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Sample records for american indian community

  1. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  2. Elder Abuse in American Indian Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisko, Briana

    2009-01-01

    Although the many American Indian tribes of the United States are unique in their own customs, languages, and histories, a common thread throughout their traditions and cultural lifestyles is that they are of a culture that reveres the elder in their communities. Elders are the carriers of the culture/history; they are the storytellers, holders of…

  3. The Power of American Indian Parents and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watahomigie, Lucille

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role that schools, communities, and parents can play in transmitting American Indian culture and language to Indian children, focusing on the experiences of the Hualapai Indians and Peach Springs School District in Arizona. (three references) (MDM)

  4. A Community Road Ahead: American Indian Leadership 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Norbert S., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This first of a series of essays on Indian leadership focuses on the role of American Indian leaders in community development, including their contributions of technological skills, humanism, and the energy and persistence needed to work toward a vision. Essential to rebuilding Indian communities is understanding how internalized oppression has…

  5. Who Supports Urban American Indian Students in Public Community Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Quarterly, 2003

    2003-01-01

    In 1977 a group of urban American Indian organizations got together to protest the leveling of rental housing for urban renewal; then they learned that a community college was going up to replace that housing, right in the middle of the Indian community. Realizing the opportunities for jobs, education, and training, the community leaders decided…

  6. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... June 8, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-14131, on page 33318, in the first column, last complete sentence in the... Urban Indian Communities; Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and urban Indian communities. The document contained one...

  7. Psychological Survival in American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaDue, Robin A.; And Others

    To provide some directions for the design and implementation of innovative health programs, both on an individual and community level, this paper, using both empirical and anecdotal sources, explores some of the possible psychological mechanisms Indian people have used to endure overt and covert Federal policies and social attitudes of termination…

  8. New Literacies at the Digital Divide: American Indian Community Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, J. David

    2009-01-01

    This study is about a community computing lab established by a U.S. Department of Commerce grant to bridge the Digital Divide in a rural Arizona American Indian community, a project called "Native Connection" (a pseudonym). This paper describes the process of integrating new literacies associated with a high-tech computer lab into the life of a…

  9. Practicing participatory research in American Indian communities1–3

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M; Reid, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the historical issues that affect research in American Indian communities and examine the implications of these issues as they relate to culturally sensitive, respectful, and appropriate research with this population. Methods include review and analysis of the literature and examination of our collective experience and that of our colleagues. Recommendations are given for conducting culturally sensitive, participatory research. We conclude that research efforts must build on the establishment of partnerships between investigators and American Indian communities to ensure accurate findings and analyses and to implement culturally relevant benefits. PMID:10195598

  10. Drug and alcohol abuse intervention in American Indian communities.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, F; LaBoueff, S

    1985-01-01

    American Indian tribes are seen as an anachronism by many non-Indian people. Most would acknowledge that Indians provided a colorful chapter in American history, but apart from contemporary Indian arts and crafts little serious thought is given to their way of life. In fact, however, Indian culture has survived a period of strong attack and today it is vital and growing. The historical conflicts between Indian and White ways of life are still not totally resolved, and there are major differences in thinking as to whether tribes should be assimilated into the larger culture or allowed to pursue an alternate cultural path. In its ambivalence toward Indian people the federal government has fostered a state of dependency which has made problem resolution extremely difficult. Federal policy has vacillated between paternalistic and repressive, which has led to much inertia within both Indian communities and those groups intended to help them. Currently there is a strong activist climate on Indian reservations and the result is a vigorous move toward self-determination. Not only are Indian people asking for self-government, but they are attempting to revitalize their traditional culture and maintain a unique alternative to the beliefs, values, and customs of the larger society. Within this historical/cultural context, drug and alcohol abuse exist as major problems for Indian people. Extant data point to alcoholism as perhaps the number one health problem for many tribes. The consequences of drug abuse are not as well documented, but recent survey data from Indian school students point to an extremely serious situation. Drug use rates are above national norms and appear to be rapidly increasing. Interventions in Indian communities must be congruent with the current movement toward self-determination. Externally imposed solutions, at a minimum, will not work and probably will only add to the sense of failure experienced by Indian people. The dynamics of drug and alcohol use

  11. Utilizing Traditional Storytelling to Promote Wellness in American Indian Communities

    PubMed Central

    HODGE, FELICIA SCHANCHE; PASQUA, ANNA; MARQUEZ, CAROL A.; GEISHIRT-CANTRELL, BETTY

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing storytelling to transmit educational messages is a traditional pedagogical method practiced by many American Indian tribes. American Indian stories are effective because they present essential ideas and values in a simple, entertaining form. Different story characters show positive and negative behaviors. The stories illustrate consequences of behaviors and invite listeners to come to their own conclusions after personal reflection. Because stories have been passed down through tribal communities for generations, listeners also have the opportunity to reconnect and identify with past tribal realities. This article reports on a research intervention that is unique in promoting health and wellness through the use of storytelling. The project utilized stories to help motivate tribal members to once more adopt healthy, traditional lifestyles and practices. The authors present and discuss the stories selected, techniques used in their telling, the preparation and setting for the storytelling, and the involvement and interaction of the group. PMID:11776018

  12. Photovoice for Healthy Relationships: Community-Based Participatory HIV Prevention in a Rural American Indian Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an example of a culturally responsive, community-based project for addressing social determinants of health in rural American Indian (AI) communities through: 1) empowering youth and community voices to set directions for HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy prevention and education efforts; 2) using…

  13. Creating an Instrument to Measure People's Perception of Community Capacity in American Indian Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oetzel, John; Wallerstein, Nina; Solimon, Audrey; Garcia, Bruce; Siemon, Mark; Adeky, Sarah; Apachito, Gracie; Caston, Elissa; Finster, Carolyn; Belone, Lorenda; Tafoya, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of community capacity for American Indian communities. The study included development and testing phases to ensure face, content, construct, and predictive validity. There were 500 participants in two southwest tribes who completed a detailed community profile, which contained 21 common items in…

  14. Protective Factors in American Indian Communities and Adolescent Violence

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jia; Chewning, Betty; St. Clair, Iyekiyapiwin Darlene; Kokotailo, Patricia K; Lacourt, Jeanne; Wilson, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With their distinct cultural heritage and rural boundaries, American Indian reservation communities offer a unique opportunity to explore protective factors that help buffer adolescents from potential risk behaviors such as violence. Prior published research on Indian communities has not explored three potential protective factors for violence - parental monitoring of adolescents and friends, adolescents’ self-efficacy to avoid fighting, and adolescents’ interest in learning more about their traditional culture. This paper explores the relationship between these factors and reduced risk of reported violence. Methods In 1998, 630 American Indian students in grades 6–12 were surveyed in five Midwestern, rural Indian reservation schools. Path analysis was used to identify the direct and indirect association of the three potential protective factors with reduced violence behavior. Results There were significant gender differences both in perceived parental monitoring and in adolescents’ self-efficacy. For female adolescents, parental monitoring had the strongest inverse relationship with female adolescents’ involvement in violence. Female adolescents’ self-efficacy and their interest in learning more about their culture were also inversely associated with violence and therefore potentially important protectors. Male adolescents who reported more interest in learning the tribe’s culture had better self-efficacy to avoid violence. However, self-efficacy did not successfully predict their reported involvement in peer violence. Conclusions These findings support exploring gender differences, parental monitoring, self-efficacy training as well as cultural elements in future violence intervention studies. Further investigation is needed to identify protective factors for risk behaviors among male adolescents and test the generalizability to non-reservation based adolescents. PMID:22926269

  15. American Indian Community Controlled Education: "Determination for Today, Direction for Tomorrow".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupris, Joseph C.

    The reemergence in the 1960's of the traditional Indian philosophy of education as preparation for societal productivity coincided with a movement within Indian communities toward more active participation in and self-control of the education of their people. By recognizing the historical right of American Indians to control their own education,…

  16. The Chicago American Indian Community, 1893-1988. Annotated Bibliography and Guide to Sources in Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, David

    This annotated bibliography identifies and describes documentary evidence of Chicago's American Indian population since the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. Sources include studies and reports generated by Indian community organizations and agencies, community newsletters, newspapers, oral histories, grant applications, personal papers, and…

  17. Worldview, Identity, and Prevention in American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Grace Powless

    Those who come from non-American Indian cultures have dominated traditional models for healing and prevention. The assumption that current training strategies, program manuals, and levels of competence with regard to cross-cultural skills and knowledge are sufficient is arguable. If training programs for mental health, physical health, and…

  18. Implementing Participatory Research with an Urban American Indian Community: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Erica B.; Jette, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Participatory research has proven an effective method for improving health equity among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) by addressing power imbalances between communities and researchers, incorporating community knowledge and theory, ensuring mutual benefit and improving community capacity and programme sustainability. However,…

  19. 76 FR 33314 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Indian communities in such areas as sexually transmitted disease control and cancer prevention. They also... Urban Indian Communities Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention; Epidemiology Program for... managed by the IHS Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention (DEDP). This program is...

  20. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  1. Research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities: navigating the cultural universe of values and process.

    PubMed

    Norton, I M; Manson, S M

    1996-10-01

    The National Institutes of Health's guidelines for recruiting ethnic minorities and women into clinical research have raised numerous questions among investigators. Highlighted in this article are a number of important issues for those researchers seeking to include American Indians and Alaska Natives in their studies; that is, defining the population of American Indians and Alaska Natives for inclusion in a study, participation of the tribes in research and approval by the Institutional Review Board, issues of confidentiality and anonymity of individuals and tribes, identifying potential benefits to American Indian and Alaska Native communities, and the importance of evaluating the scientific merit of a proposed study. Awareness and a commitment to ongoing education regarding these issues will enhance the quality and benefits of research among American Indian and Alaska Native people. PMID:8916611

  2. Photovoice for healthy relationships: community-based participatory HIV prevention in a rural American Indian community.

    PubMed

    Markus, Susan F

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an example of a culturally responsive, community-based project for addressing social determinants of health in rural American Indian (AI) communities through: 1) empowering youth and community voices to set directions for HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy prevention and education efforts; 2) using Photovoice to promote healthy relationships among AI youth; 3) using the socioecological model (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004; 2011) as a framework for organizing the creation and subsequent sharing of Photovoice messages from individual empowerment, to relationships, communities, institutions, and general society; and 4) framing analysis of Photovoice projects in alignment with Bell's (2010) model of storytelling for social justice that connects narrative and the arts in anti-racist teaching. A discussion on future steps and recommendations for future research is provided. PMID:22569727

  3. Community-Based Research and American Indians with Disabilities: Learning Together Methods that Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Catherine A.; Johnson, Sharon R.; Kendall, Elizabeth; Busby, Howard; Schacht, Robert; Hill, Calvin

    Researchers working with the American Indian Rehabilitation Research and Training Center in Arizona have found that culture is important in social research, especially with indigenous people. Community-based participatory research is one approach that has yielded outcomes valuable to researchers and community members. However, ethical concerns…

  4. American Indian Community Library Demonstration Project. First--Fourth Quarterly Reports, 1976-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lotsee

    Quarterly progress reports present the major accomplishments and activities of four American Indian Community Library Demonstration projects funded during 1976-1977. These projects established library services in New Mexico for four previously unserved Pueblo communities: Cochiti, Santo Domingo, Sky City, and Laguna. For each quarter, an overall…

  5. Ethnic Identity, Sense of Community, and Psychological Well-Being among Northern Plains American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, DenYelle Baete; Carter, Jessica S.

    2011-01-01

    Limited research has examined how ethnic identity and sense of community may be associated with psychological well-being in American Indian adolescents. Via survey data, we examined the relationships among ethnic identity, sense of community, psychosomatic symptoms, positive affect, and feelings of depression with students from a tribal high…

  6. Usefulness of a Survey on Underage Drinking in a Rural American Indian Community Health Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilder, David A.; Luna, Juan A.; Roberts, Jennifer; Calac, Daniel; Grube, Joel W.; Moore, Roland S.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of a survey on underage drinking in a rural American Indian community health clinic. One hundred ninety-seven youth (90 male, 107 female; age range 8-20 years) were recruited from clinic waiting rooms and through community outreach. The study revealed that the usefulness of the survey was twofold: Survey results…

  7. Community Background Reports: Robeson County, North Carolina, Lumbee Indians, National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 1, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, John Gregory

    As part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this paper explores and compares the background of the rural Lumbee Indian with the urban Lumbee living in Pembroke, North Carolina. An interpretation for defining the American Indian in the tri-ethnic community is included, as well as a discussion of the economics of…

  8. Historical Trauma in American Indian/Native Alaska Communities: A Multilevel Framework for Exploring Impacts on Individuals, Families, and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Campbell, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Over multiple generations, American Indian communities have endured a succession of traumatic events that have enduring consequences for community members. This article presents a multilevel framework for exploring the impact of historically traumatic events on individuals, families, and communities. The critical connection between historically…

  9. The Role of Education in American Indian Self-Determination: Lessons from the Ramah Navajo Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuelito, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    Since 1975 the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act has enabled American Indian communities to enact self-determination through community-based schooling. In this study conducted by a Navajo researcher, the Ramah Navajo community defined self-determination and how it was operationalized within the community and school. The…

  10. American Indians and the Urban Experience. Contemporary Native American Communities 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Susan, Ed.; Peters, Kurt, Ed.

    Over half of all American Indian people living in the United States now live in urban areas, but few books and little research have addressed urban Indian themes. This book compiles research, scholarly writing, poetry, prose, and artwork concerned with the Native urban experience. Of specific educational interest are chapters on the role of…

  11. Patterns and Impact of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity among Community-Resident American Indian Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Robert; Kerby, Dave S.; Hennessy, Catherine Hagan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to suggest a new approach to identifying patterns of comorbidity and multimorbidity. Design and Methods: A random sample of 1,039 rural community-resident American Indian elders aged 60 years and older was surveyed. Comorbidity was investigated with four standard approaches, and with cluster analysis. Results:…

  12. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  13. Flexible Roles for American Indian Elders in Community-Based Participatory Research.

    PubMed

    Whitewater, Shannon; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Kahn, Carmella; Attakai, Agnes; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I

    2016-01-01

    Community-based participatory research builds partnerships between communities and academic researchers to engage in research design, decision making, data collection, and dissemination of health promotion initiatives. Community-based participatory projects often have formal agreements or defined roles for community and academic partners. Our project (November 2012-November 2014) was designed to document life narratives of urban American Indian elders as a foundation for developing a resilience-based health promotion curriculum for urban American Indian adolescents aged 12 to 18. We used a flexible method for engaging community partners that honored the individual strengths of elders, encouraged them to describe how they wanted to contribute to the project, and provided multiple ways for elders to engage with university partners. We invited elders to participate in one or more of the following roles: as members of consensus panels to develop interview questions, as members of a community advisory board, or as participants in individual qualitative interviews. The flexibility of roles gave elders the opportunity to serve as advisors, co-developers, interviewees, or reviewers during 2 years of curriculum development. Engaging American Indian elders in the research process acknowledged the multiple layers of expertise they had as traditional leaders in the community while promoting trust in and ownership of the project. This flexible technique can be used by other communities that may not be comfortable with structured processes of engagement. PMID:27253635

  14. Flexible Roles for American Indian Elders in Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Kahn, Carmella; Attakai, Agnes; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I.

    2016-01-01

    Community-based participatory research builds partnerships between communities and academic researchers to engage in research design, decision making, data collection, and dissemination of health promotion initiatives. Community-based participatory projects often have formal agreements or defined roles for community and academic partners. Our project (November 2012–November 2014) was designed to document life narratives of urban American Indian elders as a foundation for developing a resilience-based health promotion curriculum for urban American Indian adolescents aged 12 to 18. We used a flexible method for engaging community partners that honored the individual strengths of elders, encouraged them to describe how they wanted to contribute to the project, and provided multiple ways for elders to engage with university partners. We invited elders to participate in one or more of the following roles: as members of consensus panels to develop interview questions, as members of a community advisory board, or as participants in individual qualitative interviews. The flexibility of roles gave elders the opportunity to serve as advisors, co-developers, interviewees, or reviewers during 2 years of curriculum development. Engaging American Indian elders in the research process acknowledged the multiple layers of expertise they had as traditional leaders in the community while promoting trust in and ownership of the project. This flexible technique can be used by other communities that may not be comfortable with structured processes of engagement. PMID:27253635

  15. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed. PMID:26550005

  16. Importance of Social Support in Preventing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies with American Indian Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent research concludes that prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) must occur with preconceptional women, either by reducing alcohol consumption in women at-risk or planning pregnancy or preventing pregnancy in women drinking at risky levels. One AEP prevention program currently underway with non-pregnant American Indian women is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) CHOICES (Changing High-risk alcohOl use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study) Program. The OST CHOICES Program shows promise in lowering the AEP risk in American Indian women, and it is a natural next step to evaluate the potential impact that social support can have on further encouraging behavioral changes. Methods Focus groups with community members and key informant interviews with health and social service professionals were completed. To uncover and interpret interrelated themes, a conventional content analysis methodology was used. Results Eight focus groups were held with 58 American Indian participants, including adult women of child-bearing age, elder women, and adult men. Key informant interviews were completed with 25 health and social service professionals. Based on input from the focus groups and key informant interviews, several subthemes regarding social support in the prevention of AEP stood out, including the role of family (especially elders), the impact community can have, and the important function of culture. Conclusions In this study, we highlighted the important influence that social support can have on AEP prevention, especially among the American Indian population, where social support has cultural and historical significance. PMID:24974087

  17. Exploring risk and protective factors with a community sample of American Indian adolescents who attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Cwik, Mary; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Goklish, Novalene; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Craig, Mariddie; Walkup, John T

    2015-01-01

    American Indian adolescents are at disproportionate risk for suicide, and community-based studies of this population, which allow a deeper understanding of risks and resilience to inform interventions, are rare. This is a cross-sectional study of N = 71 Apache adolescents. Strengths include the role of the community and American Indian paraprofessionals in the design, implementation, and interpretation of findings. Participants were M = 16.0 years old, 65% female, and 69% multiple attempters. Risks included suicidal behavior among peers and family (68%), caregivers with substance problems (62%), and participant substance use history, namely alcohol (91%) and marijuana (88%). Areas of resiliency included lower depression scores (M = 23.1) and cultural activity participation. A multi-tiered intervention at individual, family, and community levels is needed. PMID:25909321

  18. Trauma and Conditional Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annjeanette; Garroutte, Eva M.; Croy, Calvin; Jervis, Lori L.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities. Method Data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project, a cross-sectional population-based survey completed between 1997 and 2000. This study focused on 1,967 participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for trauma exposure. Traumas were grouped into interpersonal, non-interpersonal, witnessed, and “trauma to close others” categories. Analyses examined distribution of worst traumas, conditional rates of PTSD following exposure, and distributions of PTSD cases deriving from these events. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations of lifetime PTSD with trauma type. Results Overall, 15.9% of those exposed to DSM-IV trauma qualified for lifetime PTSD, a rate comparable to similar U.S. studies. Women were more likely to develop PTSD than were men. The majority (60%) of cases of PTSD among women derived from interpersonal trauma exposure (in particular, sexual and physical abuse); among men, cases were more evenly distributed across trauma categories. Conclusions Previous research has demonstrated higher rates of both trauma exposure and PTSD in American Indian samples compared to other Americans. This study shows that conditional rates of PTSD are similar to those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the elevated prevalence of this disorder in American Indian populations is largely due to higher rates of trauma exposure. PMID:23135256

  19. Community Background Reports: Pawnee, Oklahoma. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 3, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Larry M.

    A third paper of the first series (Community Backgrounds of Education in the Communities Which Have been Studied) contributes to the final report of a National Study of American Indian Education and relates to Pawnee (Pawnee County), Oklahoma. Economic, social, and demographic data are presented for Indian, Negro, and "White" subgroups of the…

  20. Community Background Reports: Neah Bay: The Makah. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 13, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, John; Barnhardt, Ray

    As one of the final papers of the National Study of American Indian Education, this report is a description of the Makah Indian community and school at Neah Bay, Washington. Included in the community description are current population factors, historical background, and economic factors. The educational portion of the document gives historical…

  1. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  2. USEFULNESS OF A SURVEY ON UNDERAGE DRINKING IN A RURAL AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITY HEALTH CLINIC

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, David A.; Luna, Juan A.; Roberts, Jennifer; Calac, Daniel; Grube, Joel W.; Moore, Roland S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of a survey on underage drinking in a rural American Indian community health clinic. One hundred ninety-seven youth (90 male, 107 female; age range 8–20 years) were recruited from clinic waiting rooms and through community outreach. The study revealed that the usefulness of the survey was twofold: Survey results could be used by clinic staff to screen for underage drinking and associated problems in youth served by the clinic, and the process of organizing, evaluating, and implementing the survey results accomplished several important goals of community-based participatory research. PMID:23824640

  3. Usefulness of a survey on underage drinking in a rural American Indian community health clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilder, David A; Luna, Juan A; Roberts, Jennifer; Calac, Daniel; Grube, Joel W; Moore, Roland S; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of a survey on underage drinking in a rural American Indian community health clinic. One hundred ninety-seven youth (90 male, 107 female; age range 8-20 years) were recruited from clinic waiting rooms and through community outreach. The study revealed that the usefulness of the survey was twofold: Survey results could be used by clinic staff to screen for underage drinking and associated problems in youth served by the clinic, and the process of organizing, evaluating, and implementing the survey results accomplished several important goals of community-based participatory research. PMID:23824640

  4. Attitudes Toward Indian Culture and Its Incorporation in the School Curriculum: Students, Parents, Teachers, and Community Leaders; Perceptions of Indian Education. The National Study of American Indian Education, Series IV, No. 10, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchard, Bruce A.

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document reported on the perceptions and attitudes of Indian students, parents, teachers, and community leaders toward Indian culture and its incorporation in the school curriculum in their respective communities. Attitudes were ascertained using various scales.…

  5. Community Based Participatory Research to Reduce Oral Health Disparities in American Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, T; Sharma, T; Harper, M; Zacher, T; Roan, R; George, C; Swyers, E; Toledo, N; Batliner, T; Braun, PA; Albino, J

    2015-01-01

    Community based participatory research is an approach aimed to equitably involve community members, representatives, and academic researchers in all aspects of the research process. Using this methodology can help integrate cultural knowledge into interventions, supporting researchers to effectively partner with communities in addressing health disparities. The Center for Native Oral Health Research (CNOHR) collaborates with two American Indian (AI) tribes to advance oral health knowledge and practice, including the conduct of randomized controlled clinical trials of culturally sensitive behavioral interventions for primary prevention of early childhood caries (ECC). This manuscript describes the development of researcher–community partnership, and the development and implementation of the two clinical trial in the community. It also gives a detailed account of the strategies developed through the community input in recruitment and retention of the study participants and finally the lessons learnt during the study implementation. PMID:26090520

  6. Pharmacogenetic research in partnership with American Indian and Alaska Native communities

    PubMed Central

    Woodahl, Erica L; Lesko, Lawrence J; Hopkins, Scarlett; Robinson, Renee F; Thummel, Kenneth E; Burke, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is a subset of personalized medicine that applies knowledge about genetic variation in gene–drug pairs to help guide optimal dosing. There is a lack of data, however, about pharmacogenetic variation in underserved populations. One strategy for increasing participation of underserved populations in pharmacogenetic research is to include communities in the research process. We have established academic–community partnerships with American Indian and Alaska Native people living in Alaska and Montana to study pharmacogenetics. Key features of the partnership include community oversight of the project, research objectives that address community health priorities, and bidirectional learning that builds capacity in both the community and the research team. Engaging the community as coresearchers can help build trust to advance pharmacogenetic research objectives. PMID:25141898

  7. The Diffusion of Telehealth in Rural American Indian Communities: A Retrospective Survey of Key Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Spero M.; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Shore, Jay H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Mental health issues are a serious concern for many American Indian Veterans, especially for post-traumatic stress disorder and related psychiatric conditions. Yet, acquiring mental health treatment can be a challenge in Native communities where specialized services are largely unavailable. Consequently, telehealth is increasingly being suggested as a way to expand healthcare access on or near reservation lands. In this study, we wanted to understand the factors affecting the diffusion of telehealth clinics that provided mental health care to rural, American Indian Veterans. Materials and Methods: We surveyed 39 key personnel and stakeholders who were involved in the decision-making process, technological infrastructure, and implementation of three clinics. Using Roger Everett's Diffusion Theory as a framework, we gathered information about specific tasks, factors hindering progress, and personal reactions to telehealth both before and after implementation. Results: Many participants expressed initial concerns about using telehealth; however, most became positive over time. Factors that influenced participants' viewpoint largely included patient and staff feedback and witnessing the fulfillment of a community health need. The use of outside information to support the implementation of the clinics and personal champions also showed considerable influence in the clinics' success. Conclusion: The findings presented here address critical gaps in our understanding of telehealth diffusion and inform research strategies regarding the cultural issues and outcomes related to telemental health services. Information contained in this report serves as a long overdue guide for developing telemental health programs and policies among American Indians, specifically, and rural populations in general. PMID:22082106

  8. Urban American Indian Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Josea

    This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American Indians that are especially pernicious to older American Indians living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American Indian elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes…

  9. Connecting the Dots for Youth Development in American Indian Communities: A Story of the Reach for the Sky Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Stephan; Hardman, Alisha M.; Marczak, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    This second article in "JAIE'"s new "Reports from the Field" section1 explores a culturally based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program at a northern Minnesota Bureau of Indian Education high school. Engaging American Indian youth from disenfranchised communities in STEM programs has been challenging. Using culturally…

  10. Community Background Reports: Cut Bank, Montana. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 8, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Theodore

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this paper is a report on the community of Cut Bank, Montana. Data were collected in the fall of 1968, when a 4-member team from the University of Colorado made a 6-week study at the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. General factors studied were location, physical…

  11. Local Control Over the Schools in Two American Indian Communities: A Preliminary Examination of Structural Constraints and "Internal Control" Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Janice Jennie

    Underlying present Governmental and private objectives to institute local control over the schools on Indian reservations is the hope that such a policy will improve American Indians' sense of relevance of their own behavior to the outcome of their destiny. Although the connection between community control and sense of personal efficacy has never…

  12. Community Self-Determination in Uptown Chicago: A Social and Cultural History of American Indian Educational Programs and Experiences, 1952-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laukaitis, John J.

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the under-studied urban dimension of the American Indian self-determination in education by showing how American Indians in Chicago established, developed, influenced, and utilized programs to meet the particular objectives and needs of their local community. By showing how American Indians worked outside of and within systems,…

  13. Body composition and overweight prevalence in 1704 schoolchildren from 7 American Indian communities123

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Benjamin; Himes, John H; Lohman, Timothy; Davis, Sally M; Stevens, June; Evans, Marguerite; Going, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Nationwide data on obesity prevalence in American Indian communities are limited. Objective We describe the body composition and anthropometric characteristics of schoolchildren from 7 American Indian communities enrolled in the Pathways study, a randomized field trial evaluating a program for the primary prevention of obesity. Design A total of 1704 children in 41 schools were enrolled in the study. Basic anthropometric measurements included weight, height, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses. Percentage body fat was estimated from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometric variables with the use of an equation developed and validated for this population. Results The children's mean (± SD) age was 7.6 ± 0.6 y, and their mean weight and height were 32.1 ± 8.9 kg and 129.8 ± 6.3 cm, respectively. Mean body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) was 18.8 ± 3.9, and mean percentage body fat was 32.6 ± 6.8%. With the use of current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference values, 30.5% of girls and 26.8% of boys were above the 95th percentiles for BMI-for-age, and 21% of girls and 19.6% of boys were between the 85th and 95th percentiles. Although there was a wide range in BMI across study sites and for both sexes, the percentage of children with a BMI above the 95th percentile was consistently higher than the national averages in all communities studied and in both girls and boys. Conclusions Overweight can be documented in a substantial number of American Indian children by the time they reach elementary school. Despite differences in the prevalence of overweight observed among communities, rates are uniformly high relative to national all-race averages. PMID:12885714

  14. Food access and cost in American Indian communities in Washington State.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Meghan; Buchwald, Dedra S; Duncan, Glen E

    2011-09-01

    Limited access to foods that make up a nutritious diet at minimal cost may influence eating behaviors and, ultimately, obesity. This study examined the number and type of food stores (convenience, grocery, supermarket) on federal reservations in Washington State, and the availability and cost of foods in the US Department of Agriculture Community Food Security Assessment Toolkit market basket, to describe the food environment of American Indians. Stores were identified by telephone survey of tribal headquarters, a commercial database, and on-site visitation. Foods were assessed using a standardized instrument containing 68 items in seven major food groups during April and May 2009. Store type and availability and cost of foods were recorded on a checklist. Fifty stores were identified on 22 American Indian reservations, including 25 convenience, 16 grocery, and 9 supermarkets. Across all stores, about 38% of checklist items were available, with supermarkets having the most and convenience stores the fewest. Foods from the dairy and sugars/sweets groups were the most prevalent, while fresh fruits/vegetables were the least. Cost of the most commonly available items was lowest in supermarkets. Seventeen reservations did not have a supermarket on their reservation, and the nearest off-reservation supermarket was about 10 miles from the tribe's headquarters, which was used as the standard for distance calculations. These results demonstrate that American Indians living on federal reservations in Washington State may have limited access to foods that make up a nutritious diet at minimal cost. PMID:21872701

  15. Gender and Community Organization Leadership in the Chicago Indian Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Anne Terry; Valentino, Debra

    2003-01-01

    This article concerns eight decades (1920-2000) of community organization in the American Indian community in Chicago. While the trends discussed may be particular to that community or time frame, the authors expect that there are parallels in other urban Indian communities. The Chicago American Indian Center was the first urban Indian center in…

  16. American Indian Literacy and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    2004-01-01

    Literacy, which has only positive connotations in most cultures, has long been associated in Native communities with colonial education, "the reculturing and reeducation of American Indians by the secular and religious institutions of colonizing nations." Early educators imposed literacy on Indian children attending government-organized boarding…

  17. Feast or famine? Supplemental food programs and their impacts on two American Indian communities in California.

    PubMed

    Dillinger, T L; Jett, S C; Macri, M J; Grivetti, L E

    1999-05-01

    This article examines the use of supplemental food programs by two Native American populations and assesses some of the health and cultural impacts of these programs. A cross-sectional survey of 80 American Indian families, 40 families residing on the Round Valley Indian Reservation and 40 in Sacramento, California was conducted to determine access, use and appropriateness of supplemental feeding programs. Respondents at both the rural and urban geographic location showed considerable familiarity with available supplemental feeding programs. USDA Food Commodities were utilized most at Round Valley, raising the concern that provided staples which were highly processed and contained significant amounts of sodium, sucrose, and fat, could contribute to the problems of obesity and diabetes. Native Americans in Sacramento used food banks and food closets as their primary source of supplemental foods, and some expressed concern that the foods provided were highly sweetened and high in fat. While some nutrition advising was available at both geographical localities, access was inadequate. The study found that the foods provided by the supplemental food programs varied considerably in their nutritional quality and healthier foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats were either completely lacking or in short supply. In addition, culturally sensitive nutritional counseling and the development of education modules to instruct program recipients in the preparation of healthy meals and how to manage obesity and diabetes were needed and requested within the California Native American communities surveyed. PMID:10627833

  18. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  19. Community-responsive interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Jared B; Adams, Alexandra K; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Karanja, Njeri; Lee, Elisa T; Walters, Karina L

    2012-08-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations bear a heavy burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and they have the highest rates of risk factors for CVD, such as cigarette smoking, obesity, and diabetes, of any U.S. population group. Yet, few randomized controlled trials have been launched to test potential preventive interventions in Indian Country. Five randomized controlled trials were initiated recently in AI/AN communities to test the effectiveness of interventions targeting adults and/or children to promote healthy behaviors that are known to impact biological CVD risk factors. This article provides a context for and an overview of these five trials. The high burden of CVD among AI/AN populations will worsen unless behaviors and lifestyles affecting CVD risk can be modified. These five trials, if successful, represent a starting point in addressing these significant health disparities. PMID:22983753

  20. American Indian Organizational Education in Chicago: The Community Board Training Project, 1979-1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laukaitis, John J.

    2009-01-01

    American Indian organizations in Chicago grew both in size and number during the 1970s. The lasting impact of War on Poverty programs and the passing of the Indian Education Act of 1972 and the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 served as significant factors for the development of these organizations. Alternative American Indian…

  1. How Schools Can Help Heal American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Don Trent

    Historical trauma may be a significant cause of the well-documented disparities between the health of American Indians and the general population. The inability to resolve past injustices against American Indians may continue to have health consequences as long as this history continues to repeat itself. Schools can play a role in healing American…

  2. Advancing community-based research with urban American Indian populations: multidisciplinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, William E; Wendt, Dennis C; Saftner, Melissa A; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    The US has witnessed significant growth among urban American Indian (AI) populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  3. Circle Of Life cancer education: giving voice to American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Octavia; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Eschiti, Valerie; Samos, Markos; Wiener, Diane; Ohlander, Kerstin; Royals, Deborah

    2013-09-01

    The Circle Of Life (COL) was first developed in 1991 as a breast health program through a partnership between the American Cancer Society and a committee of lay and professional volunteers in Oklahoma, with representation from Oklahoma American Indian tribal communities. In 2008, The Society was awarded funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to expand and enhance COL. Since then, The Society has engaged a variety of tribal health and education leaders and Society staff to comprise a COL advisory workgroup. The workgroup's mission was to make recommendations and provide guidance in the revision of COL. Four cultural values emerged from the engagement of the workgroup: (1) the value of visual communication, (2) the value of interconnected generations, (3) the value of storytelling, and (4) the value of experiential learning. These four concepts greatly shaped the revision of the COL educational tools and resources. PMID:23842983

  4. Early childhood nutrition in an American Indian community: educational strategy for obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Hoffhines, Heather; Whaley, Kelleigh Dean; Blackett, Piers R; Palumbo, Karen; Campbell-Sternloff, Dana; Glore, Stephen; Lee, Elisa T

    2014-02-01

    Prevailing infant and toddler feeding practices in an American Indian community were assessed to explore the feasibility of improvement by implementation of a maternal education program. A survey of prevailing nutritional practice was the basis for design of an instruction program on infant nutrition for mothers during pregnancy. Follow-up assessments provided information on feasibility, and requirements for an effective program. Failure to sustain breast-feeding, low fruit and vegetable intake, low fiber intake, consumption of sweetened beverages, low milk consumption and low vitamin D intake were identified as persisting problems. We conclude that infant and toddler feeding practices are comparable to national trends, but suboptimal and conducive to promoting early obesity and diabetes in a susceptible community. A successful education-based intervention strategy beginning in pregnancy appears feasible if psychosocial, environmental, and economic barriers can be addressed. PMID:24761552

  5. Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge, Use, and Factors that Influence Decisions: Results from an Evidence-Based Practice Survey of Providers in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Angela; Walrath-Greene, Christine; Fisher, Sylvia; Crossbear, Shannon; Walker, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Evidence-based Treatment Survey were used to compare providers serving families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities to their counterparts in non-American Indian/Alaska Native communities on provider characteristics and factors that influence their decision to use evidence-based practices (N = 467). The findings suggest…

  6. Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians: Can They Communicate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Clark S.

    A failure in communication between Anglo American, American Indian, and Mexican American communities exists because of the inadequate reporting of the events that occur within each of these groups. This speech outlines several basic ways in which communication can eventually be improved. First, it emphasizes that educators must recognize and…

  7. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  8. American Indian Education: Separation, Amalgamation, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zephier, Richard

    This essay examines American Indian education from a historical perspective and analyzes the role of the school as an institution in an Indian community. Since the arrival of the white man in America, Indians have faced a world of cultural conflict. Throughout the history of Indian education, their values and way of life have been demeaned. The…

  9. Preventing Substance Abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Promising Strategies for Healthier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Elizabeth H.; Cummins, Lillian H.; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2004-01-01

    Substance abuse has had profoundly devastating effects on the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives. A wide variety of intervention methods has been used to prevent or stem the development of alcohol and drug problems in Indian youth, but there is little empirical research evaluating these efforts. This article is an…

  10. American Indian Education Opportunities Program. Supplement 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molin, Paulette F.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of the American Indian Educational Opportunities Program (AIEOP) at Hampton University for this reporting period included the establishment of a student chapter of the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), a move to new office space, hosting events on campus for visiting students from the American Indian Education Program of Oxon Hill, Maryland and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, New York, collaboration with the Multicultural Leadership Team at NASA Langley Research Center for a Native American elder to serve as a speaker, participation in Native American conferences and other events, and continuing efforts to recruit and retain American Indian students.

  11. The Utility of the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6) in Two American Indian Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christina M.; Beals, Janette

    2011-01-01

    The Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6; Kessler et al., 2002) has been used widely as a screener for mental health problems and as a measure of severity of impact of mental health problems. However, the applicability and utility of this measure for assessments within American Indian communities has not been explored. Data were…

  12. Community Development by American Indian Tribes: Five Case Studies of Establishing Policy for Tribal Members with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kathy; Fowler, LaDonna; Seekins, Tom; Locust, Carol; Clay, Julie

    2000-01-01

    The Tribal Disability Actualization Process used culturally appropriate deliberation processes and particpatory action research in considering policies for American Indians with disabilities. Talking circles on five reservations were used to achieve consensus on the needs of people with disabilities and derive community-driven solutions that are…

  13. Incorporating Traditional Healing into an Urban American Indian Health Organization: A Case Study of Community Member Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William E.; Gone, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available…

  14. Community Background Reports: Papago Reservation, Sells, Arizona. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 17, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackett, Robert; Chilcott, John H.

    Number 17 in Series I of the final report of the National Study of American Indian Education describes the small community of Sells, Arizona, in terms of (1) location and climate, (2) sociocultural background, (3) transportation problems, (4) housing problems, (5) governmental influence, (6) recreation, (7) educational opportunities, and (8)…

  15. Local Control Over Formal Education in Two American-Indian Communities: A Preliminary Step Toward Cultural Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Janice J.

    The possible causes underlying the differential response to local control over education in the American Indian Ccommunities of San Juan and Santa Clara, both of the Tewa branch of the Pueblo Tribe, are reported in this paper. Results are described for the 10-week study (summer 1969) that consisted of observations of community reactions to…

  16. Translating the Diabetes Prevention Program Into American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Manson, Spero M.; Beals, Janette; Henderson, William G.; Huang, Haixiao; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) showed that lifestyle intervention can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes for those at risk. We evaluated a translational implementation of this intervention in a diverse set of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Special Diabetes Program for Indians Diabetes Prevention (SDPI-DP) demonstration project implemented the DPP lifestyle intervention among 36 health care programs serving 80 tribes. A total of 2,553 participants with prediabetes were recruited and started intervention by 31 July 2008. They were offered the 16-session Lifestyle Balance Curriculum and underwent a thorough clinical assessment for evaluation of their diabetes status and risk at baseline, soon after completing the curriculum (postcurriculum), and annually for up to 3 years. Diabetes incidence was estimated. Weight loss, changes in blood pressure and lipid levels, and lifestyle changes after intervention were also evaluated. RESULTS The completion rates of SDPI-DP were 74, 59, 42, and 33% for the postcurriculum and year 1, 2, and 3 assessments, respectively. The crude incidence of diabetes among SDPI-DP participants was 4.0% per year. Significant improvements in weight, blood pressure, and lipid levels were observed immediately after the intervention and annually thereafter for 3 years. Class attendance strongly correlated with diabetes incidence rate, weight loss, and change in systolic blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate the feasibility and potential of translating the lifestyle intervention in diverse AI/AN communities. They have important implications for future dissemination and institutionalization of the intervention throughout the Native American health system. PMID:23275375

  17. A Framework for Conducting a National Study of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Novins, Douglas K.; Moore, Laurie A.; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A.; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. Objectives and Methods We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n = 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Results Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. Conclusion and Scientific Significance This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies. PMID:22931088

  18. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  19. Reframing Diabetes in American Indian Communities: A Social Determinants of Health Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Felicia M.

    2012-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience some of the greatest health inequities of any group within the United States. AI/ANs are diagnosed with diabetes more than twice as often as non-Hispanic white Americans. Diabetes is a chronic preventable disease often associated with individual risk factors and behaviors that indicate what…

  20. Community-Based Research as a Mechanism to Reduce Environmental Health Disparities in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    McOliver, Cynthia Agumanu; Camper, Anne K.; Doyle, John T.; Eggers, Margaret J.; Ford, Tim E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Berner, James; Campbell, Larry; Donatuto, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods, forests and forest resources, and tribal health. This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by tribal communities. The tribal research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STAR research program was developed under the premise that tribal populations may be at an increased risk for environmentally-induced diseases as a result of unique subsistence and traditional practices of the tribes and Alaska Native villages, community activities, occupations and customs, and/or environmental releases that significantly and disproportionately impact tribal lands. Through a series of case studies, this article will demonstrate how grantees—tribal community leaders and members and academic collaborators—have been addressing these complex environmental concerns by developing capacity, expertise and tools through community-engaged research. PMID:25872019

  1. Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in american Indian and alaska native communities.

    PubMed

    McOliver, Cynthia Agumanu; Camper, Anne K; Doyle, John T; Eggers, Margaret J; Ford, Tim E; Lila, Mary Ann; Berner, James; Campbell, Larry; Donatuto, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods, forests and forest resources, and tribal health. This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by tribal communities. The tribal research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STAR research program was developed under the premise that tribal populations may be at an increased risk for environmentally-induced diseases as a result of unique subsistence and traditional practices of the tribes and Alaska Native villages, community activities, occupations and customs, and/or environmental releases that significantly and disproportionately impact tribal lands. Through a series of case studies, this article will demonstrate how grantees-tribal community leaders and members and academic collaborators-have been addressing these complex environmental concerns by developing capacity, expertise and tools through community-engaged research. PMID:25872019

  2. Protecting American Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act has caused concern and misunderstanding among social workers. The Act is seen as a victory for tribal sovereignty but must be viewed within the context of American Indian culture and child rearing practices. (Author/JAC)

  3. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  4. Traditional American Indian Economic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosper, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    Examines aspects of American Indian world views and values relevant to economic development policy; specifically, sense of community, connectedness of everything, consideration of future generations, and humility toward nature. Discusses constraints on economic development arising from these values and the relevance of common property ownership…

  5. Factors Associated With American Indian and White Adolescent Drug Selling in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David; Eitle, Tamela McNulty

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the correlates of adolescent drug selling in America, with most of these studies focusing on urban settings. The present study examines the risk and protective factors associated with drug selling among American Indian and white adolescents residing in a rural Northwestern state in the United States. Using survey data collected in 2010-2012, we conduct logistic regression analyses exploring the correlates of drug selling (n=568). Generally, we found support for prior explanations of drug selling, but identified some important race-specific differences. Specifically, we found that stress exposure was a risk factor for American Indians, but not whites. Conversely, academic achievement served as a protective factor for white adolescents but not American Indians. Our findings suggest that the race gap in rural drug selling can be explained by considering differences in social bonds, stress exposure, and exposure to substance using family and friends. PMID:26120365

  6. Satisfaction With Telehealth for Cancer Support Groups in Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda H.; Haozous, Emily; Towle, Cara; Revels, Laura; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted to determine the information needs of American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) cancer survivors and assess satisfaction with and acceptability of telehealth support group services for cancer survivors in AI and AN rural communities. AI and AN cancer survivors were asked to complete the Telehealth Satisfaction Survey and two open-ended questions, one regarding information needs and one seeking comments and suggestions about cancer support group meetings. Thirty-two surveys were returned. Information about nutrition during treatment and treatment-related side effects were the most sought after topics. Participants valued the opportunity to interact with other AI and AN cancer survivors who also lived in remote locations and the usefulness of the information presented. The link with geographically distant survivors was valuable to participants as they felt they were no longer alone in their cancer experiences. Determining survivors’ information needs provides meaningful topics for future support group education. Telehealth is a viable way to facilitate cancer support groups to AI and AN cancer survivors in rural communities. PMID:21112853

  7. The Destruction of American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Steven, Ed.

    Responding to the need for a comprehensive source of information regarding the separation of American Indian children from their families, this book presents essays which: examine the Indian child-welfare crisis in contemporary, legal, and historical perspectives; document the human cost of the crisis to Indian parents, children, and communities;…

  8. American Indian Completers and Noncompleters in a Tribal and Community College in Northern Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Jean Kelly Echternacht

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify societal, institutional, organizational, family, and individual factors associated with American Indian students' completion and noncompletion rates in a tribal college in northern Minnesota. Data collection included a series of in-depth interviews and two focus groups with seven…

  9. The Development of a Curriculum Toolkit with American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nicole L.; Hare, Dwight; Sempier, Tracie T.; Grace, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This article explains the creation of the "Growing and Learning with Young Native Children" curriculum toolkit. The curriculum toolkit was designed to give American Indian and Alaska Native early childhood educators who work in a variety of settings the framework for developing a research-based, developmentally appropriate, tribally specific…

  10. Community-Responsive Interventions to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Jared B.; Adams, Alexandra K.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Karanja, Njeri; Lee, Elisa T.; Walters, Karina L.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations bear a heavy burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and they have the highest rates of risk factors for CVD, such as cigarette smoking, obesity, and diabetes, of any U.S. population group. Yet, few randomized controlled trials have been launched to test potential preventive interventions in…

  11. “Alcohol is Something That Been With Us Like a Common Cold”: Community Perceptions of American Indian Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Nicole P.; Eaves, Emery R.; Koss, Mary P.; Polacca, Mona; Bletzer, Keith; Goldman, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined tribal members’ perspectives on alcohol, risk factors, consequences, and community responses. Focus groups were conducted with five American Indian tribes between 1997 and 2001. Participants were knowledgeable of the cultural lives of their reservation communities. Although there was agreement regarding the pervasiveness of heavy drinking, participants reported different opinions about the meaning of alcohol and appropriate intervention strategies. Three dilemmas were identified, suggesting that community ambivalence may serve as a barrier to reducing problem drinking. Implications, limitations, and future research directions are discussed. The study was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. PMID:20380555

  12. "We never was happy living like a Whiteman" : mental health disparities and the postcolonial predicament in American Indian communities.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P

    2007-12-01

    In the context of increasing attention to disparities in health status between U.S. ethnoracial groups, this article examines the dilemma of divergent cultural practices for redressing disparities in mental health status in American Indian communities. Drawing upon an ethnographic interview with a tribal elder from a northern Plains Indian reservation, a prototypical discourse of distress is presented and analyzed as one exemplar of the divergence between the culture of the clinic and the culture of the community. Situated in the context of continuing power asymmetries between tribal nations and the U.S. federal government, the implications of this cultural divergence for the efforts of mental health professionals, practitioners, and policymakers are identified as a predicament that only the conventions and commitments of a robust community psychology have the potential to resolve. PMID:17906926

  13. Treating hepatitis C in American Indians/Alaskan Natives: A survey of Project ECHO® (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) utilization by Indian Health Service providers

    PubMed Central

    Pindyck, Talia; Kalishman, Summers; Flatow-Trujillo, Lainey; Thornton, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Background: American Indians/Alaskan Natives have a high mortality associated with hepatitis C virus, yet treatment rates are low. The ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) model™, a videoconferencing technology for primary care providers, is underutilized at Indian Health Service facilities. Purpose: To ascertain Indian Health Service providers’ benefit of and barriers to utilizing hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinics. Methods: We electronically sent an Active Participant Survey to Indian Health Service providers utilizing hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic and a Non-Participant Survey to other Indian Health Service providers interested in this clinic. Results: In total, 100% of Active Participant Survey respondents perceive moderate to major benefit of hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic in managing hepatitis C virus, and 67% of Non-Participant Survey respondents reported lack of administrative time as the major barrier to utilizing this resource. Conclusion: Indian Health Service providers participating in hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic perceive this resource as highly beneficial, but widespread utilization may be impractical without allocating time for participation. PMID:26770809

  14. American Indian Men’s Perceptions of Breast Cancer Screening for American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Melissa K.; Pacheco, Joseph; James, Aimee S.; Brown, Travis; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Choi, Won S.; Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, especially screening mammography, is vital for decreasing breast cancer incidence and mortality. Screening rates in American Indian women are low compared to other racial/ethnic groups. In addition, American Indian women are diagnosed at more advanced stages and have lower 5-year survival rate than others. To better address the screening rates of American Indian women, focus groups (N=8) were conducted with American Indian men (N=42) to explore their perceptions of breast cancer screening for American Indian women. Our intent was to understand men’s support level toward screening. Using a community-based participatory approach, focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a text analysis approach developed by our team. Topics discussed included breast cancer and screening knowledge, barriers to screening, and suggestions to improve screening rates. These findings can guide strategies to improve knowledge and awareness, communication among families and health care providers, and screening rates in American Indian communities. PMID:25995972

  15. Directory of American Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. Inst. for Human Development.

    This directory provides general information on American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and lands. The information was compiled from several resources including the "Federal Register," the Bureau of Indian Affairs, "The Native American Almanac" (A. Hirschfelder, M. K. de Montano), the "Atlas of North American Indian Tribes" (Carl Waldman), the…

  16. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  17. American Indian Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  18. An American Indian community implements the chronic care model: evolution and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Langwell, Kathryn; Keene, Catherine; Zullo, Matthew; Ogu, Linda Chioma

    2014-11-01

    The chronic care model (CCM) has been initiated most frequently in clinical settings with outreach to the community to obtain involvement and guidance. Implementation of the CCM by communities that reach out to clinicians and develop linkages and coordination to improve care for community members with chronic conditions is less frequently observed. This commentary describes the implementation of the CCM by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Indian Reservation. The design emphasized community-based leadership, with the Tribe having the primary role in developing and implementing culturally tailored community self-management supports, improving linkages with Indian Health Service (IHS) clinicians and cultural knowledge of providers, and developing a coalition of organizations with additional resources to create a more comprehensive system of diabetes care for Tribal members with diabetes. Results indicate that community-initiated implementation of the CCM can be an effective strategy for creating a comprehensive community-clinical system of care for community members with diabetes. Overall, by the fourth implementation year, approximately 25% of Tribal members with diabetes had participated in the program and 28% of people on the Diabetes Registry had HbA1c levels above 9.0 compared to 32% before the Wind River ARDD program. The success of the Wind River program suggests that community-driven approaches are a valuable strategy in our nation's efforts to eliminate health disparities and ensure equal and fair access to quality health care for all citizens. PMID:25359246

  19. Health Promotion and Substance Abuse Prevention among American Indian and Alaska Native Communities: Issues in Cultural Competence. Cultural Competence Series 9. Special Collaborative Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E., Ed.; Beauvais, Fred, Ed.

    Substance abuse continues to be one of the most damaging and chronic health problems faced by Indian people. American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) substance abuse prevention and treatment programs must be framed within the broader context of the widening health disparities between AI/AN communities and the general population. Successful…

  20. Applying Community-Based Participatory Research Principles to the Development of a Smoking-Cessation Program for American Indian Teens: "Telling Our Story"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Kimberly; McCracken, Lyn; Dino, Geri; Brayboy, Missy

    2008-01-01

    Community-based participatory research provides communities and researchers with opportunities to develop interventions that are effective as well as acceptable and culturally competent. The present project responds to the voices of the North Carolina American Indian (AI) community and the desire for their youth to recognize tobacco addiction and…

  1. American Indian Education: One Indian Teacher's View or New Directions in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiger, Flo

    1987-01-01

    Flo Wiger, Chairperson, Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota/Minneapolis, shares her experiences and views on Indian Education. Dropout rates; higher enrollment; more relevant curricula; increased Indian faculty and staff availability; and community, tribal, and governmental involvement are included. Educational change to…

  2. In Search of Theory and Method in American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2007-01-01

    American Indian studies should have a theoretical and methodological focus sufficient to organize an academic discipline. A primary focus of American Indian studies as a discipline is to conceptualize, research, and explain patterns of American Indian individual and collective community choices and strategies when confronted with relations with…

  3. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Birgil J.

    1977-01-01

    Describing American Indian contributions to medicine, this article lists specific contributions and concludes that although some 220 drugs of Native American use were listed in the National Formulary of 1888, recent recognition of American Indian pharmacological contributions is long overdue. (JC)

  4. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, and community leaders with the programs available to Indians through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this brochure provides information on program benefits, application procedures, and who to contact for further information for 49 programs in the areas of agriculture, community…

  5. Child Abuse and Neglect in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.

    Child abuse and neglect among American Indians is a political as well as a clinical problem, as the victims belong to one cultural group and health professionls who detect maltreatment generally belong to another. Reluctance to diagnose and report child abuse, although universal, is probably more significant in Indian communities for several…

  6. The Indian in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The treatment of American Indians is discussed historically with reference to the 4 principal methods used to create or perpetuate false impressions: obliteration, defamation, disembodiment, and disparagement. Indian contributions to American civilization are cited in contrast with historical references to Indians in textbooks. The author suggests…

  7. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  8. Incorporating Traditional Healing Into an Urban American Indian Health Organization: A Case Study of Community Member Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, William E.; Gone, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available for urban AI communities do not exist in the literature, this community-based project convened 4 focus groups consisting of 26 members of a midwestern urban AI community to better understand traditional healing practices of interest and how they might be integrated into the mental health and substance abuse treatment services in an Urban Indian Health Organization (UIHO). Qualitative content analysis of focus group transcripts revealed that ceremonial participation, traditional education, culture keepers, and community cohesion were thought to be key components of a successful traditional healing program. Potential incorporation of these components into an urban environment, however, yielded 4 marked tensions: traditional healing protocols versus the realities of impoverished urban living, multitribal representation in traditional healing services versus relational consistency with the culture keepers who would provide them, enthusiasm for traditional healing versus uncertainty about who is trustworthy, and the integrity of traditional healing versus the appeal of alternative medicine. Although these tensions would likely arise in most urban AI clinical contexts, the way in which each is resolved will likely depend on tailored community needs, conditions, and mental health objectives. PMID:22731113

  9. COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING PRACTICES AMONG THREE AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITIES IN MINNESOTA.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Melissa K; Perdue, David G; Hester, Christina; Cully, Angelia; Cully, Lance; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. Effective prevention and early detection may be achieved through screening, but screening rates are low, especially in American Indian (AI) populations. We wanted to understand perceptions of CRC screening among AI located in the Great Lakes region. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim (N = 45). Data were analyzed using qualitative text analysis. Themes that deterred CRC screening were low CRC knowledge, fear of the procedure and results, cost and transportation issues, and a lack of quality and competent care. Suggestions for improvement included outreach efforts and culturally-tailored teaching materials. PMID:27188017

  10. Rebuilding TRUST: A Community, Multi-Agency, State, and University Partnership to Improve Behavioral Health Care for American Indian Youth, their Families, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Ross-Toledo, Kimberly; John, Susie; Lee Hall, Janie; Ross, Lucille; Freeland, Lance; Colleta, Ernest; Becenti-Fundark, Twila

    2014-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the strength and survival of many Nations and Tribes. However, the aftermath of colonialism has resulted in numerous health disparities and challenges for Native youth, including the highest rate of suicide in the United States. With the aims of elucidating the causes of behavioral health disparities, eliminating them, and improving behavioral health care for Native youth, a partnership of providers, community members, and university faculty and staff completed a comprehensive literature review; conducted advisory meetings with 71 American Indian youth, parents, and elders; surveyed 25 service providers; and engaged in ongoing consultation with traditional practitioners. Results from the multiple sources were synthesized and are reported with 20 policy, provider, and research recommendations that recognize the importance of moving beyond exclusive reliance on western models of care and that seek to foster transformation of individuals, families, communities, behavioral health service systems of care, and social structures. PMID:25076801

  11. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  12. Values and depressive symptoms in American Indian youth of the Northern Plains: examining the potential moderating roles of outcome expectancies and perceived community values.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Alicia C; Scott, Walter D; Estes, David

    2014-03-01

    Very little is known about processes contributing to depressive experiences in American Indian youth. We explored the relationship between value priorities and depressive symptoms among 183 (65% female) American Indian youth in grades 9-12. In addition, two potential moderators of this relationship were examined: value outcome expectations (i.e., whether one expects that values will be realized or not) and perceived community values. We found that American Indian youth who endorsed higher levels of tradition/benevolence values reported fewer depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between endorsing power/materialism values and depressive symptoms depended on the extent to which youth perceived their communities as valuing power/materialism. Finally, value outcome expectancies appeared to relate more strongly to depressive symptoms than did value priorities. Overall, these findings support tribal community efforts to impart tradition/benevolence values to American Indian youth but also emphasize the importance of attending to value outcome expectations and the perceived values of the community in understanding American Indian youth's depressive experiences. PMID:23857243

  13. Lessons Learned From a Community-Based Participatory Research Mental Health Promotion Program for American Indian Youth.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Sarah E; Golden, Shannon L; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Maynor, Rhonda F; Bryant, Alfred; Freeman, V Kay; Bell, Ronny A

    2016-05-01

    Background American Indian (AI) youth have the highest rates of suicide among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Community-based strategies are essential to address this issue, and community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage AI communities in mental health promotion programming. Objectives This article describes successes and challenges of a CBPR, mixed-method project, The Lumbee Rite of Passage (LROP), an academic-community partnership to develop and implement a suicide prevention program for Lumbee AI youth in North Carolina. Method LROP was conducted in two phases to (1) understand knowledge and perceptions of existing mental health resources and (2) develop, implement, and evaluate a cultural enrichment program as a means of suicide prevention. Discussion/Results LROP implemented an effective community-academic partnership by (1) identifying and understanding community contexts, (2) maintaining equitable partnerships, and (3) implementing a culturally tailored research design targeting multilevel changes to support mental health. Strategies formed from the partnership alleviated challenges in each of these key CBPR concept areas. Conclusions LROP highlights how a CBPR approach contributes to positive outcomes and identifies opportunities for future collaboration in a tribal community. Using culturally appropriate CBPR strategies is critical to achieving sustainable, effective programs to improve mental health of AI youth. PMID:27009131

  14. Ethics and Community Involvement in Syntheses Concerning American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Around Him, Deana M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the research was to review reporting of ethical concerns and community involvement in peer-reviewed systematic reviews or meta-analyses concerning American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian (AI/AN/NH) health. Methods Text words and indexed vocabulary terms were used to query PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and the Native Health Database for systematic reviews or meta-analyses concerning AI/AN/NH health published in peer-reviewed journals, followed by a search through reference lists. Each article was abstracted by two independent reviewers; results were discussed until consensus was reached. Results We identified 107 papers published from 1986–2012 that were primarily about AI/AN/NH health or presented findings separately for AI/AN/NH communities. Two reported seeking indigenous reviewer feedback; none reported seeking input from tribes and communities. Approximately 7% reported on institutional review board (IRB) approval of included studies, 5% reported on tribal approval, and 4% referenced the sovereignty of AI/AN tribes. Approximately 63% used evidence from more than one AI/AN/NH population study, and 28% discussed potential benefits to communities from the synthesis research. Conclusions Reporting of ethics and community involvement are not prominent. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses making community-level inferences may pose risks to communities. Future systematic reviews and meta-analyses should consider ethical and participatory dimensions of research. PMID:25089283

  15. Design of a behavioral health program for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youths: a community informed approach.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Daniel L; Johnson, Carrie L

    2011-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) urban youths experience significant mental health and substance use problems. However, culturally relevant treatment approaches that incorporate community perspectives within the urban setting are limited. This study analyzes community perspectives from AI/AN parents, AI/AN youths, and services providers within Los Angeles County. Information gathered was utilized to develop a needs assessment for AI/AN youths with mental health and substance use problems and to design a community-informed treatment approach. Nine focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. The Los Angeles County community strongly expressed the need for providing urban AI/AN youths with traditional healing services and cultural activities within their treatment program. However, various barriers to accessing mental health and substance abuse treatment services were identified. An integrated treatment approach was subsequently designed as a result of input derived from community perspectives. The community believed that providing urban AI/AN youths with an integrated treatment approach has the potential to decrease the risk of mental health and substance abuse problems in addition to enhancing their cultural identity and self esteem. PMID:22400466

  16. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  17. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  18. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Nursing Program Announcement Type: Competing Continuation. Funding... (OPHS) is accepting competitive cooperative agreement applications for the American Indians into...

  19. American Indian Capacity Building in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Don

    A 1996 research project in St. Paul, Minnesota, found high rates of poverty and unemployment in its American Indian population and a lack of connection between social service agencies and the Indian community. A follow-up project aimed to support the Indian community in identifying its own priorities for research and action. Eight focus groups…

  20. Identification of Information Needs of the American Indian Community That Can Be Met by Library Services. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, Minneapolis, Minn.

    The National Indian Education Association operated a research and demonstration project to provide library and information services to three American Indian reservations over a period of four years. Attempts were made to determine what kinds of information services the people themselves wanted, and then a program was developed to meet these needs.…

  1. American Indians in Small Cities: A Survey of Urban Acculturation in Two Northern Arizona Communities. Rehabilitation Monographs No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Roger E.; Cramer, John O.

    Urban acculturation of American Indians in Flagstaff and Winslow, Arizona was surveyed. Demographic data were obtained from Bureau of Census publications and unpublished maps and statistical tables. Sociological data included research on employment patterns, housing, economic impact of Indian consumers, and settlement patterns within urban…

  2. The Sequoyah corporation fuels release and the Church Rock spill: unpublicized nuclear releases in American Indian communities.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; deLemos, Jamie L; Bui, Cat

    2007-09-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear release exemplifies why there is public and policy interest in the high-technology, highly visible end of the nuclear cycle. The environmental and health consequences of the early steps in the cycle--mining, milling, and processing of uranium ore--may be less appreciated. We examined 2 large unintended acute releases of uranium--at Kerr McGee's Sequoyah Fuels Corporation in Oklahoma and United Nuclear Corporation's Church Rock uranium mill in New Mexico, which were incidents with comparable magnitude to the Three Mile Island release. We urge exploration of whether there is limited national interest and concern for the primarily rural, low-income, and American Indian communities affected by these releases. More attention should be given to the early stages of the nuclear cycle and their impacts on health and the environment. PMID:17666688

  3. The Sequoyah Corporation Fuels Release and the Church Rock Spill: Unpublicized Nuclear Releases in American Indian Communities

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, Doug; deLemos, Jamie L.; Bui, Cat

    2007-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear release exemplifies why there is public and policy interest in the high-technology, highly visible end of the nuclear cycle. The environmental and health consequences of the early steps in the cycle—mining, milling, and processing of uranium ore—may be less appreciated. We examined 2 large unintended acute releases of uranium—at Kerr McGee’s Sequoyah Fuels Corporation in Oklahoma and United Nuclear Corporation’s Church Rock uranium mill in New Mexico, which were incidents with comparable magnitude to the Three Mile Island release. We urge exploration of whether there is limited national interest and concern for the primarily rural, low-income, and American Indian communities affected by these releases. More attention should be given to the early stages of the nuclear cycle and their impacts on health and the environment. PMID:17666688

  4. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  5. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  6. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  7. American Indian Studies Is for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1996-01-01

    Reviews issues related to American Indian studies programs from Native and non-Native perspectives. Discusses who should study American Indians, the value of American Indian studies for Native and non-Native students, the feasibility of Indian advisory boards for funding agencies and mass media producers, and issues of scholarly review. (SV)

  8. Oregon American Indian Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Susan

    This state plan presents Oregon's 11 educational goals for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education, which have been revised and detailed by the statewide Indian Education Council. The goals support the policy of the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), the educational philosophy of the AI/AN community, and the Indian Student Bill of…

  9. Relocated American Indians in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablon, Joan

    1964-01-01

    American Indians who come to the San Francisco Bay Area choose to associate primarily with other Indians of their own or differing tribes in both informal and formal social interaction. Urbanization of Indians occurs on a large scale because of government relocation programs; however, the background in small rural folk communities creates a…

  10. American Indian Urbanization. Institute Monograph Series Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Jack O.,; Watson, O. Michael

    The nine essays in this monograph represent an expanded outgrowth of "The American Indian in Urban Society" (1971) and an attempt at improvement. The essays are titled as follows: (1) "Federal Policy and the Urban Indian" (Federal policy affecting the urbanization of Indian populations); (2) "Urbanization in a Reservation Community: The Hopi…

  11. Speaking out about physical harms from tobacco use: response to graphic warning labels among American Indian/Alaska Native communities

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Silver Wolf, David A; Tovar, Molly; Thompson, Kellie; Ishcomer, Jamie; Kreuter, Matthew W; Caburnay, Charlene; Boyum, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study is the first to explore the impact of graphic cigarette labels with physical harm images on members of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The aim of this article is to investigate how AI/AN respond to particular graphic warning labels. Methods The parent study recruited smokers, at-risk smokers and non-smokers from three different age groups (youths aged 13–17 years, young adults aged 18–24 years and adults aged 25+ years) and five population subgroups with high smoking prevalence or smoking risk. Using nine graphic labels, this study collected participant data in the field via an iPad-administered survey and card sorting of graphic warning labels. This paper reports on findings for AI/AN participants. Results After viewing graphic warning labels, participants rated their likelihood of talking about smoking risks to friends, parents and siblings higher than their likelihood of talking to teachers and doctors. Further, this study found that certain labels (eg, the label of the toddler in the smoke cloud) made them think about their friends and family who smoke. Conclusions Given the influence of community social networks on health beliefs and attitudes, health communication using graphic warning labels could effect change in the smoking habits of AI/AN community members. Study findings suggest that graphic labels could serve as stimuli for conversations about the risks of smoking among AI/AN community members, and could be an important element of a peer-to-peer smoking cessation effort. PMID:27009143

  12. Clinical Strategies for American Indian Families in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Horse, John

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a strategy for organizing mental health programs for American Indian families. Suggests four principles for clinical service: (1) spirituality; (2) immersion with families and the community; (3) "picturing," or the articulation of unconscious family behaviors; and (4) "joining," or the reconstitution of the American Indian family system.…

  13. American Indian Science & Engineering Society 1994 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Science and Engineering Society, Boulder, CO.

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. AISES educational programs provide opportunities for American Indians and Alaska Natives to pursue studies in science, engineering, and other academic arenas. The trained professionals become…

  14. Culturally Relevant Training of American Indian Educational Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Plake, Barbara S.

    American Indian participation in educational research suffers from minimal involvement of tribal people in the research effort, the obtrusive role of researchers, controversies over the content of published research, and inadequate preparation of researchers sensitive to American Indian community needs. Existing supplementary training methods to…

  15. Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO) Annual Report, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    Presenting an account of the 1975 activities and interests of the Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO is an organization which was initiated in 1970 to serve as both a catalytic and unifying force in the American Indian community), this annual report briefly describes the following: the need for AIO; facts regarding the socioeconomic status of…

  16. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    The brochure, designed to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, community leaders, and individuals with more than 50 programs available to American Indians and Alaska Natives, lists benefits, application procedures, and field contact points for United States Department of Agriculture program agencies. The nine sponsoring agencies…

  17. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program: Modifying an Existing Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Intervention for Use in an American Indian Community

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica D.; Pourier, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancies are a health issue for many American Indian communities. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how an existing alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program with non-pregnant women (Project CHOICES) was modified to fit the needs and norms of an American Indian community. The Oglala Sioux Tribe CHOICES Program was developed and implemented using community feedback through initial meetings, reviewing materials, gathering input into recruitment and intervention logistics, and conducting interviews to evaluate the program. The intervention was implemented and has been enrolling non-pregnant American Indian women for the past several years. While data collection is ongoing, it has shown preliminary success in changing behaviors and in impacting how the community views the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Overall, this study highlights the potential to expand this prevention program to other sites and with other populations, such as adolescents. By the end of this article, readers will comprehend the steps necessary to replicate such a program at other tribal and rural sites. PMID:26703670

  18. Effective Counseling with American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetsit, Deborah

    Counseling has always been a part of American Indian culture. Only recently has the European American counseling establishment recognized the role of culture in counseling. Developing a historical understanding of American Indians is important to working with American Indian students. It is also important for school counselors to recognize the…

  19. A culturally-tailored behavioral intervention trial for alcohol use disorders in three American Indian communities: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    McDonell, Michael G.; Nepom, Jenny R.; Leickly, Emily; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid; Hirchak, Kait; Echo-Hawk, Abigail; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Calhoun, Darren; Donovan, Dennis; Roll, John; Ries, Richard; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    Background Disproportionately high rates of alcohol use disorders are present in many American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, yet little information exists regarding the effectiveness of alcohol treatments in AI/AN populations. Contingency management is an intervention for illicit drug use in which tangible reinforcers (rewards) are provided when patients demonstrate abstinence as assessed by urine drug tests. Contingency management has not been widely studied as an intervention for alcohol problems because until recently, no alcohol biomarker has been available to adequately verify abstinence. Aims The HONOR Study is designed to determine whether a culturally-tailored contingency management intervention is an effective intervention for AI/AN adults who suffer from alcohol use disorders. Methods Participants include 400 AI/AN alcohol-dependent adults residing in one rural reservation, one urban community, as well as a third site to be decided, in the Western U.S. Participants complete a 4-week lead-in phase prior to randomization, then 12 weeks of either a contingency management intervention for alcohol abstinence, or a control condition where participants receive reinforcers for attending study visits regardless of alcohol use. Participants are then followed for 3-more months post-intervention. The primary study outcome is urinary ethyl glucuronide-confirmed alcohol abstinence; secondary outcomes include self-reported alcohol and drug use, HIV risk behaviors, and self-reported cigarette smoking. Discussion This will be the largest randomized, controlled trial of any alcohol for AI/ANs and the largest contingency management study targeting alcohol use disorders, thus providing important information to AI/AN communities and the alcohol treatment field in general. PMID:26706667

  20. On the Pursuit of Sound Science for the Betterment of the American Indian Community: Reply to Beals et al. (2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, Nichea S.; Smith, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors of this reply argue that ongoing criticism of existing theories, the development of alternative theories, and empirical theory tests offer the best chance for advancing American Indian research. The authors therefore note their appreciation for the comments of J. Beals et al. The authors nevertheless disagree with many of the specific…

  1. Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Pamela Jumper; Vernon, Irene S; Plested, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts. PMID:17159467

  2. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  3. Community-Based Participatory Research to Improve Preconception Health among Northern Plains American Indian Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jennifer; Mousseau, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sacred Beginnings is a community-based participatory research project that examines the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate preconception health educational intervention developed by tribal community members and elders. The primary goal is to increase knowledge of preconception health and its benefits among adolescent females and…

  4. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    MedlinePlus

    ... million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Typically, this urban clientele has less accessibility to hospitals; health clinics ... IHS and tribal health programs. Studies on the urban American Indian and Alaska Native population have documented ...

  5. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  6. Indian Communities in Action: A Case Study Approach to Community Development Among Southwestern Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr.

    Designed as a stimulus for American Indian educational development, these examples of community development programs among the Southwestern Indians are presented via the case study approach in the interest of analyzation of both positive and negative experiences. Specifically, this book presents case studies of: (1) the Round Rock School on the…

  7. The American Indian in Urban Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Jack O., Ed.; Watson, O. Michael, Ed.

    Three main questions related to American Indians in urban society are discussed by 9 anthropologists and 1 American Indian in this 3-part book. Part 1 deals with historical and current urbanization trends and their effects on American Indians, in addition to providing a historical approach to governmental policies and attitudes toward the American…

  8. Social Policy and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Wynne DuBray; Purcell, Patrick Frances

    The purpose of the monograph is to provide schools of social work and their teachers with a central core of information concerning the policy and provisions of law that affect American Indians. The core information is selective and is presented in seven chapters. The first chapter provides a brief historical overview of the unique relationship…

  9. Chronicles of American Indian Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Interracial Books for Children, Inc., New York, NY.

    More than 60 historical documents related to the struggle of American Indian nations to preserve their sovereignty from the first resistance to the European invasions of the Americas up to and including the present are contained in this chronicle. Covering the period from 1622 to 1978, this updated version is expanded to include documents…

  10. Do American Indian Mascots = American Indian People? Examining Implicit Bias towards American Indian People and American Indian Mascots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, John; Burke, Amanda; Burkley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Empirical examinations of American Indian (AI) mascots have only recently entered into the discourse of mainstream psychology. The present studies examined implicit attitudes of non-AI people towards AI mascots and the extent to which they are related to attitudes towards AI people. Significant concordance was observed between negative bias toward…

  11. Current North American Indian Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blew, Carol Van Antwerp Holliday; And Others

    Approximately 150 newsletters, newspapers, and other periodicals are cited in this bibliography of current sources of information about or directed toward North American Indians. One-sentence descriptions of content, ordering information, and frequency of publication are provided. The majority of the periodicals cited emphasize current events of…

  12. Evidence-Based Practice and Early Childhood Intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Paul; BigFoot, Dolores Subia; Funderburk, Beverly W.; Novins, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the problems that tribal communities confront when forced to select from menus of evidence-based practice that were not developed with their unique challenges and opportunities in mind. The authors discuss the possibility for adapting or enhancing existing approaches but also point out the need for much more research and…

  13. Challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska native communities: perspectives of staff from 18 treatment centers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance abuse continues to exact a significant toll, despite promising advancements in treatment, and American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities remain disproportionately impacted. Understanding the challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities could ultimately result in more effective treatment interventions, but no multi-site studies have examined this important issue. Methods This qualitative study examined the challenges of providing substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups at 18 substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Seventy-six service participants (21 individuals in clinical administrative positions and 55 front-line clinicians) participated in the project. Interview transcripts were coded to identify key themes. Results We found that the challenges of bringing effective substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities fell into three broad categories: challenges associated with providing clinical services, those associated with the infrastructure of treatment settings, and those associated with the greater service/treatment system. These sets of challenges interact to form a highly complex set of conditions for the delivery of these services. Conclusions Our findings suggest that substance abuse treatment services for AI/AN communities require more integrated, individualized, comprehensive, and longer-term approaches to care. Our three categories of challenges provide a useful framework for eliciting challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment in other substance abuse treatment settings. PMID:24938281

  14. Community-Based Surveillance and Case Management for Suicide Prevention: An American Indian Tribally Initiated System

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Allison; Goklish, Novalene; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Tingey, Lauren; Craig, Mariddie; Lupe, Ronnie; Walkup, John

    2014-01-01

    The National Strategy for Suicide Prevention highlights the importance of improving the timeliness, usefulness, and quality of national suicide surveillance systems, and expanding local capacity to collect relevant data. This article describes the background, methods, process data, and implications from the first-of-its-kind community-based surveillance system for suicidal and self-injurious behavior developed by the White Mountain Apache Tribe with assistance from Johns Hopkins University. The system enables local, detailed, and real-time data collection beyond clinical settings, with in-person follow-up to facilitate connections to care. Total reporting and the proportion of individuals seeking treatment have increased over time, suggesting that this innovative surveillance system is feasible, useful, and serves as a model for other communities and the field of suicide prevention. PMID:24754618

  15. On the Pursuit of Sound Science for the Betterment of the American Indian Community: Reply to Beals et al.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Nichea S; Smith, Gregory T

    2009-03-01

    We argue that ongoing criticism of existing theories, the development of alternative theories, and empirical theory tests offer the best chance for advancing American Indian research. We, therefore note our appreciation for Beals et al.'s comments. We nevertheless did disagree with many of Beals et al.'s specific claims, noting that (a) our characterization of the existing literature on reservation-dwelling American Indian drinking was accurate; (b) no argument made by Beals et al. undermines their theoretical contention that there is a relative lack of contingency between access to basic life reinforcers and sobriety on many reservations; (c) our theory was developed in a responsible manner: a reservation-tied American Indian developed the theory, which was reviewed by a reservation leadership team, a cultural consultant, and reviewers for this journal, at least one of whom consulted leaders of other reservations; and (d) our theory was based on previous interdisciplinary theory development. We encourage the development and testing of new, alternative theories. PMID:20160843

  16. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  17. 75 FR 35070 - American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Medicine Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number: HHS... American Indians into Medicine Program. This program is authorized under the authority of 25 U.S.C....

  18. IndianAmerican contributions to psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by IndianAmerican psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  19. Smallpox and American Indians revisited.

    PubMed

    Riley, James C

    2010-10-01

    Smallpox ravaged the people of Europe and the Americas in the early modern era. Why it was a catastrophic cause of death for American Indians that helped lead to severe depopulation, but a manageable cause among Europeans that allowed continued population growth, has puzzled scholars. Research on variola continued after smallpox eradication in 1977, prompted in part by the fear that aerosolized smallpox might be used in bioterrorism. That research updates factors that may have aggravated smallpox lethality in American Indians, giving new information about infectivity, the proportion of people who may have contracted smallpox, the burden on infants of mothers who had not had smallpox, and the toll for pregnant women. This essay reviews old and new hypotheses about why so many in the New World died from smallpox using recent smallpox research and older sources. PMID:20219730

  20. Health and aging of urban American Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, B J

    1992-01-01

    Although half of the American Indian population resides off the reservation, mostly in the western states, research on the health of urban American Indians remains sparse. American Indians living in urban areas are not eligible for the federally mandated health care provided by the Indian Health Service and receive health care services in a variety of settings. This population is at high risk for many health problems, especially cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Social, cultural, and economic barriers that impede access to health care for this group, particularly for elders living in an urban setting, could be reduced if physicians improved their understanding of and communication with American Indian patients. PMID:1413770

  1. Indian Voices: The Native American Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Historical Society, San Francisco, CA.

    The Convocation of American Indian scholars was conceived, organized, and directed by the American Indian Historical Society. The first convocation was held at Princeton University in 1970. Unlike conventions, the convocations are called when emergencies in Indian life exist, when changes are needed, and when new directions are emerging. This…

  2. American Indian Self-Image Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, Howard T.

    A self-image workshop manual for American Indians aims to help Indian people set goals and excel in whatever they plan in life. A section entitled "Are You an Eagle?" tells of the significance of eagles in traditional American Indian Culture, discusses those who merit an eagle feather for accomplishment, and lists characteristics of eagles (and…

  3. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Designed to inform Indian students about health career opportunities, this handbook prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians describes the great need for more American Indians as health professionals and gives information on specific health fields, preparation for health professions, and assistance available (financial and other).…

  4. Capacity Building from the Inside Out: Development and Evaluation of a CITI Ethics Certification Training Module for American Indian and Alaska Native Community Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Cynthia R.; Parker, Myra; Fisher, Celia B.; Moreno, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Current Human Subject Research training modules fail to capture ethically relevant cultural aspects of research involving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) community members. Applying a Community Engaged Research (CEnR) approach, we adapted the Collaborative IRB Training Initiative training module “assessing risk and benefits.” In a two-arm randomized controlled trial, followed by debriefing interviews, we evaluated module acceptability and understandability (test scores) among 40 reservation-based community members. Participants who took the adapted module, compared to those who took the standard module, reported higher scores on relevance of the material overall satisfaction, module quiz scores, and a trend toward higher self-efficacy. Implications of the efficacy of this approach for enhancing ethics training and community participation in research within AI/AN and other cultural populations within and outside the United States are discussed. PMID:24572083

  5. Do American Indian mascots = American Indian people? Examining implicit bias towards American Indian people and American Indian mascots.

    PubMed

    Chaney, John; Burke, Amanda; Burkley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Empirical examinations of American Indian (AI) mascots have only recently entered into the discourse of mainstream psychology. The present studies examined implicit attitudes of non-AI people towards AI mascots and the extent to which they are related to attitudes towards AI people. Significant concordance was observed between negative bias toward AI mascots and AI people. Negative AI mascot bias also predicted stereotype-consistent expectations of an AI person. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21866499

  6. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  7. Rebuilding Trust: A Community, Multiagency, State, and University Partnership to Improve Behavioral Health Care for American Indian Youth, Their Families, and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Ross-Toledo, Kimberly; John, Susie; Hall, Janie Lee; Ross, Lucille; Freeland, Lance; Coletta, Ernest; Becenti-Fundark, Twila; Poola, Charlene; Roanhorse, Regina; Lee, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the strength and survival of many Nations and Tribes. However, the aftermath of colonialism has resulted in numerous health disparities and challenges for Native youth, including the highest rate of suicide in the United States. With the aims of elucidating the causes of behavioral health disparities,…

  8. Easy Guide to Breastfeeding for American Indian and Alaska Native Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indian Community Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona, WIC Native American Community Health Center, Phoenix, Arizona William Daychild, the ... sensitive at first. • Since before anyone can remember, American Native and Alaska Native women have made enough breast ...

  9. 75 FR 36414 - American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Psychology Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number... Indians into Psychology Program. This program is authorized under the authority of ``25 U.S.C....

  10. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  11. Item Response Theory analyses of DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder criteria in an American Indian community sample

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, David A.; Gizer, Ian R.; Lau, Philip; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Native Americans experience some of the highest rates of DSM-IV stimulant dependence (SD) of all U.S. ethnic groups. This report compares DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder (SUD) diagnostic criteria in an American Indian community sample. Methods Demographic information, stimulant (methamphetamine or cocaine) use, and lifetime DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses were assessed in 858 adult American Indians. Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to assess SUD criteria in both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria sets along an underlying latent trait severity continuum and the effect of demographic variables on differential item functioning (DIF) in those criteria. Results The overall rate of DSM-IV SD was 33%, of DSM-IV SUD was 38%, and of DSM-5 SUD was 36% with no gender differences. All SUD symptoms in both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 datasets functioned on the moderate portion of the underlying severity continuum. “Craving” discriminated better than any other criterion at its level of severity in indicating the presence or absence of SUD. There was little DIF in groups defined by gender or any other demographic variable in either the DSM-IV or DSM-5 datasets. Conclusions These findings indicate that in this American Indian sample, diagnostic criteria for DSM-IV and DSM-5 SUD function similarly in terms of severity and DIF and that the abolition of the DSM-IV distinction between stimulant abuse and dependence in DSM-5 is warranted. PMID:24200103

  12. The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies & Traditional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    This book presents an ethnohistorical examination of American Indian thinking and philosophy and strives to explain the complexity of the American Indian mind in its traditional cultural and natural environment and in contrast to the American mainstream linear world. It is argued that Indian thinking is visual; circular; concerned with the…

  13. American Indian Perspectives of Euro-American Counseling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokken, Jayne M.; Twohey, Denise

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen American Indians participated in 17 counseling interviews with Euro-American counselors. The study analyzed interviews of American Indian participants using Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR). Counselor trustworthiness, which was increased by counselor empathy, genuineness, concern, self-disclosure, and slow pace of problem…

  14. Community Based Participatory development, implementation and evaluation of a cancer screening educational intervention among American Indians in the Northern Plains

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanian, Krishnan; Petereit, Daniel; Kanekar, Shalini; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Esmond, Sarah; Miner, Raylene; Spotted-Tail, Caroline; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The study describes the creation and implementation of a culturally appropriate cancer education intervention, and assesses its efficacy among Native Americans in a community with documented cancer-related disparities. Methods Education workshops were developed and conducted on three reservations in Western South Dakota and Rapid City by trained community representatives. Over four-hundred individuals participated in the two-hour workshops. Participants answered demographic questions, questions about previous cancer screening (to establish baseline screening rates), and completed a pre and post workshop quiz to assess learning. Results Participants demonstrated significant increases in cancer screening-related knowledge levels. Surveys reveal that participants found the information of high quality, great value and would recommend the program to friends. Pre-workshop data reveals cancer screening rates well below the national average. Conclusions Workshop participants increased their knowledge about cancer etiology and screening. This intervention may represent an effective tool for increasing cancer screening utilization among Native Americans. PMID:21431984

  15. Health Promotion and Diabetes Prevention in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities--Traditional Foods Project, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Dawn; DeBruyn, Lemyra; Santos, Marjorie; Alonso, Larry; Frank, Melinda

    2016-02-12

    Type 2 diabetes was probably uncommon in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations before the 1940s. During 2010-2012, AI/AN adults were approximately 2.1 times as likely to have diabetes diagnosed as non-Hispanic white adults. Although type 2 diabetes in youth is still uncommon, AI/AN youth (aged 15-19 years) experienced a 68% increase in diagnosed diabetes from 1994 to 2004. Health disparities are related to biological, environmental, sociological, and historical factors. This report highlights observations from the Traditional Foods Project (2008-2014) that illustrate tribally driven solutions, built on traditional ecological knowledge, to reclaim foods systems for health promotion and prevention of chronic illnesses, including diabetes. PMID:26916637

  16. Genetics Home Reference: North American Indian childhood cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions North American Indian childhood cirrhosis North American Indian childhood cirrhosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description North American Indian childhood cirrhosis is a rare liver disorder that ...

  17. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  18. State Responsibilities for American Indians -- Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Tom

    The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from…

  19. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  20. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  1. Implications of American Indian Gambling for Social Work Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momper, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1988 passage of the Indian Gaming and Regulatory Act (IGRA), American Indian tribal communities have rapidly opened up casinos. American Indian participation in recreational gambling has increased, resulting in an increase in problem and pathological gambling. However, increased revenues from gaming have significantly benefited tribes.…

  2. Substance Abuse and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Willard E.

    This guide introduces concerns and problems resulting from the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs among American Indian youth and addresses intergenerational substance abuse effects. Alcohol abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives is the most visible effect of their cultural disruption and disorganization. Alcoholism among Native Americans…

  3. American Indian Cultural Resources: A Preservation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, Kathy

    Designed for use by American Indian tribes, archaeologists, law enforcement officials, local/state/federal administrators in charge of cultural resources management matters, and the general public, this handbook has been compiled to serve as a practical guide to protecting American Indian cultural resources in Oregon. The book brings together…

  4. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  5. American Indian Studies. Library Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This guide to sources for students at San Diego State University doing library research in topics related to American Indian Studies begins by noting that information on North American Indians can be found in a variety of subject disciplines including history, anthropology, education, sociology, health care, law, business, and politics. The…

  6. Maize Genetics Outreach to American Indians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an excellent vehicle for plant genomics outreach to those American Indian tribes who use and appreciate it nutritionally, culturally, and spiritually. During the summer 2006 season we mentored six Native American Indian students for eight weeks. All six worked at the USDA-ARS North Centra...

  7. A, B, C's the American Indian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Hawk, Richard

    This book, recommended for children from preschool through age 8, presents various facts about American Indians and American Indian culture and history. Using the alphabet, the book provides information on the Apache people of the southwestern United States; the Luiseno of southern California; the Modoc of northern California; the Navajo nation,…

  8. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  9. American Indian Religion: Past, Present, Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Omer C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic concept of American Indian religion after briefly comparing fundamental religious concepts of several civilizations. Discusses the historical and current roles of medicine men, the belief in supernatural forces, the effect of missionary zeal on American Indian religions, and the appearance of Christian elements in traditional…

  10. The American Heritage Book of Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephy, Alvin M., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    The histories and anthropological origins of American Indian groups are presented via pictorial and narrative descriptions. Historical and cultural contributions of American Indians to present conditions in the Americas are detailed, concentrating primarily on those tribes affecting the history of the United States. (DK)

  11. THE SURVEY OF WELL-BEING OF YOUNG CHILDREN: RESULTS OF A FEASIBILITY STUDY WITH AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE COMMUNITIES.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Sarche, Michelle; Trucksess, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children (SWYC), a new screener for socioemotional and developmental problems and family risk in children birth to age 5 years, for use in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities. A Community of Learning within the Tribal Early Childhood Research Center, composed of university researchers, tribal early childhood program staff and evaluators, and federal partners, utilized a community-based participatory research approach to guide this qualitative study. Thirty-two focus groups and 20 key informant interviews (N = 199) were conducted with staff from Head Start, Home Visiting, and Child Care programs; pediatricians; behavioral health providers; parents of young children; tribal leaders; and other stakeholders in seven diverse AIAN communities. Three themes emerged: (a) a strong need to screen early for socioemotional and developmental problems and family risk; (b) the importance of a carefully designed process for screening; and (c) the importance of examining the content of the SWYC for cultural fit specific to tribal communities. Findings support two recommendations: (a) the development of guidelines for using the SWYC in tribal early childhood settings and (b) a full-scale validation study to determine appropriate use with and norms for children in tribal communities. PMID:26312600

  12. Identity, Cultural Values, and American Indians' Perceptions of Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Scientific and technological expertise are needed to address many of the problems and possibilities faced by American Indian communities and individuals. Indian cultures, traditional knowledge, and Indian individuals' alternative perspectives and unique ideas could aid the advancement of science. Indian access to scientific skills and expertise is…

  13. ABCC8 R1420H Loss-of-Function Variant in a Southwest American Indian Community: Association With Increased Birth Weight and Doubled Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Leslie J; Muller, Yunhua Li; Remedi, Maria Sara; Traurig, Michael; Piaggi, Paolo; Wiessner, Gregory; Huang, Ke; Stacy, Alyssa; Kobes, Sayuko; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Nichols, Colin G; Bogardus, Clifton

    2015-12-01

    Missense variants in KCNJ11 and ABCC8, which encode the KIR6.2 and SUR1 subunits of the β-cell KATP channel, have previously been implicated in type 2 diabetes, neonatal diabetes, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (HHI). To determine whether variation in these genes affects risk for type 2 diabetes or increased birth weight as a consequence of fetal hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians, missense and common noncoding variants were analyzed in individuals living in the Gila River Indian Community. A R1420H variant in SUR1 (ABCC8) was identified in 3.3% of the population (N = 7,710). R1420H carriers had higher mean birth weights and a twofold increased risk for type 2 diabetes with a 7-year earlier onset age despite being leaner than noncarriers. One individual homozygous for R1420H was identified; retrospective review of his medical records was consistent with HHI and a diagnosis of diabetes at age 3.5 years. In vitro studies showed that the R1420H substitution decreases KATP channel activity. Identification of this loss-of-function variant in ABCC8 with a carrier frequency of 3.3% affects clinical care as homozygous inheritance and potential HHI will occur in 1/3,600 births in this American Indian population. PMID:26246406

  14. Laguna Indian Reservation and Acoma Indian Reservation, Laguna-Acoma Junior and Senior High School: Community Background Reports. The National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 16, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcott, John H.; Garcia, Jerry P.

    Location, climate, population, economy, government, and social conditions of the Laguna and Acoma Indian reservations in New Mexico are discussed in this community background report. In addition, education is discussed in terms of the Laguna-Acoma Junior and Senior High School; this school, which serves students in grades 7 through 12 from both…

  15. The Virtues of Cultural Resonance, Competence, and Relational Collaboration with Native American Indian Communities: A Synthesis of the Counseling and Psychotherapy Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    The article extends the scholarship, observations, and recommendations provided in Joseph Gone's article, "Psychotherapy and Traditional Healing for American Indians: Prospects for Therapeutic Integration" (2010 [this issue]). The overarching thesis is that for many Indian and Native clients, interpersonal and interethnic problems can emerge when…

  16. Health Care Delivery Systems to American Indian Families: A Plea for Culturally Relevant Treatment Modalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ronald G.

    The effective social worker or family counselor delivering health care services to the American Indian community will focus on the strengths rather than the weaknesses of the community and will recognize and use existing natural helping systems. The American Indian family network, for example, is unique in Western society and contains a variety of…

  17. The Urban Los Angeles American Indian Experience: Perspectives from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Rita

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from two studies conducted in the Los Angeles urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) community. The research investigated the relationship between the American Indian and Alaska Native cultural values and the social problems that challenge the urban Native community in the greater Los Angeles and Orange…

  18. Community-identified strategies to increase physical activity during elementary school recess on an American Indian reservation: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Vernon; Brown, Blakely; Swaney, Gyda; Hollist, Dusten; Harris, Kari Jo; Noonan, Curtis W.; Gaskill, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an 8-week recess intervention on physical activity levels in children attending elementary school on an American Indian reservation during fall 2013. Physical activity was measured with direct observation in three zones on the playground. Lines were painted on existing pavement in zone 1. Zone 2 had permanent playground equipment and was unchanged. Zone 3 contained fields where bi-weekly facilitators led activities and provided equipment. Pre- to post-changes during recess in sedentary, moderate physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous, and vigorous physical activities were compared within zones. Females physical activity increased in Zone 1 (moderate: 100% increase; moderate-to-vigorous: 83%; vigorous: 74%, p < 0.01 for all) and Zone 3 (moderate: 54% increase, p < 0.01; moderate-to-vigorous: 48%, p < 0.01; vigorous: 40%, p < 0.05). Male sedentary activity decreased in Zone 2 (161%, p < 0.01). Physical activity changes in Zone 3 were not dependent upon the presence of a facilitator. Simple and low-cost strategies were effective at increasing recess physical activity in females. The findings also suggest that providing children games that are led by a facilitator is not necessary to increase physical activity as long as proper equipment is provided. PMID:26844133

  19. Acceptability of a web-based community reinforcement approach for substance use disorders with treatment-seeking American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Aimee N C; Turrigiano, Eva; Moore, Michelle; Miele, Gloria M; Rieckmann, Traci; Hu, Mei-Chen; Kropp, Frankie; Ringor-Carty, Roz; Nunes, Edward V

    2015-05-01

    Longstanding disparities in substance use disorders and treatment access exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Computerized, web-delivered interventions have potential to increase access to quality treatment and improve patient outcomes. Prior research supports the efficacy of a web-based version [therapeutic education system (TES)] of the community reinforcement approach to improve outcomes among outpatients in substance abuse treatment; however, TES has not been tested among AI/AN. The results from this mixed method acceptability study among a diverse sample of urban AI/AN (N = 40) show that TES was acceptable across seven indices (range 7.8-9.4 on 0-10 scales with 10 indicating highest acceptability). Qualitative interviews suggest adaptation specific to AI/AN culture could improve adoption. Additional efforts to adapt TES and conduct a larger effectiveness study are warranted. PMID:25022913

  20. Engagement, Recruitment, and Retention in a Trans-Community, Randomized Controlled Trial for the Prevention of Obesity in Rural American Indian and Hispanic Children

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M.; FitzGerald, Courtney A.; Canaca, Glenda F.; Keane, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Engagement, recruitment and retention of participants are critical to the success of research studies but specific strategies are rarely elucidated in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe the engagement, recruitment and retention process and outcomes in the Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) study, and to describe lessons learned in the process. CHILE is a multi-level, group randomized controlled trial of a childhood obesity prevention intervention in rural American Indian and predominantly Hispanic Head Start (HS) centers in New Mexico. Barriers to engagement, recruitment and retention included distrust of researchers, long travel distances, and different HS and community structures. CHILE employed multiple strategies from the onset including the use of formative assessment, building on previous relationships, developing Memoranda of Agreement, using a community engagement specialist, and gaining support of a community champion. As a result of lessons learned, additional strategies were employed, including more frequent feedback to intervention sites, revised permission forms, telephone reminders, increased site visits and over-scheduling of interviews. These strategies resulted in the recruitment of 16 HS centers, 1,879 children, 655 parents, 7 grocery stores and 14 healthcare providers, meeting or exceeding recruitment goals. By combining principles of community engagement, a variety of recruitment strategies, and lessons learned, this study obtained a high level of recruitment and retention. PMID:24549525

  1. American Indian Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of multicultural and diversity efforts suggests the need for incorporating into the discussion of librarianship an understanding of previously underrepresented populations such as the American Indian. American Indian Studies speaks from the American Indian perspective and addresses the contemporary condition of American Indians.…

  2. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the ... Cause of Death (By rank) # American Indian/Alaska Native Deaths American Indian/Alaska Native Death Rate #Non- Hispanic White ...

  3. Effects of Alcohol Use and Anti-American Indian Attitudes on Domestic-Violence Culpability Decisions for American Indian and Euro-American Actors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Hack, Lori; Tehee, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the unique issues surrounding American Indian violence. Yet American Indian women are at high risk for domestic abuse, and domestic violence has been identified as the most important issue for American Indians now and in the future by the National Congress of American Indians. American Indian women suffer from domestic…

  4. Adaptation of the Dartmouth COOP Charts for Use Among American Indian People With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Susan S.; Willmer, Adisa J.; McCalman, Raylene; Davis, Sally M.; Hickey, Martin E.; Perez, Georgia E.; Owen, Charles L.; Carter, Janette S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To adapt the Dartmouth COOP Charts for use among American Indians with diabetes and to evaluate the operating characteristics of the adapted charts because measures of health status have not been evaluated for use among American Indians with diabetes. Research Design and Methods American Indian adults participated in focus group conferences to adapt and review the Dartmouth COOP Charts for use in American Indian communities. American Indian participants with diabetes were interviewed and administered the adapted charts. The operating characteristics of the charts were evaluated by measuring internal and external consistency, reliability, and acceptability. Results Some of the wording and pictures were considered to be offensive and culturally inappropriate in American Indian communities. The adapted charts showed internal consistency in a comparison of interchart variables. Conclusions The adapted Dartmouth COOP Charts are more culturally acceptable than the original charts and appear to measure constructs adequately. PMID:9589238

  5. Reflections on a Proposed Theory of Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Alcohol Use: Comment on Spillane and Smith (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the…

  6. Indian Americans in Omaha and Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Arthur M.; And Others

    The study focuses on American Indians who have migrated to urban centers in an effort to escape conditions on the reservations and to find employment and seek a better life. Discussed in the study are 6 tribes which make up the majority of the Indian population in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska: Omaha, Winnebago, Santee Sioux, Iowa, Ponca, Sac, and…

  7. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utter, Jack

    This book aims to fill part of the gap that exists between commonly held misconceptions and the realities of American Indian history and modern life. Part I discusses the "doctrine of discovery," a European legal theory invented to justify the acquisition of Indian lands, and explains why the issue of discovery has had so great an impact on…

  8. Indian Peace Medals in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prucha, Francis Paul

    Silver medals played an important role in American Indian policy for more than a century. Following a practice of the French, Spanish, and British in the New World, the United States government presented Indian peace medals to important chiefs and warriors as symbols of attachment to the new nation. In addition, the medals were marks of rank…

  9. Education "for" American Indians: Threat or Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tax, Sol; Thomas, Robert K

    1969-01-01

    Results of this Carnegie Corporation of New York sponsored research project in literacy training among the Cherokee Indians of Eastern Oklahoma indicate that alienation rather than lack of opportunity is the chief difficulty in American Indian education. Appears in "The Florida FL Reporter special anthology issue "Linguistic-Cultural Differences…

  10. American Indian Studies: A Bibliographic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This book lists sources of information available on Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Some sources also include information on native Hawaiians, Indians of Mexico, and Indians of Central and South America. The purpose of the guide is to provide researchers with direction and organization for selecting and using the best…

  11. Oregon American Indian/Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The Oregon State Plan for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) education was developed by AI/AN communities and educators, the State Board of Education, and the State Department of Education. The plan includes 11 major educational goals: (1) the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) should promote effective education for AI/AN children; (2)…

  12. A Holistic Emphasis: The UCLA American Indian Studies Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2001-01-01

    At UCLA, the American Indian Studies Center's structure as an organized research unit allows a platform for many activities not normally within the purview of departments. The Center implements a holistic, Native view of research, policy, community engagement, and education; has a library and publications; and is a gathering place for American…

  13. Religio-Spiritual Participation in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Anderson, Heather Orton; Nez-Henderson, Patricia; Croy, Calvin; Beals, Janette; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Jacob; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a previous investigation of religio-spiritual beliefs in American Indians, this article examined prevalence and correlates of religio-spiritual participation in two tribes in the Southwest and Northern Plains (N = 3,084). Analysis suggested a “religious profile” characterized by strong participation across three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. However, sociodemographic variables that have reliably predicted participation in the general American population, notably gender and age, frequently failed to achieve significance in multivariate analyses for each tradition. Religio-spiritual participation was strongly and significantly related to belief salience for all traditions. Findings suggest that correlates of religious participation may be unique among American Indians, consistent with their distinctive religious profile. Results promise to inform researchers’ efforts to understand and theorize about religio-spiritual behavior. They also provide tribal communities with practical information that might assist them in harnessing social networks to confront collective challenges through community-based participatory research collaborations. PMID:26582964

  14. Gallstones in American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/Alaska Natives Immigrant and migrant issues Taking care ... Enter email address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health Gallstones Health conditions ...

  15. Partnering in Research: A National Research Trial Exemplifying Effective Collaboration With American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q.; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Daniel, Mary R.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A.; Felton, Beverly A.; Khan, Sohail I.; Saunkeah, Bobby R.; Wharton, David F.; Payan, Marisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  16. Partnering in research: a national research trial exemplifying effective collaboration with American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q; Copeland, Kenneth C; Daniel, Mary R; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A; Felton, Beverly A; Khan, Sohail I; Saunkeah, Bobby R; Wharton, David F; Payan, Marisa L

    2014-12-15

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  17. American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2011-01-01

    When American Indian/Native American studies (AI/NAS) programs began to emerge in the halls of academia during the late 1960s and early 1970s, some who served as faculty and staff questioned whether they would be one-generation phenomena. Would the programs survive, would they continue to draw students, and could they make an impact on…

  18. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  19. American Indian Enrichment Activities. Mini-Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosnick, Sally

    Focusing on American Indians, this annotated bibliography covers a variety of resources for enriching multicultural education in the elementary classroom and includes limited information about Mexican Americans, Blacks, and other cultural groups. Each of the 26 entries provides a descriptive annotation and indicates where the material can be…

  20. American Indians: Hands-On Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethlefsen, Ann Lyle

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the teaching methods she uses to teach how different American Indian groups lived in different regions of the North American continent. Her lessons include a number of projects: (1) Practicing symbolic writing; (2) Creating a personal timeline; (3) Studying winter counts and creating a personalized…

  1. Counseling American Indians: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, Elizabeth; Thomason, Timothy C.

    This bibliography presents 75 annotated entries on counseling and psychotherapy with American Indians. Entries include journal articles, books, book chapters, newspaper and newsletter articles, and conference papers, published 1964-96. Topics covered include counseling approaches and techniques, mental health services for Native Americans,…

  2. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  3. A Community-Based Intervention to Prevent Obesity Beginning at Birth among American Indian Children: Study Design and Rationale for the PTOTS study

    PubMed Central

    Karanja, Njeri; Aickin, Mikel; Lutz, Tam; Mist, Scott; Jobe, Jared B.; Maupomé, Gerardo; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Eating and physical activity behaviors associated with adult obesity have early antecedents, yet few studies have focused on obesity prevention interventions targeting very young children. Efforts to prevent obesity beginning at birth seem particularly important in populations at risk for early-onset obesity. National estimates indicate that American Indian (AI) children have higher rates of overweight and obesity than children of other races/ethnicities. The Prevention of Toddler Obesity and Teeth Health Study (PTOTS) is a community-partnered randomized controlled trial designed to prevent obesity beginning at birth in AI children. PTOTS was developed to test the effectiveness of a multi-component intervention designed to: promote breastfeeding, reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, appropriately time the introduction of healthy solid foods, and counsel parents to reduce sedentary lifestyles in their children. A birth cohort of 577 children from five AI tribes is randomized by tribe to either the intervention (three tribes) or the comparison condition (two tribes). The strengths and weaknesses of PTOTS include a focus on a critical growth phase, placement in the community, and intervention at many levels, using a variety of approaches. PMID:23001689

  4. The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S

    2006-12-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  5. The Persistence of American Indian Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  6. Rebuilding Native American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyhis, Don; Simonelli, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Wellbriety Movement in Native American communities draws on the wisdom and participation of traditional elders. Beginning with a basic community teaching called the Four Laws of Change and the Healing Forest Model, the Wellbriety Movement blends Medicine Wheel knowledge with the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to provide culture-specific…

  7. HIV/AIDS Prevention Education: Considerations for American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sileo, Thomas W.; Gooden, Myma A.

    2004-01-01

    American Indians/Alaska Natives represent slightly less than 0.9% of the total U.S. population, yet they account for one percent of the reported HIV and AIDS cases nationwide. Approximately 2537 cumulative AIDS cases have been identified in the American Indian/ Alaska Native community; AIDS related deaths account for about half of the cumulative…

  8. Continuing a College Education: A Guide for Counseling the American Indian Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minugh, Carol

    The last of a 3-part series, this handbook is designed to assist counselors in helping the American Indian student transfer successfully from a 2-year community college to a 4-year college or university. Section I characterizes the American Indian transfer student as being older than the average transfer student, likely to have a spouse and…

  9. SUMMER RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS IN PLANT GENOME RESEARCH FOR AMERICAN INDIANS AT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of American Indian students and researchers in plant genome research is minimal. In an effort to increase their representation in the research community, we are offering a summer program to mentor seven American Indian undergraduates in plant genomics research. Students selected to...

  10. Leadership and Accountability in American Indian Education: Voices from New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Carlotta Penny; Lee, Tiffany S.; Lopez, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    How do American Indian students, parents, and teachers conceptualize leadership in New Mexico public schools? How do they negotiate power dynamics within this context? The objective of this study was to investigate how leadership and accountability in American Indian schools and communities in New Mexico is recognized, characterized, contested,…

  11. In Pursuit of a Computing Degree: Cultural Implications for American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodaseet, Glenda G.; Varma, Roli

    2012-01-01

    While a number of challenges contribute to the American Indian population's disconnect from information technology (IT), the most glaring is the low number of American Indian students pursuing computer science (CS) studies--a degree essential to IT's entry into and diffusion across communities. Yet, research is scant on factors that contribute to…

  12. Contemporary American Indian Women: Careers And Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellanger, Patricia; Reese, Lillian

    Biographies of 77 Indian women highlight professional and personal accomplishments as well as contributions to the Indian community. Biographies are arranged by area of professional achievement in eight chapters: tribal government and politics, law, administration, education, communications, special fields (the arts, armed forces, and independent…

  13. Teaching English to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    Many practices in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools were negative, but this paper emphasizes the positive efforts that were made throughout their history, especially in regard to teaching English. The Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879, encouraged the use of English through an English language student newspaper and frequently…

  14. Hemoglobin patterns in American Indians.

    PubMed

    POLLITZER, W S; CHERNOFF, A I; HORTON, L L; FROEHLICH, M

    1959-01-23

    Two populations of North Carolina have been analyzed for hemoglobin patterns by paper electrophoresis. Of 534 Cherokee Indians, both mixed and full bloods, all showed normal hemoglobin. Lumbee Indians of less certain ethnic status had 1.7 percent of hemoglobin S, an equal amount of hemoglobin C, and one possible hemoglobin D trait among 1332 bloods studied. PMID:13624709

  15. Evidence for validity of five secondary data sources for enumerating retail food outlets in seven American Indian Communities in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies on the local food environment have used secondary sources to describe the food environment, such as government food registries or commercial listings (e.g., Reference USA). Most of the studies exploring evidence for validity of secondary retail food data have used on-site verification and have not conducted analysis by data source (e.g., sensitivity of Reference USA) or by food outlet type (e.g., sensitivity of Reference USA for convenience stores). Few studies have explored the food environment in American Indian communities. To advance the science on measuring the food environment, we conducted direct, on-site observations of a wide range of food outlets in multiple American Indian communities, without a list guiding the field observations, and then compared our findings to several types of secondary data. Methods Food outlets located within seven State Designated Tribal Statistical Areas in North Carolina (NC) were gathered from online Yellow Pages, Reference USA, Dun & Bradstreet, local health departments, and the NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. All TIGER/Line 2009 roads (>1,500 miles) were driven in six of the more rural tribal areas and, for the largest tribe, all roads in two of its cities were driven. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, concordance, and kappa statistics were calculated to compare secondary data sources to primary data. Results 699 food outlets were identified during primary data collection. Match rate for primary data and secondary data differed by type of food outlet observed, with the highest match rates found for grocery stores (97%), general merchandise stores (96%), and restaurants (91%). Reference USA exhibited almost perfect sensitivity (0.89). Local health department data had substantial sensitivity (0.66) and was almost perfect when focusing only on restaurants (0.91). Positive predictive value was substantial for Reference USA (0.67) and moderate for local health department data (0

  16. Access in Theory and Practice: American Indians in Philosophy History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Katy Gray; Brown, Michael Patterson

    2003-01-01

    The American Indian Philosophical Association (AIPA) was created in May of 1998 by a group of American Indian philosophers; it grew out of the American Philosophical Association's (APA) Committee to Advance the Status of American Indians in Philosophy. It is associated with the APA but remains an autonomous organization dedicated to the…

  17. Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurien, Prema A.

    2006-01-01

    How non-Christian religious groups should be politically recognized within Western multicultural societies has proved to be a pressing contemporary issue. This article examines some ways in which American policies regarding religion and multiculturalism have shaped Hindu Indian American organizations, forms of public expression and activism.…

  18. Involving Parents in a Community-Based, Culturally Grounded Mental Health Intervention for American Indian Youth: Parent Perspectives, Challenges, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica; LaNoue, Marianna; Lee, Christopher; Freeland, Lance; Freund, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    An important predictor of youth well-being and resilience is the presence of nurturing adults in a youth's life. Parents are ideally situated to fulfill this role but often face challenges and stressors that impede their ability to provide adequate support and guidance. American Indian parents may also be affected by intergenerational transmission…

  19. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Findings from a Community-Based Cultural Mental Health Intervention for American Indian Youth and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica; LaNoue, Marianna; Lee, Christopher; Freeland, Lance; Freund, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Through a CBPR partnership, university and American Indian (AI) tribal members developed and tested "Our Life" intervention to promote mental health of AI youth and their families by addressing root causes of violence, trauma, and substance abuse. Based on premises that well-being is built on a foundation of traditional cultural beliefs and…

  20. Community Background Reports: The Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, South Dakota. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 6, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document describes the town of Eagle Butte, South Dakota, on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation approximately 100 years after the signing of the 1868 Treaty with the Sioux. A 3-member research team collected data via interviews with students, parents,…

  1. Physical Activity Levels in American-Indian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Kristi L.; Arena, Vincent C.; Barmada, M. Michael; Bunker, Clareann H.; Hanson, Robert L.; Laston, Sandra L.; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Howard, Barbara V.; Kriska, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    Background A limited body of evidence, mostly based on self-report, is available regarding physical activity levels among American-Indian adults. Purpose This study aims to examine physical activity levels objectively by pedometer among a large cohort of American Indian adult participants in the Strong Heart Family Study. Methods Physical activity levels in 2604 American-Indian adults, aged 18–91 years, from 13 American-Indian communities were assessed using an Accusplit AE120 pedometer over a period of 7 days during 2001–2003. Anthropometric measurements were also assessed. All data analyses were conducted in 2008. Age-adjusted Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between average steps per day and age and anthropometric variables. Subjects were placed in age and BMI categories (according to NHLBI cutpoints) to examine trends in PA with increasing age and BMI. Results Daily pedometer steps ranged from 1001 to 38,755. Mean step counts by age group for men were: 5384 (18–29 years), 5120 (30–39 years), 5040 (40–49 years), 4561(50–59 years),4321 (60–69 years), and 3768 (≥70 years) and for women: 5038 (18–29 years), 5112 (30– 39 years), 5054 (40–49 years), 4582 (50–59 years), 3653 (60–69 years), and 3770 (>70 years). A significant linear trend in physical activity was noted with increasing age (P= 0.002 for men, P<0.0001 for women) and with increasing BMI (P = 0.05 for men, P = 0.04 for women). Conclusions Objectively measured data suggest that inactivity is a problem among American Indian adults and that a majority of American Indian adults in the SHFS may not be meeting the minimum physical activity public health recommendations. Efforts to increase physical activity levels in this population are warranted. PMID:19944912

  2. Initial Report of the American Indian Leaders Advisory Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Of major concern to American Indians are: government to government communications; development of Indian owned energy resources; federal budget changes as they affect the American Indian; preservation, protection, and quantification of inherent and reserved Indian water rights; preservation of treaty obligations; respect for tribal sovereignty;…

  3. The Lived Experience: American Indian Literature after Alcatraz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    In 1969, American Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island dramatized Native demands for self-determination, tribal lands, and tribal identities. Meanwhile, a blossoming American Indian literary movement began awakening America to Indians' continued existence and providing texts of "lived experience" that created a new kind of Indian leadership and…

  4. From Activism to Academics: The Evolution of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State, 1968-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Torre, Joely

    2001-01-01

    The founding of the American Indian Studies program at San Francisco State University took place against a backdrop of the Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island and the demands of Indian students for more relevant coursework. Today the program connects students to the urban Indian community through service learning projects and is committed to…

  5. Association of American Indian cultural identity with physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Glen E.; McDougall, Casey L.; Dansie, Elizabeth; Garroutte, Eva; Buchwald, Dedra; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cultural factors are associated with health behaviors among American Indians. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate whether cultural identity, defined as the primary language spoken at home, is associated with (1) higher total physical activity levels and (2) levels of leisure-time physical activity recommended for health benefits in a diverse sample of American Indians. Design Cross-sectional analysis of 5,207 American Indian adults 18 to 82 years. Participants resided on the Oglala Sioux (n = 2,025) and Cheyenne River Sioux (n = 1,528) reservations in South Dakota, and the Gila River Indian Community (n = 1,654) in Arizona. Results Bicultural participants in South Dakota, but not Arizona, reported significantly higher total physical activity compared to the English-only group (p < 0.05). About 35% of English only speakers, 39% of American Indian/Alaska Native only speakers, and 39% of participants speaking both languages met the 150 minutes/week activity threshold. Odds of being sufficiently active were higher among bicultural respondents in both regions when compared to respondents endorsing only English, controlling for socio-demographic and health-related covariates (p < 0.05). Conclusion Bicultural respondents among tribal members in South Dakota had significantly higher total physical activity, and higher levels of sufficient leisure-time activity in both South Dakota and Arizona, compared to those who spoke either language exclusively. Interventions that encourage American Indians to develop their bicultural efficacy and to draw on resources for healthy living that may be available in all the cultures with which they identify are recommended. PMID:24620441

  6. American Indian Student Counselor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Wayne H.

    The handbook, a first in the attempt to collect information about counseling Indian students, represents the results of 1976-77 couselor training workshops in South Dakota. The handbook contains article reprints, ideas, and suggestions from many counselors and non-counselors, and is intended not as expertise but as a resource primarily for…

  7. American Indian Students Speak out: What's Good Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Leisa A.; Chiodo, John J.

    2008-01-01

    For much of our country's history, citizenship has eluded American Indian people. With this in mind, the authors conducted a study to determine the perceptions of eighth and eleventh grade American Indian students regarding citizenship. We wanted to find out what American Indian students believe are the attributes of a good citizen; what…

  8. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Second Edition, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP), this handbook provides information relative to American Indian health careers in terms of need, opportunity, preparation, and information sources. Designed to encourage American Indian youth to seek careers in the health professions, this handbook describes the enormous need for…

  9. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  10. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...