75 FR 73076 - National Gas Supply Association, American Forest and Paper Association, Inc., American Public Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...., American Public Gas Association, Independent Petroleum Association of America, Process Gas Consumers Group... Petroleum Association of America, and Process Gas Consumers Group (collectively, the Associations), filed...

  7. The prevalence of cognitive impairment among African-American patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Akomolafe, Abimbola; Quarshie, Alexander; Jackson, Patricia; Thomas, Jerome; Deffer, Orlando; Oduwole, Adefisayo; Onwuanyi, Anekwe; Lapu-Bula, Rigobert; Strayhorn, Gregory; Ofili, Elizabeth; Mayberry, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This cross-sectional study sought to determine the prevalence of cognitive impairment among African-American patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We studied 100 African-American CHF patients (aged 55-87 years) in New York Heart Association classes II-IV, who are enrolled in an ongoing, randomized, controlled trial, evaluating the effectiveness of a telemonitoring intervention to improve access to ambulatory care for heart failure patients. These CHF patients were recruited from an inner-city practice, rural physician practices and an urban physician practice in Atlanta. The Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was used to measure cognition. Cognitive impairment was defined as a MMSE score of less than 24. The crude prevalence of cognitive impairment was 10% in this population of African Americans with CHF. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated an increase in odds of cognitive impairment with increasing age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.10 and 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.20; p=0.042]. There was no significant relationship between cognitive impairment and gender, education status, depression and severity of CHF. This study indicates that cognitive impairment is relatively prevalent among African Americans with CHF, but lower than previously reported among Caucasians with CHF. PMID:15926646

  8. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22578925

  9. Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Predispose Youth to Accelerated Atherosclerosis and Early Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Matthews, Karen A; McIntyre, Roger S; Miller, Gregory E; Raghuveer, Geetha; Stoney, Catherine M; Wasiak, Hank; McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-09-01

    In the 2011 "Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents," several medical conditions among youth were identified that predispose to accelerated atherosclerosis and early cardiovascular disease (CVD), and risk stratification and management strategies for youth with these conditions were elaborated. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) among youth satisfy the criteria set for, and therefore merit inclusion among, Expert Panel tier II moderate-risk conditions. The combined prevalence of MDD and BD among adolescents in the United States is ≈10%, at least 10 times greater than the prevalence of the existing moderate-risk conditions combined. The high prevalence of MDD and BD underscores the importance of positioning these diseases alongside other pediatric diseases previously identified as moderate risk for CVD. The overall objective of this statement is to increase awareness and recognition of MDD and BD among youth as moderate-risk conditions for early CVD. To achieve this objective, the primary specific aims of this statement are to (1) summarize evidence that MDD and BD are tier II moderate-risk conditions associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and early CVD and (2) position MDD and BD as tier II moderate-risk conditions that require the application of risk stratification and management strategies in accordance with Expert Panel recommendations. In this scientific statement, there is an integration of the various factors that putatively underlie the association of MDD and BD with CVD, including pathophysiological mechanisms, traditional CVD risk factors, behavioral and environmental factors, and psychiatric medications. PMID:26260736

  10. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  11. Trends in Clinical, Demographic, and Biochemical Characteristics of Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction From 2003 to 2008: A Report From the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Coronary Artery Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nathan M.; Laskey, Warren K.; Cox, Margueritte; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Cannon, Christopher P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2012-01-01

    Background An analysis of the changes in the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction could identify successes and failures of risk factor identification and treatment of patients at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Methods and Results We reviewed data collected from 138 122 patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted from 2003 to 2008 to hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Coronary Artery Disease program. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory characteristics were analyzed for each year stratified on the electrocardiogram at presentation. Patients with non–ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction were older, more likely to be women, and more likely to have hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and a history of past cardiovascular disease than were patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. In the overall patient sample, significant trends were observed of an increase over time in the proportions of non–ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction, patient age of 45 to 65 years, obesity, and female sex. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus decreased over time, whereas the prevalences of hypertension and smoking were substantial and unchanging. The prevalence of “low” high-density lipoprotein increased over time, whereas that of “high” low-density lipoprotein decreased. Stratum-specific univariate analysis revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between strata in time trends for numerous demographic, clinical, and biochemical measures. On multivariable analysis, there was concordance between strata with regard to the increase in prevalence of patients 45 to 65 years of age, obesity, and “low” high-density lipoprotein and the decrease in prevalence of “high” low-density lipoprotein. However, changes in trends in age distribution, sex ratio, and prevalence of smokers and the magnitude of change in diabetes mellitus prevalence

  12. American Association for Respiratory Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... quit smoking Learn About Tips Campaign The RC Week Store is Open! Plan fun events and build ... Harmless? AARC Partners With the CDC The RC Week Store is Open! Congenital Heart Defects Learn all ...

  13. Treatment of heart failure in African Americans--a call to action.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Judith E; Ferdinand, Keith C; Watson, Karol E; Wenger, Nanette K; Watkins, Laurence O; Flack, John M; Gavin, James R; Reed, James W; Saunders, Elijah; Wright, Jackson T

    2011-02-01

    Advances in heart failure treatment have not necessarily translated into equity in improved outcomes for African Americans. Heart failure in African Americans is characterized by a higher prevalence, especially at younger ages; more-adverse course with more frequent hospitalizations; and higher mortality rates compared to the general population. Despite this distinct disease profile, African Americans are remarkably underrepresented in large heart failure trials. This paper reviews the unique course of heart failure in African Americans and discusses treatment in the context of clinical trial evidence. African Americans with heart failure may respond differently to some standard therapies compared to whites, but low levels of enrollment of AAs in large clinical trials preclude valid conclusions in certain cases. An important exception is the African American Heart Failure Trial (AHeFT), a well-designed, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, that added a combination of fixed-dose isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine (ISDN/ HYD) to standard therapy and showed a 43% improvement in survival and a 33% reduction in first hospitalizations. Despite compelling evidence from AHeFT, post hoc secondary analyses, and recommendations from current practice guidelines, ISDN/HYD remains underutilized in African Americans with heart failure. In this paper, we put forth a call to action for racial equity in clinical research and treatment in African Americans with heart failure. PMID:21443060

  14. Perceived Risks of Certain Types of Cancer and Heart Disease among Asian American Smokers and Non-Smokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Feeley, Rosemary M.; Thomas, Priya

    2002-01-01

    Assessed Asian Americans' knowledge levels regarding the health risks of tobacco use. Surveys of Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Cambodian smokers and nonsmokers indicated that most respondents recognized the association between smoking and increased risk for lung, mouth, throat, and esophageal cancer and heart disease. There were significant…

  15. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... indispensable patient care tool. Learn more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ddPCR Quantification of Lymphoma Mutations Researchers have developed ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  16. 3 CFR 8477 - Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010. American Heart Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Heart Month, 2010 8477 Proclamation 8477 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010 Proc. 8477 American Heart Month, 2010By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Its victims are women and...

  17. Fetal Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Young, American Heart Association Overview of congenital heart disease: Congenital heart disease is a problem that occurs with the baby's ... Find answers to common questions about children and heart disease. CHD Personal Stories ... and hope. Popular Articles ...

  18. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, and Outcomes of Kawasaki Disease Among Hospitalized Children in an Inner City Hospital Before and After Publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Heart Association Guidelines for Treatment of Kawasaki Disease: An 11-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Swati; Chen, Xinguang; Ang, Jocelyn Y

    2015-11-01

    The effect of 2004 Kawasaki disease (KD) guidelines on diagnosis and outcome of KD is lacking. We studied the epidemiology of KD in our region and compared the incidence, presentation, and outcome of KD before and after publication of the guidelines. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted with a diagnosis of KD. Demographics, laboratory data, and clinical data were collected. Comparison was made between 2 groups: prepublication (2000-2004) and postpublication (2005-2009) of guidelines. A total of 312 children were included; 64% were African American, 23% White, and 2% Asian; 61% were boys; 79% were complete KD, and 66% were in winter/spring. There was a significant increase in KD cases over the 11 years. There was no significant difference in clinical findings and outcome between the 2 groups. KD admissions in our region significantly increased during the postpublication period. There was no difference in clinical presentation, laboratory findings, or outcome between the 2 groups. PMID:26134553

  19. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vision & Mission Board of Directors Fellows What is Occupational Health Nursing Public/Legislative Affairs AAOHN Alliances AAOHN Affiliates AAOHN ... Total Worker Health ® Agenda The American Association of Occupational ... nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission ...

  20. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Continuing Education Practice Management Research American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Making effective communication, a human right, ... 5 Audiology 2016: Collaborative Strategies for Students With Hearing Loss Online Conference October 5–17, 2016 Oct. ...

  1. American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Five principles developed by American Evaluation Associ intended to guide professional practice of evaluators & to inform evaluation clients and the general public about principles they can expect to be upheld by professional evaluators.

  2. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities. PMID:26467405

  3. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  4. Celebrations: American Camping Association Annual Report 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1986 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews the year's achievements and outlines goals for the future. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan notes successful fund raising to improve the association's national headquarters, passage of federal legislation exempting camps from paying federal unemployment…

  5. American Camping Association Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    Founded in 1910 as the Camp Directors' Association of America, the American Camping Association (ACA) is the largest organization serving the organized camping industry. Over 5,500 members come from all segments of the camp profession. This annual report for 1999 describes ACA activities in support of organizational commitments. These commitments…

  6. Risk and preventive factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease among foreign-born older Vietnamese Americans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh; Allen, Nancy A; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Lee, Hae Nim; Chan, Keith Tsz-Kit

    2014-01-01

    The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) data was used to examine associations of bodyweight, lifestyles, and demographic variables with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and heart disease among foreign-born older Vietnamese adults. CHIS consisted of 709 Vietnamese Americans aged 50 to 85. Thirteen percent reported T2DM and 11% had heart disease. Using logistic regression, body mass index ≥ 24, age ≥ 65, and female were significantly associated with T2DM. There was significant interaction effect of alcohol consumption and psychological distress with T2DM. The interaction of vegetable consumption, poverty, and length of living in the U.S. was significantly associated with heart disease. PMID:24483331

  7. Spirituality, Religiosity, and Weight Management Among African American Adolescent Males: The Jackson Heart KIDS Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Marino A; Beech, Bettina M; Griffith, Derek M; Thorpe, Roland J

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality and religion have been identified as important determinants of health for adults; however, the impact of faith-oriented factors on health behaviors and outcomes among African American adolescent males has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between religiosity and spirituality and obesity-related behaviors among 12-19 year old African American males (N = 105) in the Jackson Heart KIDS Pilot Study. Key variables of interest are church attendance, prayer, daily spirituality, weight status, attempts to lose weight, nutrition, physical activity, and stress. Daily spirituality is associated with whether an individual attempts to lose weight. The results from logistic regression models suggest that daily spirituality increases the odds that African American male adolescents attempt to lose weight (OR = 1.22, CI: 1.07-1.41) and have a history of diet-focused weight management (OR = 1.13, CI: 1.02-1.26). Future studies are needed to further explore the association between religion, spirituality, and obesity-related behaviors. PMID:27337622

  8. Heritability of Lipid Phenotypes among African-Americans: Jackson Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determinants of serum lipid levels include both genetic and non-genetic components. More research is needed to determine the role each plays in serum lipid levels of African-Americans. The Jackson Heart Study Family Sub-Study (JHS, FSS) represents a cohort of African-American adults for which both ...

  9. Smoking-attributable mortality in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhi; An, Qiang; Yeh, Fawn; Zhang, Ying; Howard, Barbara V; Lee, Elisa T; Zhao, Jinying

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. American Indians have the highest proportion of smoking in the United States. However, few studies have examined the impact of cigarette smoking on disease mortality in this ethnically important but traditionally understudied minority population. Here we estimated the association of cigarette smoking with cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and all-cause mortality in American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study, a large community-based prospective cohort study comprising of 4549 American Indians (aged 45-74 years) followed for about 20 years (1989-2008). Hazard ratio and population attributable risk (PAR) associated with cigarette smoking were estimated by Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for sex, study site, age, educational level, alcohol consumption, physical activity, BMI, lipids, renal function, hypertension or diabetes status at baseline, and interaction between current smoker and study site. We found that current smoking was significantly associated with cancer mortality (HR 5.0, [1.9-13.4]) in men, (HR 3.9 [1.6-9.7] in women) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.8, [1.2-2.6] in men, HR 1.6, [1.1-2.4] in women). PAR for cancer and all-cause mortality in men were 41.0 and 18.4 %, respectively, whereas the corresponding numbers in women were 24.9 and 10.9 %, respectively. Current smoking also significantly increases the risk of CVD deaths in women (HR 2.2 [1.1, 4.4]), but not men (HR 1.2 [0.6-2.4]). PAR for CVD mortality in women was 14.9 %. In summary, current smoking significantly increases the risk of CVD (in women), cancer and all-cause mortality in American Indians, independent of known risk factors. Culturally specific smoking cessation programs are urgently needed to reduce smoking-related premature deaths. PMID:25968176

  10. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates <75, an association was significant for mortality only for both SR and AF patients. Conclusions Among older patients hospitalized with heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  11. Updated Heart Failure Treatment Guidelines Issued

    MedlinePlus

    ... as Corlanor, according to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Failure ... best fits which treatment." Yancy is chief of cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in ...

  12. The Future of the American Historical Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Louis R.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the state of the American Historical Association, urging that the organization take a more active interest in the current debate over social studies in the public schools. Proposes that historians spend more time with elementary and secondary teachers, talking about the latest developments in the field. (SLM)

  13. American Camping Association. Annual Report, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1985 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. The document is in the format of a calendar covering the period October 1985 through September 1986. Calendar pages, on which relevant camping events are noted, alternate with pages of text. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan…

  14. American Evaluation Association: Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Evaluation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Evaluation Association (AEA) strives to promote ethical practice in the evaluation of programs, products, personnel, and policy. This article presents the list of principles which AEA developed to guide evaluators in their professional practice. These principles are: (1) Systematic Inquiry; (2) Competence; (3) Integrity/Honesty; (4)…

  15. American Association of University Women 2013 Bylaws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of University Women, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The American Association of University Women (AAUW) Bylaws contain governance history, policies and procedures for managing the organization, and information to conduct AAUW's affairs. The 2013 bylaws are divided into the following articles: (1) Name and Office; (2) Purpose; (3) Use of Name; (4) Membership and Dues; (5) Nominations and Elections;…

  16. American Psychological Association: Annual Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the 2008 annual reports from the various directorates and offices of the American Psychological Association (APA). In 2008, APA continued to work on initiatives, programs, and products that lend value to the member's psychology career, support the future of their discipline, and serve the public. APA's goal is to strengthen…

  17. Metabolic Profiles of Obesity in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G.; Umans, Jason G.; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T.; Jones, Dean P.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups. PMID:27434237

  18. Metabolic Profiles of Obesity in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Zhu, Yun; Best, Lyle G; Umans, Jason G; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T; Jones, Dean P; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups. PMID:27434237

  19. Essential features of designating out-of-hospital cardiac arrest as a reportable event: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee; Council on Cardiopulmonary, Perioperative, and Critical Care; Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; and Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Graham; Rumsfeld, John; Eigel, Brian; Abella, Benjamin S; Labarthe, Darwin; Hong, Yuling; O'Connor, Robert E; Mosesso, Vincent N; Berg, Robert A; Leeper, Barbara Bobbi; Weisfeldt, Myron L

    2008-04-29

    The 2010 impact goal of the American Heart Association is to reduce death rates from heart disease and stroke by 25% and to lower the prevalence of the leading risk factors by the same proportion. Much of the burden of acute heart disease is initially experienced out of hospital and can be reduced by timely delivery of effective prehospital emergency care. Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction die from cardiac arrest before they reach the hospital. A small proportion of those with cardiac arrest who reach the hospital survive to discharge. Current health surveillance systems cannot determine the burden of acute cardiovascular illness in the prehospital setting nor make progress toward reducing that burden without improved surveillance mechanisms. Accordingly, the goals of this article provide a brief overview of strategies for managing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We review existing surveillance systems for monitoring progress in reducing the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States and make recommendations for filling significant gaps in these systems, including the following: 1. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and their outcomes through hospital discharge should be classified as reportable events as part of a heart disease and stroke surveillance system. 2. Data collected on patients' encounters with emergency medical services systems should include descriptions of the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders and defibrillation by lay responders. 3. National annual reports on key indicators of progress in managing acute cardiovascular events in the out-of-hospital setting should be developed and made publicly available. Potential barriers to action on cardiac arrest include concerns about privacy, methodological challenges, and costs associated with designating cardiac arrest as a reportable event. PMID:18413503

  20. History of the american college health association.

    PubMed

    Mack, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Following Dr Edward Hitchcock's lead at Amherst College in 1861, soon other institutions of higher education established physical education departments that evolved into independent college health programs. As the field of college health expanded, leaders from numerous campuses began meeting to share information and discuss formation of a national organization. As a result, the American Student Health Association was founded in 1920 to promote campus health care for students and advance the interests of college health. The name was changed to the American College Health Association in 1948. The past history of this organization has been well documented in the literature, so this review will focus more on ACHA's accomplishments over the past 20 years.(1)(,) (2)(,) (3)(,) (4). PMID:21660802

  1. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:20975004

  2. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21087721

  3. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21232696

  4. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  5. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart. PMID:23177618

  6. Fine-Mapping in African Americans of Eight Recently Discovered Genetic Loci for Plasma Lipids: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Keebler, Mary E.; Deo, Rahul C.; Surti, Aarti; Konieczkowski, David; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Steffes, Michael W.; Wilson, James G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies in cohorts of European descent have identified novel genomic regions as associated with lipids, but their relevance in African Americans remains unclear. Methods and Results We genotyped 8 index SNPs and 488 tagging SNPs across 8 novel lipid loci in the Jackson Heart Study, a community-based cohort of 4605 African Americans. For each trait, we calculated residuals adjusted for age, sex, and global ancestry and performed multivariable linear regression to detect genotype-phenotype association with adjustment for local ancestry. To explore admixture effects, we conducted stratified analyses in individuals with a high probability of 2 African ancestral alleles or at least 1 European allele at each locus. We confirmed 2 index SNPs as associated with lipid traits in African Americans, with suggestive association for 3 more. However, the effect sizes for 4 of the 5 associated SNPs were larger in the European local ancestry subgroup compared to the African local ancestry subgroup, suggesting that the replication is driven by European ancestry segments. Through fine-mapping, we discovered 3 new SNPs with significant associations, two with consistent effect on triglyceride levels across ancestral groups: rs636523 near DOCK7/ANGPTL3 and rs780093 in GCKR. African LD patterns did not assist in narrowing association signals. Conclusions We confirm that 5 genetic regions associated with lipid traits in European-derived populations are relevant in African Americans. To further evaluate these loci, fine-mapping in larger African American cohorts and/or resequencing will be required. PMID:20570916

  7. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  8. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  9. Gene expression changes associated with myocarditis and fibrosis in hearts of mice with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; de Lima, Ricardo Santana; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Iacobas, Sanda; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Iacobas, Dumitru Andrei; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Spray, David Conover

    2010-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure in Latin American countries. About 30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop this severe symptomatic form of the disease, characterized by intense inflammatory response accompanied by fibrosis in the heart. We performed an extensive microarray analysis of hearts from a mouse model of this disease and determined significant alterations in expression of ∼12% of the sampled genes. Extensive upregulations were associated with immune-inflammatory responses (chemokines, adhesion molecules, cathepsins and MHC molecules) and fibrosis (extracellular matrix components, lysyl oxidase and Timp-1). Our results indicate potentially relevant factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease that may provide new therapeutic targets in chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:20565256

  10. Americans by Heart: Undocumented Latino Students and the Promise of Higher Education. Multicultural Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, William

    2011-01-01

    "Americans by Heart" examines the plight of undocumented Latino students as they navigate the educational and legal tightrope presented by their immigration status. Many of these students are accepted to attend some of our best colleges and universities but cannot afford the tuition to do so because they are not eligible for financial aid or…

  11. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  12. Metabolic profiles of biological aging in American Indians: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinying; Zhu, Yun; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T; Yu, Tianwei; Lin, Jue; Matsuguchi, Tet; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Jones, Dean; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V

    2014-03-01

    Short telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with age-related metabolic disorders. Telomere attrition induces profound metabolic dysfunction in animal models, but no study has examined the metabolome of telomeric aging in human. Here we studied 423 apparently healthy American Indians participating in the Strong Family Heart Study. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) was measured by qPCR. Metabolites in fasting plasma were detected by untargeted LC/MS. Associations of LTL with each metabolite and their combined effects were examined using generalized estimating equation adjusting for chronological age and other aging-related factors. Multiple testing was corrected using the q-value method (q<0.05). Of the 1,364 distinct m/z features detected, nineteen metabolites in the classes of glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophosphocholines, glycerolipids, bile acids, isoprenoids, fatty amides, or L-carnitine ester were significantly associated with LTL, independent of chronological age and other aging-related factors. Participants with longer (top tertile) and shorter (bottom tertile) LTL were clearly separated into distinct groups using a multi-marker score comprising of all these metabolites, suggesting that these newly detected metabolites could be novel metabolic markers of biological aging. This is the first study to interrogate the human metabolome of telomeric aging. Our results provide initial evidence for a metabolic control of LTL and may reveal previously undescribed new roles of various lipids in the aging process. PMID:24799415

  13. Cognitive Reserve Moderates the Association between Heart Failure and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; van Dulmen, Manfred; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Waechter, Donna; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment in persons with heart failure is common. Theories of cognitive reserve suggest that premorbid factors, such as intellectual ability, may provide a buffer against cognitive impairment due to neuropathological insult. No study has examined the influence of cognitive reserve on cognitive functioning in older adults with heart failure. Aim This study examined whether cognitive reserve moderates the relationship between heart failure severity and cognitive function. Methods A total of 157 persons with heart failure (69.26 ± 9.26 years; 39% female) completed neuropsychological testing and a brief fitness assessment. Cognitive reserve was operationalized using estimated premorbid intellect on American National Adult Reading Test (AMNART). Results A moderation analysis was performed using a hierarchical regression models for each cognitive domain. An interaction term between the AMNART and 2-minute step test was created and entered into the final block of the model, with demographic, psychosocial, and heart failure severity entered in the previous blocks. The interaction term was significant for attention (t(155) = −2.54, p = .012), executive function (t(155) = −3.30, p = .001), and language (t(155) = −2.83, p = .005) domains. Conclusion The current findings suggest that cognitive reserve moderates the association between heart failure severity and cognitive function in multiple cognitive domains. Further work is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which cognitive reserve attenuates cognitive impairment in this population. PMID:22034987

  14. Associations of Heart Failure with Sleep Quality: The Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Zuurbier, Lisette A.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Leening, Maarten J.G.; Hofman, Albert; Freak-Poli, Rosanne; Franco, Oscar H.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of sleep disturbances and heart failure increases with age. We aimed to evaluate the associations of incident heart failure and cardiac dysfunction with changes in sleep quality. Methods: This prospective population-based study was conducted in the Rotterdam Study. Of the 3,445 eligible persons (mean age 72.0 ± 7.1 years) available for cross-sectional analyses, 8.9% (n = 307) had prevalent clinical heart failure. In longitudinal analyses, 1,989 eligible persons (mean age 70.0 ± 5.8 years) were followed for an average of 6.5 ± 0.4 years, of which 4.6% (n = 91) had prevalent or incident clinical heart failure. Heart failure was assessed according to European Society of Cardiology criteria. To estimate cardiac function, we measured left ventricular fractional shortening, left ventricular systolic function, and E/A ratio by echocardiography. Heart failure and cardiac dysfunction were studied with linear regression in relation to sleep quality, assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: No associations between clinical heart failure and sleep quality were observed in cross-sectional analyses. Clinical heart failure predicted a reduction of sleep quality (B = 1.00 points on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; 95% CI 0.40, 1.60) in longitudinal assessment. This association was driven by the sleep onset latency and sleep quality components of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Cardiac dysfunction was not related to sleep quality in cross-sectional or longitudinal analyses. Conclusions: Clinical heart failure, but not cardiac dysfunction measured by echocardiography, increases the risk of poor sleep quality in the general population over time. These findings suggest that clinical manifestations of heart failure negatively affect sleep. Citation: Zuurbier LA, Luik AI, Leening MJ, Hofman A, Freak-Poli R, Franco OH, Stricker BH, Tiemeier H. Associations of heart failure with sleep quality: the Rotterdam Study. J Clin Sleep Med

  15. The American Kinesiology Association Undergraduate Core Curriculum©

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the elements of the undergraduate core in kinesiology that have been established by the American Kinesiology Association. The American Kinesiology Association also describes a set of ten student-learning outcomes that emanate from the four core content elements. This information has been developed by the American Kinesiology…

  16. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  17. Aldosterone, Renin, and Diabetes Mellitus in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Joshua J; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Kalyani, Rita R; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Bertoni, Alain G; Effoe, Valery S; Casanova, Ramon; Sims, Mario; Correa, Adolfo; Wu, Wen-Chih; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita H

    2016-04-01

    We examined the association of both aldosterone and renin, with insulin resistance, β-cell function, and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with higher levels of aldosterone and renin is associated with insulin resistance, compensatory increased β-cell function and incident diabetes in African Americans. PMID:26908112

  18. Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Furber, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Alternative fuels can be used in locomotive diesel engines as a means to reduce fuel costs or as fuel extenders when sufficient quantities of suitable lower cost fuels are not available. Broadened fuel purchasing guidelines, based on engine fuel tolerance limitation tests, offer a potential for reducing fuel costs. Fuels such as alcohols, certain vegetable oils, shale oils, and heavy oil blends can be used to extend fuel supplies. Fuel tolerance limitations of existing engines can be increased through modifications such as staged injection or the use of ceramic coatings. This paper describes the methods used by the Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Research Program to determine engine fuel tolerance limitations and extend engine fuel tolerance limits.

  19. Heart Attack Help? There's an App for That

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159504.html Heart Attack Help? There's an App for That Emergency medicine ... American Heart Association. When someone is suffering a heart attack, stroke or cardiac arrest, quick action can be ...

  20. Recommendations for the imaging assessment of prosthetic heart valves: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging endorsed by the Chinese Society of Echocardiography, the Inter-American Society of Echocardiography, and the Brazilian Department of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pibarot, Philippe; Chambers, John; Edvardsen, Thor; Delgado, Victoria; Dulgheru, Raluca; Pepi, Mauro; Cosyns, Bernard; Dweck, Mark R; Garbi, Madalina; Magne, Julien; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Bernard, Anne; Lowenstein, Jorge; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Vyhmeister, Rodrigo Hernández; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is rare but potentially life-threatening. Although often challenging, establishing the exact cause of PHV dysfunction is essential to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. In clinical practice, a comprehensive approach that integrates several parameters of valve morphology and function assessed with 2D/3D transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography is a key to appropriately detect and quantitate PHV dysfunction. Cinefluoroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and to a lesser extent, nuclear imaging are complementary tools for the diagnosis and management of PHV complications. The present document provides recommendations for the use of multimodality imaging in the assessment of PHVs. PMID:27143783

  1. 1980 Resolutions: National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This paper contains nineteen resolutions adopted by the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE). The resolutions concern (1) the maintenance of Asian/Pacific American linguistic and cultural traditions by educational institutions, (2) the support of Asian/Pacific American studies programs, (3) NAAPAE support of…

  2. American Psychiatric Association - 168th Annual Meeting (May 16-20, 2015 - Toronto, Canada).

    PubMed

    Kibble, A

    2015-06-01

    The theme of this year's American Psychiatric Association (APA) meeting was 'Psychiatry: integrating body and mind, heart and soul', with special focus given to advances in basic and cognitive neuroscience and how these may contribute to integrated care of mental health and illness. The program featured numerous tracks and subtracks in areas of interest such as addiction psychiatry, child, adolescent and geriatric psychiatry, and psychosomatic medicine. PMID:26261851

  3. Hearts and Minds: Honors Programs in North American Christian Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    For readers outside North America, the concept of "honors education" may be confusing (since the word honours features in British and Commonwealth degree titles) or obscure (bringing to mind associations with aristocratic privilege or elitist competition). But in the United States the development of honors programs in colleges, and later honors…

  4. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Best, Lyle G; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-08-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  5. ACCF/ASNC/ACR/AHA/ASE/SCCT/SCMR/SNM 2009 appropriate use criteria for cardiac radionuclide imaging: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Robert C; Berman, Daniel S; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Heidenreich, Paul A; Henkin, Robert E; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pohost, Gerald M; Williams, Kim A

    2009-06-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac radionuclide imaging (RNI) is frequently considered. This document is a revision of the original Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (SPECT MPI) Appropriateness Criteria, published 4 years earlier, written to reflect changes in test utilization and new clinical data, and to clarify RNI use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine appropriate use criteria (AUC) on a frequent basis. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Sixty-seven clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of cardiac RNI for diagnosis and risk assessment in intermediate- and high-risk patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while testing in low-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Additionally, use for perioperative testing was found to be inappropriate except for high selected groups of patients. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making, test performance, and reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:19451357

  6. Heart transplantation in rapidly progressive end-stage heart failure associated with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Juan P; Cura, Geraldine; Ramallo, German; Diez, Mirta; Vigliano, Carlos A; Katus, Hugo A; Mereles, Derliz

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterised by chronic immune-mediated malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals induced by gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. It occurs in adults and children at rates approaching 1% of the population. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is infrequent. The authors present here a first case of a severe progressive dilated cardiomyopathy that required heart transplantation in young woman with celiac disease. PMID:22696747

  7. Creation of the American Board of Ophthalmology: The Role of the American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth D

    2016-09-01

    In the early 20th century, the American Medical Association (AMA), specifically its Section on Ophthalmology, played a central role in the founding of America's first medical specialty board, the American Board of Ophthalmology. With the American Ophthalmological Society and the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, the AMA's contributions to the formation of the American Board of Ophthalmology led to the establishment of sound educational standards for practicing ophthalmologists and helped to advance the culture of medical excellence within the profession that is synonymous with board certification today. PMID:27550009

  8. Association of heart block with uncommon disease States.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-09-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  9. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... may help me? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is ...

  10. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  11. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  12. The association of pericardial fat with incident coronary heart disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)123

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Harris, Tamara B; Liu, Yongmei; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Szklo, Moyses; Ouyang, Pamela; Espeland, Mark A; Lohman, Kurt K; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew; Bluemke, David A; Carr, J Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pericardial fat (ie, fat around the heart) may have a direct role in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries through local release of inflammation-related cytokines. Cross-sectional studies suggest that pericardial fat is positively associated with coronary artery disease independent of total body fat. Objective: We investigated whether pericardial fat predicts future coronary heart disease events. Design: We conducted a case-cohort study in 998 individuals, who were randomly selected from 6814 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants and 147 MESA participants (26 from those 998 individuals) who developed incident coronary heart disease from 2000 to 2005. The volume of pericardial fat was determined from cardiac computed tomography at baseline. Results: The age range of the subjects was 45–84 y (42% men, 45% white, 10% Asian American, 22% African American, and 23% Hispanic). Pericardial fat was positively correlated with both body mass index (correlation coefficient = 0.45, P < 0.0001) and waist circumference (correlation coefficient = 0.57, P < 0.0001). In unadjusted analyses, pericardial fat (relative hazard per 1-SD increment: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.54), but not body mass index (1.00; 0.84, 1.18), was associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Waist circumference (1.14; 0.97, 1.34; P = 0.1) was marginally associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The relation between pericardial fat and coronary heart disease remained significant after further adjustment for body mass index and other cardiovascular disease risk factors (1.26; 1.01, 1.59). The relation did not differ by sex. Conclusion: Pericardial fat predicts incident coronary heart disease independent of conventional risk factors, including body mass index. PMID:19571212

  13. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  14. Macro- and micronutrients in patients with congestive heart failure, particularly African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Newman, Kevin P; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Munir, Ahmad; Davis, Richard C; Soberman, Judith E; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2007-01-01

    Not all patients with heart failure, defined as a reduced ejection fraction, will have an activation of the RAAS, salt and water retention, or the congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome. Beyond this cardiorenal perspective, CHF is accompanied by a systemic illness that includes oxidative stress, a proinflammatory phenotype, and a wasting of soft tissues and bone. A dyshomeostasis of calcium, magnesium, zinc, selenium, and vitamin D contribute to the appearance of oxidative stress and to compromised endogenous defenses that combat it. A propensity for hypovitaminosis D, given that melanin is a natural sunscreen, and for secondary hyperparathyroidism in African-Americans make them more susceptible to these systemic manifestations of CHF-a situation which is further threatened by the calcium and magnesium wasting that accompanies the secondary aldosteronism of CHF and the use of loop diuretics. PMID:18078025

  15. Abdominal obesity is associated with heart disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between overall obesity and fat distribution in dogs and the development of heart disease is unclear. In the present study we evaluated the association between overall obesity and fat distribution and clinical heart disease by morphometric and computed tomography (CT)-based measurements. Body condition score (BCS), modified body mass index (MBMI, kg/m2), waist-to-hock-to-stifle distance ratio (WHSDR), waist-to-ilium wing distance ratio (WIWDR), and waist-to-truncal length ratio (WTLR) were compared between dogs with (n = 44) and without (n = 43) heart disease using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) and subcutaneous fat (SQF) were measured in dogs with (n = 8) and without (n = 9) heart disease at the center of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae by CT. Results BCS was similar between heart disease and healthy groups (3.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.3 ± 0.1, P = 0.126). The following morphometric measurements were greater in the heart disease group compared with healthy canines: MBMI (65.0 ± 4.5 vs. 52.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2, respectively, P = 0.035); WIWDR (4.1 ± 0.1 vs. 3.1 ± 0.1, P < 0.01); and WTLR (1.25 ± 0.04 vs. 1.05 ± 0.04, P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in WHSDR (3.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.7 ± 0.2, P = 0.875). Interestingly, IAF was significantly increased in dogs with heart disease compared with healthy dogs (23.5 ± 1.5% vs. 19.4 ± 1.2%, P = 0.039) whereas SQF was similar between two groups (35.5 ± 2.7% vs. 38.6 ± 3.5%, P = 0.496). Of the five morphometric indices studied, WIWDR and WTLR provided acceptable discrimination for diagnosing heart disease in dogs, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.778 (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.683-0.874) and 0.727 (95% CI:0.619-0.835), respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is associated

  16. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  17. American Kinesiology Association: A National Effort to Promote Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Thomas, Jerry R.

    2010-01-01

    The American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education (AAKPE) and The American Kinesiology Association (AKA) should work together to help kinesiology thrive. Data are provided about kinesiology that reflects its visibility in PubMed and Google. Survey data from AKA show the rapid growth of the undergraduate major and graduate programs. In…

  18. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: Part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G; Hall, John E; Appel, Lawrence J; Falkner, Bonita E; Graves, John; Hill, Martha N; Jones, Daniel W; Kurtz, Theodore; Sheps, Sheldon G; Roccella, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain blood pressure-related risk, and to guide management. The auscultatory technique with a trained observer and mercury sphygmomanometer continues to be the method of choice for measurement in the office, using the first and fifth phases of the Korotkoff sounds, including in pregnant women. The use of mercury is declining, and alternatives are needed. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. Hybrid devices that use electronic transducers instead of mercury have promise. The oscillometric method can be used for office measurement, but only devices independently validated according to standard protocols should be used, and individual calibration is recommended. They have the advantage of being able to take multiple measurements. Proper training of observers, positioning of the patient, and selection of cuff size are all essential. It is increasingly recognized that office measurements correlate poorly with blood pressure measured in other settings, and that they can be supplemented by self-measured readings taken with validated devices at home. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring gives a better prediction of risk than office measurements and is useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension. There is increasing evidence that a failure of blood pressure to fall during the night may be associated with increased risk. In obese patients and children, the use of an appropriate cuff size is of paramount importance. PMID:15611362

  19. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G; Hall, John E; Appel, Lawrence J; Falkner, Bonita E; Graves, John; Hill, Martha N; Jones, Daniel W; Kurtz, Theodore; Sheps, Sheldon G; Roccella, Edward J

    2005-02-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain blood pressure-related risk, and to guide management. The auscultatory technique with a trained observer and mercury sphygmomanometer continues to be the method of choice for measurement in the office, using the first and fifth phases of the Korotkoff sounds, including in pregnant women. The use of mercury is declining, and alternatives are needed. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. Hybrid devices that use electronic transducers instead of mercury have promise. The oscillometric method can be used for office measurement, but only devices independently validated according to standard protocols should be used, and individual calibration is recommended. They have the advantage of being able to take multiple measurements. Proper training of observers, positioning of the patient, and selection of cuff size are all essential. It is increasingly recognized that office measurements correlate poorly with blood pressure measured in other settings, and that they can be supplemented by self-measured readings taken with validated devices at home. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring gives a better prediction of risk than office measurements and is useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension. There is increasing evidence that a failure of blood pressure to fall during the night may be associated with increased risk. In obese patients and children, the use of an appropriate cuff size is of paramount importance. PMID:15699287

  20. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Craig, Winston J; Mangels, Ann Reed

    2009-07-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods. This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence- based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes. The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients

  2. Role of autophagy in metabolic syndrome-associated heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Sidney Y; Xu, Xihui

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of multiple metabolic risk factors including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Over the past decades, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased dramatically, imposing a devastating, pandemic health threat. More importantly, individuals with metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and overall cardiovascular diseases. One of the common comorbidities of metabolic syndrome is heart anomalies leading to the loss of cardiomyocytes, cardiac dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Up-to-date, a plethora of cell signaling pathways have been postulated for the pathogenesis of cardiac complications in obesity including lipotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and sympathetic overactivation although the precise mechanism of action underscoring obesity-associated heart dysfunction remains elusive. Recent evidence has indicated a potential role of protein quality control in components of metabolic syndrome. Within the protein quality control system, the autophagy-lysosome pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for bulk degradation of large intracellular organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy has been demonstrated to play an indispensible role in the maintenance of cardiac geometry and function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology of cardiac anomalies under obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this minireview, we will discuss on how autophagy is involved in the regulation of cardiac function in obesity and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24810277

  3. Policy Statements of the American Association of Dental Schools[.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' policy statements on education (preprofessional, predoctoral, advanced, continuing, and auxiliary), government relations regarding education, research, delivery of care, and public health concerns as amended in March 1986 are presented. (MSE)

  4. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey California Automobile Association Original: 1932 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey California Automobile Association Original: 1932 Re-photo: January 1940 CONVENTO - VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  5. Discerning the Ancestry of European Americans in Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Price, Alkes L; Butler, Johannah; Patterson, Nick; Capelli, Cristian; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Scarnicci, Francesca; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Groop, Leif; Saetta, Angelica A; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Seligsohn, Uri; Waliszewska, Alicja; Schirmer, Christine; Ardlie, Kristin; Ramos, Alexis; Nemesh, James; Arbeitman, Lori; Goldstein, David B

    2008-01-01

    European Americans are often treated as a homogeneous group, but in fact form a structured population due to historical immigration of diverse source populations. Discerning the ancestry of European Americans genotyped in association studies is important in order to prevent false-positive or false-negative associations due to population stratification and to identify genetic variants whose contribution to disease risk differs across European ancestries. Here, we investigate empirical patterns of population structure in European Americans, analyzing 4,198 samples from four genome-wide association studies to show that components roughly corresponding to northwest European, southeast European, and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry are the main sources of European American population structure. Building on this insight, we constructed a panel of 300 validated markers that are highly informative for distinguishing these ancestries. We demonstrate that this panel of markers can be used to correct for stratification in association studies that do not generate dense genotype data. PMID:18208327

  6. Dental Calculus Is Associated with Death from Heart Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Söder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H.; Söder, Per-Östen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We studied whether the amount of dental calculus is associated with death from heart infarction in the dental infection—atherosclerosis paradigm. Materials. Participants were 1676 healthy young Swedes followed up from 1985 to 2011. At the beginning of the study all subjects underwent oral clinical examination including dental calculus registration scored with calculus index (CI). Outcome measure was cause of death classified according to WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, Chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regressions were used. Results. Of the 1676 participants, 2.8% had died during follow-up. Women died at a mean age of 61.5 years and men at 61.7 years. The difference in the CI index score between the survivors versus deceased patients was significant by the year 2009 (P < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis of the relationship between death from heart infarction as a dependent variable and CI as independent variable with controlling for age, gender, dental visits, dental plaque, periodontal pockets, education, income, socioeconomic status, and pack-years of smoking, CI score appeared to be associated with 2.3 times the odds ratio for cardiac death. Conclusions. The results confirmed our study hypothesis by showing that dental calculus indeed associated statistically with cardiac death due to infarction. PMID:24511535

  7. American Association of Community Colleges 2010 Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is the primary advocacy organization for the nation's community colleges, representing nearly 1,200 two-year, associate degree-granting institutions and more than 11 million students. Founded in 1920, AACC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit association. AACC is governed by a 32-member board of directors,…

  8. The Impact of Lifecourse Socioeconomic Position on Cardiovascular Disease Events in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebreab, Samson Y; Diez Roux, Ana V; Brenner, Allison B; Hickson, DeMarc A; Sims, Mario; Subramanyam, Malavika; Griswold, Michael E; Wyatt, Sharon B; James, Sherman A

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position (SEP) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among African Americans. Methods and Results We used data from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) to examine the associations of multiple measures of lifecourse SEP with CVD events in a large cohort of African Americans. During a median of 7.2-year follow-up, 362 new or recurrent CVD events occurred in a sample of 5301 participants aged 21 to 94. Childhood SEP was assessed by using mother’s education, parental home ownership, and childhood amenities. Adult SEP was assessed by using education, income, wealth, and public assistance. Adult SEP was more consistently associated with CVD risk in women than in men: age-adjusted hazard ratios for low versus high income (95% CIs), 2.46 (1.19 to 5.09) in women and 1.50 (0.87 to 2.58) in men, P for interaction=0.1244, and hazard ratio for low versus high wealth, 2.14 (1.39 to 3.29) in women and 1.06 (0.62 to 1.81) in men, P for interaction=0.0224. After simultaneous adjustment for all adult SEP measures, wealth remained a significant predictor of CVD events in women (HR=1.73 [1.04, 2.85] for low versus high). Education and public assistance were less consistently associated with CVD. Adult SEP was a stronger predictor of CVD events in younger than in older participants (HR for high versus low summary adult SEP score 3.28 [1.43, 7.53] for participants ≤50 years, and 1.90 (1.36 to 2.66) for participants >50 years, P for interaction 0.0846). Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD risk in women or men. Conclusions Adult SEP is an important predictor of CVD events in African American women and in younger African Americans. Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD events in this population. PMID:26019130

  9. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  10. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  11. Linkage Analysis of Glomerular Filtration Rate in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Mottl, Amy K.; Vupputuri, Suma; Cole, Shelley A.; Almasy, Laura; Göring, Harald HH; Diego, Vincent P.; Laston, Sandra; Franceschini, Nora; Shara, Nawar; Lee, Elisa T.; Best, Lyle G.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Umans, Jason G.; North, Kari E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indians have a disproportionately high rate of kidney disease likely due to a combination of increased environmental and genetic risk factors. In an attempt to localize genes influencing kidney disease risk factors, we performed a genome wide scan of estimated glomerular filtration rate on participants of the Strong Heart Family Study. Over 3 600 men and women from 13 American Indian tribes were recruited from 3 centers (Arizona, North and South Dakota, Oklahoma). Using SOLAR 2.1.2, multipoint variance component linkage analysis was performed in each center as well as the entire cohort after controlling for center effects. Two modeling strategies were utilized: model 1 incorporated age, sex and interaction terms and model 2 additionally controlled for diabetic status, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins, triglycerides and smoking status. Significant evidence for linkage in Arizona lay on 12p12.2 at 39cM nearest marker D12S310 (LOD=3.5). Additional loci with suggestive evidence for linkage were detected at 1p36.31 (LOD=2.0–2.3), 2q33.3 (LOD=1.8) and 9q34.2 (LOD=2.4). No significant evidence for additive interaction with diabetes, hypertension or obesity was noted. In conclusion, we found evidence for linkage of a quantitative trait locus influencing estimated glomerular filtration rate to a region of chromosome 12p in a large cohort of American Indians. PMID:18854848

  12. Contemporary definitions and classification of the cardiomyopathies: an American Heart Association Scientific Statement from the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Heart Failure and Transplantation Committee; Quality of Care and Outcomes Research and Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Groups; and Council on Epidemiology and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Thiene, Gaetano; Antzelevitch, Charles; Corrado, Domenico; Arnett, Donna; Moss, Arthur J; Seidman, Christine E; Young, James B

    2006-04-11

    Classifications of heart muscle diseases have proved to be exceedingly complex and in many respects contradictory. Indeed, the precise language used to describe these diseases is profoundly important. A new contemporary and rigorous classification of cardiomyopathies (with definitions) is proposed here. This reference document affords an important framework and measure of clarity to this heterogeneous group of diseases. Of particular note, the present classification scheme recognizes the rapid evolution of molecular genetics in cardiology, as well as the introduction of several recently described diseases, and is unique in that it incorporates ion channelopathies as a primary cardiomyopathy. PMID:16567565

  13. Wine drinking is associated with increased heart rate variability in women with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Janszky, I; Ericson, M; Blom, M; Georgiades, A; Magnusson, J-O; Alinagizadeh, H; Ahnve, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption is positively related to heart rate variability (HRV) in women with coronary heart disease (CHD) and therefore that cardiac autonomic activity is potentially implicated in the mediation of the favourable effects of moderate drinking. Design, settings, and patients: Cross sectional study of female patients who survived hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction or underwent a revascularisation procedure, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass grafting. Main outcome measures: Ambulatory 24 hour ECG was recorded during normal activities. The mean of the standard deviations of all normal to normal intervals for all five minute segments of the entire recording (SDNNI) and the following frequency domain parameters were assessed: total power, high frequency power, low frequency power, and very low frequency power. A standardised questionnaire evaluated self reported consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types: beer, wine, and spirits. Other clinical characteristics, such as age, body mass index, smoking habits, history of diabetes mellitus, menopausal status, educational status, and treatment, were also assessed. Results: Wine intake was associated with increased HRV in both time and frequency domains independently of other clinical covariates (for example, ln SDNNI was 3.89 among wine drinkers v 3.59 among wine non-drinkers in the multivariate model; p  =  0.014). In contrast, consumption of beer and spirits and the total amount of alcohol consumed did not relate significantly to any of the HRV parameters. Conclusion: Intake of wine, but not of spirits or beer, is positively and independently associated with HRV in women with CHD. These results may contribute to the understanding of the complex relation between alcohol consumption and CHD. PMID:15710709

  14. 1984 Annual Report of the American Camping Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1984 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. A preliminary message from ACA President Charles Kujawa recognizes the year's significant progress and indicates nine specific examples of success, including implementation of the Association Directions Study, approval of new camp standards,…

  15. Position Statements of the American School Counselor Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Counselor Association. Alexandria, VA.

    Position statements of the American School Counselor Association were prepared for school counselors to assist them in articulating the position of the Association on a variety of issues. The statements included here present the position followed by a brief rationale. The statements have been developed and written by a number of people over the…

  16. Federal Legislative Policy of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL. Legislation Committee.

    The American Library Association's policy on federal legislation is based on its objectives of promoting and improving library service and librarianship. Representing those who use libraries as well as those who operate them, the Association is a source of information on libraries and information services for those concerned with formulating and…

  17. 2009 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2009. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology--and the unique skills of psychologists--to the attention of the public. This report aims…

  18. 2010 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued its efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological…

  19. 2005 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2005. The examples provided in this report are a small sampling of all that APA is doing to advance the discipline of psychology in an ever-changing world.

  20. An Association Perspective: Responding to the American Dental Association's Future of Dentistry Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Rowland A.; Haden, N. Karl; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    In response to the American Dental Association's (ADA) Future of Dentistry Project, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) provided perspective on the most critical issues facing the dental profession. ADEA responded in six areas, each corresponding to areas of focus in the ADA project. This report reflects comments provided to the ADEA…

  1. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  2. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  3. Cloning, sequence analysis and phylogeny of connexin43 isolated from American black bear heart.

    PubMed

    Van Der Heyden, Marcel A G; Kok, Bart; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Toien, Oivind; Barnes, Brian M; Fedorov, Vadim G; Efimov, Igor R; Opthof, Tobias

    2007-10-01

    Conduction in the heart requires gap junctions. In mammalian ventricular myocytes these consist of connexin43 (Cx43). Hearts of non-hibernating species display conduction disturbances at reduced temperatures. These may exacerbate into lethal arrhythmias. Hibernating species are protected against these arrhythmias by a non-resolved mechanism. To analyze whether the amino acid composition of Cx43 from the hibernating American black bear displays specific features, we cloned the full coding sequence of Ursus americanus Cx43 and compared with that of other (non)hibernating species. UaCx43 displays 99.7% identity to rabbit Cx43 at the amino acid level. No specific features were observed in UaCx43 when compared to previously cloned Cx43 from hibernating and non-hibernating mammals. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction of this and other published full-length Cx43 sequences reveals a very high level of conservation from fish to men. Finally, one of the previously identified six mammalian characteristic amino acids, is not conserved in the black bear. PMID:17654014

  4. Life disruption, life continuation: contrasting themes in the lives of African-American elders with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Faith Pratt; Thornton, Nancy; Martin, Lindsey; Zalenski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the need for more information about how urban African-American elders experience advanced heart failure. Participants included 35 African Americans aged 60 and over with advanced heart failure, identified through records from a community hospital in Detroit, Michigan. Four focus groups (n = 13) and 22 individual interviews were conducted. We used thematic analysis to examine qualitative focus groups and interviews. Themes identified included life disruption, which encompassed the sub-themes of living scared, making sense of heart failure, and limiting activities. Resuming life was a contrasting theme involving culturally relevant coping strategies, and included the sub-themes of resiliency, spirituality, and self-care that helped patients regain and maintain a sense of self amid serious illness. Participants faced numerous challenges and invoked a variety of strategies to cope with their illness, and their stories of struggles, hardship, and resilience can serve as a model for others struggling with advanced illness. PMID:22352363

  5. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of Hispanic or Latino ... diagnostic categories [PDF - 58 KB] Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, ... Association Get Email Updates To receive email ...

  6. Lyme Disease and the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Stroke Journal of the American Heart Association Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Institution: NATIONAL ... Search Donate Circulation Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Home About ...

  7. Rare variant associations with waist-to-hip ratio in European-American and African-American women from the NHLBI-Exome Sequencing Project.

    PubMed

    Kan, Mengyuan; Auer, Paul L; Wang, Gao T; Bucasas, Kristine L; Hooker, Stanley; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Li, Biao; Ellis, Jaclyn; Adrienne Cupples, L; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Dupuis, Josée; Fox, Caroline S; Gross, Myron D; Smith, Joshua D; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David; Wilson, James G; Shendure, Jay; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Zhong, Hua; Lin, Danyu; Hsu, Li; Franceschini, Nora; Carlson, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo; Gabriel, Stacey; Bamshad, Michael J; Altshuler, David; Nickerson, Deborah A; North, Kari E; Lange, Leslie A; Reiner, Alexander P; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), a relative comparison of waist and hip circumferences, is an easily accessible measurement of body fat distribution, in particular central abdominal fat. A high WHR indicates more intra-abdominal fat deposition and is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous common genetic loci influencing WHR, but the contributions of rare variants have not been previously reported. We investigated rare variant associations with WHR in 1510 European-American and 1186 African-American women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Exome Sequencing Project. Association analysis was performed on the gene level using several rare variant association methods. The strongest association was observed for rare variants in IKBKB (P=4.0 × 10(-8)) in European-Americans, where rare variants in this gene are predicted to decrease WHRs. The activation of the IKBKB gene is involved in inflammatory processes and insulin resistance, which may affect normal food intake and body weight and shape. Meanwhile, aggregation of rare variants in COBLL1, previously found to harbor common variants associated with WHR and fasting insulin, were nominally associated (P=2.23 × 10(-4)) with higher WHR in European-Americans. However, these significant results are not shared between African-Americans and European-Americans that may be due to differences in the allelic architecture of the two populations and the small sample sizes. Our study indicates that the combined effect of rare variants contribute to the inter-individual variation in fat distribution through the regulation of insulin response. PMID:26757982

  8. Clinical factors associated with early readmission among acutely decompensated heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Pierre-Louis, Bredy; Rodriques, Shareen; Gorospe, Vanessa; Guddati, Achuta K.; Ahn, Chul; Wright, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a common cause of hospital readmission. Material and methods A retrospective study was conducted at Harlem Hospital in New York City. Data were collected for 685 consecutive adult patients admitted for decompensated CHF from March, 2009 to December, 2012. Variables including patient demographics, comorbidities, laboratory studies, and medical therapy were compared between CHF patient admissions resulting in early CHF readmission and not resulting in early CHF readmission. Results Clinical factors found to be independently significant for early CHF readmission included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio (OR) = 6.4), HIV infection (OR = 3.4), African-American ethnicity (OR = 2.2), systolic heart failure (OR = 1.9), atrial fibrillation (OR = 2.3), renal disease with glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/min (OR = 2.7), evidence of substance abuse (OR = 1.7), and absence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy after discharge (OR = 1.8). The ORs were used to develop a scoring system regarding the risk for early readmission. Conclusions Identifying patients with clinical factors associated with early CHF readmission after an index hospitalization for CHF using the proposed scoring system would allow for an early CHF readmission risk stratification protocol to target particularly high-risk patients. PMID:27279845

  9. Admixture mapping of serum vitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Nicholette D; Divers, Jasmin; Lu, Lingyi; Register, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Hicks, Pamela J; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Judd, Suzanne E; Irvin, Marguerite R; Gutierrez, Orlando M; Bowden, Donald W; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentrations differ between individuals of African and European descent and may play a role in observed racial differences in bone mineral density (BMD). These findings suggest that mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) may be informative for identifying genetic variants contributing to these ethnic disparities. Admixture mapping was performed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP), bioavailable vitamin D, and iPTH concentrations and computed tomography measured thoracic and lumbar vertebral volumetric BMD in 552 unrelated African Americans with type 2 diabetes from the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. Genotyping was performed using a custom Illumina ancestry informative marker (AIM) panel. For each AIM, the probability of inheriting 0, 1, or 2 copies of a European-derived allele was determined. Non-parametric linkage analysis was performed by testing for association between each AIM using these probabilities among phenotypes, accounting for global ancestry, age, and gender. Fine-mapping of MALD peaks was facilitated by genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. VDBP levels were significantly linked in proximity to the protein coding locus (rs7689609, LOD=11.05). Two loci exhibited significant linkage signals for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D on 13q21.2 (rs1622710, LOD=3.20) and 12q13.2 (rs11171526, LOD=3.10). iPTH was significantly linked on 9q31.3 (rs7854368, LOD=3.14). Fine-mapping with GWAS data revealed significant known (rs7041 with VDBP, P=1.38×10(-82)) and novel (rs12741813 and rs10863774 with VDBP, P<6.43×10(-5)) loci with plausible biological roles. Admixture mapping in combination with fine-mapping has focused efforts to identify loci contributing to ethnic differences in vitamin D-related traits. PMID:27032714

  10. Associations of cigarette smoking with rheumatoid arthritis in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Sayles, Harlan; Yu, Fang; LeVan, Tricia; Gould, Karen A.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Conn, Doyt; Jonas, Beth L.; Callahan, Leigh F.; Smith, Edwin; Brasington, Richard; Moreland, Larry W.; Reynolds, Richard; Bridges, S. Louis

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of cigarette smoking with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in African Americans and to determine to whether this association is impacted by HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE). Methods Smoking status, cumulative smoking exposure, and SE status were measured in African American patients with RA and in healthy controls. Associations of smoking with RA were examined using age- and gender-adjusted logistic regression. Additive and multiplicative SE-smoking interactions were examined. Results After adjusting for age and gender, ever (OR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.97) and current smoking (OR = 1.56; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.26) were more common in African American RA cases (n = 605) than in controls (n = 255). The association of smoking with RA was limited to those with a cumulative exposure exceeding 10 pack-years, associations that were evident in both autoantibody positive and negative disease. There was evidence of a significant additive interaction between SE status and heavy smoking (≥ 10 pack-years) in RA risk (attributable proportion due to interaction [AP] of 0.58, p = 0.007) with an AP of 0.47 (p = 0.006) between SE status and ever smoking. There was no evidence of multiplicative interactions. Conclusion Among African Americans, cigarette smoking is associated not only with the risk of autoantibody positive RA but also with the risk of autoantibody negative disease. RA risk attributable to smoking is limited to African Americans with more than 10 pack-years of exposure and is more pronounced among individuals positive for HLA-DRB1 SE. PMID:20722010

  11. American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Report, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) mission is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching. Embracing the notion that physics understanding is critical to the wellbeing of society, AAPT is committed to serving its members and the larger community by promoting effectiveness in physics teaching for…

  12. American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) mission is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching. Aspiring to advance the greater good through physics, AAPT strives to be the leading voice, primary resource, advocate of choice, and driving force in physics education, serving professionals who teach physics…

  13. Independent Consulting and the American Evaluation Association: Twenty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Deborah G.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of American Evaluation Association's (AEA) Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group (IC TIG). The TIG goes back a joint meeting held in San Francisco in 1984 of the Evaluation Network (ENet) and the Evaluation Research Society (ERS), two years before the organizations merged to become the AEA. On the fringes…

  14. The Perspective of the American Association of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent A.; Boggs, George R.

    2003-01-01

    Examines and discusses the utility of the classification systems proposed for community colleges from the perspective of the American Association of Community Colleges. Provides insights for understanding the differences among community colleges. Concludes size appears to be the most important factor driving proposed categorization systems. (NB)

  15. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2013 Membership Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to collect data regarding membership demographics as well as variables concerning the work environment for art therapists. These surveys can provide a detailed description of these characteristics and how they may change over time. This article statistically compares the…

  16. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2011 Membership Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to gather information on general demographics, employment-related characteristics, licensing, and professional affiliations. The surveys are used in the development of national media opportunities and public policy initiatives to help increase recognition for the field of…

  17. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  18. Associations among Asian Americans' Enculturation, Emotional Experiences, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Y. Joel; Tran, Kimberly K.; Lai, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Using a computer-based text analysis of 218 Asian Americans' writing samples, the authors found that enculturation as well as use of negative emotion and positive emotion words were associated with depressive symptoms. Enculturation was also found to moderate the relation between use of negative emotion words and cognitive--affective depressive…

  19. Research on the History of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomison, Dennis

    A researcher on the history of the American Library Association (ALA) describes problems encountered on his project, important trends in ALA, weaknesses and benefits of ALA, and needs in the area of historical research. Some of the problems cited are the inadequacy of organization and housing of the ALA archives, the unevenness of the archival…

  20. American Dental Education Association Annual Proceedings, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Reports activities of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) from the end of the 2001 Annual Session and Exposition (March 9, 2001) through the 2002 Annual Session and Exposition (March 7, 2002). Consists of: president's annual report, president-elect's address, executive director's report, proceedings of the 2002 House of Delegates,…

  1. American Association of Dental Schools Annual Session & Exposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The planned program of the 77th annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools, "Strengthening Alliances, Expanding Horizons," comprises this special issue, which includes information on plenary session speakers, daily programs, TechnoFair clinics and workshops, section programs and meetings, faculty development workshops, exposition…

  2. American Association of State Colleges and Universities Annual Report 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This annual report provides a comparative financial status of the the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) at fiscal year end June 30, 2005 versus fiscal year end June 30, 2004. AASCU continues to maintain its financial condition while providing programs and services desired by its members. Membership support remains…

  3. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  4. American Osteopathic Association Commitment to Quality and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunanidas, Amelia G.; Burkhart, Diane N.

    2005-01-01

    The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) initiated programs to enhance quality for 54, 000 doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs) practicing in the United States. Seven core competencies are required in undergraduate and graduate medical education standards. They include osteopathic philosophy and osteopathic manipulative medicine, medical…

  5. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset: beyond depression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia E.; Hu, Chiyi; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José A.; Uda, Hidenori; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J.; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, nor taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Methods Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. Results After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3–1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology’s links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications. PMID:23993321

  6. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology heart failure nurse curriculum.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jillian P; Astin, Felicity; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Deaton, Christi M; Kienhorst, Jens; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; McDonagh, Theresa A; Rushton, Claire A; Stromberg, Anna; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in care and management of heart failure have improved outcome, largely as a result of the developing evidence basis for medications, implantable devices and the organization of heart failure follow-up. Such developments have also increased the complexity of delivering and coordinating care. This has led to a change to the way in which heart failure services are organized and to the traditional role of the heart failure nurse. Nurses in many countries now provide a range of services that include providing care for patients with acute and with chronic heart failure, working in and across different sectors of care (inpatient, outpatient, community care, the home and remotely), organising care services around the face-to-face and the remote collection of patient data, and liaising with a wide variety of health-care providers and professionals. To support such advances the nurse requires a skill set that goes beyond that of their initial education and training. The range of nurses' roles across Europe is varied. So too is the nature of their educational preparation. This heart failure nurse curriculum aims to provide a framework for use in countries of the European Society of Cardiology. Its modular approach enables the key knowledge, skills, and behaviours for the nurse working in different care settings to be outlined and so facilitate nursing staff to play a fuller role within the heart failure team. PMID:27220672

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. Personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has changed dramatically with the development of targeted therapy with selective pulmonary vasodilators. The number of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD is increasing. It is important to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of these patients, and to achieve this, a register of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD should be established. At the World Symposium in Nice, France, in 2013, the consensus was reached that patients with a pulmonary resistance of < 4 Wood Units (WU)·m(2) have operable disease, and patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) have inoperable disease. However, these criteria are conservative. Some patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) and a good response to a pulmonary vasodilator test have operable disease and a favorable clinical course long after repair of CHD. The criteria determining operability in patients with PAH associated with CHD in the era of pulmonary vasodilators should be established using data obtained from patient registers and/or multicenter studies. The optimal management of Eisenmenger syndrome should also be established using data obtained from patient registers. Prospective studies should be conducted to determine the life expectancy of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in the era of targeted therapy. A relatively mild increase in pulmonary resistance may result in failure of a Fontan circulation. The effects of pulmonary vasodilators on the long-term prognosis of patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are still unclear. PMID:25787791

  8. Many Heart Bypass Patients Don't Take Needed Meds

    MedlinePlus

    ... their disease," Dr. Michael Savage, a professor of cardiology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, said in ... the long term, and the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend taking both ...

  9. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 2016 OUTPATIENT GLUCOSE MONITORING CONSENSUS STATEMENT.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Timothy S; Grunberger, George; Bode, Bruce W; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Jovanovič, Lois; Roberts, Victor Lawrence; Rodbard, David; Tamborlane, William V; Walsh, John

    2016-02-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician. PMID:26848630

  10. The St. Louis African American health-heart study: methodology for the study of cardiovascular disease and depression in young-old African Americans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Depression has complex bidirectional adverse associations with CAD, although the mechanisms mediating these relationships remain unclear. Compared to European Americans, African Americans (AAs) have higher rates of morbidity and mortality from CAD. Although depression is common in AAs, its role in the development and features of CAD in this group has not been well examined. This project hypothesizes that the relationships between depression and CAD can be explained by common physiological pathways and gene-environment interactions. Thus, the primary aims of this ongoing project are to: a) determine the prevalence of CAD and depression phenotypes in a population-based sample of community-dwelling older AAs; b) examine the relationships between CAD and depression phenotypes in this population; and c) evaluate genetic variants from serotoninP and inflammatory pathways to discover potential gene-depression interactions that contribute significantly to the presence of CAD in AAs. Methods/design The St. Louis African American Health (AAH) cohort is a population-based panel study of community-dwelling AAs born in 1936–1950 (inclusive) who have been followed from 2000/2001 through 2010. The AAH-Heart study group is a subset of AAH participants recruited in 2009–11 to examine the inter-relationships between depression and CAD in this population. State-of-the-art CAD phenotyping is based on cardiovascular characterizations (coronary artery calcium, carotid intima-media thickness, cardiac structure and function, and autonomic function). Depression phenotyping is based on standardized questionnaires and detailed interviews. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of selected genes in inflammatory and serotonin-signaling pathways are being examined to provide information for investigating potential gene-depression interactions as modifiers of CAD traits. Information from the parent AAH

  11. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment. PMID:21518741

  12. The association between COPD and heart failure risk: a review

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel Díez, Javier; Morgan, Jorge Chancafe; García, Rodrigo Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is commonly associated with heart failure (HF) in clinical practice since they share the same pathogenic mechanism. Both conditions incur significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the prognosis of COPD and HF combined is poorer than for either disease alone. Nevertheless, usually only one of them is diagnosed. An active search for each condition using clinical examination and additional tests including plasma natriuretic peptides, lung function testing, and echocardiography should be obtained. The combination of COPD and HF presents many therapeutic challenges. The beneficial effects of selective β1-blockers should not be denied in stable patients who have HF and coexisting COPD. Additionally, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-receptor blockers may reduce the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Moreover, caution is advised with use of inhaled β2-agonists for the treatment of COPD in patients with HF. Finally, noninvasive ventilation, added to conventional therapy, improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic exacerbation of COPD or HF in situations of acute pulmonary edema. The establishment of a combined and integrated approach to managing these comorbidities would seem an appropriate strategy. Additional studies providing new data on the pathogenesis and management of patients with COPD and HF are needed, with the purpose of trying to improve quality of life as well as survival of these patients. PMID:23847414

  13. Micronutrients in African-Americans with decompensated and compensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Maximiliano; Laguardia, Stephen P; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Nelson, Maeda D; Johnson, Patti L; Carbone, Laura D; Newman, Kevin P; Weber, Karl T

    2006-12-01

    Heart failure is thought to be more common and of greater severity in African-Americans (AAs). Potential mechanisms remain uncertain. The importance of micronutrient deficiencies in the pathophysiologic expression of congestive heart failure (CHF) in AAs remains to be explored, including hypovitaminosis D, which can promote secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), together with hypozincemia and hyposelenemia, the 2 most crucial trace minerals integral to diverse biologic functions. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), Zn, and Se were monitored in 30 AAs hospitalized during June through December 2005, with decompensated failure and reduced ejection fraction (EF) (<35%) of predominantly nonischemic origin treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), furosemide, and spironolactone. Based on their symptomatic status before hospitalization, 15 patients were stratified as having protracted (>or=4 weeks) CHF, whereas 15 patients had short-term (1-2 weeks) CHF. These hospitalized patients were compared with 10 AA outpatients with stable, similarly treated compensated failure and comparable EF, and 9 AA normal volunteers without cardiovascular disease. Serum PTH was elevated in all patients with protracted CHF and in 60% of patients with short-term CHF, but not in compensated patients or normal volunteers. However, serum 25(OH)D was reduced in all patients with >or=4 weeks and 80% with either 1-2 weeks CHF or compensated failure compared with volunteers. Serum Zn was below normal in 11 of 15 patients with protracted CHF, in 8 of 15 patients with shorter duration CHF, and in 5 of 10 patients with compensated failure. Serum Se was reduced in all patients with >or=4 weeks, 60% with short-term CHF, and 90% of compensated patients. Concomitant to hypovitaminosis D, hypozincemia, and hyposelenemia, SHPT is a covariant of CHF in housebound AAs. PMID:17162251

  14. Factors Associated With Isolated Right Heart Failure in Women

    PubMed Central

    Lagat, David K.; DeLong, Allison K.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Carter, E. Jane; Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Hogan, Joseph; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Sherman, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small observational studies have found that isolated right heart failure (IRHF) is prevalent among women of sub-Saharan Africa. Further, several risk factors for the development of IRHF have been identified. However, no similar studies have been conducted in Kenya. Objective We hypothesized that specific environmental exposures and comorbidities were associated with IRHF in women of western Kenya. Methods We conducted a case-control study at a referral hospital in western Kenya. Cases were defined as women at least 35 years old with IRHF. Control subjects were similarly aged volunteers without IRHF. Exclusion criteria in both groups included history of tobacco use, tuberculosis, or thromboembolic disease. Participants underwent echocardiography, spirometry, 6-min walk test, rest/exercise oximetry, respiratory health interviews, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing. Home visits were performed to evaluate kitchen ventilation, fuel use, and cook smoke exposure time, all surrogate measures of indoor air pollution (IAP). A total of 31 cases and 65 control subjects were enrolled. Surrogate measures of indoor air pollution were not associated with IRHF. However, lower forced expiratory volume at 1 s percent predicted (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.27 to 3.20; p = 0.004), HIV positivity (AOR: 40.4, 95% CI: 3.7 to 441; p < 0.01), and self-report of exposure to occupational dust (AOR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.14 to 14.2; p = 0.04) were associated with IRHF. In an analysis of subgroups of participants with and without these factors, lower kitchen ventilation was significantly associated with IRHF among participants without airflow limitation (AOR: 2.63 per 0.10 unit lower ventilation, 95% CI: 1.06 to 6.49; p = 0.04), without HIV (AOR: 2.55, 95% CI: 1.21 to 5.37; p = 0.02), and without occupational dust exposure (AOR: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.01 to 5.56; p = 0.05). Conclusions In this pilot study among women of western Kenya, lower kitchen

  15. Association between Functional Variables and Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Gonçalves, Andréa F.; Lima, Aline F.; Martinez, Paula F.; Okoshi, Marina P.; Okoshi, Katashi; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure prediction after acute myocardial infarction may have important clinical implications. Objective To analyze the functional echocardiographic variables associated with heart failure in an infarction model in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups: control and infarction. Subsequently, the infarcted animals were divided into groups: with and without heart failure. The predictive values were assessed by logistic regression. The cutoff values predictive of heart failure were determined using ROC curves. Results Six months after surgery, 88 infarcted animals and 43 control animals were included in the study. Myocardial infarction increased left cavity diameters and the mass and wall thickness of the left ventricle. Additionally, myocardial infarction resulted in systolic and diastolic dysfunction, characterized by lower area variation fraction values, posterior wall shortening velocity, E-wave deceleration time, associated with higher values of E / A ratio and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate. Among the infarcted animals, 54 (61%) developed heart failure. Rats with heart failure have higher left cavity mass index and diameter, associated with worsening of functional variables. The area variation fraction, the E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate were functional variables predictors of heart failure. The cutoff values of functional variables associated with heart failure were: area variation fraction < 31.18%; E / A > 3.077; E-wave deceleration time < 42.11 and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate < 69.08. Conclusion In rats followed for 6 months after myocardial infarction, the area variation fraction, E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate are predictors of heart failure onset. PMID:26815462

  16. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  17. The American Library Association in Latin America: American Librarianship as a "Modern" Model during the Good Neighbor Policy Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maymi-Sugranes, Hector J.

    2002-01-01

    Through American Library Association (ALA) projects in Latin America, American librarianship progressed from conceptualization to implementation as the model in modernizing Latin American library practices and societies. Development of library practices was fundamental to pursuit of a "modern" society. In fighting fascist propaganda, the United…

  18. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... me? Should I stay in bed? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is Angina? What is an ... a Coronary Angiogram? How Can I Recover From Heart Surgery? What is Carotid ... Do I Understand "Nutrition Facts" Labels? How Can I Quit Smoking? How Can ...

  19. The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section: increasing the opportunities for the congenital heart disease community within the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gerard R; Mitchell, Stephanie; Beekman, Robert H; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Jenkins, Kathy J; Landzberg, Michael; Webb, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (AC/PC) Section was established to develop a clear voice within the American College of Cardiology and address the myriad issues facing the congenital heart disease profession. The Section is governed by the AC/PC Council, which includes pediatric cardiologists, adult congenital cardiologists, a cardiac care associate, and a fellow-in-training member. The Council is responsible for bidirectional communication between the College's Board of Trustees and the AC/PC Section members. Since its founding in 2004, Section objectives have been defined by the College's mission: to advocate for quality cardiovascular care through education, research promotion, and the development and application of standards and guidelines and to influence health care policy. The pillars of the College-advocacy, quality, education, and member engagement-serve as the defining template for the Section's strategy. The Section has developed work groups in advocacy, clinical practice, education and training, quality, and publications. A separate leadership group has been developed for adult congenital heart disease. Work groups are open to all Section members. Recognition of the importance of lifelong care in congenital heart disease led Section leaders to incorporate pediatric cardiology and adult congenital heart disease content into each of the work groups. There are more than 1,200 Section members, with nearly 400 members actively contributing to Section activities. This article outlines Section efforts to date and highlights significant successes to date. PMID:22192673

  20. Relationships between Diet, Alcohol Preference, and Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes among Americans.

    PubMed

    Adjemian, Michael K; Volpe, Richard J; Adjemian, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive alcohol consumption is a recognized cause of morbidity and mortality, many studies have linked moderate alcohol consumption to improved cardiovascular health and a lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). Self-reported alcohol and diet data used to generate these results suffer from measurement error due to recall bias. We estimate the effects of diet, alcohol, and lifestyle choices on the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease and T2D among U.S. adults using a nationally representative cohort of households with scanner data representing their food-at-home, alcohol, and tobacco purchases from 2007-2010, and self-reported health surveys for the same study participants from 2010-2012. Multivariate regression models were used to identify significant associations among purchase data and lifestyle/demographic factors with disease prevalence in 2010, and with incidence of new disease from 2011-2012. After controlling for important confounders, respondents who purchased moderate levels of wine were 25% less likely than non-drinkers to report heart disease in 2010. However, no alcohol-related expenditure variables significantly affected the likelihood of reporting incident heart disease from 2011-2012. In contrast, many types of alcohol-related purchases were associated with a lower prevalence of T2D, and respondents who purchased the greatest volumes of wine or beer--but not liquor--were less likely to report being diagnosed with T2D in 2011-2012 than non-drinkers. PMID:25961601

  1. Neighborhood poverty, allostatic load, and birth outcomes in African American and white women: findings from the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Maeve; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Webber, Larry; Chen, Wei; Berenson, Gerald

    2013-11-01

    As a biologically-mediated pathway between adversity and declines in physical health, allostatic load has been frequently hypothesized as a potential contributor to racial disparities in birth outcomes, but an empirical evidence is lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between maternal preconception allostatic load, race, and adverse birth outcomes within the context of neighborhood-level poverty using data from the Bogalusa Heart Study. Allostatic load was quantified as a count of regulatory biomarkers falling in the highest risk quartile of the sample distribution as measured from a physical examination that took place prior to conception. Consistent with previous findings, African American women resided in more impoverished neighborhoods and had higher allostatic load scores compared to whites; however, allostatic load was not associated with preterm birth or low birth weight in fully adjusted models. These results underscore a need for further refinement of both biologic and contextual measures that capture holistically the way in which stressful conditions and experiences encountered across the life-course influence health potentials and engender inequities in reproductive health outcomes. PMID:24184350

  2. Multiple Loci Associated with Renal Function in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel; Herbert, Alan; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Erdos, Michael R.; Chen, Guanjie; Gerry, Norman P.; Christman, Michael F.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans. PMID:23028791

  3. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Daniel; Herbert, Alan; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Erdos, Michael R; Chen, Guanjie; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans. PMID:23028791

  4. 2012 Annual report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Provides the 2012 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In 2012, APA celebrated its 120th anniversary. It has grown from its original 31 members to the largest association of psychologists in the United States and a worldwide leader within the discipline. This edition of the report introduces each directorate and office within APA and talks about their goals and objectives. the president of APA, Dr. Norman Anderson, also gives a brief report which updates you on the activities of the association during its 120th anniversary as the professional home for psychologists and an advocate for the discipline. PMID:23895619

  5. Exploring feasibility of home telemanagement in African Americans with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Cha, Eunme; Dennison, Cheryl R

    2010-01-01

    Existing telemonitoring systems provide limited support in implementing personalized treatment plans. We developed a Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT) system for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) to provide support in following individualized treatment plans as well as to monitor symptoms, weight changes, and quality of life, while educating the patient on their disease. The system is designed to be placed in the patient's home and to communicate all patient data to a central server implementing real-time clinical decision support. The system questions the patient daily on their condition, monitors their weight, and provides the patient with instant feedback on their condition in the form of a 3-zone CHF action plan. Their medication regimen and suggested actions are determined by their care management team and integrated into the system, keeping a personalized approach to disease management while taking advantage of the technology available. The system is designed to be as simple as possible, making it usable by patients with no prior computer experience. A feasibility assessment in African American patients with CHF and without prior computer experience demonstrated high level of acceptance of the CHF HAT system. PMID:20841744

  6. GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE ANALYSIS OF PULSE PRESSURE IN AMERICAN INDIANS: THE STRONG HEART STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; MacCluer, Jean W.; Rose, Kathreen M.; Rutherford, Sue; Cole, Shelley A.; Laston, Sandy; Göring, Harald H.H.; Diego, Vincent P.; Roman, Mary J.; Lee, Elisa T.; Best, Lyle G.; Howard, Barbara V.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; North, Kari E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pulse pressure, a measure of central arterial stiffness and a predictor of cardiovascular mortality, has known genetic components. Methods To localize the genetic effects of pulse pressure, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis of 1,892 American Indian participants of the Strong Heart Family Study. Blood pressure was measured three times and the average of the last two measures was used for analyses. Pulse pressure, the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressures, was log-transformed and adjusted for the effects of age and sex within each study center. Variance component linkage analyses were performed using marker allele frequencies derived from all individuals and multipoint identity-by-descent matrices calculated in Loki. Results We identified a quantitative trait locus influencing pulse pressure on chromosome 7 at 37 cM (marker D7S493, LOD=3.3) and suggestive evidence of linkage on chromosome 19 at 92 cM (marker D19S888, LOD=1.8). Conclusions The signal on 7p15.3 overlaps positive findings for pulse pressure among Utah population samples, suggesting that this region may harbor gene variants for blood pressure related traits. PMID:18188160

  7. Selected Papers from the 1990 Meeting of the American Journalism Historians' Association (Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, October 2-7, 1990): Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journalism Historians' Association.

    The following 12 papers, on a variety of topics, were given at the 1990 meeting of the American Journalism Historians' Association: (1) "'Let Jim Handle It': President Dwight D. Eisenhower's First Heart Attack and Jim Hagerty's Handling of the Media" (Joseph V. Trahan, III); (2) "Eisenhower's Pyrrhic Victory in 1956: Mixed Lessons from the First…

  8. Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Value of Circulating miRNAs in Heart Failure Patients Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ali Sheikh, Md Sayed; Salma, Umme; Zhang, Baohai; Chen, Jimei; Zhuang, Jian; Ping, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem especially in the aging population (≥65 years old), affecting nearly 5 million Americans and 15 million European people. Effective management of heart failure (HF) depends on a correct and rapid diagnosis. Presently, BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) assay is generally accepted by the international community for diagnostic evaluation and risk stratification of patients with HF. However, regardless of its widespread clinical use, BNP is still encumbered by reduced specificity. As a result, diagnosis of heart failure remains challenging. Although significant improvement happened in the clinical management of HF over the last 2 decades, traditional treatments are ultimately ineffective in many patients who progress to advanced HF. Therefore, a novel diagnostic, prognostic biomarker and new therapeutic approach are required for clinical management of HF patients. Circulating miRNAs seem to be the right choice for novel noninvasive biomarkers as well as new treatment strategies for HF. In this review, we briefly discuss the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic role of circulating miRNAs in heart failure patients. We also mentioned our own technique of extraction of RNA and detection of circulating miRNAs from human plasma and oxidative stress associated miRNAs with HF. PMID:27379177

  9. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention. PMID:9391932

  10. Association of American Indian cultural identity with physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Glen E.; McDougall, Casey L.; Dansie, Elizabeth; Garroutte, Eva; Buchwald, Dedra; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cultural factors are associated with health behaviors among American Indians. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate whether cultural identity, defined as the primary language spoken at home, is associated with (1) higher total physical activity levels and (2) levels of leisure-time physical activity recommended for health benefits in a diverse sample of American Indians. Design Cross-sectional analysis of 5,207 American Indian adults 18 to 82 years. Participants resided on the Oglala Sioux (n = 2,025) and Cheyenne River Sioux (n = 1,528) reservations in South Dakota, and the Gila River Indian Community (n = 1,654) in Arizona. Results Bicultural participants in South Dakota, but not Arizona, reported significantly higher total physical activity compared to the English-only group (p < 0.05). About 35% of English only speakers, 39% of American Indian/Alaska Native only speakers, and 39% of participants speaking both languages met the 150 minutes/week activity threshold. Odds of being sufficiently active were higher among bicultural respondents in both regions when compared to respondents endorsing only English, controlling for socio-demographic and health-related covariates (p < 0.05). Conclusion Bicultural respondents among tribal members in South Dakota had significantly higher total physical activity, and higher levels of sufficient leisure-time activity in both South Dakota and Arizona, compared to those who spoke either language exclusively. Interventions that encourage American Indians to develop their bicultural efficacy and to draw on resources for healthy living that may be available in all the cultures with which they identify are recommended. PMID:24620441

  11. Dietary Habits Moderate the Association between Heart Failure and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure patients. Poor dietary habits are associated with reduced neurocognitive function in other medical populations, including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. This study examined whether dietary habits help moderate the relationship between heart failure severity and cognitive function. A total of 152 persons with heart failure completed neuropsychological testing and a fitness assessment. Dietary habits were assessed using the Starting the Conversation-Diet questionnaire, a nutrition measure suggested for use in primary care settings. Moderation analyses showed that better dietary habits attenuated the adverse impact of heart failure severity on frontal functioning (b =1.28, p < .05). Follow-up analyses revealed consumption of foods high in sodium was associated with reduced cognitive function (p < .05). This study suggests dietary habits can moderate the association between heart failure and performance on tests of attention and executive function. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm and clarify the mechanisms for our findings. PMID:23663211

  12. 77 FR 37678 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgery Facilities Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS... application from the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF)...

  13. Executive Dysfunction is Independently Associated with Reduced Functional Independence in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives To examine the independent association between executive function with instrumental activities of daily living and health behaviors in older adults with heart failure. Background Executive function is an important contributor to functional independence as it consists of cognitive processes needed for decision-making, planning, organizing, and behavioral monitoring. Impairment in this domain is common in heart failure patients and associated with reduced performance of instrumental activities of daily living in many medical and neurological populations. However, the contribution of executive functions to functional independence and healthy lifestyle choices in heart failure patients has not been fully examined. Design Cross-sectional analyses. Methods 175 heart failure patients completed a neuropsychological battery and echocardiogram. Participants also completed the Lawton-Brody instrumental activities of daily living scale and reported current cigarette use. Results Hierarchical regressions revealed reduced executive function was independently associated with worse instrumental activity of daily living performance with a specific association for decreased ability to manage medications. Partial correlations showed executive dysfunction was associated with current cigarette use. Conclusions Our findings suggest that executive dysfunction is associated with poorer functional independence and contributes to unhealthy behaviors in heart failure. Future studies should examine whether heart failure patients benefit from formal organization schemae (i.e., pill organizers) to maintain independence. Relevance to Clinical Practice Screening of executive function in heart failure patients may provide key insight into their ability to perform daily tasks, including management of treatment recommendations. PMID:23650879

  14. The Contribution of Stress to the Social Patterning of Clinical and Subclinical CVD Risk Factors in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebreab, Samson Y.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Boykin, Shawn; Sims, Mario; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Taylor, Herman A.; Wyatt, Sharon B.

    2012-01-01

    It is often hypothesized that psychosocial stress may contribute to associations of socioeconomic position (SEP) with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, few studies have investigated this hypothesis among African Americans, who may be more frequently exposed to stressors due to social and economic circumstances. Cross-sectional data from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), a large population-based cohort of African Americans, were used to examine the contributions of stressors to the association of SEP with selected cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors and subclinical atherosclerotic disease. Among women, higher income was associated with lower prevalence of hypertension, obesity, diabetes and carotid plaque and lower levels of stress. Higher stress levels were also weakly, albeit positively, associated with hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, but not with plaque. Adjustment for the stress measures reduced the associations of income with hypertension, diabetes and obesity by a small amount that was comparable to, or larger, than the reduction observed after adjustment for behavioral risk factors. In men, high income was associated with lower prevalence of diabetes and stressors were not consistently associated with any of the outcomes examined. Overall, modest mediation effects of stressors were observed for diabetes (15.9%), hypertension (9.7%), and obesity (5.1%) among women but only results for diabetes were statistically significant. No mediation effects of stressors were observed in men. Our results suggest that stressors may partially contribute to associations of SEP with diabetes and possibly hypertension and obesity in African American women. Further research with appropriate study designs and data is needed to understand the dynamic and interacting effects of stressors and behaviors on CVD outcomes as well as sex differences in these effects. PMID:22841454

  15. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  16. Association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American children

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Amy L; Tschann, Jeanne; Butte, Nancy F; Penilla, Carlos; Greenspan, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American school-aged children. Design Cross-sectional study using the baseline data from a cohort study. Mothers and children answered questions about the frequency and quantity of the child’s consumption of soda, diet soda, other sugar-sweetened beverages, 100% fruit juice, milk and water. The questions were adapted from the Youth/Adolescent FFQ. Children were weighed and measured. Data were collected on the following potential confounders: maternal BMI, household income, maternal education, maternal occupational status, maternal acculturation, child physical activity, child screen time and child fast-food consumption. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between servings (240 ml) of each beverage per week and obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile). Setting Participants were recruited from among enrolees of the Kaiser Permanente Health Plan of Northern California. Data were collected via an in-home assessment. Subjects Mexican American children (n 319) aged 8–10 years. Results Among participants, 20% were overweight and 31% were obese. After controlling for potential confounders, consuming more servings of soda was associated with increased odds of obesity (OR = 1·29; P < 0·001). Consuming more servings of flavoured milk per week was associated with lower odds of obesity (OR = 0·88; P = 0·004). Consumption of other beverages was not associated with obesity in the multivariate model. Conclusions Discouraging soda consumption among Mexican American children may help reduce the high obesity rates in this population. PMID:23308395

  17. African Ancestry Is Associated with Asthma Risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, María; Wade, Michael S.; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Kittles, Rick A.; Wang, Deli; Papaiahgari, Srinivas; Ford, Jean G.; Kumar, Rajesh; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a common complex condition with clear racial and ethnic differences in both prevalence and severity. Asthma consultation rates, mortality, and severe symptoms are greatly increased in African descent populations of developed countries. African ancestry has been associated with asthma, total serum IgE and lower pulmonary function in African-admixed populations. To replicate previous findings, here we aimed to examine whether African ancestry was associated with asthma susceptibility in African Americans. In addition, we examined for the first time whether African ancestry was associated with asthma exacerbations. Methodology/Principal Findings After filtering for self-reported ancestry and genotype data quality, samples from 1,117 self-reported African-American individuals from New York and Baltimore (394 cases, 481 controls), and Chicago (321 cases followed for asthma exacerbations) were analyzed. Genetic ancestry was estimated based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs) selected for being highly divergent among European and West African populations (95 AIMs for New York and Baltimore, and 66 independent AIMs for Chicago). Among case-control samples, the mean African ancestry was significantly higher in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics (82.0±14.0% vs. 77.8±18.1%, mean difference 4.2% [95% confidence interval (CI):2.0–6.4], p<0.0001). This association remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio: 4.55, 95% CI: 1.69–12.29, p = 0.003). African ancestry failed to show an association with asthma exacerbations (p = 0.965) using a model based on longitudinal data of the number of exacerbations followed over 1.5 years. Conclusions/Significance These data replicate previous findings indicating that African ancestry constitutes a risk factor for asthma and suggest that elevated asthma rates in African Americans can be partially attributed to African genetic ancestry. PMID:22235241

  18. Psychological trauma symptoms and Type 2 diabetes prevalence, glucose control, and treatment modality among American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Michelle M.; Gonzales, Kelly L.; Calhoun, Darren; Beals, Janette; Muller, Clemma Jacobsen; Goldberg, Jack; Nelson, Lonnie; Welty, Thomas K.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aims of this paper are to examine the relationship between psychological trauma symptoms and Type 2 diabetes prevalence, glucose control, and treatment modality among 3,776 American Indians in Phase V of the Strong Heart Family Study. Methods This cross-sectional analysis measured psychological trauma symptoms using the National Anxiety Disorder Screening Day instrument, diabetes by American Diabetes Association criteria, and treatment modality by four categories: no medication, oral medication only, insulin only, or both oral medication and insulin. We used binary logistic regression to evaluate the association between psychological trauma symptoms and diabetes prevalence. We used ordinary least squares regression to evaluate the association between psychological trauma symptoms and glucose control. We used binary logistic regression to model the association of psychological trauma symptoms with treatment modality. Results Neither diabetes prevalence (22-31%; p = 0.19) nor control (8.0-8.6; p = 0.25) varied significantly by psychological trauma symptoms categories. However, diabetes treatment modality was associated with psychological trauma symptoms categories, as people with greater burden used either no medication, or both oral and insulin medications (odds ratio = 3.1, p < 0.001). Conclusions The positive relationship between treatment modality and psychological trauma symptoms suggests future research investigate patient and provider treatment decision making. PMID:24051029

  19. Fetal heart rate changes associated with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fedorkow, D M; Stewart, T J; Parboosingh, J

    1989-07-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability was noted 90 seconds after the induction of general anesthesia with sodium thiopentone and fentanyl in a patient undergoing basket extraction of a renal calculus at 30 weeks' gestation. The fetal sleep pattern lasted for 105 minutes after the anesthetic was discontinued, 45 minutes after the mother was fully awake. PMID:2730732

  20. The association of scoliosis and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Reckles, L N; Peterson, H A; Weidman, W H; Bianco, A J

    1975-06-01

    The effects of cardiac surgery on patients with congenital heart defects and the subsequent development of scoliosis were studied. A group of 998 patients with congenital heart defects who were less than sixteen years old were operated on at the Mayo Clinic during the ten-year period 1950 through 1959. Standing roentgenograms of the spine were made of 377 of the patients ten years or more after surgery. The ages of the patients at follow-up ranged from ten years and seven months to thirty-five years and three months, with a mean age of twenty-one years and four months. The average length of follow-up was fourteen years and eleven months. Of the 377 patients, thirty-two (8.5 per cent) had curves greater than 20 degrees. The female:male ratio of patients with congenital heart defects was 1:1, whereas of those who developed scoliosis it was 5:3. There was no correlation between scoliosis and the following: patient's sex, cardiac abnormality, size or side of the heart, side of the aortic arch, presence of cyanosis, age at surgery, number and type of surgical incisions, number and side of ribs removed, or number and type of surgical procedures. PMID:1141253

  1. Visual discrimination learning in dwarf goats and associated changes in heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Jan; Nürnberg, G; Manteuffel, G

    2004-09-30

    We studied visual discrimination learning in a group of Nigerian dwarf goats using a computer-based learning device which was integrated in the animals' home pen. We conducted three consecutive learning tasks (T1, T2 and T3), each of which lasted for 13 days. In each task, a different set of four visual stimuli was presented on a computer screen in a four-choice design. Predefined sequences of stimulus combinations were presented in a pseudorandom order. Animals were rewarded with drinking water when they chose the positive stimulus by pressing a button next to it. Noninvasive measurements of goats' heartbeat intervals were carried out on the first and the last 2 days of each learning task. We analysed heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) of resting animals to study sustained physiological effects related to general learning challenge rather than acute excitement during an actual learning session. The number of trials to reach the learning criterion was 1000 in T1, when visual stimuli were presented to the goats for the first time, but decreased to 210 in T2 and 240 in T3, respectively. A stable plateau of correct choices between 70% and 80% was reached on Day 10 in T1, on Day 8 in T2 and on Day 6 in T3. We found a significant influence of the task and of the interaction between task and day on learning success. Whereas HR increased throughout T1, this relationship was inverted in T2 and T3, indicating different effects on the HR depending on how familiar goats were with the learning task. We found a significant influence of the task and the interaction between task and time within the task on HRV parameters, indicating changes of vagal activity at the heart. The results suggest that changes in HR related to learning were predominantly caused by a withdrawal of vagal activity at the heart. With regard to nonlinear processes in heartbeat regulation, increased deterministic shares of HRV indicated that the animals did not really relax until the end of T3

  2. 3 CFR 8625 - Proclamation 8625 of January 31, 2011. American Heart Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... healthier hearts for the next generation by addressing the factors that contribute to childhood obesity and...: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, tobacco use, and...

  3. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  4. Genetic variants associated with warfarin dose in African-American individuals: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Minoli A; Cavallari, Larisa H; Limdi, Nita A; Gamazon, Eric R; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Daneshjou, Roxana; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Crawford, Dana C; Wang, Jelai; Liu, Nianjun; Tatonetti, Nicholas; Bourgeois, Stephane; Takahashi, Harumi; Bradford, Yukiko; Burkley, Benjamin M; Desnick, Robert J; Halperin, Jonathan L; Khalifa, Sherief I; Langaee, Taimour Y; Lubitz, Steven A; Nutescu, Edith A; Oetjens, Matthew; Shahin, Mohamed H; Patel, Shitalben R; Sagreiya, Hersh; Tector, Matthew; Weck, Karen E; Rieder, Mark J; Scott, Stuart A; Wu, Alan HB; Burmester, James K; Wadelius, Mia; Deloukas, Panos; Wagner, Michael J; Mushiroda, Taisei; Kubo, Michiaki; Roden, Dan M; Cox, Nancy J; Altman, Russ B; Klein, Teri E; Nakamura, Yusuke; Johnson, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    effect on warfarin dose in African Americans, independent of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. Incorporation of this variant into pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms could improve warfarin dose prediction in this population. Funding National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Wisconsin Network for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust. PMID:23755828

  5. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  6. 77 FR 11583 - Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated... with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the... agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects....

  7. Overview of the Jackson Heart Study: a study of cardiovascular diseases in African American men and women.

    PubMed

    Sempos, C T; Bild, D E; Manolio, T A

    1999-03-01

    The Jackson Heart Study is a partnership among Jackson State University, Tougaloo College, the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Office of Research on Minority Health. The purposes of the study are to: (1) establish a single-site cohort study to identify the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases, especially those related to hypertension, in African American men and women; (2) build research capabilities in minority institutions by building partnerships; (3) attract minority students to careers in public health and epidemiology; and (4) establish an NHLBI Field Site in Jackson, Mississippi, similar to those established for the Framingham Heart Study and the Honolulu Heart Program. The study will consist of participants from the Jackson site of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study and a sample of residents from the Jackson metropolitan area. The study will have a sample size of approximately 6,500 men and women aged 35-84 years and will include approximately 400 families. Exam 1 is scheduled to take place in the spring of the year 2000. PMID:10100686

  8. Proceedings of the AST heart allocation meeting at the American Transplant Congress, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 4, 2015.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Teuteberg, Jeffrey; Colvin, Monica; Edwards, Leah; Daun, Tiffany; Luu, Minh; Patel, Jignesh; Vega, John David; Meyer, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Ensuring fair and equitable allocation of donor hearts in the US is the charge of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN). However, the recent increase of candidates waiting without a corresponding increase in available donors, higher waitlist mortality rates in higher status patients, the presence of disadvantaged subgroups, and the changing management of heart failure patients with increased VAD usage, has necessitated review of allocation policy. Therefore, the Heart Subcommittee of the OPTN/UNOS Thoracic Committee is exploring a further-tiered allocation system, devising a "straw man" model as a starting point for modeling analyses and public discussion. On May 4, 2015, an American Society of Transplantation (AST)-endorsed forum to discuss these potential proposed changes took place. Attendees included 41 people, mostly highly experienced transplant cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons, representing 19 heart transplant centers across the US, UNOS, and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). There was unanimous agreement that the potential proposed policy will require careful wording to avoid ambiguity and "gaming" of the system, and strong support for abolishment of local organ sharing in favor of geographic sharing. However, contention existed concerning the appropriate prioritization levels of ECMO, temporary VAD/TAH patients as well as the 30-day LVAD listing. PMID:27000519

  9. First North American 50 cc Total Artificial Heart Experience: Conversion from a 70 cc Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Kazui, Toshinobu; Ferng, Alice S; Connell, Alana; Tran, Phat L; Meyer, Mark; Rawashdeh, Badi; Smith, Richard G; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Friedman, Mark; Lick, Scott; Slepian, Marvin J; Copeland, Jack G

    2016-01-01

    The 70 cc total artificial heart (TAH) has been utilized as bridge to transplant (BTT) for biventricular failure. However, the utilization of 70 cc TAH has been limited to large patients for the low output from the pulmonary as well as systemic vein compression after chest closure. Therefore, the 50 cc TAH was developed by SynCardia (Tucson, AZ) to accommodate smaller chest cavity. We report the first TAH exchange from a 70 to 50 cc due to a fit difficulty. The patient failed to be closed with a 70 cc TAH, although the patient met the conventional 70 cc TAH fit criteria. We successfully closed the chest with a 50 cc TAH. PMID:26809081

  10. American woodcock (Scolopax minor) mortality associated with a reovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Converse, K.A.; Hansen, W.R.; Norman, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    A virus isolate associated with a 1989-90 die-off in American woodcock (Scolopax minor) was identified as a reovirus. Emaciation was a consistent necropsy finding in the woodcock involved in this die-off. This reovirus infection appeared to be systemic, had the potential for fecal-oral virus transmission, and was associated with deterioration of body condition. To our knowledge this is the first report of a virus isolate from wild American woodcock. A survey conducted in 1990-92 indicated that this virus was not present at detectable levels in the woodcock breeding and wintering population. /// Un virus asociado con la mortalidad de becadas o perdices americanas (Scolopax minor) en 1989-1990-fue identificado como reovirus. La emaciaci??n fue un resultado com??n a la necropsia de las aves que murieron. Esta infecci??n por reovirus pareci?? ser sist??mica, ten?-a el potencial de transmisi??n fecal-oral y estuvo asociada con el deterioro del ave. Creemos que este sea el primer reporte de aislamiento viral a partir de becadas americanas. Una encuesta hecha entre 1990 y 1992 indic?? que este virus no estaba presente en los niveles detectables en los reproductores y en las aves invernales.

  11. A Prospective Study of the Association Between Dispositional Optimism and Incident Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Smith, Jacqui; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although higher optimism has been linked with an array of positive health behaviors, biological processes, and cardiovascular outcomes, the relationship between optimism and heart failure has not been examined. In the United States, 80% of heart failures occur in adults aged 65+. Therefore, we examined whether higher optimism was linked with a reduced incidence of heart failure among older adults. Methods and Results Prospective data were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative study of older U.S adults. Our sample included 6,808 participants who were followed for four years. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess if optimism was independently associated with incident heart failure. We adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychological covariates. Higher optimism was associated with a lower risk of incident heart failure over the follow-up period. In a model that adjusted for sociodemographic factors, each standard deviation increase in optimism had an odds ratio of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.63–0.85) for heart failure. Effects of optimism persisted even after adjusting for a wide range of covariates. There was also evidence of a dose-response relationship. As optimism increased, risk of developing heart failure decreased monotonically, with a 48% reduced odds among people with the highest versus lowest optimism. Conclusions This is the first study to suggest that optimism is associated with a lower risk of heart failure. If future studies confirm these findings, they may be used to inform new strategies for preventing or delaying the onset of heart failure. PMID:24647117

  12. 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Presents the 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In his introduction, President Barry Anton describes how 2015 was among APA's most challenging. Although 2015 ushered in an era of greater transparency within the association and enhanced communications to members and the public, it also required painful self-reflection stemming from the revelations of an independent review by an outside law firm. The review examined the question of whether APA played any role related to the Bush administration's use of abusive interrogation techniques during the war on terror. Anton's introduction also discusses (1) the APA convention, (2) representing APA at a White House meeting with health care providers and insurance companies, (3) APA's effort to increase the number of APA-accredited internships, (4) international activities, and (5) the global summit on psychology and integrated care. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504583

  13. A Heavy Heart: The Association between Weight and Emotional Words.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueru; He, Xianyou; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    People often express emotion in language using weight (e.g., a heavy heart, light-hearted, light humor, or heavy-handed), but the question remains whether these expressions of emotion are rooted in the body. Six experiments used a priming paradigm to explore the metaphoric relation between weight perception and emotional words. Experiments 1 and 2 investigated the influence of weight perception on judgments of emotional words and the influence of emotional words on judgments of weight, respectively. A significant difference between the consistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to positive words and heaviness corresponds to negative words) and the inconsistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to negative words and heaviness corresponds to positive words) was found in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 were conducted to exclude potential confounds. Experiment 6 was a repeated-measures study that was conducted to verify the weight-emotion effect. The study confirmed that weight perception affected judgments of emotional words. The results contribute to the growing literature on conceptual metaphor theory and embodied cognition theory. PMID:27445893

  14. A Heavy Heart: The Association between Weight and Emotional Words

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueru; He, Xianyou; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    People often express emotion in language using weight (e.g., a heavy heart, light-hearted, light humor, or heavy-handed), but the question remains whether these expressions of emotion are rooted in the body. Six experiments used a priming paradigm to explore the metaphoric relation between weight perception and emotional words. Experiments 1 and 2 investigated the influence of weight perception on judgments of emotional words and the influence of emotional words on judgments of weight, respectively. A significant difference between the consistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to positive words and heaviness corresponds to negative words) and the inconsistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to negative words and heaviness corresponds to positive words) was found in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 were conducted to exclude potential confounds. Experiment 6 was a repeated-measures study that was conducted to verify the weight-emotion effect. The study confirmed that weight perception affected judgments of emotional words. The results contribute to the growing literature on conceptual metaphor theory and embodied cognition theory. PMID:27445893

  15. Associations between depression, distress tolerance, delay discounting, and alcohol-related problems in European American and African American college students.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Ashley A; Murphy, James G

    2011-12-01

    Although levels of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems are high in college students, there is significant variability in the number and type of problems experienced, even among students who drink heavily. African American students drink less and experience fewer alcohol-related problems than European American students, but are still at risk, and little research has investigated the potentially unique patterns and predictors of problems among these students. Depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting have been implicated in adult substance abuse and may be important predictors of alcohol problem severity among college students. We examined the relationship between these variables and alcohol-related problems among African American and European American students (N = 206; 53% female; 68% European American; 28% African American) who reported recent heavy drinking. In regression models that controlled for drinking level, depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting were associated with alcohol problems among African American students, but only depression was associated with alcohol problems among European American students. These results suggest that negative affect is a key risk factor for alcohol problems among college student drinkers. For African American students, the inability to tolerate negative emotions and to organize their behavior around future outcomes may also be especially relevant risk factors. PMID:21988480

  16. Organizing the Industrial Arts Student Association. American Industrial Arts Student Association Guide: I. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcox, George R., Comp.

    This guide provides information to aid chapter advisors and officers in planning, organizing, and providing American Industrial Arts Student Association (AIASA) activities to students. The main body of the guide contains eleven sections. In the first section AIASA's mission, goals, creed, motto, emblem, colors, and official dress are outlined.…

  17. Assessment of operability of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Myers, Patrick O; Tissot, Cécile; Beghetti, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a common complication of congenital heart disease, and is now predominantly among patients with uncorrected left-to-right shunts. A growing population is characterized by persistent or recurrent PAH after surgical or interventional correction of left-to-right shunts; the latter having a worse prognosis than other forms of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. New treatments for PAH have been shown to be effective in improving PAH exercise capacity and hemodynamics, raising the hope for making previously inoperable congenital heart defects operable and shifting the framework for the assessment of operability. This review focuses on current methods for assessing operability in PAH associated with congenital heart disease, and the possibility of "treat-and-repair" vs. "repair-and-treat" strategies for patients with inoperable or borderline PAH. PMID:24225339

  18. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  19. 3 CFR 8775 - Proclamation 8775 of January 31, 2012. American Heart Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....gov. To secure our children’s heart health and end childhood obesity within a generation, First Lady... inactivity, obesity, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse are major risk factors that can be prevented...

  20. Peer Associations and Coping: The Mediating Role of Ethnic Identity for Urban, African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Jeneka A.; O’Neil, Maya E.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; McWhirter, Ellen H.; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between coping strategies and prosocial and deviant peer associations for urban, African American adolescents. In addition, the study analyzed the mediating role of ethnic identity for coping strategies and peer associations. Results of the African American models were then compared with models for European American adolescents. Results indicated that African American and European American adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were more likely to associate with prosocial peers, and those who reported using self-destruction strategies were less likely to associate with prosocial peers. Adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were less likely to associate with deviant peers, and adolescents who reported using self-destruction strategies were more likely to associate with deviant peers. Ethnic identity mediated the relationship between coping and prosocial peer association for African American adolescents. Limitations of the study and future research directions are also presented. PMID:24324283

  1. Factors Associated with Pregnancy among Incarcerated African American Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Gray, Simone C; Holmes, Kristin; Bradford, Denise R

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the social and behavioral factors associated with pregnancy history among a sample of African American adolescent girls recruited from a short-term juvenile detention center in order to better understand the needs of this vulnerable population. Data were collected from a sample of 188 detained African American, 13-17-year-old girls in Atlanta, Georgia, who participated in a larger HIV prevention study. An audio computer-assisted self-interviewing survey was completed by participants to obtain information on socioecological factors to include individual, parental/familial, sexual risk, psychosocial, and substance use factors. Among the 188 participants, 25.5 % reported a history of pregnancy. A multivariable logistic regression model showed that girls with a history of pregnancy were more likely to live in a household receiving government aid, use hormonal contraceptives at last sex, participate in sex trading, have casual sex partners, have condomless sex in the past 90 days, and have a history of physical abuse. Girls with no history of pregnancy were more likely to have been incarcerated at least twice and to have previously used alcohol. Detention-based interventions and pregnancy prevention programs for this vulnerable population may benefit by addressing factors related to sexual behavior and development, substance use, individual background, and psychosocial health. PMID:27271026

  2. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    PubMed

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified. PMID:19645365

  3. 67 th annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Colca, Jerry R

    2007-10-01

    The 67 th meeting of the American Diabetes Association was held in Chicago on 22 - 26 June. This annual meeting continues to grow in size and scope and is a unique combination of basic science and medical science but also incorporates all aspects of healthcare and pharmaceutical business relating to the treatment of diabetes. The meeting was composed of general sessions, symposia summarizing the status of various fields of study and medical practice, together with both oral and poster presentations of new, previously unpublished research. The abstracts are published in Diabetes and a collection of the information can be found online with very useful summaries from the final day. These contain personalized summaries of key findings of the meetings as seen by key researches in the field. In this Meeting Highlights article, the key take-away messages are summarized from the author's point of view. PMID:17922635

  4. The Association between Childhood Physical Abuse and Heart Disease in Adulthood: Findings from a Representative Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Frank, John

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Although, the relationship between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease has been documented, very few studies have controlled for many of the known risk factors for heart disease. The objective of the current study, therefore, was to investigate the association between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease while…

  5. Associations of high HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and high HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the high HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the high HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the high HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188

  6. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Felix, Janine F.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Trompet, Stella; Wilk, Jemma B.; Gidlöf, Olof; Morley, Michael; Joehanes, Roby; Ligthart, Symen; Shan, Xiaoyin; Bis, Joshua C.; Sjögren, Marketa; Ngwa, Julius; Stott, David J.; Aguilar, David; Rice, Kenneth M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Demissie, Serkalem; Buckley, Brendan M.; Taylor, Kent D.; Ford, Ian; Yao, Chen; Liu, Chunyu; Sotoodehnia, Nona; van der Harst, Pim; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hofman, Albert; Moravec, Christine S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kellis, Manolis; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Dehghan, Abbas; Levy, Daniel; Olde, Björn; Psaty, Bruce M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Jukema, J. Wouter; Djousse, Luc; Franco, Oscar H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyer, Laurie A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Butler, Javed; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Smith, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% increased risk of death in subjects with heart failure (rs9885413, P = 2.7x10-9). We provide evidence from reporter gene assays, computational predictions and epigenomic marks that this polymorphism increases activity of an enhancer region active in multiple human tissues. The polymorphism was further reproducibly associated with a DNA methylation signature in whole blood (P = 4.5x10-40) that also associated with allergic sensitization and expression in blood of the cytokine TSLP (P = 1.1x10-4). Knockdown of the transcription factor predicted to bind the enhancer region (NHLH1) in a human cell line (HEK293) expressing NHLH1 resulted in lower TSLP expression. In addition, we observed evidence of recent positive selection acting on the risk allele in populations of African descent. Our findings provide novel genetic leads to factors that influence mortality in patients with heart failure. PMID:27149122

  7. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Gustav; Felix, Janine F; Morrison, Alanna C; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Trompet, Stella; Wilk, Jemma B; Gidlöf, Olof; Wang, Xinchen; Morley, Michael; Mendelson, Michael; Joehanes, Roby; Ligthart, Symen; Shan, Xiaoyin; Bis, Joshua C; Wang, Ying A; Sjögren, Marketa; Ngwa, Julius; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Stott, David J; Aguilar, David; Rice, Kenneth M; Sesso, Howard D; Demissie, Serkalem; Buckley, Brendan M; Taylor, Kent D; Ford, Ian; Yao, Chen; Liu, Chunyu; Sotoodehnia, Nona; van der Harst, Pim; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Liu, Yongmei; Gaziano, J Michael; Hofman, Albert; Moravec, Christine S; Uitterlinden, André G; Kellis, Manolis; van Meurs, Joyce B; Margulies, Kenneth B; Dehghan, Abbas; Levy, Daniel; Olde, Björn; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Jukema, J Wouter; Djousse, Luc; Franco, Oscar H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyer, Laurie A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Butler, Javed; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Cappola, Thomas P; Smith, Nicholas L

    2016-05-01

    Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% increased risk of death in subjects with heart failure (rs9885413, P = 2.7x10-9). We provide evidence from reporter gene assays, computational predictions and epigenomic marks that this polymorphism increases activity of an enhancer region active in multiple human tissues. The polymorphism was further reproducibly associated with a DNA methylation signature in whole blood (P = 4.5x10-40) that also associated with allergic sensitization and expression in blood of the cytokine TSLP (P = 1.1x10-4). Knockdown of the transcription factor predicted to bind the enhancer region (NHLH1) in a human cell line (HEK293) expressing NHLH1 resulted in lower TSLP expression. In addition, we observed evidence of recent positive selection acting on the risk allele in populations of African descent. Our findings provide novel genetic leads to factors that influence mortality in patients with heart failure. PMID:27149122

  8. [Case of congestive heart failure associated with hypereosinophilia developed during antibiotics treatment].

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Hagiwara, Kiyofumi; Matsuno, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Osamu

    2005-10-01

    A 92-year-old man with a history of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis received antibiotics for sepsis by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Enterococcus gallinarum. During the antibiotics treatment, skin eruptions, liver dysfunction, and hypereosinophilia developed, followed by dyspnea, congestive heart failure, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and diffuse mild myocardial hypokinesis. After the discontinuation of the antibiotics and the administration of steroid, skin eruptions, liver dysfunction, and hypereosinophilia improved parallel with the improvement of the congestive heart failure. Vancomycin hydrochloride and teicoplanin were suspected as the causative drugs on the basis of the treatment course. Although congestive heart failure is rare in the case of drug-induced hypereosinophilia, it is one of life-threatening complications. We describe herein a case of congestive heart failure associated with hypereosinophilia developed during antibiotics treatment, successfully treated with steroid after the discontinuation of the causative drug. PMID:16407668

  9. The Association of Urine Arsenic with Prevalent and Incident Chronic Kidney Disease: Evidence from the Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Laura Y.; Umans, Jason G.; Yeh, Fawn; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Guallar, Eliseo; Howard, Barbara V.; Weaver, Virginia M.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated associations between low to moderate arsenic levels and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective was to evaluate the associations of inorganic arsenic exposure with prevalent and incident CKD in American Indian adults. Methods We evaluated the associations of inorganic arsenic exposure with CKD in American Indians who participated in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) in 3,851 adults aged 45–74 years in a cross-sectional analysis, and 3,119 adults with follow-up data in a prospective analysis. Inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonate, and dimethylarsinate were measured in urine at baseline. CKD was defined as eGFR≤60 mL/min/1.73m2, kidney transplant or dialysis. Results CKD prevalence was 10.3%. The median (IQR) concentration of inorganic plus methylated arsenic species (total arsenic) in urine was 9.7 (5.8, 15.7) μg/L. The adjusted OR (95% CI) of prevalent CKD for an interquartile range in total arsenic was 0.7 (0.6, 0.8), mostly due to an inverse association with inorganic arsenic (OR 0.4 (0.3, 0.4)). Monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate were positively associated with prevalent CKD after adjustment for inorganic arsenic (OR 3.8 and 1.8). The adjusted HR of incident CKD for an IQR in ΣAs was 1.2 (1.03, 1.41). The corresponding HR for inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate were 1.0 (0.9, 1.2), 1.2 (1.00, 1.3) and 1.2 (1.0, 1.4). Conclusions The inverse association of urine inorganic arsenic with prevalent CKD suggests that kidney disease affects excretion of inorganic arsenic. Arsenic species were positively associated with incident CKD. Studies with repeated measures are needed to further characterize the relationship between arsenic and kidney disease development. PMID:25929811

  10. Associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with incident diabetes: the Strong Heart Family Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Barbara V; McKnight, Barbara; Duncan, Glen E; Beresford, Shirley AA; Mete, Mihriye; Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Zhang, Ying; Siscovick, David S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fifty percent of American Indians (AIs) develop diabetes by age 55 y. Whether processed meat is associated with the risk of diabetes in AIs, a rural population with a high intake of processed meat (eg, canned meats in general, referred to as “spam”) and a high rate of diabetes, is unknown. Objective: We examined the associations of usual intake of processed meat with incident diabetes in AIs. Design: This prospective cohort study included AI participants from the Strong Heart Family Study who were free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease at baseline and who participated in a 5-y follow-up examination (n = 2001). Dietary intake was ascertained by using a Block food-frequency questionnaire at baseline. Incident diabetes was defined on the basis of 2003 American Diabetes Association criteria. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations of dietary intake with incident diabetes. Results: We identified 243 incident cases of diabetes. In a comparison of upper and lower quartiles, intake of processed meat was associated with a higher risk of incident diabetes (OR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.63), after adjustment for potential confounders. The relation was particularly strong for spam (OR for the comparison of upper and lower quartiles: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.30, 3.27). Intake of unprocessed red meat was not associated with incident diabetes (OR for the comparison of upper and lower quartiles: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.59, 1.37). Conclusion: The consumption of processed meat, such as spam, but not unprocessed red meat, was associated with higher risk of diabetes in AIs, a rural population at high risk of diabetes and with limited access to healthy foods. PMID:22277554

  11. 77 FR 59659 - Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated... here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U... of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human...

  12. Association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with conotruncal heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sayin Kocakap, Beyza D; Sanli, Cihat; Cabuk, Feryal; Koc, Murat; Kutsal, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart diseases are common congenital anomalies with 1% prevalence worldwide and are associated with significant childhood morbidity and mortality. Among a wide range of aetiologically heterogeneous conditions, conotruncal anomalies account for approximately one-third of all congenital heart defects. The aetiology of conotruncal heart diseases is complex, with both environmental and genetic causes. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, which is often accompanied by the defects of folic acid metabolism, is known to cause conotruncal heart anomalies. In this study, we have evaluated three polymorphisms in the following two hyperhomocysteinaemia-related genes: methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and nicotinamide N-methyl transferase (NNMT rs694539) in 79 children with conotruncal heart disease and 99 children without conotruncal heart disease. Genotype distribution of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups. In the case group, AC and CC genotypes were higher than the control group (p<0.05). We have found that MTHFR A1298C polymorphism is associated with conotruncal heart disease; C allele (p=0.028), AC (OR[95% CI]=2.48[1.24-4.95], p=0.010), CC (OR[95% CI]=3.01[1.16-7.83], p=0.023), and AC+CC (OR[95% CI]=2.60[1.36-4.99], p=0.004) genotypes are more frequent in the patient group. Genotype distributions of the MTHFR C677T and NNMT rs694539 polymorphisms were similar in the two groups when evaluated separately and also according to the dominant genetic model (p>0.05). Our results suggest that MTHFR 1298C allele is a risk factor for conotruncal heart disease. PMID:25547204

  13. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Food and water safety.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Julie A; Nagy-Nero, Debe

    2009-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the public has the right to a safe food and water supply. The Association supports collaboration among food and nutrition professionals, academics, representatives of the agricultural and food industries, and appropriate government agencies to ensure the safety of the food and water supply by providing education to the public and industry, promoting technological innovation and applications, and supporting further research. New food and water safety issues evolve as the environment changes. Food and nutrition professionals should collaborate with food and agriculture industries and members of the medical community in a joint effort to address these issues. Recent food- and waterborne illnesses have occurred in new settings and/or unique foods not traditionally associated with foodborne illness outbreaks. New issues associated with food safety and security that have emerged support the need for continued education and research. Government programs have developed powerful tools such as FoodNet and PulseNet to detect food- and waterborne illness outbreaks in the United States. These government programs have provided the data to enhance public policy and educational programs such as FightBac! Mandatory and voluntary adoption of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points in the foodservice and processing industries have contributed to a decrease in foodborne illness outbreaks from traditional foods and some microorganisms usually associated with foodborne illnesses. Food and nutrition professionals are positioned to provide food and water safety education in community, clinical settings, and foodservice operations and food industries. With an aging population and an increased number of people at risk due to medical conditions for food- and waterborne illness, food and nutrition professionals should be involved in collaborative food and water safety issues in educational, research, and policy agenda settings. As

  14. Crisis and Opportunity: The Founding of the Association of American Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    It is not a surprise that presidents of American colleges formed an association. What is cause for wonder is why it took them so long. By 1869, there were 563 colleges in this nation. Yet not until 1914 did a handful of presidents feel the need to band together and found the Association of American Colleges (AAC). The Association of American…

  15. Association of genes of lipid metabolism with measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease in the Diabetes Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Burdon, K; Langefeld, C; Beck, S; Wagenknecht, L; Carr, J; Freedman, B; Herrington, D; Bowden, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lipid metabolism is affected by a range of genes and proteins. This study investigated whether some of these genes are associated with measures of subclinical CVD. Methods: Polymorphisms of paraoxonase 1 and 2, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase, and lipoprotein lipase were tested for associations with measures of subclinical CVD including carotid intima-media thickness measured by B-mode ultrasound and carotid and coronary arterial calcification measured by computed tomography. Analysis was performed in 620 European American participants in the Diabetes Heart Study, 83% of whom had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Associations of genotypes with subclinical CVD were tested by computing a series of generalised estimating equations. Results: The Q192R variant of paraoxonase 1 and rs285 of lipoprotein lipase were associated with carotid artery calcium (p values = 0.002 and 0.005, respectively). Paraoxonase 2 S311C was associated with coronary artery calcium (p value = 0.037). Conclusions: There is evidence for modest, but significant, association of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in lipid genes with measures of subclinical CVD. PMID:16141008

  16. [Actovegin treatment of duodenal ulcer associated with ischemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Smolianinov, A B

    2000-01-01

    Actovegin, a deproteinized hemoderivative, was used to correct bioenergetic defects of duodenal mucosa, to reduce inflammatory-cell infiltration, to stimulate blood supply of patients with duodenal ulcer associated with ischemic heart disease or diabetes mellitus. As shown by the results obtained in 194 patients (119 males and 75 females), adjuvant actovegin in patients with duodenal ulcer associated with ischemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus stimulates the ulcer healing, prolongs the recurrence-free interval. It can be used both in outpatient departments and specialized hospitals. PMID:10900865

  17. Double Aneuploidy 48,XXY,+21 Associated with a Congenital Heart Defect in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Shu, X; Zou, C; Shen, Z

    2013-12-01

    A neonate with a double aneuploidy associated with congenital heart defect (CHD) suffered from cyanosis after birth. He had typical features of Down syndrome (DS) including hypertelorism, slightly lowset ears with protruding pinna. Doppler echocardiography indicated complex congenital heart disease with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect, enlarged right ventricle, and mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. Further chromosomal analysis showed a karyotype of 48,XXY,+21: a double aneuploidy of DS and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). Until now, only seven cases of double aneuploidy associated with CHD defect have been reported. PMID:24778570

  18. “I Just Can’t Do It Anymore” Patterns of Physical Activity and Cardiac Rehabilitation in African Americans with Heart Failure: A Mixed Method Study

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Katz, Stuart D.; Schipper, Judith; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation (CR) are components of heart failure (HF) self-care. The aims of this study were to describe patterns of physical activity in African Americans (n = 30) with HF and to explore experience in CR. This was a mixed method, concurrent nested, predominantly qualitative study. Qualitative data were collected via interviews exploring typical physical activity, and CR experience. It was augmented by quantitative data measuring HF severity, self-care, functional capacity and depressive symptoms. Mean age was 60 ± 15 years; 65% were New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III HF. Forty-three percent reported that they did less than 30 min of exercise in the past week; 23% were told “nothing” about exercise by their provider, and 53% were told to do “minimal exercise”. A measure of functional capacity indicated the ability to do moderate activity. Two related themes stemmed from the narratives describing current physical activity: “given up” and “still trying”. Six participants recalled referral to CR with one person participating. There was high concordance between qualitative and quantitative data, and evidence that depression may play a role in low levels of physical activity. Findings highlight the need for strategies to increase adherence to current physical activity guidelines in this older minority population with HF. PMID:27417807

  19. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  20. Tacrolimus-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Gray, James M; Ameduri, Rebecca K

    2016-09-01

    HUS is a well-known entity primarily associated with bacterial infection and is characterized by a classic triad of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and kidney injury. Its atypical form has been associated with calcineurin inhibitors and has been extensively discussed in renal transplantation. We present a case of tacrolimus-associated HUS in a pediatric heart transplant recipient, which we believe to be previously unreported in the literature. PMID:27371345

  1. A review of the postulated mechanisms concerning the association of Helicobacter pylori with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Manolakis, Anastassios; Kapsoritakis, Andreas N; Potamianos, Spiros P

    2007-08-01

    Since its discovery, Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, both digestive and extradigestive. Interestingly, the majority of the extradigestive-related literature is focused on two vascular manifestations: stroke and ischemic heart disease. Potential mechanisms for the establishment of a H. pylori-induced ischemic heart disease have been proposed with regard to chronic inflammation, molecular mimicry, oxidative modifications, endothelial dysfunction, direct effect of the microorganism on atherosclerotic plaques as well as changes regarding traditional or novel risk factors for ischemic heart disease or even platelet-H. pylori interactions. A positive link between H. pylori infection and ischemic heart disease has been suggested by a series of studies focusing on epidemiologic evidence, dyslipidemic alterations, upregulation of inflammatory markers or homocysteine levels, induction of hypercoagulability, oxidation of low-density lipoprotein, causation of impaired endothelial function, detection of H. pylori DNA in atherosclerotic plaques, and participation of certain antigens and antibodies in a cross-reactivity model. There are studies, however, which investigated the relationship between H. pylori and ischemic heart disease with regard to the same parameters and failed to confirm the suggested positive association. Further studies in the direction of interaction between H. pylori and the host's genotype as well as a quest for evidence towards novel risk factors for ischemic heart disease such as oxidative stress, vascular remodeling, vascular calcification, or vasomotor activity, may reveal a field of great interest, thus contributing to the determination of new potential mechanisms. PMID:17669100

  2. Psychosocial factors associated with youth involvement in community activities promoting heart health.

    PubMed

    Altman, D G; Feighery, E; Robinson, T N; Haydel, K F; Strausberg, L; Lorig, K; Killen, J D

    1998-08-01

    This study examined factors that influence youth participation in heart disease prevention activities among 2,609 ninth graders in six inner-city public high schools. Constructs derived from social cognitive, empowerment, and community development theories informed the conceptual framework employed. Study participants were diverse with respect to gender, ethnicity, parent education, acculturation, and academic achievement. Perceived incentive value, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, sense of community, and perceived policy control were all significantly associated with participation in community activities promoting heart health. In multivariate analyses, perceived incentive value, defined as the extent to which participants valued a heart-healthy environment, was most strongly associated with community participation, accounting for 11.9% of the total variance. These findings have implications for designing school curricula and after-school and community programs targeting adolescents' involvement in health advocacy activities. PMID:9690106

  3. Age-associated Pro-inflammatory Remodeling and Functional Phenotype in the Heart and Large Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-01-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging–associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure. PMID:25665458

  4. DIETARY ASSESSMENT IN AFRICAN AMERICANS: METHODS USED IN THE JACKSON HEART STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: The dietary assessment methods used in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) with the entire cohort and a subset of the cohort who participated in a diet and physical activity substudy (DPASS) are reported. These methods were employed to validate culturally explicit data collection instruments d...

  5. Mastery Motivational Climate: Influence on Physical Play and Heart Rate in African American Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Loraine E.; Rudisill, Mary E.; St. Onge, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a planned mastery motivational physical play session on physical activity (i.e., heart rate [HR] and physical play intensity [PAHR greater than 50]) in toddlers (N = 21), as compared to a nonplanned free play session. Participants wore a monitor to measure HR over two, 30 min play…

  6. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19–3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10–2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17–2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  7. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Albert C; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lu, Tse-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan; Sung, Shih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19-3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10-2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17-2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  8. Parental Factors Associated with Mexican American Adolescent Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to further the understanding of how parenting and the relationship between the parent and the youth influence adolescent alcohol use in Mexican American families, with particular attention to acculturation. Results indicated that parental warmth is a strong factor in predicting adolescent alcohol use among Mexican adolescents. The parent-youth relationship played an important role in lowering alcohol use for Mexican American youth. Acculturation has an impact on the level of warmth, control, and the parent-youth relationship for Mexican American families. Findings indicate that there are unique family mechanisms for Mexican American families that should be considered when developing prevention and treatment options. PMID:24804138

  9. Sex and race differences in the prevalence of Fatty Liver Disease as measured by CT liver attenuation in European American and African American participants of the NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    North, K.E.; Graff, M; Franceschini, N.; Reiner, A.P.; Feitosa, M.F.; Carr, J.J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Borecki, I.B.

    2011-01-01

    Liver attenuation (LA) (Hounsfield Units, HU) by computed tomography (CT) is a validated quantitative measure inversely related to liver fat burden. We examined race-and sex- differences on the distribution of LA (one of the first stages of fatty liver disease) and the predictors of these mean differences in European American (EA) and African American (AA) participants of the Family Heart Study. A total of 1242 (1064 EA, 178 AA) and 1477 (1150 EA, 327 AA) men and women, respectively, underwent CT examination from which LA and abdominal adipose volume were measured. LA (adjusted for phantom and field center) was the dependent variable in linear mixed models (to control for family relatedness) that tested for mean differences by race and by sex. Independent explanatory variables included age, body mass index, visceral adipose tissue volume, subcutaneous adipose tissue volume, alcohol consumption, TG, HDL-C, and insulin resistance. Mean LA varied significantly by sex, [(men) 57.76 ±10.03 HU and (women) 60.03 ±10.91 HU, p=0.0002], but not by race. Higher LA was associated with older age, while higher values of VAT, triglycerides, and insulin resistance were associated with lower LA in men and women. In contrast, alcohol consumption and BMI were associated with lower LA only among men. In analyses stratified by race LA was associated with alcohol consumption, VAT, and insulin resistance in both EA and AA and with age, BMI, and HDL-C in EA participants only. Our study findings confirm that there are important sex differences and race by sex interaction effects on the distribution of liver attenuation, the prevalence of FLD, and on the influence of metabolic risk factors on LA and FLD. PMID:21900826

  10. Whole-exome imputation of sequence variants identified two novel alleles associated with adult body height in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mengmeng; Auer, Paul L.; Jiao, Shuo; Haessler, Jeffrey; Altshuler, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Carlson, Christopher S.; Carty, Cara L.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Curtis, Keith; Franceschini, Nora; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca; Lange, Leslie A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Monda, Keri L.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, James G.; North, Kari; Kooperberg, Charles; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Adult body height is a quantitative trait for which genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci, primarily in European populations. These loci, comprising common variants, explain <10% of the phenotypic variance in height. We searched for novel associations between height and common (minor allele frequency, MAF ≥5%) or infrequent (0.5% < MAF < 5%) variants across the exome in African Americans. Using a reference panel of 1692 African Americans and 471 Europeans from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), we imputed whole-exome sequence data into 13 719 African Americans with existing array-based GWAS data (discovery). Variants achieving a height-association threshold of P < 5E−06 in the imputed dataset were followed up in an independent sample of 1989 African Americans with whole-exome sequence data (replication). We used P < 2.5E−07 (=0.05/196 779 variants) to define statistically significant associations in meta-analyses combining the discovery and replication sets (N = 15 708). We discovered and replicated three independent loci for association: 5p13.3/C5orf22/rs17410035 (MAF = 0.10, β = 0.64 cm, P = 8.3E−08), 13q14.2/SPRYD7/rs114089985 (MAF = 0.03, β = 1.46 cm, P = 4.8E−10) and 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 (MAF = 0.30; β = 0.47 cm; P = 4.7E−09). Conditional analyses suggested 5p13.3 (C5orf22/rs17410035) and 13q14.2 (SPRYD7/rs114089985) may harbor novel height alleles independent of previous GWAS-identified variants (r2 with GWAS loci <0.01); whereas 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 was correlated with GWAS-identified variants in European and African populations. Notably, 13q14.2/rs114089985 is infrequent in African Americans (MAF = 3%), extremely rare in European Americans (MAF = 0.03%), and monomorphic in Asian populations, suggesting it may be an African-American-specific height allele. Our findings demonstrate that whole-exome imputation of sequence variants can identify low

  11. Association Between Toxoplasma gondii Exposure and Heart Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Salcedo-Jaquez, Misael; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Rabago-Sanchez, Elizabeth; Beristain-Garcia, Isabel; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Estrada-Martinez, Sergio; Perez-Alamos, Alma Rosa; Alvarado-Soto, Ediyair

    2016-01-01

    Background The parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes infections all around the world. Infections with T. gondii are systemic and the parasite can persist in the heart muscle. Very little is known about the impact of T. gondii on patients with heart disease. We determined the association between T. gondii exposure and patients suffering from heart diseases attending in a public hospital in Durango, Mexico; the association of T. gondii exposure with socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics of these patients was also investigated. Methods Through a case-control study, we examined the seroprevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in 400 patients with heart diseases and 400 age- and gender-matched controls using enzyme-linked immunoassays. In addition, we analyzed the association of patient characteristics as determined by a standardized questionnaire with T. gondii exposure by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Fifty-five (13.8%) of 400 patients and 32 (8.0%) of 400 controls had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies (odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15 - 2.90; P = 0.01). High anti-T. gondii IgG levels (> 150 IU/mL) were found in 28 (50.9%) of the 55 positive cases and in 14 (43.8%) of the 32 positive controls (P = 0.51). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in 13 (23.6%) of the 55 anti-T. gondii IgG positive patients and in 19 (59.4%) of 32 anti-T. gondii IgG positive controls (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.08 - 0.54; P = 0.0008). Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii exposure was positively associated with being born out of Durango State (OR = 2.93; 95% CI: 1.40 - 6.13; P = 0.004), and with consumption of alcohol (OR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.01 - 4.12; P = 0.04). Conclusions Results obtained in this study indicate that T. gondii infection is associated with heart disease, and suggest that heart disease might be related with a chronic infection. This is the first report of an association of T. gondii exposure with alcohol

  12. Association rule discovery with the train and test approach for heart disease prediction.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Carlos

    2006-04-01

    Association rules represent a promising technique to improve heart disease prediction. Unfortunately, when association rules are applied on a medical data set, they produce an extremely large number of rules. Most of such rules are medically irrelevant and the time required to find them can be impractical. A more important issue is that, in general, association rules are mined on the entire data set without validation on an independent sample. To solve these limitations, we introduce an algorithm that uses search constraints to reduce the number of rules, searches for association rules on a training set, and finally validates them on an independent test set. The medical significance of discovered rules is evaluated with support, confidence, and lift. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with heart disease. In medical terms, association rules relate heart perfusion measurements and risk factors to the degree of disease in four specific arteries. Search constraints and test set validation significantly reduce the number of association rules and produce a set of rules with high predictive accuracy. We exhibit important rules with high confidence, high lift, or both, that remain valid on the test set on several runs. These rules represent valuable medical knowledge. PMID:16617622

  13. American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges Quarterly; Vol. XVI, Nos. 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAWCJC Quarterly, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges (AAWCJC), an affiliated council of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC), produces the "Quarterly" to disseminate information pertinent to the AAWCJC membership and to provide a forum for the discussion of current issues and events. Each issue of the…

  14. The American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation: Tracing Our Roots to 1939

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2005, AAPAR was born from the American Association for Active Lifestyles and Fitness (AAALF) and the American Association for Leisure and Recreation (AALR), thus providing a home for special-interest subjects that do not fit neatly into the other units of the Alliance. This article includes a brief history of AAPAR with a focus on its…

  15. 77 FR 17068 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Application by the American Association for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Deeming...: Final notice. SUMMARY: This final notice announces our decision to approve the American Association for... 28, 2011, we published a proposed notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 66929) announcing...

  16. "My Heart Beats in Two Places": Immigration Stories in Korean-American Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi, Joanne H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of immigration on Korean children through a content and literary analysis of 14 children's picture books. A majority of published children's literature dealing with the subject of Korean Americans or Korean immigration contains culturally specific themes common to the Korean immigration experience. These…

  17. A Preliminary Study of Potential Dietary Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease among Chinese American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Wei Yue; Chen, W. William

    1994-01-01

    This study compared dietary knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and patterns between Chinese American middle school students and their Chinese equivalents. Chinese students had less knowledge and less favorable attitudes but more positive behavioral factors affecting diet. They consumed less meat, dairy products, fat, sweets, and snacks and ate more…

  18. Indian Heart/White Man's Head: Native-American Teachers in Indian Schools, 1880-1930

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gere, Anne Ruggles

    2005-01-01

    The figure of the Native-American teacher remains largely absent in histories of the teaching profession in this country and of the government-operated Indian schools that emerged and flourished at the turn of the last century. At a time when a growing literature is enlarging the understanding of what schooling has meant and means to minority…

  19. Political Economy of American Education: Democratic Citizenship in the Heart of Empire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Thomas Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chief among the goals of American education is the cultivation of democratic citizens. Contrary to State catechism delivered through our schools, America was not born a democracy; rather it emerged as a republic with a distinct bias against democracy. Nonetheless we inherit a great demotic heritage. Abolition, the labor struggle, women's…

  20. Encephalitis-associated hospitalizations among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Mehal, Jason M; Holman, Robert C; Vora, Neil M; Blanton, Jesse; Gordon, Paul H; Cheek, James E

    2014-04-01

    Encephalitis produces considerable morbidity in the United States, but morbidity rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have not been described. Hospitalization records listing an encephalitis diagnosis were analyzed by using Indian Health Service direct/contract inpatient data. For 1998-2010, there were 436 encephalitis-associated hospitalizations among AI/AN people, an average annual age-adjusted hospitalization rate of 3.1/100,000 population. The rate for infants (11.9) was more than double that for any other age group. Death occurred for 4.1% of hospitalizations. Consistent with reports for the general U.S. population, the rate was high among infants and most (53.9%) hospitalizations were of unexplained etiology. The average annual rate during the study period appeared lower than for the general U.S. population, due particularly to lower rates in the elderly. Future community-based surveillance and mortality studies are needed to confirm these findings and examine reasons underlying the low rates of encephalitis in AI/AN people. PMID:24515941

  1. The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Travis; Templeton, M.; Price, A.; Henden, A.

    2006-12-01

    Founded in 1911 and headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) is a non-profit worldwide scientific and educational organization of professional and amateur astronomers dedicated to the observing and research of variable stars. The AAVSO International Database has over 13 million observations contributed by over 2,500 observers from around the world. The AAVSO receives thousands of data requests per year from the astronomical community. AAVSO observers also contribute to active research programs and community support activities like target-of-opportunity monitoring and coordinated observing campaigns, as well as providing early notification of rare events like novae and supernovae. In 2006, the AAVSO received over 700,000 new observations. Approximately 2/3rds were photometric (UBVRIJH) and about 3/5ths of AAVSO active observers reside outside the United States. The AAVSO is also active in training amateurs in observing techniques, data mining, and data analysis and also runs an active education and public outreach (E/PO) program including the NSF-funded Hands-On Astrophysics Curriculum. AAVSO data is available for download in near real-time at www.aavso.org.

  2. Mirror syndrome associated with heart failure in a pregnant woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Gu, Wei-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Mirror syndrome is also known as Ballantyne syndrome, maternal hydrops, triple edema and pseudotoxemia. The disease can be difficult to diagnose, is related to pregnancy and can grievously endanger the health of both the mother and fetus. The pathogenesis of the disease has not been fully elucidated, and this disease may be confused with preeclampsia, even though distinguishing features can be identified. In this report case, we describe a pregnant woman who suffered from mirror syndrome associated with heart failure. After delivery, the heart failure symptoms also disappeared. PMID:26629125

  3. 77 FR 70446 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... a proposed notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 37678) announcing AAAASF's request for continued... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for Continuing CMS... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for continued recognition as...

  4. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Approval of Deeming Authority for Rural... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice...

  5. Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research

  6. Heart rhythm disturbances associated with rupatadine: a case series from the Spanish and Portuguese pharmacovigilance systems.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, A; Macías, D; Salado, I; Sáinz, M; Ortega, S; Campo, C; García del Pozo, J; Martín Arias, L H; Velasco, A; Gonçalves, S; Pombal, R; Carmona, R

    2009-05-01

    We searched the Spanish and Portuguese pharmacovigilance databases for spontaneous case reports of heart rhythm disturbances associated with rupatadine and other new H1 antihistamines. Five cases were found involving patients treated with rupatadine (13.9% of all reports relating to this drug). In all five cases, the reaction started after exposure and resolved when the drug was discontinued. In two cases, rupatadine was the only medication being taken by the patient, and no other condition that could explain the heart rhythm disturbances was diagnosed. The reporting odds ratio was 3.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-10.5). The reporting rate was 2 cases per 100,000 patients treated per year (95% confidence interval, 0.4-6.0). These results suggest a causal relationship between rupatadine and heart rhythm disturbances. PMID:19225450

  7. Prevalence and Changes over Time of Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics among African-Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Petrone, Andrew B.; Blackshear, Chad; Griswold, Michael; Harman, Jane L; Clark, Cheryl R; Talegawkar, Sameera; Hickson, DeMarc A; Gaziano, J. Michael; Dubbert, Patricia M; Correa, Adolfo; Tucker, Katherine L; Taylor, Herman A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence and changes over time of ideal Life’s Simple Seven (LSS) in African-Americans. Methods Prospective cohort of 5301 African-Americans from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) from 2000 to 2013. Each of the LSS metrics was categorized as poor, intermediate, or ideal. Results Among men, the prevalence of having 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 ideal LSS was 3.3%, 23.0%, 33.5%, 24.7%, 11.6%, 3.6%, 0.3%, and 0%, respectively. Corresponding values for women were 1.7%, 26.3%, 33.1%, 22.8%, 11.9%, 3.7%, 0.6%, and 0%. Prevalence of ideal diet was 0.9%. The proportions of those meeting LSS ideal recommendations for cholesterol and fasting glucose declined from the first through third JHS visits across all age groups, whereas prevalence of ideal BMI declined only in participants <40 years at a given visit. Prevalence of ideal blood pressure did not change over time and being ideal on physical activity improved from the first [18.3% (95% CI: 17.3% to 19.3%)] to third visit [24.8% (95% CI: 23.3% to 26.3%)]. Conclusions Our data show a low prevalence of ideal LSS (especially diet, physical activity, and obesity) in the JHS and a slight improvement in adherence to physical activity recommendations over time. PMID:25712326

  8. ALOHA to women's heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Kimberly J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the American Heart Association, ALOHA program. ALOHA is a multidisciplinary approach to helping lay people and clinicians determine the best course of action for managing cardiac risk factors in women. ALOHA, an acronym that stands for designated interventions based on individualized assessment of patients, along with the Framingham risk assessment calculator, allows health care providers with their patients to individualize treatment for heart disease and management of risk factors. PMID:16699352

  9. Associations between being overweight, variability in heart rate, and well-being in the young men.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Klaus; Schönlebe, Jana; Drexler, Hans; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system have been repeatedly shown in hypertension. We studied the associations between being overweight, blood pressure, cardiac vagal tone as measured by variability in heart rate, and well-being in a large cohort of young men. We hypothesised an inverse correlation between body mass index and the variability in heart rate. Further, we assessed systolic and diastolic blood pressure as traditional indicators of cardiovascular risk. Exclusion criteria were the use of drugs or pharmaceuticals. The following data from 786 men with a mean age of 19.4 years (standard deviation = 1.4, with a range from 16 to 24 years) were analysed in a cross-sectional study: body mass index, sleep duration, sporting activities, psychological well-being, blood pressure, heart rate, and variability in heart rate. Despite the young age of the men in this study, increased values for the body mass index were already associated with a shift in sympathovagal balance trending towards sympathetic dominance. There was also a significant positive correlation between body mass index and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that significant factors, which were associated with variability in heart rate, were body mass index and sporting activities. In addition, sporting activity and sleep duration had a significant positive impact on psychological well-being. Even in young men, being overweight is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, especially an increased sympathetic and/or lowered cardiovascular tone and increased blood pressure. Our study gives additional motivation for the early prevention and treatment of obesity in childhood and adolescence. PMID:20144255

  10. A Heart and A Mind: Self-distancing Facilitates the Association Between Heart Rate Variability, and Wise Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Igor; Sahdra, Baljinder K; Ciarrochi, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac vagal tone (indexed via resting heart rate variability [HRV]) has been previously associated with superior executive functioning. Is HRV related to wiser reasoning and less biased judgments? Here we hypothesize that this will be the case when adopting a self-distanced (as opposed to a self-immersed) perspective, with self-distancing enabling individuals with higher HRV to overcome bias-promoting egocentric impulses and to reason wisely. However, higher HRV may not be associated with greater wisdom when adopting a self-immersed perspective. Participants were randomly assigned to reflect on societal issues from a self-distanced- or self-immersed perspective, with responses coded for reasoning quality. In a separate task, participants read about and evaluated a person performing morally ambiguous actions, with responses coded for dispositional vs. situational attributions. We simultaneously assessed resting cardiac recordings, obtaining six HRV indicators. As hypothesized, in the self-distanced condition, each HRV indicator was positively related to prevalence of wisdom-related reasoning (e.g., prevalence of recognition of limits of one's knowledge, recognition that the world is in flux/change, consideration of others' opinions and search for an integration of these opinions) and to balanced vs. biased attributions (recognition of situational and dispositional factors vs. focus on dispositional factors alone). In contrast, there was no relationship between these variables in the self-immersed condition. We discuss implications for research on psychophysiology, cognition, and wisdom. PMID:27092066

  11. A Heart and A Mind: Self-distancing Facilitates the Association Between Heart Rate Variability, and Wise Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Igor; Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac vagal tone (indexed via resting heart rate variability [HRV]) has been previously associated with superior executive functioning. Is HRV related to wiser reasoning and less biased judgments? Here we hypothesize that this will be the case when adopting a self-distanced (as opposed to a self-immersed) perspective, with self-distancing enabling individuals with higher HRV to overcome bias-promoting egocentric impulses and to reason wisely. However, higher HRV may not be associated with greater wisdom when adopting a self-immersed perspective. Participants were randomly assigned to reflect on societal issues from a self-distanced- or self-immersed perspective, with responses coded for reasoning quality. In a separate task, participants read about and evaluated a person performing morally ambiguous actions, with responses coded for dispositional vs. situational attributions. We simultaneously assessed resting cardiac recordings, obtaining six HRV indicators. As hypothesized, in the self-distanced condition, each HRV indicator was positively related to prevalence of wisdom-related reasoning (e.g., prevalence of recognition of limits of one’s knowledge, recognition that the world is in flux/change, consideration of others’ opinions and search for an integration of these opinions) and to balanced vs. biased attributions (recognition of situational and dispositional factors vs. focus on dispositional factors alone). In contrast, there was no relationship between these variables in the self-immersed condition. We discuss implications for research on psychophysiology, cognition, and wisdom. PMID:27092066

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wood, O B; Bruhn, C M

    2000-02-01

    Food irradiation has been identified a sa safe technology to reduce the risk of foodborne illness as part of high-quality food production, processing, handling, and preparation. Food irradiation's history of scientific research , evaluation, and testing spans more than 40 countries around the world and it has been endorsed or support by numerous national and international food and organizations and professional groups. Food irradiation utilizes a source of ionizing energy that passes through food to destroy harmful bacteria and other organism. Often referred to as "cold pasteurization," food irradiation offers negligible loss of nutrients or sensory qualities in food as it does not substantially raise the temperature of the food during processing. Food irradiation does not replace proper food production, processing, handling, or preparation, nor can it enhance the quality of or prevent contact with foodborne bacteria after irradiation. In the United States, manufacturers are required to identify irradiated food sold to consumers with an international symbol (Radura) and and terminology describing the process on product labels. In addiction, food irradiation facilities are thoroughly regulated and monitored for worker and environmental safety. Members of The American Dietetic Association (ADA) and other food, nutrition, and health professionals have a responsibility to educate consumers, food processors, manufacturers and retailers about the safety and application of the technology. When consumers are educated about food irradiation, many prefer irradiated products because of their increased safety. It is the position of ADA that food irradiation enhances the safety and quality of the food supply and helps protect consumers from foodborne illness. The ADA encourages the government, food manufactures, food commodity groups, and qualified food and nutrition professionals to work together to educate consumers about this additional food safety tool and make this choice

  13. Native American Perceptions of the National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics: In Their Own Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Plemons, Bradford W.; Starr, Edward; Reyes, Raymond; Fleming, Candace; Latimer, Anna; Trimble, Joseph E.

    The National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics (NANACOA) initiated a strategy in 1995 to evaluate their programs and prevention efforts. The design and methodology of the project incorporated a "naturalistic" approach to help preserve cultural integrity and respect multiple perspectives. Data were gathered from archival…

  14. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Heart and Blood Vessels Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung and Blood Institute American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your heart and blood vessels healthy ...

  15. Association of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration with Heart Disease: Evidence from NHANES 2003/06

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, David; Rice, Neil E.; Lewis, Ceri; Henley, William E.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical widely used in food and drinks packaging. Associations have previously been reported between urinary BPA concentrations and heart disease, diabetes and liver enzymes in adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003/04. We aimed to estimate associations between urinary BPA concentrations and health measures in NHANES 2005/06 and in data pooled across collection years. Methodology and Findings A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES: subjects were n = 1455 (2003/04) and n = 1493 (2005/06) adults aged 18–74 years, representative of the general adult population of the United States. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, smoking, BMI, waist circumference, and urinary creatinine concentration. Main outcomes were reported diagnoses of heart attack, coronary heart disease, angina and diabetes and serum liver enzyme levels. Urinary BPA concentrations in 2005/06 (geometric mean 1.79 ng/ml, 95% CI: 1.64 to 1.96) were lower than in 2003/04 (2.49 ng/ml, CI: 2.20 to 2.83, difference p-value = 0.00002). Higher BPA concentrations were associated with coronary heart disease in 2005/06 (OR per z-score increase in BPA = 1.33, 95%CI: 1.01 to 1.75, p = 0.043) and in pooled data (OR = 1.42, CI: 1.17 to 1.72, p = 0.001). Associations with diabetes did not reach significance in 2005/06, but pooled estimates remained significant (OR = 1.24, CI: 1.10 to 1.40, p = 0.001). There was no overall association with gamma glutamyl transferase concentrations, but pooled associations with alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase remained significant. Conclusions Higher BPA exposure, reflected in higher urinary concentrations of BPA, is consistently associated with reported heart disease in the general adult population of the USA. Studies to clarify the mechanisms of these associations are urgently needed. PMID

  16. Mastery motivational climate: influence on physical play and heart rate in African American toddlers.

    PubMed

    Parish, Loraine E; Rudisill, Mary E; St Onge, Paul M

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a planned mastery motivational physical play session on physical activity (i.e., heart rate [HR] and physical play intensity [PAHR > 50]) in toddlers (N = 21), as compared to a nonplanned free play session. Participants wore a monitor to measure HR over two, 30 min play conditions. A multivariate analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate the effect of the play conditions. A significant difference between conditions and physiological measures revealed that the mastery motivational physical play session resulted in higher HR and PAHR > 50 when compared to free play. These findings suggest the mastery motivational session resulted in more vigorous physical play in toddlers than free play. PMID:17679490

  17. Long-term heart disease and stroke mortality among former American prisoners of war of World War II and the Korean Conflict: results of a 50-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Page, W F; Brass, L M

    2001-09-01

    For the first 30 years after repatriation, former American prisoners of war (POWs) of World War II and the Korean Conflict had lower death rates for heart disease and stroke than non-POW veteran controls and the U.S. population, but subsequent morbidity data suggested that this survival advantage may have disappeared. We used U.S. federal records to obtain death data through 1996 and used proportional hazards analysis to compare the mortality experience of POWs and controls. POWs aged 75 years and older showed a significantly higher risk of heart disease deaths than controls (hazard ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.56), and their stroke mortality was also increased, although not significantly (hazard ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.91). These results suggest that circulatory disease sequelae of serious, acute malnutrition and the stresses associated with imprisonment may not appear until after many decades. PMID:11569446

  18. Association between asthma and obesity among immigrant Asian Americans, California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Benjamin J; Scroggins, Christy M; Becerra, Monideepa B

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to study the comorbidity of asthma and obesity among foreign-born Asian Americans, by subgroups. Public data from the California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011, were analyzed by using independent logistic regressions, yielding the association between asthma and obesity (Asian and standard cutoffs for body mass index [BMIs]) of 19,841 Asian American immigrant respondents. Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, and Japanese immigrants had a positive association between lifetime asthma and obesity, whereas among Korean immigrants, a positive association was found between lifetime asthma and overweight status (standard BMI cutoffs). Routine screening for this comorbidity is warranted among immigrant Asian Americans. PMID:25427317

  19. Association between Characteristics of Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients with Their Needs

    PubMed Central

    Polikandrioti, Maria; Goudevenos, John; Michalis, Lampros K.; Koutelekos, Ioannis G.; Georgiadi, Elpida; Karakostas, Constantine; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During recent years that life expectancy of heart failure patients has been increased, health professionals put more emphasis on assessing their needs in daily clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between characteristics of hospitalized heart failure patients with their needs. Methods: A sample of 190 hospitalized patients with HF, recruited from public hospitals in Greece, was enrolled in the study. Data were collected by the completion of a questionnaire which included socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the questionnaire “Needs of hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease” which is consisted of 6 subscales. Statistical methods used were Kruskal wallis-test or Mann-Whitney test and Spearmans’ rho coefficient. Multiple regression analysis was performed in order to evaluate the association between patients’ characteristics and the significance of their needs. Results: 124 (65.3%) of hospitalized heart failure participants were men and 89 (46.8%) of participants were more than 70 years old. 145 (76.3%) had prior experience of hospitalization due to heart failure. The need for support and guidance was statistically significantly associated with the degree of information, (p=<0.001). The need for information from the medical and nursing staff was significantly associated with marital status and degree of information (p=0.001 and p<0.001 respectively). The need for need for being in contact with other patient groups, and ensuring communication with relatives was statistically significantly associated with the professional status and degree of information, (p=0.037 and p=<0.001 respectively). The need for individualized treatment and the need for patient’s personal participation to his/her treatment as well as the need to meet the emotional and physical needs were statistically significant associated with the degree of information, (p=<0.001, p=<0.001 respectively). Lastly, the

  20. Are CRIS Cluster Patterns Differentially Associated with African American Enculturation and Social Distance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Korell, Shannon; Vandiver, Beverly J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether Black racial identity cluster patterns, using Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores, were differentially associated with preference for African American culture and social distance from various cultural groups. African American college students (N = 351) completed the CRIS, an enculturation scale, and a social…

  1. 77 FR 59616 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Proposed Notice On May 25, 2012, we published a proposed notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 31361... American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/HFAP) Application for... decision to approve the American Osteopathic Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/ HFAP)...

  2. Practice Paper of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrient Density: Meeting Nutrient Goals within Calorie Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although nutrient density is a core nutrition concept of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, there is currently no scientifically valid definition for either nutrient density or nutrient-dense food. The purposes of this American Dietetic Association Practice Paper are to summarize the current...

  3. Embolization of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformations Associated with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesekera, N. T. Padley, S. P.; Kazmi, F.; Davies, C. L.; McCall, J. M.

    2009-09-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare cause of vaginal bleeding and miscarriage. We report two cases of uterine AVMs in patients with a history of complex congenital heart disease, an association that has not been previously described. Both patients were treated by selective uterine artery embolization, a minimally invasive therapy that has revolutionized the management of uterine AVMs, thus offering an alternative to conventional hysterectomy.

  4. The association between noise exposure and blood pressure and ischemic heart disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    van Kempen, Elise E M M; Kruize, Hanneke; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Ameling, Caroline B; Staatsen, Brigit A M; de Hollander, Augustinus E M

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that noise exposure is associated with blood pressure changes and ischemic heart disease risk, but epidemiologic evidence is still limited. Furthermore, most reviews investigating these relations were not carried out in a systematic way, which makes them more prone to bias. We conducted a meta-analysis of 43 epidemiologic studies published between 1970 and 1999 that investigate the relation between noise exposure (both occupational and community) and blood pressure and/or ischemic heart disease (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes 410-414). We studied a wide range of effects, from blood pressure changes to a myocardial infarction. With respect to the association between noise exposure and blood pressure, small blood pressure differences were evident. Our meta-analysis showed a significant association for both occupational noise exposure and air traffic noise exposure and hypertension: We estimated relative risks per 5 dB(A) noise increase of 1.14 (1.01-1.29) and 1.26 (1.14-1.39), respectively. Air traffic noise exposure was positively associated with the consultation of a general practitioner or specialist, the use of cardiovascular medicines, and angina pectoris. In cross-sectional studies, road traffic noise exposure increases the risk of myocardial infarction and total ischemic heart disease. Although we can conclude that noise exposure can contribute to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, the evidence for a relation between noise exposure and ischemic heart disease is still inconclusive because of the limitations in exposure characterization, adjustment for important confounders, and the occurrence of publication bias. PMID:11882483

  5. Association between Spirituality and Adherence to Management in Outpatients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Juglans Souto; Goldraich, Livia Adams; Nunes, Alice Hoefel; Zandavalli, Mônica Cristina Brugalli; Zandavalli, Rafaela Brugalli; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Rocha, Neusa Sica; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Clausell, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirituality may influence how patients cope with their illness. Objectives We assessed whether spirituality may influence adherence to management of outpatients with heart failure. Methods Cross sectional study enrolling consecutive ambulatory heart failure patients in whom adherence to multidisciplinary treatment was evaluated. Patients were assessed for quality of life, depression, religiosity and spirituality utilizing validated questionnaires. Correlations between adherence and psychosocial variables of interest were obtained. Logistic regression models explored independent predictors of adherence. Results One hundred and thirty patients (age 60 ± 13 years; 67% male) were interviewed. Adequate adherence score was observed in 38.5% of the patients. Neither depression nor religiosity was correlated to adherence, when assessed separately. Interestingly, spirituality, when assessed by both total score sum (r = 0.26; p = 0.003) and by all specific domains, was positively correlated to adherence. Finally, the combination of spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs was an independent predictor of adherence when adjusted for demographics, clinical characteristics and psychosocial instruments. Conclusion Spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs were the only variables consistently associated with compliance to medication in a cohort of outpatients with heart failure. Our data suggest that adequately addressing these aspects on patient’s care may lead to an improvement in adherence patterns in the complex heart failure management. PMID:27192385

  6. Outcome of Acute Graft Rejection Associated with Hemodynamic Compromise in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, Cecile; Buckvold, Shannon; Gralla, Jane; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Pietra, Biagio A.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to analyze the outcome of hemodynamically significant acute graft rejection in pediatric heart transplant recipients from a single-center experience. Acute graft rejection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality for patients who undergo orthotopic heart transplantation and has been associated with the severity of the rejection episode. A retrospective review of all children experiencing a hemodynamically significant rejection episode after orthotopic heart transplantation was performed. Fifty-three patients with 54 grafts had 70 rejection episodes requiring intravenous inotropic support. Forty-one percent of these patients required high-dose inotropic support, with the remaining 59% of patients requiring less inotropic support. Overall graft survival to hospital discharge was 41% for patients in the high-dose group compared to 94% in the low-dose group. Six-month graft survival in patients who required high-dose inotropes remained at 41% compared to 44% in the low-dose group. Hemodynamically significant acute graft rejection in pediatric heart transplant recipients is a devastating problem with poor short- and long-term outcomes. Survival to hospital discharge is dismal in patients who require high-dose inotropic support. In contrast, survival to discharge is quite good in patients who require only low-dose inotropic support; however, six-month graft survival in this group is low secondary to a high incidence of graft failure related to worsening or aggressive transplant coronary artery disease. PMID:20963408

  7. Heart Disease and Colon Cancer Prevention Beliefs and Their Association With Information Seeking and Scanning.

    PubMed

    Hovick, Shelly R; Bigsby, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Despite their understanding of the links between (a) information seeking and scanning and (b) health outcomes, researchers still know relatively little about the impact of information behaviors on people's disease-related beliefs and attitudes. The goal of this study was to validate findings linking information and health behaviors and to assess whether information seeking and scanning are associated with beliefs about the effectiveness of heart disease and colon cancer risk prevention behaviors (in regard to exercise, controlling one's diet to prevent overweight/obesity, and daily fruit and vegetable intake), as well as determine whether the effects of seeking versus scanning on these beliefs differ. Data from the Annenberg National Health Communication Survey were analyzed (N = 3,212). For colon cancer, significant main effects were detected for information scanning for each of the 3 beliefs assessed (p < .05). For heart disease, both information scanning and heart disease media exposure (p < .05) were associated with stronger beliefs. Information seeking was not associated with beliefs for either disease (p > .05). Our results suggest that disease-related cognitions and beliefs, which ultimately impact decisions to engage in prevention behaviors, may be influenced most by less purposeful forms of information acquisition. PMID:26444664

  8. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e’ (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e’ (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). Conclusions Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  9. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e' (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e' (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  10. Association between Six Minute Walk Test and All-Cause Mortality, Coronary Heart Disease-Specific Mortality, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanyar, Ali; Aziz, Michael M; Enright, Paul L; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Boudreau, Robert; Sutton-Tyrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis; Newman, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between six-minute walk test (6 MWT) performance and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and incident coronary heart disease in older adults. Methods We conducted a time-to-event analysis of 1,665 Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a 6 MWT and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results During a mean follow-up of 8 years, there were 305 incident coronary heart disease events, 504 deaths of which 100 were coronary heart disease-related deaths. The 6 MWT performance in the shortest two distance quintiles was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (290-338 meters: HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; <290 meters: HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). The adjusted risk of coronary heart disease mortality incident events among those with a 6 MWT <290 meters was not significant. Discussion Performance on the 6 MWT is independently associated with all-cause mortality and is of prognostic utility in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24695552

  11. American ginseng suppresses inflammation and DNA damage associated with mouse colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Kotakadi, Venkata S.; Ying, Lei; Cui, Xiangli; Wood, Patricia A.; Windust, Anthony; Matesic, Lydia E.; Pena, Edsel A.; Chiuzan, Codruta; Singh, Narendra P.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Hofseth, Lorne J.

    2008-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a dynamic, idiopathic, chronic inflammatory condition associated with a high colon cancer risk. American ginseng has antioxidant properties and targets many of the players in inflammation. The aim of this study was to test whether American ginseng extract prevents and treats colitis. Colitis in mice was induced by the presence of 1% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water or by 1% oxazolone rectally. American ginseng extract was mixed in the chow at levels consistent with that currently consumed by humans as a supplement (75 p.p.m., equivalent to 58 mg daily). To test prevention of colitis, American ginseng extract was given prior to colitis induction. To test treatment of colitis, American ginseng extract was given after the onset of colitis. In vitro studies were performed to examine mechanisms. Results indicate that American ginseng extract not only prevents but it also treats colitis. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (markers of inflammation) and p53 (induced by inflammatory stress) are also downregulated by American ginseng. Mucosal and DNA damage associated with colitis is at least in part a result of an oxidative burst from overactive leukocytes. We therefore tested the hypothesis that American ginseng extract can inhibit leukocyte activation and subsequent epithelial cell DNA damage in vitro and in vivo. Results are consistent with this hypothesis. The use of American ginseng extract represents a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of UC. PMID:18802031

  12. Factors Associated with American Indian Teens' Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tassy

    2004-01-01

    Factors related to American Indian (AI) high school students' self-rated health were examined. Self rated health was measured as a single-item with a four-point response option ranging from poor to excellent health. Of the 574 participants, 19% reported "fair" or "poor" health, a percentage more than twice that for U.S. high school students in…

  13. Factors Associated with Successful Functioning in American Indian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silmere, Hile; Stiffman, Arlene Rubin

    2006-01-01

    This study examines environmental and cultural factors related to successful functioning in a stratified random sample of 401 American Indian youths. The success index included seven indicators: good mental health, being alcohol and drug free, absence of serious misbehavior, clean police record, good grades, positive psychosocial functioning, and…

  14. The association of particulate air metal concentrations with heart rate variability.

    PubMed Central

    Magari, Shannon R; Schwartz, Joel; Williams, Paige L; Hauser, Russ; Smith, Thomas J; Christiani, David C

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies show an association between particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. Particulate matter is a complex mixture of elemental carbon, ammonium, sulfates, nitrates, organic components, and metals. The mechanisms of action of particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 micro m in mean aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)), as well as the constituents responsible for the observed cardiopulmonary health effects, have not been identified. In this study we focused on the association between the metallic component of PM(2.5) and cardiac autonomic function based on standard heart rate variability (HRV) measures in an epidemiologic study of boilermakers. Thirty-nine male boilermakers were monitored throughout a work shift. Each subject wore an ambulatory electrocardiogram (Holter) monitor and a personal monitor to measure PM(2.5). We used mixed-effects models to regress heart rate and SDNN index (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal) on PM(2.5) and six metals (vanadium, nickel, chromium, lead, copper, and manganese). There were statistically significant mean increases in the SDNN index of 11.30 msec and 3.98 msec for every 1 micro g/m(3) increase in the lead and vanadium concentrations, respectively, after adjusting for mean heart rate, age, and smoking status. Small changes in mean heart rate were seen with all exposure metrics. The results of this study suggest an association between exposure to airborne metals and significant alterations in cardiac autonomic function. These results extend our understanding of the adverse health effects of the metals component of ambient PM(2.5). PMID:12204821

  15. Cluster Differentiating 36 (CD36) Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Mohamed; Tao, Huan; Fungwe, Thomas V.; Hajri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Obesity is often associated with a state of oxidative stress and increased lipid deposition in the heart. More importantly, obesity increases lipid influx into the heart and induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to cell toxicity and metabolic dysfunction. Cluster differentiating 36 (CD36) protein is highly expressed in the heart and regulates lipid utilization but its role in obesity-associated oxidative stress is still not clear. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CD36 deficiency on cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and lipotoxicity associated with obesity. Methods and Results Studies were conducted in control (Lean), obese leptin-deficient (Lepob/ob) and leptin-CD36 double null (Lepob/obCD36-/-) mice. Compared to lean mice, cardiac steatosis, and fatty acid (FA) uptake and oxidation were increased in Lepob/ob mice, while glucose uptake and oxidation was reduced. Moreover, insulin resistance, oxidative stress markers and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production were markedly enhanced. This was associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase expression, and increased membrane-associated p47phox, p67phox and protein kinase C. Silencing CD36 in Lepob/ob mice prevented cardiac steatosis, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization, but reduced FA uptake and oxidation. Moreover, CD36 deficiency reduced NADPH oxidase activity and decreased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CD36 deficiency reduced palmitate-induced ROS production and normalized NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusions CD36 deficiency prevented obesity-associated cardiac steatosis and insulin resistance, and reduced NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. The study demonstrates that CD36 regulates NADPH oxidase activity and mediates FA-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27195707

  16. Alterations of dystrophin associated glycoproteins in the heart lacking dystrophin or dystrophin and utrophin

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Katharine M.; Premsukh, Monica D.; Townsend, DeWayne

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Patients with DMD lack the protein dystrophin, which is widely expressed in striated muscle. In skeletal muscle, the loss of dystrophin results in dramatically decreased expression of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). Interestingly, in the heart the DGC is normally expressed without dystrophin; this has been attributed to presence of the dystrophin homologue utrophin. We demonstrate here that neither utrophin nor dystrophin are required for the expression of the cardiac DGC. However, alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG), a major component of the DGC, is differentially glycosylated in dystrophin-(mdx) and dystrophin−/utrophin− (dko) deficient mouse hearts. In both models the altered α-DG retains laminin binding activity, but has an altered localization at the sarcolemma. In hearts lacking both dystrophin and utrophin, the alterations in α-DG glycosylation are even more dramatic with changes in gel migration equivalent to 24 ± 3 kDa. These data show that the absence of dystrophin and utrophin alters the processing of α-DG; however it is not clear if these alterations are a consequence of the loss of a direct interaction with dystrophin/utrophin, or results from an indirect response to the presence of severe pathology. Recently there have been great advances in our understanding of the glycosylation of α-DG regarding its role as a laminin receptor. Here we present data that alterations in glycosylation occurs in the hearts of animal models of DMD, but these changes do not affect laminin binding. The physiological consequences of these alterations remain to be determined, but may have significant implications for the development of therapies for DMD. PMID:24096570

  17. Alterations of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins in the heart lacking dystrophin or dystrophin and utrophin.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Katharine M; Premsukh, Monica D; Townsend, DeWayne

    2013-12-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Patients with DMD lack the protein dystrophin, which is widely expressed in striated muscle. In skeletal muscle, the loss of dystrophin results in dramatically decreased expression of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). Interestingly, in the heart the DGC is normally expressed without dystrophin; this has been attributed to presence of the dystrophin homologue utrophin. We demonstrate here that neither utrophin nor dystrophin are required for the expression of the cardiac DGC. However, alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG), a major component of the DGC, is differentially glycosylated in dystrophin-(mdx) and dystrophin-/utrophin-(dko) deficient mouse hearts. In both models the altered α-DG retains laminin binding activity, but has an altered localization at the sarcolemma. In hearts lacking both dystrophin and utrophin, the alterations in α-DG glycosylation are even more dramatic with changes in gel migration equivalent to 24 ± 3 kDa. These data show that the absence of dystrophin and utrophin alters the processing of α-DG; however it is not clear if these alterations are a consequence of the loss of a direct interaction with dystrophin/utrophin or results from an indirect response to the presence of severe pathology. Recently there have been great advances in our understanding of the glycosylation of α-DG regarding its role as a laminin receptor. Here we present data that alterations in glycosylation occur in the hearts of animal models of DMD, but these changes do not affect laminin binding. The physiological consequences of these alterations remain unknown, but may have significant implications for the development of therapies for DMD. PMID:24096570

  18. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Practice Management and for Preventive Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. The guidelines were developed by the Sections on Community and Preventive Dentistry and Practice Administration. (MLW)

  19. 77 FR 44255 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ...This final notice announces the approval of an application from the American Association of Diabetes Educators for continued recognition as a national accreditation program for accrediting entities that wish to furnish outpatient diabetes self-management training to Medicare...

  20. 2007 American Coal Ash Association membership directory as of June 21, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    A listing of names, addresses, contact numbers and websites is given for 101 members of the American Coal Ash Association. Honorary members are also named. Included are power generation companies, combustion by-product manufacturers and university departments.

  1. Different attitudes toward humor between Chinese and American students: evidence from the Implicit Association Test.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Yue, Xiao Dong; Lu, Su

    2011-08-01

    Although cross-cultural research indicates that Chinese people demonstrate less humor than do Americans, little research addresses the reasons. This cross-cultural difference may be largely due to different implicit attitudes toward humor held by Chinese and Americans, deeply rooted in the two cultural traditions. Both self-report evaluation and the Implicit Association Test (IAT) were used to compare Chinese and American attitudes toward humor. Although 60 Chinese undergraduate students showed no significant difference from 33 American exchange students in explicit attitudes toward humor, the former associated humor more frequently with unpleasant adjectives and seriousness with pleasant adjectives on the IAT; the opposite pattern was found for the American group. This indicated a negative implicit attitude toward humor among the Chinese students. PMID:22049652

  2. Third-degree heart block associated with lyme carditis: review of published cases.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Mead, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Lyme carditis is an uncommon manifestation of Lyme disease that most commonly involves some degree of atrioventricular conduction blockade. Third-degree conduction block is the most severe form and can be fatal if untreated. Systematic review of the medical literature identified 45 published cases of third-degree conduction block associated with Lyme carditis in the United States. Median patient age was 32 years, 84% of patients were male, and 39% required temporary pacing. Recognizing patient groups more likely to develop third-degree heart block associated with Lyme carditis is essential to providing prompt and appropriate therapy. PMID:24879781

  3. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Objective Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. Methods We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. Results The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. Conclusion The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis. PMID:24676374

  4. Effects of Serum Creatinine Calibration on Estimated Renal Function in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Young, Bessie A.; Fülöp, Tibor; de Boer, Ian H.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Katz, Ronit; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The calibration to Isotope Dilution Mass Spectroscopy (IDMS) traceable creatinine is essential for valid use of the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods For 5,210 participants in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), serum creatinine was measured with a multipoint enzymatic spectrophotometric assay at the baseline visit (2000–2004) and re-measured using the Roche enzymatic method, traceable to IDMS in a subset of 206 subjects. The 200 eligible samples (6 were excluded, 1 for failure of the re-measurement and 5 for outliers) were divided into three disjoint sets - training, validation, and test - to select a calibration model, estimate true errors, and assess performance of the final calibration equation. The calibration equation was applied to serum creatinine measurements of 5,210 participants to estimate GFR and the prevalence of CKD. Results The selected Deming regression model provided a slope of 0.968 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.904 to 1.053) and intercept of −0.0248 (95% CI, −0.0862 to 0.0366) with R squared 0.9527. Calibrated serum creatinine showed high agreement with actual measurements when applying to the unused test set (concordance correlation coefficient 0.934, 95% CI, 0.894 to 0.960). The baseline prevalence of CKD in the JHS (2000–2004) was 6.30% using calibrated values, compared with 8.29% using non-calibrated serum creatinine with the CKD-EPI equation (P < 0.001). Conclusions A Deming regression model was chosen to optimally calibrate baseline serum creatinine measurements in the JHS and the calibrated values provide a lower CKD prevalence estimate. PMID:25806862

  5. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Chambers, David A; Cloutier, Michelle M; Riekert, Kristin A; Rand, Cynthia S; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C; Wilson, Sandra R; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H; Okelo, Sande O; Mularski, Richard A; Nguyen, Huong Q; Patel, Minal R; Szefler, Stanley J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wilson, Kevin C; Freemer, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients' access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators' experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings. PMID:26653201

  6. Association between Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure and Autonomic Activity in Cyclic Alternating Pattern during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hideaki; Ozone, Motohiro; Ohki, Noboru; Sagawa, Yohei; Yamamichi, Keiichirou; Fukuju, Mitsuki; Yoshida, Takeshi; Nishi, Chikako; Kawasaki, Akiko; Mori, Kaori; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Izumi, Motomori; Hishikawa, Yasuo; Nishino, Seiji; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) is frequently followed by changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), but the sequential associations between CAP and autonomic nerve activity have not been studied. The study aimed to reveal the precise changes in heart rate variability (HRV) during phase A of the CAP cycle. Design: Polysomnography was recorded according to the CAP Atlas (Terzano, 2002), and BP and electrocardiogram were simultaneously recorded. The complex demodulation method was used for analysis of HRV and evaluation of autonomic nerve activity. Setting: Academic sleep laboratory. Participants: Ten healthy males. Measurements and Results: The increase in HR (median [first quartile – third quartile]) for each subtype was as follows: A1, 0.64 (-0.30 to 1.69), A2, 1.44 (0.02 to 3.79), and A3, 6.24 (2.53 to 10.76) bpm (A1 vs. A2 P < 0.001, A1 vs. A3 P < 0.001, A2 vs. A3 P < 0.001). The increase in BP for each subtype was as follows: A1, 1.23 (-2.04 to 5.75), A2, 1.76 (-1.46 to 9.32), and A3, 12.51 (4.75 to 19.94) mm Hg (A1 vs. A2 P = 0.249, A1 vs. A3 P < 0.001, A2 vs. A3 P < 0.001). In all of phase A, the peak values for HR and BP appeared at 4.2 (3.5 to 5.4) and 8.4 (7.0 to 10.3) seconds, respectively, after the onset of phase A. The area under the curve for low-frequency and high-frequency amplitude significantly increased after the onset of CAP phase A (P < 0.001) and was higher in the order of subtype A3, A2, and A1 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: All phase A subtypes were accompanied with increased heart rate variability, and the largest heart rate variability was seen in subtype A3, while a tendency for less heart rate variability was seen in subtype A1. Citation: Kondo H; Ozone M; Ohki N; Sagawa Y; Yamamichi K; Fukuju M; Yoshida T; Nishi C; Kawasaki; Mori; Kanbayashi T; Izumi M; Hishikawa Y; Nishino S; Shimizu T. Association between heart rate variability, blood pressure and autonomic activity in cyclic alternating pattern during sleep

  7. Analysis of Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation in Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Among patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD), 45% to 60% present with atrial fibrillation (AF), which is associated with increased rates of thromboembolism, heart failure, and even death. The bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) combining with mitral valve procedure has been adopted in patients of AF associated with RHD, but evaluations about its effectiveness are still limited. Methods A total of 87 patients with RHD and long persistent AF who had accepted mitral valve replacement concomitant with BRFA were studied. Clinical data were collected to analyze the midterm results of BRFA and evaluate its efficiency. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the independent factors associated with late AF recurrence. Results Sixty-six (75.9%) patients maintained sinus rhythm after a mean follow-up of 13.4 ± 5.2 months. Late AF recurrence had been detected in 21 (24.1%) patients, 11 (12.6%) patients were confirmed to be AF, 8 (9.2%) patients were atrial flutter and 2 (2.3%) patients were junctional rhythm. In Multivariate logistic regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.756, 95% CI = 1.289–2.391, p = 0.000) and early AF recurrence (OR = 5.479, 95% CI = 1.189–25.254, p = 0.029) were independent predictors of late AF recurrence. In addition, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and New York Heart Association class showed a greater improvement in patients who maintained sinus rhythm than those who experienced late AF recurrence. Conclusion BRFA is an effective technique for the treatment of long persistent AF associated with RHD during mitral valve replacement. The BMI and early AF recurrence are independent predictors for late AF recurrence. Patients with long-term restoration of sinus rhythm experienced a greater improvement of left ventricular function after BRFA. PMID:26960188

  8. Heart Failure Functional Class Associated with Depression Severity But Not Anxiety Severity

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Etem; Cay, Serkan; Sensoy, Baris; Murat, Sani; Oksuz, Fatih; Cankurt, Tayyar; Ali Mendi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common in heart failure (HF) patients and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. However, there are little or no published data that focuses on the relationship between these commonly observed situations and HF classes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between these psychiatric co-morbidities and HF symptom classes. As a second objective of our study, the associations between patient characteristics and depression severity were also assessed. Methods Our study enrolled a total of 420 HF study participants. The severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms was evaluated by Beck’s depression and anxiety. The measured total scores were used to grade depression severity and anxiety as minimal/mild and moderate/severe. Results According to NYHA Functional Classification, 228 patients (51%) had class I symptoms, 101 (23%) had class II symptoms, 31 (7%) had class III symptoms, and class IV symptoms were noted in the remaining 60 patients (19%). The mean Beck’s depression and anxiety scores were 12.4 ± 11.1 and 13.4 ± 9.0, respectively. While no association between HF symptom classes and anxiety severity was observed, a significant positive relation between HF symptom class and depression score was found. Conclusions The results of our study suggested that HF symptom class was positively associated with severity of depression. On the other hand, there was no association between HF symptom class and anxiety score in a wide population of heart failure patients. PMID:27122931

  9. Sharing Advice From The Heart | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women and Heart Disease Sharing Advice From The Heart Spring 2016 Table of Contents This year's Red ... inspired you to get involved in the American Heart Association's Go Red For Women movement and Red ...

  10. Tools for advance directives. American Health Information Management Association.

    PubMed

    Schraffenberger, L A

    1992-02-01

    these a model as you develop your own presentation geared for your specific audience. Last, but not least, we include samples of a "Living Will Declaration" and a "Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care" forms reprinted with permission from the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). We include them here so you can examine the language of each type of advance directive. Copies for your organization should be requested from AARP at 1909 K Street NW, Washington, DC 20049, (202) 662-4895. Forms specific to each state are available from The Society for the Right to Die/Concern for Dying at 250 W. 57th Street, New York, NY 10107, (212) 246-6973. The requirement under The Patient Self-Determination Act became effective December 1, 1991, but the educational requirements of the act are meant to be ongoing. These "tools" are to help you continue to be a regular contributor to the educational process in your organization. PMID:10145646

  11. Neurohumoral mechanisms associated with orthostasis: reaffirmation of the significant contribution of the heart rate response

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to compensate for acute central hypovolemia underlies the clinical development of orthostatic hypotension and instability (e.g., syncope). Although neuro-humoral control of both cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance contributes to hemodynamic stability during orthostasis, a notion has been proposed that the failure of adequate peripheral vascular constriction rather than cardiac responses represents the primary mechanism underlying the development of orthostatic intolerance. This review article provides an opportunity to present compelling evidence captured over the past 30 years in our laboratory to support the concept that neural-mediated tachycardia during orthostasis in healthy individuals represents a critical response to tolerating acute reduction in central blood volume in addition to, and independent of, peripheral vascular constriction. In this review paper, data are presented from experiments using graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) as a method to induce orthostatic intolerance in two experimental human models: (1) comparison of heart rate and autonomic responses in individuals with relatively high and low tolerance to LBNP; and (2) vagal and sympathetic blockade of cardiac neural control. These experiments revealed that: (1) greater elevations in heart rate are associated with higher orthostatic (LBNP) tolerance; (2) higher orthostatic heart rate is associated with greater sympathetic nerve activity and withdrawal of vagally-mediated cardiac baroreflex response; and (3) non-specific sympathetic blockade causes a pronounced reduction in heart rate and LBNP tolerance. Cardiac parasympathetic withdrawal contributes to protection against development of hypotension during the initial seconds of transition to an orthostatic challenge, while the primary mechanism by which tachycardia defends orthostatic stability in healthy subjects for extended durations is mediated predominantly through sympathetic adrenergic control. PMID

  12. Validation of the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF Risk Scores for Atrial Fibrillation in Hispanics, African-Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Eric; Kargoli, Faraj; Aagaard, Philip; Hoch, Ethan; Di Biase, Luigi; Fisher, John; Gross, Jay; Kim, Soo; Krumerman, Andrew; Ferrick, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A risk score for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been developed by the Framingham Heart Study and Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE)-AF consortium. However, validation of these risk scores in an inner-city population is uncertain. Thus, a validation model was built using the Framingham Risk Score for AF and CHARGE-AF covariates. An in and outpatient electrocardiographic database was interrogated from 2000 to 2013 for the development of AF. Patients were included if their age was >45 and <95 years, had <10-year follow-up, if their initial electrocardiogram was without AF, had ≥ 2 electrocardiograms, and declared a race and/or ethnicity as non-Hispanic white, African-American, or Hispanic. For the Framingham Heart Study, 49,599 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 4,860 developed AF. Discrimination analysis using area under the curve (AUC) for original risk equations: non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.712 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.694 to 0.731), African-American AUC = 0.733 (95% CI 0.716 to 0.751), and Hispanic AUC = 0.740 (95% CI 0.723 to 0.757). For the CHARGE-AF, 45,571 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 4,512 developed AF. Non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.673 (95% CI 0.652 to 0.694), African-American AUC = 0.706 (95% CI 0.685 to 0.727), and Hispanic AUC = 0.711 (95% CI 0.691 to 0.732). Calibration analysis showed qualitative similarities between cohorts. In conclusion, this is the first study to validate both the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF risk scores in both a Hispanic and African-American cohort. All models predicted AF well across all race and ethnic cohorts. PMID:26589820

  13. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  14. Heart Failure and Loss of Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Li, Dan L.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, currently affecting 5 million Americans. A syndrome defined on clinical terms, heart failure is the end-result of events occurring in multiple heart diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, genetic mutations and diabetes, and metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark feature. Mounting evidence from clinical and preclinical studies suggests strongly that fatty acid uptake and oxidation are adversely affected, especially in end-stage heart failure. Moreover, metabolic flexibility, the heart’s ability to move freely among diverse energy substrates, is impaired in heart failure. Indeed, impairment of the heart’s ability to adapt to its metabolic milieu, and associated metabolic derangement, are important contributing factors in heart failure pathogenesis. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms governing metabolic control in heart failure will provide critical insights into disease initiation and progression, raising the prospect of advances with clinical relevance. PMID:24336014

  15. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; et al

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  16. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: Comprehensive School Nutrition Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G.

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health,…

  18. Association between Retinal Arteriolar and Venule Calibre with Prevalent Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J.; Wang, Sarah B.; Au, Cheryl; Chiha, Joseph; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Gopinath, Bamini

    2015-01-01

    Background There is evidence to suggest that microvascular disease, particularly diabetic retinopathy, plays a role in the pathogenesis of HF. However, whether changes in retinal vessel calibre predicts HF is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of retinal microvascular structure with prevalent heart failure (HF). Methods The Australian Heart Eye Study (AHES) is a cross-sectional study that surveyed 1680 participants who presented to a tertiary referral hospital for the evaluation of potential coronary artery disease by coronary angiography. Retinal vessel calibre was graded using retinal photography and participants’ self-reported echocardiography-confirmed HF was obtained via an extensive medical questionnaire. Results There were 107 participants (8.1%) with prevalent self-reported HF. Persons with wider retinal arteriolar calibre (comparing highest versus lowest tertile or reference) were more likely to have prevalent HF (OR 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7–7.2) when adjusted for age and sex. After further adjustment for body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, triglycerides and estimated glomerular filtration rate, this association remained significant (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 2.0–9.8). After further stratification, this association remained significant among participants with diabetes (OR 10.3; 95% CI, 2.7–39.3) but not in those without diabetes (OR 2.7; 95% CI, 0.9–7.5). The strength of this association was not dependent on the length of history of diabetes, or retinopathy status. There was no significant association between retinal venular calibre and prevalence of HF. Conclusions Wider retinal arteriolar diameter was significantly and independently associated with prevalent HF in participants of a cross-sectional study. This association was significant stronger among participants with diabetes compared to without diabetes. No association was found between retinal venule calibre with prevalent HF. PMID:26659133

  19. Assessing Physical Activity as a Core Component in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A POSITION STATEMENT OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Leonard A; Brubaker, Peter H; Guazzi, Marco; Lavie, Carl J; Montoye, Alexander H K; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Savage, Patrick D

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-established major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. As such, physical activity counseling is 1 of the 10 core components of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs recommended by the American Heart Association and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). In addition, the ability to perform a physical activity assessment and report outcomes is 1 of the 10 core competencies of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals published by the AACVPR. Unfortunately, standardized procedures for physical activity assessment of cardiac rehabilitation patients have not been developed and published. Thus, the objective of this AACVPR statement is to provide an overview of physical activity assessment concepts and procedures and to provide a recommended approach for performing a standardized assessment of physical activity in all comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programs following the core components recommendations. PMID:27307067

  20. Close association between valvar heart disease and central nervous system manifestations in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krause, I; Lev, S; Fraser, A; Blank, M; Lorber, M; Stojanovich, L; Rovensky, J; Chapman, J; Shoenfeld, Y

    2005-01-01

    Background: Heart valves lesions and central nervous system involvement are among the most common manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Objective: To evaluate possible interrelations between these manifestations in a large group of APS patients. Methods: 284 APS patients were evaluated retrospectively, 159 of whom had primary APS. Cardiac–CNS associations were determined for the entire study population, and for subgroups of patients with primary APS or APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Results: Significant associations where found between cardiac vegetations and epilepsy (p<0.02), and between cardiac valve thickening or dysfunction and migraine (p = 0.002). Borderline association was found between valvar vegetations and migraine (p = 0.09). A significant association was also found between all valvar lesions and stroke or transient ischaemic attacks. Subanalyses showed that patients with primary APS had significant associations between cardiac valve pathology and all CNS manifestations, while patients with APS associated with SLE had no such associations. Conclusions: The study suggests potential differences in biological behaviour between primary APS and APS associated with SLE. The presence of cardiac valve pathology may be a risk factor for several types of CNS involvement in PAPS. PMID:15778242

  1. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26996746

  2. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual. PMID:26975704

  3. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies. PMID:26610534

  4. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies. PMID:26610534

  5. Association between 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and congenital heart disease: A meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenju; Hou, Zongliu; Wang, Chunhui; Wei, Chuanyu; Li, Yaxiong; Jiang, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    Background Inconsistent results were reported in recent literature regarding the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T/A1298C polymorphisms and the susceptibility of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the associations by employing multiple analytical methods. Methods Literature search was performed and published articles were obtained from PubMed, Embase and CNKI databases based on the exclusion and inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from eligible studies and the crude odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random or fix effects model to evaluate the associations between the MTHFR C677T/A1298C polymorphisms and CHD development. Subgroup based analysis was performed by Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, ethnicity, types of CHD, source of control and sample size. Results Twenty-four eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Significant association was found between fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism and CHD development in all genetic models. The pooled ORs and 95% CIs in all genetic models indicated that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with CHD in Asian, but not Caucasian in subgroup analysis. The maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not associated with CHD except for recessive model. Moreover, neither maternal nor fetal MTHFR A1298C polymorphism was associated with CHD. Conclusion The fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism may increase the susceptibility to CHD. Fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more likely to affect Asian fetus than Caucasian. The MTHFR A1298C polymorphism may not be a risk of congenital heart disease. PMID:25606381

  6. [Congenital heart block associated with maternal anti SSA/SSB antibodies :a report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Ayed, K; Gorgi, Y; Sfar, I; Khrouf, M

    2004-04-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) associated with maternal anti-SSA/SSB antibodies: a report of four cases. CHB detected in utero is strongly associated with maternal antibodies to SSA (Ro) and SSB (La). Their pathogenic role in the development of CHB has been established in several studies. The mothers of affected infants frequently had autoimmune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome) or were entirely asymptomatic. It is very difficult to identify pregnant asymptomatic mothers carrying anti-SSA/SSB antibodies. We report four cases of infants born to asymptomatic mothers with anti-SSA/SSB antibodies, three of them developed isolated congenital cardiac heart block and one with no evidence of CHB. All three CHB are detected during pregnancy between 16 and 24 weeks of gestation. All maternal sera contained antibodies to SSA alone or the both SSA and SSB. Three of four subsequent pregnancies were complicated by heart block. One child affected died in utero. While the two other newborns with CHB required pacemaker insertion during the first 3 months of life. Although the association of anti-SSA/SSB with CHB is widely accepted, the precise mechanism by which these antibodies cause cardiac conduction abnormalities remains to be defined. Antibodies to SSA/SSB have been proposed to be a serologic marker for neonatal lupus syndrome and CHB. Fetal and neonatal diseases are presumed to be due to the transplacental passage of these IgG autoantibodies from the mother into the fetal circulation. Since these antibodies may have a pathogenic role in CHB, screening of infants with isolated CHB or neonatal lupus and their mothers for the presence of anti-SSA and anti-SSB is strongly recommended. PMID:15063933

  7. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen M; Grimm, Kevin J; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2014-11-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race been tested. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African American girls had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  8. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hipwell, Alison; Stepp, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (PGS) who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African-American females had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  9. A Study of Color Association Differences between Americans and Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji; Kitao, S. Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    In intercultural communication, linguistic competence must be accompanied by an understanding of the associations that the speakers share. For communicating in a foreign language, the most important kind of association is indicative association, which is related to the literature, customs, and history of a people. When Japanese people communicate…

  10. Elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Iraj; Vahdat, Katayoun; Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Beigi, Saeideh; Assadi, Majid; Azizi, Fatemeh; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that low-grade systemic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, limited information is available about the relationship of diabetes mellitus and inflammation in Asia. We examined the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and diabetes in a general Iranian population. In an ancillary study to the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study, a cohort study of men and women aged > or = 25 years, a random sample of 1754 (49.2 percent males, 50.8 percent females) subjects were evaluated. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Elevated serum CRP was defined as more than 3.0 mg/l. The diabetes classification was based on the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. A total of 8.6 percent of the subjects (8.0 percent of males & 9.1 percent of females; p>0.05) had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Geometric mean of CRP was 1.94 mg/l (3.80 SD) in the studied population. The subjects with diabetes had a higher geometric mean of CRP levels than the subjects with no diabetes [3.67 (SD 3.71) versus 1.85 (3.83) respectively; p<0.0001)]. In multiple logistic regression analysis, diabetes showed a significant age-adjusted association with elevated CRP levels [Odds Ratio = 2.03, Confidence Interval (1.38-2.98); p<0.0001] after adjusting for sex, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol blood pressure, smoking and body mass index. In conclusion, beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, elevated CRP is significantly correlated with diabetes in general population of the northern Persian Gulf. Further insight into the specific effects of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins will be essential for the development of new preventive strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:18493107

  11. A History of Ashes: An 80 Year Comparative Portrait of Smoking Initiation in American Indians and Non-Hispanic Whites—the Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Raymond; Calhoun, Darren; Noonan, Carolyn; Whitener, Ron; Henderson, Jeff; Goldberg, Jack; Henderson, Patrica Nez

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of starting smoking by age 18 are significant. Early smoking initiation is associated with higher tobacco dependence, increased difficulty in smoking cessation and more negative health outcomes. The purpose of this study is to examine how closely smoking initiation in a well-defined population of American Indians (AI) resembles a group of Non-Hispanic white (NHW) populations born over an 80 year period. We obtained data on age of smoking initiation among 7,073 AIs who were members of 13 tribes in Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota from the 1988 Strong Heart Study (SHS) and the 2001 Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) and 19,747 NHW participants in the 2003 National Health Interview Survey. The participants were born as early as 1904 and as late as 1985. We classified participants according to birth cohort by decade, sex, and for AIs, according to location. We estimated the cumulative incidence of smoking initiation by age 18 in each sex and birth cohort group in both AIs and NHWs and used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios for the association of birth cohort, sex and region with the age at smoking initiation. We found that the cumulative incidence of smoking initiation by age 18 was higher in males than females in all SHS regions and in NHWs (p < 0.001). Our results show regional variation of age of initiation significant in the SHS (p < 0.001). Our data showed that not all AIs (in this sample) showed similar trends toward increased earlier smoking. For instance, Oklahoma SHS male participants born in the 1980s initiated smoking before age 18 less often than those born before 1920 by a ratio of 0.7. The results showed significant variation in age of initiation across sex, birth cohort, and location. Our preliminary analyses suggest that AI smoking trends are not uniform across region or gender but are likely shaped by local context. If tobacco prevention and control programs depend in part on addressing the origin of AI smoking it may

  12. Stroke and bleeding risk evaluation in atrial fibrillation: results of the European heart rhythm association survey.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Potpara, Tatjana; Dagres, Nikolaos; Pison, Laurent; Estner, Heidi; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to stroke and bleeding risk evaluation in atrial fibrillation, particularly regarding the use of risk evaluation schemes, among members of the EHRA electrophysiology (EP) research network. In this EP Wire survey, we have provided some insights into current practice in Europe for the use of these risk assessment schemes. There were some obvious practice differences. However, reassuring information on current practice in Europe was evident, but more focus on renal function is warranted, especially facing the fact that novel oral anticoagulants are used for antithrombotic therapy. PMID:24798958

  13. Clinical management of arrhythmias in elderly patients: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hocini, Mélèze; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess clinical practice in management of cardiac arrhythmias in elderly patients (age ≥75 years) in the European countries. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 50 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that management of cardiac arrhythmias is generally in accordance with the guidelines and consensus recommendations on management of cardiac arrhythmias, although there are some areas of variation, especially on age limit and exclusion of elderly patients for anticoagulation, ablation, and device therapy. PMID:25634939

  14. The association between orthostatic increase in pulse pressure and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Munenori; Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Yamada, Namie; Watanabe, Aya; Kawarasaki, Shuichi; Ozeki, Atsuko; Nakao, Tomoko; Hosoya, Yumiko; Ando, Jiro; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    The clinical meaning of changes in PP with posture remains unclear. We performed treadmill exercise testing on 144 subjects to diagnose ischemic heart disease, and measured the PPs in the supine and standing positions. The differences in the two PPs ranged between -35 and 45 mmHg. Eleven subjects were diagnosed with significant coronary ischemia. The differences in the PPs were significantly increased, and PP in the standing position was significantly elevated in these subjects. A large difference in the PPs in the standing and supine positions was associated with significant coronary ischemia, independent of significant covariables. PMID:26287795

  15. HPV Literacy and Associated Factors Among Hmong American Immigrants: Implications for Reducing Cervical Cancer Disparity.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Raiza; Simms, Tina; Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies show that certain minority and ethnic communities experience low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates despite a higher cervical cancer burden. HPV is known to be responsible for almost all cervical cancer cases. Hmong Americans, a growing Asian American population, appear to be at increased risk. The cervical cancer incidence rate among Hmong American women is three times higher than other Asian/Pacific Islanders and more than four times higher than Non-Hispanic Whites. Despite such alarming statistics, there is limited research focusing on HPV literacy and its associated factors in the Hmong American community. This study's objectives are to investigate: (1) the level of HPV knowledge among Hmong Americans; (2) HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates of Hmong Americans; and (3) factors associated with HPV literacy in the Hmong American community. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was used as the study's theoretical framework. A self-administered paper and online health survey was completed by192 Hmong Americans living in a major metropolitan area in Minnesota. Results revealed a mean score of 4.76 (SD 1.67) for the 7-item questionnaire measuring HPV knowledge. The HPV vaccination initiation rate was 46.3 % (n = 56), with 32.7 % completing the recommended three doses. Multiple regression analysis found that participants' level of education, number of doctor visits, and cervical cancer screening literacy were significantly associated with HPV knowledge. This study's results indicate the important role of health providers in educating Hmong Americans patients about HPV and cervical cancer prevention to decrease the cervical cancer burden in this high-risk population. PMID:26696118

  16. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  17. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  18. The Association between Heart Rate Reactivity and Fluid Intelligence in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Borlam, Deborah; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine (a) whether findings of increased cardiovascular reactivity in relation to cognitive ability seen in infants, young adults and the elderly can be extended to middle childhood, and (b) which specific aspect(s) of intelligence is related to cardiovascular reactivity. We examined cardiovascular activity in 340 8- and 9-year-old children during a number judgment task and measured fluid and crystalized IQ using the WISC-IV (Wechsler, 2003). Regression analyses revealed that heart rate (HR) reactivity was positively associated with fluid intelligence and perceptual reasoning in particular, after controlling for the effects of sex, age, task performance, social adversity, and resting HR. Intelligence scores were not associated with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity. Findings are consistent with prior literature in infants and older populations and for the first time suggest that the association between HR reactivity and cognitive ability is specific for fluid reasoning. PMID:25782406

  19. Cadmium exposure in association with history of stroke and heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Junenette L.; Perlstein, Todd S.; Perry, Melissa J.; McNeely, Eileen; Weuve, Jennifer

    2010-02-15

    Background: It is unclear whether environmental cadmium exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease, although recent data suggest associations with myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of measured cadmium exposure with stroke and heart failure (HF) in the general population. Methods: We analyzed data from 12,049 participants, aged 30 years and older, in the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for whom information was available on body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: At their interviews, 492 persons reported a history of stroke, and 471 a history of HF. After adjusting for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, a 50% increase in blood cadmium corresponded to a 35% increased odds of prevalent stroke [OR: 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.65] and a 50% increase in urinary cadmium corresponded to a 9% increase in prevalent stroke [OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.00-1.19]. This association was higher among women [OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.11-1.72] than men [OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 0.93-1.79] (p-value for interaction=0.05). A 50% increase in blood cadmium corresponded to a 48% increased odds of prevalent HF [OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.17-1.87] and a 50% increase in urinary cadmium corresponded to a 12% increase in prevalent HF [OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20], with no difference in sex-specific associations. Conclusions: Environmental exposure to cadmium was associated with significantly increased stroke and heart failure prevalence. Cadmium exposure may increase these important manifestations of cardiovascular disease.

  20. Biotechnology and the American agricultural industry. Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    1991-03-20

    To meet the needs of a rapidly growing population and minimize the toxic influences of traditional farming practices on the environment, the American agricultural industry has applied molecular technology to the development of food crops and livestock. By placing genes specific for highly desirable phenotypes into the DNA of plants, animals, and bacteria, farmers have increased crop and livestock survival, enhanced the nutritional quality of foods, increased industry productivity, and reduced the need for toxic pesticides and herbicides. However, introduction of genetically modified foods into the marketplace has raised a spectrum of public health issues. Physicians, as the most proximal scientific resource for most individuals, are uniquely positioned to address patient concerns regarding the safety of genetically altered foods. This report provides an overview of the inherent risks and benefits of "agrogenetics" and offers a series of recommendations designed to promote the education of the medical community and dispel public misconception regarding genetic manipulation. PMID:1999885

  1. Rates and factors associated with falls in older European Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, African-Americans, and Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Tappen, Ruth; Engstrom, Gabriella; da Costa, Bruno R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate rates and factors associated with older adult falls in different ethnic groups. Participants and methods Information on demographics, medical and falls history, and pain and physical activity levels was collected from 550 community-dwelling older adults (75±9 years old, 222 European Americans, 109 Afro-Caribbeans, 106 African-Americans, and 113 Hispanics). Results Taking medications for anxiety (risk ratio [RR] =1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.1–2.0), having incontinence (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.1–1.8, P=0.013), back pain (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.0–1.8), feet swelling (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.1–1.7), and age ≥75 years (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.0–1.6) were associated with falls. The associations were stronger for Afro-Caribbeans, but they presented approximately 40% lower prevalence of falls than the other groups. Conclusion Taking anxiety medication, incontinence, back pain, feet swelling, and age ≥75 years were associated with falls, and Afro-Caribbeans presented lower prevalence of falls. These findings need to be taken into consideration in clinical interventions in aging. PMID:26604718

  2. Maternal Dietary Patterns are Associated With Risk of Neural Tube and Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy H.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Feldkamp, Marcia L.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Studying empirically derived dietary patterns is useful in understanding dietary practice. We classified women by their dietary patterns using latent class analysis of 66 foods and studied the association of these patterns with neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart defects (CHDs) in the US National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997–2005). Logistic regression models used data from 1,047 with an NTD, 6,641 with a CHD, and 6,123 controls that were adjusted for maternal characteristics and tested the effect modification of multivitamin supplement use. Four latent dietary patterns were identified: prudent, Western, low-calorie Western, and Mexican. Among participants who did not use supplements, those in the Mexican, Western, and low-calorie Western classes were significantly more likely (odds ratios of 1.6, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively) to have offspring born with NTDs than were those in the prudent class after adjustment of for dietary folic acid intake. In contrast, among supplement users, there was no difference in the incidence of NTDs between classes. Associations between dietary class and CHD subgroups were not modified by supplement use except for tetralogy of Fallot; among supplement users, those in the Western class were twice as likely (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 2.8) as the prudent class to have offspring with tetralogy of Fallot. Women who adhered to a Western diet were 1.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.35) times more likely to have an infant with septal heart defect than were women who adhered to a prudent diet. A prudent dietary pattern, even with folate fortification, may decrease the risk of NTDs and some heart defects. PMID:23639938

  3. Low resting heart rate is associated with violence in late adolescence: a prospective birth cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph; Hallal, Pedro C; Mielke, Gregore I; Raine, Adrian; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Youth violence is a major global public health problem. Three UK and Swedish studies suggest that low resting heart rate predicts male youth violence, but this has not been tested in other social settings nor for females. Methods: A prospective, population-based birth cohort study was conducted in Pelotas, Brazil. Heart rate was measured using a wrist monitor at ages 11, 15 and 18 years. Violent crime and non-violent crime were measured at age 18 in self-reports and official records (N = 3618). Confounding variables were assessed in the perinatal period and at age 11, in interviews with mothers and children. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between quartiles of heart rate at each age, and violent and non-violent crime at age 18, separately for males and females. Results: Lower resting heart rate was a robust correlate of violent and non-violent crime for males. Comparing males in the lowest and top quartiles of heart rate at age 15 years, adjusted odds ratios were 1.9 for violent crime [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–2.7] and 1.7 for non-violent crime (95% CI 1.1–2.6). For females, crime outcomes were associated only with low resting heart rate at age 18. Associations were generally linear across the four heart rate quartiles. There was no evidence that associations differed according to socioeconomic status at age 15. Conclusions: Low resting heart rate predicted violent and non-violent crime for males, and was cross-sectionally associated with crime for females. Biological factors may contribute to individual propensity to commit crime, even in a middle-income setting with high rates of violence. PMID:26822937

  4. Cardiovascular Aspects of Space Shuttle Flights: At the Heart of Three Decades of American Spaceflight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Space Shuttle era elevated cardiovascular deconditioning from a research topic in gravitational physiology to a concern with operational consequences during critical space mission phases. NASA has identified three primary cardiovascular risks associate with short-duration (less than 18 d) spaceflight: orthostatic intolerance; decreased maximal oxygen uptake; and cardiac arrhythmias. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was observed postflight in Mercury astronauts, studied in Gemini and Apollo astronauts, and tracked as it developed in-flight during Skylab missions. A putative hypotensive episode in the pilot during an early shuttle landing, and well documented postflight hypotension in a quarter of crewmembers, catalyzed NASA's research effort to understand its mechanisms and develop countermeasures. Shuttle investigations documented the onset of OH, tested mechanistic hypotheses, and demonstrated countermeasures both simple and complex. Similarly, decreased aerobic capacity in-flight threatened both extravehicular activity and post-landing emergency egress. In one study, peak oxygen uptake and peak power were significantly decreased following flights. Other studies tested hardware and protocols for aerobic conditioning that undergird both current practice on long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions and plans for interplanetary expeditions. Finally, several studies suggest that cardiac arrhythmias are of less concern during short-duration spaceflight than during long-duration spaceflight. Duration of the QT interval was unchanged and the frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions was actually shown to decrease during extravehicular activity. These investigations on short-duration Shuttle flights have paved the way for research aboard long-duration ISS missions and beyond. Efforts are already underway to study the effects of exploration class missions to asteroids and Mars.

  5. I Latin American Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Chagas' heart disease: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jadelson Pinheiro de; Marin Neto, Jose Antonio; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Vilas-Boas, Fábio; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes; Bacal, Fernando; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Almeida, Dirceu Rodrigues; Fragata Filho, Abilio Augusto; Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Oliveira Junior, Wilson Alves de; Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Much has been achieved in one century after Carlos Chagas' discovery. However, there is surely much to be done in the next decades. At present, we are witnessing many remarkable efforts to monitor the epidemiology of the disease, to better understand the biology of the T. cruzi and its interaction with human beings as well as the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the complications in the chronic phase, and deal more appropriately and effectively with late cardiac and digestive manifestations. Although the vector and transfusion-derived transmission of the disease has been controlled in many countries, there remains a pressing need for sustained surveillance of the measures that led to this achievement. It is also necessary to adopt initiatives that enable appropriate management of social and medical conditions resulting from the migration of infected individuals to countries where the disease formerly did not exist. It's also necessary to standardize the most reliable methods of detection of infection with T. cruzi, not only for diagnosis purposes, but more crucially, as a cure criterion. The etiological treatment of millions of patients in the chronic stage of the disease is also to be unraveled. A renewed interest in this area is observed, including prospects of studies focusing on the association of drugs with benznidazole. We also wait for full evidence of the actual effectiveness of the etiological treatment to impact favorably on the natural history of the disease in its chronic phase. Eventually, cardiologists are primarily responsible for improving the clinical management of their patients with Chagas' disease, judiciously prescribing drugs and interventions that respect, as much as possible, the peculiar pathophysiology of the disease, wasting no plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:21789345

  6. A Collective Biography of the Founders of the American Association of University Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Alberta J.

    2013-01-01

    This archival study used constructivist grounded theory to document the educational and professional lives of seventeen women who founded the Association of Collegiate Alumnae (ACA) in 1881, which later became known as the American Association of University Women (AAUW). This study resulted in a collective biography of the seventeen women which…

  7. Different Approaches to Teaching the Mechanics of American Psychological Association Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Timothy M.; Spitzer, Tam M.

    2006-01-01

    Students have to learn two distinctly different tasks when writing research papers: a) creating and organizing prose, and b) formatting a manuscript according to the nuances and mechanics of a pre-determined format, such as Modern Language Association (MLA) or American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines. Two studies examined different…

  8. Faculty Status of Theological Librarians in the American Theological Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Ann L.

    This paper is the result of a survey of the institutional members of the American Theological Library Association. The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) defines faculty status as: (1) freedom to exercise independent judgment in performance of professional duties and a formal method of performance review, (2) adoption of an…

  9. Valuation and the American Evaluation Association: Helping 100 Flowers Bloom, or at Least Be Understood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The author explores the challenges encountered when organizations attempt to facilitate evaluation and improvement through policy statements of professional associations. The American Evaluation Association (AEA) is used as an example. Various AEA statements are described as general and avoiding particular value preferences. The author concludes…

  10. The History of the American Vocational Education Research Association. The First 25 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, J. David; And Others

    This book records the history of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA), which was organized in 1966 as a professional association for scholars and others with research interests in the relationship between education and work. The purposes of AVERA are as follows: stimulate research and development (R&D) activities related…

  11. American Association of Dental Schools 1998-99 Annual Proceedings (March 6, 1998-March 10, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools include the president's annual report, president-elect's and executive director's addresses, a summary of proceedings, the revised constitution, a list of competencies for entry into the dental hygiene profession, association bylaws, member administrators,…

  12. Longitudinal Associations between Experienced Racial Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Devin; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    While recent evidence has indicated that experienced racial discrimination is associated with increased depressive symptoms for African American adolescents, most studies rely on cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal research designs. As a result, the direction and persistence of this association across time remains unclear. This article…

  13. Officers, Boards, Committees, and Representatives of the American Psychological Association, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Council of Representatives is composed of the Board of Directors, the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) representative, division representatives, and state, provincial, and territorial association representatives. Then representatives for the current year, with terms of office, are listed in this article.

  14. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Association Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013... updated Guidelines. DATES: Public concerns regarding the updated AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia...

  15. An examination of the association between demographic and educational factors and African American achievement in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottledge, Michael Christopher

    Objective of the Study: The objective of this research study was to investigate whether an association exists between teacher demographic factors (years of teaching experience and gender), 2 educational factors (certification type and certification pathway) and the percent passing rate of tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS. Answers to the following questions were sought: 1. Is there an association between teacher demographic factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? 2. Is there an association between teacher educational factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? 3. Is there an association between teacher demographic factors, educational factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? Status of the Question: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), science and engineering jobs in the U.S. have increased steadily over recent years and by the year 2016 the number of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) jobs will have grown by more than 21 percent. This increase in science and engineering jobs will double the growth rate of all other workforce sectors combined. The BLS also reports that qualified minority applicants needed to fill these positions will be few and far between. African Americans, Latinos, and other minorities constitute 24 percent of the U.S. population but only 13 percent of college graduates and just 10 percent of people with college degrees who work in science and engineering (Education Trust, 2009). Drawing on the above information, I proposed the following hypotheses to the research questions: H01: There will be no significant statistical association between the demographic factors teacher gender and years of teaching experience and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African

  16. Dysregulation of Autonomic Nervous System in Chagas’ Heart Disease Is Associated with Altered Adipocytokines Levels

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Ferreira, João Marcos; Mady, Charles; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Lopes, Heno Ferreira; Ramires, Felix José Alvarez; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury; Grupi, Cesar José; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) induces autonomic dysfunction and inflammatory activity, which may promote metabolic abnormalities. We studied metabolism and his correlation with Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and inflammation in CD. Methods and Results Sixty subjects were divided into 4 groups: control group (CG), IF (indeterminate form) group; ECG group (ECG abnormalities and normal left ventricular systolic function), and LVD group (left ventricular sistolic dysfunction). Levels of adiponectin, leptin, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were assayed in serum samples by ELISA. ANS was assessed by heart rate variability in frequency domain in 24-hour Holter and postural tilt test (rest and orthostatic position). High frequency (HFr) component values were used to estimate parasympathetic activity and low frequency (LFr) component, sympathetic activity. Analyzes were made of the correlations of each of the metabolic parameters (leptin and adiponectin) with the inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and TNF- alpha) and with the ANS assessment measurements. No significant differences were observed in leptin and insulin levels. Adiponectin was higher in ECG and LVD groups: [CG = 4766.5 (5529.5), IF = 4003.5 (2482.5), ECG = 8376.5 (8388.5), LVD = 8798 (4188.0) ng/mL, p<0.001)]. IL-6 and TNF-alpha were higher in LVD group: [IL-6: CG = 1.85 (6.41); IF = 1.58 (1.91); ECG = 1.0 (1.57); LVD= 31.44 (72.19) pg/ml; p = 0.001. TNF-alpha: CG = 22.57 (88.2); IF = 19.31 (33.16); ECG = 12.45 (3.07); LVD = 75.15 (278.57) pg/ml; p = 0.04]. Adiponectin levels had a positive association with the HFr component (r = 0.539; p = 0.038) and an inverse association with the LFr component (r = - 0.539; p = 0.038) in ECG group. Leptin levels had a negative association with the HFr component (r= - 0.632; p = 0.011) and a positive association with the LFr component (r = 0.632; p = 0.011) in LVD group. Conclusions We found increased adiponectin levels in

  17. Association of lipoprotein lipase gene with coronary heart disease in Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hamid, Muzamil M; Ahmed, Safa; Salah, Awatif; Tyrab, Etayeb M A; Yahia, Lemya M; Elbashir, Elbagire A; Musa, Hassan H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is stabilizing in high-income countries and has continued to rise in low-to-middle-income countries. Association of lipid profile with lipoprotein lipase gene was studied in case and control subject. The family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most risk factors for early-onset of coronary heart disease (CHD). Sudanese patients had significantly (P<0.05) lower TC and LDL-C levels compared to controls. Allele frequency of LPL D9N, N291S and S447X carrier genotype was 4.2%, 30.7% and 7.1%, respectively. We conclude that lipoprotein lipase polymorphism was not associated with the incidence of CHD in Sudan. PMID:26025183

  18. Depressive Symptomatology, Exercise Adherence and Fitness are Associated with Reduced Cognitive Performance in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is common in heart failure (HF) and associated with reduced cognitive function. The current study used Structrual Equation Modeling to examine whether depression adversely impacts cognitive function in HF through its adverse affects on exercise adherence and cardiovascular fitness. Methods 158 HF patients completed neuropsychological testing, physical fitness test, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and measures assessing exercise adherence, and physical exertion. Results The model demonstrated excellent model fit and increased scores on the BDI-II negatively affected exercise adherence and cardiovascular fitness. There was a strong inverse association between cardiovascular fitness and cognitive function. Sobel test showed a significant indirect pathway between the BDI-II and cognitive function through cardiovascular fitness. Discussion This study suggests depression in HF may adversely impact cognitive function through reduced cardiovascular fitness. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether treatment of depression can lead to better lifestyle behaviors and ultimately improve neurocognitive outcomes in HF. PMID:23378527

  19. Opportunity costs associated with caring for older Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H. Shelton; Herrera, Angelica P.; Angel, Jacqueline L.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term care use among older Mexican-Americans is poorly understood, despite the adverse effects on health and economic disadvantage in this vulnerable population. This study examines gender-based risk of long-term care use in 628 women and 391 men, age 70 and over in the 2000-01 and 2004-05 waves of the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly. Logistic regression models are employed to assess the impact of the opportunity cost implications of family support (kin availability and co-residence) relative to health care needs (quality-adjusted life years (QALY) weighted scores and functional limitations) on women's risk of entry into a nursing home. A small percentage (∼5%) of men and women had entered a long-term care facility. Women had lower weights for QALY weights and greater disability than men, but on average were more likely to live with or in closer proximity to an adult child. Higher disability rates (p < .01) increased the risk of institutionalization regardless of gender because disability increases time burdens. Families with fewer adult children faced higher time burdens per child in caring for elderly parents; particularly for elderly mothers. Demographic trends suggest that the number of adult children available to share the caregiving load may decrease long-term care use. PMID:23979263

  20. Cardiovascular outcome associations among cardiovascular magnetic resonance measures of arterial stiffness: the Dallas heart study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated for the noninvasive assessment of total arterial compliance and aortic stiffness, but their associations with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of CMR measures of total arterial compliance and two CMR measures of aortic stiffness with respect to future cardiovascular events. Methods The study consisted of 2122 Dallas Heart Study participants without cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR at 1.5 Tesla. Aortic stiffness was measured by CMR-derived ascending aortic distensibility and aortic arch pulse wave velocity. Total arterial compliance was calculated by dividing left ventricular stroke volume by pulse pressure. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, non-fatal cardiac events, and non-fatal extra-cardiac vascular events over 7.8 ± 1.5 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess for associations between CMR measures and cardiovascular events. Results Age, systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate were independently associated with changes in ascending aortic distensibility, arch pulse wave velocity, and total arterial compliance (all p < .0001). A total of 153 participants (6.9%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjusting for traditional risk factors, total arterial compliance was modestly associated with increased risk for composite events (HR 1.07 per 1SD, p = 0.03) while the association between ascending aortic distensibility and composite events trended towards significance (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0.08). Total arterial compliance and aortic distensibility were independently associated with nonfatal cardiac events (HR 1.11 per 1SD, p = 0.001 and HR 1.45 per 1SD, p = 0.0005, respectively), but not with cardiovascular death or nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events. Arch pulse wave velocity was independently associated with nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events (HR

  1. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease With Chronotropic Incompetence in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Klein, David A; Katz, Daniel H; Beussink-Nelson, Lauren; Sanchez, Cynthia L; Strzelczyk, Theresa A; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-10-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI) is common in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and may be a key reason underlying exercise intolerance in these patients. However, the determinants of CI in HFpEF are unknown. We prospectively studied 157 patients with consecutive HFpEF who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and defined CI according to specific thresholds of the percent heart rate reserve (%HRR). CI was diagnosed as present if %HRR <80 if not taking a β blocker and <62 if taking β blockers. Participants who achieved inadequate exercise effort (respiratory exchange ratio ≤1.05) on cardiopulmonary exercise testing were excluded. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with CI. Of the 157 participants, 108 (69%) achieved a respiratory exchange ratio >1.05 and were included in the final analysis. Of these 108 participants, 70% were women, 62% were taking β blockers, and 38% had chronic kidney disease. Most patients with HFpEF met criteria for CI (81 of 108; 75%). Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), higher B-type natriuretic peptide, and higher pulmonary artery systolic pressure were each associated with CI. A 1-SD decrease in GFR was independently associated with CI after multivariable adjustment (adjusted odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 4.4, p = 0.02). The association between reduced GFR and CI persisted when considering a variety of measures of chronotropic response. In conclusion, reduced GFR is the major clinical correlate of CI in patients with HFpEF, and further study of the relation between chronic kidney disease and CI may provide insight into the pathophysiology of CI in HFpEF. PMID:26260398

  2. Type D personality negatively associated with self-care in Chinese heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Wang, Xiu-Hua; Wong, Eliza ML; Chow, Choi Kai; Chair, Sek Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the association between type D personality and self-care behaviors in heart failure (HF) patients. We examined the effect of type D personality on self-care behaviors and self-efficacy among Chinese HF patients. Methods A cross-sectional study with a convenience sample was conducted. All participants completed the questionnaires of the self-care of HF index (V6) and type D personality scale. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained from medical records and patient interviews. The methods used for data analysis included descriptive analysis, independent-sample t-test, χ2 test, and multiple linear regression. Results A total of 127 HF patients were included and 61.4% of them were male. The average age for this study sample was 64.9 ± 12.34 years. The majority of the participants were in a New York Heart Association class III or IV (87%), and the average length of living with HF was 38.24 ± 41.1 months. A total of 33.1% of the participants were identified as having type D personality. No significant differences were determined in the demographic and clinical variables between type D and non-type D patients, except for the mean age and the length of living with HF. Type D patients were younger and had a shorter time of living with HF than their non-type D counterparts. Multiple regression demonstrated significant associations between type D personality and self-care maintenance and self-efficacy after adjusting the demographic and clinical factors. However, type D personality was not significantly associated with self-care management behaviors. Conclusions Type D personality was negatively related to self-care maintenance and self-efficacy in Chinese HF patients. Future study is warranted to develop a tailored intervention to improve engagement in self-care behaviors in HF patients with type D personality. PMID:27594867

  3. Association between household income and overweight of Korean and American children: trends and differences.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yongju; Oh, Sangwoo; Park, Sangshin; Park, Yongsoon

    2010-07-01

    The prevalence of overweight in children has been dramatically increasing worldwide, and socioeconomic status is an important risk factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that household income is negatively associated with overweight in Korean and American girls and boys. In the study, 2117 children 7 to 12 years of age from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2001 and 2007 and 3016 children from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2001 and 2006 were included. Overweight is defined as the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. Lower household income significantly increased the risk for overweight in Korean boys, irrespective of adjustments. The negative association between household income and overweight of American boys disappeared after adjusting for the frequency of dining out and TV viewing time. There was no significant association between household income and overweight of Korean and American girls. As household income increased, the intake of energy from protein was increased, but energy from carbohydrates was decreased in Korean boys. On the other hand, as household income increased, energy intake from carbohydrates was increased and energy intake from proteins decreased in American boys. In conclusion, positive association between household income and overweight was found in Korean boys, but not in Korean girls and American boys and girls. Effects solely targeting reduction in income disparities cannot effectively reduce sex disparities in overweight of children. PMID:20797479

  4. Association of plasma uric acid with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure: mendelian randomisation analysis of two large cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Tom M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index. Design Mendelian randomisation analysis, using variation at specific genes (SLC2A9 (rs7442295) as an instrument for uric acid; and FTO (rs9939609), MC4R (rs17782313), and TMEM18 (rs6548238) for body mass index). Setting Two large, prospective cohort studies in Denmark. Participants We measured levels of uric acid and related covariables in 58 072 participants from the Copenhagen General Population Study and 10 602 from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, comprising 4890 and 2282 cases of ischaemic heart disease, respectively. Main outcome Blood pressure and prospectively assessed ischaemic heart disease. Results Estimates confirmed known observational associations between plasma uric acid and hyperuricaemia with risk of ischaemic heart disease and diastolic and systolic blood pressure. However, when using genotypic instruments for uric acid and hyperuricaemia, we saw no evidence for causal associations between uric acid, ischaemic heart disease, and blood pressure. We used genetic instruments to investigate body mass index as a potentially confounding factor in observational associations, and saw a causal effect on uric acid levels. Every four unit increase of body mass index saw a rise in uric acid of 0.03 mmol/L (95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.04), and an increase in risk of hyperuricaemia of 7.5% (3.9% to 11.1%). Conclusion By contrast with observational findings, there is no strong evidence for causal associations between uric acid and ischaemic heart disease or blood pressure. However, evidence supports a causal effect between body mass index and uric acid level and hyperuricaemia. This finding strongly suggests body mass index as a confounder in observational associations, and suggests a role for elevated body mass index or obesity in the development of

  5. Report of a National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute Workshop: heterogeneity in cardiometabolic risk in Asian Americans In the U.S. Opportunities for research.

    PubMed

    Narayan, K M Venkat; Aviles-Santa, Larissa; Oza-Frank, Reena; Pandey, Mona; Curb, J David; McNeely, Marguerite; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Palaniappan, Latha; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    The Asian and Pacific Islander population (Asian Americans) in the U.S. has increased dramatically in the last few decades. Yet, data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in this population are scarce. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health conducted an Expert Workshop to: 1) assess the importance of studying CVD in Asian Americans in the U.S.; and 2) consider strategic options for further investigations of CVD in this population. There is considerable geographical, ethnic, cultural, and genetic diversity within this population. Limited data also suggest striking differences in the risk of CVD, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other CVD risk factors across the Asian-American population. The Asian-American population is a new diverse pool with less contemporary genetic and cultural admixture relative to groups that have lived in the U.S. for generations, plus it is diverse in lifestyle including culture, diet, and family structure. This diversity provides a window of opportunity for research on genes and gene-environment interactions and also to investigate how acculturation/assimilation to U.S. lifestyles affects health and CVD risk among relatively homogenous groups of recent immigrants. Given the heterogeneity in body weight, body size, and CVD risk, the Asian-American population in the U.S. offers a unique model to study the interaction and relationships between visceral adiposity and adipose tissue distribution and beta cell function, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. PMID:20202512

  6. HLA disease association and protection in HIV infection among African Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Cruse, J M; Brackin, M N; Lewis, R E; Meeks, W; Nolan, R; Brackin, B

    1991-01-01

    In a previous investigation, we demonstrated an increased progression of overt AIDS in the African American population compared to the Caucasian population as reflected by the significantly lower absolute number of CD4+ lymphocytes detected in the African American population in an earlier study. The present study elucidates some of the possible genetic factors which may contribute to disease association or protection against HIV infection. The HLA phenotypes expressed as A, B, C, DR and DQw antigens were revealed by the Amos-modified typing procedure. NIH scoring was utilized to designate positive cells taking up trypan blue. A test of proportion equivalent to the chi 2 approximation was used to compare the disease population (n = 62; 38 African Americans, 24 Caucasians) to race-matched normal heterosexual local controls (323 African Americans, 412 Caucasians). Significant p values were corrected for the number of HLA antigens tested. HLA markers associated with possible protection from infection for African Americans were Cw4 and DRw6, whereas Caucasians expressed none. Disease association markers present in the African American population were A31, B35, Cw6, Cw7, DR5, DR6, DRw11, DRw12, DQw6 and DQw7, whereas in the Caucasian population A28, Aw66, Aw48, Bw65, Bw70, Cw7, DRw10, DRw12, DQw6 and DQw7 were demonstrated. The highest phenotypic frequency for a disease association marker in the study was for HLA-DR5 (62.9%) in the HIV-infected African American population without Kaposi's sarcoma compared to a frequency of 28.9% for the regional control group (p = 0.0012). We conclude that genetic factors do have a role in HIV infection since only 50-60% of those exposed to the AIDS virus will become infected. PMID:1910527

  7. New York Heart Association functional class predicts exercise parameters in the current era

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Stuart D.; Saval, Matthew A.; Robbins, Jennifer L.; Ellestad, Myrvin H.; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Handberg, Eileen M.; Zhou, Yi; Chandler, Bleakley

    2009-01-01

    The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class is a subjective estimate of a patient's functional ability based on symptoms that does not always correlate with the objective estimate of functional capacity, peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2). Additionally, relationships between these two measurements have not been examined in the current medical era when patients are using beta blockers, aldosterone antagonists, and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Using baseline data from the HF-ACTION (Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing) study, we examined this relationship. Methods 1758 patients underwent a symptom limited metabolic stress test and stopped exercise due to dyspnea or fatigue. The relationship between NYHA functional class and peak VO2 was examined. Additionally, the effects of beta blockers, aldosterone antagonists, and CRT therapy on these relationships were compared. Results NYHA II patients have a significantly higher peak VO2 (16.1 ± 4.6 vs. 13.0 ± 4.2 ml/kg/min), a lower Ve/VCO2 slope (32.8 ± 7.7 versus 36.8 ± 10.4), and a longer duration of exercise (11.0 ± 3.9 versus 8.0 ± 3.4 minutes) than NYHA III/IV patients. Within each functional class, there is no difference in any of the exercise parameters between patients on or off of beta blockers, aldosterone antagonists, or CRT therapy. Finally, with increasing age a significant difference in peak VO2, Ve/VCO2 slope, and exercise time was found. Conclusion For patients being treated with current medical therapy, there still is a difference in true functional capacity between NYHA functional class II and III/IV patients. However, within each NYHA functional class, the presence or absence or contemporary heart failure therapies does not alter exercise parameters. PMID:19782785

  8. Factors Associated with Oral Health Status in American Indian Children.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Tamanna; Quissell, David O; Henderson, William G; Thomas, Jacob F; Bryant, Lucinda L; Braun, Patricia A; Albino, Judith E

    2014-09-01

    The literature reports psychosocial, environmental, and cultural factors related to Early Childhood Caries (ECC), but few studies have included American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. AI/AN children have the highest prevalence of ECC among any population group in the United States. This study examined socio-demographic characteristics of children and their parents/caregivers and psychosocial characteristics of parents/caregivers as risk factors for baseline oral health status of preschool children in the Navajo Nation, as part of a 3-year cluster randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of trained community workers providing a fluoride varnish and oral health promotion intervention to. The study recruited 1,015 children at 52 Head Start Centers. Baseline ECC data were collected by calibrated dental hygienists for 981 of the children ages of 3-5 years, and a Basic Research Factors Questionnaire (BRFQ) was completed by their parents/caregivers. Bivariable analysis revealed that dmfs was higher in older children; in males; in children with male parents/caregivers; and when the parent/caregiver had less education and income, worse oral health behavior in caring for their children's teeth, and higher scores for external powerful others and external chance locus of control, greater perceived susceptibility and barriers, and lower scores for community risky behavior. In a multiple linear regression model, the variables that remained statistically significant were child's age and gender, and oral health behavior score of the parent/caregiver. Intervening to improve parent/caregiver oral health behavior in caring for the teeth of children potentially could in AI/AN children. PMID:25232515

  9. Association between β1 adrenergic receptor gene Arg389Gly polymorphism and risk of heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, S T; Zhao, W; Liu, B; Jia, R Y; Zhao, C J; Cui, L Q

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the association between Arg389Gly polymorphism in the β1 adrenergic receptor gene and heart failure risk. However, the specific association is still controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of all case-control studies that evaluated the association between Arg389Gly polymorphism and heart failure in humans. Studies were identified in the PubMed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies. Six case-control studies with a total of 1736 participants were included in the meta-analysis, including 882 cases with heart failure and 854 controls, and our results showed no association between the Arg389Gly polymorphism and heart failure [ArgArg vs GlyGly: odds ratio (OR) = 0.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59-1.20; ArgArg vs ArgGly: OR = 0.95, 95%CI 0.78-1.16; dominant model: OR = 1.08, 95%CI 0.89-1.31; recessive model: OR = 0.96, 95%CI 0.69-1.35]. No publication bias was found in the present study (all P values > 0.05). In conclusion, the β1 adrenergic receptor gene Arg389Gly polymorphism might not be associated with heart failure risk. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm this conclusion. PMID:26125791

  10. Genetic Loci Associated With Atrial Fibrillation: Relation to Left Atrial Structure in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Yin, Xiaoyan; McManus, David D.; Chuang, Michael L.; Cheng, Susan; Lubitz, Steven A.; Arora, Garima; Manning, Warren J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants associated with AF. Whether genetic variants associated with AF are also associated with atrial structure, an intermediate phenotype for AF, has had limited investigation. We sought to investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and atrial structure obtained by cardiovascular imaging in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results We selected 11 SNPs that have been associated with AF in GWAS. We examined the SNPs' relations to cross‐sectional left atrial (LA) dimensions (determined by transthoracic echocardiography) and LA volume (determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance [CMR]) employing linear regression. The total sample included 1555 participants with CMR LA volume (age 60±9 years, 53% women) and 6861 participants with echocardiographic LA diameter (age 48±13 years, 52% women) measured. We employed a significance threshold of P<0.0023 to account for multiple testing of the 11 SNPs and 2 LA measures. In a primary analysis, no SNPs were significantly related to the LA measures. Likewise, in secondary analyses excluding individuals with prevalent AF (n=77, CMR sample; n=105, echocardiography sample) no SNPs were related to LA volume or diameter. Conclusion In a community‐based cohort, we did not identify a statistically significant association between selected SNPs associated with AF and measures of LA anatomy. Further investigations with larger longitudinally assessed samples and a broader array of SNPs may be necessary to determine the relation between genetic loci associated with AF and atrial structure. PMID:24695651

  11. A transthyretin variant, Asp18Asn, associated with amyloid cardiomyopathy: a new African-American variant?

    PubMed

    Quarta, C Cristina; Falk, Rodney H

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical features of a transthyretin (TTR) gene mutation (Asp18Asn) in a 54-year-old Liberian male presenting with congestive heart failure due to amyloid cardiomyopathy, in the absence of neurologic impairment. Review of the literature revealed only two other documented cases of this mutation, neither of whom was described in any detail. Follow-up information on these cases revealed that they were of African origin, as was one other unpublished case. We therefore believe that this is the second TTR mutation associated with isolated cardiac manifestations to be described in patients of African origin. It appears to be far less common than the previously described Val122Ile mutation but onset may be at an earlier age, potentially making heart transplantation a viable option should heart failure become severe. PMID:23126592

  12. Anxiety, Alexithymia, and Depression as Mediators of the Association between Childhood Abuse and Eating Disordered Behavior in African American and European American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Williams, Larry J.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated structural equation models of the associations among family functioning, childhood abuse, depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and eating disorder symptomatology in a sample of 412 European American and 192 African American female undergraduates. Additionally, the specific roles of anxiety, depression, and alexithymia as…

  13. Recent opinions of the Judicial Council of the American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    1984-04-27

    The text is provided of six opinions, or interpretations, of the American Medical Association's Principles of Medical Ethics, that were approved by the Judicial Council after the publication of the 1982 edition of Current Opinions of the Judicial Council of the American Medical Association. The opinions deal briefly with the physician's ethical responsibilities in relation to accreditation of health facilities and programs, screening of semen donors for use in artificial insemination, safeguarding of confidentiality in the physician patient relationship, genetic counseling, in vitro fertilization, interprofessional relations with nurses, and sports medicine. PMID:6708251

  14. Extracellular Vesicle Proteins Associated with Systemic Vascular Events Correlate with Heart Failure: An Observational Study in a Dyspnoea Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Vernooij, Flora; Ibrahim, Irwani; Ooi, Shirley; Gijsberts, Crystel M.; Schoneveld, Arjan H.; Sen, Kuan Win; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Timmers, Leo; Richards, Arthur Mark; Jong, Chun Tzen; Mazlan, Ibrahim; Wang, Jiong-Wei; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Background SerpinF2, SerpinG1, CystatinC and CD14 are involved in inflammatory processes and plasma extracellular vesicle (EV) -levels of these proteins have been reported to be associated with systemic vascular events. Evidence is accumulating that inflammatory processes may play a pivotal role both in systemic vascular events and in heart failure. Therefore, we studied the association between plasma extracellular vesicle SerpinF2-, SerpinG1-, CystatinC and CD14-levels and the occurrence of acute heart failure in patients. Methods and Result Extracellular vesicle protein levels of SerpinG1, SerpinF2, CystatinC and CD14 were measured in an observational study of 404 subjects presenting with dysponea at the emergency department (4B-cohort). Plasma extracellular vesicles were precipitated in a total extracellular vesicles (TEX)-fraction and in separate LDL- and HDL-subfractions. Extracellular vesicle protein levels were measured with a quantitative immune assay in all 3 precipitates. Out of 404 subjects, 141 (35%) were diagnosed with acutely decompensated heart failure. After correction for confounders (including comorbidities and medications), levels of CD14 in the HDL-fraction (OR 1.53, p = 0.01), SerpinF2 in the TEX-and LDL-fraction (ORs respectively 0.71 and 0.65, p<0.05) and SerpinG1 in the TEX-fraction (OR 1.55, p = 0.004) were statistically significantly related to heart failure. Furthermore, extracellular vesicle CD14- and SerpinF2-levels were significantly higher in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction than in those with reduced ejection fraction. Conclusion Extracellular vesicle levels of CD14, SerpinG1 and SerpinF2 are associated with the occurrence of heart failure in subjects suspected for acute heart failure, suggesting common underlying pathophysiological mechanisms for heart failure and vascular events. PMID:26820481

  15. 2011 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    As we have throughout the association's history, we focused in 2011 on multiple initiatives--all designed to further, support, and communicate the important work that psychologists do. This year we had the benefit of APA's first-ever strategic plan as well as funding for the following seven initiatives that are specifically designed to execute the…

  16. Association of heart rate variability and inflammatory response in patients with cardiovascular diseases: current strengths and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Vasilios; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Maglaveras, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have confirmed a continuous cross-talk between both sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of autonomic nervous system and inflammatory response, in different clinical scenarios. In cardiovascular diseases, inflammation has been proven to play a pivotal role in disease progression, pathogenesis and resolution. A few clinical studies have assessed the possible inter-relation between neuro-autonomic output, estimated with heart rate variability analysis, which is the variability of R-R in the electrocardiogram, and different inflammatory biomarkers, in patients suffering from stable or unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Moreover, different indices derived from heart rate signals' processing, have been proven to correlate strongly with severity of heart disease and predict final outcome. In this review article we will summarize major findings from different investigators, evaluating neuro-immunological interactions through heart rate variability analysis, in different groups of cardiovascular patients. We suggest that markers originating from variability analysis of heart rate signals seem to be related to inflammatory biomarkers. However, a lot of open questions remain to be addressed, regarding the existence of a true association between heart rate variability and autonomic nervous system output or its adoption for risk stratification and therapeutic monitoring at the bedside. Finally, potential therapeutic implications will be discussed, leading to autonomic balance restoration in relation with inflammatory control. PMID:23847549

  17. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Katelyn N.; Badrov, Mark B.; Barron, Carly C.; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG. PMID:25972576

  18. The Development of Functional Overreaching Is Associated with a Faster Heart Rate Recovery in Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Anaël; Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Coutts, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate whether heart rate recovery (HRR) may represent an effective marker of functional overreaching (f-OR) in endurance athletes. Methods and Results Thirty-one experienced male triathletes were tested (10 control and 21 overload subjects) before (Pre), and immediately after an overload training period (Mid) and after a 2-week taper (Post). Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to exhaustion, including heart rate, catecholamine release and blood lactate concentration. Ten participants from the overload group developed signs of f-OR at Mid (i.e. -2.1 ± 0.8% change in performance associated with concomitant high perceived fatigue). Additionally, only the f-OR group demonstrated a 99% chance of increase in HRR during the overload period (+8 ± 5 bpm, large effect size). Concomitantly, this group also revealed a >80% chance of decreasing blood lactate (-11 ± 14%, large), plasma norepinephrine (-12 ± 37%, small) and plasma epinephrine peak concentrations (-51 ± 22%, moderate). These blood measures returned to baseline levels at Post. HRR change was negatively correlated to changes in performance, peak HR and peak blood metabolites concentrations. Conclusion These findings suggest that i) a faster HRR is not systematically associated with improved physical performance, ii) changes in HRR should be interpreted in the context of the specific training phase, the athletes perceived level of fatigue and the performance response; and, iii) the faster HRR associated with f-OR may be induced by a decreased central command and by a lower chemoreflex activity. PMID:26488766

  19. Congestive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is associated with severely impaired dynamic Starling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigeki; Hastings, Jeff L.; Prasad, Anand; Fu, Qi; Bhella, Paul S.; Pacini, Eric; Krainski, Felix; Palmer, M. Dean; Zhang, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Sedentary aging leads to increased cardiovascular stiffening, which can be ameliorated by sufficient amounts of lifelong exercise training. An even more extreme form of cardiovascular stiffening can be seen in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which comprises ∼40∼50% of elderly patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure. There are two major interrelated hypotheses proposed to explain heart failure in these patients: 1) increased left ventricular (LV) diastolic stiffness and 2) increased arterial stiffening. The beat-to-beat dynamic Starling mechanism, which is impaired with healthy human aging, reflects the interaction between ventricular and arterial stiffness and thus may provide a link between these two mechanisms underlying HFpEF. Spectral transfer function analysis was applied between beat-to-beat changes in LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP; estimated from pulmonary artery diastolic pressure with a right heart catheter) and stroke volume (SV) index. The dynamic Starling mechanism (transfer function gain between LVEDP and the SV index) was impaired in HFpEF patients (n = 10) compared with healthy age-matched controls (n = 12) (HFpEF: 0.23 ± 0.10 ml·m−2·mmHg−1 and control: 0.37 ± 0.11 ml·m−2·mmHg−1, means ± SD, P = 0.008). There was also a markedly increased (3-fold) fluctuation of LV filling pressures (power spectral density of LVEDP) in HFpEF patients, which may predispose to pulmonary edema due to intermittent exposure to higher pulmonary capillary pressure (HFpEF: 12.2 ± 10.4 mmHg2 and control: 3.8 ± 2.9 mmHg2, P = 0.014). An impaired dynamic Starling mechanism, even more extreme than that observed with healthy aging, is associated with marked breath-by-breath LVEDP variability and may reflect advanced ventricular and arterial stiffness in HFpEF, possibly contributing to reduced forward output and pulmonary congestion. PMID:21310890

  20. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  1. Factors Associated with Willingness to Participate in Biospecimen Research Among Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wanzhen; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  2. Longitudinal Genome-Wide Association of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Bogalusa Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin N.; Chen, Wei; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Peltonen, Leena; Raitakari, Olli T.; Salem, Rany M.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaw, Marian; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Topol, Eric J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have pinpointed many loci associated with CVD risk factors in adults. It is unclear, however, if these loci predict trait levels at all ages, if they are associated with how a trait develops over time, or if they could be used to screen individuals who are pre-symptomatic to provide the opportunity for preventive measures before disease onset. We completed a genome-wide association study on participants in the longitudinal Bogalusa Heart Study (BHS) and have characterized the association between genetic factors and the development of CVD risk factors from childhood to adulthood. We report 7 genome-wide significant associations involving CVD risk factors, two of which have been previously reported. Top regions were tested for replication in the Young Finns Study (YF) and two associations strongly replicated: rs247616 in CETP with HDL levels (combined P = 9.7×10−24), and rs445925 at APOE with LDL levels (combined P = 8.7×10−19). We show that SNPs previously identified in adult cross-sectional studies tend to show age-independent effects in the BHS with effect sizes consistent with previous reports. Previously identified variants were associated with adult trait levels above and beyond those seen in childhood; however, variants with time-dependent effects were also promising predictors. This is the first GWA study to evaluate the role of common genetic variants in the development of CVD risk factors in children as they advance through adulthood and highlights the utility of using longitudinal studies to identify genetic predictors of adult traits in children. PMID:20838585

  3. Association between chronic kidney disease and coronary artery calcification: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Holly; Toto, Robert; Peshock, Ronald; Cooper, Richard; Victor, Ronald

    2005-02-01

    The hypothesis that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased coronary artery calcification (CAC) was tested using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a representative sample of Dallas County residents aged 30 to 65 yr. CKD was defined as presence of microalbuminuria and GFR > or =60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (stage 1 to 2), or GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (stage 3 to 5), excluding end-stage kidney disease. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between stages of CKD and CAC scores >10, >100, and >400 versus scores < or =10 compared with no CKD while adjusting for covariates. Analyses were repeated after stratifying by presence of diabetes. The mean age was 43.9 yr, and hypertension and diabetes were noted in 31.0 and 9.8%, respectively. No association was noted between stage 1 to 2 CKD and increased CAC scores. Compared with no CKD, stage 3 to 5 CKD was associated with CAC scores >100 (odds ratio, 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 8.80) and >400 (odds ratio, 8.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.94 to 35.95) in the total population after adjustment for covariates, but these associations were substantially reduced after exclusion of participants with diabetes. Participants with diabetes and stage 3 to 5 CKD had a ninefold increased odds of CAC scores >10 versus scores < or =10 compared with participants with diabetes and without CKD, whereas no association was noted between stage 3 to 5 CKD and CAC scores >10 in the nondiabetic population. In conclusion, stage 3 to 5 CKD is associated with increased CAC scores, but this association may be substantially stronger among adults with diabetes. These findings need to be confirmed in study populations that include adults >65 yr of age and a larger number of CKD cases. PMID:15601745

  4. Association of Sex Hormones, Aging and Atrial Fibrillation in Men: The Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Moser, Carlee B.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Wang, Na; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Coviello, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous sex hormones have been related to cardiovascular outcomes and mortality. We hypothesized that sex hormones are related to atrial fibrillation (AF) in a community-based cohort of middle-aged to older men. Methods and Results We examined testosterone, estradiol, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [DHEA-S]) in relation to incident AF in men participating in the Framingham Heart Study. We assessed the 10-year risk of AF in multivariable-adjusted hazard models. The cohort consisted of 1251 men (age 68.0±8.2), of whom 275 developed incident AF. We identified a significant interaction between age and testosterone, and therefore stratified men into age 55–69 (n=786), 70–79 (n=351), and ≥80 (n=114). In men 55–69 each 1-standard deviation (SD) decrease in testosterone was associated with hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 1.59) for incident AF. The association between testosterone and 10-year incident AF in men 70–79 did not reach statistical significance. In men ≥80 years a 1-SD decrease in testosterone was associated with HR 3.53 (95% CI, 1.96 to 6.37) for AF risk. Estradiol was associated with incident AF (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.26). DHEA-S had a borderline association with risk of AF that was not statistically significant (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.28). Conclusions Testosterone and estradiol are associated with incident AF in a cohort of older men. Testosterone deficiency in men ≥80 is strongly associated with AF risk. The clinical and electrophysiologic mechanisms underlying the associations between sex hormones and AF in older men merit continued investigation. PMID:24610804

  5. A Text Messaging Intervention to Improve Heart Failure Self-Management After Hospital Discharge in a Largely African-American Population: Before-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Rabia R; Dick, Jonathan J; Smith, Bryan; Mayo, Ainoa; O'Connor, Anne; Meltzer, David O

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in finding novel approaches to reduce health disparities in readmissions for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Text messaging is a promising platform for improving chronic disease self-management in low-income populations, yet is largely unexplored in ADHF. Objective The purpose of this pre-post study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a text message–based (SMS: short message service) intervention in a largely African American population with ADHF and explore its effects on self-management. Methods Hospitalized patients with ADHF were enrolled in an automated text message–based heart failure program for 30 days following discharge. Messages provided self-care reminders and patient education on diet, symptom recognition, and health care navigation. Demographic and cell phone usage data were collected on enrollment, and an exit survey was administered on completion. The Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) was administered preintervention and postintervention and compared using sample t tests (composite) and Wilcoxon rank sum tests (individual). Clinical data were collected through chart abstraction. Results Of 51 patients approached for recruitment, 27 agreed to participate and 15 were enrolled (14 African-American, 1 White). Barriers to enrollment included not owning a personal cell phone (n=12), failing the Mini-Mental exam (n=3), needing a proxy (n=2), hard of hearing (n=1), and refusal (n=3). Another 3 participants left the study for health reasons and 3 others had technology issues. A total of 6 patients (5 African-American, 1 White) completed the postintervention surveys. The mean age was 50 years (range 23-69) and over half had Medicaid or were uninsured (60%, 9/15). The mean ejection fraction for those with systolic dysfunction was 22%, and at least two-thirds had a prior hospitalization in the past year. Participants strongly agreed that the program was easy to use (83%), reduced pills

  6. Associations between adolescents' perceived discrimination and prosocial tendencies: the mediating role of Mexican American values.

    PubMed

    Brittian, Aerika S; O'Donnell, Megan; Knight, George P; Carlo, Gustavo; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Roosa, Mark W

    2013-03-01

    Experiences with perceived discrimination (e.g., perceptions of being treated unfairly due to race or ethnicity) are expected to impact negatively youths' prosocial development. However, resilience often occurs in light of such experiences through cultural factors. The current longitudinal study examined the influence of perceived discrimination on the emergence of Mexican American adolescents' later prosocial tendencies, and examined the mediating role of Mexican American values (e.g., familism, respect, and religiosity). Participants included 749 adolescents (49 % female) interviewed at 5th, 7th, and 10th grade. Results of the current study suggested that, although perceived discrimination was associated negatively with some types of prosocial tendencies (e.g., compliant, emotional, and dire) and related positively to public prosocial helping, the associations were mediated by youths' Mexican American values. Directions for future research are presented and practical implications for promoting adolescents' resilience are discussed. PMID:23152074

  7. Associations Between Adolescents’ Perceived Discrimination and Prosocial Tendencies: The Mediating Role of Mexican American Values

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Megan; Knight, George P.; Carlo, Gustavo; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Roosa, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Experiences with perceived discrimination (e.g., perceptions of being treated unfairly due to race or ethnicity) are expected to impact negatively youths’ prosocial development. However, resilience often occurs in light of such experiences through cultural factors. The current longitudinal study examined the influence of perceived discrimination on the emergence of Mexican American adolescents’ later prosocial tendencies, and examined the mediating role of Mexican American values (e.g., familism, respect, and religiosity). Participants included 749 adolescents (49 % female) interviewed at 5th, 7th, and 10th grade. Results of the current study suggested that, although perceived discrimination was associated negatively with some types of prosocial tendencies (e.g., compliant, emotional, and dire) and related positively to public prosocial helping, the associations were mediated by youths’ Mexican American values. Directions for future research are presented and practical implications for promoting adolescents’ resilience are discussed. PMID:23152074

  8. IL10 Promoter Polymorphisms are Associated with Rheumatic Heart Disease in Saudi Arabian Patients.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Atiyeh M; Alnuzha, Aisha; Al-Mazroea, Abdulhadi H; Eldardear, Amr E; AlSamman, Ala Y; Almohammadi, Yousef; Al-Harbi, Khalid M

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is an inflammatory disease that develops following streptococcal infections. IL10 helps to balance immune responses to pathogens. IL10 polymorphisms have been associated with RHD, although results remain inconclusive. Our aim was to investigate the association between IL10 polymorphisms and RHD in Saudi Arabian patients. IL10 promoter polymorphisms (-1082A/G, -829C/T, and -592C/A) were genotyped in 118 RHD patients and 200 matched controls using the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. There was a significant difference in IL10-1082 genotype frequency between patients and controls (p = 0.01). -1082G allele carriage (GG+GA vs AA) and the (-1082, -819, -592) GCC haplotype carriage were associated with an increased risk of RHD (p = 0.004, OR 2.1, 95% CIs 1.7-3.4 and p = 0.004, OR 2, 95% CIs 1.3-3.4, respectively). The ACC haplotype was associated with a decrease in RHD risk (p = 0.015, OR 0.6, 95% CIs 0.4-0.9). IL10 promoter polymorphisms may play an important role in the development of RHD and provide an opportunity for therapeutic stratification. PMID:26255050

  9. The association between chronic exposure to traffic-related air pollution and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Bernardo S; Jerrett, Michael; Finkelstein, Murray; Kanaroglou, Pavlos; Brook, Jeffrey R; Arain, M Altaf; Sears, Malcolm R; Stieb, David; Balmes, John; Chapman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence links air pollution to the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the association between ischemic heart disease (IHD) prevalence and exposure to traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide [NO₂], fine particulate matter [PM₂.₅], and ozone [O₃]) in a population of susceptible subjects in Toronto. Local (NO₂) exposures were modeled using land use regression based on extensive field monitoring. Regional exposures (PM₂.₅, O₃) were modeled as confounders using inverse distance weighted interpolation based on government monitoring data. The study sample consisted of 2360 patients referred during 1992 to 1999 to a pulmonary clinic at the Toronto Western Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to diagnose or manage a respiratory complaint. IHD status was determined by clinical database linkages (ICD-9-CM 412-414). The association between IHD and air pollutants was assessed with a modified Poisson regression resulting in relative risk estimates. Confounding was controlled with individual and neighborhood-level covariates. After adjusting for multiple covariates, NO₂ was significantly associated with increased IHD risk, relative risk (RR) = 1.33 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2, 1.47). Subjects living near major roads and highways had a trend toward an elevated risk of IHD, RR = 1.08 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.18). Regional PM₂.₅ and O₃ were not associated with risk of IHD. PMID:22524595

  10. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have ...

  11. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely. Substantial growth in sales of foods attractive to vegetarians has occurred and these foods appear in many supermarkets. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine. A vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, use of fortified foods or supplements can be helpful in meeting recommendations for individual nutrients. Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life-cycle including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarian diets offer a number of nutritional benefits including lower levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein as well as higher levels of carbohydrates, fibre, magnesium, potassium, folate, antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and phytochemicals. Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than non-vegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer. While a number of federally funded and institutional feeding programs can accommodate vegetarians, few have foods suitable for vegans at this time. Because

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: Vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely. Substantial growth in sales of foods attractive to vegetarians has occurred, and these foods appear in many supermarkets. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians, including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine. A vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, use of fortified foods or supplements can be helpful in meeting recommendations for individual nutrients. Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarian diets offer a number of nutritional benefits, including lower levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein as well as higher levels of carbohydrates, fiber, magnesium, potassium, folate, and antioxidants such as vitamins C and E and phytochemicals. Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than nonvegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease; vegetarians also show lower blood cholesterol levels; lower blood pressure; and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer. Although a number of federally funded and institutional feeding programs can accommodate vegetarians, few have foods suitable

  13. Ageism and Body Esteem: Associations With Psychological Well-Being Among Late Middle-Aged African American and European American Women

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Social expectancy theory posits that cultural values shape how individuals perceive and evaluate others, and this influences how others evaluate themselves. Based on this theory, ageism may shape older individuals’ self-evaluations. Given the cultural focus on beauty and youth, perceptions of age discrimination may be associated with lower body esteem, and this may be associated with poor psychological well-being. Because discrimination has been associated with poor health, and perceptions of health can affect body perceptions, subjective health status may also contribute to lower body esteem. Method. These associations are assessed in a structural equation model for 244 African American and European American women in their early 60s. Results. Perceptions of age discrimination and body esteem were associated with lower psychological well-being for both ethnic groups. Body esteem partially mediated the association between age discrimination and psychological well-being among European American women but not among African American women. Discussion. Age-related discrimination is one source of psychological distress for older adults, though ageism’s associations with body esteem, health, and psychological well-being vary significantly for European American and African American women. Examining body perceptions and health in the contexts of ageism and ethnicity is necessary when considering the psychological well-being of older women. PMID:24013801

  14. Heritability and genetic association analysis of cognition in the Diabetes Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Cox, Amanda J; Hugenschmidt, Christina E; Raffield, Laura M; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Williamson, Jeff D; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive performance is an important component of healthy aging. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with negative outcomes for the brain and cognition, although causal mechanisms have not been definitely determined. Genetic risk factors warrant further consideration in this context. This study examined the heritability of cognitive function as assessed by (1) the Digit Symbol Substitution Task; (2) the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; (3) the Stroop Task; (4) the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Task; and (5) the Controlled Oral Word Association Task for Phonemic and Semantic Fluency, in the family-based, T2D-enriched, Diabetes Heart Study sample (n = 550 participants from 257 families). The genetic basis of these cognitive measures was further evaluated by association analysis with candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide SNP data. Measures of cognitive function were significantly heritable (hˆ(2) = 0.28-0.62) following adjustment for age, gender, and education. A total of 31 SNPs (from 26 genes/regions) selected to form an a priori set of candidate SNPs showed limited evidence of association with cognitive function when applying conservative metrics of significance. Genome-wide assessment of both noncoding and coding variants revealed suggestive evidence of association for several coding variants including rs139509083 in CNST (p = 4.9 × 10(-9)), rs199968569 in PLAA (p = 4.9 × 10(-9)) and rs138487371 in PCDH8 (p = 3.7 × 10(-8)). The identification of a heritable component to cognitive performance in T2D suggests a role for genetic contributors to cognitive performance even in the presence of metabolic disease and other associated comorbidities and is supported by the identification of genetic association signals in functionally plausible candidates. PMID:24684796

  15. Management of patients with ventricular tachycardia in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Todd, Derick M; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Estner, Heidi L; Broadhurst, Paul; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in the management of ventricular tachycardia (VT). The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the members of the EHRA Research Network. Responses were received from 31 centres in 16 countries. The results of the survey show that the management of VT is in general in accordance with guidelines. Antiarrhythmic drugs are still frequently used for VT treatment. In patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is routinely recommended, while the treatment options vary for patients with moderate or low risk. A discreet attitude is adopted for catheter ablation in high-risk patients as demonstrated by a relatively low rate of catheter ablation. PMID:26273104

  16. Reframing the association and significance of co-morbidities in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Triposkiadis, Filippos; Giamouzis, Gregory; Parissis, John; Starling, Randall C; Boudoulas, Harisios; Skoularigis, John; Butler, Javed; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2016-07-01

    Several co-existing diseases and/or conditions (co-morbidities) are present in patients with heart failure (HF), with diverse clinical relevance. Multiple mechanisms may underlie the co-existence of HF and co-morbidities, including direct causation, associated risk factors, heterogeneity, and independence. The complex inter-relationship of co-morbidities and their impact on the cardiovascular system contribute to the features of HF, both with reduced (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The purpose of this work is to provide an overview of the contribution of major cardiac and non-cardiac co-morbidities to HF development and outcomes, in the context of both HFpEF and HFrEF. Accordingly, epidemiological evidence linking co-morbidities to HF and the effect of prevalent and incident co-morbidities on HF outcome will be reviewed. PMID:27358242

  17. Association between recognizing dementia as a mental illness and dementia knowledge among elderly Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether older Chinese Americans perceive dementia as a mental illness and the relationship between such perception and their general understanding of dementia remains unclear. Our study aims to understand this relationship and its future implication on improving dementia literacy among ethnic minorities. METHODS: Elderly Chinese American participants from the Greater Los Angeles were asked to complete an 11-item dementia questionnaire, following a community health seminar. Cross-sectional survey data was analyzed using standard statistical methods. RESULTS: The questionnaire received an 88.3% response rate. Among 316 responders, only 28.8% (n = 91) of elderly Chinese Americans identified dementia as a mental illness, and 71.2% (n = 225) did not recognize its mental disease origin. Furthermore, in comparison between these two groups, the first group demonstrated significantly higher level of baseline knowledge of the disease. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that only approximately 1 out of 4 older Chinese Americans recognized dementia as a mental illness, consistent with previous studies on Asian Americans. Our study however showed that when dementia was being perceived as a mental illness, such perception was associated with a higher level of baseline dementia understanding. The current study suggested the potential of improving older Chinese Americans dementia literacy by increasing awareness of its mental illness origin. PMID:27354966

  18. U.S. Kids Don't Make the Grade on Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... health, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says. An analysis of 2007-08 federal government survey results found that about 91 percent of youngsters did not have healthy diets. Those between the ages of 2 and 19 ...

  19. Sharing Advice From The Heart | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get involved in the American Heart Association's Go Red For Women movement and Red Dress Collection? ... me and asked me to participate in the Go Red For Women Red Dress Collection and wear ...

  20. Elevated Plasma Soluble ST2 Is Associated with Heart Failure Symptoms and Outcome in Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Dulgheru, Raluca; Magne, Julien; Henri, Christine; Servais, Laurence; Bouznad, Nassim; Ancion, Arnaud; Martinez, Christophe; Davin, Laurent; Le Goff, Caroline; Nchimi, Alain; Piérard, Luc; Oury, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is often used as a complementary finding in the diagnostic work-up of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Whether soluble ST2, a new biomarker of cardiac stretch, is associated with symptomatic status and outcome in asymptomatic AS is unknown. sST2 and BNP levels were measured in 86 patients (74±13 years; 59 asymptomatic, 69%) with AS (<1.5 cm2) and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who were followed-up for 26±16 months. Both BNP and sST2 were associated with NYHA class but sST2 (>23 ng/mL, AUC = 0.68, p<0.01) was more accurate to identify asymptomatic patients or those who developed symptoms during follow-up. sST2 was independently related to left atrial index (p<0.0001) and aortic valve area (p = 0.004; model R2 = 0.32). A modest correlation was found with BNP (r = 0.4, p<0.01). During follow-up, 29 asymptomatic patients (34%) developed heart failure symptoms. With multivariable analysis, peak aortic jet velocity (HR = 2.7, p = 0.007) and sST2 level (HR = 1.04, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of cardiovascular events. In AS, sST2 levels could provide complementary information regarding symptomatic status, new onset heart failure symptoms and outcome. It might become a promising biomarker in these patients. PMID:26390433

  1. Altered heart rate dynamics associated with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ann, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Mee-Hee; Han, Ah-Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness is one of the common and distressing adverse effects associated with antipsychotics; however, its underlying neurobiological basis is not well understood. We examined the relationship between antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness and autonomic neurocardiac function. Methods Twenty-two schizophrenia patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, 28 schizophrenia patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, and 28 matched healthy control subjects were evaluated. Assessments of the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate dynamics were performed. Multivariate analysis of variance and correlation analysis were conducted. Results The mean interbeat (RR) interval value was significantly higher in control subjects than in patients with and without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). The low frequency/high frequency ratio was significantly higher in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05), while the approximate entropy value was significantly lower in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). Correlation analyses controlling for psychotic symptom severity showed that the degree of antipsychotic-induced restlessness had a significant negative correlation with the value of approximate entropy (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results indicate that antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness is associated with altered heart rate dynamics parameters, particularly the nonlinear complexity measure, suggesting that it might adversely affect autonomic neurocardiac integrity. Further prospective research is necessary to elucidate the precise interrelationships and causality. PMID:23986638

  2. Stress-associated cardiovascular reaction masks heart rate dependence on physical load in mice.

    PubMed

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, A A; Popova, A S; Borovik, A S; Dolgov, O N; Tsvirkun, D V; Custaud, M; Vinogradova, O L

    2014-06-10

    When tested on the treadmill mice do not display a graded increase of heart rate (HR), but rather a sharp shift of cardiovascular indices to high levels at the onset of locomotion. We hypothesized that under test conditions cardiovascular reaction to physical load in mice is masked with stress-associated HR increase. To test this hypothesis we monitored mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate in C57BL/6 mice after exposure to stressful stimuli, during spontaneous locomotion in the open-field test, treadmill running or running in a wheel installed in the home cage. Mice were treated with β1-adrenoblocker atenolol (2mg/kg ip, A), cholinolytic ipratropium bromide (2mg/kg ip, I), combination of blockers (A+I), anxiolytic diazepam (5mg/kg ip, D) or saline (control trials, SAL). MAP and HR in mice increased sharply after handling, despite 3weeks of habituation to the procedure. Under stressful conditions of open field test cardiovascular parameters in mice were elevated and did not depend on movement speed. HR values did not differ in I and SAL groups and were reduced with A or A+I. HR was lower at rest in D pretreated mice. In the treadmill test HR increase over speeds of 6, 12 and 18m/min was roughly 1/7-1/10 of HR increase observed after placing the mice on the treadmill. HR could not be increased with cholinolytic (I), but was reduced after sympatholytic (A) or A+I treatment. Anxiolytic (D) reduced heart rate at lower speeds of movement and its overall effect was to unmask the dependency of HR on running speed. During voluntary running in non-stressful conditions of the home cage HR in mice linearly increased with increasing running speeds. We conclude that in test situations cardiovascular reactions in mice are governed predominantly by stress-associated sympathetic activation, rendering efforts to evaluate HR and MAP reactions to workload unreliable. PMID:24802359

  3. Total alpha-tocopherol intakes are associated with serum alpha-tocopherol concentrations in African American adults.

    PubMed

    Talegawkar, Sameera A; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Carithers, Teresa; Taylor, Herman A; Bogle, Margaret L; Tucker, Katherine L

    2007-10-01

    African Americans in the southern United States have a high prevalence of chronic disease. Tocopherol intake and status have been associated with protection against several chronic diseases. Our objectives were, therefore, to examine the association between tocopherol intakes as measured by 2 regional FFQ and their corresponding concentrations in serum and to report on dietary sources of tocopherols in 404 men and women participating in the cross-sectional Diet and Physical Activity Sub-Study of the Jackson Heart Study. A large proportion (49% of men and 66% of women) reported dietary supplement use. Only 5.8% of men and 4.5% of women met the estimated average requirement (EAR) for vitamin E from foods alone, whereas 44.2% men and 49.2% women met it from foods and supplements. Total (diet + supplement) intake of alpha-tocopherol was associated with its corresponding measure in serum. Vitamin E supplement use, sex, serum cholesterol, education, and BMI, but not gamma-tocopherol intakes, were associated with serum gamma-tocopherol. For delta-tocopherol, associated variables included sex and serum cholesterol. The top food sources of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol were snack chips and the top food source of delta-tocopherol was margarine. Despite prevalent vitamin E supplement use, more than one-half of this population did not meet the EAR for alpha-tocopherol intake and very few met it from food alone. Supplement use was associated with higher alpha- but lower gamma-tocopherol concentration in serum. The possible health implications of this difference in relative tocopherol subtypes require further study. PMID:17885014

  4. Inaugural address of the 162nd president of the American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M

    2007-12-01

    On June 26, 2007, Ronald M. Davis, MD, was inaugurated as the 162nd president of the American Medical Association at an ornate ceremony in the Grand Ballroom of the Hilton Chicago Hotel. He is the first AMA president to be board-certified in preventive medicine. After Dr. Davis completed the Epidemic Intelligence Service program and the preventive medicine residency program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he served as director of CDC's Office on Smoking and Health and then as medical director of the Michigan Department of Public Health. Since 1995, he has served as director of the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. By tradition, the presidents of state medical societies and the leaders of a few other medical organizations sit on the dais during the AMA president's inaugural speech. Reflecting Dr. Davis's interest in strengthening the partnership between clinical medicine and public health, he invited leaders of seven preventive medicine and public health organizations to join him on the dais during his address: the Aerospace Medical Association, the American Association of Public Health Physicians, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the American Public Health Association, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, and the National Association of County and City Health Officials. Dr. Davis's inaugural address appears below, except for a portion at the beginning in which he gave tribute to many family members, friends, and colleagues for their support through the years. This portion of his speech can be found on the Journal's website at www.ajpm-online.net. PMID:18022067

  5. Female genital mutilation. Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Female genital mutilation is the medically unnecessary modification of female genitalia. Female genital mutilation typically occurs at about 7 years of age, but mutilated women suffer severe medical complications throughout their adult lives. Female genital mutilation most frequently occurs in Africa, the Middle East, and Muslim parts of Indonesia and Malaysia, and it is generally part of a ceremonial induction into adult society. Recent political and economic problems in these regions, however, have increased the numbers of students and refugees to the United States. Consequently, US physicians are treating an increasing number of mutilated patients. The Council on Scientific Affairs recommends that US physicians join the World Health Organization, the World Medical Association, and other major health care organizations in opposing all forms of medically unnecessary surgical modification of the female genitalia. PMID:7474278

  6. Association of Kidney Disease Measures with Cause-Specific Mortality: The Korean Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Yejin; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H.; Grams, Morgan; Shin, Sang Yop; Jee, Sun Ha; Coresh, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Background The link of low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and high proteinuria to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is well known. However, its link to mortality due to other causes is less clear. Methods We studied 367,932 adults (20–93 years old) in the Korean Heart Study (baseline between 1996–2004 and follow-up until 2011) and assessed the associations of creatinine-based eGFR and dipstick proteinuria with mortality due to CVD (1,608 cases), cancer (4,035 cases), and other (non-CVD/non-cancer) causes (3,152 cases) after adjusting for potential confounders. Results Although cancer was overall the most common cause of mortality, in participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD), non-CVD/non-cancer mortality accounted for approximately half of cause of death (47.0%for eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and 54.3% for proteinuria ≥1+). Lower eGFR (<60 vs. ≥60 ml/min/1.73m2) was significantly associated with mortality due to CVD (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49 [95% CI, 1.24–1.78]) and non-CVD/non-cancer causes (1.78 [1.54–2.05]). The risk of cancer mortality only reached significance at eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73m2 when eGFR 45–59 ml/min/1.73m2 was set as a reference (1.62 [1.10–2.39]). High proteinuria (dipstick ≥1+ vs. negative/trace) was consistently associated with mortality due to CVD (1.93 [1.66–2.25]), cancer (1.49 [1.32–1.68]), and other causes (2.19 [1.96–2.45]). Examining finer mortality causes, low eGFR and high proteinuria were commonly associated with mortality due to coronary heart disease, any infectious disease, diabetes, and renal failure. In addition, proteinuria was also related to death from stroke, cancers of stomach, liver, pancreas, and lung, myeloma, pneumonia, and viral hepatitis. Conclusion Low eGFR was associated with CVD and non-CVD/non-cancer mortality, whereas higher proteinuria was consistently related to mortality due to CVD, cancer, and other causes. These findings suggest the need for multidisciplinary prevention

  7. Heart period variability and respiratory changes associated with physical and mental load: non-linear analysis.

    PubMed

    Sammer, G

    1998-05-01

    In the investigation of heart rate and heart rate variability, the discrimination between mental workload, physical activity and respiration is known to be methodologically difficult. At most, heart rate variability measures are more likely to be coarse-grained measures with variability confounded by heart rate. Moreover, the spectral analysis of heart rate variability shows broad-band frequency characteristics, pointing towards non-stationarity or non-linearity. From this it is suggested to focus on non-linear dynamic analyses that are variance-insensitive. The experimental section of the paper focuses on the estimation of two non-linear measures for both heartbeat dynamics and respiration, the correlation dimension indicating complexity and the Lyapunov exponents indicating predictability. The results indicate that the complexity of heart dynamics is related to the type of task and that the predictability of heart dynamics is related to the amount of load. PMID:9613233

  8. Morphology of the heart associated with its function as conceived by ancient Greeks.

    PubMed

    Mavrodi, Alexandra; Paraskevas, George

    2014-03-01

    According to their writings, ancient Greek physicians had explored the anatomy of the heart. Although pre-Hippocratic medicine, which relied on religion and mysticism, has nothing more to present than implausible theories and speculations, younger physicians thanks to their animal dissections were able to depict the heart with detail. Hippocratic "On the Heart", Aristotle's, Herophilus', Erasistratus' and Galen's writings provide us with the necessary data to take a look at the anatomy of the heart as it was described back then. Despite of some confusing passages in their writings and some erroneous notions, the heart was described with relative accuracy. In the years after antiquity and in the Middle Age the only information about the anatomy of the heart could be derived from the ancient Greek works and only anatomists of the Renaissance managed to displace them. In this paper we present the knowledge of all known ancient Greek physicians about the heart, with emphasis on its anatomy. PMID:24447741

  9. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  10. Evaluation Use: Results from a Survey of U.S. American Evaluation Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Dreolin N.; Christie, Christina A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a cross-sectional survey on evaluation use completed by 1,140 U.S. American Evaluation Association members. This study had three foci: evaluators' current attitudes, perceptions, and experiences related to evaluation use theory and practice, how these data are similar to those reported in a previous study…

  11. Resiliency in American Library Association Award Winning Juvenile Fiction: A Correlational Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Michelle T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative content analysis was to determine whether there was a relationship between the age, gender, or race of protagonists in contemporary American Library Association award-winning juvenile literature and the representation of resilience by those characters. Award-winning juvenile fiction and biography books were…

  12. The American Bar Association and Legislatively Mandated Treatment for Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallone, Nathanial J.

    1991-01-01

    Offers historical overview of "criminal sexual psychopath" legislation, which customarily prescribes confinement for treatment (rather than incarceration for punishment) for offenders whose sex crimes are attributed to sexual psychopathology. Discusses desire of American Bar Association and Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry to repeal extant…

  13. In Search of Excellence: The First Century of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerki, Robert A.; Penna, Richard P.; Higby, Gregory J.

    1999-01-01

    This comprehensive review of the history of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy begins with a review of pharmaceutical education before 1900 and goes on to initial organizational steps (1900-1925), development of standards (1925-1950), organizational development (1950-1975), organizational issues (1975-1999), and ideas about the next…

  14. The Human Ecology of the American Educational Research Association. Report No. 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, James M., Jr.

    The concepts and methods of human ecology are applied to the geographic distribution of members of the American Educational Research Association. State characteristics are measured by five factors: (1) large-scale agriculture; (2) population size; (3) affluence-urbanization; (4) white predominance; (5) emphasis on specialized agriculture. City…

  15. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, setting curriculum standards, working together to advance nursing education, pursuing…

  16. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, leading through task force initiatives, working together to advance nursing education,…

  17. University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities: Blended Learning Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU [American Association of State Colleges and…

  18. Peer Status in an Ethnic Context: Associations with African American Adolescents' Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Patrick F.; Cole, Daphne J.; Houshyar, Shadi; Lythcott, Mawiyah; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examined the association between ethnic identity centrality and peer status for African American adolescents who represented a sizable proportion, yet numerical minority within a high school context. Initial analyses indicated that a traditional sociometric nomination procedure did not adequately characterize peer status for…

  19. An Examination of the Association between Demographic and Educational Factors and African American Achievement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottledge, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Objective of the Study: The objective of this research study was to investigate whether an association exists between teacher demographic factors (years of teaching experience and gender), 2 educational factors (certification type and certification pathway) and the percent passing rate of tenth grade African American male students on the 2010…

  20. How Is Postsecondary Education Associated with Membership in the American Corporate Elite?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Molly C.

    2011-01-01

    This study contributes to the discussion around the value of a college degree and associated career advantages by considering how postsecondary education contributes to the attainment of the most powerful and prestigious positions in the American corporate world. Guided by a conceptual framework informed by status attainment, power elite, and…

  1. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  2. Problematic Situations Associated with Dating Experiences and Relationships among Urban African American Adolescents: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Erwin, Elizabeth H.; Helms, Sarah W.; Masho, Saba W.; Farrell, Albert D.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the identification of problem situations associated with adolescent dating experiences and relationships, including those that placed youth at risk for dating violence perpetration or victimization. Interviews were conducted with 44 African American middle and high school students in an urban school system.…

  3. Degree of Implementation of the American School Counselor Association National Model and School Counselor Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Katrina Marie

    2014-01-01

    School counselors have undergone a job description evolution over the past 100 years. Changes have been made in the education that is required to be a school counselor. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) has developed a national model to define the role and job activities of school counselors. Most school counselors, counseling…

  4. 75 FR 51464 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ...This final notice announces our decision to approve without condition the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities' (AAAASF) request for continued recognition as a national accreditation program for ambulatory surgical centers (ASC) seeking to participate in the Medicare or Medicaid...

  5. The Asian American Psychological Association: Parallels and Intersections with Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Alvin N.; Singh, Anneliese A.; Wu, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). A brief history is provided, followed by current status and resources, connections to counseling psychology, and implications for the Society of Counseling Psychology and for the future of the AAPA. AAPA was created in 1972 in response to psychology's neglect…

  6. The History and Development of the Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Mary Anne

    2007-01-01

    The Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Association is an organization committed to representing those counselors who work in the field of rehabilitation across the state. The division is focused on offering leadership within the field of rehabilitation counseling, promoting professional development opportunities for counselors, and…

  7. Teaching Diversity: Experiences and Recommendations of American Psychological Association Division 2 Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy; Yescavage, Karen; Richard, Harriette; Lundquist, Arlene

    1999-01-01

    Explores how psychology instructors address diversity issues in the classroom through a survey of American Psychology Association's Division 2 members. Reveals that respondents generally acknowledged the importance of discussing diversity topics; also finds that 27% reported that diversity is not relevant and only 15% had taught any of the listed…

  8. Position Papers of the American Association on Mental Deficiency 1973-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association on Mental Deficiency, Washington, DC.

    Presented are the American Association on Mental Deficiency's position papers regarding the rights of retarded persons. Included are statements on the following topics: basic rights (such as freedom of choice and the right to the least restrictive individually appropriate housing); work by residents in private and public institutions (including…

  9. Developing a Measure of Stigma by Association with African American Adolescents Whose Mothers Have HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Sally; Berger, Barbara; Ferrans, Carol Estwing; Sultzman, Vickey; Fendrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: African American urban adolescents are one of the fastest growing groups of children affected by their mother's HIV status. These children experience HIV stigma by association with their HIV-positive mothers. Stigma may contribute to adverse outcomes for these teens. Methods: The authors describe a multistage process of scale…

  10. ATLAS. Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies. [Newsletter] Volume 3, Number 1. October, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, Brooklyn, NY.

    The October 1973 issue of ATLAS, a newsletter for the Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, is entered into the ERIC system on a one time basis to acquaint teachers with this resource. This issue reports summer activities and reviews new materials in this subject area. The events of the 1973 summer ATLAS-Fulbright Seminar to Mexico…

  11. 78 FR 39057 - Hours of Service of Drivers; Renewal and Expansion of American Pyrotechnics Association Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...FMCSA announces the granting of an exemption of 55 member- companies of the American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) from FMCSA's regulation prohibiting drivers of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) from driving after the 14th hour after coming on duty. The FMCSA renews the exemption for 45 APA member-companies and grants 10 additional carriers coverage by the exemption, which is applicable......

  12. A STUDY OF DIETARY PATTERNS IN THE MEXICAN AMERICAN POPULATION AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH OBESITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate that the prevalence of overweight and obesity continues to rise among Mexican Americans. Little is know about the dietary factors associated with this trend. Ethnic groups have different dietary patterns based on their...

  13. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  14. Spirituality and Counselor Competence: A National Survey of American Counseling Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. Scott; Wiggins-Frame, Marsha; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2007-01-01

    A random sample of 505 American Counseling Association (ACA) members completed a questionnaire that evaluated respondents' ratings of the importance of 9 competencies developed at the Summit on Spirituality (G. Miller, 1999; "Summit Results," 1995) meetings to effectively address spiritual and religious issues in counseling practice. Results…

  15. How To Prepare Program Proposals for the American Psychological Association Annual Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    The purpose of this paper is to dispel myths about preparing program proposals for the American Psychological Association's annual convention. The report's goal is to increase the number of student presenters at future annual conventions. It has been determined that, for a variety of reasons, psychology graduate students participate more in poster…

  16. Rocks in the Whirlpool: Equity of Access and the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCook, Kathleen de la Pena

    This paper provides some of the historical context of the efforts of the American Library Association (ALA) to define, extend, protect and advocate for equity of access, focusing on central tendencies rather than internal debate. The first section, "Toward the Concept of Access," discusses: how ALA became a public service organization; extension…

  17. Content Analysis of 32 Years of American Counseling Association Convention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helwig, Andrew A.; Schmidt, Lisa L. L.

    2011-01-01

    A content analysis of American Counseling Association convention sessions offered from 1977 to 2008 was conducted. The intent was to identify changes and trends in the counseling profession. Content of more than 15,000 sessions, including educational programs, keynote presentations, and training sessions, was assigned to 1 of 86 categories. A…

  18. Pressing Issues in College Counseling: A Survey of American College Counseling Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy B.; Dean, Brenda; Floyd, Suzanne; Silva, Christopher; Yamashita, Momoko; Durtschi, Jared; Heaps, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of members of the American College Counseling Association to ascertain the experiences and opinions of college counselors on several pressing issues within the college counseling profession. Survey results from 133 respondents indicated that counseling centers may benefit from increasing the number of group…

  19. American Vocational Education Research Association Members' Perceptions of Statistical Significance Tests and Other Statistical Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    A random sample of 113 members of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) was surveyed to obtain baseline information regarding AVERA members' perceptions of statistical significance tests. The Psychometrics Group Instrument was used to collect data from participants. Of those surveyed, 67% were male, 93% had earned a…

  20. Neuropsychological Training in American Psychological Association-Accredited and Nonaccredited School Psychology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amato, Rik Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines whether American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited and nonaccredited programs differ in views and offerings of neuropsychological training. Of 72 programs surveyed, 59 percent of APA-accredited programs and 53 percent of nonaccredited programs offered course work in neuropsychology. Found that students viewed neuropsychological…