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  1. Religio-Spiritual Participation in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Anderson, Heather Orton; Nez-Henderson, Patricia; Croy, Calvin; Beals, Janette; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Jacob; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a previous investigation of religio-spiritual beliefs in American Indians, this article examined prevalence and correlates of religio-spiritual participation in two tribes in the Southwest and Northern Plains (N = 3,084). Analysis suggested a “religious profile” characterized by strong participation across three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. However, sociodemographic variables that have reliably predicted participation in the general American population, notably gender and age, frequently failed to achieve significance in multivariate analyses for each tradition. Religio-spiritual participation was strongly and significantly related to belief salience for all traditions. Findings suggest that correlates of religious participation may be unique among American Indians, consistent with their distinctive religious profile. Results promise to inform researchers’ efforts to understand and theorize about religio-spiritual behavior. They also provide tribal communities with practical information that might assist them in harnessing social networks to confront collective challenges through community-based participatory research collaborations. PMID:26582964

  2. Religiosity and Spiritual Engagement in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva M.; Beals, Janette; Keane, Ellen M.; Kaufman, Carol; Spicer, Paul; Henderson, Jeff; Henderson, Patricia N.; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Social scientific investigation into the religiospiritual characteristics of American Indians rarely includes analysis of quantitative data. After reviewing information from ethnographic and autobiographical sources, we present analyses of data from a large, population-based sample of two tribes (n = 3,084). We examine salience of belief in three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. We then investigate patterns in sociodemographic subgroups, determining the significant correlates of salience with other variables controlled. Finally, we examine frequency with which respondents assign high salience to only one tradition (exclusivity) or multiple traditions (nonexclusivity), again investigating subgroup variations. This first detailed, statistical portrait of American Indian religious and spiritual lives links work on tribal ethnic identity to theoretical work on America’s “religious marketplace.” Results may also inform social/behavioral interventions that incorporate religiospiritual elements. PMID:26582963

  3. Social Epidemiology of Trauma Among 2 American Indian Reservation Populations

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Spero M.; Beals, Janette; Klein, Suzell A.; Croy, Calvin D.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prevalence of trauma in 2 large American Indian communities in an attempt to describe demographic correlates and to compare findings with a representative sample of the US population. Methods. We determined differences in exposure to each of 16 types of trauma among 3084 tribal members aged 15 to 57 years through structured interviews. We compared prevalence rates of trauma, by gender, across the 2 tribes and with a sample of the US general population. We used logistic regression analyses to examine the relationships of demographic correlates to trauma exposure. Results. Lifetime exposure rates to at least 1 trauma (62.4%–67.2% among male participants, 66.2%–69.8% among female participants) fell at the upper limits of the range reported by other researchers. Unlike the US general population, female and male American Indians exhibited equivalent levels of overall trauma exposure. Members of both tribes more often witnessed traumatic events, experienced traumas to loved ones, and were victims of physical attacks than their counterparts in the overall US population. Conclusions. American Indians live in adverse environments that place them at high risk for exposure to trauma and harmful health sequelae. PMID:15855465

  4. [Statistical Profiles and Characteristics of the American Indian Population: 1980 Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    This packet includes six statistical profiles of American Indians and Alaska Natives based on the 1980 census, and a report on 1990 census plans for Native Americans. Three general profiles outline statistics on: (1) the American Indian population as a whole; (2) selected characteristics of American Indian men; and (3) selected characteristics of…

  5. 77 FR 31637 - Revision of Agency Information Collection for the American Indian and Alaska Native Population...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Native Population and Labor Force Report AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the American Indian and Alaska Native Population and Labor Force Report. The survey instrument that is... seeking comments on a survey instrument to collect information for the American Indian Population...

  6. 1980 Census Supplementary Questionnaire Program. A Statistical Profile of the American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    This profile provides data from the 1980 census on American Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts in the total U.S. population, on American Indian reservations, and in historic areas of Oklahoma (excluding urbanized areas). Bar graphs illustrate data on (1) the overall population; (2) population by geographic region; (3) population by standard federal…

  7. Validity of the SMAST in two American Indian tribal populations.

    PubMed

    Robin, Robert W; Saremi, Aramesh; Albaugh, Bernard; Hanson, Robert L; Williams, Desmond; Goldman, David

    2004-03-01

    The standardized evaluation of alcoholism and other psychopathologies in minority populations, particularly American Indians, has long been questioned. This study investigated the validity of one of the most commonly applied assessments for alcoholism--the Short Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (SMAST)--in two distinct American Indian tribal groups. We analyzed data collected from 1989 to 1995 from largely community representative samples of 456 Southwestern and 214 Plains Indians ages 21 or older. For comparison, alcohol dependence was diagnosed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R) criteria from a detailed, modified version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia--Lifetime (SADS-L). Accuracy of the SMAST was quantified as sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the curve for receiver operating characteristics, using the DSM-III-R diagnosis as the reference. The standard SMAST cutoff score of > or = 3 had a demonstrated sensitivity 86% to 95%, but did not perform well in terms of specificity (23%-47%). Significantly higher cutoff scores (> or = 5 for both genders in the Southwestern tribe and 8 and > or = 6 for men and women in the Plains tribe) were required to demonstrate acceptable levels of specificity in both tribes. The findings suggest that the SMAST is not a valid tool to screen for alcohol misuse in these two tribal populations. The highly elevated and different thresholds required from one population to the next and from one gender to the next constitute a significant obstacle to the use of the instrument. PMID:15115215

  8. Population, Ecology, and the American Indian: A Native American Curriculum Unit for Middle and High School. NATAM XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raveling, Ronald R.

    As one of the units on Native Americans developed by public school teachers enrolled in a University of Minnesota extension course on American Indian education, this middle- and high-school unit has as its overall objective to illustrate 2 concepts: (1) the need for careful population planning and (2) how the American Indian--a model of…

  9. A Statistical Profile of the American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut Populations for the United States: 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    Twenty graphs and charts provide a 1980 statistical profile of American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut populations for the United States. Data indicate the 1980 Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut population was 1,420,400, an increase of 592,132 since 1970; little population change by region occurred during the decade, with 49% still located in the West; states…

  10. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  11. AMERICAN INDIAN POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the American Indian population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Cenesus tigerline data...

  12. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  13. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  14. Lifetime Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Populations

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Croy, Calvin; Klein, Suzell A.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be more common among American Indian populations than among other Americans. A complex diagnosis, the assessment methods for PTSD have varied across epidemiological studies, especially in terms of the trauma criteria. Here, we examined data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP) to estimate the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, using two formulas for calculating PTSD prevalence. The AI-SUPERPFP was a cross-sectional probability sample survey conducted between 1997 and 2000. Southwest (n = 1,446) and Northern Plains (n = 1,638) tribal members living on or near their reservations, aged 15–57 years at time of interview, were randomly sampled from tribal rolls. PTSD estimates were derived based on both the single worst and 3 worst traumas. Prevalence estimates varied by ascertainment method: single worst trauma (lifetime: 5.9% to 14.8%) versus 3 worst traumas (lifetime, 8.9% to 19.5%). Use of the 3-worst-event approach increased prevalence by 28.3% over the single-event method. PTSD was prevalent in these tribal communities. These results also serve to underscore the need to better understand the implications for PTSD prevalence with the current focus on a single worst event. PMID:23900893

  15. Urban American Indian Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Josea

    This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American Indians that are especially pernicious to older American Indians living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American Indian elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes…

  16. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    MedlinePlus

    ... million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Typically, this urban clientele has less accessibility to hospitals; health clinics ... IHS and tribal health programs. Studies on the urban American Indian and Alaska Native population have documented ...

  17. Using Electronic Health Records to Examine Disease Risk in Small Populations: Obesity Among American Indian Children, Wisconsin, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tomayko, Emily J.; Weinert, Bethany A.; Godfrey, Liz; Adams, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tribe-based or reservation-based data consistently show disproportionately high obesity rates among American Indian children, but little is known about the approximately 75% of American Indian children living off-reservation. We examined obesity among American Indian children seeking care off-reservation by using a database of de-identified electronic health records linked to community-level census variables. Methods Data from electronic health records from American Indian children and a reference sample of non-Hispanic white children collected from 2007 through 2012 were abstracted to determine obesity prevalence. Related community-level and individual-level risk factors (eg, economic hardship, demographics) were examined using logistic regression. Results The obesity rate for American Indian children (n = 1,482) was double the rate among non-Hispanic white children (n = 81,042) (20.0% vs 10.6%, P < .001). American Indian children were less likely to have had a well-child visit (55.9% vs 67.1%, P < .001) during which body mass index (BMI) was measured, which may partially explain why BMI was more likely to be missing from American Indian records (18.3% vs 14.6%, P < .001). Logistic regression demonstrated significantly increased obesity risk among American Indian children (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.6–2.1) independent of age, sex, economic hardship, insurance status, and geographic designation. Conclusion An electronic health record data set demonstrated high obesity rates for nonreservation-based American Indian children, rates that had not been previously assessed. This low-cost method may be used for assessing health risk for other understudied populations and to plan and evaluate targeted interventions. PMID:26916900

  18. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  19. Role of Established Type 2 Diabetes–Susceptibility Genetic Variants in a High Prevalence American Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Rong; Kobes, Sayuko; Muller, Yunhua Li; Weil, E. Jennifer; Curtis, Jeffrey M.; Nelson, Robert G.; Baier, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been identified, but there is little information on their role in populations at high risk for T2DM. We genotyped SNPs at 63 T2DM loci in 3,421 individuals from a high-risk American Indian population. Nominally significant (P < 0.05) associations were observed at nine SNPs in a direction consistent with the established association. A genetic risk score derived from all loci was strongly associated with T2DM (odds ratio 1.05 per risk allele, P = 6.2 × 10−6) and, in 292 nondiabetic individuals, with lower insulin secretion (by 4% per copy, P = 4.1 × 10−6). Genetic distances between American Indians and HapMap populations at T2DM markers did not differ significantly from genomic expectations. Analysis of U.S. national survey data suggested that 66% of the difference in T2DM prevalence between African Americans and European Americans, but none of the difference between American Indians and European Americans, was attributable to allele frequency differences at these loci. These analyses suggest that, in general, established T2DM loci influence T2DM in American Indians and that risk is mediated in part through an effect on insulin secretion. However, differences in allele frequencies do not account for the high population prevalence of T2DM. PMID:25667308

  20. Validation of the Sense of Coherence Scale in an American Indian population.

    PubMed

    Albino, Judith; Shapiro, Allison L B; Henderson, William G; Tiwari, Tamanna; Brega, Angela G; Thomas, Jacob F; Bryant, Lucinda L; Braun, Patricia A; Quissell, David O

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale in the context of an oral health-related clinical trial conducted in an American Indian population-specifically, people of the Navajo Nation. Data were derived from baseline evaluations of parents (or caregivers) of Navajo children aged 3-5 from 52 Head Start classes enrolled in a trial of an intervention to prevent early childhood caries (ECC). A 190-item Basic Research Factors Questionnaire, which included the SOC, was administered to 1,016 parents/caregivers. Assessment of internal reliability and convergent validity, and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between parents' SOC and other potentially convergent measures. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine 1- and 3-factor solutions of the SOC scale. Higher SOC was significantly related to higher parental education and income, employment status, and higher scores for social support, internal Oral Health Locus of Control (OHLOC), self-efficacy, importance of oral health, oral health knowledge and behavior, and children's oral health quality of life. Higher SOC also was related to lower reported distress and lower external OHLOC. Cronbach's α was 0.84 for all SOC items, but lower for each of the 3 SOC subscales. Confirmatory factor analyses suggested a 3-factor solution was superior to a 1-factor solution. The SOC scale had good internal reliability and convergent validity in this American Indian population. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26191608

  1. triADD: The Risk for Alcohol Abuse, Depression, and Diabetes Multimorbidity in the American Indian and Alaska Native Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tann, Sheila S.; Yabiku, Scott T.; Okamoto, Scott K.; Yanow, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the risk for alcoholism, diabetes, and depression (triADD) in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in the U.S. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a series of descriptive statistics and regression models were used to examine the interrelationships among these disorders in AI/AN populations.…

  2. Advancing community-based research with urban American Indian populations: multidisciplinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, William E; Wendt, Dennis C; Saftner, Melissa A; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    The US has witnessed significant growth among urban American Indian (AI) populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  3. Health and aging of urban American Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, B J

    1992-01-01

    Although half of the American Indian population resides off the reservation, mostly in the western states, research on the health of urban American Indians remains sparse. American Indians living in urban areas are not eligible for the federally mandated health care provided by the Indian Health Service and receive health care services in a variety of settings. This population is at high risk for many health problems, especially cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Social, cultural, and economic barriers that impede access to health care for this group, particularly for elders living in an urban setting, could be reduced if physicians improved their understanding of and communication with American Indian patients. PMID:1413770

  4. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  5. Protecting American Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act has caused concern and misunderstanding among social workers. The Act is seen as a victory for tribal sovereignty but must be viewed within the context of American Indian culture and child rearing practices. (Author/JAC)

  6. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  7. American Indian Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of multicultural and diversity efforts suggests the need for incorporating into the discussion of librarianship an understanding of previously underrepresented populations such as the American Indian. American Indian Studies speaks from the American Indian perspective and addresses the contemporary condition of American Indians.…

  8. Directory of American Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. Inst. for Human Development.

    This directory provides general information on American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and lands. The information was compiled from several resources including the "Federal Register," the Bureau of Indian Affairs, "The Native American Almanac" (A. Hirschfelder, M. K. de Montano), the "Atlas of North American Indian Tribes" (Carl Waldman), the…

  9. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  10. American Indian Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  11. Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention as Standard Practice: Working with the American Indian/Native Alaskan Populations

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya), David A.; Duran, Bonnie; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Manning, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use and the resulting problems associated with high-risk drinking in the American Indian/Native Alaskan (AI/NA) population are well-documented, as alcohol misuse has taken an incredible toll on many AI/NA communities. Presently, both overall health issues and alcohol use occur disproportionately within this population. This article provides an updated overview of the impact of alcohol use in the United States and within AI/NA communities specifically. It also provides recommendations for an alcohol-related screening and brief intervention instrument that social workers can begin using in their practice and can be utilized within the AI/NA community. PMID:25580074

  12. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Birgil J.

    1977-01-01

    Describing American Indian contributions to medicine, this article lists specific contributions and concludes that although some 220 drugs of Native American use were listed in the National Formulary of 1888, recent recognition of American Indian pharmacological contributions is long overdue. (JC)

  13. The Indian in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The treatment of American Indians is discussed historically with reference to the 4 principal methods used to create or perpetuate false impressions: obliteration, defamation, disembodiment, and disparagement. Indian contributions to American civilization are cited in contrast with historical references to Indians in textbooks. The author suggests…

  14. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  15. Smallpox and American Indians revisited.

    PubMed

    Riley, James C

    2010-10-01

    Smallpox ravaged the people of Europe and the Americas in the early modern era. Why it was a catastrophic cause of death for American Indians that helped lead to severe depopulation, but a manageable cause among Europeans that allowed continued population growth, has puzzled scholars. Research on variola continued after smallpox eradication in 1977, prompted in part by the fear that aerosolized smallpox might be used in bioterrorism. That research updates factors that may have aggravated smallpox lethality in American Indians, giving new information about infectivity, the proportion of people who may have contracted smallpox, the burden on infants of mothers who had not had smallpox, and the toll for pregnant women. This essay reviews old and new hypotheses about why so many in the New World died from smallpox using recent smallpox research and older sources. PMID:20219730

  16. Advancing Suicide Prevention Research With Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P.; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J.; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O’Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-01-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance’s prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond. PMID:25790403

  17. Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Lisa; Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O'Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-05-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond. PMID:25790403

  18. American Indians Today. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yinger, J. Milton, Ed.; Simpson, George Eaton, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of social change among American Indians and in the relationships of Indians to government and the larger society are examined in the collection of articles by 12 political and social scientists. Focusing on recent developments, this look at American Indians today encompasses rapid population growth, urbanization of the Indian population,…

  19. A comparison of the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in two American Indian and a general population sample

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Shay-Lee; Elias, Brenda; Enns, Murray W.; Sareen, Jitender; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine whether the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts differ when comparing two American Indian reservation samples to the U.S. general population. Data were from the baseline nationally representative National Comorbidity Survey (N = 5,877) and the representative American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP; N = 3,084). Face-to-face interviews were conducted using the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. American Indians from these Northern Plains and Southwest tribes appeared significantly less likely to have suicidal thoughts in their lifetime when compared with the general population, odds ratio (OR) of 0.49 (99% CI [0.36, 0.66]) and 0.36 (99% CI [0.25, 0.51]), respectively. However, members of the Northern Plains tribe were more likely to have attempted suicide in their lifetime compared with the general population (OR=1.96, 99% CI [1.45, 2.65]). Suicide attempts without suicidal ideation were more common in the two American Indian samples than in the general population. In contrast, correlates of suicidal behavior appear quite similar when comparing the groups. Increased attention is needed to determine why rates of ideation and attempts may differ in American Indians when compared with the general population. PMID:24065607

  20. Indian Americans in Omaha and Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Arthur M.; And Others

    The study focuses on American Indians who have migrated to urban centers in an effort to escape conditions on the reservations and to find employment and seek a better life. Discussed in the study are 6 tribes which make up the majority of the Indian population in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska: Omaha, Winnebago, Santee Sioux, Iowa, Ponca, Sac, and…

  1. Systematic Review of Health Disparities for Cardiovascular Diseases and Associated Factors among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Rebecca Newlin; Shin, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Background American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations experience significant health disparities compared to non-Hispanic white populations. Cardiovascular disease and related risk factors are increasingly recognized as growing indicators of global health disparities. However, comparative reports on disparities among this constellation of diseases for AI/AN populations have not been systematically reviewed. Objectives We performed a literature review on the prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; and associated morbidity and mortality among AI/AN. Data sources A total of 203 articles were reviewed, of which 31 met study criteria for inclusion. Searches were performed on PUBMED, MEDLINE, the CDC MMWR, and the Indian Health Services. Study eligibility criteria Published literature that were published within the last fifteen years and provided direct comparisons between AI/AN to non-AI/AN populations were included. Study appraisal and synthesis methods We abstracted data on study design, data source, AI/AN population, comparison group, and. outcome measures. A descriptive synthesis of primary findings is included. Results Rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome are clearly higher for AI/AN populations. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia differences are more equivocal. Our analysis also revealed that there are likely regional and gender differences in the degree of disparities observed. Limitations Studies using BRFSS telephone surveys administered in English may underestimate disparities. Many AI/AN do not have telephones and/or speak English. Regional variability makes national surveys difficult to interpret. Finally, studies using self-reported data may not be accurate. Conclusions and implications of key findings Profound health disparities in cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors for AI/AN populations persist, perhaps due to low

  2. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  3. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  4. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  5. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Nursing Program Announcement Type: Competing Continuation. Funding... (OPHS) is accepting competitive cooperative agreement applications for the American Indians into...

  6. Relationship between socioeconomic status, health status, and lifestyle practices of American Indians: evidence from a Plains reservation population.

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, A; Pearson, D; Wagner, E; Psaty, B M; Diehr, P; Koepsell, T

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents information on the prevalence of a variety of health behaviors and health conditions on an American Indian reservation in the Plains region of the western United States. In addition, data from two non-Indian comparison groups were used to examine the extent to which differences in health status and health behaviors between Indians and non-Indians could be explained by differences in socioeconomic status. The American Indian data were from a survey conducted in 1988 during an evaluation of a local community-based health promotion program, part of the Kaiser Family Foundation's Community Health Promotion Grants Program. The comparison groups were 12 communities in California surveyed in evaluating the Community Health Promotion Grants Program and three Plains States participating in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results show that the higher prevalences of risk-taking behavior among Indians and their poorer self-reported health status remained after adjustment for socioeconomic status. Also, among Indians, higher levels of income and education were not associated with improved self-reported health status and lower prevalence of tobacco use, as was the case with the comparison groups. The higher prevalences of risk-taking behaviors and ill health among American Indians residing on one reservation, even among those with higher socioeconomic status, suggests a need for the investigation of other social and environmental influences. PMID:8190864

  7. Telepsychiatry for Treating Rural American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin, Daniel; Garry, Mark T.; Zuccaro, Paula; Novins, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Of all of the medical specialties, child and adolescent psychiatry has the most severe shortage of practitioners. This shortage is even more pronounced in economically disadvantaged and rural areas. The American Indian population is younger, more economically disadvantaged, and more rural than the general U.S. population (United States Census…

  8. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  9. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  10. FastStats: Health of Mexican American Population

    MedlinePlus

    ... Death Life Expectancy Race and Ethnicity Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or ... 1 [PDF - 993 KB] Related FastStats Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or ...

  11. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  12. American Indian Literacy and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    2004-01-01

    Literacy, which has only positive connotations in most cultures, has long been associated in Native communities with colonial education, "the reculturing and reeducation of American Indians by the secular and religious institutions of colonizing nations." Early educators imposed literacy on Indian children attending government-organized boarding…

  13. 77 FR 61780 - Preparation of the 2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... 4 p.m. MST--at the Bureau of Indian Affairs' Western Regional office in the fourth floor Eagle and... directly behind 2600 North Central Avenue. Thursday, November 1, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m....

  14. Identification of Gifted Children among the American Indian Population: An Inservice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florey, Janice E.; And Others

    An inservice training program designed to help teachers identify culturally different gifted students is described in this report, which provides specific information about identifying gifted Native Americans. Introductory material summarizes some research on the learning and behavioral characteristics of Native Americans as they differ from the…

  15. Substance dependent American Indian veterans: a national evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, R D; Howard, M O; Anderson, B; Lambert, M D

    1994-01-01

    Demographic, clinical, and treatment episode characteristics of 3,087 American Indian veterans discharged from Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals in fiscal year 1991 were examined. Substance use disorders were diagnosed in 46.3 percent of discharged American Indians, compared with 23.4 percent of discharged veterans overall. More than 97 percent of American Indian substance use diagnoses were for alcohol dependence, while rates of other drug use disorders were low. Substance dependent American Indians were younger, and more likely to be male and unmarried, than nondependent American Indians. Psychiatric disorders, particularly personality disorders, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorders, were more prevalent among American Indians diagnosed with substance use disorders, than among nondependent American Indians. American Indians with substance use disorders were similar demographically to the general population of substance dependent veterans. Rates of diagnosed psychiatric disorders and drug dependencies other than alcohol were lower among American Indians receiving substance (alcohol or drug) use diagnoses than among the general population of substance dependent veterans. Rates of rehospitalization following discharge were higher in substance-abusing American Indian veterans than among their counterparts. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:8153275

  16. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Holman, Robert C.; Seeman, Sara M.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children. PMID:26547082

  17. American Indian Studies Is for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1996-01-01

    Reviews issues related to American Indian studies programs from Native and non-Native perspectives. Discusses who should study American Indians, the value of American Indian studies for Native and non-Native students, the feasibility of Indian advisory boards for funding agencies and mass media producers, and issues of scholarly review. (SV)

  18. The American Indian Knew a Better Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Albert J.

    1973-01-01

    Special problems may have to be faced by teachers when teaching American Indian children about population control, pollution control or similar concepts. These children come from a culture which already has an awareness of these problems and has practiced preventive measures. (PS)

  19. Resource Guide: Historical Trauma and Post-Colonial Stress in American Indian Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse; Deschenie, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies on historic and multi-generational trauma among Native people have assisted individuals and communities in dealing with the continuing aftereffects. Following in the footsteps of Native American elders and activists, social workers, mental health professionals, and scholars are seeking to revitalize cultural traditions to combat…

  20. Effective Counseling with American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetsit, Deborah

    Counseling has always been a part of American Indian culture. Only recently has the European American counseling establishment recognized the role of culture in counseling. Developing a historical understanding of American Indians is important to working with American Indian students. It is also important for school counselors to recognize the…

  1. American Indian Capacity Building in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Don

    A 1996 research project in St. Paul, Minnesota, found high rates of poverty and unemployment in its American Indian population and a lack of connection between social service agencies and the Indian community. A follow-up project aimed to support the Indian community in identifying its own priorities for research and action. Eight focus groups…

  2. American Indian Urbanization. Institute Monograph Series Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Jack O.,; Watson, O. Michael

    The nine essays in this monograph represent an expanded outgrowth of "The American Indian in Urban Society" (1971) and an attempt at improvement. The essays are titled as follows: (1) "Federal Policy and the Urban Indian" (Federal policy affecting the urbanization of Indian populations); (2) "Urbanization in a Reservation Community: The Hopi…

  3. Hemoglobin patterns in American Indians.

    PubMed

    POLLITZER, W S; CHERNOFF, A I; HORTON, L L; FROEHLICH, M

    1959-01-23

    Two populations of North Carolina have been analyzed for hemoglobin patterns by paper electrophoresis. Of 534 Cherokee Indians, both mixed and full bloods, all showed normal hemoglobin. Lumbee Indians of less certain ethnic status had 1.7 percent of hemoglobin S, an equal amount of hemoglobin C, and one possible hemoglobin D trait among 1332 bloods studied. PMID:13624709

  4. Advancing Community–Based Research with Urban American Indian Populations: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, William E.; Wendt, Dennis C.; Saftner, Melissa A.; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. has witnessed significant growth among urban AI populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  5. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Stephen E.; Townshend-Bulson, Lisa J.; Bruden, Dana J. T.; Homan, Chriss E.; Gove, James E.; Plotnik, Julia N.; Simons, Brenna C.; Spradling, Philip R.; McMahon, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) population. Design In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results Sustained virologic response (SVR) with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18) and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37). Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%), including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%), 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5%) and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%). By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002), estimated duration of infection (p=0.034) and HCV genotype (p<0.0001). There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%). Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%). Conclusions We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1. PMID:27029671

  6. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  7. "Starting Stories" among Older Northern Plains American Indian Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indian adults have the highest smoking rate of any racial group in the nation. By the turn of the 21st century, smoking rates for the general adult population were reported to be 24%. Among adolescents in the United States, 34.8% of high school students reported they currently smoked in 1999. In comparison, American Indian adults report…

  8. Influenza surveillance using electronic health records in the American Indian and Alaska Native population

    PubMed Central

    Keck, James W; Redd, John T; Cheek, James E; Layne, Larry J; Groom, Amy V; Kitka, Sassa; Bruce, Michael G; Suryaprasad, Anil; Amerson, Nancy L; Cullen, Theresa; Bryan, Ralph T; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs) provides new opportunities for public health surveillance. During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic, we developed a new EHR-based influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance system designed to be resource sparing, rapidly scalable, and flexible. 4 weeks after the first pandemic case, ILI data from Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities were being analyzed. Materials and methods The system defines ILI as a patient visit containing either an influenza-specific International Classification of Disease, V.9 (ICD-9) code or one or more of 24 ILI-related ICD-9 codes plus a documented temperature ≥100°F. EHR-based data are uploaded nightly. To validate results, ILI visits identified by the new system were compared to ILI visits found by medical record review, and the new system's results were compared with those of the traditional US ILI Surveillance Network. Results The system monitored ILI activity at an average of 60% of the 269 IHS electronic health databases. EHR-based surveillance detected ILI visits with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 97.8% based on chart review (N=2375) of visits at two facilities in September 2009. At the peak of the pandemic (week 41, October 17, 2009), the median time from an ILI visit to data transmission was 6 days, with a mode of 1 day. Discussion EHR-based ILI surveillance was accurate, timely, occurred at the majority of IHS facilities nationwide, and provided useful information for decision makers. EHRs thus offer the opportunity to transform public health surveillance. PMID:23744788

  9. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  10. Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians: Can They Communicate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Clark S.

    A failure in communication between Anglo American, American Indian, and Mexican American communities exists because of the inadequate reporting of the events that occur within each of these groups. This speech outlines several basic ways in which communication can eventually be improved. First, it emphasizes that educators must recognize and…

  11. Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

    This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and…

  12. The American Indian in Urban Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Jack O., Ed.; Watson, O. Michael, Ed.

    Three main questions related to American Indians in urban society are discussed by 9 anthropologists and 1 American Indian in this 3-part book. Part 1 deals with historical and current urbanization trends and their effects on American Indians, in addition to providing a historical approach to governmental policies and attitudes toward the American…

  13. Social Policy and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Wynne DuBray; Purcell, Patrick Frances

    The purpose of the monograph is to provide schools of social work and their teachers with a central core of information concerning the policy and provisions of law that affect American Indians. The core information is selective and is presented in seven chapters. The first chapter provides a brief historical overview of the unique relationship…

  14. Chronicles of American Indian Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Interracial Books for Children, Inc., New York, NY.

    More than 60 historical documents related to the struggle of American Indian nations to preserve their sovereignty from the first resistance to the European invasions of the Americas up to and including the present are contained in this chronicle. Covering the period from 1622 to 1978, this updated version is expanded to include documents…

  15. Do American Indian Mascots = American Indian People? Examining Implicit Bias towards American Indian People and American Indian Mascots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, John; Burke, Amanda; Burkley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Empirical examinations of American Indian (AI) mascots have only recently entered into the discourse of mainstream psychology. The present studies examined implicit attitudes of non-AI people towards AI mascots and the extent to which they are related to attitudes towards AI people. Significant concordance was observed between negative bias toward…

  16. Current North American Indian Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blew, Carol Van Antwerp Holliday; And Others

    Approximately 150 newsletters, newspapers, and other periodicals are cited in this bibliography of current sources of information about or directed toward North American Indians. One-sentence descriptions of content, ordering information, and frequency of publication are provided. The majority of the periodicals cited emphasize current events of…

  17. Traditional American Indian Economic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosper, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    Examines aspects of American Indian world views and values relevant to economic development policy; specifically, sense of community, connectedness of everything, consideration of future generations, and humility toward nature. Discusses constraints on economic development arising from these values and the relevance of common property ownership…

  18. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  19. 75 FR 35070 - American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Medicine Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number: HHS... American Indians into Medicine Program. This program is authorized under the authority of 25 U.S.C....

  20. American Indian Education Opportunities Program. Supplement 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molin, Paulette F.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of the American Indian Educational Opportunities Program (AIEOP) at Hampton University for this reporting period included the establishment of a student chapter of the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), a move to new office space, hosting events on campus for visiting students from the American Indian Education Program of Oxon Hill, Maryland and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, New York, collaboration with the Multicultural Leadership Team at NASA Langley Research Center for a Native American elder to serve as a speaker, participation in Native American conferences and other events, and continuing efforts to recruit and retain American Indian students.

  1. Overview of American Indian/Alaska Native Initiatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... ports several projects in American Indian/ Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, largely in collaboration with its Network ... The Network strives to: • increase the number of AI/AN researchers, scientists, and medical students involved in ...

  2. Indian Voices: The Native American Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Historical Society, San Francisco, CA.

    The Convocation of American Indian scholars was conceived, organized, and directed by the American Indian Historical Society. The first convocation was held at Princeton University in 1970. Unlike conventions, the convocations are called when emergencies in Indian life exist, when changes are needed, and when new directions are emerging. This…

  3. American Indian Self-Image Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, Howard T.

    A self-image workshop manual for American Indians aims to help Indian people set goals and excel in whatever they plan in life. A section entitled "Are You an Eagle?" tells of the significance of eagles in traditional American Indian Culture, discusses those who merit an eagle feather for accomplishment, and lists characteristics of eagles (and…

  4. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Designed to inform Indian students about health career opportunities, this handbook prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians describes the great need for more American Indians as health professionals and gives information on specific health fields, preparation for health professions, and assistance available (financial and other).…

  5. Do American Indian mascots = American Indian people? Examining implicit bias towards American Indian people and American Indian mascots.

    PubMed

    Chaney, John; Burke, Amanda; Burkley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Empirical examinations of American Indian (AI) mascots have only recently entered into the discourse of mainstream psychology. The present studies examined implicit attitudes of non-AI people towards AI mascots and the extent to which they are related to attitudes towards AI people. Significant concordance was observed between negative bias toward AI mascots and AI people. Negative AI mascot bias also predicted stereotype-consistent expectations of an AI person. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21866499

  6. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  7. American Indian Education: Separation, Amalgamation, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zephier, Richard

    This essay examines American Indian education from a historical perspective and analyzes the role of the school as an institution in an Indian community. Since the arrival of the white man in America, Indians have faced a world of cultural conflict. Throughout the history of Indian education, their values and way of life have been demeaned. The…

  8. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  9. Tobacco, Culture, and Health among American Indians: A Historical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pego, Christina M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explores possible historical and cultural reasons for the high prevalence of contemporary tobacco use among North American Indian populations. Discusses historic ceremonial and medicinal uses of tobacco, contemporary ceremonialism, and clinical observations concerning Indian tobacco use. Recommends that prevention programs promote a return to the…

  10. 75 FR 36414 - American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Psychology Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number... Indians into Psychology Program. This program is authorized under the authority of ``25 U.S.C....

  11. The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies & Traditional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    This book presents an ethnohistorical examination of American Indian thinking and philosophy and strives to explain the complexity of the American Indian mind in its traditional cultural and natural environment and in contrast to the American mainstream linear world. It is argued that Indian thinking is visual; circular; concerned with the…

  12. American Indian Perspectives of Euro-American Counseling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokken, Jayne M.; Twohey, Denise

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen American Indians participated in 17 counseling interviews with Euro-American counselors. The study analyzed interviews of American Indian participants using Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR). Counselor trustworthiness, which was increased by counselor empathy, genuineness, concern, self-disclosure, and slow pace of problem…

  13. Education of Urban Indians: Lumbee Indians in Baltimore. The National Study of American Indian Education, Series II, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, John Gregory

    As one of the final reports of the National Study of American Indian Education, this paper is devoted to the Lumbee Indian living in Baltimore, Maryland. The history of the Lumbee's migration which led to the present-day permanent settlement is provided, along with factors such as population mobility, parental attitudes toward the schools, and…

  14. Genetics Home Reference: North American Indian childhood cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions North American Indian childhood cirrhosis North American Indian childhood cirrhosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description North American Indian childhood cirrhosis is a rare liver disorder that ...

  15. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  16. State Responsibilities for American Indians -- Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Tom

    The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from…

  17. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  18. The Destruction of American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Steven, Ed.

    Responding to the need for a comprehensive source of information regarding the separation of American Indian children from their families, this book presents essays which: examine the Indian child-welfare crisis in contemporary, legal, and historical perspectives; document the human cost of the crisis to Indian parents, children, and communities;…

  19. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  20. Substance Abuse and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Willard E.

    This guide introduces concerns and problems resulting from the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs among American Indian youth and addresses intergenerational substance abuse effects. Alcohol abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives is the most visible effect of their cultural disruption and disorganization. Alcoholism among Native Americans…

  1. American Indian Cultural Resources: A Preservation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, Kathy

    Designed for use by American Indian tribes, archaeologists, law enforcement officials, local/state/federal administrators in charge of cultural resources management matters, and the general public, this handbook has been compiled to serve as a practical guide to protecting American Indian cultural resources in Oregon. The book brings together…

  2. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  3. American Indian Studies. Library Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This guide to sources for students at San Diego State University doing library research in topics related to American Indian Studies begins by noting that information on North American Indians can be found in a variety of subject disciplines including history, anthropology, education, sociology, health care, law, business, and politics. The…

  4. Maize Genetics Outreach to American Indians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an excellent vehicle for plant genomics outreach to those American Indian tribes who use and appreciate it nutritionally, culturally, and spiritually. During the summer 2006 season we mentored six Native American Indian students for eight weeks. All six worked at the USDA-ARS North Centra...

  5. A, B, C's the American Indian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Hawk, Richard

    This book, recommended for children from preschool through age 8, presents various facts about American Indians and American Indian culture and history. Using the alphabet, the book provides information on the Apache people of the southwestern United States; the Luiseno of southern California; the Modoc of northern California; the Navajo nation,…

  6. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  7. American Indian Religion: Past, Present, Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Omer C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic concept of American Indian religion after briefly comparing fundamental religious concepts of several civilizations. Discusses the historical and current roles of medicine men, the belief in supernatural forces, the effect of missionary zeal on American Indian religions, and the appearance of Christian elements in traditional…

  8. The American Heritage Book of Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephy, Alvin M., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    The histories and anthropological origins of American Indian groups are presented via pictorial and narrative descriptions. Historical and cultural contributions of American Indians to present conditions in the Americas are detailed, concentrating primarily on those tribes affecting the history of the United States. (DK)

  9. Respiratory disease mortality in New Mexico's American Indians and Hispanics.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Key, C R; Kutvirt, D M; Wiggins, C L

    1980-01-01

    To determine the effect of ethnic group on respiratory disease occurrence, average annual sex, ethnic, and disease specific mortality rates for the period of 1969 to 1977 were calculated for New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and Anglo populations. Incidence data were available for respiratory tract cancer. This study corroborates previous findings of reduced mortality from lung cancer in American Indians of both sexes and in Hispanic males. American Indian mortality from tuberculosis and from influenza and pneumonia was high. Hispanic males and American Indians of both sexes showed low mortality rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Differing cigarette usage is the most obvious explanation for the variations in COPD and lung cancer occurrence with ethnic group. PMID:7377419

  10. FastStats: Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population

    MedlinePlus

    ... Death Life Expectancy Race and Ethnicity Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or ... 1 [PDF - 993 KB] Related FastStats Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or ...

  11. Acceptability of telepsychiatry in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Brooks, Elizabeth; Savin, Daniel; Orton, Heather; Grigsby, Jim; Manson, Spero M

    2008-06-01

    Telepsychiatry differs from in-person treatment in terms of its delivery mechanism, and this dissimilarity may increase cultural differences between the provider and the patient. Because cultural competence and identification can impact patient satisfaction ratings, we wanted to explore whether cultural differences in our study population influenced telepsychiatric and in-person interviews. Here, we compared the acceptability of conducting psychiatric assessments with rural American Indian veterans by real-time videoconferencing versus inperson administration. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IIIR (SCID) was given to participants both in person and by telehealth. A process measure was created to assess participants' responses to the interview type concerning the usability of the technology, the perceptions of the interviewee/interviewer interaction, the cultural competence of the interview, and satisfaction with the interview and the interview process. The process measure was administered to 53 American Indian Vietnam veterans both in-person and by real-time interactive videoconferencing. Mean responses were compared for each participant. Interviewers were also asked several of the same questions as the participants; answers were compared to the corresponding participant responses. Overall, telepsychiatry was well received and comparable in level of patient comfort, satisfaction, and cultural acceptance to in-person interviews. We also found evidence to suggest that interviewers sometimes interpreted participant satisfaction as significantly less favorable than the participants actually responded. Despite the potential of videoconferencing to increase cultural differences, we found that it is an acceptable means for psychiatric assessment of American Indian veterans and presents an opportunity to provide mental health services to a population that might otherwise not have access. PMID:18578681

  12. Cultural Difference as the Basis for Creative Education at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM.

    The task of setting up and administering educational programs for the American Indian has been fraught with seemingly insurmountable problems and inbuilt frustrations for both the Indian population and the Federal Government. Many programs are now under way to increase Indian control of Indian affairs, including their own educational institutions.…

  13. An Index of the Social Indicators of the American Indian in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.

    Facts and figures relating to American Indians in Oklahoma are presented in this manual for use by Indian tribes and by others working in the area of Indian affairs. The historical background of Oklahoma Indians is discussed, and information is presented on various characteristics, such as population, education, health and welfare, and crime and…

  14. American Indian Men’s Perceptions of Breast Cancer Screening for American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Melissa K.; Pacheco, Joseph; James, Aimee S.; Brown, Travis; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Choi, Won S.; Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, especially screening mammography, is vital for decreasing breast cancer incidence and mortality. Screening rates in American Indian women are low compared to other racial/ethnic groups. In addition, American Indian women are diagnosed at more advanced stages and have lower 5-year survival rate than others. To better address the screening rates of American Indian women, focus groups (N=8) were conducted with American Indian men (N=42) to explore their perceptions of breast cancer screening for American Indian women. Our intent was to understand men’s support level toward screening. Using a community-based participatory approach, focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a text analysis approach developed by our team. Topics discussed included breast cancer and screening knowledge, barriers to screening, and suggestions to improve screening rates. These findings can guide strategies to improve knowledge and awareness, communication among families and health care providers, and screening rates in American Indian communities. PMID:25995972

  15. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the ... Cause of Death (By rank) # American Indian/Alaska Native Deaths American Indian/Alaska Native Death Rate #Non- Hispanic White ...

  16. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  17. Effects of Alcohol Use and Anti-American Indian Attitudes on Domestic-Violence Culpability Decisions for American Indian and Euro-American Actors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Hack, Lori; Tehee, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the unique issues surrounding American Indian violence. Yet American Indian women are at high risk for domestic abuse, and domestic violence has been identified as the most important issue for American Indians now and in the future by the National Congress of American Indians. American Indian women suffer from domestic…

  18. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utter, Jack

    This book aims to fill part of the gap that exists between commonly held misconceptions and the realities of American Indian history and modern life. Part I discusses the "doctrine of discovery," a European legal theory invented to justify the acquisition of Indian lands, and explains why the issue of discovery has had so great an impact on…

  19. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, and community leaders with the programs available to Indians through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this brochure provides information on program benefits, application procedures, and who to contact for further information for 49 programs in the areas of agriculture, community…

  20. Child Abuse and Neglect in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.

    Child abuse and neglect among American Indians is a political as well as a clinical problem, as the victims belong to one cultural group and health professionls who detect maltreatment generally belong to another. Reluctance to diagnose and report child abuse, although universal, is probably more significant in Indian communities for several…

  1. Indian Peace Medals in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prucha, Francis Paul

    Silver medals played an important role in American Indian policy for more than a century. Following a practice of the French, Spanish, and British in the New World, the United States government presented Indian peace medals to important chiefs and warriors as symbols of attachment to the new nation. In addition, the medals were marks of rank…

  2. Education "for" American Indians: Threat or Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tax, Sol; Thomas, Robert K

    1969-01-01

    Results of this Carnegie Corporation of New York sponsored research project in literacy training among the Cherokee Indians of Eastern Oklahoma indicate that alienation rather than lack of opportunity is the chief difficulty in American Indian education. Appears in "The Florida FL Reporter special anthology issue "Linguistic-Cultural Differences…

  3. American Indian Studies: A Bibliographic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This book lists sources of information available on Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Some sources also include information on native Hawaiians, Indians of Mexico, and Indians of Central and South America. The purpose of the guide is to provide researchers with direction and organization for selecting and using the best…

  4. Gallstones in American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/Alaska Natives Immigrant and migrant issues Taking care ... Enter email address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health Gallstones Health conditions ...

  5. Changes in Cancer Incidence Patterns among a Northeastern American Indian Population: 1955-1969 versus 1990-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Martin C.; Va, Puthiery; Stevens, Adrian; Kahn, Amy R.; Michalek, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This manuscript examines shifts in patterns of cancer incidence among the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) for the interval 1955-1969 compared to 1990-2004. Methods: A retrospective cohort design was used to examine cancer incidence among the SNI during 2 time intervals: 1955-1969 and 1990-2004. Person-years at risk were multiplied by…

  6. American Indian Education: One Indian Teacher's View or New Directions in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiger, Flo

    1987-01-01

    Flo Wiger, Chairperson, Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota/Minneapolis, shares her experiences and views on Indian Education. Dropout rates; higher enrollment; more relevant curricula; increased Indian faculty and staff availability; and community, tribal, and governmental involvement are included. Educational change to…

  7. American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2011-01-01

    When American Indian/Native American studies (AI/NAS) programs began to emerge in the halls of academia during the late 1960s and early 1970s, some who served as faculty and staff questioned whether they would be one-generation phenomena. Would the programs survive, would they continue to draw students, and could they make an impact on…

  8. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  9. American Indian Enrichment Activities. Mini-Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosnick, Sally

    Focusing on American Indians, this annotated bibliography covers a variety of resources for enriching multicultural education in the elementary classroom and includes limited information about Mexican Americans, Blacks, and other cultural groups. Each of the 26 entries provides a descriptive annotation and indicates where the material can be…

  10. American Indians: Hands-On Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethlefsen, Ann Lyle

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the teaching methods she uses to teach how different American Indian groups lived in different regions of the North American continent. Her lessons include a number of projects: (1) Practicing symbolic writing; (2) Creating a personal timeline; (3) Studying winter counts and creating a personalized…

  11. Counseling American Indians: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, Elizabeth; Thomason, Timothy C.

    This bibliography presents 75 annotated entries on counseling and psychotherapy with American Indians. Entries include journal articles, books, book chapters, newspaper and newsletter articles, and conference papers, published 1964-96. Topics covered include counseling approaches and techniques, mental health services for Native Americans,…

  12. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  13. A Study of Resiliency of American Indian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bill; Collins, Michele; Daugherty, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Relationships between resiliency and student achievement were investigated in a population of American Indian high school students in a county school district of Nevada. The Resiliency Belief System was used to assess the resiliency of students. The participants were mainly female students (62%), with local tribal affiliation (51%), with a grade…

  14. Guidelines for Multicultural Assessment: An Asian Indian American Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Frances K.; Fine, Emily S.; Greif, Dan C.; Devenny, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assessment of ethnic minority clients is often hindered by clinician bias and lack of culturally sensitive instruments. Multicultural guidelines can enhance clinician awareness and sensitivity in conducting assessments with diverse populations. These guidelines are illustrated using an Asian Indian American character from Lahiri's (2008)…

  15. Practicing participatory research in American Indian communities1–3

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M; Reid, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the historical issues that affect research in American Indian communities and examine the implications of these issues as they relate to culturally sensitive, respectful, and appropriate research with this population. Methods include review and analysis of the literature and examination of our collective experience and that of our colleagues. Recommendations are given for conducting culturally sensitive, participatory research. We conclude that research efforts must build on the establishment of partnerships between investigators and American Indian communities to ensure accurate findings and analyses and to implement culturally relevant benefits. PMID:10195598

  16. The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S

    2006-12-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  17. The Persistence of American Indian Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  18. Diabetes and Kidney Disease in American Indians: Potential Role of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages.

    PubMed

    Yracheta, Joseph M; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Le, MyPhuong T; Abdelmalak, Manal F; Alfonso, Javier; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Since the early 20th century, a marked increase in obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease has occurred in the American Indian population, especially the Pima Indians of the Southwest. Here, we review the current epidemic and attempt to identify remediable causes. A search was performed using PubMed and the search terms American Indian and obesity, American Indian and diabetes, American Indian and chronic kidney disease, and American Indian and sugar or fructose, Native American, Alaska Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, Amerind, and Amerindian for American Indian for articles linking American Indians with diabetes, obesity, chronic kidney disease, and sugar; additional references were identified in these publications traced to 1900 and articles were reviewed if they were directly discussing these topics. Multiple factors are involved in the increased risk for diabetes and kidney disease in the American Indian population, including poverty, overnutrition, poor health care, high intake of sugar, and genetic mechanisms. Genetic factors may be especially important in the Pima, as historical records suggest that this group was predisposed to obesity before exposure to Western culture and diet. Exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages may also be involved in the increased risk for chronic kidney disease. In these small populations in severe health crisis, we recommend further studies to investigate the role of excess added sugar, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, as a potentially remediable risk factor. PMID:26046414

  19. Teaching English to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    Many practices in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools were negative, but this paper emphasizes the positive efforts that were made throughout their history, especially in regard to teaching English. The Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879, encouraged the use of English through an English language student newspaper and frequently…

  20. Access in Theory and Practice: American Indians in Philosophy History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Katy Gray; Brown, Michael Patterson

    2003-01-01

    The American Indian Philosophical Association (AIPA) was created in May of 1998 by a group of American Indian philosophers; it grew out of the American Philosophical Association's (APA) Committee to Advance the Status of American Indians in Philosophy. It is associated with the APA but remains an autonomous organization dedicated to the…

  1. Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurien, Prema A.

    2006-01-01

    How non-Christian religious groups should be politically recognized within Western multicultural societies has proved to be a pressing contemporary issue. This article examines some ways in which American policies regarding religion and multiculturalism have shaped Hindu Indian American organizations, forms of public expression and activism.…

  2. Assessing American Indian Needs in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence; And Others

    This paper focuses on New Mexico's high-risk Indian children and programs. Specifically, Western New Mexico University has been involved with the Gallup/McKinley public school district, the largest school district (5,000 square miles) in the United States (larger than New Jersey) with a school population that is 73% Indian. This paper examines…

  3. Outing, Relocation, and Employment Assistance: The Impact of Federal Indian Population Dispersal Programs in the Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willard, William

    1997-01-01

    Educational and employment programs implemented by the Bureau of Indian Affairs during the 1950s and 1960s relocated thousands of American Indians to urban areas with the assurance of a better life. Focuses on the current status of the American Indian population in the San Francisco Bay area including Indian organizations, tribal group…

  4. The Power of American Indian Parents and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watahomigie, Lucille

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role that schools, communities, and parents can play in transmitting American Indian culture and language to Indian children, focusing on the experiences of the Hualapai Indians and Peach Springs School District in Arizona. (three references) (MDM)

  5. HIV/AIDS Prevention Education: Considerations for American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sileo, Thomas W.; Gooden, Myma A.

    2004-01-01

    American Indians/Alaska Natives represent slightly less than 0.9% of the total U.S. population, yet they account for one percent of the reported HIV and AIDS cases nationwide. Approximately 2537 cumulative AIDS cases have been identified in the American Indian/ Alaska Native community; AIDS related deaths account for about half of the cumulative…

  6. Honoring the Ways of American Indian Women: A Group Therapy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Paula T.; Robbins, Rockey; Vaughn, Karen; Youngbull, Natalie; Burks, Derek; Willmon-Haque, Sadie; Schuetz, Suzan; Brandes, Joyce A.; Nael, Andrea Zainab Omidy

    2010-01-01

    A culturally grounded group intervention for a typically underserved population of urban American Indian women is described. The intervention is designed to increase interpersonal connection, improve inter-tribal acceptance and trust, and enhance psychological well being of marginalized urban American Indian women. Topics used to structure the…

  7. Supporting the Career Aspirations of American Indian Youth. CURA Reporter, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliman-Brissett, Annette E; Turner, Sherri L.

    2005-01-01

    Dropout rates among American Indian young people are greater than 50% in some places in the country, and the rate of unemployment and underemployment among American Indians still far exceeds that of the majority population, despite affirmative action and other parity-seeking policies. In addition, U.S. Census trends indicate an influx of American…

  8. Promoting School Achievement among American Indian Students throughout the School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    American Indian students as a population are not achieving high academic standards. Yet school failure appears to be acquired rather than inherent at the onset of schooling. Many researchers have reported that American Indian children function at an average range academically until the 4th grade; but by 10th grade, however, they are, on average,…

  9. Suicide among American Indian Youth: The Role of the Schools in Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, L. Dean; Metha, Arlene

    1996-01-01

    Compares suicide rates among American Indian youth with those for other racial groups and discusses suicide risk factors for the general youth population and for American Indian youth. Describes school-based programs in terms of suicide prevention, intervention, and "postvention" strategies, with emphasis on adaptation to specific cultures.…

  10. How Schools Can Help Heal American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Don Trent

    Historical trauma may be a significant cause of the well-documented disparities between the health of American Indians and the general population. The inability to resolve past injustices against American Indians may continue to have health consequences as long as this history continues to repeat itself. Schools can play a role in healing American…

  11. Alcohol and Suicide Death among American Indians of New Mexico: 1980-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.; Van Winkle, Nancy W.; Williams, Mary B.; McFeeley, Patricia J.; DeBruyn, Lemyra M.; Serna, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Explores the relationship between alcohol use prior to suicide among American Indian decedents in New Mexico for the years 1980 through 1998. Alcohol was detected in 69% of all suicides of American Indians with some variance by major tribal cultural groups. This is higher than in suicides among the overall New Mexico population (44.3%). (Contains…

  12. In Pursuit of a Computing Degree: Cultural Implications for American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodaseet, Glenda G.; Varma, Roli

    2012-01-01

    While a number of challenges contribute to the American Indian population's disconnect from information technology (IT), the most glaring is the low number of American Indian students pursuing computer science (CS) studies--a degree essential to IT's entry into and diffusion across communities. Yet, research is scant on factors that contribute to…

  13. Physical Activity Levels in American-Indian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Kristi L.; Arena, Vincent C.; Barmada, M. Michael; Bunker, Clareann H.; Hanson, Robert L.; Laston, Sandra L.; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Howard, Barbara V.; Kriska, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    Background A limited body of evidence, mostly based on self-report, is available regarding physical activity levels among American-Indian adults. Purpose This study aims to examine physical activity levels objectively by pedometer among a large cohort of American Indian adult participants in the Strong Heart Family Study. Methods Physical activity levels in 2604 American-Indian adults, aged 18–91 years, from 13 American-Indian communities were assessed using an Accusplit AE120 pedometer over a period of 7 days during 2001–2003. Anthropometric measurements were also assessed. All data analyses were conducted in 2008. Age-adjusted Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between average steps per day and age and anthropometric variables. Subjects were placed in age and BMI categories (according to NHLBI cutpoints) to examine trends in PA with increasing age and BMI. Results Daily pedometer steps ranged from 1001 to 38,755. Mean step counts by age group for men were: 5384 (18–29 years), 5120 (30–39 years), 5040 (40–49 years), 4561(50–59 years),4321 (60–69 years), and 3768 (≥70 years) and for women: 5038 (18–29 years), 5112 (30– 39 years), 5054 (40–49 years), 4582 (50–59 years), 3653 (60–69 years), and 3770 (>70 years). A significant linear trend in physical activity was noted with increasing age (P= 0.002 for men, P<0.0001 for women) and with increasing BMI (P = 0.05 for men, P = 0.04 for women). Conclusions Objectively measured data suggest that inactivity is a problem among American Indian adults and that a majority of American Indian adults in the SHFS may not be meeting the minimum physical activity public health recommendations. Efforts to increase physical activity levels in this population are warranted. PMID:19944912

  14. Initial Report of the American Indian Leaders Advisory Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Of major concern to American Indians are: government to government communications; development of Indian owned energy resources; federal budget changes as they affect the American Indian; preservation, protection, and quantification of inherent and reserved Indian water rights; preservation of treaty obligations; respect for tribal sovereignty;…

  15. The Lived Experience: American Indian Literature after Alcatraz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    In 1969, American Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island dramatized Native demands for self-determination, tribal lands, and tribal identities. Meanwhile, a blossoming American Indian literary movement began awakening America to Indians' continued existence and providing texts of "lived experience" that created a new kind of Indian leadership and…

  16. Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Carla J.; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Kinlacheeny, J. B.; Ashley, Amber; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Greiner, K. Allen; Choi, Won S.

    2011-01-01

    The American Indian population has among the highest rates of obesity in the United States. Thus, it is critical to understand factors related to this epidemic (e.g., physical activity, nutrition) among this ethnic minority population. The current study examined factors related to engaging in at least 4 days of physical activity (PA) per week and factors related to consuming at least 5 fruits and vegetables (FV) per day among a sample of American Indians in the Midwest. We used multiple methods to recruit participants for this study, including recruitment at pow wows, focus groups, health fairs, new student orientation for American Indian students, and other venues. A total of 998 American Indians (76% participation rate) completed a survey assessing sociodemographics, physical activity level, fruit and vegetable intake, and perceptions regarding the recommendations for physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Factors associated with exercising ≥4 days in the past week (44.77% of the sample) include being younger (P = .002), being male (P<.001), having at least some college education (P = .048), eating ≥5 FV per day, and higher perceived number of days of PA recommended (P<.001). Factors associated with eating ≥5 servings of FV per day (37.01% of the sample) included exercising ≥4 days in the past week (P<.001) and higher perceived number of servings of FV recommended (P<.001). These findings highlight the importance of education in enhancing engagement in positive weight control behaviors and the importance of addressing both physical activity and nutrition among the American Indian population. PMID:21630108

  17. American Indian Student Counselor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Wayne H.

    The handbook, a first in the attempt to collect information about counseling Indian students, represents the results of 1976-77 couselor training workshops in South Dakota. The handbook contains article reprints, ideas, and suggestions from many counselors and non-counselors, and is intended not as expertise but as a resource primarily for…

  18. American Indian Students Speak out: What's Good Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Leisa A.; Chiodo, John J.

    2008-01-01

    For much of our country's history, citizenship has eluded American Indian people. With this in mind, the authors conducted a study to determine the perceptions of eighth and eleventh grade American Indian students regarding citizenship. We wanted to find out what American Indian students believe are the attributes of a good citizen; what…

  19. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Second Edition, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP), this handbook provides information relative to American Indian health careers in terms of need, opportunity, preparation, and information sources. Designed to encourage American Indian youth to seek careers in the health professions, this handbook describes the enormous need for…

  20. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  1. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  2. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  3. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  4. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  5. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  6. In Search of Theory and Method in American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2007-01-01

    American Indian studies should have a theoretical and methodological focus sufficient to organize an academic discipline. A primary focus of American Indian studies as a discipline is to conceptualize, research, and explain patterns of American Indian individual and collective community choices and strategies when confronted with relations with…

  7. Art and Healing for Native American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe M.; Coleman, Victoria D.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses elements of Native American Indian healing process and significance of arts in therapy. Until recently, most traditional healing practices were illegal in the United States. It is imperative that counselors and educators become aware of the role of arts in Native healing. Implications for counselors and educators are highlighted. (CRR)

  8. A Filmography for American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carroll Warner; Bird, Gloria

    The filmography on American Indian education lists existing films in current distribution. The introduction explains the purpose of the guide, the procedure used to compile it, samples of questionnaires used, films as audiovisual classroom aids, the classification of films for classroom use, the relation of film use to individual curricula, some…

  9. The Political Economy of North American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John H., Ed.

    This book presents 12 papers that proceed from the idea that Native American history in the United States and Canada is best understood not as an Indian-European cultural conflict but as an economic conflict between communal and capitalist modes of production. Three chapters are of particular educational interest. "Political Economy in…

  10. American Indian Languages: Cultural and Social Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Shirley; Miller, Wick R.

    This book introduces the general reader to the mosaic of American Indian languages and cultures as they exist in time and space, and supplies limited technical linguistic orientation to encourage further exploration of language interrelationships, cultures, and other ways of knowing. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the status, diversity, and…

  11. American Indian Adolescents and Disordered Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.

    2010-01-01

    School counselors play an important role in identifying and intervening with students struggling with disordered eating (e.g., Bardick et al., 2004). Research has shown that American Indian adolescents report higher rates of certain disordered eating behaviors than other racial groups. The literature on the prevalence and etiology of disordered…

  12. Tests Appropriate for Use with American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ. Test Collection.

    The annotated bibliography describes 13 standardized tests appropriate for use with American Indians from preschool through high school levels, furnishing authors, copyright date, appropriate age level, physical format (microfiche), and publisher. A separate listing provides names, addresses, and telephone numbers of 33 major U.S. publishers of…

  13. American Indian Women: The Double Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Linda Sue

    This study investigated the relationship between variables of ethnic and sex-role stereotype and job satisfaction based on Festinger's dissonance avoidance theory and Bruner and Tagirui's implicit personality theory. The respondents were 114 American Indian female supervisors, out of a representative sample of 200. The data were collected using a…

  14. Elder Abuse in American Indian Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisko, Briana

    2009-01-01

    Although the many American Indian tribes of the United States are unique in their own customs, languages, and histories, a common thread throughout their traditions and cultural lifestyles is that they are of a culture that reveres the elder in their communities. Elders are the carriers of the culture/history; they are the storytellers, holders of…

  15. American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.

    This culturally relevant curriculum was developed to teach American Indian secondary school students coping and suicide prevention skills. Although the curriculum was designed for high school students, many of the lesson plans and activities can be used with middle school students. The goal is to address the significant problem of suicide among…

  16. The North American Indian and the Eskimo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    This is a selected bibliography of some good and some outstanding audio-visual educational materials in the library of the Educational Materials Bureau, Audio-Visual Education Section, that may be considered of particular interest in the study of the North American Indian, the Eskimo, and in the fields of ethnology and anthropology. The…

  17. Literature of the American Indian. Abridged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Thomas E.; Peek, Walter W.

    From ancient stories of creation to contemporary poetry and prose, this volume ranges through thousands of years of the literature of the American Indian. Chapter One of the book deals with pre-Columbian religions and features accounts of the Creation by the Cheyenne, Navajo, Omaha, Yakima, Zuni, and Uitoto. Chapter Two has as its theme folk…

  18. Sacagawea, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skold, Betty Westrom

    Written for adolescents, this biography of the Shoshoni woman, Sacagawea, who acted as interpreter, intermediary, and guide to the Lewis and Clark Expedition emphasizes the insecurities of an American Indian woman living in the early 19th century. The known life of Sacagawea is described as involving: a period of time with the Hidatsas who had…

  19. American Indian Grandmothers: Traditions and Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Marjorie M., Ed.

    American Indian grandmothers are almost universally occupied with child care and child rearing at some time in their lives, but cultural variables influence the definition, role, and status of grandmothers in different tribes. This book contains nine chapters that blend documentary history, oral history, and ethnographic observation to illuminate…

  20. American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Directory, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. American Indian Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.

    This directory lists 55 tribal vocational rehabilitation programs serving American Indians and Alaska Natives in 19 states. Sections for each state begin with a summary page, followed by a listing of individual vocational rehabilitation programs and related agencies and organizations. Each entry includes the name of the project director, postal…

  1. A Portfolio of Outstanding Contemporary American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Theodore E. B.

    The portfolio contains 24 portraits with biographical sketches of outstanding contemporary American Indians. Representing several tribes, occupations, and points of view, the subjects are: Henry Adams, Louis W. Ballard, Robert L. Bennett, George Blue Spruce, Jarrett Blythe, Louis R. Bruce, Leon Cook, Ada Deer, Vine Deloria, Jr., James Gladstone,…

  2. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  3. Honoring Their Way: Counseling American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chee, Christine; Sand, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors review current literature on issues facing American Indian (AI) women and discuss implications for providing culturally sensitive counseling with these women. A case study of a Dine (Navajo) woman living within mainstream society and holding true to her traditional cultural beliefs illustrates how a culturally responsive approach to…

  4. Cultural Practices in American Indian Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Way, Ruth; Johnson, Sandie

    2000-01-01

    Describes effective substance abuse prevention programs created by American Indians that combine cultural components with other proven prevention strategies. Components of successful cultural interventions are family, not school, administration; a focus on peer clusters rather than individuals or entire peer groups; incorporation of spirituality,…

  5. The Future of American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apodaca, Paul

    2011-01-01

    American Indian studies celebrates forty years at a conference in conjunction with a campuswide effort to recognize the development of interdisciplinary studies programs in the second half of the twentieth century. Interdisciplinary programs (IDPs) are a major aspect of the progress of academics in the United States. The author's point at the…

  6. Multicultural Education and the American Indian. Contemporary American Indian Issues Series, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center.

    The book of readings on multicultural education and the American Indian contains 14 articles presented in 6 sections: introduction to multicultural education; multicultural education policies on the national and local levels; cross cultural education and Indian student performance; leader and teacher training; and curriculum development.…

  7. American Indian History and Writing from Home: Constructing an Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    If the typical premise of American Indian history is actually the history of Indian-white relations, then the "other" side of the coin must be turned over for understanding an Indian point of view and what is called "writing from home." Conceptually, "writing from home" is the challenge of historians who are American Indian and who write history…

  8. American Indian Stereotypes: The Truth Behind the Hype. An Indian Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stutzman, Esther

    This curriculum guide dispels the stereotypes of American Indians that humiliate and degrade real Indian culture and add fuel to the fire of racism and prejudice. It begins with a timeline of American Indian history from 15,000 B.C. to the present, and compares it to a historical timeline of Europe-Asia. The stereotype of the savage Indian is…

  9. New Directions in Indian Purpose: Reflections on the American Indian Chicago Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Educational Services, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The "Declaration of Indian Purpose" produced by the American Indian Chicago Conference in 1961 needs to be recognized and extended to meet the needs and common political concerns of American Indians today. This publication provides the complete text and the appendices to this earlier document, and includes papers in which Indian academics and…

  10. General Strain Theory and Substance Use among American Indian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established finding that American Indian adolescents are at a greater risk of illicit substance use and abuse than the general population, few generalist explanations of deviance have been extended to American Indian substance use. Using a popular generalist explanation of deviance, General Strain Theory, we explore the predictive utility of this model with a subsample of American Indian adolescents from waves one and two of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add-Health). Overall, we find mixed support for the utility of General Strain Theory to account for American Indian adolescent substance use. While exposure to recent life events, a common measure of stress exposure, was found to be a robust indicator of substance use, we found mixed support for the thesis that negative affect plays a key role in mediating the link between strain and substance use. However, we did find evidence that personal and social resources serve to condition the link between stress exposure and substance use, with parental control, self-restraint, religiosity, and exposure to substance using peers each serving to moderate the association between strain and substance use, albeit in more complex ways than expected. PMID:23826511

  11. Adult Social Roles and Alcohol Use among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Kaylin M.; Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David

    2014-01-01

    American Indians are disproportionately burdened by alcohol-related problems. Yet, research exploring predictors of alcohol use among American Indians has been limited by cross-sectional designs and reservation-based samples. Guided by a life course developmental perspective, the current study used a subsample of American Indians (n=927) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to explore alcohol use (current drinking, usual number of drinks, and binge drinking) among this population. We examined whether adult social roles (i.e., cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, college enrollment, full-time work) were linked to the rise and fall of alcohol use. Multi-level models demonstrated that adult social roles were linked to alcohol use at the within- and between-person levels. Becoming a parent was linked to a lower likelihood of being a current drinker, fewer alcoholic drinks, and less frequent binge drinking. Transitioning to full-time work was associated with a higher likelihood of being a current drinker and more frequent binge drinking. Results point to the importance of exploring within-group trajectories of alcohol use and highlight the protective and risky nature of adult social roles among American Indians. PMID:24857795

  12. Adult social roles and alcohol use among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David

    2014-09-01

    American Indians are disproportionately burdened by alcohol-related problems. Yet, research exploring predictors of alcohol use among American Indians has been limited by cross-sectional designs and reservation-based samples. Guided by a life course developmental perspective, the current study used a subsample of American Indians (n=927) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to explore alcohol use (current drinking, usual number of drinks, and binge drinking) among this population. We examined whether adult social roles (i.e., cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, college enrollment, and full-time work) were linked to the rise and fall of alcohol use. Multi-level models demonstrated that adult social roles were linked to alcohol use at the within- and between-person levels. Becoming a parent was linked to a lower likelihood of being a current drinker, fewer alcoholic drinks, and less frequent binge drinking. Transitioning to full-time work was associated with a higher likelihood of being a current drinker and more frequent binge drinking. Results point to the importance of exploring within-group trajectories of alcohol use and highlight the protective and risky nature of adult social roles among American Indians. PMID:24857795

  13. President Nixon Sets New Indian Policies and Goals: A New Era for the American Indians; The American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Richard M.

    The July 8, 1970 President's Message to the United States Congress on the American Indians is presented in this paper. The speech covered self-determination without termination, the repeal of the termination law, Indian directed programs, the restoration of Blue Lake to Taos Pueblo, local school control, economic development legislation, Indian…

  14. Exploring Indigenous Identities of Urban American Indian Youth of the Southwest.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Stephen; Wagaman, M Alex; Tso, Crescentia; Brown, Eddie F

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the indigenous identities of urban American Indian youth using measures related to three theoretical dimensions of Markstrom's identity model: identification (tribal and ethnic heritage), connection (reservation ties), and involvement in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Data came from self-administered questionnaires completed by 142 urban American Indian middle school students in a southwestern metropolitan area with the largest urban American Indian population in the United States. Using both quantitative and qualitative measures, descriptive statistics showed most youth were connected to all three dimensions of indigenous identity. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that youth with the strongest sense of American Indian ethnic identity had native fathers and were heavily involved in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Although urban American Indians may face challenges in maintaining their tribal identities, the youth in this study appeared strongly moored to their native indigenous heritage. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:23766553

  15. IndianAmerican contributions to psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by IndianAmerican psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  16. Selling Indian Education: Fundraising and American Indian Identities at Bacone College, 1880-1941

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, American Indian education in the United States was inextricably linked to Euro-American colonialism. By the late nineteenth century, many Euro-Americans thought Native Americans were a "vanishing race," and schools for Indians incorporated this belief into their design. In the United States, the large number and variety of schools…

  17. Cultural Disintegration Perpetuated through Substance Abuse among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence Armand

    Alcohol, perhaps more than any other factor, symbolizes the degree of cultural disintegration experienced by American Indians today. It has been recognized as a symptom of the numerous cultural adjustments forced upon American Indians since white contact. Indeed, alcohol among Indian groups was prohibited for a far longer period than the…

  18. Our Children's Songs: American Indian Students and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Thomas; Albert, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    A study examined American Indian students' perceptions of why schools are failing to meet their needs. Thirty-six American Indian high school students from Minnesota participated in three interviews that explored their background and experiences, instructional and non-instructional issues that affect the education of Indian students, and their…

  19. Indian Education in the American Colonies, 1607-1783.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell

    Indian schooling in colonial America was continuously immersed in the exchange between cultures that involved religion, land ownership, disease, alcohol, and warfare, and was molded by trade in furs and hides, and Indian slaves. In the past two decades American scholars have begun to reinterpret colonial North American Indian history and the…

  20. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet answers briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, teachers, researchers, librarians, government agencies, and the news media. Sections outline the history, responsibilities, educational programs, and housing programs of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA); President Bush's American Indian policy;…

  1. The Occupation of Alcatraz Island: Roots of American Indian Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Troy

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to place in historical perspective the 19-month American Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island, which began in November 1969. Discusses societywide and specifically Native American events leading to occupation; occupation itself and responses by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Nixon Administration; and other Indian activist actions during…

  2. Robert Bennett, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Carroll

    As 1 in a series of 24 American Indian biographies written for youth at the secondary level, this book details the sociocultural and professional development of Robert La Follette Bennett, a Wisconsin Oneida Indian who was born in 1912 and became the second Native American to hold the position of Commissioner of Indian Affairs in the Bureau of…

  3. American Indian identity in mental health services utilization data from a rural midwestern sample.

    PubMed

    Hack, Samantha M; Larrison, Christopher R; Gone, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    The governing bodies for psychiatry, psychology, and social work all publicly support culturally competent mental health care and have called for increased awareness of the importance of racial, ethnic, and cultural identity in mental health treatment and outcomes. However, since 1960 the population of people identifying as American Indian in the United States has grown faster than can be explained by birth rates, raising questions about the personal meaning of identity for newly self-designated American Indians. For this research, interviews were conducted with 14 self-identified American Indian clients receiving rural mental health care services in the Midwest. The goal was to assess clients' cultural connection to their racial identity and to understand what impact their American Indian identity had on their mental health care experiences. A modified Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) method was used to develop the interview protocol and code responses. Interview data revealed that clients primarily based their racial identity on family stories of an American Indian ancestor and the majority did not feel their identification as American Indian was relevant to their mental health care. Regardless of lack of cultural connection, participants often reported feeling personal pride associated with identifying as American Indian. Implications for both researchers collecting self-reported race data and for mental health practitioners who might serve self-identified American Indian clients are discussed. PMID:23834258

  4. Social, Economic and Health Characteristics of Older American Indians (Part 2 of 2). Statistical Reports on Older Americans, June 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Blanch S.

    In 1970 the Indian population of all ages was 763,000; 148,600 were 45 years of age or older and 43,800 were 65 years of age or older. Two-thirds of all older American Indian women and slightly more than one-third of the older men were either single, widowed, or divorced. Half of the older Indians received incomes below $1,408; this was 24% below…

  5. Characteristics of Telemental Health Service Use by American Indian Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Jay H.; Brooks, Elizabeth; Anderson, Heather; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Kaufmann, L. Jeanne; Manson, Spero

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined use by American Indian and Alaska Native veterans of services provided by specialty telemental health clinics focused on posttraumatic stress disorder. These clinics offer services via videoconferencing to address challenges faced by rural veterans in accessing care. Methods A retrospective chart and electronic medical record review was conducted for 85 male veteranswho used services at two rural telemental health clinics in 2006 and 2007. Service use and other characteristics were documented before and after their initial telemental health intake. Results After intake, patients use of any health services (both general medical and mental health services) significantly increased (p<.01), as did the proportion receiving appropriate psychotropic medication (p<.01). Conclusions This first examination of service use by American Indian and Alaska Native veterans at specialty telemental health clinics will help inform research and clinical strategies for improving telemental health for this and other rural populations. PMID:22302338

  6. Children's Books on India and the Indian-American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton Taylor, Gail; Sreenivasan, Jyotsna; Toke, Arun N.

    1998-01-01

    Lists recommended books that focus on Indians and the Indian-American experience in the United States. Includes folktales, myths, legends, nonfiction, fiction and titles published in India. Suggests how to select titles for classroom or library. (MMU)

  7. American Indian Family: Cultural Change and Adaptive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medicine, Bea

    1981-01-01

    Criticizes sociological research and writing on the American Indian family for not acknowledging variety in family characteristics among different nations. Discusses the negative effects of racism on Indian family structure. (GC)

  8. American Indian College Students' Ethnic Identity and Beliefs about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okagaki, Lynn; Helling, Mary Kay; Bingham, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-seven American Indian and 96 European-American undergraduate students responded to questions about their educational and ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their mother's and father's support for education. The American Indian participants completed some additional items regarding their ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their…

  9. Manual for Providing Library Services to Indians and Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.

    The manual was compiled by participants of an institute designed to train librarians to work with American Indians and Mexican Americans. Information is provided to aid library personnel in understanding the cultural backgrounds of these minority groups. Criteria for selecting books for and about Mexican Americans and Indians are included, as well…

  10. Some Elements of American Indian Pedagogy from an Anishinaabe Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Lawrence W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005 the author published an article discussing the teaching method teachers used for an introduction to American Indian studies course at Iowa State University. In his previous piece, the author did not delineate the elements that go into an American Indian pedagogy. In this article, the author discusses some elements of American Indian…

  11. American Indian Studies: Intellectual Navel Gazing or Academic Discipline?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2009-01-01

    The academic field of Native American/American Indian studies (NAS/AIS) has been and largely remains a product of political forces at the national level and now at the tribal level. The very recognition of American Indians as a unique group by the U.S. government is a political statement of survival. In this article, the author revisits the…

  12. The American Indian Perspective in America's History: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Mary Jo Tippeconnic; Nicholas, Sheila E.; Nelson, Claudia E.

    2003-01-01

    Offers annotated list of resources for the study of Native American history. Argues that instructors of American history should supplement their courses with sources that offer a fuller picture of the place of American Indians in that history. Lists 40 books, web sites, and newspapers, and includes a Web site of links to Indian radio stations,…

  13. Report on Indian Education--Task Force Five: Indian Education--Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirbeck, Helen Maynor; And Others

    The report of the Task Force on Indian Education to the American Indian Policy Review Commission delineates the interweaving of past policies and practices with present needs and concerns of Indian education. Reviewing 400 years of Indian education, the report was compiled from federal, state, local, and private records, public hearings,…

  14. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... June 8, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-14131, on page 33318, in the first column, last complete sentence in the... Urban Indian Communities; Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and urban Indian communities. The document contained one...

  15. Access to Specialty Health Care for Rural American Indians in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Hollow, Walter B.; Casey, Susan; Hart, L. Gary; Larson, Eric H.; Moore, Kelly; Lewis, Ervin; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Grossman, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The Indian Health Service (IHS), whose per capita expenditure for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health services is about half that of the US civilian population, is the only source of health care funding for many rural AI/ANs. Specialty services, largely funded through contracts with outside practitioners, may be limited by…

  16. The Chicago American Indian Community, 1893-1988. Annotated Bibliography and Guide to Sources in Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, David

    This annotated bibliography identifies and describes documentary evidence of Chicago's American Indian population since the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. Sources include studies and reports generated by Indian community organizations and agencies, community newsletters, newspapers, oral histories, grant applications, personal papers, and…

  17. Cigarette Smoking Among Urban American Indian Adults - Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota, 2011.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jean; Poupart, John; Rhodes, Kristine; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Lamont, Genelle; D'Silva, Joanne; Erickson, Darin

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, it was estimated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among American Indians was 36.5%, the highest of all racial/ethnic groups in the continental United States (1). Among American Indians, considerable cultural and geographic variation in cigarette smoking exists. Smoking prevalence among American Indians is lowest in the Southwest and highest in the Upper Midwest/Northern Plains (2). Little information is available about tobacco use among urban American Indians, who might not have ever lived on a reservation or be enrolled in or affiliated with a tribe. In Minnesota, a significant proportion of American Indians reside in urban areas. Among Minnesota's residents who identify as American Indian alone or in combination with another race, 30% live in Hennepin County and Ramsey County, which encompass Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively (collectively known as the Twin Cities). The predominant tribes (Ojibwe [Chippewa] and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota [Sioux]) traditionally have used locally grown tobacco (Nicotiana rustica), red willow, and other plants for religious ceremonies, although nonceremonial tobacco is often substituted for traditional plants. To assess prevalence of cigarette smoking among this population, it is important to distinguish ceremonial tobacco use (smoked or used in other ways) from nonceremonial tobacco use. To obtain estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence among American Indians in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, the American Indian Adult Tobacco Survey was administered to 964 American Indian residents in 2011, using respondent-driven sampling. Among all participants, 59% were current smokers, 19% were former smokers, and 22% had never smoked. Approximately 40% of employed participants reported that someone smoked in their workplace area during the preceding week. High prevalences of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among urban American Indians in Minnesota underscores the need for a comprehensive and culturally

  18. Government risk management priorities: a comparison of the preferences of Asian Indian Americans and other Americans.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R; Sinha, Reya

    2006-10-01

    A survey was conducted of approximately 200 Asian Indian Americans and 200 other residents of New Jersey in order to understand the risk management priorities that they want government to have. We found that Asian Indian Americans, especially younger women, focused on personal/family risks, such as alcohol and drug abuse, sexual abuse, and domestic violence. The New Jersey comparison group, in contrast, placed war/terrorism and loss of health care services and insurance at the top of their priorities for government. These results suggest stressful acculturation-related issues within the Asian Indian community. Both populations want more risk management from government than they believe government is currently providing. Respondents who wanted more from government tended to dread the risk, be fearful of the consequences, trust government, and have a feeling of personal efficacy. Within the Asian Indian American sample, wide variations were observed by language spoken at home and religious affiliation. Notably, Muslims and Hindi language speakers tended not to trust government and hence wanted less government involvement. This study supports our call for studies of recent migrant populations and Johnson's for testing ethnic identity and acculturation as factors in risk judgments. PMID:17054531

  19. Predictors of Pain Management among American Indian Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Felicia; Nandy, Karabi; Cadogan, Mary; Itty, Tracy; Warda, Umme; Martinez, Fernando; Quan, Ann

    2016-01-01

    There is little research on cancer symptom management among Indigenous populations. This paper reports on the predictors of cancer pain management among American Indian cancer patients/survivors and their caregivers/family. The intervention was a symptom management toolkit delivered via traditional talking circles vs. standard care (control) at eight randomized reservation and urban clinic sites in the Southwest. Participants (N=184) were American Indian adults diagnosed with cancer and/or caregiver/family members. The primary outcome measure collected via pre-test and post-test questionnaires was the ability to manage cancer pain. Significant differences at post-test were the ability to manage cancer-related pain (p=.02) and a close relationship (p=.0018) that proved significant for intervention participants and was instrumental in fostering their ability to manage pain. The study also showed improvement in the desire and ability to improve cancer pain management among intervention participants. Programs targeting American Indians should use culturally appropriate education to improve management of cancer-related symptoms. PMID:27180700

  20. The Effects of Reading Recovery™ on the American Indian/Non-American Indian Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the attention being paid to the achievement gap of minorities, the regulations and laws being enacted, the research being conducted, and the funding made available to narrow the achievement gap, there is evidence that shows it still exists for American Indians. This study examined the effects of Reading Recovery, an early literacy…

  1. Joining, Leaving, and Staying in the American Indian/Alaska Native Race Category Between 2000 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Carolyn A; Bhaskar, Renuka; Porter, Sonya R

    2016-04-01

    Conceptualizing and operationalizing American Indian populations is challenging. Each census for decades has seen the American Indian population increase substantially more than expected, with indirect and qualitative evidence that this is due to changes in individuals' race responses. We apply uniquely suited (but not nationally representative) linked data from the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses (N = 3.1 million) and the 2006-2010 American Community Survey (N = 188,131) to address three research questions. First, to what extent do American Indian people have different race responses across data sources? We find considerable race response change, especially among multiple-race and/or Hispanic American Indians. Second, how are people who change responses different from or similar to those who do not? We find three sets of American Indians: those who (1) had the same race and Hispanic responses in 2000 and 2010, (2) moved between single-race and multiple-race American Indian responses, and (3) added or dropped the American Indian response, thus joining or leaving the enumerated American Indian population. People in groups (1) and (2) were relatively likely to report a tribe, live in an American Indian area, report American Indian ancestry, and live in the West. Third, how are people who join a group different from or similar to those who leave it? Multivariate models show general similarity between joiners and leavers in group (1) and in group (2). Population turnover is hidden in cross-sectional comparisons; people joining each subpopulation of American Indians are similar in number and characteristics to those who leave it. PMID:26988712

  2. Culture loss: American Indian family disruption, urbanization, and the Indian Child Welfare Act.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Kelly; Puig, Maria Elena; Byers, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and views of urban American Indian parents regarding foster care and American Indian family issues. Findings highlight four themes: (1) discouragement from working with the current foster care system, (2) the role of culture in caregiving, (3) differing definitions of family and relatedness, and (4) the effects of historical pain due to past family disruption. These themes are used to formulate guidelines for the development of an American Indian foster care and child welfare program. PMID:12014471

  3. Indian Sports Nicknames/Logos: Affective Difference between American Indian and Non-Indian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocque, Angela R.; McDonald, J. Douglas; Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Ferraro, F. Richard

    2011-01-01

    The use of American Indian (AI) words and images in athletic teams' nicknames, logos, and mascots remains a controversial issue. This study investigated the emotional impact of the University of North Dakota's "Fighting Sioux" nickname/logo on 33 AI and 36 majority culture (MC) students enrolled at the university. Participants completed the…

  4. American-Indian diabetes mortality in the Great Plains Region 2002–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Allyson; Giroux, Jennifer; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Bob; Wallace, Debra; Bell, Ronny; Morrison, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare American-Indian and Caucasian mortality rates from diabetes among tribal Contract Health Service Delivery Areas (CHSDAs) in the Great Plains Region (GPR) and describe the disparities observed. Research design and methods Mortality data from the National Center for Vital Statistics and Seer*STAT were used to identify diabetes as the underlying cause of death for each decedent in the GPR from 2002 to 2010. Mortality data were abstracted and aggregated for American-Indians and Caucasians for 25 reservation CHSDAs in the GPR. Rate ratios (RR) with 95% CIs were used and SEER*Stat V.8.0.4 software calculated age-adjusted diabetes mortality rates. Results Age-adjusted mortality rates for American-Indians were significantly higher than those for Caucasians during the 8-year period. In the GPR, American-Indians were 3.44 times more likely to die from diabetes than Caucasians. South Dakota had the highest RR (5.47 times that of Caucasians), and Iowa had the lowest RR, (1.1). Reservation CHSDA RR ranged from 1.78 to 10.25. Conclusions American-Indians in the GPR have higher diabetes mortality rates than Caucasians in the GPR. Mortality rates among American-Indians persist despite special programs and initiatives aimed at reducing diabetes in these populations. Effective and immediate efforts are needed to address premature diabetes mortality among American-Indians in the GPR. PMID:25926992

  5. Comprehensive Health Care Program for American Indians & Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    This booklet summarizes programs of the Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS was created in 1954 as part of the Public Health Service when responsibility for American Indian and Alaska Native health care was transferred from the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The goal of…

  6. Oregon American Indian Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Susan

    This state plan presents Oregon's 11 educational goals for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education, which have been revised and detailed by the statewide Indian Education Council. The goals support the policy of the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), the educational philosophy of the AI/AN community, and the Indian Student Bill of…

  7. Economic Development in American Indian Reservations. Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar, Ed.

    A collection of 13 scholarly articles and essays, this book makes available hard-to-find information and theories about American Indian economic development. Part I, "The Land and the People", emphasizes cultural traditions and beliefs of Indian people and traces the development of the concept of sovereignty and its applicability to Indian self…

  8. American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    "American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty" is a study of knowledge and power, as it relates to Indian affairs, in the early republic. It details the interactions, exchanges, and networks through which linguistic and racial ideas were produced and it examines the effect of those ideas on Indian administration. First…

  9. Relocated American Indians in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablon, Joan

    1964-01-01

    American Indians who come to the San Francisco Bay Area choose to associate primarily with other Indians of their own or differing tribes in both informal and formal social interaction. Urbanization of Indians occurs on a large scale because of government relocation programs; however, the background in small rural folk communities creates a…

  10. [Guidance and Counseling of the American Indian College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eddie F.; Fredrick, James

    Problems faced by American Indian college students were described in these 2 guidance and counseling papers. The first paper suggested a plan for a guidance and counseling program. The 3 steps in this plan were a special summer student orientation program for Indians; and "out-reaching" guidance and counseling program where Indian students would…

  11. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  12. A Community Road Ahead: American Indian Leadership 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Norbert S., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This first of a series of essays on Indian leadership focuses on the role of American Indian leaders in community development, including their contributions of technological skills, humanism, and the energy and persistence needed to work toward a vision. Essential to rebuilding Indian communities is understanding how internalized oppression has…

  13. Intellectual Sovereignty and the Struggle for an American Indian Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrior, Robert Allen

    1992-01-01

    Examines works by Deloria, Mathews, Forbes, Allen, and Vizenor concerning how American Indians can face challenges of asserting sovereignty and the place of traditional culture in the struggle. Argues that Indian intellectuals should pursue critical analysis of the dominant society and understanding of the Indian experience in wider contexts. (SV)

  14. The Forgotten Minority: An Analysis of American Indian Employment Patterns in State and Local Governments, 1991-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Valerie H.; Kerr, Brinck; Ketcher, Linda K.; Murphy, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address a gap in the empirical literature by analyzing levels of proportional representation of American Indians over time in state and local government bureaucracies in key states. The authors limit their analysis to six states with the largest percentages of American Indian populations in 2000: Alaska, Arizona,…

  15. American Indian and Alaska Native Children in the 2000 Census. A Kids Count/PRB Report on Census, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    Because of their unique social, legal, and political status, American Indians and Alaska Natives are subject to legislative oversight unlike any other group in the United States. Census data are used to monitor the size and characteristics of the American Indian and Alaska Native population living on and off reservations. Passed in 1978 to ensure…

  16. Mortality from Infectious Diseases among New Mexico's American Indians, Hispanic Whites, and Other Whites, 1958-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines ethnic differences in infectious disease-related mortality in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic White, and other White populations from 1958-87. Findings indicate that for most infectious causes, American Indians had the highest mortality rates, followed by Hispanics. Discusses the influence of cultural beliefs and medical practices.…

  17. Clinical Strategies for American Indian Families in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Horse, John

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a strategy for organizing mental health programs for American Indian families. Suggests four principles for clinical service: (1) spirituality; (2) immersion with families and the community; (3) "picturing," or the articulation of unconscious family behaviors; and (4) "joining," or the reconstitution of the American Indian family system.…

  18. American Indian Studies. Library Research Guide. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This guide to sources for San Diego (California) State University students doing library research on topics related to American Indian Studies begins by noting that information on North American Indians can be found in a variety of subject disciplines including history, anthropology, education, sociology, health care, law, business, and politics.…

  19. American Indian Science & Engineering Society 1994 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Science and Engineering Society, Boulder, CO.

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. AISES educational programs provide opportunities for American Indians and Alaska Natives to pursue studies in science, engineering, and other academic arenas. The trained professionals become…

  20. American Indians of Idaho. Volume 1. Aboriginal Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Deward E., Jr.

    A general survey of the aboriginal American Indian cultures of Idaho is given in this book. Most of the anthropological and historical writing on the native peoples of this region are summarized. It does not deal with contemporary Indian cultures, which will be described in a second volume along with their history of contact with Euro-Americans.…

  1. Using Mental Map Principles to Interpret American Indian Cartography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of maps drawn or significantly influenced by American Indians fosters critical thinking, cultural diversity, and awareness of a much-neglected topic in cartography. Line styles, scale depiction, and the sizing of individual entities are discussed in the context of applying principles from mental maps to American Indian maps and…

  2. The Sky Clears; Poetry of the American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, A. Grove

    More than 200 authentic poems and lyrics of North American Indians are compiled in this anthology. The poetry was translated from tribal languages into English over the past 100 years by students of Indian language, lore, and life. The poems, taken from about 40 North American tribes, include songs of Eskimos of the Arctic coasts, totem-pole…

  3. Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary C.

    This study of the attitudes and status of West Indian immigrants in the United States, based on interviews with 59 West Indian immigrants, 83 adolescent and young adult children of immigrants, 27 African Americans, 25 White Americans, and 6 coworkers of immigrants shows the changes that occur as immigrants confront the realities of U.S. life. West…

  4. Culturally Relevant Training of American Indian Educational Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Plake, Barbara S.

    American Indian participation in educational research suffers from minimal involvement of tribal people in the research effort, the obtrusive role of researchers, controversies over the content of published research, and inadequate preparation of researchers sensitive to American Indian community needs. Existing supplementary training methods to…

  5. Colonial Instillations in American Indian Boarding School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rockey; Colmant, Steven; Dorton, Julie; Schultz, Lahoma; Colmant, Yevette; Ciali, Peter

    2006-01-01

    There is a general knowledge about the United States governments' deliberate attempts to destroy American Indian cultures. History books tell of American Indian students being locked in week long routines to keep them out of mischief, underfed to break down resistance and being given deadening rounds of simple, repetitious chores bereft of…

  6. Suicide, Homicide, and Alcoholism Among American Indians: Guidelines for Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, Calvin J., Comp.; And Others

    Designed to help alleviate some of the health problems among American Indians and Eskimos, this booklet covers suicide, homicide, and alcoholism. It can be used to provide: (1) "how-to" guidelines which describe ways for recognizing, handling, and preventing possible suicides among American Indians; and (2) survey data and literature for use as a…

  7. Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO) Annual Report, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    Presenting an account of the 1975 activities and interests of the Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO is an organization which was initiated in 1970 to serve as both a catalytic and unifying force in the American Indian community), this annual report briefly describes the following: the need for AIO; facts regarding the socioeconomic status of…

  8. Culture and Self in Career Development: Working with American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juntunen, Cindy L.; Cline, Kara

    2010-01-01

    The career development concerns of American Indians continue to receive limited attention in the vocational or career literature. To address this deficit, the current article will apply the cultural formulation approach to career counseling with American Indians. This article presents information on factors related to cultural and self-identity…

  9. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    The brochure, designed to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, community leaders, and individuals with more than 50 programs available to American Indians and Alaska Natives, lists benefits, application procedures, and field contact points for United States Department of Agriculture program agencies. The nine sponsoring agencies…

  10. Protecting Urban American Indian Young People from Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettingell, Sandra L.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Skay, Carol L.; Resnick, Michael D.; Potthoff, Sandra K.; Eichhorn, John

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the likelihood of a past suicide attempt for urban American Indian boys and girls, given salient risk and protective factors. Methods: Survey data from 569 urban American Indian, ages 9-15, in-school youths. Logistic regression determined probabilities of past suicide attempts. Results: For girls, suicidal histories were…