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Sample records for amides acid-labile temperature-responsive

  1. A Simple and Efficient Synthesis of an Acid-labile Polyphosphoramidate by Organobase-catalyzed Ring-Opening Polymerization and Transformation to Polyphosphoester Ionomers by Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiyi; Wang, Hai; Shen, Yuefei; Zhang, Fuwu; Seetho, Kellie; Zou, Jiong; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Dove, Andrew P.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The direct synthesis of an acid-labile polyphosphoramidate by organobase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization and an overall two-step preparation of polyphosphodiester ionomers (PPEI) by acid-assisted cleavage of the phosphoramidate bonds along the backbone of the polyphosphoramidate were developed in this study. The ultrafast organobase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of a cyclic phospholane methoxyethyl amidate monomer initiated by benzyl alcohol allowed for the preparation of well-defined polyphosphoramidates (PPA) with predictable molecular weights, narrow molecular weight distributions (PDI<1.10), and well-defined chain ends. Cleavage of the acid-labile phosphoramidate bonds on the polyphosphoramidate repeat units was evaluated under acidic conditions over a pH range of 1–5, and the complete hydrolysis produced polyphosphodiesters. The thermal properties of the resulting polyphosphoester ionomer acid and polyphosphoester ionomer sodium salt exhibited significant thermal stability. The parent PPA and both forms of the PPEIs showed low cytotoxicities toward HeLa cells and RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells. The synthetic methodology developed here has enriched the family of water-soluble polymers prepared by rapid and convenient organobase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerizations and straightforward chemical medication reactions, which are designed to be hydrolytically degradable and have promise for numerous biomedical and other applications. PMID:23997276

  2. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  3. Acid-Labile Poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-Based Star Gene Vectors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Yu; Hu, Hao; Wang, Xing; Yang, Fei; Shen, Hong; Xu, Fu-Jian; Wu, De-Cheng

    2015-06-10

    It was recently reported that ethanolamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGEA) possesses great potential applications in gene therapy due to its good biocompatibility and high transfection efficiency. Importing responsivity into PGEA vectors would further improve their performances. Herein, a series of responsive star-shaped vectors, acetaled β-cyclodextrin-PGEAs (A-CD-PGEAs) consisting of a β-CD core and five PGEA arms linked by acid-labile acetal groups, were proposed and characterized as therapeutic pDNA vectors. The A-CD-PGEAs owned abundant hydroxyl groups to shield extra positive charges of A-CD-PGEAs/pDNA complexes, and the star structure could decrease charge density. The incorporation of acetal linkers endowed A-CD-PGEAs with pH responsivity and degradation. In weakly acidic endosome, the broken acetal linkers resulted in decomposition of A-CD-PGEAs and morphological transformation of A-CD-PGEAs/pDNA complexes, lowering cytotoxicity and accelerating release of pDNA. In comparison with control CD-PGEAs without acetal linkers, A-CD-PGEAs exhibited significantly better transfection performances. PMID:25993557

  4. Acid-Labile Subunit Deficiency and Growth Failure: Description of Two Novel Cases

    PubMed Central

    David, A; Rose, S.J.; Miraki-Moud, F.; Metherell, L.A.; Savage, M.O.; Clark, A.J.L.; Camacho-Hübner, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the acid-labile subunit (ALS) gene (IGFALS) have been associated with circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) deficiency and short stature. Whether severe pubertal delay is also part of the phenotype remains controversial due to the small number of cases reported. We report 2 children with a history of growth failure due to novel IGFALS mutations. Methods The growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) and IGFALS were analyzed by direct sequencing. Ternary complex formation was studied by size exclusion chromatography. Results Two boys of 13.3 and 10.6 years, with pubertal stages 2 and 1, had mild short stature (−3.2 and −2.8 SDS, respectively) and a biochemical profile suggestive of growth hormone resistance. No defects were identified in the GHR. Patient 1 was homozygous for the IGFALS missense mutation P73L. Patient 2 was a compound heterozygote for the missense mutation L134Q and a novel GGC to AG substitution at position 546–548 (546–548delGGCinsAG). The latter causes a frameshift and the appearance of a premature stop codon. Size exclusion chromatography showed no peaks corresponding to ternary and binary complexes in either patient. Conclusion Screening of the IGFALS is important in children with short stature associated with low serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS. PMID:20389102

  5. Facile synthesis of acid-labile polymers with pendent ortho esters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Ji, Ran; Gao, Shi-Juan; Du, Fu-Sheng; Li, Zi-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a facile approach for preparation of acid-labile and biocompatible polymers with pendent cyclic ortho esters, which is based on the efficient and mild reactions between cyclic ketene acetal (CKA) and hydroxyl groups. Three CKAs, 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxane (EDO), 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxolane (EDL), and 2-ethylidene-4- methyl-1,3-dioxolane (EMD) were prepared from the corresponding cyclic vinyl acetals by catalytic isomerization of the double bond. The reaction of CKAs with different alcohols and diols was examined using trace of p-toluenesulfonic acid as a catalyst. For the monohydroxyl alcohols, cyclic ortho esters were formed by simple addition of the hydroxyl group toward CKAs with ethanol showing a much greater reactivity than iso-propanol. When 1,2- or 1,3-diols were used to react with the CKAs, we observed the isomerized cyclic ortho esters besides the simple addition products. Biocompatible polyols, that is, poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were then modified with CKAs, and the degree of substitution of the pendent ortho esters can be easily tuned by changing feed ratio. Both the small molecule ortho esters and the CKA-modified polymers demonstrate the pH-dependent hydrolysis profiles, which depend also on the chemical structure of the ortho esters as well as the polymer hydrophobicity. PMID:22176024

  6. Acid-Labile Amphiphilic PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO Copolymers: Degradable Poloxamer Analogs.

    PubMed

    Worm, Matthias; Kang, Biao; Dingels, Carsten; Wurm, Frederik R; Frey, Holger

    2016-05-01

    Poly ((ethylene oxide)-b-(propylene oxide)-b-(ethylene oxide)) triblock copolymers commonly known as poloxamers or Pluronics constitute an important class of nonionic, biocompatible surfactants. Here, a method is reported to incorporate two acid-labile acetal moieties in the backbone of poloxamers to generate acid-cleavable nonionic surfactants. Poly(propylene oxide) is functionalized by means of an acetate-protected vinyl ether to introduce acetal units. Three cleavable PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers (Mn,total = 6600, 8000, 9150 g·mol(-1) ; Mn,PEO = 2200, 3600, 4750 g·mol(-1) ) have been synthesized using anionic ring-opening polymerization. The amphiphilic copolymers exhibit narrow molecular weight distributions (Ð = 1.06-1.08). Surface tension measurements reveal surface-active behavior in aqueous solution comparable to established noncleavable poloxamers. Complete hydrolysis of the labile junctions after acidic treatment is verified by size exclusion chromatography. The block copolymers have been employed as surfactants in a miniemulsion polymerization to generate polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with mean diameters of ≈200 nm and narrow size distribution, as determined by dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Acid-triggered precipitation facilitates removal of surfactant fragments from the nanoparticles, which simplifies purification and enables nanoparticle precipitation "on demand." PMID:27000789

  7. Incorporation of Acid-Labile Masking Groups for the Traceless Synthesis of C-Terminal Peptide α-Ketoacids.

    PubMed

    Thuaud, Frédéric; Rohrbacher, Florian; Zwicky, André; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-08-01

    An optimized protocol for the masking of α-ketoacids with acid-labile cyclic acetal protecting groups is reported. Unlike prior approaches, these new conditions allow the synthesis of protected α-ketoacids bearing aromatic, hindered alkyl, and protected polar side chains. Attachment to a Wang-type linker and solid support provides a resin that delivers fully unprotected C-terminal peptide α-ketoacids upon resin cleavage. These peptides are the key starting materials for chemical protein synthesis using the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligation. PMID:27439001

  8. Synthesis of Acid-Labile PEG and PEG-Doxorubicin-Conjugate Nanoparticles via Brush-First ROMP

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A panel of acid-labile bis-norbornene cross-linkers was synthesized and evaluated for the formation of acid-degradable brush-arm star polymers (BASPs) via the brush-first ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) method. An acetal-based cross-linker was identified that, when employed in conjunction with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer, provided highly controlled BASP formation reactions. A combination of this new cross-linker with a novel doxorubicin (DOX)-branch-PEG macromonomer provided BASPs that simultaneously degrade and release cytotoxic DOX in vitro. PMID:25243099

  9. Acid-Labile Thermoresponsive Copolymers That Combine Fast pH-Triggered Hydrolysis and High Stability under Neutral Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qilu; Hou, Zhanyao; Louage, Benoit; Zhou, Dingying; Vanparijs, Nane; De Geest, Bruno G; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Biodegradable polymeric materials are intensively used in biomedical applications. Of particular interest for drug-delivery applications are polymers that are stable at pH 7.4, that is, in the blood stream, but rapidly hydrolyze under acidic conditions, such as those encountered in the endo/lysosome or the tumor microenvironment. However, an increase in the acidic-degradation rate of acid-labile groups goes hand in hand with higher instability of the polymer at pH 7.4 or during storage, thus posing an intrinsic limitation on fast degradation under acidic conditions. Herein, we report that a combination of acid-labile dimethyldioxolane side chains and hydroxyethyl side chains leads to acid-degradable thermoresponsive polymers that are quickly hydrolyzed under slightly acidic conditions but stable at pH 7.4 or during storage. We ascribe these properties to high hydration of the hydroxy-containing collapsed polymer globules in conjunction with autocatalytic acceleration of the hydrolysis reactions by the hydroxy groups. PMID:26212481

  10. Determination of enantiomers by FESI-sweeping with an acid-labile sweeper in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-feng; Zhang, Hui-ge; Qi, Sheng-da; Chen, Hong-li; Chen, Xing-guo

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a facile and highly efficient on-line concentration strategy based on a coupling of field enhanced sample injection (FESI) and sweeping was developed for the determination of trace enantiomers (propranolol, PL) by nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE). In this FESI-sweeping method, the use of a sample of high acidity and low conductivity (pH* = 2.5, 4.0 μS cm(-1)) allowed for a large amount of analyte injection. Then, the concentration of the analytes was carried out by sweeping based on the interaction of an acid-labile anionic selector, di-n-butyl L-tartrate-boric acid complex acid, and cationic analytes. Simultaneously, the concentrated analytes were released and focused at the boundary of the acid sample solution and separation buffer due to the decomposition of the selector in the acid sample solution. Under the optimum conditions, a 21,000-fold sensitivity enhancement upon normal capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was achieved for PL enantiomers. The detection limits of R-propranolol and S-propranolol were 0.26 ng mL(-1) and 0.31 ng mL(-1), respectively. Eventually, the FESI-sweeping method was applied to detect PL enantiomers in plasma, saliva, and urine. PMID:25923176

  11. PEG-detachable and acid-labile cross-linked micelles based on orthoester linked graft copolymer for paclitaxel release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhefan; Huang, Jingyi; Liu, Jing; Cheng, Sixue; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Feng

    2011-08-01

    Polyethylene glycol detachable graft copolymer, mPEG-g-p(NAS-co-BMA), was synthesized by grafting 2-(ω-methoxy)PEGyl-1,3-dioxan-5-ylamine onto poly(N-(acryloyloxy)succinimide-co-butyl methacrylate). Pseudo in situ cross-linking of the mPEG-g-p(NAS-co-BMA) was performed in dimethylformamide phosphate buffer (v/v = 1/1) by an acid-labile diamine cross-linker bearing two symmetrical cyclic orthoesters. The cross-linked (CL) micelles with different contents of mPEG segments represented different morphologies. The CL micelles containing approximately one mPEG segment exhibited 'echini' morphology whereas the CL micelle with approximately three mPEG segments formed nanowires. The hydrolysis rate of the CL micelles is highly pH-dependent and much more rapid at mild acid than physiological conditions. Hydrolyzates of the CL micelles formed vesicles because new amphiphilic copolymers were formed. Paclitaxel (PTX) was successfully loaded into the CL micelles and a controlled and pH-dependent release behavior was observed. No obvious cytotoxicity was found for the CL micelles at concentration as high as 800 mg l - 1.

  12. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs. PMID:26923270

  13. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Darren S.; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A.; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose 13C sodium acetate (13C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of 13CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT®L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps®. Test results demonstrated that DRcaps®coated with EUDRAGIT®L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine. PMID:26160716

  14. Interaction between acid-labile subunit and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Yi; Lee, Dong-Hee

    2002-03-31

    The acid-labile subunit (ALS) associates with the insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-I or II, and the IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in order to form a 150-kD complex in the circulation. This complex may regulate the serum IGFs by restricting them in the vascular system and promoting their endocrine actions. Little is known about how ALS binds to IGFBP3, which connects the IGFs to ALS. Xenopus oocyte was utilized to study the function of ALS in assembling IGFs into the ternary complexes. Xenopus oocyte was shown to correctly translate in vitro transcribed mRNAs of ALS and IGFBP3. IGFBP3 and ALS mRNAs were injected in a mixture, and their products were immunoprecipitated by antisera against ALS and IGFBP3. Contrary to traditional reports that ALS interacts only with IGF-bound IGFBP3, this study shows that ALS is capable of forming a binary complex with IGFBP3 in the absence of IGF. When cross-linked by disuccinimidyl suberate, the band that represents the ALSIGFBP3 complex was evident on the PAGE. IGFBP3 movement was monitored according to the distribution between the hemispheres. Following a localized translation in the vegetal hemisphere, IGFBP3 remained in the vegetal half in the presence of ALS. However, the mutant IGFBP3 freely diffused into the animal half, despite the presence of ALS, which is different from the wild type IGFBP3. This study, therefore, suggests that ALS may play an important role in sequestering IGFBP3 polypeptides via the intermolecular aggregation. Studies using this heterologous model will lead to a better understanding of the IGFBP3 and ALS that assemble into the ternary structure and circulate the IGF system. PMID:12297028

  15. A new structural model of the acid-labile subunit: pathogenetic mechanisms of short stature-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Kelley, Lawrence A; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2012-12-01

    The acid-labile subunit (ALS) is the main regulator of IGF1 and IGF2 bioavailability. ALS deficiency caused by mutations in the ALS (IGFALS) gene often results in mild short stature in adulthood. Little is known about the ALS structure-function relationship. A structural model built in 1999 suggested a doughnut shape, which has never been observed in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily, to which ALS belongs. In this study, we built a new ALS structural model, analysed its glycosylation and charge distribution and studied mechanisms by which missense mutations affect protein structure. We used three structure prediction servers and integrated their results with information derived from ALS experimental studies. The ALS model was built at high confidence using Toll-like receptor protein templates and resembled a horseshoe with an extensively negatively charged concave surface. Enrichment in prolines and disulphide bonds was found at the ALS N- and C-termini. Moreover, seven N-glycosylation sites were identified and mapped. ALS mutations were predicted to affect protein structure by causing loss of hydrophobic interactions (p.Leu134Gln), alteration of the amino acid backbone (p.Leu241Pro, p.Leu172Phe and p.Leu244Phe), loss of disulphide bridges (p.Cys60Ser and p.Cys540Arg), change in structural constrains (p.Pro73Leu), creation of novel glycosylation sites (p.Asp440Asn) or alteration of LRRs (p.Asn276Ser). In conclusion, our ALS structural model was identified as a highly confident prediction by three independent methods and disagrees with the previously published ALS model. The new model allowed us to analyse the ALS core and its caps and to interpret the potential structural effects of ALS mutations. PMID:22991227

  16. Temperature responsive transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A temperature responsive transmitter is provided in which frequency varies linearly with temperature. The transmitter includes two identically biased transistors connected in parallel. A capacitor, which reflects into the common bases to generate negative resistance effectively in parallel with the capacitor, is connected to the common emitters. A crystal is effectively in parallel with the capacitor and the negative resistance. Oscillations occur if the magnitude of the absolute value of the negative resistance is less than the positive resistive impedance of the capacitor and the inductance of the crystal. The crystal has a large linear temperature coefficient and a resonant frequency which is substantially less than the gain-bandwidth product of the transistors to ensure that the crystal primarily determines the frequency of oscillation. A high-Q tank circuit having an inductor and a capacitor is connected to the common collectors to increase the collector current flow which in turn enhances the radiation of the oscillator frequency by the inductor.

  17. Acid-labile pHPMA modification of four-arm oligoaminoamide pDNA polyplexes balances shielding and gene transfer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Linda; Kostka, Libor; Kessel, Eva; Krhac Levacic, Ana; Kostkova, Hana; Etrych, Tomas; Lächelt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-08-01

    We report novel pH-reversibly surface-shielded polyplexes with enhanced gene transfer activity upon systemic administration. A four-arm-structured sequence-defined cationic oligomer KK[HK[(H-Sph-K)3HC]2]2 was designed and synthesized on solid-phase, containing additional lysine residues not only for improved pDNA polyplex stability, but also providing attachment points for subsequent polyplex functionalization with amine-reactive shielding polymers. Herein, the surface of polyplexes was shielded with hydrophilic polymers, monovalent PEG or monovalent and multivalent pHPMA, optionally attached to the polyplex via the acid-labile linker AzMMMan. Overall, surface modification with PEG or pHPMA resulted in a decrease in the zeta potential of polyplexes, consistent with the degree of surface shielding. At pH 6.0, only polyplexes modified via the acid-labile linkage showed an increase in zeta potential, consistent with a "deshielding" in acidic environment, expected as beneficial for endosomal escape. Shielding was more efficient for multivalent pHPMA (20kDa, 30kDa) as compared to monovalent pHPMA (10kDa, 20kDa, 30kDa) or PEG (5kDa). In vitro transfection studies revealed higher gene expression by the polyplexes with the acid-labile shield as compared to their irreversibly shielded counterparts. Intravenous administration of AzMMMan-pHPMA modified polyplexes in an in vivo tumor mouse model mediated enhanced gene expression in the subcutaneous tumor and reduced undesirable expression in the liver. PMID:27235729

  18. Combination of acid labile detergent and C18 Empore™ disks for improved identification and sequence coverage of in-gel digested proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Henning; Lau, Benjamin; Clerens, Stefan; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Dyer, Jolon M; Ramli, Umi Salamah; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2011-04-01

    A protocol for improved extraction of peptides from in-gel protein digests, using a combination of the acid labile surfactant, sodium deoxycholate (SDC) and C18 Empore™ membranes, is presented. This approach results in better mass spectrum quality, higher numbers of identified peptide peaks and improved identification scores compared to standard tryptic digestion protocols, or protocols using only SDC or only C18 Empore™ disks. The advantages of the new protocol are demonstrated for two different types of samples: Merino wool intermediate filament proteins and Elaeis guineensis (oil palm) mesocarp proteins. PMID:21327873

  19. Block Copolymer Micelles with Acid-labile Ortho Ester Side-chains: Synthesis, Characterization, and Enhanced Drug Delivery to Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Ji, Weihang; Panus, David; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Wang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    A new type of block copolymer micelles for pH-triggered delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs has been synthesized and characterized. The micelles were formed by the self-assembly of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer consisting of a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) block and a hydrophobic polymethacrylate block (PEYM) bearing acid-labile ortho ester side-chains. The diblock copolymer was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from a PEG macro-initiator to obtain well-defined polymer chain-length. The PEG-b-PEYM micelles assumed a stable core-shell structure in aqueous buffer at physiological pH with a low critical micelle concentration as determined by proton NMR and pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy. The hydrolysis of the ortho ester side-chain at physiological pH was minimal yet much accelerated at mildly acidic pHs. Doxorubicin (Dox) was successfully loaded into the micelles at pH 7.4 and was released at much higher rate in response to slight acidification to pH 5. Interestingly, the release of Dox at pH 5 followed apparently a biphasic profile, consisting of an initial fast phase of several hours followed by a sustained release period of several days. Dox loaded in the micelles was rapidly taken up by human glioma (T98G) cells in vitro, accumulating in the endolysosome and subsequently in the nucleus in a few hours, in contrast to the very low uptake of free drug at the same dose. The dose-dependent cytotoxicity of the Dox-loaded micelles was determined by the MTT assay and compared with that of the free Dox. While the empty micelles themselves were not toxic, the IC50 values of the Dox-loaded micelles were approximately ten-times (by 24 hours) and three-times (by 48 hours) lower than the free drug. The much enhanced potency in killing the multi-drug-resistant human glioma cells by Dox loaded in the micelles could be attributed to high intracellular drug concentration and the subsequent pH-triggered drug release. These

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a PAMAM-OH derivative containing an acid-labile β-thiopropionate bond for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Qing; Wang, Kuanglei; Zhu, Jia; Li, Weinan; Li, Wenpan; Qiu, Lipeng; Guan, Guannan; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Hu, Haiyang; Chen, Dawei

    2016-07-25

    The present report describes the synthesis of a hydroxyl terminal PAMAM dendrimer (PAMAM-OH) derivative (PAMSPF). The hydroxyls of PAMAM-OH were attached to S-Methyl-l-cysteine (SMLC) via an acid-labile ester bond, named as β-thiopropionate bond, followed by modification with folic acid (FA) through a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. The degrees of attachment of SMLC and FA to the PAMAM-OH backbone were 83.9% and 12.8%, respectively. PAMSPF could condense DNA to form spherical nanoparticles with particle sizes of ∼200nm and remain stable in the presence of heparin and nuclease. The β-thiopropionate bond in PAMSPF was hydrolyzed completely and the DNA release rate was 95.8±3.3% after incubation under mildly acidic conditions at 37°C for 3h. PAMSPF/DNA was less cytotoxic to KB and HepG2 cells and exhibited a higher gene transfection efficiency than native PAMAM/DNA. The uptake assays showed that PAMSPF/DNA entered KB cells within 0.5h through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and escaped from endosomes within 2h. In addition, PAMSPF/DNA displayed long circulation time along with excellent targeting of tumor sites in vivo. These findings demonstrate that PAMSPF is an excellent carrier for safe and effective gene delivery. PMID:27260132

  1. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ) and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ) were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus −27.3±0.3 mV, respectively) and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm2), whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm2). Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%–95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days. PMID:26124659

  2. Acid-labile protein-adducted heterocyclic aromatic amines in human blood are not viable biomarkers of dietary exposure: A systematic study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kevin M; Brennan, Sarah F; Woodside, Jayne V; Cantwell, Marie; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Mooney, Mark; Elliott, Christopher T; Cuskelly, Geraldine J

    2016-05-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) are carcinogenic mutagens formed during cooking of protein-rich foods. HCA residues adducted to blood proteins have been postulated as biomarkers of HCA exposure. However, the viability of quantifying HCAs following hydrolytic release from adducts in vivo and correlation with dietary intake are unproven. To definitively assess the potential of labile HCA-protein adducts as biomarkers, a highly sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method was validated for four major HCAs: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx) and 2-amino-3,7,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (7,8-DiMeIQx). Limits of detection were 1-5 pg/ml plasma and recoveries 91-115%. Efficacy of hydrolysis was demonstrated by HCA-protein adducts synthesised in vitro. Plasma and 7-day food diaries were collected from 122 fasting adults consuming their habitual diets. Estimated HCA intakes ranged from 0 to 2.5 mg/day. An extensive range of hydrolysis conditions was examined for release of adducted HCAs in plasma. HCA was detected in only one sample (PhIP, 9.7 pg/ml), demonstrating conclusively for the first time that acid-labile HCA adducts do not reflect dietary HCA intake and are present at such low concentrations that they are not feasible biomarkers of exposure. Identification of biomarkers remains important. The search should concentrate on stabilised HCA-peptide markers and use of untargeted proteomic and metabolomic approaches. PMID:26993956

  3. Monoclonal anti-acid-labile subunit oligopeptide antibodies and their use in a two-site immunoassay for ALS measurement in humans.

    PubMed

    Stadler, S; Wu, Z; Dressendörfer, R A; Morrison, K M; Khare, A; Lee, P D; Strasburger, C J

    2001-06-01

    Quantification of the acid-labile subunit (ALS) has to date been restricted to immunoassays utilizing polyclonal antibodies. By immunization with N-terminal and C-terminal specific ALS oligopeptides, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target ALS-specific sequences outside the nonspecific leucine-rich repeats in the ALS molecule. For mAb selection, a special screening method was developed. Monoclonal antibody 5C9, which targets the N-terminus of ALS, is immobilized and the anti-ALS mAb 7H3, directed against the C-terminus, is biotinylated and used as tracer Ab. Due to the extreme pH-lability of ALS, changes in immunorecognition of ALS were investigated after acidification for protein unfolding in different pH ranges and in a time-dependent manner. It was determined that acidification of the serum samples to pH 2.7 for 30 min, followed by neutralization and dilution to 1:100 was the optimal acid-neutralization method. For standardization purposes, a serum pool derived from healthy volunteers was assigned the value 1 U/ml ALS. The sandwich assay has a working range with a linear dose-response curve in a log/log system between 0.005 and 10 U/ml. ALS levels in seven acromegalic patients ranged from 2.0 to 4.2 U/ml, and in 12 untreated growth hormone deficient patients from 0.036 to 0.986 U/ml (mean=0.45 U/ml). After 12 months of growth hormone therapy, ALS levels increased significantly to 1.18+/-0.45 U/ml (mean+/-SD; p<0.0006). The increase ranged from 0.48 to 1.4 U/ml. The change in ALS with growth hormone (GH) therapy correlated closer with the change in IGF-I (r=0.798, p=0.0057; Spearman rank correlation) than with the change in insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3; r=0.549, p=0.057). This specific sandwich assay for the measurement of ALS provides a potentially valuable indicator of growth hormone secretory status. With this mAb-based immunofluorometric assay, the nonspecific detection of other proteins containing leucine-rich repeat

  4. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polyphosphoester-graft-paclitaxel Conjugates with Acid-labile Linkages as a pH-Sensitive and Functional Nanoscopic Platform for Paclitaxel Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jiong; Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Pollack, Stephanie F.; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Fan, Jingwei; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest to develop new types of stimuli-responsive drug delivery vehicles with high drug loading and controlled release properties for chemotherapeutics. An acid-labile, polyphosphoester-based degradable, polymeric paclitaxel (PTX) conjugate containing ultra-high levels of PTX loading has been improved significantly, in this second generation development, which involves connection of each PTX molecule to the polymer backbone via a pH-sensitive β-thiopropionate linkage. The results for this system indicate that it has great potential as an effective anti-cancer agent. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polyphosphoester-graft-PTX drug conjugate (PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2) was synthesized by organocatalyst-promoted ring-opening polymerization of 2-(but-3-en-1-yloxy)-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane-2-oxide from a PEO macroinitiator, followed by thermo-promoted thiolene click conjugation of a thiol-functionalized PTX prodrug to the pendant alkene groups of the block copolymer. The PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 formed well-defined nanoparticles in aqueous solution, by direct dissolution into water, with a number-averaged hydrodynamic diameter of 114 ± 31 nm. The conjugate had PTX loading capacity as high as 53 wt%, and a maximum PTX concentration of 0.68 mg/mL in water (vs. 1.7 μg/mL for free PTX). Although the PTX concentration is ca. 10× less than for our first generation material, its accelerated release allowed for similar free PTX concentrations vs. time. The PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 exhibited accelerated drug release under acidic conditions (~50 wt% PTX released in 8 d) compared to neutral conditions (~20 wt% PTX released in 8 d) and compared to the first generation analog that contained ester linkages between PTX and the polymer backbone (<5 wt% PTX released in 4 d), due to their acid-sensitive hydrolytically-labile β-thiopropionate linkages between PTX molecules and the polymer backbone. The positive cell-killing activity of PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 against two cancer cell

  5. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  6. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  7. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  8. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  9. Amide coordination effects in organolithiums

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, S.M.; Ritchie, J.P. )

    1989-04-26

    Organolithiums containing the amide group are examined by ab initio molecular orbital calculations with the 3-21G basis set. Amide coordination with the metal cation results in a large thermodynamic stabilization of the ion pair. Basis set superposition errors at 3-21G are estimated to favor the complex by 10-15 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}; nevertheless, qualitative trends at this level are believed to be reliable. The calculations stabilization energy due to the amide drops off depending upon whether lithiation occurs {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma} to the amide - provided the cation is accessible to the amide oxygen. Without correction for basis set superposition error, stabilization energies at 3-21G (in kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are 45 in acetamide, 40 in benzamide, and 38 in syn-bicyclo(1.1.1)-pentane-2-carboxamide. Amide coordination effects in lithiocubanes are also estimated and found to be large. Thus, thermodynamics plays an important role in amide-assisted metalations. In addition, formation of an acetamide-methyllithium complex is found to be 37.5 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} exothermic relative to separated molecules, suggesting that formation of this complex lies along the metalation reaction pathways. This complexation facilitates the reaction kinetically. Analysis of electron density distributions and electrostatic potentials shows that the carbanion-lithium and the amide-lithium interactions are primarily closed-shell ones, being essentially ionic bonds.

  10. The Temperature Response of EUV Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Gallagher, P.

    2009-05-01

    The temperature response of an EUV imager provides the user with the temperature range over which the instrument or passband is sensitive. These response curves appear to be highly peaked, implying a narrow range of temperature sensitivity. However, in the past, these response functions have been calculated using quiet sun spectra or constant density, assumptions which are relevant only in specific circumstances. The multithermal response of the EUV imagers - TRACE, SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP and SDO/AIA were investigated. It was found that a highly peaked response curve is only appropriate when looking at cooler material. However, studying higher temperature emission from e.g. active regions and flares produces a very broad, almost flat response between 105 and 107 K for all instruments. CLR is supported by an SPD studentship and the ESA/Prodex grant administered by Enterprise Ireland.

  11. The temperature response of fungal enzyme kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, M.; Lu, Y.; Taylor, J.; Allison, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes produced and excreted by microbes mediate the decomposition of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) -containing compounds in their environment. Climate change has the potential to alter the rate of decomposition especially in high latitude regions where stocks of recalcitrant, or long-lived, C are abundant. This project compares extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across ten fungi strains within the model family Neurospora in order to assess the range of variation in temperature sensitivities of fungal enzyme Vmax and Km. Vmax values of most enzymes tested increased exponentially,which was hypothesized and consistant with thermodynamic principles. We also hypothesized that Neurospora strains would exhibit different EEA temperature sensitivities based on their native climate. We observed strain-dependent variation in enzyme temperature responses consistent with strain-specific adaptation to local conditions. Since fungi are the major decomposers of organic carbon in high-latitude ecosystems, an increase in EEA in-situ would result in higher carbon dioxide emissions. These findings suggest a shift in fungal processing of soil organic carbon and nutrients in response to changing climate.

  12. Diaminopimelic Acid Amidation in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Levefaudes, Marjorie; Patin, Delphine; de Sousa-d'Auria, Célia; Chami, Mohamed; Blanot, Didier; Hervé, Mireille; Arthur, Michel; Houssin, Christine; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    A gene named ltsA was earlier identified in Rhodococcus and Corynebacterium species while screening for mutations leading to increased cell susceptibility to lysozyme. The encoded protein belonged to a huge family of glutamine amidotransferases whose members catalyze amide nitrogen transfer from glutamine to various specific acceptor substrates. We here describe detailed physiological and biochemical investigations demonstrating the specific role of LtsA protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum (LtsACg) in the modification by amidation of cell wall peptidoglycan diaminopimelic acid (DAP) residues. A morphologically altered but viable ΔltsA mutant was generated, which displays a high susceptibility to lysozyme and β-lactam antibiotics. Analysis of its peptidoglycan structure revealed a total loss of DAP amidation, a modification that was found in 80% of DAP residues in the wild-type polymer. The cell peptidoglycan content and cross-linking were otherwise not modified in the mutant. Heterologous expression of LtsACg in Escherichia coli yielded a massive and toxic incorporation of amidated DAP into the peptidoglycan that ultimately led to cell lysis. In vitro assays confirmed the amidotransferase activity of LtsACg and showed that this enzyme used the peptidoglycan lipid intermediates I and II but not, or only marginally, the UDP-MurNAc pentapeptide nucleotide precursor as acceptor substrates. As is generally the case for glutamine amidotransferases, either glutamine or NH4+ could serve as the donor substrate for LtsACg. The enzyme did not amidate tripeptide- and tetrapeptide-truncated versions of lipid I, indicating a strict specificity for a pentapeptide chain length. PMID:25847251

  13. Temperature response of bundle-sheath conductance in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; van der Putten, Peter E L; Driever, Steven M; Struik, Paul C

    2016-04-01

    A small bundle-sheath conductance (g bs) is essential for the C4 CO2-concentrating mechanism to suppress photorespiration effectively. To predict the productivity of C4 crops accurately under global warming, it is necessary to examine whether and how g bs responds to temperature. We investigated the temperature response of g bs in maize by fitting a C4 photosynthesis model to combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of irradiance and CO2 response curves at 21% and 2% O2 within the range of 13.5-39 °C. The analysis was based on reported kinetic constants of C4 Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and temperature responses of C3 mesophyll conductance (g m). The estimates of g bs varied greatly with leaf temperature. The temperature response of g bs was well described by the peaked Arrhenius equation, with the optimum temperature being ~34 °C. The assumed temperature responses of g m had only a slight impact on the temperature response of g bs In contrast, using extreme values of some enzyme kinetic constants changed the shape of the response, from the peaked optimum response to the non-peaked Arrhenius pattern. Further studies are needed to confirm such an Arrhenius response pattern from independent measurement techniques and to assess whether it is common across C4 species. PMID:26969744

  14. Temperature response of bundle-sheath conductance in maize leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xinyou; van der Putten, Peter E.L.; Driever, Steven M.; Struik, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    A small bundle-sheath conductance (g bs) is essential for the C4 CO2-concentrating mechanism to suppress photorespiration effectively. To predict the productivity of C4 crops accurately under global warming, it is necessary to examine whether and how g bs responds to temperature. We investigated the temperature response of g bs in maize by fitting a C4 photosynthesis model to combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of irradiance and CO2 response curves at 21% and 2% O2 within the range of 13.5–39 °C. The analysis was based on reported kinetic constants of C4 Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and temperature responses of C3 mesophyll conductance (g m). The estimates of g bs varied greatly with leaf temperature. The temperature response of g bs was well described by the peaked Arrhenius equation, with the optimum temperature being ~34 °C. The assumed temperature responses of g m had only a slight impact on the temperature response of g bs. In contrast, using extreme values of some enzyme kinetic constants changed the shape of the response, from the peaked optimum response to the non-peaked Arrhenius pattern. Further studies are needed to confirm such an Arrhenius response pattern from independent measurement techniques and to assess whether it is common across C4 species. PMID:26969744

  15. Characterization of fatty amides produced by lipase-catalyzed amidation of multihydroxylated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel multi-hydroxylated primary fatty amides produced by direct amidation of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (DOD) and 7,10,12-trihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (TOD) were characterized by GC-MS and NMR. The amidation reactions were catalyzed by immobilized Pseudozyma (Candida) antarctica li...

  16. Balanced excitation and inhibition in temperature responses to meth

    PubMed Central

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2014-01-01

    Fatal hyperthermia after administration of various amphetamines is well-known clinical phenomenon, however, there is no consistent theory explaining its etiology and/or pathogenesis. Dose-dependence of temperature responses to methamphetamine is intricate. Recently, using mathematical modeling it was suggested that delicate interplay of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms underlies this complexity.

  17. Temperature responses of exercizing dogs to infusion of electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Brzezinska, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of infusions with solutions of various ionic and osmotic composition on exercise temperature responses was studied in dogs who do not regulate their temperature by sweating. The results suggest an association between plasma Na+ and Ca++ level within the normal physiological range and the control of body temperature during exercise.

  18. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  19. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    PubMed

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. PMID:27237055

  20. Quantum entanglement between amide-I and amide-site in Davydov-Scott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly derive non-Markovian operator Langevin equations of the Davydov monomer in its environment. Next, we replace the equations with the c-number quantum general Langevin equations (QGLEs) by calculating statistical and quantum averages of the operator Langevin equations. Then, by using the c-number QGLEs we investigate the evolutions of the subsystems amide-I and amide-site. The evolution of a parameter θ describing quantum entanglement of the coupling subsystems with continuous variable Hamiltonian has also been investigated. It is shown that there is certain entanglement between the amide-I and amide-site in the Davydov-Scott monomer.

  1. Electronic structure of lithium amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, N.; Takeda, Y.; Saitoh, Y.; Yamagami, H.; Tsubota, M.; Paik, B.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Muro, T.; Kato, Y.; Kinoshita, T.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the insulator lithium amide (LiNH2), which is a lightweight complex hydride being considered as a high-capacity hydrogen storage material, is investigated by N 1s soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XES and XAS spectra show a band gap between the valence and conduction bands. The valence band in the XES spectrum consists of three peaks, which extend up to ~-8 eV from the valence band top. The band calculation within the local-density approximation (LDA) for LiNH2shows energetically separated three peaks in the occupied N 2p partial density of states (pDOS) and the band gap. The energy distribution of three peaks in the XES spectrum agrees with that in the calculated pDOS except for the peak at the highest binding energy, which is attributed to the strongly hybridized state between N 2p and H 1s. The XES experiment has clarified that the strongly hybridized state with H 1s in LiNH2is located at binding energy higher than that of the LDA calculation, while the overall feature of the electronic structure of LiNH2experimentally obtained by XES and XAS is consistent with the calculated result.

  2. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins.

    PubMed

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-08-18

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N-H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N-H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  3. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  4. Temperature responsive behavior of polymer brush/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites.

    PubMed

    Micciulla, Samantha; Soltwedel, Olaf; Löhmann, Oliver; von Klitzing, Regine

    2016-01-28

    The complex interaction of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) physisorbed onto end-grafted polymer brushes with focus on the temperature-responsive behavior of the system is addressed in this work. The investigated brush/multilayer composite consists of a poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PSS/PDADMAC) multilayer deposited onto the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) P(NIPAM-b-DMAEMA) brush. Ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry were used to monitor the brush collapse with the thickness decrease as a function of temperature and the change in the monomer distribution perpendicular to the substrate at temperatures below, across and above the phase transition, respectively. It was found that the adsorption of PEMs onto polymer brushes had a hydrophobization effect on PDMAEMA, inducing the shift of its phase transition to lower temperatures, but without suppressing its temperature-responsiveness. Moreover, the diffusion of the free polyelectrolyte chains inside the charged brush was proved by comparing the neutron scattering length density profile of pure and the corresponding PEM-capped brushes, eased by the enhanced contrast between hydrogenated brushes and deuterated PSS chains. The results presented herein demonstrate the possibility of combining a temperature-responsive brush with polyelectrolyte multilayers without quenching the responsive behavior, even though significant interpolyelectrolyte interactions are present. This is of importance for the design of multicompartment coatings, where the brush can be used as a reservoir for the controlled release of substances and the multilayer on the top as a membrane to control the diffusion in/out by applying different stimuli. PMID:26612742

  5. Assessment of Tank 241-C-106 temperature response indications

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents an assessment of waste tank 241-C-106 temperature response indications. The results are obtained through evaluation of historical data for FIC surface level data and temperature indication data from thermocouples in risers 8 and 14, contained in the SACS and TMACS databases. Computer analysis is used to augment observations and conclusions about hypothesized mechanisms present in the tank that could explain the data observations. From the historical temperature indications of risers 8 and 14 (neglecting the ventilation outages), several general observational conclusions are drawn that support hypotheses explaining more recently observed behavior.

  6. Convergent synthesis of digitally-encoded poly(alkoxyamine amide)s.

    PubMed

    Roy, Raj Kumar; Laure, Chloé; Fischer-Krauser, Diane; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Binary-encoded poly(alkoxyamine amide)s were prepared by oligomer ligation. These polymers contain digital sequences based on two monomers defined as 0 and 1 bits. A library of oligomers containing all possible dyads 00, 01, 10 and 11 was prepared and used to construct long coded sequences. PMID:26359908

  7. Salt forms of the pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Buist, Amanda R; Kennedy, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is well known as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient used in the study of polymorphism and the generation and comparison of cocrystal forms. The pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine (DCBZ) is a less well known material and is largely of interest here as a structural congener of CBZ. Reaction of DCBZ with strong acids results in protonation of the amide functionality at the O atom and gives the salt forms dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)}, dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)·H2O} and dihydrocarbamazepine hydrobromide monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium bromide monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Br(-)·H2O}. The anhydrous hydrochloride has a structure with two crystallographically independent ion pairs (Z' = 2), wherein both cations adopt syn conformations, whilst the two hydrated species are mutually isostructural and have cations with anti conformations. Compared to neutral dihydrocarbamazepine structures, protonation of the amide group is shown to cause changes to both the molecular (C=O bond lengthening and C-N bond shortening) and the supramolecular structures. The amide-to-amide and dimeric hydrogen-bonding motifs seen for neutral polymorphs and cocrystalline species are replaced here by one-dimensional polymeric constructs with no direct amide-to-amide bonds. The structures are also compared with, and shown to be closely related to, those of the salt forms of the structurally similar pharmaceutical carbamazepine. PMID:26846502

  8. Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Mak, W.C.; Olesen, K.; Sivlér, P.; Lee, C.J.; Moreno-Jimenez, I.; Edin, J.; Courtman, D.; Skog, M.; Griffith, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line—human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation. PMID:26096147

  9. Temperature-Responsive Gene Silencing by a Smart Polymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular siRNA release is a crucial step in efficient gene silencing mediated by cationic polymers. Here, we show an example of temperature change-induced intracellular siRNA release and silencing using a temperature-responsive polymer consisting of dendrimer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and phenylboronic acid. The smart polymer can trigger the release of loaded siRNA in a controlled manner upon cooling the surrounding solution below its lower critical solution temperature. Gene silencing efficacy of the polymer was significantly increased by cool treatment after its cellular uptake. The polymer and the cool treatment cause minimal toxicity to the transfected cells. The results provide a facile and promising strategy to design stimuli-responsive polymers for efficient gene silencing. PMID:26783999

  10. Polyimides Containing Amide And Perfluoroisopropyl Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezem, James F.

    1993-01-01

    New polyimides synthesized from reactions of aromatic hexafluoroisopropyl dianhydrides with asymmetric amide diamines. Soluble to extent of at least 10 percent by weight at temperature of about 25 degrees C in common amide solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Polyimides form tough, flexible films, coatings, and moldings. Glass-transition temperatures ranged from 300 to 365 degrees C, and crystalline melting temperatures observed between 543 and 603 degrees C. Display excellent physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Useful as adhesives, laminating resins, fibers, coatings for electrical and decorative purposes, films, wire enamels, and molding compounds.

  11. Friedel-Crafts Acylation with Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erum K.; DeSchepper, Daniel J.; Nilsson Lill, Sten O.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acylation has been known since the 1870s and it is an important organic synthetic reaction leading to aromatic ketone products. Friedel-Crafts acylation is usually done with carboxylic acid chlorides or anhydrides while amides are generally not useful substrates in these reactions. Despite being the least reactive carboxylic acid derivative, we have found a series of amides capable of providing aromatic ketones in good yields (55–96%, 17 examples). We propose a mechanism involving diminished C-N resonance through superelectrophilic activation and subsequent cleavage to acyl cations. PMID:22690740

  12. Humidity and temperature response of photopolymer-based holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulchyk, Tatsiana; Walshe, James; Cody, Dervil; Martin, Suzanne; Naydenova, Izabela

    2015-05-01

    Holographic sensors have significant potential in various applications ranging from in vitro diagnostics to optical security. They are capable of providing fast, real-time, reversible or irreversible, visual colorimetric or optical readouts. The main challenge in the development of holographic sensors is to improve their selectivity by functionalizing the holographic recording material and achieve a response to a specific analyte. This material should be permeable to the analyte and its properties should change under exposure to the analyte. This work explores the humidity and temperature response of volume phase gratings recorded in photopolymers containing acrylamide and diacetone acrylamide as monomers, and triethanolamine and N-phenylglycine as photoinitiators. Characterization of the humidity response of photopolymer-based gratings in the relative humidity (RH) range of 20-90 % was carried out by measuring the diffraction efficiency of slanted transmission gratings and the position of the maximum intensity in the spectral response of reflection gratings. A strong humidity dependence of the diffraction efficiency of diacetone acrylamide-based transmission gratings was observed at RH=20-90%. The humidity dependence of the spectral response of the reflection gratings showed that photopolymers containing triethanolamine are more hydrophilic than photopolymers containing N-phenylglycine. The temperature response of slanted transmission gratings was investigated in the temperature (T) range of 20-60 °C. Exposure of the photopolymer layers containing triethanolamine to elevated temperature showed that the observed Bragg angle shift was caused by layer shrinkage due to water evaporation. The application of a sealing technique allowed for the observation of the photopolymer layer swelling due to the layer's thermal expansion. The results demonstrate an effective approach to obtaining photopolymer-based gratings with tuneable temperature and humidity sensitivity.

  13. Enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy amides via Umpolung amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leighty, Matthew W; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-09-19

    α-Oxy amides are prepared through enantioselective synthesis using a sequence beginning with a Henry addition of bromonitromethane to aldehydes and finishing with Umpolung Amide Synthesis (UmAS). Key to high enantioselection is the finding that ortho-iodo benzoic acid salts of the chiral copper(II) bis(oxazoline) catalyst deliver both diastereomers of the Henry adduct with high enantiomeric excess, homochiral at the oxygen-bearing carbon. Overall, this approach to α-oxy amides provides an innovative complement to alternatives that focus almost entirely on the enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy carboxylic acids. PMID:22967461

  14. PLANT FATTY ACID (ETHANOL) AMIDE HYDROLASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays a central role in modulating endogenous N-acylethanolamine (NAE) levels in vertebrates, and, in part, constitutes an “endocannabinoid” signaling pathway that regulates diverse physiological and behavioral processes in animals. Recently, an Arabidopsis FAAH hom...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  17. Amide bond formation through iron-catalyzed oxidative amidation of tertiary amines with anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanming; Ma, Lina; Jia, Fan; Li, Zhiping

    2013-06-01

    A general and efficient method for amide bond synthesis has been developed. The method allows for synthesis of tertiary amides from readily available tertiary amines and anhydrides in the presence of FeCl2 as catalyst and tert-butyl hydroperoxide in water (T-Hydro) as oxidant. Mechanistic studies indicated that the in situ-generated α-amino peroxide of tertiary amine and iminium ion act as key intermediates in this oxidative transformation. PMID:23668222

  18. Rubisco Catalytic Properties and Temperature Response in Crops.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Kapralov, Maxim V; Galmés, Jeroni

    2016-08-01

    Rubisco catalytic traits and their thermal dependence are two major factors limiting the CO2 assimilation potential of plants. In this study, we present the profile of Rubisco kinetics for 20 crop species at three different temperatures. The results largely confirmed the existence of significant variation in the Rubisco kinetics among species. Although some of the species tended to present Rubisco with higher thermal sensitivity (e.g. Oryza sativa) than others (e.g. Lactuca sativa), interspecific differences depended on the kinetic parameter. Comparing the temperature response of the different kinetic parameters, the Rubisco Km for CO2 presented higher energy of activation than the maximum carboxylation rate and the CO2 compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration. The analysis of the Rubisco large subunit sequence revealed the existence of some sites under adaptive evolution in branches with specific kinetic traits. Because Rubisco kinetics and their temperature dependency were species specific, they largely affected the assimilation potential of Rubisco from the different crops, especially under those conditions (i.e. low CO2 availability at the site of carboxylation and high temperature) inducing Rubisco-limited photosynthesis. As an example, at 25°C, Rubisco from Hordeum vulgare and Glycine max presented, respectively, the highest and lowest potential for CO2 assimilation at both high and low chloroplastic CO2 concentrations. In our opinion, this information is relevant to improve photosynthesis models and should be considered in future attempts to design more efficient Rubiscos. PMID:27329223

  19. Global Patterns in Leaf Respiration and its Temperature Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heskel, M.; Atkin, O. K.; O'Sullivan, O. S.; Reich, P. B.; Tjoelker, M. G.; Weerasinghe, L. K.; Penillard, A.; Egerton, J. J. G.; Creek, D.; Bloomfield, K. J.; Xiang, J.; Sinca, F.; Stangl, Z.; Martinez-de la Torre, A.; Griffin, K. L.; Huntingford, C.; Hurry, V.; Meir, P.; Turnbull, M.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf respiration (R) represents a massive flux of carbon to the atmosphere. Currently, neither physiological models nor terrestrial biosphere models are able to disentangle sources of variation in leaf R among different plant species and contrasting environments. Similarly, such models do not adequately describe the short-term temperature (T) response of R, which can lead to inaccurate representation of leaf R in simulation models of regional and global terrestrial carbon cyling. Even minor differences in the underlying basal rate of leaf R and/or shape of the T-response curve can significantly impact estimates of carbon released and stored in ecosystems. Given this, we recently assembled and analyzed two new global databases (arctic-to-tropics) of leaf R and its short-term T-dependence. The results highlight variation in basal leaf R among species and across global gradients in T and aridity, with leaf R at a standard T (e.g. 25°C) being greatest in plants growing in the cold, dry Arctic and lowest in the warm, moist tropics. Arctic plants also exhibit higher rates of leaf R at a given photosynthetic capacity or leaf N concentration than their tropical counterparts. The results also point to convergence in the short-term temperature response of respiration across biomes and plant functional types. The applicability and significance of the short-term T-response of R for simulation models of plant and ecosystem carbon fluxes will be discussed.

  20. Global temperature responses to current emissions from the transport sectors

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Terje; Fuglestvedt, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Transport affects climate directly and indirectly through mechanisms that cause both warming and cooling of climate, and the effects operate on very different timescales. We calculate climate responses in terms of global mean temperature and find large differences between the transport sectors with respect to the size and mix of short- and long-lived effects, and even the sign of the temperature response. For year 2000 emissions, road transport has the largest effect on global mean temperature. After 20 and 100 years the response in net temperature is 7 and 6 times higher, respectively, than for aviation. Aviation and shipping have strong but quite uncertain short-lived warming and cooling effects, respectively, that dominate during the first decades after the emissions. For shipping the net cooling during the first 4 decades is due to emissions of SO2 and NOx. On a longer timescale, the current emissions from shipping cause net warming due to the persistence of the CO2 perturbation. If emissions stay constant at 2000 levels, the warming effect from road transport will continue to increase and will be almost 4 times larger than that of aviation by the end of the century. PMID:19047640

  1. Adsorption behavior of proteins on temperature-responsive resins.

    PubMed

    Poplewska, Izabela; Muca, Renata; Strachota, Adam; Piątkowski, Wojciech; Antos, Dorota

    2014-01-10

    The adsorption behavior of proteins on thermo-responsible resins based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its copolymer containing an anionic co-monomer has been investigated. The influence of the polymer composition, i.e., the content of the co-monomer and crosslinker on the thermo-sensitivity of the protein adsorption has been quantified. The properties of ungrafted polymer as well grafted onto the agarose matrix have been analyzed and compared. Batch and dynamic (column) experiments have been performed to measure the adsorption equilibrium of proteins and to quantify the phase transition process. As model proteins lysozyme, lactoferrin, α-chymotrypsinogen A and ovalbumin have been used. The adsorption process was found to be governed by ionic interactions between the negatively charged surface of resin and the protein, which enabled separation of proteins differing in electrostatic charge. The interactions enhanced with increase of temperature. Decrease of temperature facilitated desorption of proteins and reduced the salt usage in the desorption buffer. Grafted polymers exhibited markedly higher mechanical stability and, however, weaker temperature response compared to the ungrafted ones. PMID:24315357

  2. [Amides of creatine: perspectives of neuroprotection].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, T D; Chefu, S G; Baĭsa, A E; Leko, M V; Burov, S V; Veselkina, O S

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of derivatives of creatine and amino acids (CrAA) for decreasing cerebral injury in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuroprotective effects of amides of creatine and glycine (CrGlyOEt), phenylalanine (CrPheNH2), thyrosine (CrTyrNH2), and GABA (CrGABAOEt) were investigated. Brain injury was evaluated on day 2 after transient MCAO using a TTC staining of brain slices. Compared with the MCAO control group, all the CrAms showed decreased cerebral injury (p < 0.05). However CrPheNH2, CrTyrNH2, and CrGABAOEt were toxic after intravenous administration and investigated only after intraperitoneal injection. CrGlyOEt did not show any toxicity at dose of 1 mmol/kg. These data evidenced that creatinyl amides can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in brain ischemia treatment. PMID:21961295

  3. Studies of indium amides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, A.P.; Berry, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    A reaction between InI{sub 3} and 3 eq. of KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} forms indium(III) amide (In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}) a white, nearly insoluble compound. Indium(III) amide readily combines with KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} to form the mixed metal amide K{sub 2}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 5}. Other potassium and sodium derivatives MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub 3+x} derivatives were prepared in a similar manner, but not all were obtained pure in the solid state. An impure tri-lithium derivative (Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}) was obtained by adding a KNH{sub 2} solution (6 eq) to a solution of InI{sub 3} and 3 eq of LiI. Pyrolysis (in vacuo 25-300{degrees}C, under N{sub 2} 300-400{degrees}C) of In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} or MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub x+3} (M = Na, K) to 400{degrees}C results in the formation of InN, but indium metal is also formed from some of the mixed metal amides. The product from thermal decomposition of Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6} under vacuum was tentatively identified as the ternary nitride Li{sub 3}InN{sub 2}. Products were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and powder x-ray diffraction experiments.

  4. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  5. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  6. Chromatographically separable rotamers of an unhindered amide

    PubMed Central

    Geffe, Mario; Andernach, Lars; Trapp, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Summary Surprisingly stable formamide rotamers were encountered in the tetrahydroisoquinoline and morphinan series of alkaloids. We investigated the hindered rotation around the amide bond by dynamic high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and kinetic measurements of the interconversion of the rotamers which can readily be separated by HPLC as well as TLC. The experimental results of the different methods were compared to each other as well as to results obtained by DFT calculations. PMID:24778722

  7. Tree canopy temperature response under experimental warming and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, S. N.; Garrity, S. R.; Cai, M.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Tree mortality associated with rising temperatures and drought has been observed in numerous locations across the globe. Simulated global climate change experiments, such as increased air temperature and reduced precipitation, can help us understand tree response to altered climate regimes and identify key physiological mechanisms involved in tree stress response. We collected canopy-level leaf temperature measurements from several piñon (Pinus edulis) and one-seed juniper (juniperus monosperma) subjected to experimental warming, drought, combined warming and drought treatments, and control conditions in a field-based experiment in northern New Mexico beginning June 2012. We examined leaf temperature responses to the treatments by using continuous measurements from infrared thermocouples located above the tree canopy. We found that leaf temperatures were approximately 5 degrees warmer in heated chambers compared to leaf temperatures of trees outside chambers. Comparisons within each treatment demonstrated that, on average, piñon had higher absolute differences between leaf temperature and air temperature values compared to juniper trees. Stomatal conductance, measured with a leaf porometer showed that within each treatment, juniper had higher stomatal conductance relative to piñon, and that heated trees had lower stomatal conductance relative to non-heated trees. These differences may be attributable to the fact that piñon trees are isohydric, meaning that they have a lower tolerance to water stress. To date, we have not observed a significant drought effect on leaf temperature, however, this is likely due to the short duration of the drought treatment to date. We expect that as the experiment progresses, a drought effect will emerge. One of the key questions that we hope to answer as data continues to be collected is how tree physiology responds to drought, heat, and the interaction between both variables. Although this case study is being conducted in

  8. Non-monotonic temperature response of polymer mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Woodward, Clifford E; Forsman, Jan

    2016-01-21

    In a recent publication, Feng et al. [Feng et al., Nat. Mater., 2015, 14, 61] reported a very interesting re-entrant solidification behaviour of colloidal particles in an aqueous solution containing polyethylene oxide (PEO). In this system, a crystalline colloidal phase, which is present at low temperatures, melts to a homogeneous fluid upon increasing the temperature. Further raising the temperature, however, eventually gives rise to a flocculated colloidal phase. Feng et al. proposed that the low-temperature crystalline phase is caused by polymer depletion while, at higher temperature, an increased attraction between polymers and particles leads to bridging attractions, and colloidal flocculation. The intermediate temperature regime sees the colloidal interactions dominated by charge repulsion, giving rise to a fluid phase. In the model by Feng et al., polymers are treated as hard spheres, which interact with the colloids via a phenomenological, temperature dependent potential. In this work, we develop a more detailed polymer density functional treatment, based on a model for aqueous PEO solutions that was originally developed by Karlström [Karlström, J. Phys. Chem., 1985, 89, 4962] for bulk solutions. In this model, monomers are assumed to be in either of two classes of states, labelled A and B, where B is more solvophobic than A. On the other hand, the degeneracy of the B states exceed that of A, causing the population of solvophobic monomers to increase with temperature. If the colloidal particles are also solvophobic, then this model displays the same qualitative temperature response as was observed by Feng et al. That is, at low temperatures, A type monomers predominate and one observes depletion interactions, whereas polymer bridging dominates at higher temperatures, due to the attraction between B-type monomers and the colloidal surface. Interestingly, the intermediate temperature regime is characterized by a polymer mediated interaction between colloids

  9. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  10. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China. PMID:26230212

  11. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  12. Synthesis of Nitriles via Palladium-Catalyzed Water Shuffling from Amides to Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wandi; Haskins, Christopher W.; Yang, Yang; Dai, Mingji

    2014-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of nitriles from amides has been described. Two similar, but complementary reaction conditions have been identified to convert various amides including α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated amides, cinnamides, aromatic amides and alkyl amides to the corresponding nitriles in good to excellent yield. PMID:25316145

  13. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  14. Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Hydroxy Amides and β-Amino Alcohols from α-Keto Amides.

    PubMed

    Mamillapalli, N Chary; Sekar, Govindasamy

    2015-12-14

    Synthesis of enantiomerically enriched α-hydroxy amides and β-amino alcohols has been accomplished by enantioselective reduction of α-keto amides with hydrosilanes. A series of α-keto amides were reduced in the presence of chiral Cu(II)/(S)-DTBM-SEGPHOS catalyst to give the corresponding optically active α-hydroxy amides with excellent enantioselectivities by using (EtO)3SiH as a reducing agent. Furthermore, a one-pot complete reduction of both ketone and amide groups of α-keto amides has been achieved using the same chiral copper catalyst followed by tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride (TBAF) catalyst in presence of (EtO)3SiH to afford the corresponding chiral β-amino alcohol derivatives. PMID:26503887

  15. Copper-catalyzed oxidative amidation of aldehydes with amine salts: synthesis of primary, secondary, and tertiary amides.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra; Ngiam, Joyce S Y; Seayad, Abdul M; Tuan, Dang Thanh; Chai, Christina L L; Chen, Anqi

    2012-09-21

    A practical method for the amidation of aldehydes with economic ammonium chloride or amine hydrochloride salts has been developed for the synthesis of a wide variety of amides by using inexpensive copper sulfate or copper(I) oxide as a catalyst and aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide as an oxidant. This amidation reaction is operationally straightforward and provides primary, secondary, and tertiary amides in good to excellent yields for most cases utilizing inexpensive and readily available reagents under mild conditions. In situ formation of amine salts from free amines extends the substrate scope of the reaction. Chiral amides are also synthesized from their corresponding chiral amines without detectable racemization. The practicality of this amide formation reaction has been demonstrated in an efficient synthesis of the antiarrhythmic drug N-acetylprocainamide. PMID:22894712

  16. Role of native defects in the Li amide/Li imide hydrogen storage reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khang; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2010-03-01

    Reversible reaction involving Li amide/Li imide (LiNH2 + LiH <-> Li2NH + H2) has been shown to be a potential mechanism for hydrogen storage [1]. Recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction refinement suggests that the transformation between LiNH2 and Li2NH is a bulk reaction that occurs through non-stoichiometric processes [2]. To build a deeper understanding of these processes, we have carried out first-principles studies based on density functional theory of native point defects and defect complexes in LiNH2 and Li2NH. Among the native defects, we find that positively and negatively charged Li and H interstitials and vacancies have the lowest formation energies. Some of the Li-related defects are found to be very mobile, and should be the dominant migratory species in the systems. Our first-principles results suggest specific mechanisms for the role of native defects in the Li amide/Li imide reaction. [1] P. Chen et al., Nature 420, 302 (2002). [2] W. I. F. David et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 1594 (2007).

  17. Conversion of Amides to Esters by the Nickel-Catalyzed Activation of Amide C–N Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been well studied for more than a century.1 They serve as the key building blocks of proteins and are present in an broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to resonance stability of the amide bond.1,2 Whereas Nature can easily cleave amides through the action of enzymes, such as proteases,3 the ability to selectively break the C–N bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry is quite difficult. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that amide C–N bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We have used this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of this unusual transformation. Our results provide a new strategy to harness amide functional groups as synthons and are expected fuel the further use of amides for the construction of carbon–heteroatom or carbon–carbon bonds using non-precious metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  18. Polymer Amide as an Early Topology

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) could have been one of the first normal density materials to accrete in space. We present ab initio calculations of the energetics of amino acid polymerization via gas phase collisions. The initial hydrogen-bonded di-peptide is sufficiently stable to proceed in many cases via a transition state into a di-peptide with an associated bound water molecule of condensation. The energetics of polymerization are only favorable when the water remains bound. Further polymerization leads to a hydrophobic surface that is phase-separated from, but hydrogen bonded to, a small bulk water complex. The kinetics of the collision and subsequent polymerization are discussed for the low-density conditions of a molecular cloud. This polymer in the gas phase has the properties to make a topology, viz. hydrophobicity allowing phase separation from bulk water, capability to withstand large temperature ranges, versatility of form and charge separation. Its flexible tetrahedral carbon atoms that alternate with more rigid amide groups allow it to deform and reform in hazardous conditions and its density of hydrogen bonds provides adhesion that would support accretion to it of silicon and metal elements to form a stellar dust material. PMID:25048204

  19. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Amidation of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eloisa; Martin, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    A user-friendly, nickel-catalyzed reductive amidation of unactivated primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl bromides with isocyanates is described. This catalytic strategy offers an efficient synthesis of a wide range of aliphatic amides under mild conditions and with an excellent chemoselectivity profile while avoiding the use of stoichiometric and sensitive organometallic reagents. PMID:27357076

  20. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%). PMID:11014298

  1. Cytotoxic Amides from Fruits of Kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jeremy; Burgess, Elaine J; Richardson, Alistair T B; Hawkins, Bill C; Baird, Sarah K; Smallfield, Bruce M; van Klink, John W; Perry, Nigel B

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic amides have been isolated from the fruits of the endemic New Zealand medicinal plant kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum (Piperaceae). The main amide was piperchabamide A and this is the first report of this rare compound outside the genus Piper. Eleven other amides were purified including two new compounds with the unusual 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-pyridinyl group. The new compounds were fully characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, which showed a slow exchange between two rotamers about the amide bond, and they were chemically synthesized. In view of the antitumor activity of the related piperlongumine, all of these amides plus four synthetic analogs were tested for cytotoxicity. The most active was the piperine homolog piperdardine, with an IC50 of 14 µM against HT 29 colon cancer cells. PMID:26039266

  2. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  3. Amidation of Bioactive Peptides: The Structure of the Lyase Domain of the Amidating Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chufan, E.; De, M; Eipper, B; Mains, R; Amzel, L

    2009-01-01

    Many neuropeptides and peptide hormones require amidation of their carboxy terminal for full biological activity. The enzyme peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine {alpha}-amidating lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.2.5) catalyzes the second and last step of this reaction, N-dealkylation of the peptidyl-{alpha}-hydroxyglycine to generate the {alpha}-amidated peptide and glyoxylate. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the PAL catalytic core (PALcc) alone and in complex with the nonpeptidic substrate {alpha}-hydroxyhippuric acid. The structures show that PAL folds as a six-bladed {Beta}-propeller. The active site is formed by a Zn(II) ion coordinated by three histidine residues; the substrate binds to this site with its {alpha}-hydroxyl group coordinated to the Zn(II) ion. The structures also reveal a tyrosine residue (Tyr{sup 654}) at the active site as the catalytic base for hydroxyl deprotonation, an unusual role for tyrosine. A reaction mechanism is proposed based on this structural data and validated by biochemical analysis of site-directed PALcc mutants.

  4. Amide N-oxides: an ab initio molecular orbital study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Arthur; DuBois, Thomas D.

    2001-06-01

    There are no known examples of amide N-oxides. The present study employs ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the 6-3G ∗ level to explore potential target molecules in this class. Bridgehead bicyclic lactams appear to be attractive targets for oxidation to form the corresponding N-oxides because they have reduced (or zero) amide resonance energy. The amide N-oxide linkage is predicted to have a ca. 9-10 kcal/mol rotational barrier due to eclipsing of nonbonded oxygen atoms in the transition state. The linkage has a nearly flat conformational ( ΦON-CO) profile in the range 120-240° and this suggests that a very sterically hindered acyclic amide N-oxide may be a practical synthetic target. The oxidation of strained amides is calculated to be highly exothermic if dimethyldioxirane is employed. This reagent is predicted to react appreciably exothermically with normal, stable amides such as N, N-dimethylacetamide, thus offering the potential for generating and studying such relatively unstable amide N-oxides at low temperatures.

  5. Chemical attributes of some clouds amid a forest ecosystem's trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous physical and chemical characteristics of clouds amid and above the trees of a montane forest, located about 3.3 km southwest of Mt. Mitchell, NC, were collected between 13 and 22 June 1993. This paper summarizes the chemical characteristics of the cloud droplets amid the trees. The ionic composition and pH of the analyzed amid-canopy cloud water samples are generally consistent with those of previous above-canopy cloud water samples obtained at this site. Magnesium, sodium, and calcium are highly correlated to each other amid the canopy as compared to above the canopy. Above-canopy and amid-canopy cloud-only episodes, with concurrent event-averaged cloud water pH values at or below 3.1, generally contain more magnesium, sodium, and calcium in the amid-canopy cloud water samples compared to concurrent above-canopy cloud water samples. The observed chemical differences between the amid-canopy cloud and the above- canopy cloud suggest an unhealthier environment for the tree canopy when the cloud water traversing this site has a pH value at or below 3.1. The predominant ion deposition fluxes were calculated to provide preliminary data for studies designed to explicitly quantify how the chemical composition of cloud water affects tree health. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Conformational features of secondary N-cyclopropyl amides.

    PubMed

    González-de-Castro, Ángela; Broughton, Howard; Martínez-Pérez, José A; Espinosa, Juan F

    2015-04-17

    NMR studies in conjunction with ab initio calculations revealed unexpected conformational behavior of N-cyclopropylacetamide (1). This secondary amide displays 16-19% E-rotamer (cis) around the carbonyl-nitrogen bond in apolar solvents, in contrast to other aliphatic secondary acetamides in which significant E-rotamer populations are rare due to steric contacts between the substituents on the amide bond. In addition, 1 adopts an ortho conformation around the N-cPr bond instead of the anti conformation generally preferred by secondary acetamides. This distinct conformational behavior was also observed for other secondary N-cyclopropyl amides. PMID:25803271

  7. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  8. Synthesis, HPLC measurement and bioavailability of the phenolic amide amkamide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amkamide, oretamide, becatamide, enferamide and veskamide are phenolic amides whose analogues are found in plants. Recently, becatamide was reported to have very potent mitochondria protective activity. In this study, becatamide and analogues (amkamide, oretamide, enferamide and veskamide) were chem...

  9. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  10. Fabrication of transplantable corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets using a novel temperature-responsive closed culture device.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Kitano, Yuriko; Watanabe, Hiroya; Mizutani, Manabu; Nozaki, Takayuki; Senda, Naoko; Saitoh, Kazuo; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-05-01

    Temperature-responsive culture surfaces make it possible to harvest transplantable carrier-free cell sheets. Here, we applied temperature-responsive polymer for polycarbonate surfaces with previously developed closed culture devices for an automated culture system in order to fabricate transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and colony-forming assays revealed that corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets could be harvested with the temperature-responsive closed culture devices. The results were similar to those obtained using temperature-responsive culture inserts. These results indicate that the novel temperature-responsive closed culture device is useful for fabricating transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets. PMID:23475606

  11. Synthesis of Glycosyl Amides Using Selenocarboxylates as Traceless Reagents for Amide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luana; Affeldt, Ricardo F; Lüdtke, Diogo S

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate-derived amides were successfully prepared in good yields from a broad range of substrates, including furanosyl and pyranosyl derivatives. The methodology successfully relied on the in situ generation of lithium selenocarboxylates from Se/LiEt3BH and acyl chlorides or carboxylic acids and their reaction with sugar azides. A key aspect of the present protocol is that we start from elemental selenium; isolation and handling of all reactive and sensitive selenium-containing intermediates is avoided, therefore providing the selenocarboxylate the status of a traceless reagent. PMID:27275515

  12. Temperature-responsive molecular recognition chromatography using phenylalanine and tryptophan derived polymer modified silica beads.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Yuki; Kanazashi, Ryosuke; Ayano, Eri; Okano, Teruo; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2016-02-01

    Temperature-responsive polymers incorporating molecular-recognition sites were developed as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The grafted stationary phases consisted of functional copolymers composed of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and N-acryloyl aromatic amino acid methyl esters, i.e., phenylalanine and tryptophan methyl esters (Phe-OMe and Trp-OMe). Three novel temperature-responsive polymers, P(NIPAAm-co-Phe-OMe5), P(NIPAAm-co-Phe-OMe10), and P(NIPAAm-co-Trp-OMe5), were synthesized. These copolymers exhibited a reversible hydrophilic/hydrophobic phase transition at their lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs). The polymers were grafted onto aminopropyl silica using an activated ester-amine coupling method, and were packed into a stainless steel column, which was connected to an HPLC system. Temperature-responsive chromatography was conducted using water as the sole mobile phase. More hydrophobic analytes were retained longer, and the retention times of aromatic steroids and aromatic amino acids were dramatically increased. This indicated that π-π interactions occurred between the phenyl or indole moieties of phenylalanine or tryptophan, respectively, and the aromatic compounds. Furthermore, the retention times of compounds with hydrogen bond acceptors were higher with P(NIPAAm-co-Trp-OMe5), which contained indole as a hydrogen bond donor, than with P(NIPAAm-co-Phe-OMe5). This indicated that hydrogen bonding occurred between the stationary phase and the analytes. These results indicate that hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions all affected the separation mode of the temperature-responsive chromatography, and led to selective separation with molecular recognition. Both temperature-response and molecular recognition characteristics are present in the proposed separation system that utilizes a temperature-responsive polymer bearing aromatic amino acid derivatives. PMID:26646169

  13. Orexinergic Neurotransmission in Temperature Responses to Methamphetamine and Stress: Mathematical Modeling as a Data Assimilation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Fu, Daniel; Tan, Patrick; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Zaretskaia, Maria V.; Rusyniak, Daniel E.; Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Zaretsky, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental Data Orexinergic neurotransmission is involved in mediating temperature responses to methamphetamine (Meth). In experiments in rats, SB-334867 (SB), an antagonist of orexin receptors (OX1R), at a dose of 10 mg/kg decreases late temperature responses (t>60 min) to an intermediate dose of Meth (5 mg/kg). A higher dose of SB (30 mg/kg) attenuates temperature responses to low dose (1 mg/kg) of Meth and to stress. In contrast, it significantly exaggerates early responses (t<60 min) to intermediate and high doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) of Meth. As pretreatment with SB also inhibits temperature response to the stress of injection, traditional statistical analysis of temperature responses is difficult. Mathematical Modeling We have developed a mathematical model that explains the complexity of temperature responses to Meth as the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory nodes. We have extended the developed model to include the stress of manipulations and the effects of SB. Stress is synergistic with Meth on the action on excitatory node. Orexin receptors mediate an activation of on both excitatory and inhibitory nodes by low doses of Meth, but not on the node activated by high doses (HD). Exaggeration of early responses to high doses of Meth involves disinhibition: low dose of SB decreases tonic inhibition of HD and lowers the activation threshold, while the higher dose suppresses the inhibitory component. Using a modeling approach to data assimilation appears efficient in separating individual components of complex response with statistical analysis unachievable by traditional data processing methods. PMID:25993564

  14. Synthesis of imides via palladium-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of α-oxocarboxylic acids with secondary amides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Liu, Jie; Li, Dengke; Wang, Lei

    2016-05-18

    An efficient synthesis of imides has been developed through a Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of α-oxocarboxylic acids with secondary amides. The reactions of N-substituted N-heteroarene-2-carboxamides with 2-oxo-2-arylacetic acids proceeded smoothly to generate the corresponding products in good yields in the presence of Pd(OAc)2 and K2S2O8. PMID:27143171

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Group 4 Amide Chloride and Amide Imide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xianghua; Cheng, Shu-Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xue-Tai; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Group 4 amide chloride complexes (Me2N)(2)Ht[N(SiMe3)(2)]Cl (1b), [(Me3Si)(2)N](2)MCl2Li(THF)(3)Cl (M = Zr, 2a; Hf, 2b), and [(Me3Si)(2)MCl2MCl2(THF) (M = Zr, 3a; Hf, 3b) and their X-ray crystal structures are reported. An improved synthesis of {[(Me3Si)(2)N]Ti(mu-NSiMe3)Cl}(2) (4) and its use to prepare amide imide {[(Me3Si)(2)N]Ti(mu-NSiMe3)(NMe2}(2) (5) are also presented. X-ray crystal structures of 5 and previously reported complexes (Me2N)(2)Zr[N(SiMe3)(2)]Cl (1a), [(Me3Si)(2)N](2)TiCl2 (6), and [(Me3Si)(2)N]ZrCl3(THF)(2) (7) have been determined. Both 1a and 1b are dimers {[(Me3Si)(2)N](2)TiCl2 (M = Zr, Hf) in the solid state.

  16. Biodegradable and injectable paclitaxel-loaded poly(ester amide)s microspheres: fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Chu, C C

    2009-05-01

    Novel biodegradable submicron microspheres of amino acid based poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) were fabricated by an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion/solvent evaporation technique and their morphology and drug loading efficiency were examined. PEAs microspheres of mean diameter <1 microm with very narrow size distribution were obtained at a fair yield about 80%. The effects of PEA polymer concentration, polyvinyl alcohol emulsifier concentration, and the homogenizer speed on the size and morphology of final PEA microspheres were examined by analyzing their SEM images. It is found that a low PEA concentration, a high PVA concentration, and a high homogenizer speed are the optimal conditions for obtaining smaller microspheres. The biodegradation behaviors of these PEA microspheres at 37 degrees C were investigated as a function of enzyme (alpha-chymotrypsin) concentration and incubation time. The data showed similar surface erosion degradation mechanism as PEA polymers reported previously. Paclitaxel loaded PEA microspheres with high encapsulation efficiency were obtained without significantly affecting their size and surface morphology. The high drug loading efficiency close to 100% suggested that PEA microspheres may have the potential for the injection administration of highly hydrophobic anticancer drugs. PMID:18937264

  17. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B.; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Stevenson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using 13C-labeled sugars and [15N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  18. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  19. Temperature-responsive intelligent interfaces for biomolecular separation and cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2009-06-01

    Temperature-responsive intelligent surfaces, prepared by the modification of an interface with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its derivatives, have been used for biomedical applications. Such surfaces exhibit temperature-responsive hydrophilic/hydrophobic alterations with external temperature changes, which, in turn, result in thermally modulated interactions with biomolecules and cells. In this review, we focus on the application of these intelligent surfaces to chromatographic separation and cell cultures. Chromatographic separations using several types of intelligent surfaces are mentioned briefly, and various effects related to the separation of bioactive compounds are discussed, including wettability, copolymer composition and graft polymer architecture. Similarly, we also summarize temperature-responsive cell culture substrates that allow the recovery of confluent cell monolayers as contiguous living cell sheets for tissue-engineering applications. The key factors in temperature-dependent cell adhesion/detachment control are discussed from the viewpoint of grafting temperature-responsive polymers, and new methodologies for effective cell sheet culturing and the construction of thick tissues are summarized. PMID:19324682

  20. Temperature-responsive intelligent interfaces for biomolecular separation and cell sheet engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    Temperature-responsive intelligent surfaces, prepared by the modification of an interface with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its derivatives, have been used for biomedical applications. Such surfaces exhibit temperature-responsive hydrophilic/hydrophobic alterations with external temperature changes, which, in turn, result in thermally modulated interactions with biomolecules and cells. In this review, we focus on the application of these intelligent surfaces to chromatographic separation and cell cultures. Chromatographic separations using several types of intelligent surfaces are mentioned briefly, and various effects related to the separation of bioactive compounds are discussed, including wettability, copolymer composition and graft polymer architecture. Similarly, we also summarize temperature-responsive cell culture substrates that allow the recovery of confluent cell monolayers as contiguous living cell sheets for tissue-engineering applications. The key factors in temperature-dependent cell adhesion/detachment control are discussed from the viewpoint of grafting temperature-responsive polymers, and new methodologies for effective cell sheet culturing and the construction of thick tissues are summarized. PMID:19324682

  1. Sustained Drug Release on Temperature-Responsive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Integrated Hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon ); Liu, Jun; Chang, Jeong H.; Exarhos, Gregory J. )

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid temperature-responsive hydroxyapatite-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (HAP-PNIPAAm) gel has been synthesized by the interpenetration of PNIPAAm into a sintered HAP disk through a radical-initiated polymerization of NIPAAm monomers under N2 atmosphere, and shows sustained positive thermo-responsive drug release profile over a month at PBS buffer.

  2. Biocatalytic amidation of carboxylic acids and their antinemic activity.

    PubMed

    Bose, Abinesh; Shakil, Najam Akhtar; Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Singh, Manish K

    2010-04-01

    A series of novel N-alkyl substituted amides, synthesized by enzyme catalysis, were evaluated against root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and found to have potential antinemic activity. The corresponding amides were prepared by the condensation of equimolar amounts of carboxylic acids with different alkyl amines in the presence of Candida antarctica lipase at 60-90 degrees C in 16-20 h. The reactions were carried out in a non - solvent system without the use of any activating agents. All the products were obtained in appreciable amounts and the yields for different compounds varied between 77.4-82.3%. The synthesized compounds were characterized using spectroscopy techniques namely Infra Red (IR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) ((1)H and (13)C). Nematicidal activity of synthesized amides was evaluated against J(2)s of Meloidogyne incognita at 500, 250, 125 and 62.5 ppm concentrations after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h of exposure. Among all the tested compounds, N-propyl-butyramide, N-propyl-pentanamide and N-propyl-hexanamide were found to possess significant activity with LC(50) values of 67.46, 83.49 and 96.53 respectively. N-propyl-butyramide with LC(50) value of 67.46 ppm was found to be most active amide against J(2)s of Meloidogyne incognita. The bioactivity study showed that an increase in alkyl chain significantly decreased the activity of amides against root-knot nematode. PMID:20390959

  3. Binding of Fatty Acid Amide Amphiphiles to Bovine Serum Albumin: Role of Amide Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Dey, Joykrishna

    2015-06-25

    The study of protein-surfactant interactions is important because of the widespread use of surfactants in industry, medicine, and pharmaceutical fields. Sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SL-Sar) is a widely used surfactant in cosmetics, shampoos. In this paper, we studied the interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with SL-Sar and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SL-Gly) by use of a number of techniques, including fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding strength of SL-Sar is stronger than that of structurally similar SL-Gly, which differs only by the absence of a methyl group in the amide nitrogen atom. Also, these two surfactants exhibit different binding patterns with the BSA protein. The role of the amide bond and hence the surfactant headgroup in the binding mechanism is discussed in this paper. It was observed that while SL-Sar destabilized, SL-Gly stabilized the protein structure, even at concentrations less than the critical micelle concentration (cmc) value. The thermodynamics of surfactant binding to BSA was studied by use of ITC. From the ITC results, it is concluded that three molecules of SL-Sar in contrast to only one molecule of SL-Gly bind to BSA in one set of binding sites at room temperature. However, on increasing temperature four molecules of SL-Gly bind to the BSA through H-bonding and van der Waals interactions, due to loosening of the BSA structure. In contrast, with SL-Sar the binding process is enthalpy driven, and very little structural change of BSA was observed at higher temperature. PMID:26023820

  4. Nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weires, Nicholas A.; Baker, Emma L.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    The Suzuki-Miyaura coupling has become one of the most important and prevalent methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Although palladium catalysis has historically dominated the field, the use of nickel catalysis has become increasingly widespread because of its unique ability to cleave carbon-heteroatom bonds that are unreactive towards other transition metals. We report the first nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides, which proceeds by an uncommon cleavage of the amide C-N bond after N-tert-butoxycarbonyl activation. The methodology is mild, functional-group tolerant and can be strategically employed in sequential transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling sequences to unite heterocyclic fragments. These studies demonstrate that amides, despite classically considered inert substrates, can be harnessed as synthons for use in reactions that form C-C bonds through cleavage of the C-N bond using non-precious metal catalysis.

  5. On the unconventional amide I band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Campa, Alessandro; Giansanti, Andrea

    1987-04-01

    We developed a new model to study the molecular dynamics of the acetanilide (ACN) crystal by computer simulation. Low-frequency oscillations of the molecules as a whole were considered with high-frequency vibrations of the amidic degrees of freedom involved in hydrogen bonding. The low-temperature power spectrum has two peaks, shifted by 15 cm -1, in the region of the amide I band: one of them corresponds to the so-called anomalous amide I band in the IR and Raman spectra of ACN. We found that this peak is due to the coupling of the low-frequency motion in the chain of molecules with the motion of the hydrogen-bonded protons, at variance with current suggestions.

  6. Intramolecular amide bonds stabilize pili on the surface of bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Budzik, Jonathan M.; Poor, Catherine B.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Chuan; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-12

    Gram-positive bacteria elaborate pili and do so without the participation of folding chaperones or disulfide bond catalysts. Sortases, enzymes that cut pilin precursors, form covalent bonds that link pilin subunits and assemble pili on the bacterial surface. We determined the x-ray structure of BcpA, the major pilin subunit of Bacillus cereus. The BcpA precursor encompasses 2 Ig folds (CNA{sub 2} and CNA{sub 3}) and one jelly-roll domain (XNA) each of which synthesizes a single intramolecular amide bond. A fourth amide bond, derived from the Ig fold of CNA{sub 1}, is formed only after pilin subunits have been incorporated into pili. We report that the domains of pilin precursors have evolved to synthesize a discrete sequence of intramolecular amide bonds, thereby conferring structural stability and protease resistance to pili.

  7. Modulations in restricted amide rotation by steric induced conformational trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.; Thompson, William B.; Goto, Joy J.; Maitra, Kalyani; Maitra, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    The rotation around the amide bond in N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (m-DEET) has been studied extensively and often used in laboratory instructions to demonstrate the phenomenon of chemical exchange. Herein, we show that a simple modification to N,N-diethyl-o-toluamide (o-DEET) significantly alters the dynamics of the restricted rotation around the amide bond due to steric interactions between the ring methyl group and the two N-ethyl groups. This alters the classic two-site exchange due to restricted rotation around the amide bond, to a three-site exchange, with the third conformation trapped at a higher-energy state compared to the other two. This often overlooked phenomenon is elucidated using variable-temperature NMR, two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy and molecular modeling studies.

  8. First synthesis of etidronate partial amides starting from PCl3.

    PubMed

    Turhanen, Petri A; Niemi, Riku; Peräkylä, Mikael; Järvinen, Tomi; Vepsäläinen, Jouko J

    2003-09-21

    Methods for the preparation of mixed tetra-amide esters 1 and 2, the partial amide ester 3, and tri- and P,P-diamides 4 and 5 from monophosphorus spieces 12, 8 and 9, respectively, were developed. Compounds 8 and 9 were obtained from phosphorus trichloride via MeOPCl2, which was treated with 2 eq. and 4 eq. of piperidine, followed by water or acetyl chloride, respectively. Tetrasubstituted amide bisphosphonates 1 and 2 were selectively dealkylated with lithium or silyl halide to achieve target compounds 3-5. Piperidine was found to be a good desilylation reagent. Quantum mechanical calculations illustrate why derivative 2 was produced in low yield. The usefulness of compounds 1, 3 and 4 as prodrugs of etidronate was determined in aqueous buffer and human serum. PMID:14527155

  9. Decomposition of lithium amide and imide films on nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2007-02-01

    Thin films of lithium hydride, lithium amide and lithium imide were grown from lithium and ammonia under controlled conditions in an ultra high vacuum chamber. By making thin films instead of bulk or powder samples, it was possible to study the stability and the release of hydrogen without influence of transport phenomena. Surprisingly, lithium amide and lithium imide were seen to decompose at higher temperatures than lithium hydride. Furthermore, it was seen that hydrogen reversibly could be removed by heat treatment and subsequently refilled.

  10. A Direct and Stereoretentive Synthesis of Amides from Cyclic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Deboprosad; Bellucci, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosulfites prepared in situ using thionyl chloride react with nitrile complexes of titanium (IV) fluoride to give a one-pot conversion of alcohols into amides. For the first time, amides are obtained from cyclic alcohols with stereoretention. Critical to the design of these new Ti(IV) reactions has been the use of little explored Ti(IV) nitrile complexes which are thought to chelate chlorosulfites in the transition state to create a carbocation that is rapidly captured by the nitrile nucleophile via a front-side attack mechanism. PMID:24273447

  11. Copper-Catalyzed Carbonylative Coupling of Cycloalkanes and Amides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahui; Dong, Kaiwu; Zhu, Fengxiang; Wang, Zechao; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-13

    Carbonylation reactions are a most powerful method for the synthesis of carbonyl-containing compounds. However, most known carbonylation procedures still require noble-metal catalysts and the use of activated compounds and good nucleophiles as substrates. Herein, we developed a copper-catalyzed carbonylative transformation of cycloalkanes and amides. Imides were prepared in good yields by carbonylation of a C(sp(3) )-H bond of the cycloalkane with the amides acting as weak nucleophiles. Notably, this is the first report of copper-catalyzed carbonylative C-H activation. PMID:27167881

  12. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  13. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  14. Preparation and drug release behavior of temperature-responsive mesoporous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiufang; Liu Ping; Tian Yong

    2011-06-15

    A temperature-responsive composite based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) has been successfully prepared by a simple wetness impregnation technique. The structures and properties of the composite were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} sorption, thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results showed that the inclusion of PNIPAAm had not greatly changed the basic ordered pore structure of the OMCs. Ibuprofen (IBU) was selected as model drug, and in vitro test of IBU release exhibited a temperature-responsive controlled release delivery. - Graphical abstract: The bands located at 1650 and 1549 cm{sup -1} could be assigned to C=O stretching and N-H bending vibrations for polymer PNIPAAm (a). The bands at 1388 and 1369 cm{sup -1} were due to isopropyl group, and the band at 1459 cm{sup -1} was related to the bending vibration of C-H (a). For the PNIPAAm/OMCs composite, the characteristic bands of polymer were still observed besides those for carbon materials and the bands at around 1585 cm{sup -1} and a broad band at about 1100 cm{sup -1} were characteristics for the carbon materials(c). In addition, little shifts of C=O and N-H bands compared to the pure PNIPAAm were also observed (b), indicating a weak interaction between the polymer and carbon material. These results could be a proof that the PNIPAAm has been incorporated into the carbon material. Highlights: > A temperature-responsive PNIPAAm/OMCs composite was successfully synthesized by a simple wetness impregnation technique for the first time. > The inclusion of PNIPAAm had not greatly changed the basic ordered pore structure of the OMCs. > In vitro test of IBU release exhibited a temperature-responsive controlled release delivery.

  15. Iodine-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Amidation of β,γ-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids with Chloramine Salts Leading to Allylic Amides.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kojima, Takumi; Hishikawa, Yusuke; Minakata, Satoshi

    2015-10-26

    The iodine-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids with chloramine salts is described. This method enables the regioselective synthesis of allylic amides from various types of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids containing substituents at the α- and β-positions. In the reaction, N-iodo-N-chloroamides, generated by the reaction of a chloramine salt with I2 , function as a key active species. The reaction provides an attractive alternative to existing methods for the synthesis of useful secondary allylic amine derivatives. PMID:26493878

  16. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; De Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; Davin, Edouard L.; Motesharrei, Safa; Zeng, Ning; Li, Shuangcheng; Kalnay, Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extratropics. In this study, we use an earth system model of intermediate complexity to investigate how deforestation on various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends nonlinearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decrease in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decrease in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate in modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) evapotranspiration change; thus, warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Our analysis reveals that the latitudinal temperature change largely results from the climate conditions in which deforestation occurs and is less influenced by the magnitude of individual biophysical changes such as albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency.

  17. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; de Noblet-Ducoudré, N.; Davin, E. L.; Zeng, N.; Motesharrei, S.; Li, S. C.; Kalnay, E.

    2015-10-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extra-tropics. In this study, we use an earth system model to investigate how deforestation at various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends non-linearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions, but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decreases in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decreases in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate on modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) evapotranspiration change, thus warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Further analysis on the contribution of individual biophysical factors (albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency) reveals that the latitudinal signature embodied in the temperature change probably result from the background climate conditions rather than the initial biophysical perturbation.

  18. Reconstruction of conjunctival epithelium-like tissue using a temperature-responsive culture dish

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qinke; Zhu, Mengyu; Chen, Junzhao; Shao, Chunyi; Yan, Chenxi; Wang, Zi; Fan, Xianqun; Gu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the feasibility of engineering conjunctival epithelial cell sheets on a temperature-responsive culture dish for ocular surface reconstruction. Methods Rabbit conjunctival epithelial cells (rCjECs) were cultured in DMEM/F-12 (1:1) medium. The morphology and phenotype of the rCjECs were confirmed with phalloidin staining, periodic acid–Schiff (PAS) staining, and immunocytochemistry. The rCjECs cultured on a temperature-responsive culture dish for 10 days produced confluent conjunctival epithelial cell sheets. Then, the phenotype, structure, and function of the conjunctival epithelial cell sheets were examined. Results The conjunctival epithelial cells were compact, uniform, and cobblestone shape. All cultured conjunctival epithelial cells were harvested as intact cell sheets by reducing the culture temperature to 20 °C. Conjunctival epithelial cells were stratified in four to five cell layers similar to the conjunctival epithelium. CCK-8 analysis, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining, and the live and dead viability assay confirmed that viable proliferation cells were retained in the cell sheets. Immunohistochemistry for CK4, CK19, and MUC5AC showed the cell sheets still maintained characteristics of the conjunctival epithelium. Conclusions A temperature-responsive culture dish enables fabrication of viable conjunctival epithelial cell sheets with goblet cells and proliferative cells. Conjunctival epithelial cell sheets will be promising for reconstruction of the conjunctival epithelium. PMID:26396489

  19. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types.

    PubMed

    Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J G; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-04-01

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration-temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates. PMID:27001849

  20. Temperature-Responsive Smart Nanocarriers for Delivery Of Therapeutic Agents: Applications and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Ghasemi, Alireza; Amiri, Mohammad; Bahrami, Mohsen; Malekzad, Hedieh; Ghahramanzadeh Asl, Hadi; Mahdieh, Zahra; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Ghasemi, Amir; Rahmani Taji Boyuk, Mohammad Reza; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-08-24

    Smart drug delivery systems (DDSs) have attracted the attention of many scientists, as carriers that can be stimulated by changes in environmental parameters such as temperature, pH, light, electromagnetic fields, mechanical forces, etc. These smart nanocarriers can release their cargo on demand when their target is reached and the stimulus is applied. Using the techniques of nanotechnology, these nanocarriers can be tailored to be target-specific, and exhibit delayed or controlled release of drugs. Temperature-responsive nanocarriers are one of most important groups of smart nanoparticles (NPs) that have been investigated during the past decades. Temperature can either act as an external stimulus when heat is applied from the outside, or can be internal when pathological lesions have a naturally elevated termperature. A low critical solution temperature (LCST) is a special feature of some polymeric materials, and most of the temperature-responsive nanocarriers have been designed based on this feature. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent efforts to prepare innovative temperature-responsive nanocarriers and discuss their novel applications. PMID:27349465

  1. Ultrasound-assisted direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Mirza-Aghayan, Maryam; Ganjbakhsh, Nahid; Molaee Tavana, Mahdieh; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound irradiation was successfully applied for the direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols with amines into the corresponding amides using graphite oxide (GO) as an oxidative and reusable solid acid catalyst in acetonitrile as solvent at 50°C under air atmosphere. The direct oxidative amidation of benzyl alcohols takes place under mild conditions yielding the corresponding amides in good to high yields (69-95%) and short reaction times under metal-free conditions. PMID:27150743

  2. Universal mechanism for breaking amide bonds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.; Cook, Peter L.; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The photodissociation of the amide bond by UV light and soft x-rays is investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C, N, and O 1s edges. Irradiation leaves a clear and universal signature for a wide variety of amides, ranging from oligopeptides to large proteins and synthetic polyamides, such as nylon. As the π* peak of the amide bond shrinks, two new π* peaks appear at the N 1s edge with a characteristic splitting of 1.1 eV. An additional characteristic is the overall intensity reduction of both the π* and σ* features at the O 1s edge, which indicates loss of oxygen. The spectroscopic results are consistent with the release of the O atom from the amide bond, followed by the migration of the H atom from the N to one of its two C neighbors. Migration to the carbonyl C leads to an imine, and migration to the Cα of the amino acid residue leads to a nitrile. Imine and nitrile produce the two characteristic π* transitions at the N 1s edge. A variety of other models is considered and tested against the N 1s spectra of reference compounds.

  3. Amidation of esters with amino alcohols using organobase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Nicola; Campbell, Peter S; Jamieson, Craig; Potjewyd, Frances; Simpson, Iain; Watson, Allan J B

    2014-10-01

    A catalytic protocol for the base-mediated amidation of unactivated esters with amino alcohol derivatives is reported. Investigations into mechanistic aspects of the process indicate that the reaction involves an initial transesterification, followed by an intramolecular rearrangement. The reaction is highly general in nature and can be extended to include the synthesis of oxazolidinone systems through use of dimethyl carbonate. PMID:25226088

  4. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-...

  5. Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by amide sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Nikandrov, I.S.; Kogtev, S.E.; Kazimirov, O.E.; Pavlova, I.V.

    1994-04-10

    Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by industrial amide plastics has been studied. Sorption capacity of the sorbents studied has been determined under static and dynamic conditions. Physical and chemical interaction has been demonstrated to take place between sulfur(IV) oxide and the sorbent studied.

  6. Amides and Hydrazides from Amine and Hydrazine Hydrochlorides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shama, Sami A.; Tran, Thuan L.

    1978-01-01

    This safe and efficient procedure for the synthesis of N-substituted amides and hydrazides is a modification of the Schotten-Bausmann procedure in which the amine or hydrazide is replaced by the corresponding hydrochloride salt, and the use of alkali is eliminated. (Author/BB)

  7. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  8. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  9. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  10. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  11. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  12. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  16. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  19. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    PubMed

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  20. Nine of 16 stereoisomeric polyhydroxylated proline amides are potent β-N-acetylhexosaminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Benjamin J; Glawar, Andreas F G; Martínez, R Fernando; Ngo, Nigel; Liu, Zilei; Fleet, George W J; Butters, Terry D; Nash, Robert J; Yu, Chu-Yi; Wormald, Mark R; Nakagawa, Shinpei; Adachi, Isao; Kato, Atsushi; Jenkinson, Sarah F

    2014-04-18

    All 16 stereoisomeric N-methyl 5-(hydroxymethyl)-3,4-dihydroxyproline amides have been synthesized from lactones accessible from the enantiomers of glucuronolactone. Nine stereoisomers, including all eight with a (3R)-hydroxyl configuration, are low to submicromolar inhibitors of β-N-acetylhexosaminidases. A structural correlation between the proline amides is found with the ADMDP-acetamide analogues bearing an acetamidomethylpyrrolidine motif. The proline amides are generally more potent than their ADMDP-acetamide equivalents. β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase inhibition by an azetidine ADMDP-acetamide analogue is compared to an azetidine carboxylic acid amide. None of the amides are good α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase inhibitors. PMID:24641544

  1. Regional and global temperature response to anthropogenic SO2 emissions from China in three climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasoar, Matthew; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Lamarque, Jean-François; Shindell, Drew T.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Collins, William J.; Faluvegi, Greg; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-08-01

    We use the HadGEM3-GA4, CESM1, and GISS ModelE2 climate models to investigate the global and regional aerosol burden, radiative flux, and surface temperature responses to removing anthropogenic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from China. We find that the models differ by up to a factor of 6 in the simulated change in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and shortwave radiative flux over China that results from reduced sulfate aerosol, leading to a large range of magnitudes in the regional and global temperature responses. Two of the three models simulate a near-ubiquitous hemispheric warming due to the regional SO2 removal, with similarities in the local and remote pattern of response, but overall with a substantially different magnitude. The third model simulates almost no significant temperature response. We attribute the discrepancies in the response to a combination of substantial differences in the chemical conversion of SO2 to sulfate, translation of sulfate mass into AOD, cloud radiative interactions, and differences in the radiative forcing efficiency of sulfate aerosol in the models. The model with the strongest response (HadGEM3-GA4) compares best with observations of AOD regionally, however the other two models compare similarly (albeit poorly) and still disagree substantially in their simulated climate response, indicating that total AOD observations are far from sufficient to determine which model response is more plausible. Our results highlight that there remains a large uncertainty in the representation of both aerosol chemistry as well as direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects in current climate models, and reinforces that caution must be applied when interpreting the results of modelling studies of aerosol influences on climate. Model studies that implicate aerosols in climate responses should ideally explore a range of radiative forcing strengths representative of this uncertainty, in addition to thoroughly evaluating the models used against

  2. Long- and short-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated boreal soil organic matter transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Buckeridge, K. M.; Edwards, K. A.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms use exoenzymes to decay soil organic matter into assimilable substrates, some of which are transformed into CO2. Microbial CO2 efflux contributes up to 60% of soil respiration, a feature that can change with temperature due to altered exoenzyme activities (short-term) and microbial communities producing different exoenzymes (longer-term). Often, however, microbial temperature responses are masked by factors that also change with temperature in soil, making accurate projections of microbial CO2 efflux with warming challenging. Using soils along a natural climate gradient similar in most respects except for temperature regime (Newfoundland Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect), we investigated short-vs. long-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated organic matter transformations. While incubating soils at 5, 15, and 25°C for 84 days, we measured exoenzyme activities, CO2 efflux rates and biomass, and extracted DNA at multiple times. We hypothesized that short-term, temperature-induced increases in exoenzyme activities and CO2 losses would be smaller in soils from warmer regions, because microbes presumably adapted to warmer regions should use assimilable substrates more efficiently and thus produce exoenzymes at a lower rate. While incubation temperature generally induced greater exoenzyme activities (p<0.001), exoenzymes' temperature responses depended on enzymes and regions (p<0.001). Rate of CO2 efflux was affected by incubation temperature (P<0.001), but not by region. Microbial biomass and DNA sequencing will reveal how microbial community abundance and composition change with short-vs. longer-term temperature change. Though short-term microbial responses to temperature suggest higher CO2 efflux and thus lower efficiency of resource use with warming, longer-term adaptations of microbial communities to warmer climates remain unknown; this work helps fill that knowledge gap.

  3. Modeling the Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Wen, G.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric temperature responses to decadal solar variations are computed for two scenarios of solar spectral irradiance (SSI), SIM-based out-of-phase and proxy-based in-phase variations, using a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also GISS modelE (GCM.) For both scenarios and both models, maximum responses occur in upper stratosphere, decreasing downward to the surface. Upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over tropics in GCM, ~5x as large as responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). Modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to SIM-based forcing are similar to 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). For both RCM and GCM, surface responses to the two scenarios are significantly smaller than stratospheric responses. On centennial timescales, SSI variations are poorly known. However, two scenarios of reconstructed TSI, one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other on flux transport with much less background [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005], provide a potential range of TSI variations. We apply phase relations among different SSI bands both from SIM observations and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive associated historical SSI, which then drives the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provide a first order estimate of temperature responses to SSI variations on centennial time scales. We discuss potential mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere-troposphere couplings responsible for the climate responses to spectral solar variations.

  4. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through. PMID:26905884

  5. Differences Between Rice and Wheat in Temperature Responses of Photosynthesis and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takeshi; Makino, Amane

    2009-01-01

    The temperature responses of photosynthesis (A) and growth were examined in rice and wheat grown hydroponically under day/night temperature regimes of 13/10, 19/16, 25/19, 30/24 and 37/31°C. Irrespective of growth temperature, the maximal rates of A were found to be at 30–35°C in rice and at 25–30°C in wheat. Below 25°C the rates were higher in wheat, while above 30°C they were higher in rice. However, in both species, A measured at the growth temperature remained almost constant irrespective of temperature. Biomass production and relative growth rate (RGR) were greatest in rice grown at 30/24°C and in wheat grown at 25/19°C. Although there was no difference between the species in the optimal temperature of the leaf area ratios (LARs), the net assimilation rate (NAR) in rice decreased at low temperature (19/16°C) while the NAR in wheat decreased at high temperature (37/31°C). For both species, the N-use efficiency (NUE) for growth rate (GR), estimated by dividing the NAR by leaf-N content, correlated with GR and with biomass production. Similarly, when NUE for A at growth temperature was estimated, the temperature response of NUE for A was similar to that of NUE for GR in both species. The results suggest that the difference between rice and wheat in the temperature response of biomass production depends on the difference in temperature dependence of NUE for A. PMID:19251744

  6. Altitudinal changes in temperature responses of net photosynthesis and dark respiration in tropical bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zotz, Gerhard; Salazar Allen, Noris; Bader, Maaike Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims There is a conspicuous increase of poikilohydric organisms (mosses, liverworts and macrolichens) with altitude in the tropics. This study addresses the hypothesis that the lack of bryophytes in the lowlands is due to high-temperature effects on the carbon balance. In particular, it is tested experimentally whether temperature responses of CO2-exchange rates would lead to higher respiratory carbon losses at night, relative to potential daily gains, in lowland compared with lower montane forests. Methods Gas-exchange measurements were used to determine water-, light-, CO2- and temperature-response curves of net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 18 tropical bryophyte species from three altitudes (sea level, 500 m and 1200 m) in Panama. Key Results Optimum temperatures of net photosynthesis were closely related to mean temperatures in the habitats in which the species grew at the different altitudes. The ratio of dark respiration to net photosynthesis at mean ambient night and day temperatures did not, as expected, decrease with altitude. Water-, light- and CO2-responses varied between species but not systematically with altitude. Conclusions Drivers other than temperature-dependent metabolic rates must be more important in explaining the altitudinal gradient in bryophyte abundance. This does not discard near-zero carbon balances as a major problem for lowland species, but the main effect of temperature probably lies in increasing evaporation rates, thus restricting the time available for photosynthetic carbon gain, rather than in increasing nightly respiration rates. Since optimum temperatures for photosynthesis were so fine tuned to habitat temperatures we analysed published temperature responses of bryophyte species worldwide and found the same pattern on the large scale as we found along the tropical mountain slope we studied. PMID:23258418

  7. Simulation of pressure and temperature responses for the 20 Inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation of the pressure and temperature responses of the 20 inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) is developed. The simulation models the tunnel system as a set of lumped parameter volumes connected by flow regulating elements such as valves and nozzles. Simulated transient responses of temperature and pressure for the five boundary points of the 20 inch SWT operating map are produced from their respective initial conditions, tunnel operating conditions, heater input power, and valve positions. Upon reaching steady state, a linearized model for each operating point is determined. Both simulated and actual tunnel responses are presented for comparison.

  8. A new approach to quantifying soil temperature responses to changing air temperature and snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackiewicz, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    Seasonal snow cover provides an effective insulating barrier, separating shallow soil (0.25 m) from direct localized meteorological conditions. The effectiveness of this barrier is evident in a lag in the soil temperature response to changing air temperature. The causal relationship between air and soil temperatures is largely because of the presence or absence of snow cover, and is frequently characterized using linear regression analysis. However, the magnitude of the dampening effect of snow cover on the temperature response in shallow soils is obscured in linear regressions. In this study the author used multiple linear regression (MLR) with dummy predictor variables to quantify the degree of dampening between air and shallow soil temperatures in the presence and absence of snow cover at four Greenland sites. The dummy variables defining snow cover conditions were z = 0 for the absence of snow and z = 1 for the presence of snow cover. The MLR was reduced to two simple linear equations that were analyzed relative to z = 0 and z = 1 to enable validation of the selected equations. Compared with ordinary linear regression of the datasets, the MLR analysis yielded stronger coefficients of multiple determination and less variation in the estimated regression variables.

  9. Plant nanobionic materials with a giant temperature response mediated by pectin-Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Raffaele; Daraio, Chiara; Maresca, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Conventional approaches to create biomaterials rely on reverse engineering of biological structures, on biomimicking, and on bioinspiration. Plant nanobionics is a recent approach to engineer new materials combining plant organelles with synthetic nanoparticles to enhance, for example, photosynthesis. Biological structures often outperform man-made materials. For example, higher plants sense temperature changes with high responsivity. However, these properties do not persist after cell death. Here, we permanently stabilize the temperature response of isolated plant cells adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Interconnecting cells, we create materials with an effective temperature coefficient of electrical resistance (TCR) of −1,730% K−1, ∼2 orders of magnitude higher than the best available sensors. This extreme temperature response is due to metal ions contained in the egg-box structure of the pectin backbone, lodged between cellulose microfibrils. The presence of a network of CNTs stabilizes the response of cells at high temperatures without decreasing the activation energy of the material. CNTs also increase the background conductivity, making these materials suitable elements for thermal and distance sensors. PMID:25825744

  10. Plant nanobionic materials with a giant temperature response mediated by pectin-Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Raffaele; Daraio, Chiara; Maresca, Bruno

    2015-04-14

    Conventional approaches to create biomaterials rely on reverse engineering of biological structures, on biomimicking, and on bioinspiration. Plant nanobionics is a recent approach to engineer new materials combining plant organelles with synthetic nanoparticles to enhance, for example, photosynthesis. Biological structures often outperform man-made materials. For example, higher plants sense temperature changes with high responsivity. However, these properties do not persist after cell death. Here, we permanently stabilize the temperature response of isolated plant cells adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Interconnecting cells, we create materials with an effective temperature coefficient of electrical resistance (TCR) of -1,730% K(-1), ∼2 orders of magnitude higher than the best available sensors. This extreme temperature response is due to metal ions contained in the egg-box structure of the pectin backbone, lodged between cellulose microfibrils. The presence of a network of CNTs stabilizes the response of cells at high temperatures without decreasing the activation energy of the material. CNTs also increase the background conductivity, making these materials suitable elements for thermal and distance sensors. PMID:25825744

  11. Modeling and Experimental Analysis on the Temperature Response of AlN-Film Based SAWRs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The temperature responses of aluminum nitride (AlN) based surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) are modeled and tested. The modeling of the electrical performance is based on a modified equivalent circuit model introduced in this work. For SAWR consisting of piezoelectric film and semiconducting substrate, parasitic parameters from the substrate is taken into consideration for the modeling. By utilizing the modified model, the high temperature electrical performance of the AlN/Si and AlN/6H-SiC based SAWRs can be predicted, indicating that a substrate with a wider band gap will lead to a more stable high temperature behavior, which is further confirmed experimentally by high temperature testing from 300 K to 725 K with SAWRs having a wavelength of 12 μm. Temperature responses of SAWR's center frequency are also calculated and tested, with experimental temperature coefficient factors (TCF) of center frequency being -29 ppm/K and -26 ppm/K for the AlN/Si and AlN/6H-SiC based SAWRs, which are close to the predicted values. PMID:27483286

  12. Temperature-responsive polymers and brushes with tunable onset of response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa; Efimenko, Kiril; Genzer, Jan; Manias, Evangelos

    2006-03-01

    Temperature-responsive polymers are of high interest in the scientific field of stimuli responsive materials, in particular water soluble polymers with a response at ˜36.5^oC. However, difficulties in tailoring this T-response, as illustrated for example from studies of PNIPAM in numerous functionalized and copolymer forms, has hampered their proliferation. Here we present a systematic series of temperature-responsive polymers, which were designed, synthesized, and studied, and we show that we can tailor with high sensitivity their onset of T-response via the design of their monomer. Specifically, we demonstrate lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water finely tuned between 5 and 70^oC, by controlling the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance in the monomer (closely following predictions of phase behavior theories). In addition, we will also show that these polymers maintain their T-responsive characteristics when end-tethered to solid surfaces, over a wide range of grafting densities in combinatorial brushes. This approach allows for controlling contact angle, adhesion and tackiness as a function of temperature.

  13. Recent development of temperature-responsive surfaces and their application for cell sheet engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhonglan; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering, which fabricates sheet-like tissues without biodegradable scaffolds, has been proposed as a novel approach for tissue engineering. Cells have been cultured and proliferate to confluence on a temperature-responsive cell culture surface at 37°C. By decreasing temperature to 20°C, an intact cell sheet can be harvested from the culture surface without enzymatic treatment. This new approach enables cells to keep their cell–cell junction, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrix. Therefore, recovered cell sheet can be easily not only transplanted to host tissue, but also constructed a three-dimensional (3D) tissue by layering cell sheets. Moreover, cell sheet manipulation technology and bioreactor have been combined with the cell sheet technology to fabricate a complex and functional 3D tissue in vitro. So far, cell sheet technology has been applied in regenerative medicine for several tissues, and a number of clinical studies have been performed. In this review, recent advances in the preparation of temperature-responsive cell culture surface, the fabrication of organ-like tissue and the clinical application of cell sheet engineering are summarized and discussed. PMID:26816628

  14. Preparation and catalytic performance of temperature-responsive cell-like particles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiufeng; Dai, Zhao; Guo, Wenjuan; Chu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    A novel kind of cell-like particles as temperature-responsive catalysts was presented in this paper. First, uniform α-Fe₂O₃shuttle-like nanoparticles were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis. Then, these α-Fe₂O₃particles were coated by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), SiO₂and poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), respectively. After the removal of SiO₂layer by etching with HF solution, the cell-like particles were prepared when the α-Fe₂O₃, AuNPs, and PNIPAM were as cell nucleus, catalysts, and cell membranes, respectively. These cell-like particles showed a novel temperature-responsively catalytic performance because the PNIPAM shell could change its hydrophilicity and swelling capacity under different temperature. When the temperature was 25°C, the yield of 4-aminophenol (4-AP) from 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by reduction of NaBH₄was about 100% in 15 min, while the yield of 4-AP was about 90.5% in 40 min. when the temperature was 40°C. PMID:25262506

  15. Changing temperature response turned boreal forest from carbon sink into carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelle, Achim; Hadden, David

    2015-04-01

    19 years of flux measurements reveal that a boreal forest in northern Sweden has turned from a carbon sink into a carbon source. A consistent annual uptake of about 4 tonnes CO2 per hectare turned into annual emissions of the same magnitude within a few years. While biomass increment and gross CO2 uptake remained unchanged, gross respiration has increased, mainly during the autumn periods. This increasingly reduced the annual number of days with net CO2 uptake. No significant trend towards higher temperatures could be observed during the measurement period. However, the temperature responses of ecosystem respiration have changed with time, leading to higher respiration rates in the temperature range between 0 °C and 5 °C, which is the most common range during spring and autumn. Consequently, respiration fluxes under those temperature conditions have increased, both in spring and - even more - in autumn. Thus the change of the carbon balance is not directly caused by climate warming, as stated in other studies, but by changes in ecosystem functioning. The reasons for the rapid change in temperature response are still unknown and may be sought in changes of litterfall and dead wood distribution, changes in fungi- and microbial communities, or hydrological changes.

  16. Simple Amides of Oleanolic Acid as Effective Penetration Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Partyka, Danuta; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal transport is now becoming one of the most convenient and safe pathways for drug delivery. In some cases it is necessary to use skin penetration enhancers in order to allow for the transdermal transport of drugs that are otherwise insufficiently skin-permeable. A series of oleanolic acid amides as potential transdermal penetration enhancers was formed by multistep synthesis and the synthesis of all newly prepared compounds is presented. The synthetized amides of oleanolic acid were tested for their in vitro penetration promoter activity. The above activity was evaluated by means of using the Fürst method. The relationships between the chemical structure of the studied compounds and penetration activity are presented. PMID:26010090

  17. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  18. New substituted amides and hydrazides of pectic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenko, V.L.; Potapova, L.B.; Slivkin, A.I.; Razumnaya, Z.A.

    1988-05-10

    Structural variants of pectin amides and hydrazides are of practical value as flocculants in water treatment. The purpose of this work was to further investigate the synthesis of substituted amides and hydrazides of pectic acid and to study their activity as flocculants. They used pectin, methylation products of pectin, pectic acid, and methyl pectates. The synthesized analogs of pectinic materials containing nitrogen are essentially copolymers of hydrazido (amido) and carboxyl (methoxyl) derivatives of D-galacturonic acid. The flocculant activity of the new polymers was monitored with simulated drainage water containing kaolin or abrasive powder (for glass manufacture) in the presence of polyvalent metal ions. The use of the new ampholytic flocculants in the purification of water from suspended impurities permits a high degree of clarification with a sharp decrease in reagent consumption.

  19. Amino alcohol-based degradable poly(ester amide) elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Currently available synthetic biodegradable elastomers are primarily composed of crosslinked aliphatic polyesters, which suffer from deficiencies including (1) high crosslink densities, which results in exceedingly high stiffness, (2) rapid degradation upon implantation, or (3) limited chemical moieties for chemical modification. Herein, we have developed poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate)s, a new class of synthetic, biodegradable elastomeric poly(ester amide)s composed of crosslinked networks based on an amino alcohol. These crosslinked networks feature tensile Young’s modulus on the order of 1 MPa and reversable elongations up to 92%. These polymers exhibit in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. These polymers have projected degradation half-lives up to 20 months in vivo. PMID:18295329

  20. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  1. Amide and Peptide Bond Formation in Water at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christopher M; Keener, Megan; Gallou, Fabrice; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2015-08-21

    A general and environmentally responsible method for the formation of amide/peptide bonds in an aqueous micellar medium is described. Use of uronium salt (1-cyano-2-ethoxy-2-oxoethylidenaminooxy)dimethylaminomorpholinocarbenium hexafluorophosphate (COMU) as a coupling reagent, 2,6-lutidine, and TPGS-750-M represents mild conditions associated with these valuable types of couplings. The aqueous reaction medium is recyclable leading to low E Factors. PMID:26251952

  2. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  3. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  4. Total chemical synthesis of lassomycin and lassomycin-amide.

    PubMed

    Lear, S; Munshi, T; Hudson, A S; Hatton, C; Clardy, J; Mosely, J A; Bull, T J; Sit, C S; Cobb, S L

    2016-05-11

    Herein we report a practical synthetic route to the lasso peptide lassomycin () and C-terminal variant lassomycin-amide (). The biological evaluation of peptides and against Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that neither had any activity against this bacterium. This lack of biological activity has led us to propose that naturally occurring lassomycin may actually exhibit a standard lasso peptide threaded conformation rather than the previously reported unthreaded structure. PMID:27101411

  5. Rapid Access to 3-Aminoindazoles from Tertiary Amides.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Patrick; Régnier, Sophie; Bechara, William S; Charette, André B

    2015-07-17

    A two-step synthesis of structurally diverse 3-aminoindazoles from readily available starting materials was developed. This sequence includes a one-pot synthesis of aminohydrazones through chemoselective Tf2O-mediated activation of tertiary amides and subsequent addition of nucleophilic hydrazides. These precursors then participate in an intramolecular ligand-free Pd-catalyzed C-H amination reaction. The azaheterocycles synthesized via this approach were further diversified through subsequent deprotection/functionalization reactions. PMID:26154712

  6. Mild Metal-Free Hydrosilylation of Secondary Amides to Amines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Lang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Yan-Rong

    2016-05-20

    The combination of amide activation by Tf2O with B(C6F5)3-catalyzed hydrosilylation with TMDS constitutes a method for the one-pot reduction of secondary amides to amines under mild conditions. The method displays a broad applicability for the reduction of many types of substrates, and shows good compatibility and excellent chemoselectivity for many sensitive functional groups. Reductions of a multifunctionalized α,β-unsaturated amide obtained from another synthetic methodology, and a C-H functionalization product produced the corresponding amines in good to excellent yield. Chemoselective reduction of enantiomeric pure (ee >99%) tetrahydro-5-oxo-2-furaneamides yielded 5-(aminomethyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-ones in a racemization-free manner. The latter were converted in one pot to N-protected 5-hydroxypiperidin-2-ones, which are building blocks for the synthesis of many natural products. Further elaboration of an intermediate led to a concise four-step synthesis of (-)-epi-pseudoconhydrine. PMID:27100232

  7. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  8. Isotope-enriched protein standards for computational amide I spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, Mike; Roy, Anish R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-03-28

    We present a systematic isotope labeling study of the protein G mutant NuG2b as a step toward the production of reliable, structurally stable, experimental standards for amide I infrared spectroscopic simulations. By introducing isotope enriched amino acids into a minimal growth medium during bacterial expression, we induce uniform labeling of the amide bonds following specific amino acids, avoiding the need for chemical peptide synthesis. We use experimental data to test several common amide I frequency maps and explore the influence of various factors on map performance. Comparison of the predicted absorption frequencies for the four maps tested with empirical assignments to our experimental spectra yields a root-mean-square error of 6-12 cm{sup −1}, with outliers of at least 12 cm{sup −1} in all models. This means that the predictions may be useful for predicting general trends such as changes in hydrogen bonding configuration; however, for finer structural constraints or absolute frequency assignments, the models are unreliable. The results indicate the need for careful testing of existing literature maps and shed light on possible next steps for the development of quantitative spectral maps.

  9. First synthesis and anticancer activity of novel naphthoquinone amides.

    PubMed

    Pradidphol, Narathip; Kongkathip, Ngampong; Sittikul, Pichamon; Boonyalai, Nonlawat; Kongkathip, Boonsong

    2012-03-01

    Sixteen novel naphthoquinone aromatic amides were synthesized by a new route starting from 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid in nine or ten steps with good to excellent yield. Amide formation reaction was carried out by using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as an efficient condensing agent leading to carboxamides in high yield. The key step for converting naphthol to 3-hydroxynaphthoquinone was the Fremy's salt oxidation followed by hydroxylation with tert-butyl hydroperoxide and triton B. Anticancer activity of these new naphthoquinone amides were evaluated and benzamide 22 showed potent inhibition against NCI-H187 cell lines while naphthamides 23 and 43 were the most potent inhibition against KB cells. The decatenation assay revealed that compounds 24 and 43 at 20 μM can inhibit hTopoIIα activity while three other compounds, namely compounds 22, 23, and 45, exhibited hTopoIIα inhibitory activity at final concentration of 50 μM. Docking experiment revealed the same trend as the cytotoxicity and decatenation assay. Therefore, naphthamides 24 and 43 can be promising target molecules for anticancer drug development. PMID:22280818

  10. MS/MS Digital Readout: Analysis of Binary Information Encoded in the Monomer Sequences of Poly(triazole amide)s.

    PubMed

    Amalian, Jean-Arthur; Trinh, Thanh Tam; Lutz, Jean-François; Charles, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry was evaluated as a reliable sequencing methodology to read codes encrypted in monodisperse sequence-coded oligo(triazole amide)s. The studied oligomers were composed of monomers containing a triazole ring, a short ethylene oxide segment, and an amide group as well as a short alkyl chain (propyl or isobutyl) which defined the 0/1 molecular binary code. Using electrospray ionization, oligo(triazole amide)s were best ionized as protonated molecules and were observed to adopt a single charge state, suggesting that adducted protons were located on every other monomer unit. Upon collisional activation, cleavages of the amide bond and of one ether bond were observed to proceed in each monomer, yielding two sets of complementary product ions. Distribution of protons over the precursor structure was found to remain unchanged upon activation, allowing charge state to be anticipated for product ions in the four series and hence facilitating their assignment for a straightforward characterization of any encoded oligo(triazole amide)s. PMID:26950162

  11. An Efficient Computational Model to Predict Protonation at the Amide Nitrogen and Reactivity along the C–N Rotational Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    N-protonation of amides is critical in numerous biological processes, including amide bonds proteolysis and protein folding, as well as in organic synthesis as a method to activate amide bonds towards unconventional reactivity. A computational model enabling prediction of protonation at the amide bond nitrogen atom along the C–N rotational pathway is reported. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of amides with a controlled degree of rotation in synthetic chemistry and biology. PMID:25766378

  12. Synergistic effects of three Piper amides on generalist and specialist herbivores.

    PubMed

    Dyer, L A; Dodson, C D; Stireman, J O; Tobler, M A; Smilanich, A M; Fincher, R M; Letourneau, D K

    2003-11-01

    The tropical rainforest shrub Piper cenocladum, which is normally defended against herbivores by a mutualistic ant, contains three amides that have various defensive functions. While the ants are effective primarily against specialist herbivores, we hypothesized that these secondary compounds would be effective against a wider range of insects, thus providing a broad array of defenses against herbivores. We also tested whether a mixture of amides would be more effective against herbivores than individual amides. Diets spiked with amides were offered to five herbivores: a naïve generalist caterpillar (Spodoptera frugiperda), two caterpillar species that are monophagous on P. cenocladum (Eois spp.), leaf-cutting ants (Atta cephalotes), and an omnivorous ant (Paraponera clavata). Amides had negative effects on all insects, whether they were naïve, experienced, generalized, or specialized feeders. For Spodoptera, amide mixtures caused decreased pupal weights and survivorship and increased development times. Eois pupal weights, larval mass gain, and development times were affected by additions of individual amides, but increased parasitism and lower survivorship were caused only by the amide mixture. Amide mixtures also deterred feeding by the two ant species, and crude plant extracts were strongly deterrent to P. clavata. The mixture of all three amides had the most dramatic deterrent and toxic effects across experiments, with the effects usually surpassing expected additive responses, indicating that these compounds can act synergistically against a wide array of herbivores. PMID:14682530

  13. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    2010-05-01

    We apply two scenarios of 11-year solar spectral forcing, namely SIM-based out-of-phase variations and proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM. For both scenarios, and both models, we find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, and temperature responses decrease downward to the surface. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of ~5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature response to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing resembles 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two scenarios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., one based on 11-year cycles with background [Lean 2000] and the second from flux transport that has much less background change [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide a range of variations of TSI on centennial time scales. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI. The spectral solar forcing is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provides a first-order estimate of climate response. We report the different responses of stratosphere, troposphere, and ocean surface to these 4 scenarios of centennial spectral solar forcing. We further discuss the mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere

  14. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  15. Overview of the Temperature Response in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere to Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beig, Gufran; Scheer, Juergen; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Keckhut, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The natural variability in the terrestrial mesosphere needs to be known to correctly quantify global change. The response of the thermal structure to solar activity variations is an important factor. Some of the earlier studies highly overestimated the mesospheric solar response. Modeling of the mesospheric temperature response to solar activity has evolved in recent years, and measurement techniques as well as the amount of data have improved. Recent investigations revealed much smaller solar signatures and in some case no significant solar signal at all. However, not much effort has been made to synthesize the results available so far. This article presents an overview of the energy budget of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) and an up-to-date status of solar response in temperature structure based on recently available observational data. An objective evaluation of the data sets is attempted and important factors of uncertainty are discussed.

  16. Biocompatible zwitterionic sulfobetaine copolymer-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for temperature-responsive drug release.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiao-Tong; Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2012-05-14

    A novel nanocontainer, which could regulate the release of payloads, has been successfully fabricated by attaching zwitterionic sulfobetaine copolymer onto the mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). RAFT polymerization is employed to prepare the hybrid poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-coated MSNs (MSN-PDMAEMA). Subsequently, the tertiary amine groups in PDMAEMA are quaternized with 1,3-propanesultone to get poly(DMAEMA-co-3-dimethyl(methacryloyloxyethyl)ammonium propanesulfonate)-coated MSNs [MSN-Poly(DMAEMA-co-DMAPS)]. The zwitterionic PDMAPS component endows the nanocarrier with biocompatibility, and the PDMAEMA component makes the copolymer shell temperature-responsive. Controlled release of loaded rhodamine B has been achieved in the saline solutions. PMID:22488562

  17. Temperature response of 129Xe depolarization transfer and its application for ultra-sensitive NMR detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2008-03-20

    Temporary trapping of atomic xenon in functionalized cryptophane cages makes the high sensitivity of hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe available for highly specific NMR detection of biomolecules like proteins in solution. Here, we study the signal transfer onto a reservoir of unbound hp xenon by gating the residence time of the nuclei in the cage through the temperature-dependent exchange rate. Temperature changes were detectable immediately as an altered reservoir signal and yielded a sensitivity of 0.6 K. The temperature response is adjustable with lower concentrations of caged xenon providing more sensitivity at higher temperatures and allows ultra-sensitive detection of such molecular cages at 310 K. Functionalized cryptophane could be detected at concentrations as low as 10nM which corresponds to a 4000-fold sensitivity enhancement compared to conventional detection. This sensitivity makes hp-NMR capable of detecting such constructs in concentrations far belowthe detection limit by UV-visible light absorbance.

  18. A temperature-responsive network links cell shape and virulence traits in a primary fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Beyhan, Sinem; Gutierrez, Matias; Voorhies, Mark; Sil, Anita

    2013-07-01

    Survival at host temperature is a critical trait for pathogenic microbes of humans. Thermally dimorphic fungal pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum, are soil fungi that undergo dramatic changes in cell shape and virulence gene expression in response to host temperature. How these organisms link changes in temperature to both morphologic development and expression of virulence traits is unknown. Here we elucidate a temperature-responsive transcriptional network in H. capsulatum, which switches from a filamentous form in the environment to a pathogenic yeast form at body temperature. The circuit is driven by three highly conserved factors, Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3, that are required for yeast-phase growth at 37°C. Ryp factors belong to distinct families of proteins that control developmental transitions in fungi: Ryp1 is a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, and Ryp2 and Ryp3 are both members of the Velvet family of proteins whose molecular function is unknown. Here we provide the first evidence that these WOPR and Velvet proteins interact, and that Velvet proteins associate with DNA to drive gene expression. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, we determine that Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3 associate with a large common set of genomic loci that includes known virulence genes, indicating that the Ryp factors directly control genes required for pathogenicity in addition to their role in regulating cell morphology. We further dissect the Ryp regulatory circuit by determining that a fourth transcription factor, which we name Ryp4, is required for yeast-phase growth and gene expression, associates with DNA, and displays interdependent regulation with Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3. Finally, we define cis-acting motifs that recruit the Ryp factors to their interwoven network of temperature-responsive target genes. Taken together, our results reveal a positive feedback circuit that directs a broad transcriptional switch between environmental and

  19. Acute Effects of Normobaric Hypoxia on Hand-Temperature Responses During and After Local Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Keramidas, Michail E, Roger Kölegård, Igor B. Mekjavic, and Ola Eiken. Acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. High Alt Med Biol. 15:183–191, 2014.—The purpose was to investigate acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after a cold-water hand immersion test. Fifteen males performed two right-hand immersion tests in 8°C water, during which they were inspiring either room air (Fio2: 0.21; AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (Fio2: 0.14; HYPO). The tests were conducted in a counterbalanced order and separated by a 1-hour interval. Throughout the 30-min cold-water immersion (CWI) and the 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) phases, finger-skin temperatures were measured continuously with thermocouple probes; infrared thermography was also employed during the RW phase to map all segments of the hand. During the CWI phase, the average skin temperature (Tavg) of the fingers did not differ between the conditions (AIR: 10.2±0.5°C, HYPO: 10.0±0.5°C; p=0.67). However, Tavg was lower in the HYPO than the AIR RW phase (AIR: 24.5±3.4°C; HYPO: 22.0±3.8°C; p=0.002); a response that was alike in all regions of the immersed hand. Accordingly, present findings suggest that acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia does not aggravate the cold-induced drop in hand temperature of normothermic males. Still, hypoxia markedly impairs the rewarming responses of the hand. PMID:24666109

  20. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  1. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  2. Iridium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydroalkynylation of Enamides for the Synthesis of Homopropargyl Amides.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Bi-Jie

    2016-07-25

    Reported is an iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydroalkynylation of enamides with terminal alkynes. The reaction occurs regioselectively at the β-position of an enamide to produce homopropargyl amides. Good to high enantioselectivity was observed with an iridium complex ligated by a chiral bis(phosphine) ligand. This method provides a straightforward route to synthesize chiral homopropargyl amides with a stereocenter β to the amide. PMID:27111577

  3. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jie-Ping; Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C-N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C-H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  4. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C–H bond amidation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C–N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C–H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  5. Synthesis of Imidates: TFA-Mediated Regioselective Amide Alkylation Using Meerwein's Reagent.

    PubMed

    Popov, Kirill; Somfai, Peter

    2016-04-15

    Regioselective O-alkylation of an amide to form the corresponding imidate is a common synthetic problem, often resulting in varying amounts of N-alkylation. Screening existing methods for converting amides to imidates gave inconsistent or irreproducible results, sometimes affording N-alkylamide as the major product. A simple and reliable protocol for amide O-alkylation with complete regioselectivity has been designed, and its scope and efficiency demonstrated on a number of substrates. PMID:27019206

  6. Copper-catalyzed direct amidation of heterocycles with N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sichang; Ni, Zhangqin; Huang, Xin; Wang, Jichao; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2014-11-01

    A highly efficient amidation reaction of heterocycles with N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide (NFSI) has been developed, presumably proceeding via C-H bond activation. Cuprous iodide was employed as the catalyst, and various α-amidated heterocycle derivatives have been generated in good to excellent yields. This chemistry endowed an economic method of synthesis of valuable amidated heterocycles through a direct C-N bond-coupling processes. PMID:25310043

  7. Copper-Catalyzed Reductive N-Alkylation of Amides with N-Tosylhydrazones Derived from Ketones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Qi, Fu-Ling; Han, Fu-She; Wang, Yan-Hua

    2016-07-20

    A CuI-catalyzed reductive coupling of ketone-derived N-tosylhydrazones with amides is presented. Under the optimized conditions, an array of N-tosylhydrazones derived from aryl-alkyl and diaryl ketones could couple effectively with a wide variety of (hetero)aryl as well as aliphatic amides to afford the N-alkylated amides in high yields. The method represents the very few examples for reliably accessing secondary and tertiary amides through a reductive N-alkylation protocol. PMID:27346856

  8. Evaluation of the Ser-His Dipeptide, a Putative Catalyst of Amide and Ester Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Melissa J; Lavis, Luke D; Hilvert, Donald; Gellman, Samuel H

    2016-08-01

    Efficient hydrolysis of amide bonds has long been a reaction of interest for organic chemists. The rate constants of proteases are unmatched by those of any synthetic catalyst. It has been proposed that a dipeptide containing serine and histidine is an effective catalyst of amide hydrolysis, based on an apparent ability to degrade a protein. The capacity of the Ser-His dipeptide to catalyze the hydrolysis of several discrete ester and amide substrates is investigated using previously described conditions. This dipeptide does not catalyze the hydrolysis of amide or unactivated ester groups in any of the substrates under the conditions evaluated. PMID:27400366

  9. BODIPY catalyzed amide synthesis promoted by BHT and air under visible light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Chao; Xue, Dong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2016-08-01

    A novel and efficient protocol for the synthesis of amides is reported which employs a BODIPY catalyzed oxidative amidation reaction between aromatic aldehydes and amines under visible light. Compared with the known Ru or Ir molecular catalysts and other organic dyes, the BODIPY catalyst showed higher reactivity toward this reaction. Mechanistic studies reveal that dioxygen could be activated through an ET and a SET pathway, forming active peroxides in situ, which are vital for the key step of the reaction, i.e. the oxidation of hemiaminal to amide. The broad substrate scope and mild reaction conditions make this reaction practically useful and environmentally friendly for the synthesis of amide compounds. PMID:27363514

  10. Formation of Amides from Imines via Cyanide-Mediated Metal-Free Aerobic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Ahn; Cho, Yeon-Ho; Lee, Ye-Sol; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2015-12-18

    A new protocol for the direct formation of amides from imines derived from aromatic aldehydes via metal-free aerobic oxidation in the presence of cyanide is described. This protocol was applicable to various aldimines, and the desired amides were obtained in moderate to good yields. Mechanistic studies suggested that this aerobic oxidative amidation might proceed via the addition of cyanide to imines followed by proton transfer from carbon to nitrogen in the original imines, leading to carbanions of α-amino nitriles, which undergo subsequent oxidation with molecular oxygen in air to provide the desired amide compounds. PMID:26580330

  11. Amide I band and photoinduced disassembly of a peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measey, Thomas J.; Markiewicz, Beatrice N.; Gai, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Peptide hydrogels are promising candidates for a wide range of medical and biotechnological applications. To further expand the potential utility of peptide hydrogels, herein we demonstrate a simple yet effective strategy to render peptide hydrogels photodegradable, making controlled disassembly of the gel structure of interest feasible. In addition, we find that the high-frequency amide I' component (i.e., the peak at ˜1685 cm-1) of the photodegradable peptide hydrogel studied shows an unusually large enhancement, in comparison to that of other peptide fibrils consisting of antiparallel β-sheets, making it a good model system for further study of the coupling-structure relationship.

  12. Dapdiamides, Tripeptide Antibiotics Formed by Unconventional Amide Ligases†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Construction of a genomic DNA library from Pantoea agglomerans strain CU0119 and screening against the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora yielded a new family of antibiotics, dapdiamides A−E (1−5). The structures were established through 2D-NMR experiments and mass spectrometry, as well as the synthesis of dapdiamide A (1). Transposon mutagenesis of the active cosmid allowed identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster. The dapdiamide family’s promiscuous biosynthetic pathway contains two unconventional amide ligases that are predicted to couple its constituent monomers. PMID:20041689

  13. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer. PMID:25510639

  14. Isolation and identification of fatty acid amides from Shengli coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ming-Jie Ding; Zhi-Min Zong; Ying Zong; Xiao-Dong Ou-Yang; Yao-Guo Huang; Lei Zhou; Feng Wang; Jiang-Pei Cao; Xian-Yong Wei

    2008-07-15

    Shengli coal, a Chinese brown coal, was extracted with carbon disulfide and the extract was gradiently eluted with n-hexane and ethyl acetate (EA)/n-hexane mixed solvents with different concentrations of EA in a silica gel-filled column. A series of fatty acid amides, including fourteen alkanamides (C{sub 15}-C{sub 28}) and three alkenamides (C{sub 18} and C{sub 22}), were isolated from the coal by this method and analyzed with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. An isotopic investigation of the temperature response of young and old soil organic matter respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Nancy; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Reay, David; Smith, Keith; Otten, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    The effect of temperature on rates of soil respiration is critical to our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and potential feedbacks to climate change. The relative temperature sensitivity of labile and recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM) is still controversial; different studies have produced contrasting results, indicating limited understanding of the underlying relationships between stabilisation processes and temperature. Current global carbon cycle models still rely on the assumption that SOM pools with different decay rates have the same temperature response, yet small differences in temperature response between pools could lead to very different climate feedbacks. This study examined the temperature response of soil respiration and the age of soil carbon respired from radiocarbon dated fractions of SOM (free, intra-aggregate and mineral-bound) and whole soils (organic and mineral layers). Samples were collected from a peaty gley soil from Harwood Forest, Northumberland, UK. SOM fractions were isolated from organic layer (5 - 17 cm) material using high density flotation and ultrasonic disaggregation - designated as free (< 1.8 g cm-3), intra-aggregate (< 1.8 g cm-3 within aggregates > 1.8 g cm-3) and mineral-bound (> 1.8 g cm-3) SOM. Fractions were analysed for chemical composition (FTIR, CHN analysis, ICP-OES), 14C (AMS), δ13C and δ15N (MS) and thermal properties (DSC). SOM fractions and bulk soil from the organic layer and the mineral layer (20 - 30 cm) were incubated in sealed vessels at 30 ° C and 10 ° C for 3 or 9 months to allow accumulation of CO2 sufficient for sampling. Accumulated respired CO2 samples were collected on zeolite molecular sieve cartridges and used for AMS radiocarbon dating. In parallel, material from the same fractions and layers were incubated at 10 ° C, 15 ° C, 25 ° C and 30 ° C for 6 months and sampled weekly for CO2 flux measurements using GC chromatography. Initial data have shown radiocarbon ages ranging

  16. A pH- and Temperature-Responsive Magnetic Composite Adsorbent for Targeted Removal of Nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yang; Ning, Zhuo; Shaopeng, Zhang; Yayi, Dong; Xuntong, Zhang; Jiachun, Shen; Weiben, Yang; Yuping, Wang; Jianqiang, Chen

    2015-11-11

    A pH- and temperature-responsive magnetic adsorbent [poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted chitosan/Fe3O4 composite particles, CN-MCP], was synthesized for the removal of the endocrine-disrupting chemical nonylphenol. According to the structural characteristics (changeable surface-charge and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties) of the targeted contaminant, CN-MCP was designed owning special structure (pH- and temperature-responsiveness for the changeable surface-charge and adjustable hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties, respectively). Compared to chitosan magnetic composite particles without grafting modification (CS-MCP) and several other reported adsorbents, CN-MCP exhibited relatively high adsorption capacity for nonylphenol under corresponding optimal conditions (123 mg/g at pH 9 and 20 °C; 116 mg/g at pH 5 and 40 °C). Meanwhile, high selectivity of the novel adsorbent in selective adsorption of nonylphenol from bisolute solution of nonylphenol and phenol was found. Effects of grafting ratio of the grafted polymer branches and coexisting inorganic salts on the adsorption were systematically investigated. Moreover, CN-MCP demonstrated desired reusability during 20 times of adsorption-desorption recycling. The high adsorption capacity, high selectivity, and desired reusability aforementioned revealed the significant application potential of CN-MCP in the removal of NP. On the basis of the adsorption behaviors, isotherms equilibrium, thermodynamics and kinetics studies, and instrumental analyses including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, BET specific surface area, zeta potential, and static water contact angle measurements, distinct adsorption mechanisms were found under various conditions: charge attraction between CN-MCP and the contaminant, as well as binding between polymeric branches of CN-MCP and nonyls, contributed to the adsorption at pH 9 and 20 °C; whereas hydrophobic interaction between CN-MCP and nonylphenol played a dominant role at pH 5 and 40

  17. Global temperature response to the major volcanic eruptions in multiple reanalysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Hibino, T.; Mehta, S. K.; Gray, L.; Mitchell, D.; Anstey, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global temperature responses to the eruptions of Mount Agung in 1963, El Chichón in 1982, and Mount Pinatubo in 1991 are investigated using nine currently available reanalysis data sets (JRA-55, MERRA, ERA-Interim, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, ERA-40, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, and 20CR). Multiple linear regression is applied to the zonal and monthly mean time series of temperature for two periods, 1979-2009 (for eight reanalysis data sets) and 1958-2001 (for four reanalysis data sets), by considering explanatory factors of seasonal harmonics, linear trends, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, solar cycle, and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The residuals are used to define the volcanic signals for the three eruptions separately, and common and different responses among the older and newer reanalysis data sets are highlighted for each eruption. In response to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, most reanalysis data sets show strong warming signals (up to 2-3 K for 1-year average) in the tropical lower stratosphere and weak cooling signals (down to -1 K) in the subtropical upper troposphere. For the El Chichón eruption, warming signals in the tropical lower stratosphere are somewhat smaller than those for the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The response to the Mount Agung eruption is asymmetric about the equator with strong warming in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. Comparison of the results from several different reanalysis data sets confirms the atmospheric temperature response to these major eruptions qualitatively, but also shows quantitative differences even among the most recent reanalysis data sets. The consistencies and differences among different reanalysis data sets provide a measure of the confidence and uncertainty in our current understanding of the volcanic response. The results of this intercomparison study may be useful for validation of climate model responses to volcanic forcing and for assessing proposed geoengineering by stratospheric

  18. Extraction and spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum with thiocyanate and amides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, K.S.; Khatri, H.; Mishra, K.

    1983-09-01

    The organic solution of commonly available amides (HAL), such as N-phenylacetamide, N-(methylphenyl) acetamide, N-(dimethylphenyl)acetamide, N-(diethylphenyl)acetamide, N-phenylpropionamide, N-phenylbutramide, and benzamide, is capable of extracting Mo(V) from SCN/sup -/ solutions. Mo(VI) was reduced to Mo(V) with mild reducing agents and allowed to react with SCN/sup -/ in strongly acidic media. The species formed was extracted with a benzene solution of amide dimers as a mixed-ligand complex. The special advantage of the method is that the HAL has good chemical stability with a very simple method of preparation. Moreover, it eliminates most of the drawbacks of established methods, such as interference from metal ions, variation of color intensity of the complex with respect to amounts of reagents, or prolonged extraction of the metal. The effect of various acids in the extraction of the metal was studied, as well as the effect of diverse ions in the determination of Mo. The ions and their tolerated amounts causing an error <2% are reported. The present method was accurately applied to ore, alloy steels, and synthetic matrices. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Collagen and component polypeptides: Low frequency and amide vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Merzel, F.; Johnson, M. R.; Kearley, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is a fibrous protein, which exists widely in the human body. The biomechanical properties of collagen depend on its triple helix structure and the corresponding low frequency vibrations. We use first-principles, density functional theory methods and analytical force fields to investigate the molecular vibrations of a model collagen compound, the results being validated by comparison with published, inelastic neutron scattering data. The results from these atomistic simulations are used at higher frequency to study the Amide I and V vibrations and therefore the vibrational signature of secondary and tertiary structure formation. In addition to collagen, its component homopolymers, poly-glycine and poly-proline are also studied. The Amide V vibration of glycine is strongly modified in going from the single helix of poly-glycine II to the triple helix of collagen. The collagen models are hydrated and this work allows us to discuss the relative merits of density functional theory and force field methods when tackling complex, partially crystalline systems.

  20. Interaction of thioamides, selenoamides, and amides with diiodine.

    PubMed

    Hadjikakou, Sotiris K; Hadjiliadis, Nick

    2006-01-01

    We review the results of our work on the iodine interaction with thioamides, selenoamides, and amides. Complexes with (i) "spoke" or "extended spoke" structures, D . I(2) and D . I(2) . I(2), respectively, (D is the ligand donor) (ii) iodonium salts of {[D(2) - I](+)[I(n)](-)} (n = 3, 7) and {[D(2) - I](+)[FeCl(4)](-)} formulae and (iii) disulfides of the categories (a) [D - D], (b) {[D - DH](+)[I(3)](-)} have been isolated and characterized. A compound of formula {[D(2) - I](+)[I(3)](-)[D . I(2)]} containing both types of complexes (i) and (ii) was also isolated. The interaction of diiodine with selenium analogs of the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU), of formulae RSeU (6-alkyl-2-Selenouracil) results in the formation of complexes with formulae [(RSeU)I(2)]. All these results are correlated with the mechanism of action of antithyroid drugs. Finally, we review here our work on the diiodine interaction with the amides (LO). PMID:17497011

  1. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability. PMID:26263697

  2. Complexation of di-amides of dipicolinic acid with neodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Lapka, J.L.; Paulenova, A.

    2013-07-01

    Di-amides have undergone significant studies as possible ligands for use in the partitioning of trivalent minor actinides and lanthanides. The binding affinities of three isomeric ligands with neodymium in acetonitrile solution have been investigated. The stability constants of the metal-ligand complexes formed between different isomers of N,N'-diethyl-N,N'- ditolyl-di-picolinamide (EtTDPA) and trivalent neodymium in acetonitrile have been determined by spectrophotometric and calorimetric methods. Each isomer of EtTDPA has been found to be capable of forming three complexes with trivalent neodymium, Nd(EtTDPA), Nd(EtTDPA){sub 2}, and Nd(EtTDPA){sub 3}. Values from spectrophotometric and calorimetric titrations are within reasonable agreement with each other. The order of stability constants for each metal:ligand complex decreases in the order Et(m)TDPA > Et(p)TDPA > Et(o)TDPA. The obtained values are comparable to other di-amidic ligands obtained under similar system conditions and mirror previously obtained solvent extraction data for EtTDPA at low ionic strengths. (authors.

  3. Body temperature responses of Savanna Brown goat to the harmattan and hot-dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igono, M. O.; Molokwu, E. C. I.; Aliu, Y. O.

    1982-09-01

    Rectal and vaginal temperature responses of the Savanna Brown goat indigenous to the Nigerian guinea savanna were determined during the harmattan and the hot-dry season. Measurements were made at 06:00h and at 14:00h after 8h exposure to field conditions. At the 06:00h measurements during the harmattan, all animals were observed to shiver. A significant (P<0.01) positive correlation was found between rectal (Tre) and vaginal temperatures. During the harmattan, mean Tre was 38.2‡C at 06:00h and 39.7‡C at 14:00h; the mean difference, δTre was 1.5‡C. During the hot-dry season, Tre at 06:00h was 38.1‡C, and at 14:00h, 38.7; δTre was 0.6‡C. It is concluded that the harmattan is thermally more stressful than the hot-dry season and that passive thermolability may not be an important mechanism in the Savanna Brown goat in adaptation to thermal stress.

  4. Preparation and characterization of temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles for multi-modal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Aihua; Chen, Qi; Ai, Fanrong; Wang, Deping; Huang, Wenhai

    2011-10-01

    The temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles were synthesized by emulsion-free polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and acrylamide (Am) in the presence of oleic acid-modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The magnetic properties and heat generation ability of the composite particles were characterized. Furthermore, temperature and alternating magnetic field (AMF) triggered drug release behaviors of vitamin B(12)-loaded composite particles were also examined. It was found that composite particles enabled drug release to be controlled through temperature changes in the neighborhood of lower critical solution temperature. Continuous application of AMF resulted in an accelerated release of the loaded drug. On the other hand, intermittent AMF application to the composite particles resulted in an "on-off", stepwise release pattern. Longer release duration and larger overall release could be achieved by intermittent application of AMF as compared to continuous magnetic field. Such composite particles may be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release. PMID:21833605

  5. Velocity and Temperature Response Functions of 77 Near-Infrared (800 - 1400 nm) Photospheric Lines - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penza, V.; Berrilli, F.

    2012-04-01

    We present a new list of solar photospheric lines in the near-infrared (NIR) region obtained by synthesis under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation. We give novel velocity and temperature response functions (RFs) for 77 lines over the spectral range 800 - 1400 nm. Using these RFs, we are able to obtain for each line the core formation height and the range of atmospheric layers where thermodynamic perturbations are dominant. Moreover, by using the depth-integrated RFs, we give an indication of the dependence on the wavelength of the RFs and quantify their sensitivity to thermodynamic variations. The NIR region represents a significant source of interest for spectroscopic and polarimetric studies. Indeed, at these wavelengths we explore the deeper photospheric layers, and the Zeeman splitting is larger than in the visible range. Several research fields in solar astrophysics ( e.g., photospheric and chromospheric dynamics, magnetoconvection in active regions, and interaction between solar plasma and magnetic field) should benefit from using this new line list. Moreover, various new NIR instruments are planned for future space missions or next generation ground-based solar telescopes, such as the European Solar Telescope (EST) or the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  6. Direct effects of endogenous pyrogen on medullary temperature-responsive neurons in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Y; Morimoto, A; Takase, Y; Murakami, N

    1981-01-01

    The effect of endogenous pyrogen (E.P.) injected directly into the tissue near the recording site were examined on the activities of the medullary temperature-responsive (TR) neurons in rabbits anesthetized with urethane. Endogenous pyrogen prepared from rabbit's whole blood was administered by a fine glass cannula (100-200 micrometer in diameter) in a fluid volume of 1 to 4 microliter. The cannula was fixed to the manipulator in parallel with a microelectrode and their tips were less than 0.05 mm apart. In rabbits with the intact preoptic/anterior hypothalamic (PO/AH) region, 4 warm-responsive neurons out of 7 were inhibited and 6 cold-responsive neuron out of 7 were excited by the direct administration of the E.P. In rabbits with lesions of the PO/AH, 5 warm-responsive neurons out of 9 were inhibited and 6 cold-responsive neurons out of 8 were facilitated by E.P. Antipyretics administered locally after the E.P. antagonized the pyretic effect, causing a return of the discharge of TR neuron to the control rate within 2.4 +/- 1.2 (mean +/- S.D.) min. The medullary TR neuron itself has the ability to respond to the E.P. and contributes to the development of fever. PMID:7289227

  7. Self-Assembly of Temperature-Responsive Protein-Polymer Bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Moatsou, Dafni; Li, Jian; Ranji, Arnaz; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Ntai, Ioanna; Jewett, Michael C; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2015-09-16

    We report a simple temperature-responsive bioconjugate system comprising superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) decorated with poly[(oligo ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (PEGMA) polymers. We used amber suppression to site-specifically incorporate the non-canonical azide-functional amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF) into sfGFP at different positions. The azide moiety on modified sfGFP was then coupled using copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry with the alkyne terminus of a PEGMA synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The protein in the resulting bioconjugate was found to remain functionally active (i.e., fluorescent) after conjugation. Turbidity measurements revealed that the point of attachment of the polymer onto the protein scaffold has an impact on the thermoresponsive behavior of the resultant bioconjugate. Furthermore, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis showed the wrapping of the polymer around the protein in a temperature-dependent fashion. Our work demonstrates that standard genetic manipulation combined with an expanded genetic code provides an easy way to construct functional hybrid biomaterials where the location of the conjugation site on the protein plays an important role in determining material properties. We anticipate that our approach could be generalized for the synthesis of complex functional materials with precisely defined domain orientation, connectivity, and composition. PMID:26083370

  8. The use of infrared thermography to detect the skin temperature response to physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity has a noticeable effect on skin blood flow and temperature. The thermal regulatory and hemodynamic processes during physical activity are controlled by two conflicting mechanisms: the skin vasoconstriction induced by the blood flow demand to active muscles and the skin vasodilation required by thermoregulation to increase warm blood flow and heat conduction to the skin. The time-evolution of skin temperature during exercise can give useful information about the adaptation of the subject as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise. In this paper, infrared thermography is used to investigate the thermal response of skin temperature during running exercise on treadmill for a group of seven healthy and trained runners. Two different treadmill exercises are considered: a graded load exercise and a constant load exercise; for both exercises the duration was 30 minutes. Within the limits due to the relatively small size of the sample group, results typically indicate a fall in skin temperature during the initial stage of running exercise. As the exercise progresses, the dynamics of the skin temperature response depends on the type of exercise (graded versus constant load) and probably on the level of training of the subject.

  9. Stream temperature response to three riparian vegetation scenarios by use of a distributed temperature validated model.

    PubMed

    Roth, T R; Westhoff, M C; Huwald, H; Huff, J A; Rubin, J F; Barrenetxea, G; Vetterli, M; Parriaux, A; Selkeer, J S; Parlange, M B

    2010-03-15

    Elevated in-stream temperature has led to a surge in the occurrence of parasitic intrusion proliferative kidney disease and has resulted in fish kills throughout Switzerland's waterways. Data from distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in-stream measurements for three cloud-free days in August 2007 over a 1260 m stretch of the Boiron de Merges River in southwest Switzerland were used to calibrate and validate a physically based one-dimensional stream temperature model. Stream temperature response to three distinct riparian conditions were then modeled: open, in-stream reeds, and forest cover. Simulation predicted a mean peak stream temperature increase of 0.7 °C if current vegetation was removed, an increase of 0.1 °C if dense reeds covered the entire stream reach, and a decrease of 1.2 °C if a mature riparian forest covered the entire reach. Understanding that full vegetation canopy cover is the optimal riparian management option for limiting stream temperature, in-stream reeds, which require no riparian set-aside and grow very quickly, appear to provide substantial thermal control, potentially useful for land-use management. PMID:20131784

  10. Seasonal temperature responses to land-use change in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kueppers, L.M.; Snyder, M.A.; Sloan, L.C.; Cayan, D.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Kanamitsu, M.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, Mary; Du, H.; Weare, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the western United States, more than 79 000??km2 has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. These changes have the potential to alter surface temperature by modifying the energy budget at the land-atmosphere interface. This study reports the seasonally varying temperature responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) - RSM, RegCM3, MM5-CLM3, and DRCM - to conversion of potential natural vegetation to modern land-cover and land-use over a 1-year period. Three of the RCMs supplemented soil moisture, producing large decreases in the August mean (- 1.4 to - 3.1????C) and maximum (- 2.9 to - 6.1????C) 2-m air temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9% to 36% absolute change). Modeled changes in the August minimum 2-m air temperature were not as pronounced or consistent across the models. Converting natural vegetation to urban land-cover produced less pronounced temperature effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effect dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type and urban parameterizations. Overall, the RCM results indicate that the temperature impacts of land-use change are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface soil moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Controllable and switchable drug delivery of ibuprofen from temperature responsive composite nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Toan; Hernandez, Mariana; Patel, Dhruvil; Burns, Elena; Peterman, Vanessa; Wu, Ji

    2015-08-01

    Composited electrospun nanofibers made of temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) and biodegradable poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) can be utilized for `on-demand' and controlled drug release of ibuprofen without burst effect for potential pharmaceutical applications. Three types of nanofibers, PCL, pNIPAM and pNIPAM/PCL composite NFs containing ibuprofen were fabricated using electrospinning techniques. Ibuprofen release rates from PCL NFs are not affected by the temperature in the range of 22-34°C (less than 10%). In contrast, the ibuprofen release rates from pNIPAM NFs are very sensitive to the change in temperature, which is five times higher at 22°C compared to 34°C. However, there is a serious burst effect at 22°C. Compared to other two types of NFs, pNIPAM/PCL composite NFs prepared demonstrated a variable and controlled release at both room and higher temperature, due to the extra protection from the hydrophobic poly (ɛ-caprolactone). The rate at 22°C is 75% faster compared to that at 34°C. This kind of composite design can provide a novel approach to suppress the burst effect in drug delivery systems for potential pharmaceutical applications.

  12. Tunable temperature responsive liquid chromatography through thiolactone-based immobilization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).

    PubMed

    Satti, Angel J; Espeel, Pieter; Martens, Steven; Van Hoeylandt, Tim; Du Prez, Filip E; Lynen, Frederic

    2015-12-24

    A straightforward and efficient functionalization of aminopropylsilica with polymeric structures is described for the development of temperature responsive stationary phases applicable in purely aqueous liquid chromatography. The immobilization of the thermoresponsive polymers involves a thiolactone-based ring opening using the primary amines in aminopropylsilica, with a simultaneous one-pot, thiol-ene functionalization with an acrylate of choice. This mild, straightforward and modular grafting process results in high polymer coupling yields. By variation of the acrylate for the thiol-ene reaction, different stationary phases can be readily obtained. Two stationary phases as a result of the modular modification of aminopropylsilica were evaluated with test mixtures of hydrophobic analytes and a mixture of di- and tripeptides. Analyses using the 5μm material packed in 10cm×4.6mm columns revealed high hydrophobic retention, which proved adaptable as a function of the temperature in aqueous mobile phases. High versus low retention were obtained at temperatures above and below the lower critical solution temperature of the polymer, respectively. Moreover, the columns depict potential for diastereoisomeric peptide separation. Finally, the lower retention, observed when using PEGylated silica, illustrates the potential of the approach for modular stationary phase tuning. PMID:26655790

  13. Novel temperature-responsive polymer brushes with carbohydrate residues facilitate selective adhesion and collection of hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idota, Naokazu; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Narain, Ravin; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-12-01

    Temperature-responsive glycopolymer brushes were designed to investigate the effects of grafting architectures of the copolymers on the selective adhesion and collection of hypatocytes. Homo, random and block sequences of N-isopropylacrylamide and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate were grafted on glass substrates via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The galactose/lactose-specific lectin RCA120 and HepG2 cells were used to test for specific recognition of the polymer brushes containing galactose residues over the lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs). RCA120 showed a specific binding to the brush surfaces at 37 °C. These brush surfaces also facilitated the adhesion of HepG2 cells at 37 °C under nonserum conditions, whereas no adhesion was observed for NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. When the temperature was decreased to 25 °C, almost all the HepG2 cells detached from the block copolymer brush, whereas the random copolymer brush did not release the cells. The difference in releasing kinetics of cells from the surfaces with different grafting architectures can be explained by the correlated effects of significant changes in LCST, mobility, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of the grafted polymer chains. These findings are important for designing ‘on-off’ cell capture/release substrates for various biomedical applications such as selective cell separation.

  14. Effects of head cooling on cardiovascular and body temperature responses during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Watanuki, S

    1993-11-01

    Cardiovascular and body temperature responses during submaximal exercise (25% and 50% VO2max) were investigated using female subjects (n = 6) in two separate experiments; one with head cooling and heating and the other with torso heating with and without head cooling. To supply the heat load, a liquid conditioned cap and vest were used. In the first experiment, a significant decrease in heart rate, oxygen intake (VO2) and cardiac output (Q) at relative work intensity of 50% VO2max was observed by head cooling. These results show that head cooling is very effective to reduce the physiological strain. In the second experiment, Q as a function of VO2 during torso heating was decreased by head cooling. However, the tympanic membrane temperature during head cooling at 15 degrees C was significantly higher than that at 20 degrees C and it was almost the same level with torso heating without head cooling. The results suggest that excess head cooling is not beneficial in terms of improving the body heat dissipation. PMID:8123182

  15. Light- and temperature-responsive liposomes incorporating cinnamoyl Pluronic F127.

    PubMed

    Wang, MinHui; Kim, Jin-Chul

    2014-07-01

    Light- and temperature-responsive liposomes were prepared by immobilizing cinnamoyl Pluronic F127 (CP F127) on the surface of egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes. CP F127 was prepared by a condensation reaction, and the molar ratio of cinnamoyl group to Pluronic F127 was calculated to be 1:1.4 on (1)H NMR spectrum. The cinnamoyl group of CP F127 was readily dimerized under the irradiation of a UV light (254 nm, 6 W). CP F127 decreased the absolute value of the zeta potential of liposome possibly because it can shift the hydrodynamic plane away from the liposome surface. The size of liposome decorated with CP F127, measured on a dynamic light scattering machine and observed on a TEM, was larger than that of bare liposome. The liposome bearing CP F127 seemed to fuse and aggregate each other. The liposome released calcein, a fluorescence dye, in response to a UV irradiation, possibly because the photo-dimerization of cinnamoyl group perturbs the liposomal membrane. Moreover, the liposome released the dye in response to a temperature change, possible due to the phase transition of Pluronic F127 layer on the liposomal surface or the hydrophobic interaction of the polymer with liposomal membrane. PMID:24709213

  16. A bimodal temperature response and effect of light intensity in the photocontrol of germination of seeds in Jussiaea suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Wulff, R; Arias, I; Ponce, M; Muñoz, V

    1972-12-01

    A bimodal temperature response is observed in the germination of seeds in Jussiaea suffruticosa, both under continuous and cyclic light treatments. Germination exhibits two maxima at around 25° C and at 40°, and a minimum in the region of 30-35°. The response depends on light intensity both under continuous and intermittent light treatments. This dependence is much more noticeable in the region of minimum germination (30°). Both preincubation in darkness at 35° and high light intensities (15 500 lux) tend to eliminate the bimodal temperature response. PMID:24477485

  17. Biosynthesis of peptide neurotransmitters: studies on the formation of peptide amides.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A F; Smyth, D G

    1988-01-01

    A high proportion of peptide transmitters and peptide hormones terminate their peptide chain in a C-terminal amide group which is essential for their biological activity. The specificity of an enzyme that catalyses the formation of the amide was investigated with the aid of synthetic peptide substrates. With peptides containing l-amino acids the enzyme exhibited an essential requirement for glycine in the C-terminal position; amidation did not take place with peptides that had leucine, alanine, glutamic acid, lysine or N-methylglycine at the C-terminus and a peptide extended by the attachment of lysine to the C-terminal glycine did not act as a substrate. Amidation did occur with a peptide containing C-terminal D-alanine but no reaction was detected with peptides having C-terminal, D-serine or D-leucine. In tripeptides with a neutral amino acid in the penultimate position, amidation, took place readily but the reaction was slower when this position was occupied by an acidic or a basic residue. A series of overlapping peptides with C-terminal glycine, based on partial sequences of calcitonin, underwent amidation at similar rates, indicating that the amidating enzyme recognizes only a limited sequence at the C-terminus of its substrates. The results provide evidence that the amidating enzyme has a highly compact substrate binding site. PMID:2906151

  18. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  3. Reaction of arynes with vinylogous amides: nucleophilic addition to the ortho-quinodimethide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wang, Xuemei; Wei, Zhibin; Wu, Chunrui; Shi, Feng

    2013-09-01

    The reaction of arynes with vinylogous amides containing no free N-H bonds proceeds in a [2 + 2] cycloaddition fashion at ambient temperature. The electronic properties of the vinylogous amides allow for the cycloadducts undergoing a facile ring-opening process, leading to electronically biased ortho-quinodimethide intermediates. Subsequent nucleophilic addition with alcohols affords 2-substituted benzaldehydes or ketones. PMID:23957502

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of backbone/amide-modified analogs of leualacin.

    PubMed

    Hu, M K; Yang, F C; Chou, C C; Yen, M H

    1999-02-22

    Leualacin (1), a cyclic depsi-pentapeptide, and its backbone/amide-modified analogs 2-4 were synthesized. Amide analogue 3 exhibited stronger vasodilatory effects. It also strongly inhibited collagen- and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregations with IC50s of 0.6 microM and 2.0 microM, respectively. PMID:10098664

  5. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkylsulfate salt. 721.720 Section 721.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  10. Langmuir films of an amide extracted from Piperaceae and its interaction with phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, P. A.; Oliveira, O. N.; Aroca, R. F.; Chierice, G. O.; Constantino, C. J. L.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we investigate Langmuir monolayers from an amide extracted from dried roots of Ottonia propinqua, a native Brazilian plant believed to exhibit anesthetic and hallucinogen activities. In addition to producing monolayers from the amide itself, we probe the molecular-level action of the amide on phospholipids employed as simple membrane models. The surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms for the amide were little affected by a number of subphase conditions. Almost no changes were observed upon varying the compression speed, spreading volume onto the surface, ions in the subphase, ionic strength and the solution solvent. However, stronger effects occurred when the subphase temperature and pH were altered, as the isotherms were shifted to larger areas with increasing temperatures and decreasing pHs. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular packing adopted by the amide at the air-water interface. In the mixed films with arachidic acid, the area per molecule varied linearly with the concentration of amide, probably due to phase separation. On the other hand, in the mixed films with dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), small amounts of the amide were sufficient to change the π- A isotherms significantly. This points to a strong molecular-level interaction, probably between the phosphate group in the zwitterion of DPPC and the nitrogen from the amidic group.

  11. Bifurcate localization modes of excess electron in aqueous Ca(2+)amide solution revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation: towards hydrated electron versus hydrated amide anion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-07-28

    In this work, we conduct ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on the localization dynamics of an excess electron (EE) in acetamide/Ca(2+) aqueous solutions with three different interaction modes of Ca(2+) with acetamide: tight contact, solvent-shared state, and separated interaction. The simulated results reveal that an EE could exhibit two different localization behaviors in these acetamide/Ca(2+) aqueous solutions depending on different amideCa(2+) interactions featuring different contact distances. For the tight contact and solvent-shared state of amideCa(2+) solutions, vertically injected diffuse EEs follow different mechanisms with different dynamics, forming a cavity-shaped hydrated electron or a hydrated amide anion, respectively. Meanwhile, for the separated state, only one localization pattern of a vertically injected diffuse EE towards the formation of hydrated amide anion is observed. The hindrance of hydrated Ca(2+) and the attraction of the hydrated amide group originating from its polarity and low energy π* orbital are the main driving forces. Additionally, different EE localization modes have different effects on the interaction between the amide group and Ca(2+) in turn. This work provides an important basis for further understanding the mechanisms and dynamics of localizations/transfers of radiation-produced EEs and associated EE-induced lesions and damage to biological species in real biological environments or other aqueous solutions. PMID:27351489

  12. Amide enolate additions to acylsilanes: in situ generation of unusual and stereoselective homoenolate equivalents.

    PubMed

    Lettan, Robert B; Galliford, Chris V; Woodward, Chase C; Scheidt, Karl A

    2009-07-01

    The synthesis of beta-hydroxy carbonyl compounds is an important goal due to their prevalence in bioactive molecules. A novel approach to construct these structural motifs involves the multicomponent reaction of acylsilanes, amides, and electrophiles. The addition of amide enolates to acylsilanes generates beta-silyloxy homoenolate reactivity by undergoing a 1,2-Brook rearrangement. These unique nucleophiles formed in situ can then undergo addition to alkyl halides, aldehydes, ketones, and imines. The gamma-amino-beta-hydroxy amide products derived from the addition of these homoenolates to N-diphenylphosphinyl imines are generated with excellent diastereoselectivity (> or = 20:1) and can be efficiently converted to highly valuable gamma-lactams. Finally, the use of optically active amide enolates delivers beta-hydroxy amide products with high levels of diastereoselectivity (> or = 10:1). PMID:19505076

  13. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups. PMID:26256383

  14. Temperature response of photosynthesis in different drug and fiber varieties of Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Lata, Hemant; Khan, Ikhlas A; Elsohly, Mahmoud A

    2011-07-01

    The temperature response on gas and water vapour exchange characteristics of three medicinal drug type (HP Mexican, MX and W1) and four industrial fiber type (Felinq 34, Kompolty, Zolo 11 and Zolo 15) varieties of Cannabis sativa, originally from different agro-climatic zones worldwide, were studied. Among the drug type varieties, optimum temperature for photosynthesis (Topt) was observed in the range of 30-35 °C in high potency Mexican HPM whereas, it was in the range of 25-30 °C in W1. A comparatively lower value (25 °C) for Topt was observed in MX. Among fiber type varieties, Topt was around 30 °C in Zolo 11 and Zolo 15 whereas, it was near 25 °C in Felinq 34 and Kompolty. Varieties having higher maximum photosynthesis (PN max) had higher chlorophyll content as compared to those having lower PN max. Differences in water use efficiency (WUE) were also observed within and among the drug and fiber type plants. However, differences became less pronounced at higher temperatures. Both stomatal and mesophyll components seem to be responsible for the temperature dependence of photosynthesis (PN) in this species, however, their magnitude varied with the variety. In general, a two fold increase in dark respiration with increase in temperature (from 20 °C to 40 °C) was observed in all the varieties. However, a greater increase was associated with the variety having higher rate of photosynthesis, indicating a strong association between photosynthetic and respiratory rates. The results provide a valuable indication regarding variations in temperature dependence of PN in different varieties of Cannabis sativa L. PMID:23573022

  15. Regulation of BN115, a low-temperature-responsive gene from winter Brassica napus.

    PubMed Central

    White, T C; Simmonds, D; Donaldson, P; Singh, J

    1994-01-01

    The genomic clone for BN115, a low-temperature-responsive gene, was isolated from winter Brassica napus and its sequence was determined. A 1.2-kb fragment of the 5' regulatory region (from bp -1107 to +100) was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and BN115-promoted GUS expression was observed in green tissues of transgenic B. napus plants only after incubation at 2 degrees C. No expression was observed after incubation at 22 degrees C, either in the presence or the absence of ABA. Microprojectile bombardment of winter B. napus leaves with a BN115 promoter/GUS construct yielded similar results and was used to analyze a series of deletions from the 5' end of the promoter. Results obtained from transient expression studies showed that the low-temperature regulation of BN115 expression involves a possible enhancer region between bp -1107 and -802 and a second positive regulatory region located between bp -302 and -274. Deletion analyses and results from replacement with a truncated cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter suggest that the minimal size required for any maintenance of low-temperature GUS expression is a -300-bp fragment. Within this fragment are two 8-bp elements with the sequence TGGCCGAC, which are identical to those present in the positive regulatory region of the promoter of the homologous Arabidopsis cor15a gene and to a 5-bp core sequence in the low-temperature- and dehydration-responsive elements identified in the promoter regions of several cold-responsive Arabidopsis thaliana genes. PMID:7824659

  16. pH- and temperature-responsive aqueous foams stabilized by hairy latex particles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Akiyama, Ko; Nakayama, Saori; Hamasaki, Sho; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-21

    Polystyrene (PS) particles carrying pH- and temperature-responsive poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMA) hairs (PDMA-PS particles) were synthesized by dispersion polymerization. The diameter, diameter distribution, morphology, chemical composition and surface chemistry of the particles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental microanalysis, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. The hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance of the PDMA could be tuned by varying both pH and temperature and therefore these sterically stabilized particles acted as doubly stimuli-responsive stabilizers for aqueous foams by adsorption and desorption to/from the air-water interface. At and above pH 6.0, in which range the PDMA hairs were either non-protonated or partially protonated, particle-stabilized foams were formed at both 23 and 55 °C. The foam prepared at 55 °C was the more stable of the two, lasting for at least 24 h, whereas the 23 °C foam destabilized within 24 h. SEM studies indicated that the particles adsorbed at the air-water interface as monolayers at 23 °C and as multilayers at 55 °C. At and below pH 5, in which range the hairs were cationic, hydrophilic and water-soluble, no foam was formed irrespective of temperature. Rapid defoaming could be induced by lowering the solution pH at both temperatures, due to rapid in situ protonation of the PDMA hairs, prompting the PDMA-PS particles to desorb from the air-water interface. The foaming and defoaming cycles could be repeated at least five times. PMID:25426611

  17. Temperature response of carbon isotope discrimination and mesophyll conductance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Evans, John R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    The partial pressure of CO2 at the sites of carboxylation within chloroplasts depends on the conductance to CO2 diffusion from intercellular airspace to the sites of carboxylation, termed mesophyll conductance (gm ). We investigated the temperature response of gm in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) by combining gas exchange in high light, ambient CO2 in either 2 or 21% O2 with carbon isotope measurements using tuneable diode laser spectroscopy. The gm increased linearly with temperature in 2 or 21% O2 . In 21% O2 , isotope discrimination associated with gm decreased from 5.0 ± 0.2 to 1.8 ± 0.2‰ as temperature increased from 15 to 40 °C, but the photorespiratory contribution to the isotopic signal is significant. While the fractionation factor for photorespiration (f = 16.2 ± 0.7‰) was independent of temperature between 20 and 35 °C, discrimination associated with photorespiration increased from 1.1 ± 0.01 to 2.7 ± 0.02‰ from 15 to 40 °C. Other mitochondrial respiration contributed around 0.2 ± 0.03‰. The drawdown in CO2 partial pressure from ambient air to intercellular airspaces was nearly independent of leaf temperature. By contrast, the increase in gm with increasing leaf temperature resulted in the drawdown in CO2 partial pressure between intercellular airspaces and the sites of carboxylation decreasing substantially at high temperature. PMID:22882584

  18. Identification of High-Temperature-Responsive Genes in Cereals1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hemming, Megan N.; Walford, Sally A.; Fieg, Sarah; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Trevaskis, Ben

    2012-01-01

    High temperature influences plant development and can reduce crop yields. We examined how ambient temperature influences reproductive development in the temperate cereals wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare). High temperature resulted in rapid progression through reproductive development in long days, but inhibited early stages of reproductive development in short days. Activation of the long-day flowering response pathway through day-length-insensitive alleles of the PHOTOPERIOD1 gene, which result in high FLOWERING LOCUS T-like1 transcript levels, did not allow rapid early reproductive development at high temperature in short days. Furthermore, high temperature did not increase transcript levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like genes. These data suggest that genes or pathways other than the long-day response pathway mediate developmental responses to high temperature in cereals. Transcriptome analyses suggested a possible role for vernalization-responsive genes in the developmental response to high temperature. The MADS-box floral repressor HvODDSOC2 is expressed at elevated levels at high temperature in short days, and might contribute to the inhibition of early reproductive development under these conditions. FLOWERING PROMOTING FACTOR1-like, RNase-S-like genes, and VER2-like genes were also identified as candidates for high-temperature-responsive developmental regulators. Overall, these data suggest that rising temperatures might elicit different developmental responses in cereal crops at different latitudes or times of year, due to the interaction between temperature and day length. Additionally, we suggest that different developmental regulators might mediate the response to high temperature in cereals compared to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:22279145

  19. Temperature responses of carbon monoxide and hydrogen uptake by vegetated and unvegetated volcanic cinders

    PubMed Central

    King, Caitlin E; King, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem succession on a large deposit of volcanic cinders emplaced on Kilauea Volcano in 1959 has resulted in a mosaic of closed-canopy forested patches and contiguous unvegetated patches. Unvegetated and unshaded surface cinders (Bare) experience substantial diurnal temperature oscillations ranging from moderate (16 °C) to extreme (55 °C) conditions. The surface material of adjacent vegetated patches (Canopy) experiences much smaller fluctuations (14–25 °C) due to shading. To determine whether surface material from these sites showed adaptations by carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) consumption to changes in ambient temperature regimes accompanying succession, we measured responses of CO and H2 uptake to short-term variations in temperature and long-term incubations at elevated temperature. Based on its broader temperature optimum and lower activation energy, Canopy H2 uptake was less sensitive than Bare H2 uptake to temperature changes. In contrast, Bare and Canopy CO uptake responded similarly to temperature during short-term incubations, indicating no differences in temperature sensitivity. However, during extended incubations at 55 °C, CO uptake increased for Canopy but not Bare material, which indicated that the former was capable of thermal adaptation. H2 uptake for material from both sites was completely inhibited at 55 °C throughout extended incubations. These results indicated that plant development during succession did not elicit differences in short-term temperature responses for Bare and Canopy CO uptake, in spite of previously reported differences in CO oxidizer community composition, and differences in average daily and extreme temperatures. Differences associated with vegetation due to succession did, however, lead to a notable capacity for thermophilic CO uptake by Canopy but not Bare material. PMID:22258097

  20. Highly temperature responsive core-shell magnetic particles: synthesis, characterization and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahbubor; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2011-08-15

    Temperature responsive magnetic polymer submicron particles were prepared by two step seed emulsion polymerization process. First, magnetic seed polymer particles were obtained by emulsion polymerization of styrene using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and divinylbenzne (DVB) as a cross-linker in the presence of oil-in-water magnetic emulsion (organic ferrofluid droplets). Thereafter, DVB cross-linked magnetic polymer particles were used as seed in the precipitation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to induce thermosensitive PNIPAM shell onto the hydrophobic polymer surface of the cross-linked magnetic polymer particles. To impart cationic functional groups in the thermosensitive PNIPAM backbone, the functional monomer aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) was used to polymerize with NIPAM while N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and 2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (V-50) were used as a cross-linker and as an initiator respectively. The effect of seed to monomer (w/w) ratio along with seed nature on the final particle morphology was investigated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results demonstrated particles swelling at below volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) and deswelling above the VPTT. The perfect core (magnetic) shell (polymer) structure of the particles prepared was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The chemical composition of the particles were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of temperature, pH, ionic strength on the colloidal properties such as size and zeta potential of the micron sized thermo-sensitive magnetic particles were also studied. In addition, a short mechanistic discussion on the formation of core-shell morphology of magnetic polymer particles has also been discussed. PMID:21570083

  1. Temperature responses of some North Atlantic Cladophora species (Chlorophyceae) in relation to their geographic distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambridge, M.; Breeman, A. M.; van Oosterwijk, R.; van den Hoek, C.

    1984-09-01

    The temperature responses for growth and survival have been experimentally tested for 6 species of the green algal genus Cladophora (Chlorophyceae; Cladophorales) (all isolated from Roscoff, Brittany, France, one also from Connecticut, USA), selected from 4 distribution groups, in order to determine which phase in the annual temperature regime might prevent the spread of a species beyond its present latitudinal range on the N. Atlantic coasts. For five species geographic limits could be specifically defined as due to a growth limit in the growing season or to a lethal limit in the adverse season. These species were: (1) C. coelothrix (Amphiatlantic tropical to warm temperate), with a northern boundary on the European coasts formed by a summer growth limit near the 12°C August isotherm. On the American coasts sea temperatures should allow its occurrence further north. (2) C. vagabunda (Amphiatlantic tropical to temperate), with a northern boundary formed by a summer growth limit near the 15°C August isotherm on both sides of the Atlantic. (3) C. dalmatica, as for C. vagabunda. (4) C. hutchinsiae (Mediterranean-Atlantic warm temperate), with a northern boundary formed by a summer growth limit near the 12°C August isotherm, and possibly also a winter lethal limit near the 6°C February isotherm; and a southern boundary formed by a southern lethal limit near the 26°C August isotherm. It is absent from the warm temperate American coast because its lethal limits, 5° and 30°C, are regularly reached there. (5) Preliminary data for C. rupestris (Amphiatlantic temperate), suggest the southeastern boundary on the African coast to be a summer lethal limit near the 26°C August isotherm; the southwestern boundary on the American coast lies on the 20°C August isotherm. For one species, C. albida, the experimental growth and survival range was wider than expected from its geographic distribution, and reasons to account for this are suggested.

  2. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  3. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  4. Hand temperature responses to local cooling after a 10-day confinement to normobaric hypoxia with and without exercise.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, M E; Kölegård, R; Mekjavic, I B; Eiken, O

    2015-10-01

    The study examined the effects of a 10-day normobaric hypoxic confinement (FiO2: 0.14), with [hypoxic exercise training (HT); n = 8)] or without [hypoxic ambulatory (HA; n = 6)] exercise, on the hand temperature responses during and after local cold stress. Before and after the confinement, subjects immersed their right hand for 30 min in 8 °C water [cold water immersion (CWI)], followed by a 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW), while breathing either room air (AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (HYPO). The hand temperature responses were monitored with thermocouples and infrared thermography. The confinement did not influence the hand temperature responses of the HA group during the AIR and HYPO CWI and the HYPO RW phases; but it impaired the AIR RW response (-1.3 °C; P = 0.05). After the confinement, the hand temperature responses were unaltered in the HT group throughout the AIR trial. However, the average hand temperature was increased during the HYPO CWI (+0.5 °C; P ≤ 0.05) and RW (+2.4 °C; P ≤ 0.001) phases. Accordingly, present findings suggest that prolonged exposure to normobaric hypoxia per se does not alter the hand temperature responses to local cooling; yet, it impairs the normoxic RW response. Conversely, the combined stimuli of continuous hypoxia and exercise enhance the finger cold-induced vasodilatation and hand RW responses, specifically, under hypoxic conditions. PMID:25039992

  5. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  6. Polymer amide in the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that exothermic gas phase polymerization of amino acids can occur in the conditions of a warm dense molecular cloud to form hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) (McGeoch and McGeoch 2014). In a search for evidence of this presolar chemistry Allende and Murchison meteorites and a volcano control were diamond burr-etched and Folch extracted for potential HPA yielding 85 unique peaks in the meteorite samples via matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS). The amino acids after acid hydrolysis in Allende were below the level of detection but many of the Allende peaks via the more sensitive MALDI/TOF analysis could be fitted to a polymer combination of glycine, alanine, and alpha-hydroxyglycine with high statistical significance. A similar significant fit using these three amino acids could not be applied to the Murchison data indicating more complex polymer chemistry.

  7. Lead Optimization Studies of Cinnamic Amide EP2 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  8. Uranium complexes with amide, alkoxide and thiolate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ephritikhine, Michel

    1994-10-01

    Alkoxide, hydroxide and mu-oxo complexes of U(IV) have been synthesized by (a) the reaction of alcohols, ketones and water with hydride or borohydride derivatives, (b) the coupling reaction of ketones with UCl4 in the presence of sodium amalgam; (c) the reduction of CO2 by (U(C5H4SiMe3)3) or (U(C5H4SiMe3)3H); (d) the deoxygenation of CO by (U(C5H5)3R) complexes; and (e) condensation reactions of alkoxide and hydroxide compounds. Thiolate complexes were made by the treatment of uranium borohydride or hydride compounds with thiols. The reaction of UCl4 with NaSR reagents afforded the homoleptic thiolate complexes ((THF)3Na(mu-SR)3U(mu-SR)3Na(THF)3). Amide compounds, including U(V) derivatives, were prepared from U(NEt 2)4.

  9. Small Antimicrobial Agents Based on Acylated Reduced Amide Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Teng, Peng; Huo, Da; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Wu, Jianfeng; She, Fengyu; Su, Ma; Lin, Xiaoyang; Yan, Jiyu; Cao, Annie; Xi, Chuanwu; Hu, Yong; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria has emerged to be one of the greatest threats in the 21st century. Herein, we report the development of a series of small molecular antibacterial agents that are based on the acylated reduced amide scaffold. These molecules display good potency against a panel of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Meanwhile, they also effectively inhibit the biofilm formation. Mechanistic studies suggest that these compounds kill bacteria by compromising bacterial membranes, a mechanism analogous to that of host-defense peptides (HDPs). The mechanism is further supported by the fact that the lead compounds do not induce resistance in MRSA bacteria even after 14 passages. Lastly, we also demonstrate that these molecules have therapeutic potential by preventing inflammation caused by MRSA induced pneumonia in a rat model. This class of compounds could lead to an appealing class of antibiotic agents combating drug-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27526720

  10. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616